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  1. Does Studying Peace Make a Difference? An Experiment at the University of Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaman, Julienne; Harris, Geoff

    2000-01-01

    University of Papua New Guinea students (n=23) who took a 1-semester peace studies course were compared with 23 who were studying politics. Only peace studies students significantly changed their critical thinking and values. (SK)

  2. A Study of Overloading in University of Papua and New Guinea (UPNG). E.R.U. Report 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ann E.; Jones, John

    This report, one of a series of reports from the University of Papua New Guinea, presents information gathered on full-time students from Papua New Guinea and other areas of the South Pacific and relates to one particular factor which contributes to student success and failure, that of overloading. The study reported is confined to the period…

  3. Leadership Styles of New Ireland High School Administrators: A Papua New Guinea Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tivinarlik, Alfred; Wanat, Carolyn L.

    2006-01-01

    This yearlong ethnographic study of principals' leadership in Papua New Guinea high schools describes influences of imposing a bureaucratic school organization on principals' decision making in a communal society. Communal values of kinship relationships, "wantok" system, and "big men" leadership challenged principals'…

  4. Cognitive Studies with Students in Papua New Guinea. E.R.U. Report 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John

    Students in Papua New Guinea experience considerable difficulty in dealing with much of their work--especially in science and mathematics. The ability to achieve some acknowledged level of excellence is dependent upon cognitive factors. During 1972 a series of pilot studies were carried out in various secondary and tertiary institutions to…

  5. "We Like Being Taught": A Study on Teacher Absenteeism in Papua and West Papua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNICEF, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Teacher absenteeism is a global phenomenon. It is recognised in numerous studies and policy documents as one of the most critical causes of children's impaired learning and moral growth, and as a barrier to national and international development goals, such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) and Education For All (EFA). This research is the…

  6. Geochemical study on hot-spring water in West New Britain Province, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahan, M. M.; Verave, R. T.; Irarue, P. Y.

    2015-10-01

    West New Britain Province, which occupies the western part of New Britain Island in Papua New Guinea, is ideally located within an active tectonic region that influences volcanism creating an environment favourable for geothermal activity. Geothermal mapping of surface manifestations reveals high temperature geothermal prospects along the northern coastline of West New Britain Province that are further confirmed by geochemical analysis. The occurrence of geothermal features is confined to the Quaternary Kimbe Volcanics and alluvium in the lowland areas. The features in Talasea appear to be controlled by deep-seated northerly trending faults while structures in Hoskins also appear to be deep seated but have not been identified. The geothermal systems in West New Britain Province have not been drilled, but preliminary reconnaissance geothermal mapping and geochemical analysis reveals four high temperature geothermal prospects suitable for further investigation and development of geothermal energy. These are the Pangalu (Rabili) and Talasea Station geothermal prospects in Talasea and Kasiloli (Magouru) and Silanga (Bakama and Sakalu) geothermal prospects in Hoskins. The calculated reservoir temperatures for these fields are in the range of 245-310 °C. Recommendations are made for further follow-up exploratory investigations.

  7. Integrated package approach in delivering interventions during immunisation campaigns in a complex environment in Papua New Guinea: a case study.

    PubMed

    Vince, John David; Datta, Siddhartha Sankar; Toikilik, Steven; Lagani, William

    2014-08-06

    Papua New Guinea's difficult and varied topography, poor transport infrastructure, changing dynamics of population and economy in recent times and understaffed and poorly financed health service present major challenges for successful delivery of vaccination and other preventative health interventions to both the rural majority and urban populations, thereby posing risks for vaccine preventable disease outbreaks in the country. The country has struggled to meet the vaccination coverage targets required for the eradication of poliomyelitis and elimination of measles. Escalation of inter and intra country migration resulting from major industrial developments, particularly in extraction industries, has substantially increased the risk of infectious disease importation. This case study documents the evolution of immunisation programmes since the introduction of supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs). Single antigen SIAs have advantages and disadvantages. In situations in which the delivery of preventative health interventions is difficult, it is likely that the cost benefit is greater for multiple than for single intervention. The lessons learned from the conduct of single antigen SIAs can be effectively used for programmes delivering multiple SIA antigens, routine immunisations, and other health interventions. This paper describes a successful and cost effective multiple intervention programme in Papua New Guinea. The review of the last SIA in Papua New Guinea showed relatively high coverage of all the interventions and demonstrated the operational feasibility of delivering multiple interventions in resource constrained settings. Studies in other developing countries such as Lesotho and Ethiopia have also successfully integrated health interventions with SIA. In settings such as Papua New Guinea there is a strong case for integrating supplementary immunisation activity with routine immunisation and other health interventions through a comprehensive outreach

  8. TB incidence and characteristics in the remote gulf province of Papua New Guinea: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence and characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) in remote areas of Papua New Guinea (PNG) are largely unknown. The purpose of our study was to determine the incidence of TB in the Gulf Province of PNG and describe disease characteristics, co-morbidities and drug resistance profiles that could impact on disease outcomes and transmission. Methods Between March 2012 and June 2012, we prospectively collected data on 274 patients presenting to Kikori Hospital with a presumptive diagnosis of TB, and on hospital inpatients receiving TB treatment during the study period. Sputum was collected for microscopy, GeneXpert analysis, culture and genotyping of isolates. Results We estimate the incidence of TB in Kikori to be 1290 per 100,000 people (95% CI 1140 to 1460) in 2012. The proportion of TB patients co-infected with HIV was 1.9%. Three of 32 TB cases tested were rifampicin resistant. Typing of nine isolates demonstrated allelic diversity and most were related to Beijing strains. Conclusions The incidence of TB in Kikori is one of the highest in the world and it is not driven by HIV co-infection. The high incidence and the presence of rifampicin resistant warrant urgent attention to mitigate substantial morbidity in the region. PMID:24555577

  9. Hospital Admission following Induced Abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea – A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Vallely, Lisa M.; Homiehombo, Primrose; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Kumbia, Antonia; Mola, Glen D. L.; Whittaker, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion. Methods Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information. Findings Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119) of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119) of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported. Conclusion In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion. PMID:25329982

  10. Critical interactions between Global Fund-supported programmes and health systems: a case study in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Rudge, James W; Phuanakoonon, Suparat; Nema, K Henry; Mounier-Jack, Sandra; Coker, Richard

    2010-11-01

    In Papua New Guinea, investment by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund) has played an important role in scaling up the response to HIV and tuberculosis (TB). As part of a series of case studies on how Global Fund-supported programmes interact with national health systems, we assessed the nature and extent of integration of the Global Fund portfolios within the national HIV and TB programmes, the integration of the HIV and TB programmes within the general health system, and system-wide effects of Global Fund support in Papua New Guinea. The study relied on a literature review and 30 interviews with key stakeholders using the Systemic Rapid Assessment Toolkit and thematic analysis. Global Fund-supported activities were found to be largely integrated, or at least coordinated, with the national HIV and TB programmes. However, this has reinforced the vertical nature of these programmes with respect to the general health system, with parallel systems established to meet the demands of programme scale-up and the performance-based nature of Global Fund investment in the weak health system context of Papua New Guinea. The more parallel functions include monitoring and evaluation, and procurement and supply chain systems, while human resources and infrastructure for service delivery are increasingly integrated at more local levels. Positive synergies of Global Fund support include engagement of civil-society partners, and a reliable supply of high-quality drugs which may have increased patient confidence in the health system. However, the severely limited and overburdened pool of human resources has been skewed towards the three diseases, both at management and service delivery levels. There is also concern surrounding the sustainability of the disease programmes, given their dependence on donors. Increasing Global Fund attention towards health system strengthening was viewed positively, but should acknowledge that system changes are slow

  11. Tetrodotoxic poisoning from ingestion of a porcupine fish (Diodon hystrix) in Papua New Guinea: nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Trevett, A J; Mavo, B; Warrell, D A

    1997-01-01

    Near Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea, three of four adult family members who ate a porcupine fish (Diodon hystrix) were severely poisoned. Within one hour of the meal, both the mother and her older daughter had developed paraesthesiae, ataxia, hypersalivation, sweating, and had collapsed and died. The younger daughter developed similar symptoms with progressive paralysis requiring mechanical ventilation for 24 hr, but she made a complete recovery 10 days after the poisoning. In this patient, nerve conduction studies showed reduced sensory and motor conduction velocities and evoked amplitudes with gradual improvement in parallel with the patient's clinical condition, consistent with the known action of tetrodotoxin on voltage-gated sodium channels.

  12. Prioritizing Surgical Care on National Health Agendas: A Qualitative Case Study of Papua New Guinea, Uganda, and Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Dare, Anna J.; Lee, Katherine C.; Bleicher, Josh; Elobu, Alex E.; Kamara, Thaim B.; Liko, Osborne; Luboga, Samuel; Danlop, Akule; Kune, Gabriel; Hagander, Lars; Leather, Andrew J. M.; Yamey, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the social and political factors that influence priority setting for different health services in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), yet these factors are integral to understanding how national health agendas are established. We investigated factors that facilitate or prevent surgical care from being prioritized in LMICs. Methods and Findings We undertook country case studies in Papua New Guinea, Uganda, and Sierra Leone, using a qualitative process-tracing method. We conducted 74 semi-structured interviews with stakeholders involved in health agenda setting and surgical care in these countries. Interviews were triangulated with published academic literature, country reports, national health plans, and policies. Data were analyzed using a conceptual framework based on four components (actor power, ideas, political contexts, issue characteristics) to assess national factors influencing priority for surgery. Political priority for surgical care in the three countries varies. Priority was highest in Papua New Guinea, where surgical care is firmly embedded within national health plans and receives significant domestic and international resources, and much lower in Uganda and Sierra Leone. Factors influencing whether surgical care was prioritized were the degree of sustained and effective domestic advocacy by the local surgical community, the national political and economic environment in which health policy setting occurs, and the influence of international actors, particularly donors, on national agenda setting. The results from Papua New Guinea show that a strong surgical community can generate priority from the ground up, even where other factors are unfavorable. Conclusions National health agenda setting is a complex social and political process. To embed surgical care within national health policy, sustained advocacy efforts, effective framing of the problem and solutions, and country-specific data are required. Political

  13. New technology and regional studies in human ecology: A Papua New Guinea example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, George E. B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two key issues in using technologies such as digital image processing and geographic information systems are a conceptually and methodologically valid research design and the exploitation of varied sources of data. With this realized, the new technologies offer anthropologists the opportunity to test hypotheses about spatial and temporal variations in the features of interest within a regionally coherent mosaic of social groups and landscapes. Current research on the Mountain OK of Papua New Guinea is described with reference to these issues.

  14. High Levels of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in a Study in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Evelyn; Kave, Ellan; Mosoro, Euodia; Markby, Jessica; Aleksic, Eman; Gare, Janet; Elsum, Imogen A.; Nano, Gideon; Kaima, Petronia; Dala, Nick; Gurung, Anup; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Myatt, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Papua New Guinea is a Pacific Island nation of 7.3 million people with an estimated HIV prevalence of 0.8%. ART initiation and monitoring are guided by clinical staging and CD4 cell counts, when available. Little is known about levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in recently infected individuals in Papua New Guinea. Methods Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a total of 123 individuals recently infected with HIV and aged less than 30 years was implemented in Port Moresby (n = 62) and Mount Hagen (n = 61) during the period May 2013-April 2014. HIV drug resistance testing was performed using dried blood spots. Transmitted HIV drug resistance was defined by the presence of one or more drug resistance mutations as defined by the World Health Organization surveillance drug resistance mutations list. Results The prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 16.1% (95% CI 8.8%-27.4%) and 8.2% (95% CI 3.2%-18.2%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. The prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 3.2% (95% CI 0.2%-11.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI 0.2%-11.8%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. No protease inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was observed. Conclusions The level of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance in antiretroviral drug naïve individuals recently infected with HIV in Port Moresby is amongst the highest reported globally. This alarming level of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a young sexually active population threatens to limit the on-going effective use of NNRTIs as a component of first-line ART in Papua New Guinea. To support the choice of nationally recommended first-line antiretroviral therapy, representative surveillance of HIV drug resistance among antiretroviral therapy initiators in Papua New Guinea should be urgently implemented. PMID:28146591

  15. Etiology of child mortality in Goroka, Papua New Guinea: a prospective two-year study.

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Trevor; Michael, Audrey; Mgone, Joyce; Frank, Dale; Wal, Tilda; Sehuko, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To collect accurate data on disease- and microbial-specific causes and avoidable factors in child deaths in a developing country. METHODS: A systematic prospective audit of deaths of children seen at Goroka Hospital in the highlands of Papua New Guinea was carried out. Over a 24-month period, we studied 353 consecutive deaths of children: 126 neonates, 186 children aged 1-59 months, and 41 children aged 5-12 years. FINDINGS: The most frequent age-specific clinical diagnoses were as follows: for neonates--very low birth weight, septicaemia, birth asphyxia and congenital syphilis; for children aged 1-59 months--pneumonia, septicaemia, marasmus and meningitis; and for children aged 5-12 years--malignancies and septicaemia. At least one microbial cause of death was identified for 179 (50.7%) children and two or more were identified for 37 (10.5%). Nine microbial pathogens accounted for 41% of all childhood deaths and 76% of all deaths that had any infective component. Potentially avoidable factors were identified for 177 (50%) of deaths. The most frequently occurring factors were as follows: no antenatal care in high-risk pregnancies (8.8% of all deaths), very delayed presentation (7.9%), vaccine-preventable diseases (7.9%), informal adoption or child abandonment leading to severe malnutrition (5.7%), and lack of screening for maternal syphilis (5.4%). Sepsis due to enteric Gram-negative bacilli occurred in 87 (24.6%). The strongest associations with death from Gram- negative sepsis were adoption/abandonment leading to severe malnutrition, village births, and prolonged hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Reductions in child mortality will depend on addressing the commonest causes of death, which include disease states, microbial pathogens, adverse social circumstances and health service failures. Systematic mortality audits in selected regions where child mortality is high may be useful for setting priorities, estimating the potential benefit of specific and non

  16. Factors Affecting Attendance at and Timing of Formal Antenatal Care: Results from a Qualitative Study in Madang, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Erin V. W.; Pell, Christopher; Angwin, Angeline; Auwun, Alma; Daniels, Job; Mueller, Ivo; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Pool, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Appropriate antenatal care (ANC) is key for the health of mother and child. However, in Papua New Guinea (PNG), only a third of women receive any ANC during pregnancy. Drawing on qualitative research, this paper explores the influences on ANC attendance and timing of first visit in the Madang region of Papua New Guinea. Methods Data were collected in three sites utilizing several qualitative methods: free-listing and sorting of terms and definitions, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, observation in health care facilities and case studies of pregnant women. Respondents included pregnant women, their relatives, biomedical and traditional health providers, opinion leaders and community members. Results Although generally reported to be important, respondents’ understanding of the procedures involved in ANC was limited. Factors influencing attendance fell into three main categories: accessibility, attitudes to ANC, and interpersonal issues. Although women saw accessibility (distance and cost) as a barrier, those who lived close to health facilities and could easily afford ANC also demonstrated poor attendance. Attitudes were shaped by previous experiences of ANC, such as waiting times, quality of care, and perceptions of preventative care and medical interventions during pregnancy. Interpersonal factors included relationships with healthcare providers, pregnancy disclosure, and family conflict. A desire to avoid repeat clinic visits, ideas about the strength of the fetus and parity were particularly relevant to the timing of first ANC visit. Conclusions This long-term in-depth study (the first of its kind in Madang, PNG) shows how socio-cultural and economic factors influence ANC attendance. These factors must be addressed to encourage timely ANC visits: interventions could focus on ANC delivery in health facilities, for example, by addressing healthcare staff’s attitudes towards pregnant women. PMID:24842484

  17. Lumpectomy with or without postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer with favourable prognostic features: results of a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Holli, K; Saaristo, R; Isola, J; Joensuu, H; Hakama, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to study the value of adding post-operative radiotherapy to lumpectomy in a subgroup of breast cancer patients with favourable patient-, tumour-, and treatment-related prognostic features. 152 women aged over 40 with unifocal breast cancer seen in preoperative mammography were randomly assigned to lumpectomy alone (no-XRT group) or to lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy to the ipsilateral breast (50 Gy given within 5 weeks, XRT group). All cancers were required to be invasive node-negative, smaller than 2 cm in diameter and well or moderately differentiated, to contain no extensive intraductal component, to be progesterone receptor-positive, DNA diploid, have S-phase fraction ≤7 and be excised with at least 1 cm margin. During a mean follow-up time of 6.7 years, 13 (18.1%) cancers recurred locally in the no-XRT and 6 (7.5%) in the XRT group (P = 0.03). There was no difference between the groups in the ultimate breast preservation rate (95.0% vs. 94.4% in XRT and no-XRT, respectively, P = 0.88), distant metastasis-free survival (P = 0.36), or 5-year cancer-specific survival (97.1% in XRT and 98.6 in no-XRT). Radiation therapy given after lumpectomy reduces the frequency of ipsilateral breast recurrences even in women with small breast cancer with several favourable clinical and biological features. However, the breast preservation rate may not increase due to more frequent use of salvage mastectomies in patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161371

  18. Geophysical study of a magma chamber near Mussau Island, Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dadisman, Shawn V.; Marlow, M. S.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of a 24-channel seismic-reflection data collected near Mussau Island, Papua New Guinea, shows a high-amplitude, negative-polarity reflection that we believe is from the top of a magma chamber.  The reflecting horizon lies at a depth of about 4.4 s subbottom and can be traced laterally for 2.6 km.  On shot gathers, the reflection demonstrates normal moveout appropriate for an in-place event.  The frequency spectrum of the reflection shows a decrease in high-frequency content when compared to the sea floor reflection, as would be expected for a deep subsurface event.  The polarity of the reflection event is negative, suggesting that the reflection horizon is the top of a low-velocity zone.  Magnetic data indicate that the ridge containing the reflecting horizon is magnetic, and the geology of Massau Island suggests that the ridge is volcanic in its origin.  We speculate that the high-amplitude reflection is from the top of a magma chamber some 7-11 km deep.

  19. Can Postoperative Nutrition be Favourably Maintained by Oral Diet in Patients with Emergency Temporary Ileostomy? A Tertiary Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Debabrata; Dey, Ramprasad; Choudhury, Krishnangshu Bhanja; Das, Gautam; Bhattacharya, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Temporary ileostomy is an emergency procedure performed in cases having septic peritonitis in presence of perforation or obstruction or gangrene of small intestine. These patients usually suffer from gross malnutrition following surgery. Aim To measure nutritional status of patients with emergency temporary ileostomy and to determine whether their postoperative nutrition can be favourably maintained by oral diet alone. Materials and Methods Sixty patients were enrolled for the study on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria during the study period from January 2012 to December 2013. Oral feeding was started as soon as ileostomy started functioning and patients expressed hunger, about 48-72 hours postoperatively. An individualized diet chart was formulated for each patient using Harris Benedict Equation. Nutritional assessment was done on 1) 1st day of oral feeding, 2) After 7 days of oral feeding, 3). After three months of oral feeding. Nutritional parameters (anthropometric, biochemical) employed were tabulated and statistically analysed with SPSS v 17, Chicago. Results Out of 60 patients, 36 males and 24 females were enrolled in the study. The patients were in the age group of 20-60 years with a mean age of 45 years. After 7 days of oral nutrition the nutritional status deteriorated with a significant decrease in body weight (p<0.001) and serum haemoglobin (p <0.001). However, at the end of the study, the patients had their nutritional status restored satisfactorily with normalization of basic parameters like bodyweight, haemoglobin and serum albumin (p<0.001). Conclusion Proper dietary advice and oral nutrition were found to be sufficient for gradual restoration and maintenance of satisfactory nutritional status in the postoperative period. PMID:26816941

  20. Iron and infection: narrative review of a major iron supplementation study in Papua New Guinea undertaken by the Department of Tropical Paediatrics, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, 1979-1983, its aftermath and the continuing relevance of its results.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    In 1978, I returned from a 2-year government posting as provincial paediatrician to East and West Sepik provinces of Papua New Guinea (PNG), having already enrolled on the Diploma of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (DTM&H) course at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. I had been too late to enrol for the more relevant Diploma in Tropical Paediatrics course, but, whilst on the DTM&H course, made up for lost time by presenting myself to Professor Ralph Hendrickse in his office. I outlined my proposal for a double-blind, controlled, randomised trial of iron intervention with the aim of improving iron nutrition and decreasing susceptibility to and morbidity from infections in a cohort of infants in PNG. My reason for suggesting such a study was the high rate of anaemia in infants there and my perception from the literature of the time that the balance of studies favoured a beneficial effect of iron supplementation on infectious susceptibility, and that iron deficiency was associated with reversible abnormalities of immune function (although it had and has since been difficult to demonstrate the severity and relevance of these in observational in-vivo studies in humans).1,2 Ralph made an on-the-spot decision, immediately offering me the opportunity to join his department on 1 January 1979 on temporary funding while I applied for (and secured) a major grant from the Wellcome Trust for this work.

  1. Studies on bronchial hyperreactivity, allergic responsiveness, and asthma in rural and urban children of the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Turner, K J; Dowse, G K; Stewart, G A; Alpers, M P

    1986-04-01

    The prevalence of asthma and allergic responsiveness in rural and urban children of the highlands of Papua New Guinea was studied. Bronchial provocation studies with histamine demonstrated significant bronchial hyperreactivity in 0.5% (1 in 195) rural and 1.7% (1 in 59) urban children, rates which were significantly lower than those observed in corresponding adult populations (7%). Urban children demonstrated a higher incidence of skin test reactivity toward Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Aspergillus fumigatus, and dog dander than did the rural children. However, there were no significant differences between these populations with regard to total serum IgE levels, the degree of parasitism as judged by stool examination, or allergic responses to Ascaris suum, plantain, and coffee bean husk. A more detailed study demonstrated age- and sex-related differences in total IgE and mite-specific RAST scores in the rural but not the urban population. These data suggest an active suppression of the capacity of children to mount an IgE response to environmental allergens such as the mite manifesting itself as low asthma prevalence. The data also indicate that, although the underlying defect of bronchial hyperreactivity in asthma may be genetically inherited, it is not revealed until the lung has received an allergen-induced inflammatory insult.

  2. Developing Assessment and Evaluation Strategies for Vernacular Elementary School Classrooms: A Collaborative Study in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Yasuko

    2001-01-01

    Investigated assessment and evaluation strategies in a Papua New Guinea community, helping community members reclaim their cultural identity by understanding the significance of educational practices carried out in everyday living and helping them make school practices more culturally relevant. The community principles of assessment and evaluation…

  3. English Community School Teacher Education and English as a Second Language in Papua New Guinea: A Study of a Practicum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeegers, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    This article explores community (primary) school teacher education in the subject, English, at a Papua New Guinea (PNG) teachers' college as manifested in end-of-year English lessons in practicum rounds of pre-service community school teachers. English is the official language overlaid on 700 indigenous languages in this country where…

  4. A clinical study of kuru patients with long incubation periods at the end of the epidemic in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Collinge, John; Whitfield, Jerome; McKintosh, Edward; Frosh, Adam; Mead, Simon; Hill, Andrew F.; Brandner, Sebastian; Thomas, Dafydd; Alpers, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Kuru is so far the principal human epidemic prion disease. While its incidence has steadily declined since the cessation of its route of transmission, endocannibalism, in Papua New Guinea in the 1950s, the arrival of variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (vCJD), also thought to be transmitted by dietary prion exposure, has given kuru a new global relevance. We investigated all suspected cases of kuru from July 1996 to June 2004 and identified 11 kuru patients. There were four females and seven males, with an age range of 46–63 years at the onset of disease, in marked contrast to the age and sex distribution when kuru was first investigated 50 years ago. We obtained detailed histories of residence and exposure to mortuary feasts and performed serial neurological examination and genetic studies where possible. All patients were born a significant period before the mortuary practice of transumption ceased and their estimated incubation periods in some cases exceeded 50 years. The principal clinical features of kuru in the studied patients showed the same progressive cerebellar syndrome that had been previously described. Two patients showed marked cognitive impairment well before preterminal stages, in contrast to earlier clinical descriptions. In these patients, the mean clinical duration of 17 months was longer than the overall average in kuru but similar to that previously reported for the same age group, and this may relate to the effects of both patient age and PRNP codon 129 genotype. Importantly, no evidence for lymphoreticular colonization with prions, seen uniformly in vCJD, was observed in a patient with kuru at tonsil biopsy. PMID:18849289

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Concerning Malaria in Pregnancy: Results from a Qualitative Study in Madang, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Erin V. W.; Pell, Christopher; Angwin, Angeline; Auwun, Alma; Daniels, Job; Mueller, Ivo; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Pool, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria is the leading cause of illness and death in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Infection during pregnancy with falciparum or vivax malaria, as occurs in PNG, has health implications for mother and child, causing complications such as maternal anemia, low birth weight and miscarriage. This article explores knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning malaria during pregnancy and it’s prevention in Madang, PNG, a high prevalence area. Methods As part of a qualitative study in Madang, exploring MiP, participatory techniques (free-listing and sorting) were conducted along with focus group discussions, in-depth interviews (with pregnant women, health staff and other community members) and observations in the local community and health facilities. Results The main themes explored were attitudes towards and knowledge of MiP, its risks, and prevention. Although there was a general awareness of the term “malaria”, it was often conflated with general sickness or with pregnancy-related symptoms. Moreover, many preventive methods for MiP were related to practices of general healthy living. Indeed, varied messages from health staff about the risks of MiP were observed. In addition to ideas about the seriousness and risk of MiP, other factors influenced the uptake of interventions: availability and perceived comfort of sleeping under insecticide-treated mosquito nets were important determinants of usage, and women’s heavy workload influenced Chloroquine adherence. Conclusion The non-specific symptoms of MiP and its resultant conflation with symptoms of pregnancy that are perceived as normal have implications for MiP prevention and control. However, in Madang, PNG, this was compounded by the inadequacy of health staff’s message about MiP. PMID:25893405

  6. Using existing data and focused surveys to highlight Cuvier's beaked whales favourable areas: a case study in the central Tyrrhenian Sea.

    PubMed

    Gannier, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the necessary elements to implement strategic mitigation in order to avoid Cuvier's beaked whale (CBW) strandings linked to intense sound sources, such as military active sonars, in the Mediterranean Sea. A careful review of stranding data and the analysis of existing survey results are required to highlight the main characters of the species regional distribution. Focused and repeated surveys are needed to confirm that possible favourable areas, such as the Balearic, Tyrrhenian or Aegean Seas, are really favourable CBW habitats. These surveys should be carried out with sea states 0 to 1 in order to minimize the risk of false absence data. Among the regions of interest, the central Tyrrhenian Sea was surveyed with a 12 m sailboat in 2007 and 2008. With 907 km of effective effort, a mean sighting rate of 1.9 CBW school/100 km was obtained, which is amongst the highest densities recorded in the Mediterranean.

  7. Kinetics of potassium release in sweet potato cropped soils: a case study in the highlands of Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekhar Rao, B. K.

    2015-02-01

    The present study attempts to employ potassium (K) release parameters to identify soil-quality degradation due to changed land use patterns in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) farms of the highlands of Papua New Guinea. Rapid population increase in the region increased pressure on the land to intensify subsistence production mainly by reducing fallow periods. Such continuous cropping practice coupled with lack of K fertilization practices could lead to a rapid loss of soil fertility and soil-resource degradation. The study aims to evaluate the effects of crop intensification on the K-release pattern and identify soil groups vulnerable to K depletion. Soils with widely differing exchangeable and non-exchangeable K contents were sequentially extracted for periods between 1 and 569 h in 0.01 M CaCl2, and K-release data were fitted to four mathematical models: first order, power, parabolic diffusion and Elovich equations. Results showed two distinct parts in the K-release curves, and 58-80% of total K was released to solution phase within 76 h (first five extractions) with 20-42% K released in the later parts (after 76 h). Soils from older farms that were subjected to intensive and prolonged land use showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower cumulative K-release potential than the farms recently brought to cultivation (new farms). Among the four equations, first-order and power equations best described the K-release pattern; the constant b, an index of K-release rates, ranged from 0.005 to 0.008 mg kg-1 h-1 in the first-order model and was between 0.14 and 0.83 mg kg-1 h-1 in the power model for the soils. In the non-volcanic soils, model constant b values were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the volcanic soils, thus indicating the vulnerability of volcanic soils to K deficiency. The volcanic soils cropped for several crop cycles need immediate management interventions either through improved fallow management or through mineral fertilizers plus animal manures

  8. Cannabis in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    McDonald, David

    2004-03-01

    This review covers published information on psychoactive drugs, particularly cannabis, in Papua New Guinea. Legal drugs are mentioned to place the illegal drugs into a broader public health context. Although a number of psychoactive drugs were used traditionally (and are used now), cannabis is the only illicit drug for which prevalence of use is currently not negligible. Very little epidemiology research on cannabis use and its individual and public health sequelae has been conducted, although a fuller criminology literature on the topic exists. The published cannabis use prevalence studies are limited in scope, and the most-cited one is of questionable accuracy. The complex interactions between the health of individuals and their social environments are highlighted by the destructive impacts that cannabis cultivation, trafficking and use are having in contemporary PNG.

  9. Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    1986-10-01

    The situation of the island archipelago nation of Papua New Guinea is reviewed in terms of its geography, people, history, government, politics economy and foreign relations. Papua New Guinea consists of the eastern half of the main island of New Guinea (the western portion is Indonesia), and several island groups, all located northeast of Australia. The island has extreme geographical variations, ranging from precipitous mountains to extensive swamps and river valleys, all in a monsoon cimate. As a result, there are hundreds of small groups each with unique cultures and languages; over 650 languages, many unrelated to each other. The population is estimated at 3.5 million, growing at about 2.5% per year. Historically, the region has been occupied by Germany, Britain, Japan, and the U.S. The country came under the international trusteeship system in 1949, and now has a vigorous parliamentary government. The economy is based on subsistence agriculture, but is buttressed by resources such as gold, copper, and other metals, oil, timber, tropical agricultural products, fish. The only indusry is local production, since the minimum wage is too high to compete with Asian labor.

  10. Public attitudes to the promotion of genomic crop studies in Japan: correlations between genomic literacy, trust, and favourable attitude.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Izumi; Tanzawa, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Maiko; Maeda, Tadahiko; Muto, Kaori; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Nagai, Akiko; Yamagata, Zentaro

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to assess public attitudes in Japan to the promotion of genomic selection in crop studies and to examine associated factors. We analysed data from a nationwide opinion survey. A total of 4,000 people were selected from the Japanese general population by a stratified two-phase sampling method, and 2,171 people participated by post; this survey asked about the pros and cons of crop-related genomic studies promotion, examined people's scientific literacy in genomics, and investigated factors thought to be related to genomic literacy and attitude. The relationships were examined using logistic regression models stratified by gender. Survey results showed that 50.0% of respondents approved of the promotion of crop-related genomic studies, while 6.7% disapproved. No correlation was found between literacy and attitude towards promotion. Trust in experts, belief in science, an interest in genomic studies and willingness to purchase new products correlated with a positive attitude towards crop-related genomic studies.

  11. [Papua New Guinea].

    PubMed

    Jacquemart, Y; Josse, R

    2002-01-01

    Papua New Guinea is an independent country located in Oceania with a population of 4.9 million. Urban development is low and the estimated population density is 9 inhabitants per square kilometre. The terrain is mountainous and accessibility for health care services is difficult in some locations. Medical care facilities are organized in 18 provinces that are divided into 2 to 8 districts in which basic health care and hospital services are delivered through 1765 first aid units, 319 dispensaries, 189 specialized clinics and centers and 19 hospitals. There are no local schools for training medical and paramedical personnel who come from outside the country. Malaria, filariasis, leprosy, tuberculosis, infant diarrheal diseases, viral hepatitis, and envenomation are major public health problems. Buruli ulcer, dengue fever and arboviruses are emerging diseases.

  12. The local electric field favours more than exposed nitrogen atoms on CO2 capture: a case study on the rht-type MOF platform.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Yang; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Space, Brian; Wojtas, Lukasz; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-06-14

    Two rht-type metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) based upon the tetrazolate moiety and pyrazolate moiety, respectively, have been investigated for carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorption and selective adsorption of CO2 over CH4, which shows that the rht-MOF featuring the pyrazolate moiety demonstrates superior performances compared to the rht-MOF based on the tetrazolate moiety. In spite of more exposed nitrogen atoms in the tetrazolate-based rht-MOF, the counter-intuitive observations of CO2 capture in the two rht-MOFs were interpreted by computational studies, which reveal that the local electric field favours more than the richness of exposed nitrogen atoms for the interactions with CO2 molecules.

  13. Imidacloprid and thiacloprid neonicotinoids bind more favourably to cockroach than to honeybee α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: insights from computational studies.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Balaji; Graton, Jérôme; Laurent, Adèle D; Alamiddine, Zakaria; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Coqueret, Olivier; Olivier, Christophe; Thany, Steeve H; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2015-02-01

    The binding interactions of two neonicotinoids, imidacloprid (IMI) and thiacloprid (THI) with the extracellular domains of cockroach and honeybee α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in an homomeric receptor have been studied through docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The binding mode predicted for the two neonicotinoids is validated through the good agreement observed between the theoretical results with the crystal structures of the corresponding complexes with Ac-AChBP, the recognized structural surrogate for insects nAChR extracellular ligand binding domain. The binding site of the two insect α6 receptors differs by only one residue of loop D, a serine residue (Ser83) in cockroach being replaced by a lysine residue (Lys108) in honeybee. The docking results show very close interactions for the two neonicotinoids with both α6 nAChR models, in correspondence to the trends observed in the experimental neonicotinoid-Ac-AChBP complexes. However, the docking parameters (scores and energies) are not significantly different between the two insect α6 nAChRs to draw clear conclusions. The MD results bring distinct trends. The analysis of the average interaction energies in the two insects α6 nAChRs shows indeed better affinity of neonicotinoids bound to α6 cockroach compared to honeybee nAChR. This preference is explained by tighter contacts with aromatic residues (Trp and Tyr) of the binding pocket. Interestingly, the non-conserved residue Lys108 of loop D of α6 honeybee nAChR interacts through van der Waals contacts with neonicotinoids, which appear more favourable than the direct or water mediated hydrogen-bond interaction between the OH group of Ser83 of α6 cockroach nAChR and the electronegative terminal group of the two neonicotinoids (nitro in IMI and cyano in THI). Finally, in both insects nAChRs, THI is consistently found to bind more favourably than IMI.

  14. Using Folktales to Strengthen Literacy in Papua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yektiningtyas-Modouw, Wigati; Karna, Sri R. W.

    2013-01-01

    Rural and remote Papua and West Papua are among the most important regions for Indonesia to achieve the second MDG on primary education with equity. Both provinces have gross, net enrolment and literacy rates which barely touch the national averages. Given the distinct political, socio-cultural, and geographical aspects of Papua and West Papua…

  15. Distance Education in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avalos, Beatrice, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The theme of this special double serial issue is "Distance Education in Papua New Guinea." The following articles are featured: (1) "Distance Education in Papua New Guinea" (John Lynch); (2) "Distance Education in Papua New Guinea: Context, Issues and Prospects" (Michael Crossley and Richard Guy); (3) "Distance…

  16. The phylogenetic position of a new species of Plakobranchus from West Papua, Indonesia (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia, Sacoglossa).

    PubMed

    Meyers-Muñoz, María Angélica; van der Velde, Gerard; van der Meij, Sancia E T; Stoffels, Bart E M W; van Alen, Theo; Tuti, Yosephine; Hoeksema, Bert W

    2016-01-01

    Plakobranchus papua Meyers-Muñoz & van der Velde, sp. n. from West Papua (Papua Barat province, Indonesia), is described based on its external morphology, colour pattern, internal anatomy, radula and reproductive system. In a molecular phylogenetic study specimens of this new species were compared with those of ten candidate taxa under the name Plakobranchus ocellatus van Hasselt, 1824. DNA analyses of COI mtDNA showed a clear distinction between Plakobranchus papua sp. n. and "Plakobranchus ocellatus". Plakobranchus papua, sp. n. also differed from all taxa that have been synonymised with Plakobranchus ocellatus. The genus is in dire need of taxonomic revision, preferably based on an integrative analysis involving morphology and DNA of all known Plakobranchus varieties.

  17. The phylogenetic position of a new species of Plakobranchus from West Papua, Indonesia (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia, Sacoglossa)

    PubMed Central

    Meyers-Muñoz, María Angélica; van der Velde, Gerard; van der Meij, Sancia E.T.; Stoffels, Bart E.M.W.; van Alen, Theo; Tuti, Yosephine; Hoeksema, Bert W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Plakobranchus papua Meyers-Muñoz & van der Velde, sp. n. from West Papua (Papua Barat province, Indonesia), is described based on its external morphology, colour pattern, internal anatomy, radula and reproductive system. In a molecular phylogenetic study specimens of this new species were compared with those of ten candidate taxa under the name Plakobranchus ocellatus van Hasselt, 1824. DNA analyses of COI mtDNA showed a clear distinction between Plakobranchus papua sp. n. and “Plakobranchus ocellatus”. Plakobranchus papua, sp. n. also differed from all taxa that have been synonymised with Plakobranchus ocellatus. The genus is in dire need of taxonomic revision, preferably based on an integrative analysis involving morphology and DNA of all known Plakobranchus varieties. PMID:27408559

  18. Comparative studies on physical characteristics and resting metabolism between young male highlanders of Papua New Guinea and young male Japanese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, S.; Tsujita, J.; Mayuzumi, M.; Tanaka, N.

    1980-09-01

    Anthropometric measurements and measurements of resting metabolism were made on 15 young male highlanders in Beha village at altitudes between 1,500 m and 1,800 m in the Eastern Highland of Papua New Guinea in August in 1978 and 10 young male Japanese in Nishinomiya in September. New Guineans showed significantly lower height, considerably lower body weight than Japanese but heavier body weight for height and significantly greater mean values of Rohrer's index and Brugsch's index than Japanese. Skinfold thicknesses for New Guineans were significantly smaller than those for Japanese. Thus, physically, New Guineans were more muscular and athletic when compared with Japanese. The mean value of resting metabolic rate for New Guineans, 46.35 W/m2, at 25°C was considerably lower than that for Japanese, 51.01 W/m2. New Guineans showed significantly lower mean value of resting metabolism 47.57 W/m2 at 30°C than Japanese 55.16 W/m2. The mean values of respiratory quotient for New Guineans (RQ = 0.950 at 25°C and 0.971 at 30°C) were significantly greater than those for Japanese (0.81 at 25°C and 0.81 at 30°C). New Guineans showed considerably lower mean value of heart rate at 30°C (71.1 beats/min) than Japanese (79.2 beats/min). The smaller physique of New Guineans might be the result of lower caloric intake and protein intake as well as of living in a tropical climate.

  19. Micro-Level Planning for a Papua New Guinean Elementary School Classroom: "Copycat" Planning and Language Ideologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the government of Papua New Guinea (PNG) enacted educational reform. It officially abandoned its English-only policy at elementary school level, in favour of community languages. In response, the Kairak community of East New Britain Province developed a vernacular literacy programme. This paper, based on original fieldwork…

  20. Contribution of dengue fever to the burden of acute febrile illnesses in Papua New Guinea: an age-specific prospective study.

    PubMed

    Senn, Nicolas; Luang-Suarkia, Dagwin; Manong, Doris; Siba, Peter Max; McBride, William John Hannan

    2011-07-01

    Malaria is a major contributor to the burden of febrile illnesses in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Dengue fever (DF) is likely to contribute; however, its epidemiology in PNG is poorly understood. We performed a prospective age-stratified study in outpatient clinics investigating the prevalence of DF; 578 patients were enrolled, and 317 patients with a negative rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for malaria were tested for dengue. Malaria was confirmed in 52% (301/578, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 48-56%), DF was diagnosed in 8% (46/578, 95% CI = 6-10%), and 40% (95% CI = 36-44%) had neither diagnosis. Among the 317 malaria RDT-negative patients, 14% (45/317, 95% CI = 10-18%) had DF. The seroprevalence of dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG) was 83% (204/247, 95% CI = 78-87%), and no dengue hemorrhagic fever was seen. This study provides good evidence for the first time that DF is common in PNG and is responsible for 8% of fever episodes. The common occurrence of DF in a population with presumed previous exposure to dengue is an important observation.

  1. The role of indigenous traditional counting systems in children's development of numerical cognition: results from a study in Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matang, Rex A. S.; Owens, Kay

    2014-09-01

    The Government of Papua New Guinea undertook a significant step in developing curriculum reform policy that promoted the use of Indigenous knowledge systems in teaching formal school subjects in any of the country's 800-plus Indigenous languages. The implementation of the Elementary Cultural Mathematics Syllabus is in line with the above curriculum emphasis. Given the aims of the reform, the research reported here investigated the influence of children's own mother tongue (Tok Ples) and traditional counting systems on their development of early number knowledge formally taught in schools. The study involved 272 school children from 22 elementary schools in four provinces. Each child participated in a task-based assessment interview focusing on eight task groups relating to early number knowledge. The results obtained indicate that, on average, children learning their traditional counting systems in their own language spent shorter time and made fewer mistakes in solving each task compared to those taught without Tok Ples (using English and/or the lingua franca, Tok Pisin). Possible reasons accounting for these differences are also discussed.

  2. Social Work Education and Police in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovai, Betty

    2007-01-01

    The contribution of social work education to the professional capacity development of police officers commenced in 1974 when the Diploma in Police Studies was introduced at the University of Papua New Guinea under the Social Work Programme. In 2001, a study was conducted to assess the impact of social work education on police officers. The study…

  3. An Anthropologist Who Studies Music and Poetics in a Rain Forest in Papua New Guinea Worries about the Future of the Natives There.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1991-01-01

    Living with the Kaluli of Papua New Guinea and completing his anthropology dissertation, Steven Feld saw ceremonial life begin to die and the sounds of helicopters and drill rigs compete with birds and waterfalls. Feld's sophisticated recordings preserve some ways in which the people act and blend with their environment. (MSE)

  4. Mapping of earthquakes vulnerability area in Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad Fawzy Ismullah, M.; Massinai, Muh. Altin

    2016-05-01

    Geohazard is a geological occurrence which may lead to a huge loss for human. A mitigation of these natural disasters is one important thing to be done properly in order to reduce the risks. One of the natural disasters that frequently occurs in the Papua Province is the earthquake. This study applies the principle of Geospatial and its application for mapping the earthquake-prone area in the Papua region. It uses earthquake data, which is recorded for 36 years (1973-2009), fault location map, and ground acceleration map of the area. The earthquakes and fault map are rearranged into an earthquake density map, as well as an earthquake depth density map and fault density map. The overlaid data of these three maps onto ground acceleration map are then (compiled) to obtain an earthquake unit map. Some districts area, such as Sarmi, Nabire, and Dogiyai, are identified by a high vulnerability index. In the other hand, Waropen, Puncak, Merauke, Asmat, Mappi, and Bouven Digoel area shows lower index. Finally, the vulnerability index in other places is detected as moderate.

  5. Non-communicable disease risk factor patterns among mining industry workers in Papua, Indonesia: longitudinal findings from the Cardiovascular Outcomes in a Papuan Population and Estimation of Risk (COPPER) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Rodrigo; Rahajeng, Ekowati; Viliani, Francesca; Kushadiwijaya, Haripurnomo; Amiya, Rachel M; Bangs, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) constitute an increasing slice of the global burden of disease, with the South-East Asia region projected to see the highest increase in NCD-related deaths over the next decade. Mining industry employees may be exposed to various factors potentially elevating their NCD risk. This study aimed to assess the distribution and 5-year longitudinal trends of key metabolic NCD risk factors in a cohort of copper–gold mining company workers in Papua, Indonesia. Methods Metabolic indicators of NCD risk were assessed among employees (15 580 at baseline, 6496 prospectively) of a large copper–gold mining operation in Papua, Indonesia, using routinely collected 5-year medical surveillance data. The study cohort comprised individuals aged 18–68 years employed for ≥1 year during 2008–2013. Assessed risk factors were based on repeat measures of cholesterol, blood glucose, blood pressure and body weight, using WHO criteria. Results Metabolic risk indicator rates were markedly high and increased significantly from baseline through 5-year follow-up (p<0.001). Adjusting for gender and age, longer duration of employment (≥10 years) predicted raised cholesterol (adjusted OR (AOR)=1.13, p=0.003), raised blood pressure (AOR=1.16, p=0.009) and overweight/obesity (AOR=1.14, p=0.001) at baseline; and persistent raised cholesterol (AOR=1.26, p=0.003), and both incident (AOR=1.33, p=0.014) and persistent raised blood glucose (AOR=1.62, p=0.044) at 3-year follow-up. Conclusions Individuals employed for longer periods in a mining operations setting in Papua, Indonesia, may face elevated NCD risk through various routes. Workplace health promotion interventions and policies targeting modifiable lifestyle patterns and environmental exposures present an important opportunity to reduce such susceptibilities and mitigate associated health risks. PMID:26231573

  6. Surveillance of avian influenza viruses in Papua New Guinean poultry, June 2011 to April 2012.

    PubMed

    Jonduo, Marinjho; Wong, Sook-San; Kapo, Nime; Ominipi, Paskalis; Abdad, Mohammad; Siba, Peter; McKenzie, Pamela; Webby, Richard; Horwood, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the circulation of avian influenza viruses in poultry populations throughout Papua New Guinea to assess the risk to the poultry industry and human health. Oropharyngeal swabs, cloacal swabs and serum were collected from 537 poultry from 14 provinces of Papua New Guinea over an 11-month period (June 2011 through April 2012). Virological and serological investigations were undertaken to determine the prevalence of avian influenza viruses. Neither influenza A viruses nor antibodies were detected in any of the samples. This study demonstrated that avian influenza viruses were not circulating at detectable levels in poultry populations in Papua New Guinea during the sampling period. However, avian influenza remains a significant risk to Papua New Guinea due to the close proximity of countries having previously reported highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses and the low biosecurity precautions associated with the rearing of most poultry populations in the country.

  7. Effects of hydrothermal alteration on Pb in the active PACMANUS hydrothermal field, ODP Leg 193, Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea: A LA-ICP-MS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Yannick; Scott, Steven D.; Gorton, Michael P.; Zajacz, Zoltan; Halter, Werner

    2007-09-01

    The conventional model of leaching volcanic rocks as a source of metals in a seafloor hydrothermal systems has been tested by examining the behavior of Pb and other trace elements during hydrothermal alteration. ODP Leg 193 drill sites 1188 (Snowcap) and 1189 (Roman Ruins) on Pual Ridge in the eastern Manus Basin offshore eastern Papua New Guinea provide a unique three-dimensional window into an active back-arc hydrothermal system. We investigate by means of a LA-ICP-MS microbeam technique the capacity of Pb to be leached from a host volcanic rock exposed to various types and intensities of alteration. Our results are in general agreement with previous studies that utilized bulk analytical techniques but provide a more detailed explanation of the processes. Fresh representative dacitic lavas from the Pual Ridge have an average whole rock Pb content of 5.2 ppm, an average interstitial glass Pb content of 5.6 ppm and an average plagioclase Pb content of 1.0 ppm. Altered matrix samples have highly variable Pb values ranging from 0 to 52.4 ppm. High Pb values in altered samples are associated with a low temperature chlorite and clay mineral assemblage, in some cases overprinted by a high temperature (up to 350 °C) silica-rich "bleaching" alteration. Only the most highly altered matrix samples have REE patterns that differ from the fresh Pual Ridge dacite. This may represent either different lava histories or alteration characteristics that have affected normally immobile REEs. Altered samples with the highest Pb values have similar REE patterns to those of the local unaltered lavas. They are compositionally similar to typical Pual Ridge dacites indicating a genetic relationship between the main regional volcanic suite and the subseafloor hydrothermally altered, Pb-enriched material. Relative loss/gain for Pb between the analyzed altered samples and a calculated precursor show a maximum relative gain of 901%. Samples with relative Pb gain from both drill sites are

  8. Papua New Guinea: Tough course

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, M.

    1991-11-01

    This paper describes the problems that seismic crews face in Papua New Guinea. The complex geologic conditions which often entail karstified carbonate rocks which are overlying folded sedimentary and igneous rocks, cause severe problems with data collection and interpretation. Secondly, the rugged topography and dense rain forest vegetation along with the wild animals and diseases create inaccessible or undesirable work areas. However, these conditions can be overcome and this paper briefly describes how one exploration company uses local natives to assist in development of reliable seismic surveys.

  9. Country watch: Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Kisau, J

    1995-01-01

    Senior lecturers, students, the Dean of the Arts Faculty, university administrators, and a nongovernmental organization called PNG Trust are working together on an AIDS Awareness Committee at the University of Papua New Guinea. They dispense educational materials to staff and students to increase awareness and provide advice on safer sex practices. The orientation book for new and continuing students contains selections from the committee's materials. A social scientist on the committee has conducted a pre-intervention survey to determine the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices of students. The intervention consists of four weeks of video showings and discussions. The post-intervention survey will take place later in 1995. Committee members, the university clinic, the student services office, female dormitories, and the university staff bar distribute free condoms on request, especially to students, who are on limited scholarships. The committee has developed an HIV/AIDS policy for the university that has been sent to the University Council for approval. The policy contends that protective and preventive approaches to HIV/AIDS are restatements of existing health, safety, and human rights codes. Recommendations in the policy include prevention of discrimination, confidentiality of all records, rejection of mandatory HIV testing of staff and students, and provision of appropriate medical care for students who tell the university health services of a positive HIV status. Assuming it is approved, the policy will apply to all university campuses in Papua New Guinea. The committee would like the university, after policy adoption, to provide them with a room as a resource center and to incorporate social work students in a counseling service. Students can volunteer to operate a telephone helpline and photocopy educational materials.

  10. Natural and human impacts in a 35 000-year vegetation history in central New Britain, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentfer, Carol; Pavlides, Christina; Specht, Jim

    2010-12-01

    Phytoliths and micro-charcoal from the Yombon Airstrip archaeological site in central New Britain, Papua New Guinea, provide the longest vegetation history record yet available for the New Guinea islands. The record begins about 35 kya with the first evidence for human presence at the site and, with the exception of the Last Glacial Maximum period, is continuous to the present. Three other sites provide supplementary evidence, including plant macro-remains, from the early Holocene onwards. The record is punctuated by a series of volcanic events, which are reflected in the vegetation record by alternating frequencies of closed forest and regrowth elements. Micro-charcoal is present from the oldest levels and fluctuates in frequency throughout the sequence, increasing substantially from the terminal Pleistocene-early Holocene onwards. This coincides with the first appearance of panicoid grasses and a range of potential cultivars including bananas and Saccharum. Increased levels of burning coinciding with the appearance of potential plant cultivars may indicate shifts in plant food production leading to cultivation from the early Holocene onwards. This compares favourably with previously reported evidence from Garua Island off the north coast of New Britain. The combination of trends in burning, vegetation clearance and appearance of potential cultivars on New Britain appears to parallel changes in the Papua New Guinea highlands at a similar time, and suggests regional similarities in subsistence and vegetation management practices from before the LGM onwards. Further studies are needed to clarify the timing and extent of these shifts across the region, and to provide a vegetation picture for the period before human colonisation of New Britain.

  11. Environmental adversity and uncertainty favour cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Andras, Peter; Lazarus, John; Roberts, Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    Background A major cornerstone of evolutionary biology theory is the explanation of the emergence of cooperation in communities of selfish individuals. There is an unexplained tendency in the plant and animal world – with examples from alpine plants, worms, fish, mole-rats, monkeys and humans – for cooperation to flourish where the environment is more adverse (harsher) or more unpredictable. Results Using mathematical arguments and computer simulations we show that in more adverse environments individuals perceive their resources to be more unpredictable, and that this unpredictability favours cooperation. First we show analytically that in a more adverse environment the individual experiences greater perceived uncertainty. Second we show through a simulation study that more perceived uncertainty implies higher level of cooperation in communities of selfish individuals. Conclusion This study captures the essential features of the natural examples: the positive impact of resource adversity or uncertainty on cooperation. These newly discovered connections between environmental adversity, uncertainty and cooperation help to explain the emergence and evolution of cooperation in animal and human societies. PMID:18053138

  12. Supporting Pacific Island Countries to Strengthen Their Resistance to Tobacco Industry Interference in Tobacco Control: A Case Study of Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    McCool, Judith; McKenzie, Jeanie; Lyman, Annabel; Allen, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use is the biggest single preventable cause of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Western Pacific region. Currently, 14 Pacific Island countries have ratified the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and, in having done so, are committed to implementing tobacco control measures aligned with the FCTC. Progressing strong and effective tobacco control legislation is essential to achieving long term gains in public health in small island countries. However, survey evidence suggests that pervasive tobacco industry interference serves to undermine tobacco control and public policy in several Pacific countries. An initiative was developed to provide dedicated, in-country technical support for developing legislation and policy to support implementation of Article 5.3 of the FCTC in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. This paper examines the factors that have assisted the two Pacific countries to make progress in implementing Article 5.3 and what this might mean for supporting progress in other Pacific settings. A document analysis was undertaken to identify the process and outcome of the intervention. Two significant outputs from the project including having identified and documented specific examples of TII and the development of draft legislation for Article 5.3 and other key resources for public servants both within and outside the health sector. Key determinants of progress included a motivated and engaged Ministry of Health, active civil society group or champion and access to media to prepare tobacco industry related material to stimulate public and policy sector debate. PMID:23924884

  13. "Whenever they cry, I cry with them": Reciprocal relationships and the role of ethics in a verbal autopsy study in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gouda, H N; Kelly-Hanku, A; Wilson, L; Maraga, S; Riley, I D

    2016-08-01

    Verbal autopsy (VA) methods usually involve an interview with a recently bereaved individual to ascertain the most probable cause of death when a person dies outside of a hospital and/or did not receive a reliable death certificate. A number of concerns have arisen around the ethical and social implications of the use of these methods. In this paper we examine these concerns, looking specifically at the cultural factors surrounding death and mourning in Papua New Guinea, and the potential for VA interviews to cause emotional distress in both the bereaved respondent and the VA fieldworker. Thirty one semi-structured interviews with VA respondents, the VA team and community relations officers as well as observations in the field and team discussions were conducted between June 2013 and August 2014. While our findings reveal that VA participants were often moved to cry and feel sad, they also expressed a number of ways they benefited from the process, and indeed welcomed longer transactions with the VA interviewers. Significantly, this paper highlights the ways in which VA interviewers, who have hitherto been largely neglected in the literature, navigate transactions with the participants and make everyday decisions about their relationships with them in order to ensure that they and VA interviews are accepted by the community. The role of the VA fieldworker should be more carefully considered, as should the implications for training and institutional support that follow.

  14. Favourable and Unfavourable Conditions for Children's Confidence Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebers, Claudia M.; von der Linden, Nicole; Howie, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    Two studies are presented in which favourable and unfavourable conditions for children's meta-cognitive monitoring processes are examined. Previously reported findings have shown that especially children's uncertainty monitoring (in contrast to certainty monitoring) poses specific problems for children in their elementary school years. When…

  15. Papua New Guinea to emphasize alcohol fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-09

    It is reported that Australia's Davy McKee Pacific is to build the first of nine proposed ethanol plants in Papua New Guinea in a bid to produce 50% of the country's transport fuels by 1990. The first $4 million facility, on the Baiyer River, will yield 2 million liters of ethanol a year from the cassava root.

  16. Navigating Contested Terrain: Vernacular Education in a Papua New Guinean Village

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troolin, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of language development in rural Papua New Guinea, in which parents felt the local school was not meeting the educational needs of their children. In this case study, the local, national and global narratives concerning use of the vernacular in education were apparent in the negotiation leading to an apparent…

  17. A comparative study of intestinal helminths in pre-school-age urban and rural children in Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Shield, Jennifer M; Kow, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    Children aged between 1 month and 10 years from one rural coastal locality, two rural upland localities and two urban localities in Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea were examined between September 1980 and September 1982. Hookworm (predominantly Necator americanus), Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura increased in prevalence with age. The prevalence of Strongyloides fuelleborni subspecies kellyi, where present, was either highest in the < 1 year age group or similar in all age groups. N. americanus prevalence was between 59% and 83% in the 3 year age group except at the coastal locality, where it was 15%. A. lumbricoides prevalence in the 3 year age group was very low in one upland locality and between 7% and 41% for the other localities. T. trichiura prevalence in the 3 year age group was between 33% and 55% at the coastal and two urban localities, and very low at the two upland localities. S. f. kellyi prevalence in the < 1 year age group was 48% and 20% respectively at the two upland localities, 2% at one of the urban localities and not detected at the other localities. Strongyloides stercoralis was detected at both urban localities, but not at the coastal locality or at the upland locality where testing was done. Many children had infections of more than one species, and there was a significant association of A. lumbricoides with T. trichiura at the coastal and two urban localities. The presence of S. f. kellyi at one of the urban localities raises the possibility that this once isolated species may now be spreading as infected people visit and settle in the towns. Between 68% and 93% of children in the 3 year age group and between 65% and 100% in the 5 year age group were infected with at least one helminth species.

  18. National Profiles in Technical and Vocational Education in Asia and the Pacific: Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific.

    One of a series of studies on the development of technical and vocational education in the member states of UNESCO, this report profiles the educational system in Papua New Guinea. The four parts of the document provide information about the following: the geography, the history, and the economy of the country; the educational system; technical…

  19. Implementing a New Model for Teachers' Professional Learning in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honan, Eileen; Evans, Terry; Muspratt, Sandy; Paraide, Patricia; Reta, Medi; Baroutsis, Aspa

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study that investigates the possibilities of developing a professional learning model based on action research that could lead to sustained improvements in teaching and learning in schools in remote areas of Papua New Guinea. The issues related to the implementation of this model are discussed using a critical lens that…

  20. Emerging Pedagogies of Linguistic and Cultural Continuity in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickford, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores issues of linguistic and cultural continuity in vernacular education in the south pacific state of Papua New Guinea (PNG). It draws from an ongoing ethnographic study of the introduction of vernacular teaching in elementary and lower primary schooling where English has recently been replaced as the medium of instruction making…

  1. Education in Papua New Guinea 1973-1993: The Late-Development Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Sheldon G.

    1993-01-01

    Explores connections between comparative and international studies and educational development in Papua New Guinea during the past 20 years. Argues that fears of "qualification escalation" and overproduction of educated school leavers, influence of foreign advisors, and ignoring of contextual factors have resulted in restricted secondary…

  2. Susan Setae and the Papua Hahine Social Action Forum.

    PubMed

    Laumaea, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the childhood, educational experiences and professional life of Susan Setae. As the founder and current president of Papua Hahine Social Action Forum--an organization involved in caring and providing support for victims of violence--Susan makes an important contribution to the lives of her fellow citizens in Papua New Guinea. The article documents Susan's early influences and her passion to see women in Papua New Guinea live lives free of violence.

  3. Magmatic Contribution of Ore Metals to the Conical Seamount Hydrothermal System, Papua New Guinea: a High-Precision Pb Isotope Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfit, M.; Kamenov, G.; Mueller, P.; Jonasson, I.

    2004-12-01

    During RV SONNE cruise SO-133 in 1998 polymetallic gold mineralization was discovered at Conical Seamount, located on the flank of Lihir island, Papua New Guinea. The seamount and the island are composed mainly of trachybasalts and basaltic trachyandesites, although some monzonites are found on Lihir. Sr isotopic analyses suggest that most of the Sr in the mineralized samples is derived from the local alkaline lavas. Elevated 87Sr/86Sr ratios in some of the samples suggest that during the waning stages of the hydrothermal system, some of the Sr was contributed either from seawater or the thick sequence of marine sediments underlying the island. High-precision Pb isotopic analyses conducted with MC-ICP-MS show that the ores and volcanic rocks share similar Pb isotopic compositions, suggesting that the Pb in the mineralized zones was ultimately derived from local magmatic sources. The Pb isotopic data, however, reveal small, but significant, differences between the mineralized zones and the associated host lavas. Mineralized samples from Lihir have slightly less radiogenic lead isotopic ratios than their host lavas. These lead isotopic compositions are similar, however, to some of the fresh lavas recovered from Conical seamount and to a monzonite intrusion underlying the Ladolam deposit. Lead isotopic ratios in mineralized samples from Conical seamount, however, are slightly more radiogenic than their host lavas and similar to those of fresh lavas recovered from nearby Tubaf and Edison seamounts. Petrographic data reveal a complex magmatic history for the magma chamber inferred beneath Conical seamount. Based on zoning patterns in the Conical clinopyroxenes, it appears that a sub-seamount magma chamber was recharged with a mafic magma similar to the most primitive, volatile-rich, and xenolith-bearing lavas recovered from Tubaf and Edison seamounts. Rapid cooling of this mafic magma accompanied by exsolution of metal-bearing fluids in the relatively shallow magma

  4. New and little known Brachodidae from tropical Asia and Papua New Guinea (Lepidoptera, Cossoidea).

    PubMed

    Kallies, Axel

    2013-01-01

    In this study nine new species and a new genus of Brachodidae are described from tropical Asia and Papua New Guinea. Synechodes polias sp. nov. and Synechodes tamila sp. nov. are described from Sulawesi and southern India, respectively. A new genus, Saccocera gen. nov. (type species Miscera orpheus Kallies, 2004), is described to accommodate five species occurring from Taiwan and Sumatra across Melanesia to Papua New Guinea. It differs significantly from the related genera Miscera Walker, 1863 and Synechodes Turner, 1913 in morphological details of the head and the male and female genitalia. Two species of Saccocera are described here, Saccocera panaras sp. nov. from Papua New Guinea and Saccocera miangkabau sp. nov. from Sumatra. Furthermore, Miscera minahasa sp. nov. and Paranigilgia mariannae sp. nov. are described from Sulawesi, Paranigilgia brandti sp. nov. and Nigilgia atribractea sp. nov. from Papua, and Nigilgia browni sp. nov. is described from Christmas Island. Finally, Synechodes heppneri Kallies, 1998 syn. nov. is reverted to a junior synonym of Synechodes coniophora Turner, 1913. Nigilgia anactis Diakonoff, 1982 is figured for the first time and its distribution in Asia is discussed.

  5. An investigation into febrile illnesses of unknown aetiology in Wipim, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bande, Grace; Hetzel, Manuel W; Iga, Jonah; Barnadas, Celine; Mueller, Ivo; Siba, Peter M; Horwood, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea the aetiology of febrile illnesses remains poorly characterized, mostly due to poor diagnostic facilities and the inaccessibility of much of the rural areas of the country. We investigated the aetiological agents of febrile illnesses for 136 people presenting to Wipim Health Centre in Western Province, Papua New Guinea. Arboviral and rickettsial real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, malaria blood smears and a malaria PCR test were used to identify pathogens associated with a history of fever. In 13% (n = 18) of cases an aetiological agent was identified. Dengue virus type 1 was detected in 11% (n = 15) of the samples tested and malaria in 2% (n = 3). None of the other arboviral or rickettsial pathogens tested for were detected in any of the samples. Although dengue viruses have been identified in Papua New Guinea using serological methods, this study represents the first direct detection of dengue in the country. The detection of malaria, on the other hand, was surprisingly low considering the previous notion that this was a hyperendemic region of Papua New Guinea.

  6. Seroepidemiologic survey of cysticercosis-taeniasis in four central highland districts of Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Salim, Lidwina; Ang, Agnes; Handali, Sukwan; Tsang, Victor C W

    2009-03-01

    Cysticercosis and taeniasis are known to be present in Papua, Indonesia. Several small studies have found a high prevalence of cysticercosis (23.5-56.9%) in the central highlands of Papua. A seroepidemiologic survey was carried out in four districts (Jayawijaya, Paniai, Pegunungan Bintang, and Puncak Jaya) of Papua. Anti-cysticercosis and anti-taeniasis antibodies were measured in 2,931 people using recombinant T24 and recombinant ES33 as a measure of cysticercosis and taeniasis exposures, respectively. Prevalence of cysticercosis-taeniasis is high in the Jayawijaya and Paniai districts (20.8% and 29.2% for cysticercosis and 7% and 9.6% for taeniasis, respectively) and lowest in the other two districts (Pegunungan Bintang and Puncak Jaya) (2% and 2% for cysticercosis and 1.7% and 10.7% for taeniasis, respectively). Our data show that the prevalence of cysticercosis and taeniasis are unchanged from that reported nearly 35 years ago at the beginning of cysticercosis-taeniasis epidemics in Papua, Indonesia.

  7. Historical ecology of the Raja Ampat Archipelago, Papua Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Maria Lourdes D; Heymans, Johanna J; Pauly, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a review of the status of marine resources of the Raja Ampat Archipelago, Papua Province, Indonesia, based on narratives of early European expeditions in various museums and libraries in Europe, Canada, and local archives in Papua. More than 500 pertinent documents on the study area were identified and located in various European museums and at the University of British Columbia library. About half of these were scanned (25,000 pages), which yielded the equivalent of 900 pages of text (or 4% of the total number of pages scanned) with observations on abundance and impact of the human population on the marine ecosystem within 2 degrees North and 2 degrees South between 127 degrees and 132 degrees East. In general, these observations, which spanned the period from 1810 to the present, suggest a decrease in the perceived occurrences of turtles, fish, and invertebrates; perceived abundance of turtles, fish, and algae; percieved subsistence exploitation of marine resources; and an increase in perceived commercial exploitation of marine resources. We conclude with a discussion of the problems and potential of contents analysis, and its use in the historical reconstruction of broad biodiversity trends.

  8. Can natural selection favour altruism between species?

    PubMed

    Wyatt, G A K; West, S A; Gardner, A

    2013-09-01

    Darwin suggested that the discovery of altruism between species would annihilate his theory of natural selection. However, it has not been formally shown whether between-species altruism can evolve by natural selection, or why this could never happen. Here, we develop a spatial population genetic model of two interacting species, showing that indiscriminate between species helping can be favoured by natural selection. We then ask if this helping behaviour constitutes altruism between species, using a linear-regression analysis to separate the total action of natural selection into its direct and indirect (kin selected) components. We show that our model can be interpreted in two ways, as either altruism within species, or altruism between species. This ambiguity arises depending on whether or not we treat genes in the other species as predictors of an individual's fitness, which is equivalent to treating these individuals as agents (actors or recipients). Our formal analysis, which focuses upon evolutionary dynamics rather than agents and their agendas, cannot resolve which is the better approach. Nonetheless, because a within-species altruism interpretation is always possible, our analysis supports Darwin's suggestion that natural selection does not favour traits that provide benefits exclusively to individuals of other species.

  9. Tobacco smoking in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Brott, K

    1981-12-01

    The consumption of cigarettes in Papua New Guinea appears to have increased tenfold over the past twenty years, largely as a result of massive advertising campaigns. It is recommended that legislation be introduced to enforce restrictions on the levels of tar and nicotine in cigarettes sold here, and to make it compulsory to print health warnings on cigarette packets. It is also recommended that the advertising of tobacco products be restricted or banned.

  10. Prevalence and Correlates of HIV Infection Among Sex Workers in Papua New Guinea: First Results from the Papua New Guinea and Australia Sexual Health Improvement Project (PASHIP).

    PubMed

    Wand, Handan; Siba, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the individual and combined impacts of socio-demographic and sexual behaviours on HIV diagnosis among 523 female sex workers who participated in the Papua New Guinea and Australia Sexual Health Improvement Project. Logistic regression models were used to identify the factors associated with HIV positivity. We estimated their population level impacts in order to quantify the proportion of HIV seropositivity is attributed to these factors. Less than 40 % of women consented to get tested for HIV. HIV prevalence was 7 % (95 % CI 4-11 %); lack of education and knowledge/awareness of HIV accounted for ~70 % of the HIV diagnoses. A major obstacle is lack of interest for testing. Our study underscored the major challenges in this culturally, linguistically heterogeneous country. The epidemic in Papua New Guinea requires targeted prevention interventions among those at highest risk of acquiring or transmitting infection.

  11. Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Susan; Paraide, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG), an independent state in the southwest Pacific, is the most linguistically diverse country in the world. Its roughly six million people speak over 800 distinct languages. In spite of this diversity, in 1995 the Papua New Guinean government established a mother tongue-based bilingual education programme in which community…

  12. Disrupting Assumptions about Vernacular Education in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honan, Eileen

    2003-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience at the Papua New Guinea Education Institute delivering in-service professional development programs to teachers who were implementing the country's new curriculum. Explains the notion of the "bridging years," when children in Papua New Guinea develop skills and knowledge in two cultures and two languages.…

  13. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with favourable long-term prognosis in paediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a retrospective study of patients treated on BCH-2003 and CCLG-2008 protocol in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-Guang; Zhang, Rui-Dong; Li, Wei-Jing; Zhao, Xiao-Xi; Cui, Lei; Wu, Min-Yuan; Zheng, Hu-Yong; Li, Zhi-Gang

    2014-07-01

    Activating mutations of NOTCH1 are a common occurrence in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), but its impact on T-ALL treatment is still controversial. In this study, the incidence, clinical features, and prognosis of 92 Chinese children with T-ALL treated using the Beijing Children's Hospital-2003 and Chinese Childhood Leukaemia Group-2008 protocols were analysed. NOTCH1 mutations were found in 42% of T-ALL patients and were not associated with clinical features, prednisone response, and minimal residual disease (MRD) at day 33 and 78. However, proline, glutamate, serine, threonine (PEST)/transactivation domain (TAD) mutations were associated with younger age (15/16 mutant vs. 48/76 wild-type, P = 0·018) and more central nervous system involvement (4/16 mutant vs. 3/76 wild-type, P = 0·016); while heterodimerization domain (HD) mutations were associated with KMT2A-MLLT1 (MLL-ENL; 4/30 mutant vs. 1/62 wild-type, P = 0·037). Furthermore, prognosis was better in patients with NOTCH1 mutations than in those with wild-type NOTCH1 (5-year event-free survival [EFS] 92·0 ± 4·5% vs. 64·0 ± 7·1%; P = 0·003). Long-term outcome was better in patients carrying HD mutations than in patients with wild-type HD (5-year EFS 89·7 ± 5·6% vs. 69·3 ± 6·2%; P = 0·034). NOTCH1 mutations and MRD at day 78 were independent prognostic factors. These findings indicate that NOTCH1 mutation predicts a favourable outcome in Chinese paediatric patients with T-ALL on the BCH-2003 and CCLG-2008 protocols, and may be considered a prognostic stratification factor.

  14. More than just a cut: a qualitative study of penile practices and their relationship to masculinity, sexuality and contagion and their implications for HIV prevention in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Male circumcision (MC) has been shown to reduce vaginal transmission of HIV to men. While community acceptability is important in a countries preparedness to introduce MC, it is equally important to map contemporary MC and other penile cutting practices, and the socio-cultural dimensions underpinning these practices. Methods A total of 482 men and women (n = 276 and n = 210, respectively) participated in 82 semi-structured and 45 focus group discussions from four different provinces of Papua New Guinea (PNG), each representing one of the four socially and geographically diverse regions of the country. Results Of the men interviewed 131 self-reported that they had undergone a penile alteration with some reporting multiple types. Practices were diverse and could be grouped into five broad categories: traditional (customary) penile cutting; contemporary penile cutting; medical circumcision; penile inserts; and penile bloodletting practices in which sharp objects are used to incise the glans and or inserted and withdrawn from the male urethra or in order to induce bleeding. Socio-cultural traditions, enhanced sexual pleasure and improved genital hygiene were key motivators for all forms of penile practices. Conclusions The findings from this study highlight the complex and diverse nature of penile practices in PNG and their association with notions of masculinity, sexuality and contagion. Contemporary penile practices are critical to a community’s acceptance of MC and of a country’s ability to successfully implement MC in the context of a rich and dynamic culture of penile practices. If a MC program were to be successfully rolled out in PNG to prevent HIV it would need to work within and build upon these diverse cultural meanings and motivators for penile practices already commonly performed in PNG by men. PMID:22818494

  15. Associations of Socioeconomic Status with Diet and Physical Activity in Migrant Bougainvilleans in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Vengiau, Gwendalyn; Umezaki, Masahiro; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Siba, Peter; Watanabe, Chiho

    2014-01-01

    Urban migrants in Papua New Guinea have undergone a nutritional transition. The present study investigated associations of socioeconomic status with dietary and physical activity patterns among migrant Bougainvilleans from Nassioi territory in the capital city of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. All adults Naasioi migrants residing in Port Moresby were identified (N = 185) and 70 were included. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to evaluate physical activity, and dietary patterns were assessed by per-week consumption frequency of food items. Principal component analysis was applied to produce a composite score for socioeconomic status. Least square regression analysis indicated that socioeconomic status was positively correlated with consumption of a traditional diet (p = .03) and negatively with walking-related physical activity (p = .02), but it was not correlated with MET-minutes of moderate/vigorous activity. Different patterns of nutritional transition occur among migrants in urban Papua New Guinea, depending on socioeconomic status.

  16. Hydrological changes over Papua New Guinea during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Edouard; Ménot, Guillemette; Rostek, Frauke; Tachikawa, Kazuyo; de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Bonnet, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Today the Fly River in Papua New Guinea is a major sediment contributor to the global ocean (the first in PNG and the 13st globally according to Milliman & Fansworth 2011 CUP). In order to reconstruct hydrological changes during the glacial period, we studied a deep-sea core located in the Gulf of Papua, just in front of the Fly River mouth. The history of detrital input in core MD97-2134 was reconstructed at high resolution by measuring various inorganic and organic proxies. In particular, we present Fe, Ti, Ca profiles measured with an ITRAX XRF scanner. We also measured molecular proxies such as n-alkanes by GC and tetraethers by LC-MS to derive BIT index values. These independent proxies provide a coherent picture for the period covering the last 30 thousands of years. The riverine input was much stronger during the glacial period with n-alkanes, BIT and Ti/Ca values several times higher than during the Holocene (factor 2 for n-alkanes, 2-3 for the BIT and 6-7 for Ti/Ca). This systematic increase is the likely signature of stronger precipitations superimposed on physiographical changes. The latter are linked to lower sea levels during the glacial period, which led to a shorter distance from the coast and probably to a widening of the drainage basin. In addition to these expected changes, we also observe prominent maxima of the riverine input during specific millennium-scale periods corresponding chronologically to Heinrich events # 1, 2, 3 and the Younger Dryas event. These precipitation maxima are in phase with those observed in Indonesia (Muller et al. 2012 Geology, Ayliffe et al. Nat. Geo. 2013), but in antiphase with the drought periods reconstructed farther north, notably in China (Wang et al. 2001 Science). The spatial distribution of precipitation changes constitutes the clear signature of wide latitudinal shifts of the ITCZ during H events. The resolution of our Papua record allows studying further important details, providing evidence for two phases

  17. Protection of breastfeeding in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, H.; Vince, J.; Boas, P.; Danaya, R.

    1999-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea the bottle-feeding of babies has been increasing, predominantly among unemployed women of low educational status. Many women are unaware of their legal right to have breaks at work for the purpose of breastfeeding, and a high proportion of workplaces have no facilities for mothers who wish to breastfeed their children. The laws on the feeding of infants should be updated and implemented, and an effort is needed to explain the benefits of breastfeeding and the rights of working mothers. PMID:10212520

  18. Genogeography and Immune Epitope Characteristics of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype C Reveals Two Distinct Types: Asian and Papua-Pacific.

    PubMed

    Thedja, Meta Dewi; Muljono, David Handojo; Ie, Susan Irawati; Sidarta, Erick; Turyadi; Verhoef, Jan; Marzuki, Sangkot

    2015-01-01

    Distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes/subgenotypes is geographically and ethnologically specific. In the Indonesian archipelago, HBV genotype C (HBV/C) is prevalent with high genome variability, reflected by the presence of 13 of currently existing 16 subgenotypes. We investigated the association between HBV/C molecular characteristics with host ethnicity and geographical distribution by examining various subgenotypes of HBV/C isolates from the Asia and Pacific region, with further analysis on the immune epitope characteristics of the core and surface proteins. Phylogenetic tree was constructed based on complete HBV/C genome sequences from Asia and Pacific region, and genetic distance between isolates was also examined. HBV/C surface and core immune epitopes were analyzed and grouped by comparing the amino acid residue characteristics and geographical origins. Based on phylogenetic tree and geographical origins of isolates, two major groups of HBV/C isolates--East-Southeast Asia and Papua-Pacific--were identified. Analysis of core and surface immune epitopes supported these findings with several amino acid substitutions distinguishing the East-Southeast Asia isolates from the Papua-Pacific isolates. A west-to-east gradient of HBsAg subtype distribution was observed with adrq+ prominent in the East and Southeast Asia and adrq- in the Pacific, with several adrq-indeterminate subtypes observed in Papua and Papua New Guinea (PNG). This study indicates that HBV/C isolates can be classified into two types, the Asian and the Papua-Pacific, based on the virus genome diversity, immune epitope characteristics, and geographical distribution, with Papua and PNG as the molecular evolutionary admixture region in the switching from adrq+ to adrq-.

  19. Genogeography and Immune Epitope Characteristics of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype C Reveals Two Distinct Types: Asian and Papua-Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Thedja, Meta Dewi; Muljono, David Handojo; Ie, Susan Irawati; Sidarta, Erick; Turyadi; Verhoef, Jan; Marzuki, Sangkot

    2015-01-01

    Distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes/subgenotypes is geographically and ethnologically specific. In the Indonesian archipelago, HBV genotype C (HBV/C) is prevalent with high genome variability, reflected by the presence of 13 of currently existing 16 subgenotypes. We investigated the association between HBV/C molecular characteristics with host ethnicity and geographical distribution by examining various subgenotypes of HBV/C isolates from the Asia and Pacific region, with further analysis on the immune epitope characteristics of the core and surface proteins. Phylogenetic tree was constructed based on complete HBV/C genome sequences from Asia and Pacific region, and genetic distance between isolates was also examined. HBV/C surface and core immune epitopes were analyzed and grouped by comparing the amino acid residue characteristics and geographical origins. Based on phylogenetic tree and geographical origins of isolates, two major groups of HBV/C isolates—East-Southeast Asia and Papua-Pacific—were identified. Analysis of core and surface immune epitopes supported these findings with several amino acid substitutions distinguishing the East-Southeast Asia isolates from the Papua-Pacific isolates. A west-to-east gradient of HBsAg subtype distribution was observed with adrq+ prominent in the East and Southeast Asia and adrq- in the Pacific, with several adrq-indeterminate subtypes observed in Papua and Papua New Guinea (PNG). This study indicates that HBV/C isolates can be classified into two types, the Asian and the Papua-Pacific, based on the virus genome diversity, immune epitope characteristics, and geographical distribution, with Papua and PNG as the molecular evolutionary admixture region in the switching from adrq+ to adrq-. PMID:26162099

  20. Rebel girls? Unplanned pregnancy and colonialism in highlands Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Butt, Leslie; Munro, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    In highlands Papua, Indonesia, rapid social change under a colonial system of governance has created novel sexual opportunities for young indigenous women. Recent scholarship has viewed similar youthful sexual practices that challenge the status quo as expressions of personal agency. By looking at how young women and their families cope with unplanned pregnancies, we suggest that a more viable analytic approach would be to view sexuality, pregnancy and childbirth as a single unit of analysis. From this perspective, young women's experiences are primarily ones of constraint. Case studies offer insights into the ways a political context of colonial domination limits options and choices for young women who have children born out of wedlock. In particular, this paper describes how the 'settler gaze' - omnipresent colonial norms and judgments - creates regulatory effects in the realm of reproduction.

  1. Malaria in a cohort of Javanese migrants to Indonesian Papua.

    PubMed

    Krisin; Basri, H; Fryauff, D J; Barcus, M J; Bangs, M J; Ayomi, E; Marwoto, H; Elyazar, I R F; Richie, T L; Baird, J K

    2003-09-01

    The epidemiology of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax was investigated among Javanese migrants to an endemic region of Papua, Indonesia. A cohort of 243 migrants from Java was followed for malaria in a new settlement village in the endemic Armopa area of north-eastern Papua, beginning on the day each migrant arrived in the village. The subjects were monitored during home visits (three/week) and by the twice-monthly production of bloodsmears that were checked for malarial parasites. At the end of 33 months, 159 (65%) of the subjects remained under follow-up. The prevalence of parasitaemia in the village declined from 16% among those already living there when the study began in August 1996, to 5% when the study finished in June 1999. Over this period, 596 infections by P. falciparum and 723 by P. vivax occurred in the cohort, 22 and 27 of the subjects each experiencing at least six infections by P. falciparum and P. vivax, respectively. The incidence of malarial infection was higher during the first and second years post-migration (3.2 and 2.7 infections/person-year) than during the third (1.2 infections/person-year). Although the geometric mean parasite counts for P. falciparum increased over time (1209, 1478, and 1830 parasites/microl in the first, second and third years, respectively), the corresponding values for P. vivax (497, 535 and 490 parasites/microl) showed no such trend. Only one of the nine subjects who developed severe malaria (requiring intravenous quinine therapy) was a child, giving an odds ratio for a case of severe malaria being in an adult of 6.1 (P=0.08).

  2. Parasitic zoonoses in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Owen, I L

    2005-03-01

    Relatively few species of zoonotic parasites have been recorded in humans in Papua New Guinea. A greater number of potentially zoonotic species, mostly nematodes, occur in animals but are yet to be reported from humans. Protozoa is the best represented group of those infecting man, with Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanesis, Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Entamoeba polecki, Balantidium coli and, possibly, Blastocystis hominis. The only zoonotic helminths infecting humans include the trematode Paragonimus westermani, the cestodes Hymenolepis nana, H. diminuta and the sparganum larva of Spirometra erinacea, and the nematodes Trichinella papuae and Angiostrongylus cantonensis and, possibly, Ascaris suum. Other groups represented are Acanthocephala (Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus)), insects (Chrysomya bezziana, Cimex sp., Ctenocephalides spp.), and mites (Leptotrombidium spp. and, possibly Sarcoptes scabiei, and Demodex sp.). One leech (Phytobdella lineata) may also be considered as being zoonotic. The paucity of zoonotic parasite species can be attributed to long historical isolation of the island of New Guinea and its people, and the absence until recent times of large placental mammals other than pig and dog. Some zoonotic helminths have entered the country with recent importation of domestic animals, in spite of quarantine regulations, and a few more (two cestodes, one nematode and one tick) are poised to enter from neighbouring countries, given the opportunity. Improvement in water supplies, human hygiene and sanitation would reduce the prevalence of many of these parasites, and thorough cooking of meat would lessen the risk of infection by some others.

  3. Indications for Caesarean sections in a rural hospital in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Mark, Terence B; Radcliffe, Jim; Laman, Moses

    2014-07-01

    We retrospectively documented indications for Caesarean sections in a rural district level hospital in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. Over a 53-month study period, 745 Caesarean sections were performed. Prolonged labour, previous history of Caesarean section, cephalopelvic disproportion, malpresentation and fetal distress accounted for over 88% of Caesarean sections performed. In older mothers (aged >30 years), antepartum haemorrhage (Fisher exact test, P = 0.05) and multiple indications (P = 0.001) were leading reasons for Caesarean sections while cephalopelvic disproportion (P = 0.005) was the leading indication in younger mothers. Further prospective studies incorporating perinatal and maternal mortality rates are required to optimise the value of Caesarean sections at district level hospitals in Papua New Guinea.

  4. At Risk: The Relationship between Experiences of Child Sexual Abuse and Women's HIV Status in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ione R.

    2012-01-01

    Child sexual abuse in Papua New Guinea is a human rights issue as well as an indicator of HIV risk in women. This study aimed to develop knowledge about the link between violence experienced by women and their HIV status. The study used a mixed method approach to collect quantitative and qualitative data through structured interviews with a sample…

  5. Exploration and development of the Kutubu project in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.K. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes the exploration and development of the Kutubu project, the first major oil development in Papua New Guinea. It presents a case study of how a broad range of interrelated development issues were addressed and resolved during planning to obtain an optimized development plan. The first oil from the Kutubu project was produced in mid-1992. So far, field performance is as anticipated.

  6. Expert Opinion to Identify High-Risk Entry Routes of Canine Rabies into Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Brookes, V J; Ward, M P

    2017-03-01

    The proximity of Papua New Guinea (PNG) to canine rabies-endemic countries in South-East Asia presents a risk of incursion of this disease into PNG and the rest of the Oceanic region. The objective of this study was to identify the highest risk routes for entry of dogs - associated with movement of people - into PNG from canine rabies-endemic countries. A structured, in-country expert-elicitation workshop was used, and 20 entry routes were identified. The highest risk routes were three land routes from Papua, Indonesia (hunters, traditional border crossers and unregulated, unchecked 'shopper-crossers') and two sea routes (fishing and logging). These results will be used to direct more detailed risk assessments to develop surveillance strategies and incursion response plans.

  7. Papua New Guinea's next generation of medical researchers: Celestine Aho, Patricia Rarau and Pamela Toliman.

    PubMed

    Vilakiva, Geraldine; Gibbs, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Celestine Aho, Patricia Rarau and Pamela Toliman are amongst the next generation of health researchers at the Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research (PNGIMR). Face-to-face interviews were conducted with all three women for the purpose of profiling women who are leaders in health and medicine in Papua New Guinea (PNG). They were asked questions about their early life and childhood, education, work life and training, and mentors who have supported their career path and leadership role. All three see opportunities before them to tackle the health challenges facing PNG, find solutions and contribute to human development in their country. At PNGIMR, Pamela is a senior scientific officer in the HIV and STI laboratory; Celestine is a senior scientific officer in the bacteriology laboratory working on pneumococcal vaccines; and Patricia is the study clinician for the Partnership in Health Project, monitoring the impact of the PNG liquefied natural gas (LNG) project.

  8. Employment Strategy in Papua New Guinea: An International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsden, Keith

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to other East Asian countries, in Papua New Guinea the economy is stagnating due to high labor costs, overvalued currency, stagnant productivity, high government consumption, and barriers to external and internal investment and exports. (SK)

  9. Beyond Dependency Theory: A Postcolonial Analysis of Educating Papua New Guinean High School Students in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Juliana Mohok; Hickling-Hudson, Anne

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the social and educational implications of the "Secondary Schools Scholarship Project" (SSSP) in which Australia gave over 1,000 adolescents from Papua New Guinea three-year scholarships to study in Australian high schools. Drawing from postcolonial theory, the paper uses concepts of ambivalence, hybridity, hegemony,…

  10. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism in Papua, Indonesia: 2001–2012 survey results

    PubMed Central

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Wada, Taizo; Fujisawa, Michiko; Ishine, Masayuki; Garcia del Saz, Eva; Hirata, Yutaka; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Kokubo, Yasumasa; Seguchi, Harumichi; Sakamoto, Ryota; Manuaba, Indrajaya; Watofa, Paulina; Rantetampang, Andreas L; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Only one previous follow-up study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism in Papua, Indonesia has been carried out since a survey undertaken in 1962–1981 by Gajdusek and colleagues. Therefore, to clarify the clinical epidemiology of ALS and parkinsonism in the southern coastal region of Papua, the clinical characteristics and prevalence of the diseases in this region were examined and assessed. Methods Cases of ALS and parkinsonism were clinically examined during a 2001–2012 survey in Bade and other villages along the Ia, Edera, Dumut and Obaa rivers in Papua, Indonesia. Possible, probable and definite ALS was diagnosed clinically by certified neurologists based on El Escorial criteria. The criteria for a diagnosis of parkinsonism were the presence of at least two of the four following signs: tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural impairment with a progressive course. Results During the survey, 46 cases of ALS and/or parkinsonism were diagnosed within a population range of 7000 (2001–2002) to 13 900 (2007–2012). The 46 cases consisted of 17 probable-definite cases of ALS, including three with cognitive impairment (CI), 13 cases of overlapping possible, probable or definite ALS and parkinsonism, including five with CI, and 16 cases of parkinsonism, including one with CI. The crude point prevalence rate of pure ALS was estimated to be at least 73 (95% CI 0 to 156) to 133 (27 to 240)/100 000 people and that of overlapping ALS and parkinsonism at least 53 (0 to 126) to 98 (2 to 193)/100 000 in 2007, or 2010 in some regions. Conclusions While the prevalence of ALS in Papua has decreased over the past ∼30–35 years, it remains higher than the global average. There was a high prevalence of overlapping ALS, parkinsonism and CI, which has also been previously reported in Guam and Kii. PMID:24740977

  11. Review of the species of Visiana Swinhoe from the Papua New Guinea region (Lepidoptera: Geometridae: Larentiinae).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The genus isiana Swinhoe which belongs to the subfamily Larentiinae (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) is widely distributed within the Indo-Australian region. The present study is the first extensive review of historic Visiana specimens from the Papua New Guinea region deposited in the Natural History Museum (London, UK) and Australian National Insect Collection (Canberra, Australia). The species examined are as follows: V. hyperctenista (Prout) from the Bismarck Archipelago, V. vinosa (Warren) from the eastern part of Papua New Guinea, V. ranensis (Prout), stat. nov. from the Moluccas (Indonesia), and four newly described species V. horista, sp. nov. from Bougainville Island, V. grandivinosa sp. nov. from New Britain, V. variovinosa, sp. nov. from the eastern part of Papua New Guinea, and V. morobensis, sp. nov. from the Morobe province. The lectotype is designated for V. hyperctienista. Redescriptions of V. hyperctenista, V. vinosa and V. ranensis are provided, the four new species are described, figures of all seven species are shown. The species V. hyperctenista and V. horista are treated as a sister-group, the diagnostic characters are defined. A checklist of the known Papuan species of the genus Visiana is provided.

  12. Viruses associated with influenza-like-illnesses in Papua New Guinea, 2010.

    PubMed

    Kono, Jacinta; Jonduo, Marinjho H; Omena, Matthew; Siba, Peter M; Horwood, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    Influenza-like-illness can be caused by a wide range of respiratory viruses. The etiology of influenza-like-illness in developing countries such as Papua New Guinea is poorly understood. The etiological agents associated with influenza-like-illness were investigated retrospectively for 300 nasopharyngeal swabs received by the Papua New Guinea National Influenza Centre in 2010. Real-time PCR/RT-PCR methods were used for the detection of 13 respiratory viruses. Patients with influenza-like-illness were identified according to the World Health Organization case definition: sudden onset of fever (>38°C), with cough and/or sore throat, in the absence of other diagnoses. At least one viral respiratory pathogen was detected in 66.3% of the samples tested. Rhinoviruses (17.0%), influenza A (16.7%), and influenza B (12.7%) were the pathogens detected most frequently. Children <5 years of age presented with a significantly higher rate of at least one viral pathogen and a significantly higher rate of co-infections with multiple viruses, when compared to all other patients >5 years of age. Influenza B, adenovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were all detected at significantly higher rates in children <5 years of age. This study confirmed that multiple respiratory viruses are circulating and contributing to the presentation of influenza-like-illness in Papua New Guinea.

  13. Family planning in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Osborn, M

    1986-11-01

    The general situation of family planning in Papua New Guinea, several of the relevant traditional beliefs, and a pilot project of community based distribution and family planning education in a rural market town. There is no government policy on population, although community based distribution programs have been active in some areas for 10 years. Papua New Guinea has a crude birth rate of 44/1000, an average of 6 children per family, but has only begun to introduce primary health care. Consequently, the population is expected to double by 2015. The pilot program, in a market town called Maprik in East Sepik Province, targets 44,378 women from surrounding villages, of whom about 800 may be using contraception. A family planning nurse is training 20 members of a Women's Council. In a 4-day course, held in the Council House, community distribution workers discussed family planning, responsible parenthood, sex education, nutrition, environmental and population issues. Ancient taboos and social controls that used to space births are breaking down under the pressure of missionization and westernization. Intercourse is still prohibited during menstruation and breastfeeding. There are specific magic spells and rituals used to insure fertility or abortion: these examples were used to help women understand the concepts of modern family planning methods. The nurse encouraged feedback from the women, and only held one formal teaching session, on record-keeping. For the success of the program, field workers should work from within, and supervise adequately. This will be done with quarterly refresher courses and monthly follow-up in each village.

  14. Genotypic Characterization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Derived from Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive Individuals Residing in Sorong, West Papua.

    PubMed

    Witaningrum, Adiana Mutamsari; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Khairunisa, Siti Qamariyah; Yunifiar M, Muhammad Qushai; Indriati, Dwi Wahyu; Bramanthi, Rendra; Nasronudin; Kameoka, Masanori

    2016-08-01

    Papua and West Papua provinces have the highest prevalence rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Indonesia; however, data on the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 are limited. We conducted a genotypic study on HIV-1 genes derived from antiretroviral therapy-naive individuals residing in Sorong, West Papua. HIV-1 genomic fragments were amplified from 43 peripheral blood samples, and sequencing analysis of the genes was carried out. Of the 43 samples, 41 protease (PR), 31 reverse transcriptase (RT), 26 gag, and 25 env genes were sequenced. HIV-1 subtyping revealed that CRF01_AE (48.8%, 21/43) and subtype B (41.9%, 18/43) were the major subtypes prevalent in the region, whereas other recombinant forms were also detected. Major drug resistance-associated mutations for PR inhibitors were not detected; however, mutations for the RT inhibitors, A62V and E138A, appeared in a few samples, indicating the possible emergence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in Sorong, West Papua.

  15. Characterization of population structure from the mitochondrial DNA vis-à-vis language and geography in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther J; Koki, George; Merriwether, D Andrew

    2010-08-01

    Situated along a corridor linking the Asian continent with the outer islands of the Pacific, Papua New Guinea has long played a key role in understanding the initial peopling of Oceania. The vast diversity in languages and unique geographical environments in the region have been central to the debates on human migration and the degree of interaction between the Pleistocene settlers and newer migrants. To better understand the role of Papua New Guinea in shaping the region's prehistory, we sequenced the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of three populations, a total of 94 individuals, located in the East Sepik Province of Papua New Guinea. We analyzed these samples with a large data set of Oceania populations to examine the role of geography and language in shaping population structure within New Guinea and between the region and Island Melanesia. Our results from median-joining networks, star-cluster age estimates, and population genetic analyses show that while highland New Guinea populations seem to be the oldest settlers, there has been significant gene flow within New Guinea with little influence from geography or language. The highest genetic division is between Papuan speakers of New Guinea versus East Papuan speakers located outside of mainland New Guinea. Our study supports the weak language barriers to genetic structuring among populations in close contact and highlights the complexity of understanding the genetic histories of Papua New Guinea in association with language and geography.

  16. Effects of Including Misidentified Sharks in Life History Analyses: A Case Study on the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Jonathan J.; Chin, Andrew; Baje, Leontine; Green, Madeline E.; Appleyard, Sharon A.; Tobin, Andrew J.; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; White, William T.

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries observer programs are used around the world to collect crucial information and samples that inform fisheries management. However, observer error may misidentify similar-looking shark species. This raises questions about the level of error that species misidentifications could introduce to estimates of species’ life history parameters. This study addressed these questions using the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos as a case study. Observer misidentification rates were quantified by validating species identifications using diagnostic photographs taken on board supplemented with DNA barcoding. Length-at-age and maturity ogive analyses were then estimated and compared with and without the misidentified individuals. Vertebrae were retained from a total of 155 sharks identified by observers as C. amblyrhynchos. However, 22 (14%) of these were sharks were misidentified by the observers and were subsequently re-identified based on photographs and/or DNA barcoding. Of the 22 individuals misidentified as C. amblyrhynchos, 16 (73%) were detected using photographs and a further 6 via genetic validation. If misidentified individuals had been included, substantial error would have been introduced to both the length-at-age and the maturity estimates. Thus validating the species identification, increased the accuracy of estimated life history parameters for C. amblyrhynchos. From the corrected sample a multi-model inference approach was used to estimate growth for C. amblyrhynchos using three candidate models. The model averaged length-at-age parameters for C. amblyrhynchos with the sexes combined were  L¯∞ = 159 cm TL and  L¯0 = 72 cm TL. Females mature at a greater length (l50 = 136 cm TL) and older age (A50 = 9.1 years) than males (l50 = 123 cm TL; A50 = 5.9 years). The inclusion of techniques to reduce misidentification in observer programs will improve the results of life history studies and ultimately improve management through the use of more

  17. Effects of Including Misidentified Sharks in Life History Analyses: A Case Study on the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Smart, Jonathan J; Chin, Andrew; Baje, Leontine; Green, Madeline E; Appleyard, Sharon A; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; White, William T

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries observer programs are used around the world to collect crucial information and samples that inform fisheries management. However, observer error may misidentify similar-looking shark species. This raises questions about the level of error that species misidentifications could introduce to estimates of species' life history parameters. This study addressed these questions using the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos as a case study. Observer misidentification rates were quantified by validating species identifications using diagnostic photographs taken on board supplemented with DNA barcoding. Length-at-age and maturity ogive analyses were then estimated and compared with and without the misidentified individuals. Vertebrae were retained from a total of 155 sharks identified by observers as C. amblyrhynchos. However, 22 (14%) of these were sharks were misidentified by the observers and were subsequently re-identified based on photographs and/or DNA barcoding. Of the 22 individuals misidentified as C. amblyrhynchos, 16 (73%) were detected using photographs and a further 6 via genetic validation. If misidentified individuals had been included, substantial error would have been introduced to both the length-at-age and the maturity estimates. Thus validating the species identification, increased the accuracy of estimated life history parameters for C. amblyrhynchos. From the corrected sample a multi-model inference approach was used to estimate growth for C. amblyrhynchos using three candidate models. The model averaged length-at-age parameters for C. amblyrhynchos with the sexes combined were L∞ = 159 cm TL and L0 = 72 cm TL. Females mature at a greater length (l50 = 136 cm TL) and older age (A50 = 9.1 years) than males (l50 = 123 cm TL; A50 = 5.9 years). The inclusion of techniques to reduce misidentification in observer programs will improve the results of life history studies and ultimately improve management through the use of more accurate data

  18. Global warming favours light-coloured insects in Europe.

    PubMed

    Zeuss, Dirk; Brandl, Roland; Brändle, Martin; Rahbek, Carsten; Brunzel, Stefan

    2014-05-27

    Associations between biological traits of animals and climate are well documented by physiological and local-scale studies. However, whether an ecophysiological phenomenon can affect large-scale biogeographical patterns of insects is largely unknown. Insects absorb energy from the sun to become mobile, and their colouration varies depending on the prevailing climate where they live. Here we show, using data of 473 European butterfly and dragonfly species, that dark-coloured insect species are favoured in cooler climates and light-coloured species in warmer climates. By comparing distribution maps of dragonflies from 1988 and 2006, we provide support for a mechanistic link between climate, functional traits and species that affects geographical distributions even at continental scales. Our results constitute a foundation for better forecasting the effect of climate change on many insect groups.

  19. The Implementation of Special Autonomy in West Papua, Indonesia: Problems and Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    SPECIAL AUTONOMY IN WEST PAPUA, INDONESIA : PROBLEMS AND RECOMMENDATIONS by Muhammad Yusran Halmin December 2006 Thesis Advisor...of Special Autonomy in West Papua, Indonesia : Problems and Recommendations 6. AUTHOR(S) Muhammad Yusran Halmin 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING...words) West Papua in the easternmost area of Indonesia has long been recognized as one of its most controversial provinces. Since its

  20. Pelagic production and respiration in the Gulf of Papua during May 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, A. D.; Carleton, J. H.; Duggan, S.

    2007-07-01

    The metabolic balance between production and respiration in plankton communities of the Gulf of Papua was investigated in May 2004. Water samples taken at 19 stations were allocated to groups on the basis of physico-chemical characteristics. Oxygen consumption and production in flasks incubated in the dark and in the light was determined by micro-Winkler titration. Dark bottle respiration in samples influenced by the estuarine plume averaged 3.09±1.92 (SD) mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 and production within surface light bottles averaged 7.63±3.36 (SD) mmol O 2 m -3 d -1. Corresponding values in stations more typical of the central Gulf of Papua were 1.68±1.30 (SD) mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 and 1.08±2.25 (SD) mmol O 2 m -3 d -1. Despite a shallow (<10 m) euphotic zone within the plume stations, phytoplankton production in the surface layers was sufficiently high to subsidise total water column respiration. Integrating production and respiration over the water column resulted in a calculation of net community production (NCP) of 626±504 (SD) mg C m -2 d -1, and community respiration (CR) of 712±492 mg C m -2 d -1 at the plume stations, with an average P: R ratio of 1.97. In the offshore group NCP was 157±450 (SD) mg C m -2 d -1 and CR was 1620±1576 mg C m -2 d -1. The average P: R ratio was 1.27. Three of the 7 stations allocated to the offshore group were net heterotrophic. In contrast to earlier studies in the area indicating that the Gulf of Papua waters is heterotrophic [Robertson, A.I., Dixon, P., Alongi, D.M., 1998. The influence of fluvial discharge on pelagic production in the Gulf of Papua, Northern Coral Sea. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 46, 319-331], our data indicate that in May 2004 the Gulf was in positive metabolic balance, but by only ˜120 mg C m -2 d -1. We conclude that waters of the Gulf of Papua under riverine influence are net autotrophic, but that within the central Gulf there is a fine metabolic balance alternating between autotrophy and

  1. Reported Experiences Enhance Favourable Attitudes toward Toads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomazic, Iztok

    2011-01-01

    There are many factors that influence the formation of attitudes, one of the most crucial ones being education. Positive attitudes toward animals can be effectively accomplished principally by enabling students to directly experience organisms and their environments. The following study presents the development of a Toad Attitude Questionnaire…

  2. Female sexuality in Nairobi: flawed or favoured?

    PubMed

    Spronk, Rachel

    2005-05-01

    Studies of female sexuality in Africa tend to adopt an instrumental approach, many times problematizing sexual conduct in relation to HIV infection and/or reproduction. This study aimed to explore sexuality as a relational concept. Using interviews and participant observation, the paper shows how sexuality becomes a point of self-identification for young professional women in Nairobi between 20 and 30 years-old. These women form a group who implicitly and explicitly criticize conventional gender roles through the overt pursuit of sexual pleasure as recognition of their womanhood. This aspect of the feminine sense of self is at odds with normative notions of femininity. To avoid criticism for being 'un-proper', women adopt a deferential attitude towards men. The focus on upwardly mobile professional women and their experiments with new types of heterosexual relations in dating provides insight into both sexuality and gender.

  3. Natural selection can favour 'irrational' behaviour.

    PubMed

    McNamara, J M; Trimmer, P C; Houston, A I

    2014-01-01

    Understanding decisions is the fundamental aim of the behavioural sciences. The theory of rational choice is based on axiomatic principles such as transitivity and independence of irrelevant alternatives (IIA). Empirical studies have demonstrated that the behaviour of humans and other animals often seems irrational; there can be a lack of transitivity in choice and seemingly irrelevant alternatives can alter decisions. These violations of transitivity and IIA undermine rational choice theory. However, we show that an individual that is maximizing its rate of food gain can exhibit failure of transitivity and IIA. We show that such violations can be caused because a current option may disappear in the near future or a better option may reappear soon. Current food options can be indicative of food availability in the near future, and this key feature can result in apparently irrational behaviour.

  4. Historical Analysis of Population Reactions to Stimuli - A Case Study of the Solomon Islands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    as events) in regional populations. The first three studies focussed on East Timor, Aceh, and Papua New Guinea and Papua, and helped to develop the...Aceh and Papua New Guinea . This is an item of note as the histories are very different as are the time frames for the study. This might be an...ethnic groups are key aspects of a societal memory that operates within the Solomon Islands. This is different to Papua New Guinea , where no or

  5. Papua New Guinea pipeline overcomes adverse climate, terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.B. ); Leipert, G.F. )

    1993-02-15

    Construction of the Kutubu oil-export facilities in Papua New Guinea illustrates the importance of proper planning and flexible execution in completing on schedule and within budget a project through difficult and remote terrain. As part of the Kutubu petroleum development project, the pipeline transports crude oil from a central production facility (CPF) in the southern highlands to a marine terminal located in the Gulf of Papua. The paper describes the land line construction, construction challenges, the plan for catch-up when establishing right-of-way proved slow, pipes and valves used, marine activities, river construction, coating, and commissioning.

  6. Injuries caused by pigs in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Barss, P; Ennis, S

    Pigs are intelligent animals that can be formidable adversaries to humans because of their sharp tusks and their ability to attack swiftly. Domestic and feral pigs have an important role in the ecology of village life in Melanesia. A six-year review of all injuries that were caused by pigs that were referred from the villages in Milne Bay Province, Papua New Guinea, to the Provincial Hospital was completed. Some of the injuries that were seen among the 20 patients who were studied included: three penetrating abdominal injuries with prolapse and strangulation of the intestine; a "sucking" chest wound; bilateral pneumothoraces; two infected open fractures of the radius and the ulna; a perforating injury of the knee with septic arthritis; a hand injury with laceration of multiple tendons; an arterial injury of the wrist; injury of a tibial nerve with foot drop; and a severe scrotal injury with exposure of the testicles. Most injuries resulted from the hunting of feral pigs. Adult male hunters who used dogs and carried only one spear were injured most frequently. Wounds from injuries by pigs are deep, often involve multiple critical structures, and are grossly contaminated. Resuscitation requires the administration of fluid and often blood. Treatment includes irrigation, debridement and closure of the wound. The principles of managing such injuries, the prevention of injuries, the ecology of pigs and humans, human infections originating from pigs, and safer methods of hunting pigs are discussed.

  7. Neogene evolution of the mixed carbonate-siliciclastic system in the Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcherepanov, Evgueni N.; Droxler, André W.; Lapointe, Philippe; Dickens, Gerald R.; Bentley, Sam J.; Beaufort, Luc; Peterson, Larry C.; Daniell, James; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2008-03-01

    This paper outlines the evolution of the late Cenozoic mixed carbonate-siliciclastic depositional system in the Gulf of Papua (GoP), using seismic, gravity, multibeam bathymetry, well data sets, and Landsat imagery. The deposition of the mixed sedimentary sequences was influenced by dynamic interplay of tectonics, eustasy, in situ carbonate production, and siliciclastic sediment supply. The roles of these major factors are estimated during different periods of the GoP margin evolution. The Cenozoic mixed system in the GoP formed in distinct phases. The first phase (Late Cretaceous-Paleocene) was mostly driven by tectonics. Rifting created grabens and uplifted structural blocks which served later as pedestals for carbonate edifices. Active neritic carbonate accumulation characterized the second phase (Eocene-middle Miocene). During this phase, mostly eustatic fluctuations controlled the large-scale sedimentary geometries of the carbonate system. The third phase (late Miocene-early Pliocene) was characterized by extensive demise of the carbonate platforms in the central part of the study area, which can be triggered by one or combination of several factors, such as eustatic sea level fluctuations, increased tectonic subsidence, uplift, sudden influx of siliciclastics, or dramatic changes in environmental conditions and climate. The fourth phase (late Pliocene-Holocene) was dominated by siliciclastics, which resulted in the burial of drowned and/or active carbonate platforms, although some platforms still remain alive until present-day.

  8. Lake warming favours small-sized planktonic diatom species

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Monika; Reuter, John E.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    Diatoms contribute to a substantial portion of primary production in the oceans and many lakes. Owing to their relatively heavy cell walls and high nutrient requirements, planktonic diatoms are expected to decrease with climate warming because of reduced nutrient redistribution and increasing sinking velocities. Using a historical dataset, this study shows that diatoms were able to maintain their biovolume with increasing stratification in Lake Tahoe over the last decades; however, the diatom community structure changed. Increased stratification and reduced nitrogen to phosphorus ratios selected for small-celled diatoms, particularly within the Cyclotella genus. An empirical model showed that a shift in phytoplankton species composition and cell size was consistent within different depth strata, indicating that altered nutrient concentrations were not responsible for the change. The increase in small-celled species was sufficient to decrease the average diatom size and thus sinking velocity, which strongly influences energy transfer through the food web and carbon cycling. Our results show that within the diverse group of diatoms, small-sized species with a high surface area to volume ratio were able to adapt to a decrease in mixing intensity, supporting the hypotheses that abiotic drivers affect the size structure of planktonic communities and that warmer climate favours small-sized diatom cells. PMID:18812287

  9. Lake warming favours small-sized planktonic diatom species.

    PubMed

    Winder, Monika; Reuter, John E; Schladow, S Geoffrey

    2009-02-07

    Diatoms contribute to a substantial portion of primary production in the oceans and many lakes. Owing to their relatively heavy cell walls and high nutrient requirements, planktonic diatoms are expected to decrease with climate warming because of reduced nutrient redistribution and increasing sinking velocities. Using a historical dataset, this study shows that diatoms were able to maintain their biovolume with increasing stratification in Lake Tahoe over the last decades; however, the diatom community structure changed. Increased stratification and reduced nitrogen to phosphorus ratios selected for small-celled diatoms, particularly within the Cyclotella genus. An empirical model showed that a shift in phytoplankton species composition and cell size was consistent within different depth strata, indicating that altered nutrient concentrations were not responsible for the change. The increase in small-celled species was sufficient to decrease the average diatom size and thus sinking velocity, which strongly influences energy transfer through the food web and carbon cycling. Our results show that within the diverse group of diatoms, small-sized species with a high surface area to volume ratio were able to adapt to a decrease in mixing intensity, supporting the hypotheses that abiotic drivers affect the size structure of planktonic communities and that warmer climate favours small-sized diatom cells.

  10. Literacy in an Emergent Society: Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahai, Naihuwo

    Papua New Guinea has made tremendous progress by officially recognizing the value of vernacular languages as a resource in the sociocultural, economic, and political development of the country. Many of the strategies of implementation reflect the peculiarities identified with the current momentum in literacy. The strong lower level involvement in…

  11. Remuneration disparities in Oceania: Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Marai, Leo; Kewibu, Vincent; Kinkin, Elly; Peter Peniop, John; Salini, Christian; Kofana, Genesis

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores the impact of remuneration differences on workers in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. In these countries remunerative differences are linked to government policy (in Papua New Guinea) and job contracts (in the Solomon Islands), and have impacted on industrial relations in both settings (strike action). A total of N = 350 professionals (n = 60 expatriates) from 54 organizations in aid, government, higher education and industry (mean response rate = 36%) responded to an organizational survey form. Remuneration ratios between international and local respondents based on the World Bank's index of purchasing power parity approached 9:1. In both sites staff compared pay and benefits (remuneration) packages: Internationally remunerated staff rated their ability higher than their local counterparts did; locally remunerated groups reported more injustice in remuneration, were more demotivated by the gaps, and were more likely to be thinking about leaving the organization. In-country workshops of N = 40 largely local stakeholders from aid and community organizations plus government ministries considered the survey's findings and recommended: in Solomon Islands, (a) introducing a policy of localization, (b) establishing a remuneration commission (already existent in Papua New Guinea), and (c) reducing the remunerative gap; in Papua New Guinea, (d) reversing the post-Independence "dual pay system" (currently official policy), (e) instituting pay-for-performance, and (f) ensuring the existent localization policy is applied to recruitment, selection, and staff career planning and management.

  12. Folk Opera: Stories Crossing Borders in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haseman, B.; Baldwin, A.; Linthwaite, H.

    2014-01-01

    The Life Drama project is a drama-based sexual health promotion project, developed by a cross-cultural research team in Papua New Guinea (PNG) over the past four years. Recognising the limitations of established theatre-in-education and theatre-for-development approaches when working across cultures, the research team explored ways of tapping into…

  13. Technology-Enhancement for Papua New Guinean Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bino, Vagi; Edmonds-Wathen, Cris

    2014-01-01

    Technology facilitated the implementation of teacher professional learning based on a design of principles to improve the teaching of "Cultural Mathematics" in elementary schools in Papua New Guinea. An offline "website", a set of interlinked resource materials was used in workshops to enhance the professional learning.…

  14. Subsidence of the Gulf of Papua in the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhiyu, Wang; Stein, Carol A.

    1992-05-01

    The Gulf of Papua, between Papua New Guinea and the northeastern Australian margin, contains thick Cenozoic strata. We have examined the subsidence history using data from eight wells in the Gulf of Papua. Four are in the western Gulf region overlying Paleozoic basement and four are in the eastern Gulf near the Aure trough. Backstripping results show two subsidence episodes for the western wells. The first episode, from early Cenozoic to Oligocene, may be due to a small amount of lithospheric stretching associated with the opening of the Coral Sea. The second, from Early Miocene to the present, has a substantially higher subsidence rate which cannot be explained by a Paleocene rifting event. The Late Oligocene-Late Miocene episode of rapid subsidence in the Aure trough, to the east, appears to be a significant factor affecting the subsidence of the western Gulf of Papua during this period. To test this, we computed the expected deflection from flexure due to the load of the Aure trough strata and find a profile similar to that observed. The model used had an effective elastic thickness similar to those for rifted continental margins, thus implying a relatively weak lithosphere. In addition, the predicted position of the forebulge in the western Gulf occurs where Oligocene strata are absent, suggesting post-depositional uplift and hence facilitating the growth of Early Miocene reefs.

  15. Quality Assurance and Assessment in Education in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mel, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Education in Papua New Guinea (PNG) has experienced major shifts and changes over the last decade or so under the National Education Reform. In that context there is recognition for schools to appreciate their local contexts and conditions regarding assessment. The National Educational Department is also aware of the fact that there is need for…

  16. Petroleum scene heating in fledgling crude exporter Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-18

    Operators, paced by a feisty independent based in Port Moresby, have drilled a string of discoveries near the infrastructure of the Kutubu development project that supports Papua New Guinea crude exports. All signs point to the increasing likelihood of good sized -- maybe world class -- oil discoveries that promise to sustain exploration and development interest beyond 2000. Also in the offing are world class gas strikes that eventually could support a liquefied natural gas export project. And integration is the newest concept in Papua New Guinea petroleum. Efforts are under way to build the country's first refineries. Most operators in Papua New Guinea believe thy have merely scratched the surface of the country's oil and gas potential. Thy agree there still will be frustrations and setbacks -- political as well as technical -- but the prevailing opinion is that these problems are no greater than they are in a number of other countries with similar exploration/development potential. The paper discusses the development of Papua New Guinea's oil and gas industry, and exploratory drilling in areas other than Kutubu.

  17. Towards a Language Policy for Education in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, James

    Language role and language policy in education in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are discussed. First, the history of language policy since the turn of the century is chronicled briefly. The present policy of requiring initial literacy education in English is described and its critics cited, and current proposals to provide literacy education in each…

  18. Four new orchid species from the Lengguru fold belt, West Papua, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Juswara, Lina; Schuiteman, André; Droissart, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bulbophyllum leucoglossum, Dendrobium centrosepalum, Dendrobium taeniocaule, and Taeniophyllum pyriforme are here described as new species, based on herbarium specimens collected from the Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt in the West Papua Bird’s neck, Indonesian New Guinea. All four novelties were found growing in submontane forest (elevation > 1000 m a.s.l.) on limestone karst. Information concerning the distribution and habitat for these taxa is provided along with diagnostic features, line drawings, high resolution photographs, and a map of collecting localities. More field studies are required to find additional populations of these new species, in order to better characterize their habitat, ecology and conservation status. PMID:27081349

  19. Seeking treatment for symptomatic malaria in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Malaria places a significant burden on the limited resources of many low income countries. Knowing more about why and where people seek treatment will enable policy makers to better allocate the limited resources. This study aims to better understand what influences treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in one such low-income country context, Papua New Guinea (PNG). Methods Two culturally, linguistically and demographically different regions in PNG were selected as study sites. A cross sectional household survey was undertaken in both sites resulting in the collection of data on 928 individuals who reported suffering from malaria in the previous four weeks. A probit model was then used to identify the factors determining whether or not people sought treatment for presumptive malaria. Multinomial logit models also assisted in identifying the factors that determined where people sought treatments. Results Results in this study build upon findings from other studies. For example, while distance in PNG has previously been seen as the primary factor in influencing whether any sort of treatment will be sought, in this study cultural influences and whether it was the first, second or even third treatment for a particular episode of malaria were also important. In addition, although formal health care facilities were the most popular treatment sources, it was also found that traditional healers were a common choice. In turn, the reasons why participants chose a particular type of treatment differed according to the whether they were seeking an initial or subsequent treatments. Conclusions Simply bringing health services closer to where people live may not always result in a greater use of formal health care facilities. Policy makers in PNG need to consider within-country variation in treatment-seeking behaviour, the important role of traditional healers and also ensure that the community fully understands the potential implications of not seeking treatment for

  20. The Changing Face of Librarianship in Papua New Guinea: Libraries for Life in the Papua New Guinea Information Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obi, Margaret J.

    "Libraries for life" in Papua New Guinea today is not an impossible goal to strive for to achieve with today's new and old information and communication technologies. However, in order for this to happen, a number of questions will need to be asked. There are three that need immediate attention: (1) What is an "information…

  1. A prospective survey of cases of complications of induced abortion presenting to Goroka Hospital, Papua New Guinea, 2011.

    PubMed

    Asa, Isaac; de Costa, Caroline; Mola, Glen

    2012-10-01

    Induced abortion on demand or for socio-economic indications is illegal in Papua New Guinea under the 1974 Criminal Code. Nevertheless, the procedure is known to be widely practised. This prospective study examines the demographic and medical features of women presenting with complications of induced abortion to Goroka Hospital in a 6-month period. It was noted that abortion was most commonly induced using the synthetic prostaglandin analogue misoprostol. Although illegal induced abortion cannot be condoned, it appears that misoprostol, much safer in this context than mechanical or traditional herbal methods, is now being widely used for the purpose of induced abortion in Papua New Guinea, as it is in other developing countries.

  2. Health-Related Research Projects in Fiji and Papua New Guinea: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Fiji and Papua New Guinea Health Research Portals.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Kannan; Gowri, S

    2016-06-10

    Evidence-based medicine and evidence-based public health rely on the best available evidence generated in a specific area for it to be implemented in healthcare practice. This study assesses the range of research studies conducted in Fiji and Papua New Guinea (PNG) islands by reviewing the types of studies now registered with the respective health research registry portals. We assessed all studies registered on the Fiji Health Research Portal (FHRP) and Papua New Guinea Health Research Portal (PNGHRP) since 2014 for the following details: year of registration; study type and participants; field of research; basic statistical analyses; and multicentric or single center study. A total of 99 studies were registered in the FHRP and 6 in PNGHRP during the period under review. Nearly, one fourth of the studies from Fiji and one third from PNG islands are studies evaluating various health policies without involving or collecting data from human subjects. All the registered studies in both the islands were observational (rather than experimental). A total of 58.2% of the registered studies in FHRP and 66.7% in PNGHRP were performed as student projects. A geographic scope of 21.2% of the proposed studies in FHRP and 33.3% in PNGHRP was limited to the respective islands. We conclude from the present analysis that there is a clear need for conducting more high-quality research in both Fiji and PNG in order to meet the health needs of the respective nations. More research focusing on health needs and contributing factors to both communicable and noncommunicable diseases are the need of the hour in both of these south Pacific islands.

  3. The veil of ignorance can favour biological cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Queller, David C.; Strassmann, Joan E.

    2013-01-01

    Lack of information is a constraint but ignorance can sometimes assist the evolution of cooperation by constraining selfishness. We discuss examples involving both ignorance of role or pay-off and ignorance of relatedness. Ignorance can favour cooperative traits like grouping and warning coloration and reduce conflicts from meiotic drive, imprinting, greenbeards and various forms of nepotism. PMID:24132090

  4. Inappropriate feeding practice favors the transmission of Trichinella papuae from wild pigs to saltwater crocodiles in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Pozio, Edoardo; Owen, Ifor L; Marucci, Gianluca; La Rosa, Giuseppe

    2005-02-28

    The recent discovery of Trichinella zimbabwensis in farmed crocodiles (Crocodilus niloticus) of Zimbabwe and its ability to infect mammals, and the development of both T. zimbabwensis and Trichinella papuae in experimentally infected reptiles led to an investigation of Trichinella infection in saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) and in wild pigs (Sus scrofa) of Papua New Guinea, to see if T. papuae also, is present in both cold- and warm-blooded animals. Of 222 crocodiles examined, 47 animals (21.2%), all from Kikori, Gulf Province, were positive for non-encapsulated larvae in the muscles. The greatest number of larvae was found usually in the biceps, with an average of 7 larvae/g. One isolate from a crocodile infected successfully both laboratory rats and mice. Of 81 wild pigs examined, 9 from Bensbach river area (Western Province) and 1 from Kikori area (Gulf Province) were positive for non-encapsulated larvae in the muscles. Trichinella larvae from both saltwater crocodiles and wild pigs have been identified by multiplex-PCR analysis as T. papuae. The sequence analysis of the region within the large subunit ribosomal DNA, known as the expansion segment V, has shown the presence of a molecular marker distinguishing T. papuae isolates of Bensbach river area from those of Kikori area. This marker could be useful to trace back the geographical origin of the infected animal. The epidemiological investigation carried out in the Kikori area has shown that local people catch young crocodiles in the wild and keep them in holding pens for several months, before sending them to the crocodile farm in Lae (Morobe Province). They feed the crocodiles primarily with wild pig meat bought at the local market and also with fish. These results stress the importance of using artificial digestion for routinely screening of swine and crocodiles, and of adopting measures for preventing the spread of infection, such as the proper disposal of carcasses and the adequate freezing of

  5. Arthritis in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Pile, K D; Richens, J E; Laurent, R M; Bhatia, K; Prasad, M L; Lupiwa, T; Hudson, B J; Tapsall, J; McPetrie, R

    1993-01-01

    Acute polyarthritis is an important cause of morbidity in many tropical countries. Classification has often been difficult, with the term tropical polyarthritis used for those in whom a diagnosis could not be made. The implication that this is a distinct entity is probably incorrect, with likely causes being septic arthritis or post-infective reactive arthritis. This study aimed to determine the types of arthritis found in 43 patients (30 men) presenting consecutively to the Goroka Base Hospital in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Gonococcal arthritis was diagnosed in eight patients (six men) on the basis of isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the joint aspirate. In all cases the N gonorrhoeae was identified by the closed culture system on chocolate agar, but not always by routine plating. There were no specific clinical features that identified patients with a gonococcal septic arthritis. The remaining 34 patients had an undifferentiated oligoarthritis. The pattern of arthritis in men and women was of a lower limb pauciarticular arthritis with a predilection for the knee and ankle joints. A total of 30% of male patients had a history of urethral discharge and 44% of all patients had preceding diarrhoea. Arthritis was the only feature in 59% of patients and in 32% there was an associated enthesitis. In this study most patients had an oligoarthritis consistent with a reactive arthritis or a septic arthritis due to N gonorrhoeae. Broth inoculation of synovial fluid was the best method to isolate N gonorrhoeae, with standard methods for gonococcal isolation failing in some patients. It is recommended that the term 'tropical polyarthritis' is no longer used as it does not refer to a specific entity but consists of several known arthritides.

  6. Maternal Health Phone Line: Saving Women in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Amanda H.A.; Sabumei, Gaius; Mola, Glen; Iedema, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research project which has involved the establishment of a maternal health phone line in Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Mobile phones and landline phones are key information and communication technologies (ICTs). This research study uses the “ICTs for healthcare development” model to ascertain benefits and barriers to the successful implementation of the Childbirth Emergency Phone. PNG has a very high maternal mortality rate. The “three stages of delay” typology was developed by Thaddeus and Maine to determine factors that might delay provision of appropriate medical treatment and hence increase risk of maternal death. The “three stages of delay” typology has been utilised in various developing countries and also in the present study. Research undertaken has involved semi-structured interviews with health workers, both in rural settings and in the labour ward in Alotau. Additional data has been gathered through focus groups with health workers, analysis of notes made during phone calls, interviews with women and community leaders, observations and field visits. One hundred percent of interviewees (n = 42) said the project helped to solve communication barriers between rural health workers and Alotau Provincial Hospital. Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews. The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications. The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges. PMID:25923199

  7. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Sibson, R. H.; Renner, J.; Toy, V. G.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we introduce work which aims assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ1 - σ3) and σ3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ3' under constant σ1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ1 , ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we also experimentally explore the reshear of natural pseudotachylytes (PSTs) from two different fault zones; the Gole Larghe Fault, Adamello, Italy in which the PSTs are in relatively isotropic Tonalite (at lab sample scale) and the Alpine Fault, New Zealand in which the PSTs are in highly anisotropic foliated shist. We test whether PSTs will reshear in both rock types under the right conditions, or whether new fractures in the wall rock will form in preference to reactivating the PST (PST shear strength is higher than that of the host rock). Are PSTs representative of one slip event?

  8. Immunofluorescence assay method to detect dengue virus in Paniai-Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucipto, Teguh Hari; Ahwanah, Nur Laila Fitriati; Churrotin, Siti; Matake, Norifumi; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Soegijanto, Soegeng

    2016-03-01

    The dengue viruses (DENV), which include in the family Flaviviridae and the genus Flavivirus, was endemic in tropical areas and had been transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti. An increasing number of immigrants from endemic areas to the non-endemic areas have emphasized the need for a simple and reliable test for the diagnosis of dengue virus infection. The purpose of this study was to detect the dengue virus by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in the general population at Paniai-Papua. The results obtained from this study had showed a significantly better discrimination for DENV specific IgG antibodies. A total of 158 samples, 116 samples were IgG antibodies positive and 42 samples were negative. The conclusion of this study, Papua is not only a malaria endemic area, but also dengue virus infections were detected by IFA method. Therefore, the IFA can be used as an important diagnostic tool, which is a quick and an easy way to test samples from immigrants who come to the non-endemic areas.

  9. Population structure and phylogeography of the Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) across the Scotia Arc.

    PubMed

    Levy, Hila; Clucas, Gemma V; Rogers, Alex D; Leaché, Adam D; Ciborowski, Kate L; Polito, Michael J; Lynch, Heather J; Dunn, Michael J; Hart, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Climate change, fisheries' pressure on penguin prey, and direct human disturbance of wildlife have all been implicated in causing large shifts in the abundance and distribution of penguins in the Southern Ocean. Without mark-recapture studies, understanding how colonies form and, by extension, how ranges shift is challenging. Genetic studies, particularly focused on newly established colonies, provide a snapshot of colonization and can reveal the extent to which shifts in abundance and occupancy result from changes in demographic rates (e.g., reproduction and survival) or migration among suitable patches of habitat. Here, we describe the population structure of a colonial seabird breeding across a large latitudinal range in the Southern Ocean. Using multilocus microsatellite genotype data from 510 Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) individuals from 14 colonies along the Scotia Arc and Antarctic Peninsula, together with mitochondrial DNA data, we find strong genetic differentiation between colonies north and south of the Polar Front, that coincides geographically with the taxonomic boundary separating the subspecies P. p. papua and P. p. ellsworthii. Using a discrete Bayesian phylogeographic approach, we show that southern Gentoos expanded from a possible glacial refuge in the center of their current range, colonizing regions to the north and south through rare, long-distance dispersal. Our findings show that this dispersal is important for new colony foundation and range expansion in a seabird species that ordinarily exhibits high levels of natal philopatry, though persistent oceanographic features serve as barriers to movement.

  10. Time trend of malaria in relation to climate variability in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Kolam, Joel; Inape, Kasis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to describe the regional malaria incidence in relation to the geographic and climatic conditions and describe the effect of altitude on the expansion of malaria over the last decade in Papua New Guinea. Methods Malaria incidence was estimated in five provinces from 1996 to 2008 using national health surveillance data. Time trend of malaria incidence was compared with rainfall and minimum/maximum temperature. In the Eastern Highland Province, time trend of malaria incidence over the study period was stratified by altitude. Spatio-temporal pattern of malaria was analyzed. Results Nationwide, malaria incidence was stationary. Regionally, the incidence increased markedly in the highland region (292.0/100000/yr, p =0.021), and remained stationary in the other regions. Seasonality of the malaria incidence was related with rainfall. Decreasing incidence of malaria was associated with decreasing rainfall in the southern coastal region, whereas it was not evident in the northern coastal region. In the Eastern Highland Province, malaria incidence increased in areas below 1700 m, with the rate of increase being steeper at higher altitudes. Conclusions Increasing trend of malaria incidence was prominent in the highland region of Papua New Guinea, while long-term trend was dependent upon baseline level of rainfall in coastal regions. PMID:26987606

  11. Transmission dynamics of Wuchereria bancrofti in East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bockarie, M; Kazura, J; Alexander, N; Dagoro, H; Bockarie, F; Perry, R; Alpers, M

    1996-06-01

    Bancroftian filariasis is endemic in many areas of Papua New Guinea. This study describes the entomologic indices of transmission near Dreikikir in East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea. A total of 1,735 culicine mosquitoes, including Culex and Mansonia species, were dissected, but none were infected with filarial larvae. In contrast, Anopheles punctulatus and An. koliensis were found to be potential vectors: 7.3% of Anopheles were infected and the mean number of first- to third-stage larvae per infected mosquito was 2.7. Transmission indices varied significantly in five villages located within a 50-km radius of each other. Annual biting rates ranged from 4,789 to 48,020 bites/person/year; annual infective biting rates from 15 to 836/person/year; and annual transmission potential from 31 to 2,340 third-stage larvae/person/year. Monthly transmission potential and monthly infective biting rate varied significantly in each village, with the highest indices of transmission observed in villages nearest sites where puddles formed in river beds during the dry season. These data indicate that there is small area variation in the intensity and temporal pattern of filariasis transmission and that culicine mosquitoes are not important vectors of W. bancrofti in this area.

  12. Lake Murray, Fly and Strickland River Basins, Papua, New Guinea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Lake Murray, a manmade reservoir, lies between the Fly and Strickland River Basins, Papua, New Guinea (7.0S, 141.5E). The region, photographed in sunglint, shows the water level in the reservoir and the full extent of the drainage basins of both river systems as the rivers meander through wide alluvial floodplains. Some forest clearing can be seen in places throughout the region, but most of the area remains in closed canopy forest.

  13. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Renner, J.; Sibson, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus, both in dry and saturated conditions. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ_1 - σ_3) and σ_3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ_3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ_3' under constant σ_1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ_1, ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we explore reshear conditions under an initial condition of (σ_1' = σ_3'), then inducing reshear on the existing fault first by increasing σ_1'(load-strengthening), then by decreasing σ_3' (load-weakening), again comparing relative damage zone development and acoustic emission levels. In saturated experiments, we explore the values of pore fluid pressure (P_f) needed for re-shear to occur in preference to the formation of a new fault. Typically a limiting factor in conventional triaxial experiments performed in compression is that P_f cannot exceed the confining pressure (σ_2 and σ_3). By employing a sample assembly that allows deformation while the loading piston is in extension, it enables us to achieve pore pressures in

  14. Linguistic and Cultural Variations as Barriers to the TEFL Settings in Papua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yembise, Yohana Susana

    2011-01-01

    The article aims at presenting a description of languages and cultures and the effect on the teaching of English as a Foreign Language in schools in Papua. It starts with a general picture of the uniqueness of languages and cultures in Papua: its geography, the originality of the people, and the languages and cultures of both NAN and AN. The word…

  15. Introducing the Chemical Industry into the Science Curriculum in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponnamperuma, A. C. W.; Palmer, W. P.

    1987-01-01

    Papua New Guinea is a young, developing nation, achieving independence in 1975. Industries which can be classified as chemical industries by western standards, are almost non-existent in Papua New Guinea. As yet, most of the raw materials it produces are exported to other countries to be processed or manufactured into useful products. However,…

  16. The Work of Glendon Lean on the Counting Systems of Papua New Guinea and Oceania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Kay

    2001-01-01

    Introduces data collated by Glendon Lean on nearly 900 counting systems in Papua New Guinea, Oceania, and Irian Jaya (West Papua) which came from a questionnaire completed by students and talks with village elders. Lean's thesis on the spontaneous developments of these ancient cultures challenged traditional theories describing the spread of…

  17. Investigations of selected pathogens among village pigs in Central Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, Widi; Cargill, Colin Frank; Putra, I Made; Kirkwood, Roy Neville; Trott, Darren John; Salasia, Siti Isrina Oktavia; Slipranata, Mitra; Reichel, Michael Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Village pig husbandry is an important part of livestock production in Papua Province, Eastern Indonesia. However, high level of disease and mortality constrains production. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the selected pathogens in village pigs in the Jayawijaya Region of Papua Province, Indonesia. Two studies were conducted: Study 1 determined the prevalence of selected pathogens in dead or moribund pigs sent to the main local market for sale. Study 2 recorded the prevalence of the selected pathogens, on pig farms in the Subdistrict of Wamena that had not recorded a case of pig mortality during the duration of Study 1. Blood samples of individuals from both groups were tested for CSF antigen and antibody, as well as antibody against PCV2. Organs with evident pathological changes from Study 1 and tonsilar swabs from Study 2 were subjected to bacteriological culture and identification of Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Faecal samples from both studies were examined for eggs of strongyle parasites, Trichuris suis, Ascaris suum, Strongyloides ransomi and coccidia. The main infections in both studies were CSF, PCV2 and strongyle parasites, but prevalence was higher in Study 1 (P < 0.05). T. suis and S. zooepidemicus were prevalent in pigs in Study 1, but rare in healthy pigs (P < 0.05). Infections with coccidia, A. suum and S. ransomi were common but did not differ between groups (P < 0.05), with S. suis infections uncommon in both studies. This suggests that infections with CSF, PCV2, strongyle and T. suis are important pathogens in village pig farms in Jayawijaya. Local pig husbandry practices, such as confining pigs and heat-treating pig feeds, may be practical solutions to help minimize infection in village pigs in Jayawijaya.

  18. Cryptic female choice via sperm dumping favours male copulatory courtship in a spider.

    PubMed

    Peretti, A V; Eberhard, W G

    2010-02-01

    Males of many animals perform 'copulatory courtship' during copulation, but the possible reproductive significance of this behaviour has seldom been investigated. In some animals, including the spider Physocyclus globosus (Pholcidae), the female discards sperm during or immediately following some copulations. In this study, we determined which of several variables associated with copulation correlated with paternity success in P. globosus when two males mate with a single female. Then, by determining which of these variables also correlated with sperm dumping, we inferred which variables may affect paternity via the mechanism of sperm dumping. Male abdomen vibration (a copulatory courtship behaviour) and male genitalic squeezing both correlated with both paternity and sperm dumping; so, these traits may be favoured by biased sperm dumping. Biased sperm dumping may also be the mechanism by which possible cryptic female choice favours another male trait that was the subject of a previous study, responsiveness to female stridulation.

  19. Arguments in favour of compulsory treatment of opioid dependence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zunyou

    2013-02-01

    Twelve agencies of the United Nations, including the World Health Organization, have issued a joint statement that calls on Member States to replace the compulsory detention of people who use opioids in treatment centres with voluntary, evidence-informed and rights-based health and social services. The arguments in favour of this position fall into three broad categories: Compulsory treatment centres infringe on an individual's liberty, they put human beings at risk of harm, and evidence of their effectiveness against opioid dependence has not been generated. The United Nations statement underscores that although countries apply different criteria for sending individuals to compulsory treatment centres, detention often takes place without due process, legal safeguards or judicial review. This clearly violates internationally recognized human rights standards. Furthermore, people who are committed to these centres are often exposed to physical and sexual violence, forced labour and sub-standard living conditions. They are often denied health care, despite their heightened vulnerability to HIV infection and tuberculosis. Finally, there is no evidence, according to the statement, that these centres offer an environment that is conducive to recovery from opioid dependence or to the rehabilitation of commercial sex workers or of children who have suffered sexual exploitation, abuse or lack of care and protection. The author of this paper sets forth several arguments that counter the position taken by the United Nations and argues in favour of compulsory treatment within a broader harm reduction strategy aimed at protecting society as well as the individual concerned.

  20. Global health diplomacy, national integration, and regional development through the monitoring and evaluation of HIV/ AIDS programs in Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, and Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Kevany, Sebastian; Gildea, Amy; Garae, Caleb; Moa, Serafi; Lautusi, Avaia

    2015-01-01

    The South Pacific countries of Vanuatu, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea have ascended rapidly up the development spectrum in recent years, refining an independent and post-colonial economic and political identity that enhances their recognition on the world stage. All three countries have overcome economic, political and public health challenges in order to stake their claim to sovereignty. In this regard, the contributions of national and international programs for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS, with specific reference to their monitoring and evaluation (M&E) aspects, have contributed not just to public health, but also to broader political and diplomatic goals such as ‘nation-building’. This perspective describes the specific contributions of global health programs to the pursuit of national integration, development, and regional international relations, in Vanuatu, Samoa and Papua New Guinea, respectively, based on in-country M&E activities on behalf of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis (TB) and Malaria and the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) during 2014 and 2015. Key findings include: (1) that global health programs contribute to non-health goals; (2) that HIV/AIDS programs promote international relations, decentralized development, and internal unity; (3) that arguments in favour of the maintenance and augmentation of global health funding may be enhanced on this basis; and (4) that "smart" global health approaches have been successful in South Pacific countries. PMID:26029892

  1. Global health diplomacy, national integration, and regional development through the monitoring and evaluation of HIV/AIDS programs in Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, and Samoa.

    PubMed

    Kevany, Sebastian; Gildea, Amy; Garae, Caleb; Moa, Serafi; Lautusi, Avaia

    2015-04-27

    The South Pacific countries of Vanuatu, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea have ascended rapidly up the development spectrum in recent years, refining an independent and post-colonial economic and political identity that enhances their recognition on the world stage. All three countries have overcome economic, political and public health challenges in order to stake their claim to sovereignty. In this regard, the contributions of national and international programs for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS, with specific reference to their monitoring and evaluation (M&E) aspects, have contributed not just to public health, but also to broader political and diplomatic goals such as 'nation-building'. This perspective describes the specific contributions of global health programs to the pursuit of national integration, development, and regional international relations, in Vanuatu, Samoa and Papua New Guinea, respectively, based on in-country M&E activities on behalf of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis (TB) and Malaria and the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) during 2014 and 2015. Key findings include: (1) that global health programs contribute to non-health goals; (2) that HIV/AIDS programs promote international relations, decentralized development, and internal unity; (3) that arguments in favour of the maintenance and augmentation of global health funding may be enhanced on this basis; and (4) that "smart" global health approaches have been successful in South Pacific countries.

  2. Nursing accounting competencies related to HIV in a Papua New Guinea context.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair M

    2013-01-01

    Nursing administration is an important part of the campaign to eliminate HIV across Papua New Guinea (PNG). This paper considers the critical importance of developing nursing leadership in effective accounting competencies in relation to HIV projects in PNG. The results of the study's textual analysis of audit reports of the Auditor General of PNG revealed a failure on the part of PNG's main health agencies involved with its national HIV program to provide competent financial reporting. In light of these results, this study shows how improving accounting and other financial competencies among nursing leaders would benefit the implementation of the PNG HIV national strategy. The findings of this study have implications not only for the internal control of HIV nursing competencies but also for nursing leadership related to HIV issues in a developing-country context.

  3. Persistence as the path from motivation to performance in the Papua New Guinea health sector.

    PubMed

    Elich, Luke

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers how the individual capacity states of motivation, confidence, skill and ability relate to performance, and identifies a crucial role for the discretionary behaviour of individuals: specifically, employee persistence and innovation. The study Understanding the people and performance link: unlocking the black box undertaken by Purcell and colleagues is relied upon in constructing a theoretical framework for the conceptual interrelationships between performance and the human-resource-mediating variables, which is then applied within the Papua New Guinea (PNG) health sector context. The study by Purcell and colleagues, which was informed by organizations with well-developed and functioning human resource policies and practices, is distinguished from the PNG health sector, where human resource frameworks are largely ineffective--yet it is determined that the importance of 'discretionary behaviour' relative to performance, whilst varied, is undiminished.

  4. Masculinity, mental health and Violence in Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Fiji and Kiribati.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Graham

    2007-09-01

    This paper presents the findings of a four country study conducted by the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific-International through its affiliates in Fiji Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea and Kiribati to demonstrate the linkage between young men, mental health and violence in the Pacific. The findings common among the four studies arise from the sociocultural and economic transitions occurring across the Pacific Region, where recent years have shown that the Pacific lifestyle has become increasingly stressful and violent. Limited opportunity to participate in the modern lifestyle and its economy has led to personal mental stress, social exclusion, unemployment and the growth of a subgroup of disaffected young people, who resort to a range of means to acquire their daily needs and, among whom, the norms that govern the use of violence differ from those of the general community.

  5. Taeniasis/cysticercosis in Papua (Irian Jaya), Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Margono, Sri S; Wandra, Toni; Swasono, Meutia F; Murni, Sri; Craig, Philip S; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Reports showed that an important parasitic zoonotic disease caused by Taenia solium, Taenia saginata and Taenia asiatica is found endemic in several areas of Indonesia including Papua, Bali and North Sumatra. At present it is known that the highest prevalence of taeniasis/cysticercosis in Indonesia, caused by T. solium is among the indigenous communities in Papua (formerly Irian Jaya). In the early 1970s, 8-9% of stool samples from the Enarotali hospital, Paniai District (Irian Jaya) were found positive with Taenia eggs. The samples were from members of the Ekari (Kapauku) ethnic group. Stool samples from the Moni ethnic group, living east of surrounding lakes, were egg negative. Cysticerci of T. solium were discovered in pigs. During the years 1973-1976 cases of burns increased and were ultimately found to be primarily associated with epileptic seizures induced by neurocysticercosis cases. Among 257 cases of burns, 88 cases (62.8%) were suffering from epileptic seizures before or during hospitalization. In the year 1981 T. solium seropositive persons were mostly (16%) found in the endemic Obano village. In 1997 the parasite was discovered in Jayawijaya District, which is located approximately 250 km east of Paniai District. During 1991-1995, a local health center in Assologaima, Jayawijaya District reported 1120 new cases with burns and a further 293 new cases of epileptic seizures among 15,939 inhabitants. The histopathologic appearance and mitochondrial DNA analysis found the cysts to be similar to those of T. solium from other regions of the world. Sensitive and specific serological diagnostic methods were used and improved. Cysticerci were detected in dogs, as well as in pigs. A coproantigen test for detection of adult tapeworms in patients was carried out. Medical treatment with praziquantel for taeniasis and albendazole for cysticercosis (with prednisone and sodium phenytoin treatment in cases with neurocysticercosis) was undertaken. Lifestyle, religion, and

  6. Climate change and habitat conversion favour the same species.

    PubMed

    Frishkoff, Luke O; Karp, Daniel S; Flanders, Jon R; Zook, Jim; Hadly, Elizabeth A; Daily, Gretchen C; M'Gonigle, Leithen K

    2016-09-01

    Land-use change and climate change are driving a global biodiversity crisis. Yet, how species' responses to climate change are correlated with their responses to land-use change is poorly understood. Here, we assess the linkages between climate and land-use change on birds in Neotropical forest and agriculture. Across > 300 species, we show that affiliation with drier climates is associated with an ability to persist in and colonise agriculture. Further, species shift their habitat use along a precipitation gradient: species prefer forest in drier regions, but use agriculture more in wetter zones. Finally, forest-dependent species that avoid agriculture are most likely to experience decreases in habitable range size if current drying trends in the Neotropics continue as predicted. This linkage suggests a synergy between the primary drivers of biodiversity loss. Because they favour the same species, climate and land-use change will likely homogenise biodiversity more severely than otherwise anticipated.

  7. Bottle-feeding legislation in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J

    1980-02-01

    Research in Papua New Guinea and elsewhere in the developing world has indicted the dangers of bottle feeding infants. Following a failure to obtain the voluntary agreement of shopkeepers to restrict sales of infant-feeding bottles and teats, legislation was passed which placed these items on prescription. In order to obtain a prescription certain conditions have to be satisfied. A follow-up survey which was carried out in Port Moresby two years after the introduction of legislation indicated a significant decline in the extent of bottle feeding.

  8. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, F L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an ‘obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their

  9. Historical Analysis of Population Reactions to Stimuli - Case Studies of Papua and Papua New Guinea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Irian and the associated tensions with Indonesia over the issue of refugees and border incursions. From 1990 to 1993 there was a breakdown in law and...independent Indonesia , at the 1949 United Nations (UN) Round table agreements all NEI territory in the region except for WNG was handed to the new... Indonesia . WNG was to remain a Dutch colony. In the same year the Constitution of the Government of Netherlands New Guinea was established. In the

  10. Compaction of forest soil by logging machinery favours occurrence of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schnurr-Pütz, Silvia; Bååth, Erland; Guggenberger, Georg; Drake, Harold L; Küsel, Kirsten

    2006-12-01

    Soil compaction caused by passage of logging machinery reduces the soil air capacity. Changed abiotic factors might induce a change in the soil microbial community and favour organisms capable of tolerating anoxic conditions. The goals of this study were to resolve differences between soil microbial communities obtained from wheel-tracks (i.e. compacted) and their adjacent undisturbed sites, and to evaluate differences in potential anaerobic microbial activities of these contrasting soils. Soil samples obtained from compacted soil had a greater bulk density and a higher pH than uncompacted soil. Analyses of phospholipid fatty acids demonstrated that the eukaryotic/prokaryotic ratio in compacted soils was lower than that of uncompacted soils, suggesting that fungi were not favoured by the in situ conditions produced by compaction. Indeed, most-probable-number (MPN) estimates of nitrous oxide-producing denitrifiers, acetate- and lactate-utilizing iron and sulfate reducers, and methanogens were higher in compacted than in uncompacted soils obtained from one site that had large differences in bulk density. Compacted soils from this site yielded higher iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic potentials than did uncompacted soils. MPN estimates of H2-utilizing acetogens in compacted and uncompacted soils were similar. These results indicate that compaction of forest soil alters the structure and function of the soil microbial community and favours occurrence of prokaryotes.

  11. Surveillance and molecular characterization of group A rotaviruses in Goroka, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Paul Francis; Luang-Suarkia, Dagwin; Bebes, Sauli; Boniface, Karen; Datta, Siddhartha Sankar; Siba, Peter Max; Kirkwood, Carl Dunn

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular epidemiology of group A rotaviruses in cases of acute gastroenteritis in Goroka, Papua New Guinea. From April 2008 through November 2010, 813 diarrheal stool samples were collected from children < 5 years of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis. Rotavirus antigen was detected in 31.2% of samples using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Genotyping revealed the presence of the globally circulating strains G1P[8] (50.0%), G3P[8] (23.0%), and G2P[4] (8.2%). The globally emerging strains G9 and G12 were detected in 1.2% and 6.1% of samples, respectively. Mixed infections were detected in a high proportion of samples (11.9%), with 9.0% and 3.7% of samples displaying multiple G and P genotypes, respectively.

  12. CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 variation and HIV/AIDS in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Mehlotra, Rajeev K; Hall, Noemi B; Bruse, Shannon E; John, Bangan; Blood Zikursh, Melinda J; Stein, Catherine M; Siba, Peter M; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphisms in chemokine receptors, serving as HIV co-receptors, and their ligands are among the well-known host genetic factors associated with susceptibility to HIV infection and/or disease progression. Papua New Guinea (PNG) has one of the highest adult HIV prevalences in the Asia-Pacific region. However, information regarding the distribution of polymorphisms in chemokine receptor (CCR5, CCR2) and chemokine (CXCL12) genes in PNG is very limited. In this study, we genotyped a total of nine CCR2-CCR5 polymorphisms, including CCR2 190G >A, CCR5 -2459G >A and Δ32, and CXCL12 801G >A in PNG (n=258), North America (n=184), and five countries in West Africa (n=178). Using this data, we determined previously characterized CCR5 haplotypes. In addition, based on the previously reported associations of CCR2 190, CCR5 -2459, CCR5 open reading frame, and CXCL12 801 genotypes with HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, we calculated composite full risk scores, considering both protective as well as susceptibility effects of the CXCL12 801 AA genotype. We observed a very high frequency of the CCR5 -2459A allele (0.98) in the PNG population, which together with the absence of Δ32 resulted in a very high frequency of the HHE haplotype (0.92). These frequencies were significantly higher than in any other population (all P-values<0.001). Regardless of whether we considered the CXCL12 801 AA genotype protective or susceptible, the risk scores were significantly higher in the PNG population compared with any other population (all P-values<0.001). The results of this study provide new insights regarding CCR5 variation in the PNG population, and suggest that the collective variation in CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 may increase the risk of HIV/AIDS in a large majority of Papua New Guineans.

  13. Eviota brahmi n. sp. from Papua New Guinea, with a redescription of Eviota nigriventris (Teleostei: Gobiidae).

    PubMed

    Greenfield, David W; Tornabene, Luke

    2014-04-28

    Greenfield & Randall (2011) described the gobiid fishes Eviota dorsogilva from Fiji and E. dorsopurpurea from Papua New Guinea as new species in what they termed the Eviota nigriventris complex. They also extended the range of E. nigriventris, type locality Banda Sea, to Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea. In the present paper, we describe their misidentified E. nigriventris from Papua New Guinea as a new species, E. brahmi, and redescribe E. nigriventris based on new material from near the type locality. The four species of this complex differ mainly in coloration, but are also shown to be distinct using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  14. Mother tongue-based bilingual education in Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Susan; Paraide, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG), an independent state in the southwest Pacific, is the most linguistically diverse country in the world. Its roughly six million people speak over 800 distinct languages. In spite of this diversity, in 1995 the Papua New Guinean government established a mother tongue-based bilingual education programme in which community languages are taught as a subject and used for instruction in the first three years of formal education. English is introduced as a subject in the third year of school and becomes one of the languages of instruction, with the community language, in early primary. In grades seven and eight, teachers use only English for instruction, although community languages can still be used informally. By the early 2000s, over 400 languages were being used in PNG's formal education system. This paper describes the background to PNG's bilingual education programme, then provides an overview of its main features and the positive outcomes as well as the problems encountered since it was initiated 15 years ago.

  15. Have historical climate changes affected Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) populations in Antarctica?

    PubMed

    Peña M, Fabiola; Poulin, Elie; Dantas, Gisele P M; González-Acuña, Daniel; Petry, Maria Virginia; Vianna, Juliana A

    2014-01-01

    The West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) has been suffering an increase in its atmospheric temperature during the last 50 years, mainly associated with global warming. This increment of temperature trend associated with changes in sea-ice dynamics has an impact on organisms, affecting their phenology, physiology and distribution range. For instance, rapid demographic changes in Pygoscelis penguins have been reported over the last 50 years in WAP, resulting in population expansion of sub-Antarctic Gentoo penguin (P. papua) and retreat of Antarctic Adelie penguin (P. adeliae). Current global warming has been mainly associated with human activities; however these climate trends are framed in a historical context of climate changes, particularly during the Pleistocene, characterized by an alternation between glacial and interglacial periods. During the last maximal glacial (LGM∼21,000 BP) the ice sheet cover reached its maximum extension on the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP), causing local extinction of Antarctic taxa, migration to lower latitudes and/or survival in glacial refugia. We studied the HRVI of mtDNA and the nuclear intron βfibint7 of 150 individuals of the WAP to understand the demographic history and population structure of P. papua. We found high genetic diversity, reduced population genetic structure and a signature of population expansion estimated around 13,000 BP, much before the first paleocolony fossil records (∼1,100 BP). Our results suggest that the species may have survived in peri-Antarctic refugia such as South Georgia and North Sandwich islands and recolonized the Antarctic Peninsula and South Shetland Islands after the ice sheet retreat.

  16. Evolution of trust and trustworthiness: social awareness favours personality differences.

    PubMed

    McNamara, John M; Stephens, Philip A; Dall, Sasha R X; Houston, Alasdair I

    2009-02-22

    Interest in the evolution and maintenance of personality is burgeoning. Individuals of diverse animal species differ in their aggressiveness, fearfulness, sociability and activity. Strong trade-offs, mutation-selection balance, spatio-temporal fluctuations in selection, frequency dependence and good-genes mate choice are invoked to explain heritable personality variation, yet for continuous behavioural traits, it remains unclear which selective force is likely to maintain distinct polymorphisms. Using a model of trust and cooperation, we show how allowing individuals to monitor each other's cooperative tendencies, at a cost, can select for heritable polymorphisms in trustworthiness. This variation, in turn, favours costly 'social awareness' in some individuals. Feedback of this sort can explain the individual differences in trust and trustworthiness so often documented by economists in experimental public goods games across a range of cultures. Our work adds to growing evidence that evolutionary game theorists can no longer afford to ignore the importance of real world inter-individual variation in their models.

  17. Predators favour mimicry in a tropical reef fish.

    PubMed

    Caley, M Julian; Schluter, Dolph

    2003-04-07

    Batesian mimicry evolves when the 'umbrella' of protection provided by resemblance to a conspicuous unpalatable model species is sufficient to overcome increased predation risk associated with greater conspicuousness. However, the shape and extent of this umbrella, that is, how the level of protection provided by mimicry changes with degree of resemblance between model and mimic, is poorly known. We investigated the response of wild predatory fishes to plastic replicas of a model-mimic species pair of tropical reef fishes, Canthigaster valentini (a toxic pufferfish, the model) and Paraluteres prionurus (the putative mimic), and additional replicas with progressively lower degrees of resemblance to the mimic species. Our results reveal a relatively broad region of protection, indicated by a reduced approach rate by piscivorous fishes, surrounding the colour pattern of the model species. Protection increased with increasing resemblance. By contrast, the response of non-piscivorous fishes was unrelated to degree of resemblance of replicas to the model. Our results suggest that piscivorous fishes on the reef are educated regarding the toxicity of C. valentini, and that avoidance of fish having the pufferfish colour pattern has generated selection favouring mimetic resemblance by the palatable P. prionurus. The relatively broad protective umbrella has probably facilitated the initial evolution of resemblance in the palatable prey species despite the potential hazards of greater conspicuousness.

  18. Partner switching can favour cooperation in a biological market.

    PubMed

    Schwagmeyer, P L

    2014-09-01

    Intraspecific cooperation and interspecific mutualisms can be promoted by mechanisms that reduce the frequency with which cooperative organisms are exploited by unhelpful partners. One such mechanism consists of changing partners after interacting with an uncooperative individual. I used McNamara et al.'s (Nature, 451, 2008, 189) partner switching model as a framework to examine whether this mechanism can select for increased cooperative investment by house sparrows (Passer domesticus) collaborating to rear offspring; previous research on this species has shown that substantial cooperative investments by both pair members are required to achieve high pay-offs from collaborating. I found that the poorer the outcome of a breeding attempt relative to the number of eggs the female invested, the greater the likelihood of partner switching. The incidence of partner switching changed seasonally, with peak switching coinciding with an increase in the number of alternative partners available to females. After females switched partners, their breeding outcomes rose to match those of females that remained with the same partner; this was not the case for males that switched partners. Consistent with the model's prediction, males in stable partnerships achieved over 25% higher than average reproductive success, which was attributable to both persistently good breeding outcomes and their older partners' high fecundity. These results provide empirical support for the hypothesis that partner switching favours increased cooperative investment levels, and they demonstrate that variation in the relative value of by-product benefits can enhance that process.

  19. Does natural selection favour the Rescorla-Wagner rule?

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Pete C; McNamara, John M; Houston, Alasdair I; Marshall, James A R

    2012-06-07

    A fundamental question relating to animal behaviour is how animals learn; in particular, how they come to associate stimuli with rewards. Numerous empirical findings can be explained by assuming that animals use some mechanism similar to the Rescorla-Wagner learning rule, which is a relatively simple and highly general method of updating the associative strength between different stimuli. However, the Rescorla-Wagner rule is often not optimal, which raises the question of why a rule with such properties should have evolved. We consider the evolution of learning rules in a simple environment where there exists an optimal rule of similar complexity to the Rescorla-Wagner rule. We show that because the Rescorla-Wagner rule is less sensitive to changes in its parameters than the optimal rule, there is a wider range of parameter values over which the rule structure is initially viable. Consequently, the Rescorla-Wagner rule can be favoured by natural selection, ahead of other rules which are more accurate.

  20. The probable role of cannibalism in spreading Trichinella papuae infection in a crocodile farm in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Owen, Ifor L; Awui, Columba; Langelet, Eric; Soctine, Wenda; Reid, Simon

    2014-07-14

    Between 2003 and 2007, 83 (50%) of 167 crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) purchased as juveniles by a crocodile farm 3 or 4 years earlier from Kikori, Gulf Province, were found to be infected with Trichinella papuae. Between 2005 and 2007 infection was detected in a number of crocodiles at the farm obtained from six localities other than Kikori, as well as in a few animals born on the farm. Up to 2004, all juveniles at the farm, whether wild- or farm-born, were penned together; the practice was then stopped to prevent possible infection through cannibalism. The last infected animal from Kikori was seen in 2007, 4 years after the purchase of crocodiles from there ceased. The last non-Kikori infected crocodile was seen, also, in 2007. None of the 1972 crocodiles (comprising wild- and farm-born animals) tested from 2008 to 2013, using the digestion method, was infected with T. papuae. This indicates that infection of non-Kikori crocodiles was the result of cannibalism within the farm during the years up to 2004 when juvenile crocodiles were kept together, and that the farm is now free of the infection.

  1. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea.

  2. Macrocnemis gracilis, a new genus and species of Idiocnemidinae (Zygoptera: Platycnemididae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Theischinger, G; Gassmann, D; Richards, S J

    2015-07-27

    A new genus and species belonging to the damselfly subfamily Idiocnemidinae from Papua New Guinea, Macrocnemis gracilis gen. nov. sp. nov. is described and illustrated. It is the largest known member of the Papuan idiocnemidine radiation, and its affinities to existing genera remain unclear. The new taxon is currently known with certainty only from small streams flowing through mid-montane rainforest in the Hindenburg Range of Papua New Guinea's rugged central cordillera.

  3. Modelling Favourability for Invasive Species Encroachment to Identify Areas of Native Species Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Báez, José C.; Ferri-Yáñez, Francisco; Bellido, Jesús J.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the vulnerability of the native Mediterranean pond turtle to encroachment by the invasive red-eared slider in southern Spain. We first obtained an ecogeographical favourability model for the Mediterranean pond turtle. We then modelled the presence/absence of the red-eared slider in the Mediterranean pond turtle range and obtained an encroachment favourability model. We also obtained a favourability model for the red-eared slider using the ecogeographical favourability for the Mediterranean pond turtle as a predictor. When favourability for the Mediterranean pond turtle was high, favourability for the red-eared slider was low, suggesting that in these areas the Mediterranean pond turtle may resist encroachment by the red-eared slider. We also calculated favourability overlap between the two species, which is their simultaneous favourability. Grids with low overlap had higher favourability values for the Mediterranean pond turtle and, consequently, were of lesser conservation concern. A few grids had high values for both species, being potentially suitable for coexistence. Grids with intermediate overlap had similar intermediate favourability values for both species and were therefore areas where the Mediterranean pond turtle was more vulnerable to encroachment by the red-eared slider. We mapped the favourability overlap to provide a map of vulnerability of the Mediterranean pond turtle to encroachment by the red-eared slider. PMID:24719577

  4. Bioactive natural products from Papua New Guinea marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Noro, Jeffery C; Kalaitzis, John A; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-10-01

    The discovery of novel natural products for drug development relies heavily upon a rich biodiversity, of which the marine environment is an obvious example. Marine natural product research has spawned several drugs and many other candidates, some of which are the focus of current clinical trials. The sponge megadiversity of Papua New Guinea is a rich but underexplored source of bioactive natural products. Here, we review some of the many natural products derived from PNG sponges with an emphasis on those with interesting biological activity and, therefore, drug potential. Many bioactive natural products discussed here appear to be derived from non-ribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthesis pathways, strongly suggesting a microbial origin of these compounds. With this in mind, we also explore the notion of sponge-symbiont biosynthesis of these bioactive compounds and present examples to support the working hypothesis.

  5. Geological remote sensing for hydrocarbon exploration in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, G.L.; Phelps, J.C.; Eisenberg, L.L.

    1996-07-01

    One of the most active hydrocarbon exploration provinces of the last decade has been the fold and thrust belt of Papua New Guinea. Geologic remote sensing is an indispensable part of the exploration process in that remote and rugged area where usable seismic data are obtainable only locally, if at all. Photointerpretation of stereo synthetic aperture radar imagery has been especially useful in conventional lithostratigraphic mapping, both local and regional. Results of remote sensing imagery interpretation, integrated with surface geologic data, limited seismic, and balanced structural cross sections, facilitated the documentation of structural styles and provided the basis for a new, regional structural model. The role of remote sensing during various stages of the exploration process is summarized; imagery and map examples are presented.

  6. Men’s Extramarital Sexuality in Rural Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Wardlow, Holly

    2007-01-01

    Married women in rural Papua New Guinea are at risk for HIV primarily because of their husbands’ extramarital relationships. Labor migration puts these men in social contexts that encourage infidelity. Moreover, many men do not view sexual fidelity as necessary for achieving a happy marriage, but they view drinking and “looking for women” as important for male friendships. Although fear of HIV infection is increasing, the concern that men most often articulated about the consequences of extramarital infidelity was possible violent retaliation for “stealing” another man’s wife. Therefore, divorced or separated women who exchange sex for money are considered to be “safe” partners. Interventions that promote fidelity will fail in the absence of a social and economic infrastructure that supports fidelity. PMID:17463367

  7. Sulphur dioxide fluxes from Papua New Guinea's volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGonigle, A. J. S.; Oppenheimer, C.; Tsanev, V. I.; Saunders, S.; Mulina, K.; Tohui, S.; Bosco, J.; Nahou, J.; Kuduon, J.; Taranu, F.

    2004-04-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) hosts some of the most prolific degassing volcanoes in the world. Collectively, they are thought to be responsible for a significant contribution of sulfur dioxide to the regional and global atmosphere. Despite their importance, very few measurements of SO2 fluxes from PNG volcanoes have been made in the past, leading to uncertainty in estimates of total global volcanic sulfur budgets. We report here sulphur dioxide flux measurements obtained by ultraviolet spectroscopy during July and August 2003 for the following PNG volcanoes: Tavurvur, Ulawun, Pago, Langila, Bagana and Manam. We found fluxes of 1.3, 7.4, 1.4, 2.9, 23 and 2.1 kg s-1, respectively, for these sources. This amounts to a total of 38 kg s-1 of SO2, constituting some 6-9% and 7-12% of the estimated global time-integrated volcanic emissions to the atmosphere, and troposphere, respectively.

  8. "Training by Papua New Guinea Women, for Papua New Guinea Women": Lessons from the Development of a Co-Constructed Course for Women Smallholder Farmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pamphilon, Barbara; Mikhailovich, Katja; Chambers, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the lessons from a collaborative project that worked with women agricultural leaders in Papua New Guinea. The project sought to build the capacity of these leaders as trainers in a way that would enable the development of a sustainable community of practice and worked within a critical and place-based pedagogy underpinned by…

  9. A new, widely distributed species of the Exocelina ekari-group from West Papua (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae).

    PubMed

    Shaverdo, Helena; Panjaitan, Rawati; Balke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Exocelina manokwariensis sp. n. from West Papua is placed into the Exocelina ekari-group based on the structure of its male genitalia. The new species is described, including its three subspecies, from the mainland of West Papua, Waigeo Island, Batanta and Salawati Islands, and Bomberai peninsula. An identification key to the subspecies as well as data on species distribution are provided.

  10. Early Childhood Care and Education in a Changing World: Building on Village Life in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikupu, Andrew; Glover, Anne

    2004-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea, the early childhood care and education of young children is largely a parental and community responsibility. Like many other village-based societies, including those found throughout Africa, Asia and the South Pacific, more than 80% of Papua New Guinean children grow up in subsistence farming and fishing tribal villages. In…

  11. Health promotion and empowerment in Henganofi District, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Barcham, Richard; Silas, Esther; Irie, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that the government of Papua New Guinea is failing to provide basic services in health to the majority of its people. Local non-government organisations (NGOs), partnered with international NGOs, are attempting to fill this gap. With limited resources, these small Indigenous organisations must focus much of their effort on training that supports self-reliance as the main strategy for communities to improve their quality of life. This project explored the training content and methodology of Touching The Untouchables (TTU), a small Indigenous NGO based in Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, that has trained a network of village volunteers in health promotion and safe motherhood.
    Village life imposes multiple demands, from self-sufficiency in food to maintaining law and order. There are established attitudes about power and dependence, referred to as 'cargo thinking'. Cargo thinking stands as a barrier to the necessity of self-reliance, and requires training strategies that seek to empower participants to create change from their own initiative. Empowerment is understood as oriented towards individual people taking collective action to improve their circumstances by rectifying disparities in social power and control. To achieve self-reliance, empowerment is necessarily operational on the levels of person, community and society.
    In addition to being operational on all three levels of empowerment, the training content and methodology adopted and developed by TTU demonstrate that empowering practice in training employs approaches to knowledge that are evidence-based, reflexive, contextual and skill-based. Creating knowledge that is reflexive and exploring knowledge about the broader context uses special kinds of communicative tools that facilitate discussion on history, society and political economy. Furthermore, training methodologies that are oriented to empowerment create settings that require the use of all three types of communication

  12. Diet of land birds along an elevational gradient in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Sam, Katerina; Koane, Bonny; Jeppy, Samuel; Sykorova, Jana; Novotny, Vojtech

    2017-03-09

    Food preferences and exploitation are crucial to many aspects of avian ecology and are of increasing importance as we progress in our understanding of community ecology. We studied birds and their feeding specialization in the Central Range of Papua New Guinea, at eight study sites along a complete (200 to 3700 m a.s.l.) rainforest elevational gradient. The relative species richness and abundance increased with increasing elevation for insect and nectar eating birds, and decreased with elevation for fruit feeding birds. Using emetic tartar, we coerced 999 individuals from 99 bird species to regurgitate their stomach contents and studied these food samples. The proportion of arthropods in food samples increased with increasing elevation at the expense of plant material. Body size of arthropods eaten by birds decreased with increasing elevation. This reflected the parallel elevational trend in the body size of arthropods available in the forest understory. Body size of insectivorous birds was significantly positively correlated with the body size of arthropods they ate. Coleoptera were the most exploited arthropods, followed by Araneae, Hymenoptera, and Lepidoptera. Selectivity indexes showed that most of the arthropod taxa were taken opportunistically, reflecting the spatial patterns in arthropod abundances to which the birds were exposed.

  13. Diet of land birds along an elevational gradient in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Katerina; Koane, Bonny; Jeppy, Samuel; Sykorova, Jana; Novotny, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Food preferences and exploitation are crucial to many aspects of avian ecology and are of increasing importance as we progress in our understanding of community ecology. We studied birds and their feeding specialization in the Central Range of Papua New Guinea, at eight study sites along a complete (200 to 3700 m a.s.l.) rainforest elevational gradient. The relative species richness and abundance increased with increasing elevation for insect and nectar eating birds, and decreased with elevation for fruit feeding birds. Using emetic tartar, we coerced 999 individuals from 99 bird species to regurgitate their stomach contents and studied these food samples. The proportion of arthropods in food samples increased with increasing elevation at the expense of plant material. Body size of arthropods eaten by birds decreased with increasing elevation. This reflected the parallel elevational trend in the body size of arthropods available in the forest understory. Body size of insectivorous birds was significantly positively correlated with the body size of arthropods they ate. Coleoptera were the most exploited arthropods, followed by Araneae, Hymenoptera, and Lepidoptera. Selectivity indexes showed that most of the arthropod taxa were taken opportunistically, reflecting the spatial patterns in arthropod abundances to which the birds were exposed. PMID:28276508

  14. Infection levels of gastrointestinal parasites in sheep and goats in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Koinari, M; Karl, S; Ryan, U; Lymbery, A J

    2013-12-01

    Gastrointestinal parasites of livestock cause diseases of important socio-economic concern worldwide. The present study investigated the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in sheep and goats in lowland and highland regions of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Faecal samples were collected from a total of 165 small ruminants (110 sheep and 55 goats) from February to April 2011. Analysis by a modified McMaster technique revealed that 128 animals (72% of sheep and 89% of goats) were infected with one or more species of gastrointestinal parasites. The gastrointestinal parasites found and their prevalences in sheep (S) and in goats (G) were as follows: strongyle 67.3% (S), 85.5% (G); Eimeria 17.3% (S), 16.4% (G); Strongyloides, 8.2% (S), 23.6% (G); Fasciola, 5.5% (S), 18.2% (G); Trichuris, 1.8% (S), 3.6% (G); and Nematodirus, 1.8% (S), 3.6% (G). Two additional genera were found in goats: Moniezia (9.1%) and Dictocaulus (3.6%). This is the first study to quantitatively examine the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in goats in PNG. The high rates of parasitism observed in the present study are likely to be associated with poor farming management practices, including lack of pasture recovery time, lack of parasite control measures and poor-quality feed.

  15. Current status of Taenia solium and cysticercosis in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Owen, Ifor L

    2006-01-01

    There is no evidence that taeniasis due to Taenia solium is present in Papua New Guinea (PNG), but there is some serological evidence that human cysticercosis exists at particular locations near the border with West Papua (Indonesia), where refugees from across the border have been settled. Only a few surveys have been conducted; the first was in 1986, when one refugee who originated from an infected locality in West Papua was found to be serologically positive, but asymptomatic. Subsequently, there have been unpublished reports of more positive but asymptomatic cases amongst refugees and, it is claimed, amongst local inhabitants that live near the border. A serological survey conducted in PNG in 1999 at the southern end of the border revealed no positive cases of cysticercosis. There are no reports of pigs or dogs affected with cysticercosis in PNG.

  16. Local biologies and HIV/AIDS in highlands Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Butt, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    The province of Papua, Indonesia has one of the fastest growing rates of HIV infection in Asia. Within volatile political conditions, HIV has reached generalized epidemic status for indigenous Papuans. This article explores the merits of using the concept of local biologies as an analytic tool to assess the range of factors which affect a local pattern of untreated HIV and rapid onset of AIDS. A research team conducted 32 in-depth interviews with HIV-positive indigenous persons and 15 interviews with health care workers in urban and peri-urban sites in the central highlands region. The results show fear of gossip and stigmatization, regional political conditions and gaps in care interweave to create local biological conditions of evasion of care and rapid onset of AIDS. The normative emphasis in contemporary scholarship on stigma as shaping subjective responses to HIV needs to be complemented by a full assessment of the physiological impact of health services, and the ways political conditions trickle down and mediate local biological patterns. The concept of local biologies is highly effective for explaining the full scope of possible factors affecting the intersection of social and physical realms for HIV-positive persons.

  17. Geographic variation of human mitochondrial DNA from Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.; Wilson, A.C. ); Jorde, L.B. ); Bhatia, K. )

    1990-03-01

    High resolution mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction maps, consisting of an average of 370 sites per mtDNA map, were constructed for 119 people from 25 localities in Papua, New Guinea (PNG). Comparison of these PNG restriction maps to published maps from Australian, Caucasian, Asian and African mtDNAs reveals that PNG has the lowest amount of mtDNA variation, and that PNG mtDNA lineages originated from Southeast Asia. The statistical significance of geographic structuring of populations with respect to mtDNA was assessed by comparing observed G{sub ST} values to a distribution of G{sub ST} values generated by random resampling of the data. These analyses show that there is significant structuring of mtDNA variation among worldwide populations, between highland and coastal PNG populations, and even between two highland PNG populations located approximately 200 km apart. However, coastal PNG populations are essentially panmictic, despite being spread over several hundred kilometers. The high resolution technique for examining mtDNA variation, coupled with extensive geographic sampling within a single defined area, leads to an enhanced understanding of the influence of geography on mtDNA variation in human populations.

  18. Mummy Restoration Project Among the Anga of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Ronald G; Nelson, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    We report on a unique Mummy restoration project among the anga of papua new guinea. Moimango was a village leader who had gone through the smoked body mummification process about 50 years ago. His smoked body has been displayed, alongside other ancestors, on a cliff niche gallery 308 m (1011 feet) above Koke Village. Although somewhat protected by an overhang, Moimango suffered a great deal of deterioration as he has been unprotected and exposed to the elements. The goals of our 2010 expedition to Koke Village was to assess the efficacy of restoration efforts applied to Moimango initiated by the authors and villagers of Koke in 2008. The restoration process used materials native to the local jungles. We examined Moimango for additional restoration challenges that may have arisen since the 2008 expedition. We discovered that many of the restoration techniques developed and applied in 2008 held up well. We found that the anatomical supports developed from native tapa and kumaka sap were still in place and effective, as well as our lichen eradication method of a suca slurry applied in 2008. Of particular importance was the stability of Moimago's head, which prior to restoration, was held in place by only the mummified muscle and integument of the lateral and posterior neck region. Endoscopic evaluation demonstrated disarticulated C1 and C2 vertebrae. New restoration challenges included construction of a new display chair, realignment and securing of the mandible, replacing and securing a loose tooth, repatching, and recoating with ritualistic red ochre clay.

  19. Information systems for health sector monitoring in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Cibulskis, R. E.; Hiawalyer, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes (i). how a national health information System was designed, tested and implemented in Papua New Guinea, (ii). how the system was integrated with other management information systems, and (iii). how information has been used to support decision-making. It concludes that central coordination of systems design is essential to make sure that information systems are aligned with government priorities and can deliver the information required by managers. While there is often scope for improving the performance of existing information systems, too much emphasis can be placed on revising data collection procedures and creating the perfect information system. Data analysis, even from imperfect systems, can stimulate greater interest in information, which can improve the quality and completeness of reporting and encourage a more methodical approach to planning and monitoring services. Our experience suggests that senior decision-makers and political leaders can play an important role in creating a culture of information use. By demanding health information, using it to formulate policy, and disseminating it through the channels open to them, they can exert greater influence in negotiations with donors and other government departments, encourage a more rational approach to decision-making that will improve the operation of health services, and stimulate greater use of information at lower levels of the health system. The ability of information systems to deliver these benefits is critical to their sustainability. PMID:12378295

  20. Sources and management of hazardous waste in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.

    1996-12-31

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) has considerable mineral wealth, especially in gold and copper. Large-scale mining takes place, and these activities are the source of most of PNG`s hazardous waste. Most people live in small farming communities throughout the region. Those living adjacent to mining areas have experienced some negative impacts from river ecosystem damage and erosion of their lands. Industry is centered mainly in urban areas and Generates waste composed of various products. Agricultural products, pesticide residues, and chemicals used for preserving timber and other forestry products also produce hazardous waste. Most municipal waste comes from domestic and commercial premises; it consists mainly of combustibles, noncombustibles, and other wastes. Hospitals generate pathogenic organisms, radioactive materials, and chemical and pharmaceutical laboratory waste. Little is known about the actual treatment of waste before disposal in PNG. Traditional low-cost waste disposal methods are usually practiced, such as use of landfills; storage in surface impoundments; and disposal in public sewers, rivers, and the sea. Indiscriminate burning of domestic waste in backyards is also commonly practiced in urban and rural areas. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Assessing women's understandings of health in rural Papua New Guinea: implications for health policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Rachael; Earnest, Jaya

    2011-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea (PNG), women's health is addressed by applying biomedical solutions which often ignore the complexity of women's histories, cultural contexts and lived experiences. The objective of this study was to examine adult and older women's perceptions of health and well-being to identify priority areas for public service interventions. Rapid ethnographic assessment was conducted in the Wosera district, a rural area of PNG from mid-2005 to early 2006, to examine the health concerns of women. Twenty-seven adult women and 10 older women participated in the study. Health was not limited to one aspect of a woman's life, such as their biology or maternal roles; it was also connected with the social, cultural and spiritual dimensions of women's daily existence. Participants also identified access to money and supportive interpersonal relationships as significant for good health. A disconnect was found to exist between women's understandings of good health and socio-political health policies in PNG, something likely to be repeated in health service delivery to different cultural groups across the Asia Pacific region. Health and development practitioners in PNG must become responsive to the complexity of women's social relationships and to issues relating to the context of women's empowerment in their programmes.

  2. The voice of Holland: Dutch public and patient's opinion favours single-port laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, Sofie AF; Broeders, EPM; Stassen, LPS; Bouvy, ND

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Single-port laparoscopy is prospected as the future of minimal invasive surgery. It is hypothesised to cause less post operative pain, with a shorter hospitalisation period and improved cosmetic results. Population- and patient-based opinion is important for the adaptation of new techniques. This study aimed to assess the opinion and perception of a healthy population and a patient population on single-port laparoscopy compared with conventional laparoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An anonymous 33-item questionnaire, describing conventional and single-port laparoscopy, was given to 101 patients and 104 healthy volunteers. The survey participants (median age 44 years; range 17-82 years) were asked questions about their personal situation and their expectations and perceptions of the two different surgical techniques; conventional multi-port laparoscopy and single-port laparoscopy. RESULTS: A total of 72% of the participants had never heard of single-port laparoscopy before. The most important concern in both groups was the risk of surgical complications. When complication risks remain similar, 80% prefers single-port laparoscopy to conventional laparoscopy. When the risk of complications increases from 1% to 10%, 43% of all participants prefer single-port laparoscopy. A total of 70% of the participants are prepared to receive treatment in another hospital if single-port surgery is not performed in their hometown hospital. The preference for single-port approach was higher in the female population. CONCLUSION: Although cure and safety remain the main concerns, the population and patients group have a favourable perception of single-port surgery. The impact of public opinion and patient perception towards innovative techniques is undeniable. If the safety of the two different procedures is similar, this study shows a positive attitude of both participant groups in favour of single-port laparoscopy. However, solid scientific proof for the safety and

  3. Rediscovery of the Threatened River Sharks, Glyphis garricki and G. glyphis, in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    White, William T.; Appleyard, Sharon A.; Sabub, Benthly; Kyne, Peter M.; Harris, Mark; Lis, Rickson; Baje, Leontine; Usu, Thomas; Smart, Jonathan J.; Corrigan, Shannon; Yang, Lei; Naylor, Gavin J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent surveys of the shark and ray catches of artisanal fishers in the Western Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG) resulted in the rediscovery of the threatened river sharks, Glyphis garricki and Glyphis glyphis. These represent the first records of both species in PNG since the 1960s and 1970s and highlight the lack of studies of shark biodiversity in PNG. Two individuals of G. garricki and three individuals of G. glyphis were recorded from coastal marine waters of the Daru region of PNG in October and November 2014. The two G. garricki specimens were small individuals estimated to be 100–105 cm and ~113 cm total length (TL). The three G. glyphis specimens were all mature, one a pregnant female and two adult males. These are the first adults of G. glyphis recorded to date providing a more accurate maximum size for this species, i.e. ~260 cm TL. A single pup which was released from the pregnant female G. glyphis, was estimated to be ~65 cm TL. Anecdotal information from the fishers of pregnant females of G. glyphis containing 6 or 7 pups provides the first estimate of litter size for this species. The jaws of the pregnant female G. glyphis were retained and a detailed description of the dentition is provided, since adult dentition has not been previously documented for this species. Genetic analyses confirmed the two species cluster well within samples from these species collected in northern Australia. PMID:26445387

  4. Short report: therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine combined with primaquine against Plasmodium falciparum in northeastern Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Baird, J Kevin; Wiady, Iwa; Sutanihardja, Awalludin; Suradi; Purnomo; Basri, Hasan; Sekartuti; Ayomi, Ester; Fryauff, David J; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2002-06-01

    Chloroquine combined with primaquine was evaluated for therapy of uncomplicated malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum in nonimmune Javanese migrants to northeastern Papua, Indonesia. Subjects were randomized to treatment with standard chloroquine therapy (25 mg/kg in 3 doses over the course of 48 hours) with 30 mg primaquine administered daily for 28 days (n = 25) or a placebo of primaquine (n = 28). The 14-day cumulative incidence of therapeutic failure was 56% with primaquine and 79% with placebo (odds ratio [OR], 0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-1.3; P = 0.08). Primaquine administered daily created a marginally significant improvement in therapeutic efficacy at day 14, but not at day 7 (20% versus 36%; OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-1.8; P = 0.2) or day 28 (82% versus 93%; OR, 0.31; 95% Cl, 0.04-2.1; P = 0.23). This report corroborates studies suggesting that therapeutic doses of primaquine exert no discernible effect on parasitemia by P. falciparum.

  5. Rapid onset of transmission-reducing antibodies in javanese migrants exposed to malaria in papua, indonesia.

    PubMed

    Bousema, J Teun; Roeffen, Will; van der Kolk, Mike; de Vlas, Sake J; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Bangs, Michael J; Teelen, Karina; Kurniawan, Liliana; Maguire, Jason D; Baird, J Kevin; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2006-03-01

    Transmission of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is initiated by sexual stages in the mosquito. Anti-Pfs48/45 and anti-Pfs230 sexual stage antibodies that are ingested together with parasites can reduce parasite development and subsequently malaria transmission. Acquisition of sexual stage immunity was studied in a cohort of 102 non-immune Javanese individuals migrating to hyperendemic Papua Indonesia. Seroprevalence of antibodies against Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 and functional transmission-reducing activity (TRA) were measured upon arrival and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Asexual parasitemia and gametocytemia were assessed every two weeks. The TRA and seroreactivity increased with the number of P. falciparum infections. The longitudinally sustained association between TRA and antibodies against Pfs48/45 (odds ratio [OR] = 3.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.51-9.29) and Pfs230 (OR = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.36-10.17) suggests that functional transmission reducing immunity is acquired after limited exposure to infection.

  6. Source properties of the 1998 July 17 Papua New Guinea tsunami based on tide gauge records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Satake, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    We analysed four newly retrieved tide gauge records of the 1998 July 17 Papua New Guinea (PNG) tsunami to study statistical and spectral properties of this tsunami. The four tide gauge records were from Lombrum (PNG), Rabaul (PNG), Malakal Island (Palau) and Yap Island (State of Yap) stations located 600-1450 km from the source. The tsunami registered a maximum trough-to-crest wave height of 3-9 cm at these gauges. Spectral analysis showed two dominant peaks at period bands of 2-4 and 6-20 min with a clear separation at the period of ˜5 min. We interpreted these peak periods as belonging to the landslide and earthquake sources of the PNG tsunami, respectively. Analysis of the tsunami waveforms revealed 12-17 min delay in landslide generation compared to the origin time of the main shock. Numerical simulations including this delay fairly reproduced the observed tide gauge records. This is the first direct evidence of the delayed landslide source of the 1998 PNG tsunami which was previously indirectly estimated from acoustic T-phase records.

  7. Discrepancies between national maternal mortality data and international estimates: the experience of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Mola, Glen; Kirby, Barry

    2013-11-01

    Over the past 30 years maternal mortality estimates for Papua New Guinea have varied widely. There is no mandatory vital registration in PNG, and 85% of the population live in rural areas with limited or no access to health services. Demographic Health Survey data for PNG estimates the maternal mortality ratio to be 370 deaths per 100,000 live births in 1996 and 733 in 2006, whereas estimates based upon mathematical models (as calculated by international bodies) gave figures of 930 for 1980 and 230 for 2010. This disparity has been a source of considerable confusion for health workers, policy makers and development partners. In this study, we compared 2009 facility-based survey data with figures from the national Health Information System records. The comparison revealed similar maternal mortality ratios: for provincial hospitals (245 and 295), government health centres (574 and 386), church agency health centres (624 and 624), and nationally (394 and 438). Synthesizing these estimates for supervised births in facilities and data on unsupervised births from a community-based survey in one province indicates a national MMR of about 500. Knowing the maternal mortality ratio is a necessary starting point for working out how to reduce it.

  8. Rediscovery of the Threatened River Sharks, Glyphis garricki and G. glyphis, in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    White, William T; Appleyard, Sharon A; Sabub, Benthly; Kyne, Peter M; Harris, Mark; Lis, Rickson; Baje, Leontine; Usu, Thomas; Smart, Jonathan J; Corrigan, Shannon; Yang, Lei; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2015-01-01

    Recent surveys of the shark and ray catches of artisanal fishers in the Western Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG) resulted in the rediscovery of the threatened river sharks, Glyphis garricki and Glyphis glyphis. These represent the first records of both species in PNG since the 1960s and 1970s and highlight the lack of studies of shark biodiversity in PNG. Two individuals of G. garricki and three individuals of G. glyphis were recorded from coastal marine waters of the Daru region of PNG in October and November 2014. The two G. garricki specimens were small individuals estimated to be 100-105 cm and ~113 cm total length (TL). The three G. glyphis specimens were all mature, one a pregnant female and two adult males. These are the first adults of G. glyphis recorded to date providing a more accurate maximum size for this species, i.e. ~260 cm TL. A single pup which was released from the pregnant female G. glyphis, was estimated to be ~65 cm TL. Anecdotal information from the fishers of pregnant females of G. glyphis containing 6 or 7 pups provides the first estimate of litter size for this species. The jaws of the pregnant female G. glyphis were retained and a detailed description of the dentition is provided, since adult dentition has not been previously documented for this species. Genetic analyses confirmed the two species cluster well within samples from these species collected in northern Australia.

  9. Breastfeeding structure as a test of parental investment theory in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Tracer, David P

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary parental investment theory predicts that parents invest preferentially in offspring best able to translate investments into fitness payoffs. It has also been proposed that where the reproductive prospects of offspring are directly correlated with parental investment and variance in fertility is higher for males than females, parents in better condition should bias investment toward males while those in poorer condition should bias investment toward females. Lactation is arguably among the costliest forms of investment expended by mothers and is thus expected to be allocated in ways consistent with fitness payoffs. Quantitative data collected among 110 Papua New Guinean mother-infant pairs during 470 h of focal follows on nursing frequency and duration and responses to infant demands by maternal and offspring characteristics are presented to provide empirically-based descriptions of infant care and tests of evolutionary parental investment theory. Results indicate that mothers show very high levels of investment in offspring. However, although breastfeeding in developing countries is often characterized as on-demand, fussing and crying by infants were only attended to with breastfeeding about 30% of the time. Contrary to expectations of parental investment theory that parents should invest less in poorer quality offspring, mothers increased investment in offspring in poorer condition. The expectation that mothers in better condition would bias investment toward male offspring was also not supported; better nourished mothers biased investment toward female offspring. This study illustrates how infant feeding data may be used for testing larger evolutionary questions such as those derived from parental investment theory.

  10. Clinothem Lobe Growth and Possible Ties to Downslope Processes in the Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, E. A. Y.; Driscoll, N. W.; Milliman, J. D.; Slingerland, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Gulf of Papua is fed by the large-floodplain Fly River and small mountainous rivers to the north, thus creating an ideal environment where end-member cases of river systems and their deltas (e.g. the large-floodplain Brazos River and the narrow-shelved Eel River) can be studied. Input from five rivers into the gulf has constructed a three-dimensional mid-shelf clinothem composed of three depositional lobes, with a central lobe downlapped by two younger lobes to the north and south. This geometry suggests that the three lobes are not syndepositional but rather that clinoform depocenters have shifted 60 km, thus bypassing adjacent accommodation. Newly examined CHIRP (Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse) seismic lines and XRF analysis of piston cores from the 2004 NSF MARGINS program reveal distinct lobes offshore that exhibit increased complexity moving shoreward. Evidence of shoreward complexity and lobe interfingering cause us to question the originally proposed mechanism for depocenter shift involving circulation changes. An alternative hypothesis that stems from distinct lobe architecture farther offshore suggests that channelized downslope processes and nearshore storage may play important roles in lobe growth.

  11. In Favour of Ethics Education, against Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillson, John

    2011-01-01

    The questions that I address are: "What ought to become of Religious Education (RE)?" and "To what extent do non-religious beliefs belong in RE?" I will argue that there are compelling reasons for studying religious and non-religious views alongside each other, but that there are serious objections to doing this in the context of any subject…

  12. Raman spectroscopy of detrital garnet from the (U)HP terrane of eastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andò, Sergio; Baldwin, Suzanne L.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Malusà, Marco G.; Aliatis, Irene; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Garnet is one of the most widespread heavy minerals in sediments derived from orogenic systems. Its chemical composition varies systematically with temperature and pressure conditions, and thus provides information on the metamorphic evolution of source areas that is crucial in tectonic and geodynamic reconstructions. Garnet is easily identified in mineral grain mounts and is relatively stable during burial diagenesis. Raman spectroscopy allows rapid determination of garnet compositions in grain mounts or thin sections of sand and sandstone samples, and can be used to assess their density and chemical composition quite accurately ("MIRAGEM" method of Bersani et al., 2009; Andò et al., 2009). In the D'Entrecastreaux Islands of southeastern Papua New Guinea, the world's youngest (U)HP rocks are exposed. There, mafic rocks and their felsic host gneisses were metamorphosed under eclogite facies conditions from late Miocene to Pliocene, before being exhumed from depths of ~90 km (Baldwin et al., 2004, 2008). The eclogite preserves a peak assemblage of garnet, omphacite, rutile, phengite and Si02 (Hill and Baldwin, 1993). A coesite-eclogite has been found in one small island outcrop. In order to sample garnet populations representative of a larger geographical area, we sampled and studied a heavy-mineral-dominated placer sand (HMC 80) from a beach from SE Goodenough Island. Garnet grains in beach sand are associated with blue-green to subordinately green-brown amphibole and minor epidote, omphacitic clinopyroxene, titanite, apatite and rutile. The subordinate low-density fraction is feldspatho-quartzose with high-rank metamorphic rock fragments and biotite (Q62 F35 Lm2; MI 360). Detrital garnets are mostly classified as almandine with relatively high Mg and Ca and lacking Mn, typical of the eclogite facies (Win et al., 2007; type Ci garnets of Mange and Morton 2007; Andò et al., 2013). In well-described stratigraphic sequences within syn-and post-tectonic basins

  13. Plastic traits of an exotic grass contribute to its abundance but are not always favourable.

    PubMed

    Firn, Jennifer; Prober, Suzanne M; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2012-01-01

    In herbaceous ecosystems worldwide, biodiversity has been negatively impacted by changed grazing regimes and nutrient enrichment. Altered disturbance regimes are thought to favour invasive species that have a high phenotypic plasticity, although most studies measure plasticity under controlled conditions in the greenhouse and then assume plasticity is an advantage in the field. Here, we compare trait plasticity between three co-occurring, C(4) perennial grass species, an invader Eragrostis curvula, and natives Eragrostis sororia and Aristida personata to grazing and fertilizer in a three-year field trial. We measured abundances and several leaf traits known to correlate with strategies used by plants to fix carbon and acquire resources, i.e. specific leaf area (SLA), leaf dry matter content (LDMC), leaf nutrient concentrations (N, C:N, P), assimilation rates (Amax) and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE). In the control treatment (grazed only), trait values for SLA, leaf C:N ratios, Amax and PNUE differed significantly between the three grass species. When trait values were compared across treatments, E. curvula showed higher trait plasticity than the native grasses, and this correlated with an increase in abundance across all but the grazed/fertilized treatment. The native grasses showed little trait plasticity in response to the treatments. Aristida personata decreased significantly in the treatments where E. curvula increased, and E. sororia abundance increased possibly due to increased rainfall and not in response to treatments or invader abundance. Overall, we found that plasticity did not favour an increase in abundance of E. curvula under the grazed/fertilized treatment likely because leaf nutrient contents increased and subsequently its' palatability to consumers. E. curvula also displayed a higher resource use efficiency than the native grasses. These findings suggest resource conditions and disturbance regimes can be manipulated to disadvantage

  14. Does displayed enthusiasm favour recall, intrinsic motivation and time estimation?

    PubMed

    Moè, Angelica

    2016-11-01

    Displayed enthusiasm has been shown to relate to intrinsic motivation, vitality, and positive affect, but its effects on recall performance and time estimation have not yet been explored. This research aimed at studying the effects of a delivery style characterised by High Enthusiasm (HE) on recall, time estimation, and intrinsic motivation. In line with previous studies, effects on intrinsic motivation were expected. In addition, higher recall and lower time estimations were hypothesised. In two experiments, participants assigned to a HE condition or to a normal reading control condition listened to a narrative and to a descriptive passage. Then, they were asked to rate perceived time, enthusiasm, pleasure, interest, enjoyment and curiosity, before writing a free recall. Experiment 1 showed that in the HE condition, participants recalled more, were more intrinsically motivated, and expressed lower time estimations compared to the control condition. Experiment 2 confirmed the positive effects of HE reading compared to normal reading, using different passages and a larger sample.

  15. The favourable large misorientation angle grain boundaries in graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuyun; Xu, Ziwei; Yuan, Qinghong; Xin, John; Ding, Feng

    2015-12-21

    A grain boundary (GB) in graphene is a linear defect between two specifically oriented graphene edges, whose title angles are denoted as θ1 and θ2, respectively. Here we present a systematic theoretical study on the structure and stability of GBs in graphene as a function of the misorientation angle, Φ = (θ1-θ2) and the GB orientation in multi-crystalline graphene, which is denoted by Θ = (θ1 + θ2). It is surprising that although the number of disorders of the GB, i.e., the pentagon-heptagon pairs (5|7s), reaches the maximum at Φ∼ 30°, the GB formation energy versus the Φ curve reaches a local minimum. The subsequent M-shape of the Efvs. the Φ curve is due to the strong cancellation of the local strains around 5|7 pairs by the "head-to-tail" formation. This study successfully explains many previously observed experimental puzzles, such as the multimodal distribution of GBs and the abundance of GB misorientation angles of ∼30°. Besides, this study also showed that the formation energy of GBs is less sensitive to Θ, although the twin boundaries are slightly more stable than others.

  16. Meteorological Conditions Favouring Development of Urban Air Pollution Episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, Alexander; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Finardi, Sandro; Beekmann, Matthias; Sokhi, Ranjeet; Mahura, Alexander; Ginsburg, Alexander; Mažeikis, Adomas

    2013-04-01

    The causes of urban air pollution episodes are complex and depend on various factors including emissions, meteorological parameters, topography, atmospheric chemical processes and solar radiation. The relative importance of such factors is dependent on the geographical region, its surrounding emission source areas and the related climatic characteristics, as well as the season of the year. The key pollutants are PM10, PM2.5, O3 and NO2, as these cause the worst air quality problems in European cities. The main aim of this study realised within the MEGAPOLI project was to describe and quantify the influence of meteorological patterns on urban air pollution especially high-level concentrations air pollution episodes in megacities. Several European urban agglomerations and megacities, including the Po Valley, Helsinki, London, Paris, Moscow, Vilnius, were considered in the study. The study also carried out analysis of meteorological patterns leading to urban air pollution episodes considered by the development of suitable indicators linking particular meteorological conditions/ parameters to increased air pollution levels in the urban areas. These indicators constitute a useful tool for regulators in suggesting effective policies and mitigation measures. Finally, a combination of modelling and analysis of observations data can allow both the quality assurance of the new parameterisations as well as the verification of input emissions.

  17. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: can we expect a favourable outcome?

    PubMed

    Panda, Naresh K; Simhadri, Sridhar; Sridhara, Suryanarayana Rao

    2004-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck is an uncommon, progressive, destructive soft tissue infection of mixed aerobic and anaerobic organisms, having high mortality if left untreated (22 to 100 per cent). This study makes an attempt to analyse various factors and management methods determining the overall prognosis. A retrospective analysis of all cases of necrotizing fasciitis involving the head and neck, with exclusion of those involving the eyelid and the scalp, was undertaken. Various parameters such as demography, aetiology, complications, management and outcome were studied. Males outnumbered the females with the latter having a greater risk of involvement after 60 years. Odontogenic infection was the primary source of infection. Anaerobes were cultured in seven out of 17 cases, with six others showing mixed Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. Anaemia was the most commonly associated illness, with diabetes affecting four out of 17 cases. Aggressive surgical debridement with triple antibiotic therapy was used in the management of necrotizing fasciitis with an overall mortality of 11.8 per cent. Patients having late referral, anaemia and one or other complication had increased duration of total hospital stay. Better results can be obtained with proper control of infection by early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement and triple antibiotic therapy, along with timely control of complications and associated illnesses.

  18. Natural selection can favour ‘irrational’ behaviour

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, J. M.; Trimmer, P. C.; Houston, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding decisions is the fundamental aim of the behavioural sciences. The theory of rational choice is based on axiomatic principles such as transitivity and independence of irrelevant alternatives (IIA). Empirical studies have demonstrated that the behaviour of humans and other animals often seems irrational; there can be a lack of transitivity in choice and seemingly irrelevant alternatives can alter decisions. These violations of transitivity and IIA undermine rational choice theory. However, we show that an individual that is maximizing its rate of food gain can exhibit failure of transitivity and IIA. We show that such violations can be caused because a current option may disappear in the near future or a better option may reappear soon. Current food options can be indicative of food availability in the near future, and this key feature can result in apparently irrational behaviour. PMID:24429682

  19. Effects of early developmental conditions on innate immunity are only evident under favourable adult conditions in zebra finches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coster, Greet; Verhulst, Simon; Koetsier, Egbert; de Neve, Liesbeth; Briga, Michael; Lens, Luc

    2011-12-01

    Long-term effects of unfavourable conditions during development can be expected to depend on the quality of the environment experienced by the same individuals during adulthood. Yet, in the majority of studies, long-term effects of early developmental conditions have been assessed under favourable adult conditions only. The immune system might be particularly vulnerable to early environmental conditions as its development, maintenance and use are thought to be energetically costly. Here, we studied the interactive effects of favourable and unfavourable conditions during nestling and adult stages on innate immunity (lysis and agglutination scores) of captive male and female zebra finches ( Taeniopygia guttata). Nestling environmental conditions were manipulated by a brood size experiment, while a foraging cost treatment was imposed on the same individuals during adulthood. This combined treatment showed that innate immunity of adult zebra finches is affected by their early developmental conditions and varies between both sexes. Lysis scores, but not agglutination scores, were higher in individuals raised in small broods and in males. However, these effects were only present in birds that experienced low foraging costs. This study shows that the quality of the adult environment may shape the long-term consequences of early developmental conditions on innate immunity, as long-term effects of nestling environment were only evident under favourable adult conditions.

  20. Effects of untreated bed nets on the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax and Wuchereria bancrofti in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Burkot, T R; Garner, P; Paru, R; Dagoro, H; Barnes, A; McDougall, S; Wirtz, R A; Campbell, G; Spark, R

    1990-01-01

    The impact of untreated bed nets on the transmission of human malaria and filariasis in a village in a hyperendemic area of Papua New Guinea was studied. In anopheline mosquitoes, the Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite antigen positivity rate, filarial infection rates and human blood indices dropped significantly after bed nets were introduced. This reduction in human-vector contact did not affect mosquito density as no significant difference in either landing rates or indoor resting catches was found. The number of bed nets in a house and ownership of dogs were factors significantly associated with a reduction in the number of indoor resting mosquitoes. However, the reduction in the P. falciparum sporozoite antigen rate in mosquitoes was not accompanied by a reduction in either malaria parasite or antibody prevalences or titres against the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

  1. Infant mortality in a deprived area of Papua New Guinea: priorities for antenatal services and health education.

    PubMed

    Garner, P; Heywood, P; Baea, M; Lai, D; Smith, T

    1996-03-01

    This cross-sectional study of women was conducted in a deprived area of Papua New Guinea with an estimated infant mortality rate of 133/1000 live births. Mortality patterns derived from birth histories showed that neonatal deaths contribute proportionally more to infant mortality than postneonatal deaths, emphasizing the need for better care at delivery. To examine possible mechanisms for intervention, pregnant women were interviewed to determine patterns of antenatal clinic use, antimalarial drugs and micronutrient supplements given, and how much the women smoked. The results showed that the health system was failing to implement current routine supplementation and prophylaxis regimens, and that there was a need to revise national guidelines. A large proportion of pregnant women smoked during pregnancy, and this behaviour could be a target for future public health campaigns and health worker promotion advice to women.

  2. Atmospheric and oceanologic conditions favouring large bioproduction of northern Adriatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Romina; Lučić, Davor; Njire, Jakica; Djakovac, Tamara; Precali, Robert; Supić, Nastjenjka

    2016-04-01

    An interdisciplinary study based on long term data collected in the northern Adriatic relieved winter period to be crucial for the total annual zooplankton production in the region. Namely, yearly averages of some investigated zooplankton species in the 2000-2007 interval were highly related to their February and/or March abundances. The large winter zooplankton abundances appeared in winters of the "A type", in which freshened waters from the Po River spread over the region. Also, the production of phytoplankton was in winters of the "A type" higher than in winters of the "B type", in which these waters are restricted to the coastal areas and do not impact the open sea. That was presumably due to increase in nutrients. In fact, the total inorganic nitrogen and ortophosphate concentration in eastern part reached maximal February values in the 1990-2007 interval in winters of the "A type". Spreading of the Po River water across the northern Adriatic and appearance of the two winter types depends on the existing geostrophic circulation patterns and atmospheric and hydrologic conditions in the preceding months, thus enabling forecast. Obtained results are basis for the future theoretical ecological model which can explain long term changes in bioproduction in the region and be used in planning future environment actions aimed to sustained development, especially as winter phytoplankton and zooplankton production seems to reflect on annual catch of small pelagic fish important for Adriatic fishery, anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus).

  3. HPV status and favourable outcome in vulvar squamous cancer.

    PubMed

    Wakeham, Katie; Kavanagh, Kim; Cuschieri, Kate; Millan, David; Pollock, Kevin G; Bell, Sarah; Burton, Kevin; Reed, Nicholas S; Graham, Sheila V

    2017-03-01

    It is universally accepted that high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the cause of cervical dysplasia and cancer. More recently, it has been shown that HPV is also a marker of clinical outcome in oropharyngeal cancer. However, contemporary information is lacking on both the prevalence of HPV infection in vulvar cancer (VSCC), its precursor lesion, vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and the influence of HPV-status on the prognosis of this malignancy. We have conducted a detailed population-based study to examine rates of progression of VIN to VSCC, type-specific HPV prevalence in vulvar disease and the influence of HPV status on clinical outcome in VSCC. We observed that the age at which women are diagnosed with VSCC is falling and there is a significant time gap between first diagnosis of VIN and progression to invasive disease. HR-HPV infection was detected in 87% (97/112) cases of VIN and 52% cases (32/62) of VSCC. The presence of HR-HPV in squamous intraepithelial lesion was associated with lower rates of progression to invasive cancer (hazard ratio, 0.22, p = 0.001). In the adjusted analysis, HR-HPV was associated with improved progression-free survival of VSCC compared to those with HPV negative tumours (hazard ratio, 0.32, p = 0.02).

  4. [Emerging Acinetobacter baumannii infections and factors favouring their occurrence].

    PubMed

    Eveillard, M; Joly-Guillou, M-L

    2012-10-01

    During the last decade, Acinetobacter baumannii (AB) has been increasingly responsible for infections occurring in three particular contexts (in terms of patients and environment). Community AB pneumonia is severe infections, mainly described around the Indian Ocean, and which mainly concern patients with major co-morbidities. AB is also responsible for infections occurring among soldiers wounded in action during operations conducted in Iraq or Afghanistan. Lastly, this bacterium is responsible for infections occurring among casualties from natural disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis. Those infections are often due to multidrug-resistant strains, which can be implicated in nosocomial outbreaks when patients are hospitalized in a local casualty department or during their repatriation thereafter. The source of the contaminations which lead to AB infections following injuries (warfare or natural disasters) is still poorly known. Three hypotheses are usually considered: a contamination of wounds with environmental bacteria, a wound contamination from a previous cutaneous or oropharyngeal endogenous reservoir, or hospital acquisition. The implication of telluric or agricultural primary reservoirs in human AB infections is a common hypothesis which remains to be demonstrated by further specifically designed studies.

  5. Evaluation of the Global Fund-supported National Malaria Control Program in Papua New Guinea, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, Manuel W; Pulford, Justin; Maraga, Seri; Barnadas, Celine; Reimer, Lisa J; Tavul, Livingstone; Jamea-Maiasa, Sharon; Tandrapah, Tony; Maalsen, Anna; Makita, Leo; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is the major funaer Of the National Malaria Control Program in Papua New Guinea (PNG). One of the requirements of a Global Fund grant is the regular and accurate reporting of program outcomes and impact. Under-performance as well as failure to report can result in reduction or discontinuation of program funding. While national information systems should be in a position to provide accurate and comprehensive information for program evaluation, systems in developing countries are often insufficient. This paper describes the five-year plan for the evaluation of the Global Fund Round 8 malaria grant to PNG (2009-2014) developed by the Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research (PNGIMR). It builds on a complementary set of studies including national surveys and sentinel site surveillance for the assessment of program outcomes and impact. The PNGIMR evaluation plan is an integral part of the Global Fund grant. The evaluation program assesses intervention coverage (at individual, household and health facility levels), antimalarial drug efficacy, indicators of malaria transmission and morbidity (prevalence, incidence), and all-cause mortality. Operational research studies generate complementary information for improving the control program. Through the evaluation, PNGIMR provides scientific expertise to the PNG National Malaria Control Program and contributes to building local capacity in monitoring and evaluation. While a better integration of evaluation activities into routine systems would be desirable, it is unlikely that sufficient capacity for data analysis and reporting could be established at the National Department of Health (NDoH) within a short period of time. Long-term approaches should aim at strengthening the national health information system and building sufficient capacity at NDoH for routine analysis and reporting, while more complex scientific tasks can be supported by the PNGIMR as the de facto

  6. League Bilong Laif: Rugby, Education and Sport-for-Development Partnerships in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Emma; Schulenkorf, Nico

    2016-01-01

    League Bilong Laif (LBL) is a sport-for-development (SFD) programme that was established in 2013 as a three-way partnership between the Australian Government, the Papua New Guinea (PNG) Government (Department of Education) and the Australian Rugby League Commission (National Rugby League). As a contribution to addressing low rates of school…

  7. Situation Reports--Barbados, Canada, Papua and New Guinea, St. Vincent, Surinam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in six countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Barbados, Canada, Papua and New Guinea, St. Vincent, and Surinam. Information is provided in the following areas where appropriate and if it is available: (1) statistics on population, birth and death rates, G. N. P.,…

  8. Educational Investment in Conflict Areas of Indonesia: The Case of West Papua Province

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollet, Julius Ary

    2007-01-01

    Education has become a central issue in West Papua. During the Suharto regime, the Indonesian government paid little attention to educational investment in the province which led to poor educational infrastructure and a shortage of teachers. As a result, the quality of human resources in the province is poor. Since 2001, the adoption of the…

  9. Biodiversity inventories and conservation of the marine fishes of Bootless Bay, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effective management and conservation of biodiversity is predicated on clearly defined conservation targets. Species number is frequently used as a metric for conservation prioritization and monitoring changes in ecosystem health. We conducted a series of synoptic surveys focusing on the fishes of the Bootless Bay region of Papua New Guinea to generate a checklist of fishes of the region. Bootless Bay lies directly south of Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea, and experiences the highest human population density of any marine area in the country. Our checklist will set a baseline against which future environmental changes can be tracked. Results We generated a checklist of 488 fish species in 72 families found in Bootless Bay during a two-week sampling effort. Using incident-based methods of species estimation, we extrapolate there to be approximately 940 fish species in Bootless Bay, one of the lowest reported numbers in Papua New Guinea. Conclusions Our data suggest that the Bootless Bay ecosystem of Papua New Guinea, while diverse in absolute terms, has lower fish biodiversity compared to other shallow marine areas within the country. These differences in faunal diversity are most likely a combination of unequal sampling effort as well as biophysical factors within Bootless Bay compounded by historical and/or contemporary anthropogenic disturbances. PMID:22849436

  10. Professional Learning for Cultural Mathematics in Papua New Guinea's Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Kay; Edmonds-Wathen, Cris; Kravia, Geori; Sakopa, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    A design of principles for teacher professional learning was developed to improve the teaching of "Cultural Mathematics" in elementary schools in Papua New Guinea. The design's appropriateness for PNG elementary schools is the focus of the research implemented through week-long workshops using technology enhancement. Implementation has…

  11. Prevalence of henipavirus and rubulavirus antibodies in pteropid bats, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Breed, Andrew C; Yu, Meng; Barr, Jennifer A; Crameri, Gary; Thalmann, Claudia M; Wang, Lin Fa

    2010-12-01

    To determine seroprevalence of viruses in bats in Papua New Guinea, we sampled 66 bats at 3 locations. We found a seroprevalence of 55% for henipavirus (Hendra or Nipah virus) and 56% for rubulavirus (Tioman or Menangle virus). Notably, 36% of bats surveyed contained antibodies to both types of viruses, indicating concurrent or consecutive infection.

  12. Country Education Profiles: Australia, and Australia-Territories (Papua, New Guinea and Norfolk Island).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Bureau of Education, Geneva (Switzerland).

    One of a series of profiles prepared by the Cooperative Educational Abstracting Service, this brief outline provides basic background information on educational principles, system of administration, structure and organization, curricula, and teacher training in Australia and Australian Territories (Papua, New Guinea and Norfolk Island). Statistics…

  13. Revitalisation of Indigenous Languages in Education: Contextualising the Papua New Guinea Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove

    2003-01-01

    Situates two papers on Papua New Guinea in the context of discussion about maintenance and revitalization of endangered languages and about education through the medium of indigenous and minority languages. The articles are "What Is Our Culture? What Is Our Language? Dialogue Towards the Maintenance of Indigenous Culture and Language in Papua…

  14. Evaluating the Professional Learning for "Cultural Mathematics" in Papua New Guinea's Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bino, Vagi; Sakopa, Priscilla; Tau, Kila; Kull, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative data are both being used to evaluate a large project in remote areas of Papua New Guinea. Results from teacher and student questionnaires are yet to be evaluated. The responses from teachers participating in the project workshops are reported here to be extremely positive towards the content and delivery of the…

  15. Modernity, Prestige, and Self-Promotion: Literacy in a Papua New Guinean Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Eamonn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I examine patterns of literacy use in the daily life a rural community in the Papua New Guinea highlands. It is demonstrated that many of these practices do not correspond to the ways in which agencies responsible for imparting literacy, particularly the local school, intend. Instead, village concepts of prestige, chance, and…

  16. Failure of a massive earthquake-induced landslide dam in Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, J. P.; Loveday, I. C.; Schuster, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the recent occurrence of a large earthquake-induced landslide that dammed the Bairaman River in the interior of hte island of New Britian, Papua New Guinea, and the subsequent overtopping and failure of this landslide dam. 

  17. Colonial Legacies and Neo-Colonial Practices in Papua New Guinean Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Rooney, Dick

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the Westernization of academic quality within the Papua New Guinea higher education system and the hybridity of the university sector where different actors force knowledge to be created for the needs of a small, formal economy, rather than for the development needs of the country. The country has yet to find a system that best…

  18. Elementary Teacher Education in Papua New Guinea: Towards a Culturally Connected Perspective of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahambu, Casper; Brownlee, Joanne M.; Petriwskyj, E. Anne

    2012-01-01

    Global and national agendas for quality education have led to reforms in Papua New Guinea's (PNG) elementary education, but criticism of the learner-centred Western pedagogies has emerged. One key influence on quality teacher education relates to perspectives of teaching. Existing research shows teachers' beliefs and perceptions of teaching…

  19. The Inclusion of Inclusive Education in International Development: Lessons from Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Fanu, Guy

    2013-01-01

    A new "inclusive" curriculum has been introduced in Papua New Guinea, with significant levels of support from a bilateral development agency. The curriculum is inclusive in the sense that it is designed to meet the diverse, complex, and ever-changing needs of students. Research indicates the curriculum has been shaped by various…

  20. The Challenges in Developing a Mathematics Curriculum for Training Elementary Teachers in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagi, Oneau; Green, Rosemary

    2004-01-01

    As Papua New Guinea undergoes a period of major education reform that includes the establishment of an elementary education programme, the development of an elementary teacher education curriculum is proving to be a challenging task. As a background this paper provides contextual information about the elementary education programme and highlights…

  1. Grammar of Kove: An Austronesian Language of the West New Britain Province, Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a descriptive grammar of Kove, an Austronesian language spoken in the West New Britain Province of Papua New Guinea. Kove is primarily spoken in 18 villages, including some on the small islands north of New Britain. There are about 9,000 people living in the area, but many are not fluent speakers of Kove. The dissertation…

  2. Negotiating Individualistic and Collectivist Futures: Emerging Subjectivities and Social Forms in Papua New Guinean High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerath, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that Papua New Guinea high school students' academic disengagement results from emerging personal subjectivities and new social networks. Ethnographic research highlights the authority students attribute to their perceptions of limited opportunity structures facing them and the idealized village-based egalitarian student identity being…

  3. Learning to Lead: A Social Justice Perspective on Understanding Elementary Teacher Leadership in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, Joanne; Scholes, Laura; Farrell, Ann; Davis, Julie; Cook, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Leadership in elementary education is currently recognized as a political imperative in Papua New Guinea (PNG), as the nation develops strategies towards equitable access to schooling. One recent initiative aimed at building educational leadership was an intensive Australian Leadership Award Fellowship (ALAF) program funded by AusAID, involving a…

  4. Knowledge Flow and Capacity Development: A Case of Psychology in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marai, Leo; Haihuie, Samuel; Kavanamur, David

    2005-01-01

    Despite political rhetoric to the contrary, higher education (HE) in Papua New Guinea remains heavily Westernized, resulting in an alienation of HE, and its students, from the development needs of the country. Taking the discipline of psychology as an example, indigenization is not a complete solution to this alienation, since many of the issues…

  5. Learning Science in a High School Learning Environment in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najike, Samuel; McRobbie, Campbell; Lucas, Keith

    This paper reports on the classroom learning environment and teaching practices in a Papua New Guinea ninth-grade science class and the conflict between the informal, traditional learning paradigm and new school approaches to science teaching. Observations and interviews with teachers and four students were supplemented with questionnaires and…

  6. The Conundrum of Educational Provision and the Application of Performativity and Technology in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Heidegger's philosophy of technology demonstrates how technology acts as an agent of performativity within the school system serving the interests of the state and global economy. Papua New Guinea provides an example of how performativity and technology have become entrenched in a non-Western developing nation, usurped traditional education, and…

  7. Vernacular Education and Development: Dilemmas, Struggles and Innovations in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Yasuko

    2001-01-01

    Describes the process by which the Maiwala community in Papua New Guinea designed an elementary school curriculum that recognizes the need for Western-style education in order to communicate with the outside world, but focuses on vernacular education that makes the curriculum culturally relevant and meaningful to the community. (Contains 36…

  8. Subsidies, Selectivity and the Returns to Education in Urban Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, John; Fatai, Osaiasi Koliniusi

    2006-01-01

    There is debate about whether the rate of return to education in developing countries declines with the level of schooling. This paper reports evidence from urban Papua New Guinea which shows that the average private rate of return to an additional year of education rises with the level of education considered. This pattern is robust to the…

  9. Teaching the Pragmatics of Accounts-Payable Letters in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, James

    The development of a course in English letter-writing for workers in the accounts-payable departments of Papua New Guinea businesses is described. The needs assessment involved extensive discussion with company staff and their supervisors, collection and analysis of letters recently produced by that staff, and development of a diagnostic test. It…

  10. The Costs of Children: Perceptions of Australian and Papua New Guinean Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Jeffrey; Callan, Victor J.

    1984-01-01

    Compared the perceptions of 281 Papua New Guinean students and 329 Australian students of the economic and psychological costs of having children. Australians gave high ratings to the importance of financial and emotional costs, while New Guinea students were more aware of overpopulation and restrictions on parents. (JAC)

  11. Predominance of modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and active transmission of Beijing sublineage in Jayapura, Indonesia Papua.

    PubMed

    Chaidir, Lidya; Sengstake, Sarah; de Beer, Jessica; Oktavian, Antonius; Krismawati, Hana; Muhapril, Erfin; Kusumadewi, Inri; Annisa, Jessi; Anthony, Richard; van Soolingen, Dick; Achmad, Tri Hanggono; Marzuki, Sangkot; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype distribution is different between West and Central Indonesia, but there are no data on the most Eastern part, Papua. We aimed to identify the predominant genotypes of M. tuberculosis responsible for tuberculosis in coastal Papua, their transmission, and the association with patient characteristics. A total of 199 M. tuberculosis isolates were collected. Spoligotyping was applied to describe the population structure of M. tuberculosis, lineage identification was performed using a combination of lineage-specific markers, and genotypic clusters were identified using a combination of 24-locus-MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping. A high degree of genetic diversity was observed among isolates based on their spoligopatterns. Strains from modern lineage 4 made up almost half of strains (46.9%), being more abundant than the ancient lineage 1 (33.7%), and modern lineage 2 (19.4%). Thirty-five percent of strains belonged to genotypic clusters, especially strains in the Beijing genotype. Previous TB treatment and mutations associated with drug resistance were more common in patients infected with strains of the Beijing genotype. Papua shows a different distribution of M. tuberculosis genotypes compared to other parts of Indonesia. Clustering and drug resistance of modern strains recently introduced to Papua may contribute to the high tuberculosis burden in this region.

  12. Report of the Advisory Committee on Education in Papua and New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of External Territories, Canberra.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of the Committee's recommendations for upgrading education in the Australian territories of New Guinea and Papua. These recommendations were made with the intention of achieving higher standards of education, a professional body of teachers, a more effective use of limited…

  13. Quantitative Concepts, Vernacular, and Education in Papua New Guinea. E.R.U. Report 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John

    This report represents an attempt made by the field staff of a Summer Institute of Linguistics at the University of Papua New Guinea to improve the existing educational programs, which, by and large, are centrally produced in an expatriate-dominated context, and administered country-wide. Based on the assumption that language and social structure…

  14. Gold--Its Extraction and the Environment: Experiences in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Mike; Owens, Chris

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how the mining of gold has impacted the development of both Australia and Papua, New Guinea. Outlines the essential chemistry of small scale mining, the impact of gold on the economy, and the environmental effect of mercury on both the miners and the environment. (Author/CCM)

  15. Language Choice in an Acutely Multilingual Society: Communication and Development in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Geoff P.

    Acute intercultural communication problems posed by multilingualism in Papua New Guinea are discussed, and ways in which they are being addressed are examined. An introductory section outlines the language situation in Melanesia. It is noted that the area's language diversity and colonization and missionary activity have resulted in the emergence…

  16. Rapid Kinematic and Tectonic Variations Along the 1400-km-long Australia-Woodlark Plate Boundary Zone, Papua New Guinea and Woodlark Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Taylor, F. W.; Gahagan, L.; Watson, L.

    2004-12-01

    Previous GPS studies have shown the wide variability in present-day plate motions across the highly arcuate, 1400-km-long Australia-Woodlark plate boundary extending from Papua New Guinea to the Solomon Islands. GPS-determined motions range from orthogonal oceanic spreading in the Woodlark basin, to continental transtension in the 2.5-km-high core complex area of easternmost Papua New Guinea, to continental strike-slip and transpression in 4-km-high mountains of the Papuan Peninsula. We use imagery, earthquake focal mechanisms, coral reef uplift data, and structural mapping studies to establish the along-strike continuity of the active plate boundary fault. Systematic angular changes in the direction of the plate vector along this continuous fault explain its varied tectonic geomorphology, Holocene uplift history, and geologic structure. We use a series of plate reconstructions to illustrate the longer term, Cenozoic evolution of this boundary including: its formation as an arcuate, N- and NE-dipping ophiolitic suture zone during Paleogene time, the progressive "unzippering" of this thrust over the past 6 Ma along a N- and NE-dipping, low-angle normal fault in easternmost Papua New Guinea, and its "zippering" or continued shortening on the suture thrust in the Owen Stanley Ranges of the Papuan Peninsula. Over the 1400-km-length of the fault, the length of segments of oceanic spreading, transtension, and transpression is 250-500 km; the time period separating one tectonic style from the succeeding style encroaching from the east is several million years. This systematic spatial and temporal superposition of tectonic styles, leads to complex - but predictable - along-strike variations in geologic history.

  17. Differential detection of Trichinella papuae, T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis by real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Boonmars, Thidarut; Wu, Zhiliang; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2012-04-30

    Trichinellosis caused by nematodes of Trichinella spp. is a zoonotic foodborne disease. Three Trichinella species of the parasite including Trichinella spiralis, Trichinella papuae and Trichinella pseudospiralis, have been etiologic agents of human trichinellosis in Thailand. Definite diagnosis of this helminthiasis is based on a finding of the Trichinella larva (e) in a muscle biopsy. The parasite species or genotype can be determined using molecular methods, e.g., polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This study has utilized real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR (real-time FRET PCR) and a melting curve analysis for the differential diagnosis of trichinellosis. Three common Trichinella species in Thailand were studied using one set of primers and fluorophore-labeled hybridization probes specific for the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene. Using fewer than 35 cycles as the cut-off for positivity and using different melting temperatures (T(m)), this assay detected T. spiralis, T. papuae and T. pseudospiralis in muscle tissue and found the mean T(m) ± SD values to be 51.79 ± 0.06, 66.09 ± 0.46 and 51.46 ± 0.09, respectively. The analytical sensitivity of the technique enabled the detection of a single Trichinella larva of each species, and the detection limit for the target DNA sequence was 16 copies of positive control plasmid. A test of the technique's analytical specificity showed no fluorescence signal for a panel of 19 non-Trichinella parasites or for human and mouse genomic DNA. Due to the sensitivity and specificity of the detection of these Trichinella species, as well as the fast and high-throughput nature of these tools, this method has application potential in differentiating non-encapsulated larvae of T. papuae from T. spiralis and T. pseudospiralis in tissues of infected humans and animals.

  18. Targeting the impact of agri-environmental policy - Future scenarios in two less favoured areas in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nadia; Fleskens, Luuk; Stroosnijder, Leo

    2016-10-01

    Targeting agri-environmental measures (AEM) improves their effectiveness in the delivery of public goods, provided the necessary coordination with other incentives. In less favoured areas (LFA) measures focusing on the conservation of extensive farming contribute to sustainable land management in these areas. In this paper we investigate the implementation of a possible AEM supporting the improvement of permanent pastures coordinated with the extensive livestock and single farm payments actually in place. Through applying a spatially-explicit mixed integer optimisation model we simulate future land use scenarios for two less favoured areas in Portugal (Centro and Alentejo) considering two policy scenarios: a 'targeted AEM', and a 'non-targeted AEM'. We then compare the results with a 'basic policy' option (reflecting a situation without AEM). This is done with regard to landscape-scale effects on the reduction of fire hazard and erosion risk, as well as effects on farm income. The results show that an AEM for permanent pastures would be more cost-effective for erosion and fire hazard mitigation if implemented within a spatially targeted framework. However when cost-effectiveness is assessed with other indicators (e.g. net farm income and share of grazing livestock) 'non-targeted AEM' implementation delivers the best outcome in Alentejo. In Centro the implementation of an AEM involves important losses of income compared to the 'basic policy'. 'Targeted AEM' tends to favour farms in very marginal conditions, i.e. targeting is demonstrated to perform best in landscapes where spatial heterogeneity is higher. The results also show the risk of farm abandonment in the two studied less favoured areas: in all three scenarios more than 30% of arable land is deemed to be abandoned.

  19. Factors predictive of clinical pregnancy in the first intrauterine insemination cycle of 306 couples with favourable female patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Yunus; Hassa, Hikmet; Oge, Tufan; Tokgoz, Vehbi Yavuz

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the factors predictive of clinical pregnancy in the first superovulation/intrauterine insemination (SO/IUI) cycle of couples with favourable female characteristics. We analyzed retrospectively the first SO/IUI cycle of 306 infertile couples with mild male factor infertility and unexplained infertility. The women had a favourable prognosis in terms of ovarian reserve. Univariate logistic regression analyses identified body mass index (BMI) [odds ratio (OR) = 0.9, P = 0.014], sperm concentration [OR = 1.007, P = 0.007] and inseminating motile sperm count (IMC) [OR = 1.007, P = 0.032] as significant predictive factors of clinical pregnancy. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified BMI [OR = 0.87, P = 0.008] and sperm concentration [OR = 1.008, P = 0.011] as significant factors. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups did not differ significantly in terms of the age and smoking status of the woman, duration and type of infertility, length of the stimulation, total gonadotropin dosage or antral follicle count. Of the female characteristics investigated, BMI was the most significant predictive factor of clinical pregnancy in the first SO/IUI cycle of couples with unexplained or mild male factor infertility and favourable female characteristics. In overweight women, weight loss should be advised before starting SO/IUI. Sperm concentration and IMC were significant male predictive factors for clinical pregnancy in the first SO/IUI.

  20. A possible role for rusa deer (Cervus timorensis russa) and wild pigs in spread of Trypanosoma evansi from Indonesia to Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Reid, S; Husein, A; Hutchinson, G; Copeman, D

    1999-01-01

    Movement of transmigrants and livestock from western Indonesia to southeastern areas of Irian Jaya near the border with Papua New Guinea may pose a risk of introducing Trypanosoma evansi into Papua New Guinea via feral Rusa deer (Cervus timorensis russa) and wild pigs which inhabit these areas in large numbers. Pilot experimental studies were conducted to observe infection in pigs and Rusa deer with a strain of T. evansi isolated in Indonesia. Parasitaemia and signs of clinical disease were monitored each second day for 120 days. Trypanosomes were observed in haematocrit tubes at the plasma-buffy coat interface of jugular blood of deer and pigs on 86% and 37% of sampling occasions respectively. Parasitaemia was at a high level in deer for 35% of the time but for only 11.5% of the time in pigs. Results indicate that both Rusa deer and pigs have a high tolerance for infection with T. evansi. The deer suffered mild anaemia evidenced by a 25% reduction in packed cell volume (PCV) 14 days after infection which coincided with the initial peak in parasitaemia. However, PCV had returned to pre infection values by the end of the experiment. The pigs showed no change in PCV. There were no visual indications of disease in either species and appetite was not noticeably affected. It was concluded that both Rusa deer and pigs were capable reservoir hosts for T. evansi but that Rusa deer, with their more persistent higher levels of parasitaemia, have more potential to spread T. evansi into Papua New Guinea from West Irian than pigs.

  1. Elevated blood plasma antioxidant status is favourable for achieving IVF/ICSI pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Velthut, Agne; Zilmer, Mihkel; Zilmer, Kersti; Kaart, Tanel; Karro, Helle; Salumets, Andres

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the roles of intrafollicular and systemic oxidative stress and antioxidant response in ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes. For this purpose, 102 ICSI patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation were enrolled and samples were collected on the day of follicle puncture. Total peroxide (TPX) concentrations and total antioxidant response (TAR) were measured in follicular fluid and blood plasma, and an oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated based on these two parameters. Urinary concentrations of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2a (F2IsoP) were measured. Elevated intrafollicular oxidative stress was positively correlated with ovarian stimulation outcome: less FSH per retrieved oocyte was used, more oocytes were collected and higher serum oestradiol concentrations were measured in patients with higher follicular OSI. However, high urinary F2IsoP related to lower embryo quality and F2IsoP was also elevated in smoking patients. Patients with endometriosis had lower follicular antioxidant status. Most importantly, higher systemic blood TAR was significantly favourable for achieving clinical pregnancy (P=0.03). In conclusion, the findings suggest clear associations between oxidative stress, antioxidant status and several aspects of ovarian stimulation and IVF/ICSI outcome, including pregnancy rate. Several oxygen-dependent biochemical reactions produce reactive oxygen species as by-products that may eventually lead to oxidative stress, which is detrimental to cells and tissues. Total antioxidant status, on the other hand, comprises several agents that balance the excess of these reactive oxygen species and reduce potential damage to the body. The aim of the current work was to study this balance in 102 patients participating in an ICSI programme and to examine the degree to which total peroxide content and antioxidant status influence infertility and pregnancy outcome. During the study, several tests

  2. Why Huddle? Ecological Drivers of Chick Aggregations in Gentoo Penguins, Pygoscelis papua, across Latitudes

    PubMed Central

    Collen, Ben; Johnston, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aggregations of young animals are common in a range of endothermic and ectothermic species, yet the adaptive behavior may depend on social circumstance and local conditions. In penguins, many species form aggregations (aka. crèches) for a variety of purposes, whilst others have never been observed exhibiting this behavior. Those that do form aggregations do so for three known benefits: 1) reduced thermoregulatory requirements, 2) avoidance of unrelated-adult aggression, and 3) lower predation risk. In gentoo penguins, Pygoscelis papua, chick aggregations are known to form during the post-guard period, yet the cause of these aggregations is poorly understood. Here, for the first time, we study aggregation behavior in gentoo penguins, examining four study sites along a latitudinal gradient using time-lapse cameras to examine the adaptive benefit of aggregations to chicks. Our results support the idea that aggregations of gentoo chicks decrease an individual’s energetic expenditure when wet, cold conditions are present. However, we found significant differences in aggregation behavior between the lowest latitude site, Maiviken, South Georgia, and two of the higher latitude sites on the Antarctic Peninsula, suggesting this behavior may be colony specific. We provide strong evidence that more chicks aggregate and a larger number of aggregations occur on South Georgia, while the opposite occurs at Petermann Island in Antarctica. Future studies should evaluate multiple seabird colonies within one species before generalizing behaviors based on one location, and past studies may need to be re-evaluated to determine whether chick aggregation and other behaviors are in fact exhibited species-wide. PMID:26840252

  3. Why Huddle? Ecological Drivers of Chick Aggregations in Gentoo Penguins, Pygoscelis papua, across Latitudes.

    PubMed

    Black, Caitlin; Collen, Ben; Johnston, Daniel; Hart, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Aggregations of young animals are common in a range of endothermic and ectothermic species, yet the adaptive behavior may depend on social circumstance and local conditions. In penguins, many species form aggregations (aka. crèches) for a variety of purposes, whilst others have never been observed exhibiting this behavior. Those that do form aggregations do so for three known benefits: 1) reduced thermoregulatory requirements, 2) avoidance of unrelated-adult aggression, and 3) lower predation risk. In gentoo penguins, Pygoscelis papua, chick aggregations are known to form during the post-guard period, yet the cause of these aggregations is poorly understood. Here, for the first time, we study aggregation behavior in gentoo penguins, examining four study sites along a latitudinal gradient using time-lapse cameras to examine the adaptive benefit of aggregations to chicks. Our results support the idea that aggregations of gentoo chicks decrease an individual's energetic expenditure when wet, cold conditions are present. However, we found significant differences in aggregation behavior between the lowest latitude site, Maiviken, South Georgia, and two of the higher latitude sites on the Antarctic Peninsula, suggesting this behavior may be colony specific. We provide strong evidence that more chicks aggregate and a larger number of aggregations occur on South Georgia, while the opposite occurs at Petermann Island in Antarctica. Future studies should evaluate multiple seabird colonies within one species before generalizing behaviors based on one location, and past studies may need to be re-evaluated to determine whether chick aggregation and other behaviors are in fact exhibited species-wide.

  4. Meta-analysis of phenotypic selection on flowering phenology suggests that early flowering plants are favoured.

    PubMed

    Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A; Ollerton, Jeff; Parra-Tabla, Victor; De-Nova, J Arturo

    2011-05-01

    Flowering times of plants are important life-history components and it has previously been hypothesized that flowering phenologies may be currently subject to natural selection or be selectively neutral. In this study we reviewed the evidence for phenotypic selection acting on flowering phenology using ordinary and phylogenetic meta-analysis. Phenotypic selection exists when a phenotypic trait co-varies with fitness; therefore, we looked for studies reporting an association between two components of flowering phenology (flowering time or flowering synchrony) with fitness. Data sets comprising 87 and 18 plant species were then used to assess the incidence and strength of phenotypic selection on flowering time and flowering synchrony, respectively. The influence of dependence on pollinators, the duration of the reproductive event, latitude and plant longevity as moderators of selection were also explored. Our results suggest that selection favours early flowering plants, but the strength of selection is influenced by latitude, with selection being stronger in temperate environments. However, there is no consistent pattern of selection on flowering synchrony. Our study demonstrates that phenotypic selection on flowering time is consistent and relatively strong, in contrast to previous hypotheses of selective neutrality, and has implications for the evolution of temperate floras under global climate change.

  5. Ethical challenges in integrating patient-care with clinical research in a resource-limited setting: perspectives from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings where healthcare services are limited and poverty is common, it is difficult to ethically conduct clinical research without providing patient-care. Therefore, integration of patient-care with clinical research appears as an attractive way of conducting research while providing patient-care. In this article, we discuss the ethical implications of such approach with perspectives from Papua New Guinea. Discussion Considering the difficulties of providing basic healthcare services in developing countries, it may be argued that integration of clinical research with patient-care is an effective, rational and ethical way of conducting research. However, blending patient-care with clinical research may increase the risk of subordinating patient-care in favour of scientific gains; therapeutic misconception and inappropriate inducement; and the risk of causing health system failures due to limited capacity in developing countries to sustain the level of healthcare services sponsored by the research. Nevertheless, these ethical and administrative implications can be minimised if patient-care takes precedence over research; the input of local ethics committees and institutions are considered; and funding agencies acknowledge their ethical obligation when sponsoring research in resource-limited settings. Summary Although integration of patient-care with clinical research in developing countries appears as an attractive way of conducting research when resources are limited, careful planning and consideration on the ethical implications of such approach must be considered. PMID:23885908

  6. Health insurance and medical schemes in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Ambihaipahar, U; Sivakumaran, S

    1996-01-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) is an independent nation in the Pacific region. It is located due north of Australia. It is made up of a main island and about 100 smaller islands in the Bismark and Solomon Seas, to the north and east of the main island. The population of PNG is about 4.0 million, the total land area approximately 463,840 sq km and population density 8/square km. Only about 15% of the population is urban, average household size is 5.4 and 45.1% literate. Politically and administratively, it is divided into nineteen provinces and a National Capital District. Since 85% of the population lives in rural areas, the provision of services to the rural areas is constrained by difficult terrain, poor infrastructure and geographic dispersion of the rural population. PNG is a developing Pacific nation with an economy largely based on primary and mining industries. According to the 1993 World Bank estimates, more than 30% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is derived from agriculture. The expenditure on health, as a percentage of the GDP, was 2.8% in 1989, (Table 1). This is low compared to developed nations (ranging from 8% to 14%), but very reasonable compared to the rest of the developing world. Indonesia for example expends 2.7% of GDP on health care. All government expenditures declined sharply in the post 1989 period, including health care expenditures. However, by 1989, the expenditure per capita on health was almost back to 1986 levels. PNG has a small population base relative to the other countries in its World Bank peer group. However, its per capita GDP is reasonable at US$850, the third highest amongst its group and higher than Indonesia, for example, which is US$700/head. Like almost all countries in its gorup, it experienced a negative growth rate over the decade 1980-1991 but kept inflation at a reasonable 5.2% for the same period. On most other indicators PNG fares reasonably well, in comparison with other developing nations (Tables 2 & 3).

  7. Magmas and reservoirs beneath the Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet de Maisonneuve, C.; Costa Rodriguez, F.; Huber, C.

    2013-12-01

    The area of Rabaul (Papua New Guinea) consists of at least seven - possibly nine - nested-calderas that have formed over the past 200 ky. The last caldera-forming eruption occurred 1400 y BP, and produced about 10 km3 of crystal-poor, two-pyroxene dacite. Since then, five effusive and explosive eruptive episodes have occurred from volcanic centres along the caldera rim. The most recent of these was preceded by decade-long unrest (starting in 1971) until the simultaneous eruption of Vulcan and Tavurvur, two vents on opposite sides of the caldera in 1994. Most eruptive products are andesitic in composition and show clear signs of mixing/mingling between a basalt and a high-K2O dacite. The hybridization is in the form of banded pumices, quenched mafic enclaves, and hybrid bulk rock compositions. In addition, the 1400 y BP caldera-related products show the presence of a third mixing component; a low-K2O rhyodacitic melt or magma. Geochemical modeling considering major and trace elements and volatile contents shows that the high-K2O dacitic magma can be generated by fractional crystallization of the basaltic magma at shallow depths (~7 km, 200 MPa) and under relatively dry conditions (≤3 wt% H2O). The low-K2O rhyodacitic melt can either be explained by extended crystallization at low temperatures (e.g. in the presence of Sanidine) or the presence of an additional, unrelated magma. Our working model is therefore that basalts ascend to shallow crustal levels before intruding a main silicic reservoir beneath the Rabaul caldera. Storage depths and temperatures estimated from volatile contents, mineral-melt equilibria and rock densities suggest that basalts ascend from ~20 km (~600 MPa) to ~7 km (200 MPa) and cool from ~1150-1100°C before intruding a dacitic magma reservoir at ~950°C. Depending on the state of the reservoir and the volumes of basalt injected, the replenishing magma may either trigger an eruption or cool and crystallize. We use evidence from major and

  8. A new, widely distributed species of the Exocelina ekari-group from West Papua (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Copelatinae)

    PubMed Central

    Shaverdo, Helena; Panjaitan, Rawati; Balke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Exocelina manokwariensis sp. n. from West Papua is placed into the Exocelina ekari-group based on the structure of its male genitalia. The new species is described, including its three subspecies, from the mainland of West Papua, Waigeo Island, Batanta and Salawati Islands, and Bomberai peninsula. An identification key to the subspecies as well as data on species distribution are provided. PMID:26877680

  9. Macadamia nut consumption modulates favourably risk factors for coronary artery disease in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Garg, Manohar L; Blake, Robert J; Wills, Ron B H; Clayton, Edward H

    2007-06-01

    Macadamia nuts are rich source of monounsaturated fats (oleic and palmitoleic acids) and contain polyphenol compounds, therefore, their consumption can be expected to impart health benefits to humans. This study was conducted to examine the effects of consuming macadamia nuts in hypercholesterolemic male individuals on plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress, coagulation and inflammation. Seventeen hypercholesterolemic male subjects were given macadamia nuts (40-90 g/day), equivalent to 15% energy intake, for a period of 4 weeks. As expected, monounsaturated fatty acids (16:1n-7, 18:1n-9 and 20:1n-9) were elevated in the plasma lipids of all volunteers following intervention with macadamia nuts. Plasma markers of inflammation (leukotriene, LTB(4)) and oxidative stress (8-isoprostane) were significantly lower (1,353 +/- 225 vs. 1,030 +/- 129 pg/mL and 876 +/- 97 vs. 679 +/- 116 pg/mL, respectively) within 4 weeks following macadamia nut intervention. There was a non-significant (23.6%) reduction in the plasma TXB(2)/PGI(2) ratio following macadamia nut consumption. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that short-term macadamia nut consumption modifies favourably the biomarkers of oxidative stress, thrombosis and inflammation, the risk factors for coronary artery disease, despite an increase in dietary fat intake. These data, combined with our previous results on cholesterol-lowering effects of macadamia nuts, suggest that regular consumption of macadamia nuts may play a role in the prevention of coronary artery disease.

  10. Airborne Quercus pollen in SW Spain: Identifying favourable conditions for atmospheric transport and potential source areas.

    PubMed

    Maya-Manzano, José María; Fernández-Rodríguez, Santiago; Smith, Matt; Tormo-Molina, Rafael; Reynolds, Andrew M; Silva-Palacios, Inmaculada; Gonzalo-Garijo, Ángela; Sadyś, Magdalena

    2016-11-15

    The pollen grains of Quercus spp. (oak trees) are allergenic. This study investigates airborne Quercus pollen in SW Spain with the aim identifying favourable conditions for atmospheric transport and potential sources areas. Two types of Quercus distribution maps were produced. Airborne Quercus pollen concentrations were measured at three sites located in the Extremadura region (SW Spain) for 3 consecutive years. The seasonal occurrence of Quercus pollen in the air was investigated, as well as days with pollen concentrations ≥80Pm(-3). The distance that Quercus pollen can be transported in appreciable numbers was calculated using clusters of back trajectories representing the air mass movement above the source areas (oak woodlands), and by using a state-of-the-art dispersion model. The two main potential sources of Quercus airborne pollen captured in SW Spain are Q. ilex subsp. ballota and Q. suber. The minimum distances between aerobiological stations and Quercus woodlands have been estimated as: 40km (Plasencia), 66km (Don Benito), 62km (Zafra) from the context of this study. Daily mean Quercus pollen concentration can exceed 1,700Pm(-3), levels reached not less than 24 days in a single year. High Quercus pollen concentration were mostly associated with moderate wind speed events (6-10ms(-1)), whereas that a high wind speed (16-20ms(-1)) seems to be associated with low concentrations.

  11. The Impact of a Filariasis Control Program on Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Russell; Griffin, Lysaght; Laban, Nedley; Samson, Mellie; Bassat, Quique

    2011-01-01

    Background Annual mass drug administration (MDA) over five years is the WHO's recommended strategy to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (LF). Some experts, however, consider that longer periods of treatment might be necessary in certain high prevalence and transmission environments based upon past unsuccessful field experience and modelling. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate predictors of success in a LF control program we conducted an ecological study during a pre-existing MDA program. We studied 27 villages in Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea, from two areas with different infection rates before MDA. We undertook surveys to collect information on variables potentially having an influence on the outcome of the program, including epidemiological (baseline prevalence of infection, immigration rate), entomological (vector density) and operational (treatment coverage, vector control strategies) variables. The success in a village was defined using variables related to the infection (circulating filarial antigenemia prevalence <1%) and transmission (antigenemia prevalence <1 in 1000 children born since start of MDA). 8709 people were involved in the MDA program and average coverage rates were around 70%. The overall prevalence of filariasis fell from an initial 17.91% to 3.76% at round 5 (p<0.001). Viewed on a village by village basis, 12/27 (44%) villages achieved success. In multivariate analysis, low baseline prevalence was the only factor predicting both success in reducing infection rates (OR 19,26; CI 95% 1,12 to 331,82) and success in preventing new infections (OR 27,44; CI 95% 1,05 to 719,6). Low vector density and the use of an optimal vector control strategy were also associated with success in reducing infection rates, but this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide the data that supports the recommendation that high endemic areas may require longer duration MDA programs, or alternative control strategies

  12. Ba/Ca in Planktonic Foraminifera as a Recorder of Freshwater Input to the Ocean: Proxy Refinement in the Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, K.

    2015-12-01

    In the study of paleoclimate, the past several decades have seen large strides in the advancement of proxies designed to reconstruct changes in sea surface temperature (SST); however, techniques for reconstructing ocean salinity are less well developed. The ratio of Ba/Ca in planktic foraminiferal tests has shown initial promise as a tool for reconstructing salinity in continental margin sites near river mouths. In these environments, Ba/Ca shows an inverse correlation with salinity, and often a less clear correlation to nutrients or indicators of productivity, as is more typical in open-ocean settings. An ideal area in which to apply and test foraminiferal Ba/Ca as a proxy for freshwater input is the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), where temperatures are relatively stable, but large variations in precipitation are today driven by the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and strength of the Australian-Indonesian monsoon. Foraminiferal Ba/Ca in sediments proximal to a river mouth should therefore reflect changes in riverine input, which in turn reflect variations in precipitation on different timescales. We present here planktic foraminiferal δ18O, Ba/Ca, and Mg/Ca records spanning the last glacial-interglacial transition from marine sediment cores in the Gulf of Papua, located in the WPWP. The δ18O records show an increase in the magnitude of glacial-interglacial (G-IG) δ18O change (∆18O) moving away from the coastline and the mouth of the primary local freshwater source, the Fly River. The reduced amplitude in G-IG ∆18O in the cores closer to shore, manifested by more negative δ18O values before ~20 kyr ago, is likely due to freshwater input from the Fly River, with the effects diminishing with distance from the Fly River source. Temperature and sea level are also changing over the deglaciation, however, contributing to the signal recorded in the calcite δ18O. We use planktic Mg/Ca analyses and independent records of sea level change to isolate the

  13. Is earthquake activity along the French Atlantic margin favoured by local rheological contrasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazabraud, Yves; Béthoux, Nicole; Delouis, Bertrand

    2013-09-01

    The seismological study of recent seismic crises near Oleron Island confirms the coexistence of an extensional deformation and a transtensive regime in the Atlantic margin of France, which is different from the general western European stress field corresponding to a strike-slip regime. We argue that the switch of the principal stress axes σ1/σ2 in a NW-SE vertical plane is linked with the existence of crustal heterogeneities. Events of magnitude larger than 5 sometimes occur along the Atlantic margin of France, such as the 7 September 1972 (ML = 5.2) earthquake near Oleron island and the 30 September 2002 (ML = 5.7) Hennebont event in Brittany. To test the mechanism of local strain localization, we model the deformation of the hypocentral area of the Hennebont earthquake using a 3D thermo-mechanical finite element code. We conclude that the occurrence of moderate earthquakes located in limited parts of the Hercynian shear zones (as the often reactivated swarms near Oleron) could be due to local reactivation of pre-existing faults. These sporadic seismic ruptures are favoured by stress concentration due to rheological heterogeneities.

  14. Does natural selection favour taller stature among the tallest people on earth?

    PubMed

    Stulp, Gert; Barrett, Louise; Tropf, Felix C; Mills, Melinda

    2015-05-07

    The Dutch are the tallest people on earth. Over the last 200 years, they have grown 20 cm in height: a rapid rate of increase that points to environmental causes. This secular trend in height is echoed across all Western populations, but came to an end, or at least levelled off, much earlier than in The Netherlands. One possibility, then, is that natural selection acted congruently with these environmentally induced changes to further promote tall stature among the people of the lowlands. Using data from the LifeLines study, which follows a large sample of the population of the north of The Netherlands (n = 94 516), we examined how height was related to measures of reproductive success (as a proxy for fitness). Across three decades (1935-1967), height was consistently related to reproductive output (number of children born and number of surviving children), favouring taller men and average height women. This was despite a later age at first birth for taller individuals. Furthermore, even in this low-mortality population, taller women experienced higher child survival, which contributed positively to their increased reproductive success. Thus, natural selection in addition to good environmental conditions may help explain why the Dutch are so tall.

  15. Living with strangers: direct benefits favour non-kin cooperation in a communally nesting bird.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Christina

    2011-06-07

    The greater ani (Crotophaga major), a Neotropical cuckoo, exhibits an unusual breeding system in which several socially monogamous pairs lay eggs in a single nest and contribute care to the communal clutch. Cooperative nesting is costly-females compete for reproduction by ejecting each other's eggs-but the potential direct or indirect fitness benefits that might accrue to group members have not been identified. In this study, I used molecular genotyping to quantify patterns of genetic relatedness and individual reproductive success within social groups in a single colour-banded population. Microsatellite analysis of 122 individuals in 49 groups revealed that group members are not genetic relatives. Group size was strongly correlated with individual reproductive success: solitary pairs were extremely rare and never successful, and nests attended by two pairs were significantly more likely to be depredated than were nests attended by three pairs. Egg loss, a consequence of reproductive competition, was greater in large groups and disproportionately affected females that initiated laying. However, early-laying females compensated for egg losses by laying larger clutches, and female group members switched positions in the laying order across nesting attempts. The greater ani, therefore, appears to be one of the few species in which cooperative breeding among unrelated individuals is favoured by direct, shared benefits that outweigh the substantial costs of reproductive competition.

  16. Learning styles favoured by professional, amateur, and recreational athletes in different sports.

    PubMed

    González-Haro, Carlos; Calleja-González, Julio; Escanero, Jesus F

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the learning styles of different groups of athletes grouped according to level of performance and sport. Seventy-one male athletes completed a questionnaire on learning styles at the beginning of the 2008-2009 training season. Learning styles were assessed using the Honey-Alonso Learning Styles Questionnaire, and were also converted into learning styles described by Kolb. The Honey-Alonso learning styles were compared among the various groups using one-way analysis of variance, and the Kolb learning styles that were most favoured using a chi-square test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to verify the relationships between variables. No significant differences were observed in learning styles between different sports and physical activities. Years of experience did not correlate strongly with learning styles. With respect to level of performance, the pragmatic component was significantly lower in professional athletes than amateur and recreational athletes. These characteristics of learning styles preferred by the athletes should help coaches and physical trainers to reflect on their role as educators in the context of planning sports training.

  17. Emergence of FY*Anull in a Plasmodium vivax-endemic region of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Woolley, Ian; Masinde, Godfred L.; Miller, Stephanie M.; McNamara, David T.; Hazlett, Fred; Mgone, Charles S.; Alpers, Michael P.; Genton, Blaise; Boatin, B. A.; Kazura, James W.

    1999-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea (PNG), numerous blood group polymorphisms and hemoglobinopathies characterize the human population. Human genetic polymorphisms of this nature are common in malarious regions, and all four human malaria parasites are holoendemic below 1500 meters in PNG. At this elevation, a prominent condition characterizing Melanesians is α+-thalassemia. Interestingly, recent epidemiological surveys have demonstrated that α+-thalassemia is associated with increased susceptibility to uncomplicated malaria among young children. It is further proposed that α+-thalassemia may facilitate so-called “benign” Plasmodium vivax infection to act later in life as a “natural vaccine” against severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Here, in a P. vivax-endemic region of PNG where the resident Abelam-speaking population is characterized by a frequency of α+-thalassemia ≥0.98, we have discovered the mutation responsible for erythrocyte Duffy antigen-negativity (Fy[a−b−]) on the FY*A allele. In this study population there were 23 heterozygous and no homozygous individuals bearing this new allele (allele frequency, 23/1062 = 0.022). Flow cytometric analysis illustrated a 2-fold difference in erythroid-specific Fy-antigen expression between heterozygous (FY*A/FY*Anull) and homozygous (FY*A/FY*A) individuals, suggesting a gene-dosage effect. In further comparisons, we observed a higher prevalence of P. vivax infection in FY*A/FY*A (83/508 = 0.163) compared with FY*A/FY*Anull (2/23 = 0.087) individuals (odds ratio = 2.05, 95% confidence interval = 0.47–8.91). Emergence of FY*Anull in this population suggests that P. vivax is involved in selection of this erythroid polymorphism. This mutation would ultimately compromise α+-thalassemia/P. vivax-mediated protection against severe P. falciparum malaria. PMID:10570183

  18. Interactions of Papua New Guinea medicinal plant extracts with antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Erica C.; Hathaway, Laura B.; Lamb, John G.; Pond, Chris D.; Rai, Prem P.; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R.; Franklin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance A substantial proportion of the population in Papua New Guinea (PNG) lives with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment requires lifelong use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The majority of people in PNG use traditional medicines (TM) derived from plants for all types of health promotions. Consequently, there is a concern that herb-drug interactions may impact the efficacy of ART. Herb-drug, or drug-drug, interactions occur at the level of metabolism through two major mechanisms: enzyme induction or enzyme inhibition. In this study, extracts of commonly-used medicinal plants from PNG were screened for herb-drug interactions related to cytochrome P450s (CYPs). Materials and Methods Sixty nine methanol extracts of TM plants were screened for their ability to induce CYPs by human aryl hydrocarbon receptor- (hAhR-) and human pregnane X receptor- (hPXR-) dependent mechanisms, utilizing a commercially available cell-based luciferase reporter system. Inhibition of three major CYPs, CYP1A2, CYP3A4, and CYP2D6, was determined using human liver microsomes and enzyme-selective model substrates. Results Almost one third of the TM plant extracts induced the hAhR-dependent expression of CYP1A2, the hPXR-dependent expression of CYP3A4, or both. Almost two thirds inhibited CYP1A2, CYP3A4, or CYP2D6, or combinations thereof. Many plant extracts exhibited both induction and inhibition properties. Conclusions We demonstrated that the potent and selective ability of extracts from PNG medicinal plants to affect drug metabolizing enzymes through induction and/or inhibition is a common phenomenon. Use of traditional medicines concomitantly with ART could dramatically alter the concentrations of antiretroviral drugs in the body; and their efficacy. PNG healthcare providers should counsel HIV patients because of this consequence. PMID:25138353

  19. Cyclic patterns of cerebral malaria admissions in Papua New Guinea for the years 1987-1996.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, B D; Valev, D; Werner, R; Atanassova, P A

    2013-11-01

    Data on the dynamics of malaria incidence, admissions and mortality and their best possible description are very important to better forecast and assess the implementation of programmes to register, monitor (e.g. by remote sensing) and control the disease, especially in endemic zones. Semi-annual and seasonal cycles in malaria rates have been observed in various countries and close similarity with cycles in the natural environment (temperature, heliogeophysical activity, etc.), host immunity and/or virulence of the parasite suggested. This study aimed at confirming previous results on malaria cyclicity by exploring whether trans-year and/or multiannual cycles might exist. The exploration of underlying chronomes (time structures) was done with raw data (without smoothing) by linear and nonlinear parametric regression models, autocorrelation, spectral (Fourier) and periodogram regression analysis. The strongest cyclical patterns of detrended malaria admissions were (i) annual period of 1·0 year (12 months or seasonality); (ii) quasi-biennial cycle of about 2·25 years; and (iii) infrannual, circadecennial cycle of about 10·3 years. The seasonal maximum occurred in May with the minimum in September. Notably, these cycles corresponded to similar cyclic components of heliogeophysical activity such as sunspot seasonality and solar activity cyclicities and well-known climate/weather oscillations. Further analyses are thus warranted to investigate such similarities. In conclusion, multicomponent cyclical dynamics of cerebral malaria admissions in Papua New Guinea were observed thus allowing more specific analyses and modelling as well as correlations with environmental factors of similar cyclicity to be explored. Such further results might also contribute to and provide more precise estimates for the forecasting and prevention, as well as the better understanding, of the dynamics and aetiology of this vector-borne disease.

  20. Fluvial and oceanographic controls on clinoform architecture in the Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, E. A. Y.; Driscoll, N. W.; Milliman, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Receiving sediment input from the large-floodplain Fly River and small mountainous rivers, the Gulf of Papua (GOP) is an ideal environment to study how clinoforms record the response of dispersal systems to sea level rise. Contributions from the Fly River and small mountainous rivers to the clinoform have varied due to differing responses to rising sea levels since the last glacial maximum. Near-bed currents that advect sediment to the northeast further complicate this signal. Pairing geophysical and geochemical data from the 2004 NSF MARGINS Source-to-Sink program, we imaged clinoform architecture with CHIRP seismic profiles, identified clinoform sediment provenance, and constrained depositional timing with radiocarbon dates. Sediment provenance can be identified from higher illite:smectite and quartz:feldspar ratios in Fly River sediment than that from small mountainous rivers draining volcanoclastics. Increasing illite:smectite ratios in surficial sediment imply that the Fly River is presently building out clinoforms; however, for most of the late Holocene, the northeastern rivers contributed the bulk of the sediment. The time-lag for Fly River sediment flux to the clinoform suggests sediment storage within its wide floodplain during the rapid transgressions, compared to shorter time-lags in the small mountainous rivers during transgressions. CHIRP profiles reveal consistent patterns of oblique stacking on top of preexisting topography, creating topographic highs and intervening lows. Aggradation on topographic highs occurs during the lower-energy Monsoon season; however, this sediment is winnowed away by energetic currents during the Trade Wind season and advected to the northeast. Northeast progradation is supported by greater sediment thicknesses and accumulation rates along the northeast sides of GOP promontories. Teasing out influences of oceanographic currents can illuminate contributions of large and small-floodplain rivers in the same basin.

  1. Imaging continental breakup using teleseismic body waves: The Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilon, Zachary; Abers, Geoffrey A.; Gaherty, James B.; Jin, Ge

    2015-09-01

    This study images the upper mantle beneath the D'Entrecasteax Islands, Papua New Guinea, providing insight into mantle deformation beneath a highly rifted continent adjacent to propagating spreading centers. Differential travel times from P and S-wave teleseisms recorded during the 2010-2011 CDPapua passive seismic experiment are used to invert for separate VP and VS velocity models of the continental rift. A low-velocity structure marks the E-W axis of the rift, correlating with the thinnest crust, high heat flow, and a linear trend of volcanoes. This slow region extends 250 km along strike from the oceanic spreading centers, demonstrating significant mantle extension ahead of seafloor breakup. The rift remains narrow to depth indicating localization of extension, perhaps as a result of mantle hydration. A high-VP structure at depths of 90-120 km beneath the north of the array is more than 6.5% faster than the rift axis and contains well-located intermediate depth earthquakes. These independent observations place firm constraints on the lateral thermal contrast at depth between the rift axis and cold lithosphere to the north that may be related to recent subduction, although the polarity of subduction cannot be resolved. This geometry is gravitationally unstable; downwelling or small-scale convection could have facilitated rifting and rapid lithospheric removal, although this may require a wet mantle to be realistic on the required time scales. The high-V structure agrees with the maximum P,T conditions recorded by young ultra-high pressure rocks exposed on the rift axis and may be implicated in their genesis.

  2. Men's preferences for women's breast morphology in New Zealand, Samoa, and Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Dixson, Barnaby J; Vasey, Paul L; Sagata, Katayo; Sibanda, Nokuthaba; Linklater, Wayne L; Dixson, Alan F

    2011-12-01

    Sexual selection via mate choice may have influenced the evolution of women's breast morphology. We conducted an image-based questionnaire quantifying and comparing the preferences of men from Papua New Guinea (PNG), Samoa, and New Zealand (NZ) for images of women's breast size, breast symmetry, areola size, and areolar pigmentation. Results showed that men from PNG preferred larger breasts to a greater extent than men from Samoa and NZ, providing some support for the hypothesis that men from subsistence living cultures have a greater preference for morphological cues indicative of caloric reserves. Symmetrical breasts were most attractive to men in each culture. However, preferences were highest among NZ men, followed by men from Samoa, and were lowest among men from PNG. These results did not support the hypothesis that people living in higher pathogen environments have a greater preference for traits indicative of pathogen resistance and developmental stability. Large areolae were preferred among men from PNG, and to a lesser extent in Samoa, while in NZ men preferred medium-sized areolae. Thus, men's preferences for women's areolar size appear to be highly culturally specific. Darkly pigmented areolae were most attractive to men from Samoa and PNG, whereas men from NZ preferred areolae with medium pigmentation. These findings suggest that areolar pigmentation indicative of sexual maturity is preferred by men rather than lighter pigmentation, which may signal that a woman is in the early years of reproductive maturity. This study highlights the importance of cross-cultural research when testing the role of morphological cues in mate choice.

  3. Polyphased rifting to post-breakup evolution of the Coral Sea region, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulois, Cédric; Pubellier, Manuel; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Delescluse, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The Coral Sea Basin, offshore Papua New Guinea, is generally described as a rift propagator that opened through the Australian craton during the Late Cretaceous. Rifting was later followed by spreading activity during Palaeocene to lowermost Eocene times and basin inversion during the Cenozoic. Herein, we specifically describe the extensional structures and show that the area has actually a much longer history that dates back from the Late Palaeozoic. A special focus is made on the northern margin of the Coral Sea Basin along which subsurface and HD topographic data were recently acquired. Extension took place discontinuously from the Late Palaeozoic to the Lower Cenozoic through several rift megacycles that include extensional pulses and relaxation episodes. The first rift megacycle (R1), poorly documented, occurred during the Triassic along an old Permo-Triassic, NS-trending structural fabric. Evidence of Permo-Triassic features is principally observed in the western part of the Coral Sea near the Tasman Line, a major lithospheric discontinuity that marks the eastern limit of the underlying Australian craton in Papua New Guinea. This early Triassic framework was reactivated during a Jurassic rifting stage (R2), resulting in small (~10/20km) tilted basins bounded by major NS, NE-SW and EW normal faults. Extension formed a large basin, floored by oceanic crust that might have connected with the Tethys Ocean. The Owen Stanley Oceanic Basin containing deep-marine sediments now obducted in the Ocean Stanley Thrust Belt are likely to represent this oceanic terrane. Both R1 and R2 megacycles shaped the geometry of the Jurassic Australian margin. A third Cretaceous extensional megacycle (R3) only reactivated the largest faults, cutting through the midst of this early stretched continental margin. It formed wider, poorly tilted basins and terminated with the onset of the Coral Sea seafloor spreading from Danian to Ypresian times (61.8 to 53.4 Myr). Then, the overall

  4. A mathematical analysis of the influence of adverse and favourable winds on sprinting.

    PubMed

    Ward-Smith, A J

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of running performance, based on the first law of thermodynamics and originally derived for still air conditions, is extended to account for the effects of favourable and adverse winds. Solutions to the full theory have been obtained by numerical integration of the governing equations. Simplifications to the full calculation procedure have also been investigated. Calculations for races over a distance of 100 m show that the advantage to an athlete of a following wind increases progressively with increasing wind speed. A favourable wind of 2 ms-1 provides a benefit of about 0.18 s on running time.

  5. The volcanic environment for 40,000 years of human occupation on the Willaumez Isthmus, West New Britain, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neall, V. E.; Wallace, R. C.; Torrence, R.

    2008-10-01

    The stratigraphic sequence of 22 tephra beds and their associated paleosols at two sites selected from our studies in West New Britain, Papua New Guinea provide the essential environmental background for understanding human responses to c. 40 ka years of volcanic activity. Lithology, grain size, and mineralogy of the tephras, interpreted for the first time, elucidate the varying volcanic provenance, especially of the Pleistocene beds, and the environmental conditions which former inhabitants experienced. This sequence provides an important long-term record of how humans coped with volcanic adversity in Papua New Guinea. The stratigraphic record contains abundant evidence for human settlement during the intervals between volcanic eruptions. Following plinian and subplinian eruptions, people abandoned the region for significant periods of time. In some cases, these cataclysmic events caused major cultural disasters characterised by local population extinction and loss of some significant types of cultural behaviour. Despite the punctuated record of settlement and changes in material culture, over the long-term, human populations found effective ways to maintain themselves within an active volcanic environment. Key responses included persistence of mobile and flexible settlement patterns, planned and staged uses of raw materials, social exchange, and increasing levels of landscape management.

  6. The gut microbiota of rural papua new guineans: composition, diversity patterns, and ecological processes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Inés; Stegen, James C; Maldonado-Gómez, Maria X; Eren, A Murat; Siba, Peter M; Greenhill, Andrew R; Walter, Jens

    2015-04-28

    Although recent research revealed an impact of westernization on diversity and composition of the human gut microbiota, the exact consequences on metacommunity characteristics are insufficiently understood, and the underlying ecological mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, we have compared the fecal microbiota of adults from two non-industrialized regions in Papua New Guinea (PNG) with that of United States (US) residents. Papua New Guineans harbor communities with greater bacterial diversity, lower inter-individual variation, vastly different abundance profiles, and bacterial lineages undetectable in US residents. A quantification of the ecological processes that govern community assembly identified bacterial dispersal as the dominant process that shapes the microbiome in PNG but not in the US. These findings suggest that the microbiome alterations detected in industrialized societies might arise from modern lifestyle factors limiting bacterial dispersal, which has implications for human health and the development of strategies aimed to redress the impact of westernization.

  7. 1-D seismic velocity model and hypocenter relocation using double difference method around West Papua region

    SciTech Connect

    Sabtaji, Agung E-mail: agung.sabtaji@bmkg.go.id; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    West Papua region has fairly high of seismicity activities due to tectonic setting and many inland faults. In addition, the region has a unique and complex tectonic conditions and this situation lead to high potency of seismic hazard in the region. The precise earthquake hypocenter location is very important, which could provide high quality of earthquake parameter information and the subsurface structure in this region to the society. We conducted 1-D P-wave velocity using earthquake data catalog from BMKG for April, 2009 up to March, 2014 around West Papua region. The obtained 1-D seismic velocity then was used as input for improving hypocenter location using double-difference method. The relocated hypocenter location shows fairly clearly the pattern of intraslab earthquake beneath New Guinea Trench (NGT). The relocated hypocenters related to the inland fault are also observed more focus in location around the fault.

  8. Leucosiid crabs from Papua New Guinea, with descriptions of eight new species (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Galil, Bella S; Ng, Peter K L

    2015-10-06

    Twenty-five species of leucosiid crabs are reported from Madang Province, Papua New Guinea. Of these, seven are new to science: two each are included in Alox Tan & Ng, 1995 and Tanaoa Galil, 2003, and one each in Ryphila Galil, 2009, Seulocia Galil, 2005, and Urnalana Galil, 2005. Fifteen additional species are new records for Papua New Guinea: Alox rugosum (Stimpson, 1858), Ancylodactyla nana (Zarenkov, 1990), Arcania heptacantha De Man, 1907, Heterolithadia fallax (Henderson, 1893), Hiplyra longimana (A. Milne Edwards, 1874), Myra curtimana Galil, 2001, M. digitata Galil 2004, Nursilia dentata Bell, 1855, Oreotlos etor Tan & Richer de Forges, 1993, Parilia major Sakai, 1961, Raylilia coniculifera Galil, 2001, R. uenoi (Takeda, 1995), Toru pilus (Tan, 1996), Urashima pustuloides (Sakai, 1961) and Leucosia rubripalma Galil, 2003. The new species are described and illustrated, and their affinities with allied taxa discussed. Colour photographs are provided for 20 species.

  9. Maintenance of a reliable laboratory service for tuberculosis intervention in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Makaen, Johnson; Omena, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    The reemergence of tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant strains, in Papua New Guinea highlights the never ending nature of the antituberculosis (anti-TB) campaign in that country and warrants the need for constant vigilance against the condition. Through surveillance, early detection, and management, the spread and incidence of TB can be kept in check. To maintain successful TB control programs, the government and partners committed to this campaign need to overhaul essential aspects of laboratory services. Clinical laboratories play a critical role in diagnostics; their functions cannot be substituted nor relegated. It is time to end neglect of these services in Papua New Guinea and to arm the laboratories in that country with full financial and logistical support so that they can lead the campaign against TB.

  10. Complications of bush thoracotomy in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J; Tharion, J

    1995-03-01

    Bush thoracotomy is still practised in the South Western Highlands of Papua New Guinea, by traditional bush doctors. These bush thoracotomies are performed with the aim of letting out the 'bad blood' that is believed to have collected in the body cavities following injuries. During a 3 year period between 1989 and 1992, 183 patients with complications of bush thoracotomy were treated at the Sopas Hospital in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Of these patients, 55 had chest wall infections only, without any pleural involvement. Of the patients with empyemas, 14 were treated by decortication of the empyema with one death and all remaining patients were treated by drainage procedures with one death. We recommend early treatment by adequate drainage of the empyema and, where feasible, early decortication. Continuing education to eradicate the procedure, and provision of adequate surgical facilities for management of complications, should be the long-term aim for this continuing problem.

  11. Trends in tobacco consumption and incidences of associated neoplasms in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Scrimgeour, E M; Jolley, D

    1983-04-30

    From 1960 to 1979 total annual consumption of tobacco in Papua New Guinea increased from 573 to 1800 metric tonnes. The annual consumption of tobacco per head increased from 2.78 to 6.14 kg, and the proportion of commercial cigarettes smoked is estimated to have increased from 20% to 71% of the total tobacco consumption. Between 1965 and 1979 the average annual age standardised incidence of reported cases of carcinoma of the oral cavity increased significantly in women (p less than 0.01) but not in men (p greater than 0.05). This rise might have been related to increasing consumption of tobacco or alcohol, or both, in individuals who habitually chewed betel nut. There was no significant change in the reported incidences of carcinoma of the larynx, lung, oesophagus, pancreas, kidney, or bladder. At present there are no constraints on the marketing of tobacco in Papua New Guinea.

  12. Myristicyclins A and B: antimalarial procyanidins from Horsfieldia spicata from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Van Wagoner, Ryan M; Pond, Cristopher D; Pole, Ann R; Jensen, James B; Blankenship, D'Arbra; Grimberg, Brian T; Kiapranis, Robert; Matainaho, Teatulohi K; Barrows, Louis R; Ireland, Chris M

    2014-01-17

    An antimalarial screen for plants collected from Papua New Guinea identified an extract of Horsfieldia spicata as having activity. Isolation of the active constituents led to the identification of two new compounds: myristicyclins A (1) and B (2). Both compounds are procyanidin-like congeners of myristinins lacking a pendant aromatic ring. Myristicyclin A was found to inhibit the ring, trophozoite, and schizont stages of Plasmodium falciparum at similar concentrations in the mid-μM range.

  13. Myristicyclins A and B: Antimalarial procyanidins from Horsfieldia spicata from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenyu; Van Wagoner, Ryan M.; Pond, Cristopher D.; Pole, Ann R.; Jensen, James B.; Blankenship, D’Arbra; Grimberg, Brian T.; Kiapranis, Robert; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Barrows, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    An antimalarial screen for plants collected from Papua New Guinea identified an extract of Horsfieldia spicata as having activity. Isolation of the active constituents led to the identification of two new compounds: myristicyclins A (1) and B (2). Both compounds are procyanidin-like congeners of myristinins lacking a pendant aromatic ring. Myristicyclin A was found to inhibit the ring, trophozoite, and schizont stages of Plasmodium falciparum at similar concentrations in the mid-μM range. PMID:24350818

  14. Darwin's Arguments in Favour of Natural Selection and against Special Creationism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nola, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In many places in "The Origin of Species", Darwin compares his own theory of Natural Selection favourably with Special Creationism which comes off as a bad second best. He does this using some version of the argument form known as "Inference to the Best Explanation". The first part of this paper is methodological. It considers Whewell's notion of…

  15. Hill-Robertson Interference Maintained by Red Queen Dynamics Favours the Evolution of Sex.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jack; Galbraith, James D

    2017-03-15

    Although it is well established theoretically that selective interference among mutations (Hill-Robertson interference) favours meiotic recombination, genome-wide mean rates of mutation and strengths of selection appear too low to support this as the mechanism favouring recombination in nature. A possible solution to this discrepancy between theory and observation is that selection is at least intermittently very strong due to the antagonistic coevolution between a host and its parasites. The Red Queen theory posits that such coevolution generates fitness epistasis among loci, which generates negative linkage disequilibrium among beneficial mutations, which in turn favours recombination. This theory has received only limited support. However, Red Queen dynamics without epistasis may provide the ecological conditions that maintain strong and frequent selective interference in finite populations that indirectly selects for recombination. This hypothesis is developed here through the simulation of Red Queen dynamics. This approach required the development of a method to calculate the exact frequencies of multi-locus haplotypes after recombination. Simulations show that recombination is favoured by the moderately weak selection of many loci involved in the interaction between a host and its parasites, which results in substitution rates that are compatible with empirical estimates. The model also reproduces the previously reported rapid increase in the rate of outcrossing in Caenorhabditis elegans coevolving with a bacterial pathogen. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of Cocoa Beans from China, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fenglin; Tan, Lehe; Wu, Huasong; Fang, Yiming; Xu, Fei; Chu, Zhong; Wang, Qinghuang

    2013-05-21

    A survey on five kinds of cocoa beans from new cocoa planting countries was conducted to analyze each kind's basic quality. The average bean weight and butter content of Hainan cocoa beans were the lowest, at less than 1.1 g, and 39.24% to 43.44%, respectively. Cocoa beans from Indonesia where shown to be about 8.0% and 9.0% higher in average bean weight and butter content, respectively, than that of Papua New Guinea and about 20.0% and 25.0% higher in average bean weight and butter content than Chinese dried beans, respectively. The average total polyphenolic content ranged from 81.22 mg/10 g to 301.01 mg/10 g. The Hainan 2011 sample had the highest total polyphenolic content, followed by the unfermented sample from Indonesia and the Papua New Guinea sample. The polyphenolic levels found in the Hainan 2010 sample were 123.61 mg/10 g and lower than the other three samples, but the Indonesian fermented sample had the lowest total polyphenolic content of 81.22 mg/10 g. The average total amino acid content ranged from 11.58 g/100 g to 18.17 g/100 g. The total amino acid content was the highest in the Indonesian unfermented sample, followed by the Hainan 2011 sample and the Papua New Guinea sample. The levels found in the Hainan 2010 sample were lower; the Indonesian fermented sample had the lowest total amino acid content.

  17. Three new species of Oreophryne (Anura, Microhylidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Fred

    2013-01-01

    I describe three new species of the diverse microhylid frog genus Oreophryne from Papua New Guinea. Two of these occur in two isolated mountain ranges along the northern coast of Papua New Guinea; the third is from Rossel Island in the very southeasternmost part of the country. All three are the first Oreophryne known from these areas to have a cartilaginous connection between the procoracoid and scapula, a feature usually seen in species far to the west or from the central cordillera of New Guinea. Each of the new species also differs from the many other Papuan Oreophryne in a variety of other morphological, color-pattern, and call features. Advertisement-call data for Oreophryne species from the north-coast region suggest that they represent only two of the several call types seen in regions further south, consistent with the relatively recent derivation of these northern regions as accreted island-arc systems. The distinctively different, whinnying, call type of the new species from Rossel Island occurs among other Oreophryne from southeastern Papua New Guinea but has been unreported elsewhere, raising the possibility that it may characterize a clade endemic to that region.

  18. Three new species of Oreophryne (Anura, Microhylidae) from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Abstract I describe three new species of the diverse microhylid frog genus Oreophryne from Papua New Guinea. Two of these occur in two isolated mountain ranges along the northern coast of Papua New Guinea; the third is from Rossel Island in the very southeasternmost part of the country. All three are the first Oreophryne known from these areas to have a cartilaginous connection between the procoracoid and scapula, a feature usually seen in species far to the west or from the central cordillera of New Guinea. Each of the new species also differs from the many other Papuan Oreophryne in a variety of other morphological, color-pattern, and call features. Advertisement-call data for Oreophryne species from the north-coast region suggest that they represent only two of the several call types seen in regions further south, consistent with the relatively recent derivation of these northern regions as accreted island-arc systems. The distinctively different, whinnying, call type of the new species from Rossel Island occurs among other Oreophryne from southeastern Papua New Guinea but has been unreported elsewhere, raising the possibility that it may characterize a clade endemic to that region. PMID:24146562

  19. The Impact of Repeated Rounds of Mass Drug Administration with Diethylcarbamazine Plus Albendazole on Bancroftian Filariasis in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Gary J.; Kastens, Will; Susapu, Melinda; Laney, Sandra J.; Williams, Steven A.; King, Christopher L.; Kazura, James W.; Bockarie, Moses J.

    2008-01-01

    Background This study employed various monitoring methods to assess the impact of repeated rounds of mass drug administration (MDA) on bancroftian filariasis in Papua New Guinea, which has the largest filariasis problem in the Pacific region. Methodology/Principal Findings Residents of rural villages near Madang were studied prior to and one year after each of three rounds of MDA with diethylcarbamazine plus albendazole administered per World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. The mean MDA compliance rate was 72.9%. Three rounds of MDA decreased microfilaremia rates (Mf, 1 ml night blood by filter) from 18.6% pre-MDA to 1.3% after the third MDA (a 94% decrease). Mf clearance rates in infected persons were 71%, 90.7%, and 98.1% after 1, 2, and 3 rounds of MDA. Rates of filarial antigenemia assessed by card test (a marker for adult worm infection) decreased from 47.5% to 17.1% (a 64% decrease) after 3 rounds of MDA. The filarial antibody rate (IgG4 antibodies to Bm14, an indicator of filarial infection status and/or exposure to mosquito-borne infective larvae) decreased from 59.3% to 25.1% (a 54.6% decrease). Mf, antigen, and antibody rates decreased more rapidly in children <11 years of age (by 100%, 84.2%, and 76.8%, respectively) relative to older individuals, perhaps reflecting their lighter infections and shorter durations of exposure/infection prior to MDA. Incidence rates for microfilaremia, filarial antigenemia, and antifilarial antibodies also decreased significantly after MDA. Filarial DNA rates in Anopheles punctulatus mosquitoes that had recently taken a blood meal decreased from 15.1% to 1.0% (a 92.3% decrease). Conclusions/Significance MDA had dramatic effects on all filariasis parameters in the study area and also reduced incidence rates. Follow-up studies will be needed to determine whether residual infection rates in residents of these villages are sufficient to support sustained transmission by the An. punctulatus vector. Lymphatic filariasis

  20. Vaccenic acid favourably alters immune function in obese JCR:LA-cp rats.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Heather J; Gerdung, Christopher A; Ruth, Megan R; Proctor, Spencer D; Field, Catherine J

    2009-08-01

    Vaccenic acid (VA) is a ruminant-derived trans-fat and precursor of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). The objective of the present study was to explore the effects of VA on immune function in a model of the metabolic syndrome, JCR:LA-cp rats. Lean (2:1 mix of +/cp and +/+) and obese (cp/cp) rats, aged 8 weeks, were fed a control (0% VA) or a VA diet (1.5% (w/w) VA) for 3 weeks (twenty rats per group). Splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) immune cell phenotypes (flow cytometry), ex vivo cytokine production (ELISA) and phospholipid fatty acid concentrations were measured. Obese rats had higher proportions of splenic macrophages, total T-cells, helper T-cells (total and percentage CD25+), cytotoxic T-cells (total and percentage CD25+) and produced higher concentrations of IL-6 to concanavalin A (ConA) compared with lean rats. Obese rats had lower proportions of MLN T-cells, new T-cells (CD3+CD90+) and cytotoxic T-cells, but higher proportions of helper cells that were CD45RC+, CD25+ and CD4lo, and produced higher concentrations of IL-2, IL-10, interferon gamma and TNFalpha in response to ConA compared with lean rats. VA was higher in plasma phospholipids and both VA and CLA (cis-9, trans-11) were higher in MLN phospholipids compared with control-fed rats. Lean VA-fed rats had lower proportions of MLN and splenocyte CD45RC+ helper cells, and helper T-cells. Splenocytes from VA-fed rats produced 16-23% less IL-2, IL-10 and TNFalpha compared with controls. VA normalised production of MLN IL-2 and TNFalpha in obese rats to levels similar to those seen in lean rats. These results indicate that dietary VA favourably alters the pro-inflammatory tendency of mesenteric lymphocytes from JCR:LA-cp rats.

  1. Temporal fluctuations in oribatid mites indicate that density-independent factors favour parthenogenetic reproduction.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Christian; Scheu, Stefan; Maraun, Mark

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the oribatid mite density, community structure and the percentage of parthenogenetic individuals in four different forest types across three regions in Germany in 2008 and once again in 2011. We compared temporal (inter-annual) fluctuations in population densities between sexually and parthenogenetically reproducing species of oribatid mites. We hypothesized that population densities in parthenogenetic oribatid mite species fluctuate more than in sexual ones. Further, we expected species composition and dominance of parthenogenetic species to differ between forest types and regions. Oribatid mite community structure did not differ between years but varied with forest type and region, indicating low species turnover in time. As hypothesized, temporal fluctuations were more pronounced in parthenogenetic as compared to sexual species. The percentage of parthenogenetic individuals was significantly higher in coniferous than in beech forests and significantly higher in Schorfheide-Chorin than in Hainich-Dün and Schwäbische Alb. The results indicate that parthenogenetic species flourish if populations are controlled by density-independent factors and dominate at sites were resources are plentiful and easily available, such as coniferous forests, and in regions with more acidic soils and thick organic layers, such as Schorfheide-Chorin. However, historical factors also may have contributed to the increased dominance of parthenogenetic species in the Schorfheide-Chorin, as this region was more heavily glaciated and this may have favoured parthenogenetic species. Overall, our study supports the hypothesis that parthenogenetic species benefit from the lack of density-dependent population control whereas the opposite is true for sexual species.

  2. Circulating Irisin Concentrations Are Associated with a Favourable Lipid Profile in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Oelmann, Simon; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Bahls, Martin; Friedrich, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims Irisin is a myokine, which is mainly inversely associated with the risk for non-communicable diseases. Irisin improves cellular energy metabolism by uncoupling the mitochondrial respiratory chain resulting in increased energy expenditure using lipids. To date potential associations between irisin concentration and lipid profile are poorly understood. Therefore, this investigation aimed to evaluate potential associations between irisin and lipid levels in the general population. Methods Data of 430 men and 537 women from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND) with available irisin and lipid concentrations were used. Analyses of variance, linear and logistic regression models adjusted for age, HBA1c, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, systolic blood pressure, ALAT were calculated. Results We detected significantly inverse associations between irisin and circulating levels of total [beta coefficient 0.21 (standard error 0.08), p = 0.01], low-density cholesterol [-0.16 (0.07), p = 0.03] and triglycerides [-0.17 (0.08), p = 0.02] for men. Females without lipid lowering medication had an inverse association between irisin and total cholesterol [-0.12 (0.06), p = 0.05]. Further, male subjects with irisin concentrations in the third tertile had an increased odds for elevated low-density cholesterol [odds ratio 1.96 (95% confidence interval 1.07–3.48), p = 0.03) and triglyceride [1.95 (1.09–3.47), p = 0.02] levels, even after exclusion of subjects with lipid lowering medication. In addition, our data revealed an annual rhythm of serum irisin levels with peak levels arise in winter and summer months. Conclusion This is the first investigation to report a significant association between circulating irisin and a favourable lipid profile in the general population. This may infer that higher irisin concentrations are associated with a reduced risk for non-communicable diseases. PMID:27128661

  3. Beyond sexual desire and curiosity: sexuality among senior high school students in Papua and West Papua Provinces (Indonesia) and implications for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Diarsvitri, Wienta; Utomo, Iwu Dwisetyani; Neeman, Teresa; Oktavian, Antonius

    2011-10-01

    When it comes to sexuality and norms, young Indonesians are becoming more open. Concern about this is related to the rapid increase in HIV prevalence in Indonesia, especially in Papua and West Papua Provinces. While much research has been conducted among youth who have left school, little is known about senior high school students' sexuality and sexual practices in these provinces. Using qualitative and quantitative data, we explore perspectives on and experiences of sexuality, contraceptive use, unintended pregnancy and unsafe abortion among 1082 Year 11 students from 16 senior high schools in both provinces. Findings suggest that around 38.3% of students reported having had sexual intercourse and 36.5% of these having had their first sexual encounter before they were 15 years old. Furthermore, contraceptive use among sexually active students was very low. Around 32% of female students who reported having had sexual intercourse also reported having an unintended pregnancy and the majority of them had had unsafe abortions. The paper points to the implications of students' high-risk sexual behaviours for HIV prevention.

  4. The influence of freshwater and material export on sedimentary facies and benthic processes within the Fly Delta and adjacent Gulf of Papua (Papua New Guinea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alongi, D. M.; Christoffersen, P.; Tirendi, F.; Robertson, A. I.

    1992-02-01

    Large volumes of freshwater and suspended material debouch from the Fly River in southwestern Papua New Guinea into the Gulf of Papua, greatly influencing the hydrography and sedimentary processes within the river delta and adjacent shelf region. Sedimentary facies within the subtidal regions of the Fly Delta are composed mainly of compacted and eroded very fine black sand, and highly laminated, muddy sand and sandy mud, progressing to prodelta mud with intermixed primary and biogenic structures in the inner Gulf of Papua. These prodelta muds grade further to mixed terrigenous-carbonate deposits southwards into the northern Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait, and to well-bioturbated, fluid mud northwards into the Gulf of Papua. The transition from physically-dominated, estuarine conditions within the delta to more quiescent, marine conditions on the shelf leads to concomitant changes in sediment chemistry, microbial activity and infaunal and epifaunal communities. Particulate (C, N, P) and dissolved inorganic and organic nutrient concentrations were a function of sediment type (higher in finer deposits) rather than location (delta vs gulf). C: N: P ratios of solid-phase nutrients varied greatly, but were usually less than those predicted by the Redfield ratio. Mean interstitial concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients were low (μM range), but dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus levels were equivalent to those found in higher latitude systems. Fluxes of dissolved inorganic nutrients were generally low (μmol m -2 day -1). Flux rates were mostly negative (into the sediment) in the delta suggesting that these deposits are a sink for nutrients. In the offshore deposits, dissolved inorganic fluxes were higher and mostly positive indicating that they are a source for dissolved nutrients. Standing crops of bacteria (range: below detection limits— 2.5 × 10 10 cells g -1 dry wt), meiofauna (range: 5-750 individuals 10 cm -2; 9-1006 μg dry wt 10

  5. Ethnochemistry and Ethnomedicine of Ancient Papua New Guineans and Their Use in Motivating Students in Secondary Schools and Universities in PNG

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marasinghe, Basil

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50,000 years of Papua New Guinea's human history, Papua New Guineans have been making significant contributions to Science, particularly in the fields of Chemistry and Medicine. However, because of the absence of any written language for over 800 dialects, the information has not been recorded and the contributions of ancient Papua…

  6. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Strain AUSPNG1, Isolated from a Cutaneous Ulcer of a Child from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Marinov, Georgi K.; Roberts, Sally A.; Robson, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi has recently emerged as a leading cause of cutaneous ulcers in the yaws-endemic areas of Papua New Guinea and other South Pacific islands. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the H. ducreyi strain AUSPNG1, isolated from a cutaneous ulcer of a child from Papua New Guinea. PMID:26847887

  7. Draft Whole-Genome Sequence of Haemophilus ducreyi Strain AUSPNG1, Isolated from a Cutaneous Ulcer of a Child from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Marinov, Georgi K; Roberts, Sally A; Robson, Jenny; Spinola, Stanley M

    2016-02-04

    Haemophilus ducreyi has recently emerged as a leading cause of cutaneous ulcers in the yaws-endemic areas of Papua New Guinea and other South Pacific islands. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the H. ducreyi strain AUSPNG1, isolated from a cutaneous ulcer of a child from Papua New Guinea.

  8. An Assessment of Language Needs for Technical Communication in a Multilingual Speech Community: Implications for Teaching LSP in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, James

    A survey of 98 Papua New Guinea technical university graduates in the applied sciences, engineering fields, and forestry investigated their language skill use and language needs in the workplace. Results indicate that, as in Papua New Guinea society in general, English and Tok Pisin are the two most important languages for technical communication…

  9. Family characteristics predicting favourable changes in 10 and 11-year-old children's lifestyle-related health behaviours during an 18-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ray, Carola; Roos, Eva

    2012-02-01

    Lifestyle-related health behaviours such as screen time, physical activity, sleep duration, and food intake tend to change into non-favourable directions when children become young adolescents. Cross-sectional studies show that family characteristics are important determinants for children's health behaviours. This study examined whether family characteristics such as parenting practices at meals and family involvement predict a more favourable change in children's lifestyle-related health behaviours during an 18-month follow-up. 745 children in school grades 4 and 5 (response rate 65%) filled in a baseline questionnaire in the autumn of 2006. A follow-up was conducted in the spring of 2008 (91%). Several health behaviours had changed in a non-favourable direction. Baseline parenting practices at meals and family involvement predicted some of the changes in the lifestyle-related health behaviours in 2008. Parenting practices at meals predicted a smaller increase in TV, DVD viewing time, and a smaller decrease in fruit intake. Amongst family involvement determinants, less time alone at home after school predicted a smaller increase in screen time, a smaller decrease in sleep duration, and a smaller increase in soft drink intake. For conclusion several family characteristics predicted favourable changes in children's lifestyle-related health behaviours.

  10. The relationship between undernutrition and humoral immune status in children with pneumonia in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Allan W; Otczyk, Diana C; Barker, Jane; Lehmann, Deborah; Alpers, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition is a significant risk factor for childhood infectious diseases in developing countries, including Papua New Guinea (PNG). Whilst the mechanisms are not fully understood there is little doubt that impairment of immune function is a major contributing factor in enhancing disease susceptibility in malnourished children. This susceptibility has been clearly shown for pneumonia in PNG. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of undernutrition on the humoral immune profile in children less than 60 months of age with pneumonia. The study was cross-sectional with measurements of nutritional status and parameters of the immune response being assessed simultaneously. The children were grouped according to age for the purpose of comparative analysis. The children were from the Goroka region of the Eastern Highlands Province of PNG and had been admitted to hospital with moderate-severe pneumonia. They were classified as undernourished (less than 80% weight for age) or nourished (greater than or equal to 80% weight for age). Serum albumin, IgG, IgA and IgM and salivary albumin and IgA were measured. Antibodies to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae outer membrane protein and Escherichia coli O antigen were also determined in serum and saliva. Undernourished children aged less than 49 months had lower levels of serum albumin than nourished children throughout this age range. Lower values of salivary IgA were observed in infants (less than 13 months of age) than in older children, with a larger proportion of younger children having no detectable IgA. The age-related immunological profile was similar in undernourished and nourished children. At different age intervals the concentration of immunoglobulins in serum and saliva from undernourished children was generally found to be less than or the same as that from nourished children. In most cases undernourished children had lower levels of specific antibodies than nourished children but for some antibodies in

  11. Unrestricted migration favours virulent pathogens in experimental metapopulations: evolutionary genetics of a rapacious life history.

    PubMed

    Eshelman, Christal M; Vouk, Roxanne; Stewart, Jodi L; Halsne, Elizabeth; Lindsey, Haley A; Schneider, Stacy; Gualu, Miliyard; Dean, Antony M; Kerr, Benjamin

    2010-08-27

    Understanding pathogen infectivity and virulence requires combining insights from epidemiology, ecology, evolution and genetics. Although theoretical work in these fields has identified population structure as important for pathogen life-history evolution, experimental tests are scarce. Here, we explore the impact of population structure on life-history evolution in phage T4, a viral pathogen of Escherichia coli. The host-pathogen system is propagated as a metapopulation in which migration between subpopulations is either spatially restricted or unrestricted. Restricted migration favours pathogens with low infectivity and low virulence. Unrestricted migration favours pathogens that enter and exit their hosts quickly, although they are less productive owing to rapid extirpation of the host population. The rise of such 'rapacious' phage produces a 'tragedy of the commons', in which better competitors lower productivity. We have now identified a genetic basis for a rapacious life history. Mutations at a single locus (rI) cause increased virulence and are sufficient to account for a negative relationship between phage competitive ability and productivity. A higher frequency of rI mutants under unrestricted migration signifies the evolution of rapaciousness in this treatment. Conversely, spatially restricted migration favours a more 'prudent' pathogen strategy, in which the tragedy of the commons is averted. As our results illustrate, profound epidemiological and ecological consequences of life-history evolution in a pathogen can have a simple genetic cause.

  12. Mass treatment with ivermectin for filariasis control in Papua New Guinea: impact on mosquito survival.

    PubMed

    Bockarie, M J; Hii, J L; Alexander, N D; Bockarie, F; Dagoro, H; Kazura, J W; Alpers, M P

    1999-05-01

    Field studies were carried out to determine the impact of mass human treatment with ivermectin on the survival of anthropophagic mosquitoes of the Anopheles punctulatus complex (Diptera: Culicidae), the vectors of lymphatic filariasis and malaria in Papua New Guinea. In a village where mass treatment had been given, using 400 microg/kg ivermectin plus 6 mg/kg diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC), we performed pre- and post-treatment collections of freshly blood-engorged mosquitoes from the same nine bedrooms. All blood-fed mosquitoes collected less than 4 days after mass treatment died within 9 days, whereas 67% of those collected before treatment survived for >9 days. Comparison (using the log-rank test) of the survival curves for mosquitoes collected (i) before treatment, (ii)<4 days after treatment, and (iii) 28 days after treatment, showed the survival rate of group (ii) to be significantly lower than the other two (chi2=176, df=2, P<0.0001). Pre- and post-treatment all-night landing catches showed no reduction in human biting rates in the experimental village. In another village, where people were mass treated with ivermectin (400 microg/kg) only, the survival rates of freshly blood-engorged An. punctulatus collected from bedroom resting-sites less than 1 day after treatment, were compared to similar collections carried out at the same time in a nearby village where people were not treated with ivermectin. The 48-h survival rate for the ivermectin-treated village was 31% compared to 94% for the other; this difference was highly significant (chi2=32.42, df=1, P<0.0001). Mosquitoes fed 2 months post-treatment with DEC or collected 38 days post-treatment with ivermectin had normal survival rates. We conclude that the duration of the systemic lethal effect of ivermectin on mosquitoes is insufficient to be of epidemiological significance in filariasis control programmes that are based on biannual and annual single-dose treatments, but might reduce vectorial capacity

  13. Replacive sulfide formation in anhydrite chimneys from the Pacmanus hydrothermal field, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Catharina; Bach, Wolfgang; Plümper, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal flow within the oceanic crust is an important process for the exchange of energy and mass between the lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Infiltrated seawater heats up and interacts with wall rock, causing mineral replacement reactions. These play a large role in the formation of ore deposits; at the discharge zone, a hot, acidic and metal-rich potential ore fluid exits the crust. It mixes with seawater and forms chimneys, built up of sulfate minerals such as anhydrite (CaSO4), which are subsequently replaced by sulfide minerals. Sulfide formation is related to fluid pathways, defined by cracks and pores in the sulfate chimney. Over time, these systems might develop into massive sulfide deposits. The big question is then: how is sulfate-sulfide replacement related to the evolution of rock porosity? To address this question, sulfide-bearing anhydrite chimneys from the Pacmanus hydrothermal field (Manus Basin, Papua New Guinea) were studied using X-ray tomography, EMPA, FIB-SEM and -TEM. The apparently massive anhydrite turns out highly porous on the micro scale, with sulfide minerals in anhydrite cleavage planes and along grain boundaries. The size of the sulfide grains relates to the pores they grew into, suggesting a tight coupling between dissolution (porosity generation) and growth of replacive minerals. Some of the sulfide grains are hollow and apparently used the dissolving anhydrite as a substrate to start growth in a pore. Another mode of sulfide development is aggregates of euhedral pyrite cores surrounded by colloform chalcopyrite. This occurrence implies that fluid pathways have remained open for some time to allow several stages of precipitation during fluid evolution. To start the replacement and to keep it going, porosity generation is crucial. Our samples show that dissolution of anhydrite occurred along pathways where fluid could enter, such as cleavage planes and grain boundaries. It appears that fluids ascending within the inner

  14. Superiority of traditional village diet and lifestyle in minimizing cardiovascular disease risk in Papua New Guineans.

    PubMed

    Kende, M

    2001-01-01

    In the traditional society of Papua New Guinea (PNG) atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are rare. However, among the urban population reports of cases of atheroma-related CVD are increasing. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare the CVD risk factors in a homogeneous population of the Southern Highlands Province living in both rural and urban areas differing only in their diet and lifestyle. A total of 221 Samberigi people over the age of 25 years were selected for the survey. These included 123 individuals from remote villages of Samberigi and 98 of their relatives who had lived in Port Moresby city continuously for a minimum of 5 years. The anthropometric measurements, blood lipid, blood glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were measured and compared. The rural diets were mainly of vegetarian type, limited in variety and low in fat and protein content. In the urban subjects, the typical meal comprised refined foods with high fat and protein content. The urban men and women had significantly (p < 0.05) greater body weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist and hip circumferences than their rural counterparts. In Port Moresby, 57% of the men and 67% of the women were overweight or obese compared to 28% of their rural counterparts. Similarly, the mean plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were significantly higher in the urban group. However, no significant differences were demonstrated for waist to hip ratio, LDLC/HDLC ratio and lipoprotein (a) levels between the two groups. The total cholesterol, LDLC and HbA1c were positively associated with age and BMI in both rural and urban locations. In conclusion, there were significant increases in CVD risk factors in the urban population compared to the rural residents. This was predominantly due to the adoption of a western lifestyle and diet as people moved from rural villages

  15. Late Miocene to Recent formation of the Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt and foreland basin as a consequence of Woodlark microplate rotation, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Bryan; Mann, Paul

    2015-06-01

    The Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt and Aure-Moresby foreland basin are located in the eastern Gulf of Papua (GOP), Papua New Guinea (PNG), and formed during late Miocene-Recent as the result of large-scale, counterclockwise rotation of the 355,000 km2 Woodlark microplate. To document the structure, stratigraphy, and age of convergent deformation along the poorly studied, western edge of the rotating Woodlark microplate, we integrate results of 2,538 km of previously unpublished 2-D seismic reflection data with onshore geologic and GPS studies from previous workers. The late Miocene Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt is a 400 km long, northwest-trending fold-belt exposed onshore in Papua New Guinea that plunges to the southeast, where continuous folds and northeast-dipping thrusts can be imaged in the subsurface for more than 250 km. The arcuate trend of the Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt along the southwestern coast and offshore areas of the Papuan peninsula parallels the shape of the adjacent, offshore Aure-Moresby foreland basin and the strike of the transpressional segment of the left-lateral Owen-Stanley fault zone (OSFZ) passing along the center of the Papuan peninsula. As the OSFZ becomes more transtensional east of 148°E, folds of the Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt along southern coast of the peninsula become less prominent, and the adjacent Aure-Moresby foreland basin transitions into an undeformed Cenozoic passive margin setting. These observations of convergent an left-lateral deformation along the Aure-Moresby fold-thrust belt are consistent with: (1) counterclockwise rotation of the Woodlark microplate known from regional GPS studies; (2) coeval opening of the Woodlark basin along its southern edge in the late Miocene; and (3) rapid subduction at the New Britain trench along its northern edge. The kinematics of the rotating Woodlark microplate are driven by slab pull forces acting on the actively subducting northern edge of the microplate.

  16. Qualitative Research to Design Sustainable Community-Based Surveillance for Rabies in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Victoria J.; Kennedy, Emma; Dhagapan, Phillipa; Ward, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Given the proximity and recent spread of rabies in Indonesia, effective rabies surveillance in dogs is a priority in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea (PNG). Reporting of potential cases requires community engagement; therefore, the value and acceptability of such a system is critical to ensure sustainable surveillance. We used qualitative research methods to identify factors that influence the acceptability and value of community-based rabies surveillance. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with informants in 16 communities in East Arnhem, the Northern Peninsula Area, the Torres Strait in Australia, and in Western Province, PNG. Thematic analysis identified common themes including the importance of verbal communication, particularly via radio, community meetings, and direct conversation. We also found that dogs have high value to community members through connection to culture, economic (especially hunting), and companionship. The greatest barrier to the reporting of sick dogs was insufficient veterinary services and the subsequent lack of treatment response. In some regions, acceptance that sick dogs are a normal daily occurrence and lack of trust of authorities were also barriers to reporting. The findings from this study will be used to design sustainable rabies surveillance in Northern Australia and PNG by utilizing traditional communication channels and building on existing and valued animal-management services. The methods and findings of this study complement previous quantitative research, so as to target surveillance to high-risk areas within these regions. PMID:28275611

  17. Are counterfeit or substandard anti-infective products the cause of treatment failure in Papua New Guinea?

    PubMed

    Nair, Anita; Strauch, Stefanie; Lauwo, Jackson; Jähnke, Richard W O; Dressman, Jennifer

    2011-11-01

    Counterfeit and substandard products present a big challenge to any national plan or policy devised to improve public health. Poor quality drug products are especially a problem in lower income countries where product information and drug regulation enforcement are scant or absent. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the quality of amodiaquine and amoxicillin formulations sold in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and to detect the presence of counterfeit or substandard drugs in circulation, if any. Fourteen samples, collected from five registered pharmacies in Port Moresby, PNG, were subjected to visual inspection, quality control tests, and verification of product authenticity. The quality control tests included weight variation, content uniformity, thin layer chromatography, and dissolution. None of the products complied with all of the evaluation criteria. Two products, one of which was purportedly distributed by a company which proved to be nonexistent, contained no detectable amodiaquine. The present study confirms that counterfeit and substandard amodiaquine and amoxicillin products are finding their way into the distribution chain in Port Moresby, PNG. This quality problem with anti-infective products is of great concern, as it not only exposes patients to poor quality products but also fosters the development of resistant bacterial strains.

  18. Qualitative Research to Design Sustainable Community-Based Surveillance for Rabies in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Victoria J; Kennedy, Emma; Dhagapan, Phillipa; Ward, Michael P

    2017-01-01

    Given the proximity and recent spread of rabies in Indonesia, effective rabies surveillance in dogs is a priority in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea (PNG). Reporting of potential cases requires community engagement; therefore, the value and acceptability of such a system is critical to ensure sustainable surveillance. We used qualitative research methods to identify factors that influence the acceptability and value of community-based rabies surveillance. Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with informants in 16 communities in East Arnhem, the Northern Peninsula Area, the Torres Strait in Australia, and in Western Province, PNG. Thematic analysis identified common themes including the importance of verbal communication, particularly via radio, community meetings, and direct conversation. We also found that dogs have high value to community members through connection to culture, economic (especially hunting), and companionship. The greatest barrier to the reporting of sick dogs was insufficient veterinary services and the subsequent lack of treatment response. In some regions, acceptance that sick dogs are a normal daily occurrence and lack of trust of authorities were also barriers to reporting. The findings from this study will be used to design sustainable rabies surveillance in Northern Australia and PNG by utilizing traditional communication channels and building on existing and valued animal-management services. The methods and findings of this study complement previous quantitative research, so as to target surveillance to high-risk areas within these regions.

  19. How the need for money and the need for security influence migration and economic diversification in the Papua New Guinea highlands.

    PubMed

    Rambo, K F

    1995-01-01

    The author began studying migration between rural areas of the Papua New Guinea highlands under the premise that commitment to the cash economy and to capitalist investment could be investigated by concentrating largely upon people's coffee-growing activities. Coffee, as a small-holder cash crop, is the most evident and, in some areas, the only significant means by which money is earned. His cases concerned migration from a high-altitude homeland, where land for growing coffee was scarce, to lower resettlement areas in locations ideal for coffee growing. During an earlier period of fieldwork, both migrants and non-migrants insisted that the motivation to move was based upon a desire to grow more coffee and earn more cash. Changes in the local division of labor in the Simbu and Western Highlands Provinces are discussed, with the work strategies undertaken by the migrants in the study illustrated by brief case studies presented after a general description of the research.

  20. Synoptic conditions favouring the occurrence of dust transport from Africa toward Sardinia Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canu, Annalisa; Pellizzaro, Grazia; Pintus, Gabriella; Duce, Pierpaolo

    2016-04-01

    Dust events that reach Italy have usually origin in the Sahara and Sahel regions (north-western part of Africa), which represent the dust sources nearest to Italy. In those regions the dust-lifting activity occurs in a remarkable way. Every dust event is different from the others; in fact dust transport and dust concentration in the air can vary remarkably depending on the synoptic situation. In Sardinia, dust events are more frequent in the May-November period, but they can also take place in the December-April period. The main aim of this work was to describe dust outbreaks in Sardinia and to identify the main meteorological scenarios that originate the transport of dust towards the central and western Mediterranean Basin. The evaluation of the geographical dispersion of Saharan dust was performed by using MODIS satellite data and Meteosat imagery combined with SKIRON forecasting model. The origin and the trajectory of the dust carried by winds towards Italy were inferred by the NOAA HYSPLIT model (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model). In addition, PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter of less than 10 μm) and meteorological data registered by the ARPAS (Regional Environmental Protection Agency of Sardinia) monitoring stations were used to highlight the arrival of African air masses in Sardinia. The study was carried out during the 2014. A total of five events occurred during the year (two in spring and three in autumn) were analyzed. The origin of air masses loaded with dust from North Africa was confirmed by satellite imagery and 3-days air mass backward trajectories calculated by the NOAA HYSPLIT model. The analysis of the PM10 daily pattern registered at northern and southern Sardinia sites showed a rising of values during the dust event. The arrival of air masses from Africa caused the daily mean air temperature to rise whereas relative humidity values decreased. Finally, the results showed that all the event analyzed were

  1. New species of Pseudabbreviata (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) and other helminths in two species of Hypsilurus (Sauria: Agamidae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles R; Goldberg, Stephen R; Kraus, Fred

    2009-08-01

    Pseudabbreviata novaeguineaensis n. sp. from the stomach of Hypsilurus modestus (Agamidae) from Papua New Guinea is described and illustrated. The new species was also found in the stomach of Hypsilurus papuensis from Papua New Guinea. Pseudabbreviata novaeguineaensis n. sp. represents the sixth species assigned to the genus and the first from the Australo-Papuan Region. The new species differs from other species assigned to Pseudabbreviata by the vulva position in the female and pedunculate papillae arrangement in the male tail morphology. In addition to the new species, H. modestus harbored Meteterakis crombiei, Strongyluris gonyocephali, and larvae of Abbreviata sp. (in cysts).

  2. Pneumonia associated with infection with pneumocystis, respiratory syncytial virus, chlamydia, mycoplasma, and cytomegalovirus in children in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Shann, F; Walters, S; Pifer, L L; Graham, D M; Jack, I; Uren, E; Birch, D; Stallman, N D

    1986-01-01

    Paired serum samples were collected from 94 children with pneumonia admitted to Goroka Hospital, Papua New Guinea. All but three of the children were aged 1-24 months. Only nine children were malnourished, with weight for age less than 70% of the Harvard median (three had weight for age less than 60% of the Harvard median). Pneumocystis carinii antigen was detected in the serum of 23 children. Twenty two children had serological evidence of recent infection with respiratory syncytial virus. Five children were probably infected with Chlamydia trachomatis at the time of the study, and there was less convincing serological evidence of current infection in a further 11 children. Five children showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Although only one child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to cytomegalovirus, 86 children had this antibody. No child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Ureaplasma urealyticum or Legionella pneumophila. P carinii, respiratory syncytial virus, C trachomatis, M pneumoniae, and cytomegalovirus may be important causes of pneumonia in children in developing countries. PMID:3002538

  3. Lessons learnt from a measles outbreak in Madang Province, Papua New Guinea, June 2014 – March 2015

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Beverley; Flint, James

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study examined measles vaccine wastage during an outbreak response in Madang Province of Papua New Guinea from June 2014 to March 2015. Methods Vaccine wastage was defined as the number of doses received by a health centre minus the total number of doses administered during and returned following the outbreak vaccination campaign. Vaccine data were collected from the Provincial Health Information Office, the Provincial Vaccine Store register and clinic and health centre immunization registers for calculating the vaccine wastage. Interviews were conducted with all 48 health centres involved in the outbreak response using a structured questionnaire to explore the reasons for vaccine wastage. Results Of the 154 110 doses issued by Madang Province during the outbreak, a total of 85 236 (55%) doses were wasted. The wastage varied by district from 31% to 90%. The total cost of the vaccine wastage was estimated to be 589 810 Kina (US$ 196 604). None of the health centres maintained vaccine stock registers. Most health centres indicated multiple failures in cold chain logistics. Almost 40% of health centres reported incorrectly diluting vaccines. The same percentage of health centres reported using incorrect injection techniques. Discussion Regular audits of cold chain logistics, staff training and improved processes for recording vaccine administration and wastage will decrease vaccine wastage during vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and also benefit routine immunization activities.

  4. Transgressive women don't deserve protection: young men's narratives of sexual violence against women in rural Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Hanku, A; Aeno, H; Wilson, L; Eves, R; Mek, A; Nake Trumb, R; Whittaker, M; Fitzgerald, L; Kaldor, J M; Vallely, A

    2016-11-01

    Sexual violence against women and girls is commonplace in Papua New Guinea (PNG). While the experiences of women are rightly given central place in institutional responses to sexual violence, the men who perpetrate violence are often overlooked, an oversight that undermines the effectiveness of prevention efforts. This paper draws on interviews conducted with young men as part of a qualitative longitudinal study of masculinity and male sexuality in a rural highland area of PNG. It explores one aspect of male sexuality: men's narratives of sexual violence. Most striking from the data is that the collective enactment of sexual violence against women and girls is reported as an everyday and accepted practice amongst young men. However, not all women and girls were described as equally at risk, with those who transgress gender roles and roles inscribed and reinforced by patriarchal structures, at greater risk. To address this situation, efforts to reduce sexual violence against women and girls require an increased focus on male-centred intervention to critically engage with the forms of patriarchal authority that give license to sexual violence. Understanding the perceptions and experiences of men as perpetrators of sexual violence is a critical first step in the process of changing normative perceptions of gender, a task crucial to reducing sexual violence in countries such as PNG.

  5. Pathways involving traumatic losses, worry about family, adult separation anxiety and posttraumatic stress symptoms amongst refugees from West Papua.

    PubMed

    Tay, Alvin Kuowei; Rees, Susan; Chen, Jack; Kareth, Moses; Silove, Derrick

    2015-10-01

    There is some evidence that adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD) symptoms are closely associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) amongst refugees exposed to traumatic events (TEs), but the pathways involved remain to be elucidated. A recent study suggests that separation anxiety disorder precedes and predicts onset of PTSD. We examined a path model testing whether ASAD symptoms and worry about family mediated the path from traumatic losses to PTSD symptoms amongst 230 refugees from West Papua. Culturally adapted measures were applied to assess TE exposure and symptoms of ASAD and PTSD. A structural equation model indicated that ASAD symptoms played an important role in mediating the effects of traumatic losses and worry about family in the pathway to PTSD symptoms. Although based on cross-sectional data, our findings suggest that ASAD symptoms may play a role in the path from traumatic losses to PTSD amongst refugees. We propose an evolutionary model in which the ASAD and PTSD reactions represent complementary survival responses designed to protect the individual and close attachments from external threats.

  6. Effect of Climate Factors on the Childhood Pneumonia in Papua New Guinea: A Time-Series Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinseob; Kim, Jong-Hun; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Ho; Honda, Yasushi; Ha, Mina; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kolam, Joel; Inape, Kasis

    2016-02-15

    This study aimed to assess the association between climate factors and the incidence of childhood pneumonia in Papua New Guinea quantitatively and to evaluate the variability of the effect size according to their geographic properties. The pneumonia incidence in children under five-year and meteorological factors were obtained from six areas, including monthly rainfall and the monthly average daily maximum temperatures during the period from 1997 to 2006 from national health surveillance data. A generalized linear model was applied to measure the effect size of local and regional climate factor. The pooled risk of pneumonia in children per every 10 mm increase of rainfall was 0.24% (95% confidence interval: -0.01%-0.50%), and risk per every 1 °C increase of the monthly mean of the maximum daily temperatures was 4.88% (95% CI: 1.57-8.30). Southern oscillation index and dipole mode index showed an overall negative effect on childhood pneumonia incidence, -0.57% and -4.30%, respectively, and the risk of pneumonia was higher in the dry season than in the rainy season (pooled effect: 12.08%). There was a variability in the relationship between climate factors and pneumonia which is assumed to reflect distribution of the determinants of and vulnerability to pneumonia in the community.

  7. Low host specificity and abundance of frugivorous lepidoptera in the lowland rain forests of Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Ctvrtecka, Richard; Miller, Scott E.; Rosati, Margaret E.; Molem, Kenneth; Damas, Kipiro; Gewa, Bradley; Novotny, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    We studied a community of frugivorous Lepidoptera in the lowland rainforest of Papua New Guinea. Rearing revealed 122 species represented by 1,720 individuals from 326 woody plant species. Only fruits from 52% (171) of the plant species sampled were attacked. On average, Lepidoptera were reared from 1 in 89 fruits and a kilogram of fruit was attacked by 1.01 individuals. Host specificity of Lepidoptera was notably low: 69% (33) of species attacked plants from >1 family, 8% (4) fed on single family, 6% (3) on single genus and 17% (8) were monophagous. The average kilogram of fruits was infested by 0.81 individual from generalist species (defined here as feeding on >1 plant genus) and 0.07 individual from specialist species (feeding on a single host or congeneric hosts). Lepidoptera preferred smaller fruits with both smaller mesocarp and seeds. Large-seeded fruits with thin mesocarp tended to host specialist species whereas those with thick, fleshy mesocarp were often infested with both specialist and generalist species. The very low incidence of seed damage suggests that pre-dispersal seed predation by Lepidoptera does not play a major role in regulating plant populations via density-dependent mortality processes outlined by the Janzen-Connell hypothesis. PMID:28231249

  8. Listening to the rural health workers in Papua New Guinea - the social factors that influence their motivation to work.

    PubMed

    Razee, Husna; Whittaker, Maxine; Jayasuriya, Rohan; Yap, Lorraine; Brentnall, Lee

    2012-09-01

    Despite rural health services being situated and integrated within communities in which people work and live, the complex interaction of the social environment on health worker motivation and performance in Low Middle Income Countries has been neglected in research. In this article we investigate how social factors impact on health worker motivation and performance in rural health services in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with 33 health workers from three provinces (Central, Madang, and Milne Bay) in PNG between August and November 2009. They included health extension officers, community health workers and nursing officers, some of whom were in charge of the health centres. The health centres were a selection across church based, government and private enterprise health facilities. Qualitative analysis identified the key social factors impacting on health worker motivation and performance to be the local community context, gender roles and family related issues, safety and security and health beliefs and attitudes of patients and community members. Our study identified the importance of strong supportive communities on health worker motivation. These findings have implications for developing sustainable strategies for motivation and performance enhancement of rural health workers in resource poor settings.

  9. The paradoxes of gender mainstreaming in developing countries: The case of health care in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Lamprell, Gina; Greenfield, David; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Gender mainstreaming developed as the global strategy for gender equality nearly two decades ago. Since then it has faced criticism for its technocratic application, and its role in the de-politicisation and neutralisation of the women's movement in gender policy-making. In the health sector, this incongruity is exacerbated by a traditional bio-medical approach to women's issues. In this paper, we ask whether gender mainstreaming can be made to work in the health sectors of developing countries where these challenges, as well as women's poor health status, are further complicated by a raft of local traditional, cultural, political and socioeconomic barriers. To answer these questions, we present a case study of Papua New Guinea (PNG), one of the world's most disadvantaged and politically challenging countries. We review data on women's health in PNG and analyse PNG's aspirational and actual performance on gender mainstreaming, looking at: international commitments; political will and capacity; national policies and programmes; and the women's movement along with civil society's participation. We find numerous paradoxes between the aims of gender mainstreaming and the necessary conditions for its success.

  10. Effect of Climate Factors on the Childhood Pneumonia in Papua New Guinea: A Time-Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseob; Kim, Jong-Hun; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Ho; Honda, Yasushi; Ha, Mina; Hashizume, Masahiro; Kolam, Joel; Inape, Kasis

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the association between climate factors and the incidence of childhood pneumonia in Papua New Guinea quantitatively and to evaluate the variability of the effect size according to their geographic properties. The pneumonia incidence in children under five-year and meteorological factors were obtained from six areas, including monthly rainfall and the monthly average daily maximum temperatures during the period from 1997 to 2006 from national health surveillance data. A generalized linear model was applied to measure the effect size of local and regional climate factor. The pooled risk of pneumonia in children per every 10 mm increase of rainfall was 0.24% (95% confidence interval: −0.01%–0.50%), and risk per every 1 °C increase of the monthly mean of the maximum daily temperatures was 4.88% (95% CI: 1.57–8.30). Southern oscillation index and dipole mode index showed an overall negative effect on childhood pneumonia incidence, −0.57% and −4.30%, respectively, and the risk of pneumonia was higher in the dry season than in the rainy season (pooled effect: 12.08%). There was a variability in the relationship between climate factors and pneumonia which is assumed to reflect distribution of the determinants of and vulnerability to pneumonia in the community. PMID:26891307

  11. The rocky road from roots to rice: a review of the changing food and nutrition situation in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Saweri, W

    2001-01-01

    Although it is not happening uniformly within the country, the adoption of a modern lifestyle by Papua New Guineans is affecting their food habits and choices. More and more people consume rice, tinned fish and tinned meat. In towns and in villages with easy access to urban centres, these food items comprise an ever increasing part of the diet. These dietary changes are leading to increases in the prevalence of chronic lifestyle-related diseases such as obesity, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Although average calorie availability is similar in urban and rural sectors, at around 2600 kilocalories per person per day, the nutritional outcomes are different. This is mainly due to the higher energy density of the modern urban diet with a greater intake of fat and protein. The traditional diet is low in protein with rather high energy content from starchy root crops. Studies have shown that urban children tend to be taller and heavier than their rural counterparts and that the prevalence of overweight and obesity is higher among adults in urban than in rural areas. Finally, across all income groups and geographical regions, more women than men are chronically undernourished.

  12. Comparison of Cocoa Beans from China, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Fenglin; Tan, Lehe; Wu, Huasong; Fang, Yiming; Xu, Fei; Chu, Zhong; Wang, Qinghuang

    2013-01-01

    A survey on five kinds of cocoa beans from new cocoa planting countries was conducted to analyze each kind’s basic quality. The average bean weight and butter content of Hainan cocoa beans were the lowest, at less than 1.1 g, and 39.24% to 43.44%, respectively. Cocoa beans from Indonesia where shown to be about 8.0% and 9.0% higher in average bean weight and butter content, respectively, than that of Papua New Guinea and about 20.0% and 25.0% higher in average bean weight and butter content than Chinese dried beans, respectively. The average total polyphenolic content ranged from 81.22 mg/10 g to 301.01 mg/10 g. The Hainan 2011 sample had the highest total polyphenolic content, followed by the unfermented sample from Indonesia and the Papua New Guinea sample. The polyphenolic levels found in the Hainan 2010 sample were 123.61 mg/10 g and lower than the other three samples, but the Indonesian fermented sample had the lowest total polyphenolic content of 81.22 mg/10 g. The average total amino acid content ranged from 11.58 g/100 g to 18.17 g/100 g. The total amino acid content was the highest in the Indonesian unfermented sample, followed by the Hainan 2011 sample and the Papua New Guinea sample. The levels found in the Hainan 2010 sample were lower; the Indonesian fermented sample had the lowest total amino acid content. PMID:28239108

  13. Respiratory impairment in coffee factory workers in the Asaro Valley of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D; Brott, K; Koki, G

    1985-01-01

    In a coffee growing area of Papua New Guinea, a developing country in the western Pacific region, coffee factory workers were found to have more chronic symptomatic respiratory impairment than a carefully matched group of neighbouring villagers. This impairment was not related to their duration of employment. Coffee factory workers were found also to have a greater prevalence of reversible but asymptomatic airways obstruction on entering their factories after two days off duty than a group of soft drink factory workers. These findings are thought to be related to exposure to the dust produced in large quantities during coffee processing. Images PMID:4015998

  14. Subsistence ecology and carrying capacity in two Papua New Guinea populations.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, R

    1994-07-01

    This article examines the mechanisms of subsistence adaptation of two Papua New Guinea populations, the Metroxylon sago-depending lowland Gidra and the taro-monoculture Mountain Ok, surviving in low population densities of 0.5 and 1.4 persons per km2. Observation of the groups' land use systems strongly suggests that their population densities have not been far below the carrying capacity, although the territory of each population is markedly heterogeneous. Both groups have maintained their sustainable food production not only for resource management but also for survival at a population level, either expanding their territory or changing the sustainable level in tandem with changes of subsistence system.

  15. Biologically active components of a Papua New Guinea analgesic and anti-inflammatory lichen preparation

    PubMed Central

    Bugni, Tim S.; Andjelic, Cynthia D.; Pole, Ann R.; Rai, Prem; Ireland, Chris M.; Barrows, Louis R.

    2009-01-01

    A traditional preparation of Parmotrema saccatilobum (Taylor) Hale (Family: Parmeliaceae) is being considered for inclusion into the PNG national drug formulary by the Ministry of Health Taskforce on Traditional Medicines. The lichen preparation is traditionally used in the Milne Bay province of Papua New Guinea for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. A hexane extract of Parmotrema saccatilobum yielded the principle components atranorin and chloroatranorin. Atranorin and chloroatranorin were tested in a COX-1 and -2 enzyme inhibition assay, which showed that atranorin inhibited COX-1 in a dose dependent manner and suggests partial inhibition by atranorin and chloroatranorin of COX-2 and COX-1, respectively. PMID:19289158

  16. Biologically active components of a Papua New Guinea analgesic and anti-inflammatory lichen preparation.

    PubMed

    Bugni, Tim S; Andjelic, Cynthia D; Pole, Ann R; Rai, Prem; Ireland, Chris M; Barrows, Louis R

    2009-07-01

    A traditional preparation of Parmotrema saccatilobum (Taylor) Hale (Family: Parmeliaceae) is being considered for inclusion into the PNG national drug formulary by the Ministry of Health Taskforce on Traditional Medicines. The lichen preparation is traditionally used in the Milne Bay province of Papua New Guinea for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. A hexane extract of P. saccatilobum yielded the principle components atranorin and chloroatranorin. Atranorin and chloroatranorin were tested in a COX-1 and -2 enzyme inhibition assay, which showed that atranorin inhibited COX-1 in a dose dependent manner and suggests partial inhibition by atranorin and chloroatranorin of COX-2 and COX-1, respectively.

  17. Idiocnemis schorri sp. nov., a new damselfly species from southern Papua New Guinea (Odonata: Platycnemididae).

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Dirk; Richards, Stephen J; Polhemus, Dan A

    2016-09-29

    Idiocnemis schorri sp. nov. is described from the Hindenburg and Muller Ranges and the Kikori River Basin of southern Papua New Guinea. The new species differs from all congeners by, among other characters, a unique colour pattern on the thorax. Characters of males and females are illustrated and compared to those of similar species from the Idiocnemis bidentata group. The new species is found along small, shallow rainforest streams and is currently known only from the Trans-Fly Foreland and Papuan Gulf Foreland areas of endemism.

  18. Paramoguai kavieng, a new genus and species of camptandriid crab from Papua New Guinea (Crustacea: Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Ahyong, Shane T

    2014-08-26

    Paramoguai kavieng is recognised as a new genus and species of camptandriid crab, recently discovered in Papua New Guinea. The new genus closely resembles Moguai Tan & Ng, 1999, from the western Pacific, sharing similar carapace and pereopod structure, but is distinguished chiefly by the fusion of the maxilliped 3 ischiomerus, features of the epistome and front, and position of the anterolateral margins of the carapace. The new genus is unique in the Camptandriidae Stimpson, 1858, in having an epistome with a bilobed buccal margin. Moguai pyriforme Naruse, 2005, from Japan, which differs from P. kavieng primarily in carapace ornamentation and gonopod morphology, is transferred to Paramoguai. 

  19. On the move: migration, urbanization and development in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Walsh, A C

    1987-03-01

    "Migration and urbanization data from Papua New Guinea's first truly national census in 1980 are considered against a backdrop of spatial and social inequalities. Source and destination factors affecting migration flows and destinations are found to relate to population density, availability of rural wages, ease of access, destination wage-earning opportunities, historical linkages and present day developments. Short-distance migration differs from longer-distance migration; many migrants are short-term, and possibly circular, migrants. Migration and urbanization are considered part of the same process of developmental change." A section is included on earlier censuses and surveys, data reliability, and related problems.

  20. Cherax (Astaconephrops) gherardii, a new crayfish (Decapoda: Parastacidae) from West Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Patoka, Jiří; Bláha, Martin; Kouba, Antonín

    2015-06-05

    Cherax (Astaconephrops) gherardii n. sp. is a moderate burrowing crayfish endemic to the Ajamaru Lakes of West Papua, Indonesia. This species is one of the crayfish species from this region that are exploited for ornamental purposes. Its commonly used commercial name in the pet trade is "Rainbow Crayfish" or "Blue Moon Crayfish", and its native name is "udang kuku biru". The new species is genetically and morphologically similar to Cherax boesemani, however, both species may be easily distinguished morphologically or by using sequence divergence, which is substantial for considering C. gherardii n. sp. to be a valid species.

  1. Feasibility of laser trabeculoplasty in angle closure glaucoma: a review of favourable histopathological findings in narrow angles.

    PubMed

    Matos, Alexis Galeno; Asrani, Sanjay G; Paula, Jayter Silva

    2017-02-28

    Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) has been indicated as a safe and efficient treatment for primary open-angle glaucoma; however, recent studies have also shown positive results with the use of SLT in some clinical conditions related to primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG). Despite the potential benefits of SLT in selected cases of PACG, the mechanisms underlying the modifications in the trabecular meshwork tissue of patients with PACG are poorly understood. This narrative review approached both the current, limited knowledge about the histological changes observed in different forms of PACG and the clinical results of SLT treatment for PACG. Favourable outcomes of SLT in patients with PACG, specifically in areas of non-occluded angle, need further substantiation through large controlled clinical trials. A deeper understanding of the biomolecular changes of those areas is essential to improve both laser technical details and the clinical efficacy of SLT therapy.

  2. The H II galaxy Hubble diagram strongly favours Rh = ct over ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Melia, Fulvio

    2016-12-01

    We continue to build support for the proposal to use H II galaxies (HIIGx) and giant extragalactic H II regions (GEHR) as standard candles to construct the Hubble diagram at redshifts beyond the current reach of Type Ia supernovae. Using a sample of 25 high-redshift HIIGx, 107 local HIIGx, and 24 GEHR, we confirm that the correlation between the emission-line luminosity and ionized-gas velocity dispersion is a viable luminosity indicator, and use it to test and compare the standard model ΛCDM and the Rh = ct universe by optimizing the parameters in each cosmology using a maximization of the likelihood function. For the flat ΛCDM model, the best fit is obtained with Ω _m= 0.40_{-0.09}^{+0.09}. However, statistical tools, such as the Akaike (AIC), Kullback (KIC) and Bayes (BIC) Information Criteria favour Rh = ct over the standard model with a likelihood of ≈94.8-98.8 per cent versus only ≈1.2-5.2 per cent. For wCDM (the version of ΛCDM with a dark-energy equation of state wde ≡ pde/ρde rather than wde = wΛ = -1), a statistically acceptable fit is realized with Ω _m=0.22_{-0.14}^{+0.16} and w_de= -0.51_{-0.25}^{+0.15} which, however, are not fully consistent with their concordance values. In this case, wCDM has two more free parameters than Rh = ct, and is penalized more heavily by these criteria. We find that Rh = ct is strongly favoured over wCDM with a likelihood of ≈92.9-99.6 per cent versus only 0.4-7.1 per cent. The current HIIGx sample is already large enough for the BIC to rule out ΛCDM/wCDM in favour of Rh = ct at a confidence level approaching 3σ.

  3. Low antigen dose favours selection of somatic mutants with hallmarks of antibody affinity maturation.

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, A; Milstein, C

    1998-01-01

    The immunization schedule is critical for the derivation of high-affinity antibodies, low antigen dose being particularly favourable for the development of a more efficient memory response. To analyse the molecular events underpinning this preference, we analysed the early maturation of the response to the hapten 2-phenyloxazolone (phOx) using low and high doses of immunogen. The phOx response is initially dominated by antibodies expressing the VkOx1-Jk5 light chain and the hallmark of the early stages of maturation is the substitution of His 34 by Asn or Gln increasing affinity 10- or eightfold, respectively, and of Tyr 36 by Phe. High-affinity antibodies express mutations at both sites. We cloned and sequenced VkOx1-Jk5 light chains from antigen-specific B cells taken 14 and 21 days after immunization with high and low antigen doses. We found that overall, the derived sequences were more mutated both at longer times and at higher dose. At day 14, His 34 was more frequently mutated at the higher than at the lower dose, while at day 21 the reverse was true. On the other hand, the His 34/Tyr 36 mutation pair was more frequent at low than high doses at both 14 and 21 days. Furthermore, at both times, the low immunization protocol yielded double mutants in cells with a lower mutation background. It appears therefore that while the higher dose may favour the acquisition of individual critical mutations, low-dose immunization favours the selection of a more focused mutational pattern, whereby advantageous mutations are associated with a low mutational background. Images Figure 1 PMID:9616362

  4. Geochemical and geochronological constraints on the origin and evolution of rocks in the active Woodlark Rift of Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirakparvar, Nasser Alexander

    Tectonically active regions provide important natural laboratories to glean information that is applicable to developing a better understanding of the geologic record. One such area of the World is Papua New Guinea, much of which is situated in an active and transient plate boundary zone. The focus of this PhD research is to develop a better understanding of rocks in the active Woodlark Rift, situated in Papua New Guinea's southernmost reaches. In this region, rifting and lithospheric rupture is occurring within a former subduction complex where there is a history of continental subduction and (U)HP metamorphism. The lithostratigraphic units exposed in the Woodlark Rift provide an opportunity to better understand the records of plate boundary processes at many scales from micron-sized domains within individual minerals to regional geological relationships. This thesis is composed of three chapters that are independent of one another but are all related to the overall goal of developing a better understanding of the record of plate boundary processes in the rocks currently exposed in the Woodlark Rift. The first chapter, published in its entirety in Earth and Planetary Science Letters (2011 v. 309, p. 56 - 66), is entitled 'Lu-Hf garnet geochronology applied to plate boundary zones: Insights from the (U)HP terrane exhumed within the Woodlark Rift'. This chapter focuses on the use of the Lu-Hf isotopic system to date garnets in the Woodlark Rift. Major findings of this study are that some of the rocks in the Woodlark Rift preserve a Lu-Hf garnet isotopic record of initial metamorphism and continental subduction occurring in the Late Mesozoic, whereas others only preserve a record of tectonic processes related to lithospheric rupture during the initiation of rifting in the Late Cenozoic. The second chapter is entitled 'Geochemical and geochronological constraints on the origin of rocks in the active Woodlark Rift of Papua New Guinea: Recognizing the dispersed

  5. Coregistration of multimodal imaging is associated with favourable two-year seizure outcome after paediatric epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Perry, Michael Scott; Bailey, Laurie; Freedman, Daniel; Donahue, David; Malik, Saleem; Head, Hayden; Keator, Cynthia; Hernandez, Angel

    2017-03-01

    Multimodal coregistration uses multiple image datasets coregistered to an anatomical reference (i.e. MRI), allowing multiple studies to be viewed together. Commonly used in intractable epilepsy evaluation and generally accepted to improve localization of the epileptogenic zone, data showing that coregistration improves outcome is lacking. We compared seizure freedom following epilepsy surgery in paediatric patients, evaluated before and after the use of coregistration protocols at our centre, to determine whether this correlated with a change in outcome. We included paediatric epilepsy surgery patients with at least one anatomical and one functional neuroimaging study as part of their presurgical evaluation. Preoperatively designated palliative procedures and repeat surgeries were excluded. Multiple pre-, peri-, and postoperative variables were compared between groups with the primary outcome of seizure freedom. In total, 115 were included with an average age of 10.63 years (0.12-20.7). All evaluations included video-EEG (VEEG) and MRI. Seven (6%) had subtraction single-photon emission CT (SPECT), 46 (40%) had positron emission tomography (PET), and 62 (54%) had both as part of their evaluation. Sixty (52%) had extratemporal epilepsy and 25 (22%) were MRI-negative. Sixty-eight (59%) had coregistration. Coregistered patients were less likely to undergo invasive EEG monitoring (p=0.045) and were more likely to have seizure freedom at one (p=0.034) and two years (p<0.001) post-operatively. A logistic regression accounting for multiple covariates supported an association between the use of coregistration and favourable post-surgical outcome. Coregistered imaging contributes to favourable postoperative seizure reduction compared to visual analysis of individual modalities. Imaging coregistration is associated with improved outcome, independent of other variables after surgery. Coregistered imaging may reduce the need for invasive EEG monitoring, likely due to improved

  6. Is pollen removal or seed set favoured by flower longevity in a hummingbird-pollinated Salvia species?

    PubMed Central

    Aximoff, Izar Araujo; Freitas, Leandro

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The period between the beginning of anthesis and flower senescence modulates the transport of pollen by pollinators among conspecific flowers, and its length may therefore influence reproductive success. This study evaluated whether floral longevity favours pollen removal from the anthers over fecundity (seed set) in an ornithophilous species that does not undergo pollen limitation. Methods Field investigations were conducted on floral longevity, nectar production, pollinator behaviour, and variations in fruit set (FS), mean number of seeds per fruit (MSF) and pollen removal by hummingbirds (PR) during the anthesis of Salvia sellowiana in south-east Brazil. Key Results Anthesis of flowers exposed to pollinators lasted 4 d, as well as on flowers with pollen removed from the anthers or deposited on the stigma. The longevity of bagged flowers was significantly higher (approx. 9 d). FS and PR reached 87·2 and 90 %, respectively, in natural conditions. PR increased gradually over the period of anthesis; however, FS and MSF reached their maxima in the first hours of anthesis. Nectar production was continuous, but the secretion rate was reduced after pollination. The removal of nectar from non-pollinated flowers stimulated its production. Conclusions The longevity of anthesis in S. sellowiana seems to be related to the mechanism of gradual dispensing of pollen, resulting in greater male reproductive success. This is in agreement with the pollen-donation hypothesis. The small number of ovules (four) of S. sellowiana and the high frequency and the foraging mode of its pollinators may favour the selection for floral longevity driven by male fitness in this system. PMID:20622254

  7. Tamoxifen favoured the rat sensorial cortex regeneration after a penetrating brain injury.

    PubMed

    Franco Rodríguez, N E; Dueñas Jiménez, J M; De la Torre Valdovinos, B; López Ruiz, J R; Hernández Hernández, L; Dueñas Jiménez, S H

    2013-09-01

    A penetrating brain injury produces a glial scar formed by astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia and NG2 cells. Glial scar is a barrier preventing the extent of damage but it has deleterious effects in the regeneration of the axons. Estradiol and tamoxifen reduce gliosis and have neuroprotective effects in the hippocampus and the spinal cord. We evaluated the proliferation of glia and the electrocorticogram in the sensorial cortex in a brain injury model. At seven days post-injury, estradiol, tamoxifen and estradiol plus tamoxifen reduced the number of resident and proliferative NG2 and reactive astrocyte vimentin+ cells. Estradiol and tamoxifen effects on NG2 cells could be produced by the classical oestrogen receptors found in these cells. The glial scar was also reduced by tamoxifen. At thirty days post-injury, the amount of resident and proliferative astrocytes increased significantly, except in the estradiol plus tamoxifen group, whilst the oligodendrocytes proliferation in the glial scar was reduced in treated animals. Tamoxifen promotes the survival of FOX-3+ neurons in the injured area and a recovery in the amplitude of electrocorticogram waves. At thirty days, estradiol did not favour the survival of neurons but produced a greater number of reactive astrocytes. In contrast, the number of oligodendrocytes was reduced. Tamoxifen could favour brain repair promoting neuron survival and adjusting glial cell number. It seems to recover adequate neural communication.

  8. Harmful filamentous cyanobacteria favoured by reduced water turnover with lake warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Thomas; Köster, Oliver; Salcher, Michaela M.; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2012-11-01

    Anthropogenic-induced changes in nutrient ratios have increased the susceptibility of large temperate lakes to several effects of rising air temperatures and the resulting heating of water bodies. First, warming leads to stronger thermal stratification, thus impeding natural complete water turnover (holomixis), which compensates for oxygen deficits in the deep zones. Second, increased water temperatures and nutrient concentrations can directly favour the growth of harmful algae. Thus, lake-restoration programmes have focused on reducing nutrients to limit toxic algal blooms. Here we present evidence that the ubiquitous harmful cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens has become the dominant species in a large lake during the past four decades, although the phosphorus content of the ecosystem decreased fivefold. However, the nitrogen input was not diminished concomitantly, favouring this non-N2-fixing cyanobacterium owing to increased N:P ratios. P. rubescens contains gas vesicles that allow for buoyancy to accumulate within the depth of optimal irradiance. As the toxic cyanobacterium has low consumption by predators, water turnover represents the main mechanism of seasonal population control. Thus, unidirectional lake-restoration measures in parallel with recurrent absence of holomixis owing to lake warming may lead to similar undesired effects that have formerly emerged from fertilization.

  9. Fast-killing parasites can be favoured in spatially structured populations

    PubMed Central

    West, Stuart A.; Buckling, Angus

    2017-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the evolution of infectious disease is influenced by host population structure. Theory predicts that parasites should be more ‘prudent’—less transmissible—in spatially structured host populations. However, here we (i) highlight how low transmission, the phenotype being selected for in this in context, may also be achieved by rapacious host exploitation, if fast host exploitation confers a local, within-host competitive advantage and (ii) test this novel concept in a bacteria–virus system. We found that limited host availability and, to a lesser extent, low relatedness favour faster-killing parasites with reduced transmission. By contrast, high host availability and high relatedness favour slower-killing, more transmissible parasites. Our results suggest high, rather than low, virulence may be selected in spatially structured host–parasite communities where local competition and hence selection for a within-host fitness advantage is high. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission’. PMID:28289263

  10. Women favour dyadic relationships, but men prefer clubs: cross-cultural evidence from social networking.

    PubMed

    David-Barrett, Tamas; Rotkirch, Anna; Carney, James; Behncke Izquierdo, Isabel; Krems, Jaimie A; Townley, Dylan; McDaniell, Elinor; Byrne-Smith, Anna; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to create lasting, trust-based friendships makes it possible for humans to form large and coherent groups. The recent literature on the evolution of sociality and on the network dynamics of human societies suggests that large human groups have a layered structure generated by emotionally supported social relationships. There are also gender differences in adult social style which may involve different trade-offs between the quantity and quality of friendships. Although many have suggested that females tend to focus on intimate relations with a few other females, while males build larger, more hierarchical coalitions, the existence of such gender differences is disputed and data from adults is scarce. Here, we present cross-cultural evidence for gender differences in the preference for close friendships. We use a sample of ∼112,000 profile pictures from nine world regions posted on a popular social networking site to show that, in self-selected displays of social relationships, women favour dyadic relations, whereas men favour larger, all-male cliques. These apparently different solutions to quality-quantity trade-offs suggest a universal and fundamental difference in the function of close friendships for the two sexes.

  11. Reproductive compensation favours male-killing Wolbachia in a live-bearing host

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Julie L.; Zeh, David W.; Bonilla, Melvin M.; Zeh, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited, cellular endosymbionts that can enhance their fitness by biasing host sex ratio in favour of females. Male killing (MK) is an extreme form of sex-ratio manipulation that is selectively advantageous if the self-sacrifice of Wolbachia in males increases transmission through females. In live-bearing hosts, females typically produce more embryos than can be carried to term, and reproductive compensation through maternal resource reallocation from dead males to female embryos could increase the number of daughters born to infected females. Here, we report a new strain of MK Wolbachia (wCsc2) in the pseudoscorpion, Cordylochernes scorpioides, and present the first empirical evidence that reproductive compensation favours the killing of males in a viviparous host. Females infected with the wCsc2 strain produced 26 per cent more and significantly larger daughters than tetracycline-cured females. In contrast to the previously described wCsc1 MK Wolbachia strain in C. scorpioides, wCsc2 infection was not accompanied by an increase in the rate of spontaneous brood abortion. Characterization of the wCsc1 and wCsc2 strains by multi-locus sequence typing and by Wolbachia surface protein (wsp) gene sequencing indicates that the marked divergence between these two MK strains in their impact on host reproductive success, and hence in their potential to spread, has occurred in association with homologous recombination in the wsp gene. PMID:19710065

  12. Women Favour Dyadic Relationships, but Men Prefer Clubs: Cross-Cultural Evidence from Social Networking

    PubMed Central

    David-Barrett, Tamas; Rotkirch, Anna; Carney, James; Behncke Izquierdo, Isabel; Krems, Jaimie A.; Townley, Dylan; McDaniell, Elinor; Byrne-Smith, Anna; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to create lasting, trust-based friendships makes it possible for humans to form large and coherent groups. The recent literature on the evolution of sociality and on the network dynamics of human societies suggests that large human groups have a layered structure generated by emotionally supported social relationships. There are also gender differences in adult social style which may involve different trade-offs between the quantity and quality of friendships. Although many have suggested that females tend to focus on intimate relations with a few other females, while males build larger, more hierarchical coalitions, the existence of such gender differences is disputed and data from adults is scarce. Here, we present cross-cultural evidence for gender differences in the preference for close friendships. We use a sample of ∼112,000 profile pictures from nine world regions posted on a popular social networking site to show that, in self-selected displays of social relationships, women favour dyadic relations, whereas men favour larger, all-male cliques. These apparently different solutions to quality-quantity trade-offs suggest a universal and fundamental difference in the function of close friendships for the two sexes. PMID:25775258

  13. Differential reproductive success favours strong host preference in a highly specialized brood parasite

    PubMed Central

    De Mársico, María C; Reboreda, Juan C

    2008-01-01

    Obligate avian brood parasites show dramatic variation in the degree to which they are host specialists or host generalists. The screaming cowbird Molothrus rufoaxillaris is one of the most specialized brood parasites, using a single host, the bay-winged cowbird (Agelaioides badius) over most of its range. Coevolutionary theory predicts increasing host specificity the longer the parasite interacts with a particular avian community, as hosts evolve defences that the parasite cannot counteract. According to this view, host specificity can be maintained if screaming cowbirds avoid parasitizing potentially suitable hosts that have developed effective defences against parasitic females or eggs. Specialization may also be favoured, even in the absence of host defences, if the parasite's reproductive success in alternative hosts is lower than that in the main host. We experimentally tested these hypotheses using as alternative hosts two suitable but unparasitized species: house wrens (Troglodytes aedon) and chalk-browed mockingbirds (Mimus saturninus). We assessed host defences against parasitic females and eggs, and reproductive success of the parasite in current and alternative hosts. Alternative hosts did not discriminate against screaming cowbird females or eggs. Egg survival and hatching success were similarly high in current and alternative hosts, but the survival of parasitic chicks was significantly lower in alternative hosts. Our results indicate that screaming cowbirds have the potential to colonize novel hosts, but higher reproductive success in the current host may favour host fidelity. PMID:18647716

  14. Valuing Indigenous Knowledge in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea: A Model for Agricultural and Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radcliffe, Chris; Parissi, Cesidio; Raman, Anantanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    Current methods of agricultural and environmental education for indigenous farmers in Papua New Guinea (PNG) fail to provide high level engagement. Indigenous knowledge (IK) forms the basis of natural resource management, agriculture and health of farmers in PNG, yet its value to agricultural and environmental education in PNG is rarely…

  15. A survey of Papua New Guinean parturients at the Port Moresby General Hospital: sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics.

    PubMed

    Klufio, C A; Amoa, A B; Kariwiga, G

    1994-04-01

    A survey of 673 consecutive Papua New Guinea parturients carried out at the Port Moresby General Hospital between May and June 1990 showed that socioeconomic and educational factors played a part in predicting perinatal death. Mothers who have previously experienced a perinatal death are more likely to experience a second one.

  16. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of Papua-New Guinea, Eastern Indonesia, and East Timor, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pitman, Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated means of 5.8 billion barrels of oil and 115 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas in five geologic provinces in the areas of Papua New Guinea, eastern Indonesia, and East Timor.

  17. 'Education for Equality' and 'Education for Life': Examining Reading Literacy and Reading Interest in Papua New Guinea Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Sarah; Ogle, Graham; Kaleveld, Lisette; Maurice, John; Keria, Betty; Louden, William; Rohl, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Reading literacy and reading interest was examined in four primary schools in Papua New Guinea: in an international, suburban, settlement and village school. In this paper we present a summary of findings located within a local context and examine the implications as viewed through two lenses. From an 'educational for equality' perspective, the…

  18. The Use of Indigenous Languages in Early Basic Education in Papua New Guinea: A Model for Elsewhere?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaus, David

    2003-01-01

    Suggests Papua New Guinea offers a practical example of how a small, multilingual country with limited resources has developed a package of strategies for dealing with the challenges of multilingualism and using its multiplicity of languages in education as a tool for improving teaching and learning, saving resources, and moving towards education…

  19. From Vernacular to English: A Model of Innovation from within the Hearts of the Indigenous Teachers in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Yasuko; Lister, Ronah

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the effectiveness of initial vernacular education for successful transfer to English. The data is drawn from the personal, innovative experiences of a local vernacular elementary school teacher in Papua New Guinea, who helped individual children to gain literacy skills in the local vernacular. As a result, the children were…

  20. The Failure of Progressive Classroom Reform: Lessons from the Curriculum Reform Implementation Project in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Progressive education has been an article of educational faith in Papua New Guinea during the last 50 years but the best available evidence indicates that major reforms to formalistic curriculum and teaching in primary and secondary classrooms have failed during this period despite large-scale professional, administrative and financial support. In…

  1. Language Use and the Instructional Strategies of Grade 3 Teachers to Support "Bridging" in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franken, Margaret; August, Matilda

    2011-01-01

    For over a decade, the Department of Education in Papua New Guinea (PNG) has adopted vernacular education as a way of ensuring that the educational experiences of children in schools draw on the cultural and linguistic knowledge they bring to the classroom. In PNG, there are many potential vernaculars--apart from the local languages, there are Tok…

  2. Colonialism, Education and Social Change in the British Empire: The Cases of Australia, Papua New Guinea and Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the history of relations between colonialism, schooling and social change in Australia, Papua New Guinea and Ireland, countries that were once part of the British Empire. It indicates that responses to schooling ranged from acceptance and tolerance, to modification and rejection, depending on the country, the issue, and the…

  3. The Social Cost of Acting "Extra": Students' Moral Judgements of Self, Social Relations, and Academic Success in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerath, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Investigated how high school students in Papua New Guinea responded to rising educational credentialism and unemployment by drawing on elements of their traditional egalitarian village identity to make moral judgements about appropriate selves and futures. Interview and observation data indicated that students referred to specific western…

  4. On Training in Language Documentation and Capacity Building in Papua New Guinea: A Response to Bird et al.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    In a recent article, Bird et al. (2013) discuss a workshop held at the University of Goroka in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in 2012. The workshop was intended to offer a new methodological framework for language documentation and capacity building that streamlines the documentation process and accelerates the global effort to document endangered…

  5. Quantifying the Human Impacts on Papua New Guinea Reef Fish Communities across Space and Time

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Joshua A.; Amatangelo, Kathryn L.; Hufbauer, Ruth A.

    2015-01-01

    Describing the drivers of species loss and of community change are important goals in both conservation and ecology. However, it is difficult to determine whether exploited species decline due to direct effects of harvesting or due to other environmental perturbations brought about by proximity to human populations. Here we quantify differences in species richness of coral reef fish communities along a human population gradient in Papua New Guinea to understand the relative impacts of fishing and environmental perturbation. Using data from published species lists we categorize the reef fishes as either fished or non-fished based on their body size and reports from the published literature. Species diversity for both fished and non-fished groups decreases as the size of the local human population increases, and this relationship is stronger in species that are fished. Additionally, comparison of modern and museum collections show that modern reef communities have proportionally fewer fished species relative to 19th century ones. Together these findings show that the reef fish communities of Papua New Guinea experience multiple anthropogenic stressors and that even at low human population levels targeted species experience population declines across both time and space. PMID:26466336

  6. Onset of clinical immunity to Plasmodium falciparum among Javanese migrants to Indonesian Papua.

    PubMed

    Baird, J K; Krisin; Barcus, M J; Elyazar, I R F; Bangs, M J; Maguire, J D; Fryauff, D J; Richie, T L; Sekartuti; Kalalo, W

    2003-09-01

    Onset of clinical immunity to Plasmodium falciparum occurred among Javanese migrants to Indonesian Papua. Surveillance of the 243 migrants investigated began on the day of their arrival in Indonesian Papua and continued for 33 months. Asexual parasitaemia without fever constituted objective evidence of clinical immunity. Compared with first infection, the odds ratio (OR) for not having fever at the fourth infection within 24 months was 3.2 [95% confidence interval (CI)=1.03-10.2; P=0.02]. The corresponding OR with fewer infections within 24 months was not distinguishable from 1.0. The level of the fourth parasitaemia within 24 months (N=58) was classified as 'high' or 'low' in relation to the median count at first infection (840 parasites/microl; N=187). Fourth parasitaemias that were low-but not those that were high (OR=1.8; CI=0.6-5.4; P=0.35)-were associated with dramatic protection from fever (OR=31; CI=3.5-1348; P=0.0001). Among the adult subjects, the risk of fever with low parasitaemia was significantly higher at the first infection than at the fourth (OR=12.6; CI=1.7-530; P=0.005), indicating the development of clinical immunity. A similar but less marked pattern appeared among the children investigated (OR=6.5; CI=0.8-285; P=0.06).

  7. Adult Javanese migrants to Indonesian Papua at high risk of severe disease caused by malaria.

    PubMed

    Baird, J K; Basri, H; Weina, P; MaGuire, J D; Barcus, M J; Picarema, H; Elyazar, I R F; Ayomi, E; Sekartuti

    2003-08-01

    Migrants from Java arrive in hyperendemic Papua, Indonesia lacking exposure to endemic malaria. We evaluated records of evacuation to hospital with a diagnosis of severe malaria from a transmigration village in northeastern Papua. During the first 30 months, 198 residents with severe disease were evacuated (7.5 evacuations/100 person-years). During this period the risk of evacuation for adults (> 15 years of age) was 2.8. (95% CI = 2.1-3.8; P < 0.0001) relative to children, despite apparently equal exposure to risk of infection. Relative risk (RR) for adults was greatest during the first 6 months (RR > 16; 95% CI > or = 2.0-129; P = 0.0009), and diminished during the second 6 months (RR = 9.4; 95% CI = 2.7-32.8; P < 0.0001) and the third 6 months (RR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.7-7.9; P = 0.0004). During the next two 6-month intervals, the RR for adults was 1.6 and 1.5 (95 % CI range 0.8-2.6; P < 0.18). Adults lacking chronic exposure were far more likely to progress to severe disease compared to children during initial exposure, but not after chronic exposure to infection.

  8. Adult Javanese migrants to Indonesian Papua at high risk of severe disease caused by malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Baird, J. K.; Basri, H.; Weina, P.; MaGuire, J. D.; Barcus, M. J.; Picarema, H.; Elyazar, I. R. F.; Ayomi, E.; Sekartuti

    2003-01-01

    Migrants from Java arrive in hyperendemic Papua, Indonesia lacking exposure to endemic malaria. We evaluated records of evacuation to hospital with a diagnosis of severe malaria from a transmigration village in northeastern Papua. During the first 30 months, 198 residents with severe disease were evacuated (7.5 evacuations/100 person-years). During this period the risk of evacuation for adults (> 15 years of age) was 2.8. (95% CI = 2.1-3.8; P < 0.0001) relative to children, despite apparently equal exposure to risk of infection. Relative risk (RR) for adults was greatest during the first 6 months (RR > 16; 95% CI > or = 2.0-129; P = 0.0009), and diminished during the second 6 months (RR = 9.4; 95% CI = 2.7-32.8; P < 0.0001) and the third 6 months (RR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.7-7.9; P = 0.0004). During the next two 6-month intervals, the RR for adults was 1.6 and 1.5 (95 % CI range 0.8-2.6; P < 0.18). Adults lacking chronic exposure were far more likely to progress to severe disease compared to children during initial exposure, but not after chronic exposure to infection. PMID:12948380

  9. Quantifying the Human Impacts on Papua New Guinea Reef Fish Communities across Space and Time.

    PubMed

    Drew, Joshua A; Amatangelo, Kathryn L; Hufbauer, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    Describing the drivers of species loss and of community change are important goals in both conservation and ecology. However, it is difficult to determine whether exploited species decline due to direct effects of harvesting or due to other environmental perturbations brought about by proximity to human populations. Here we quantify differences in species richness of coral reef fish communities along a human population gradient in Papua New Guinea to understand the relative impacts of fishing and environmental perturbation. Using data from published species lists we categorize the reef fishes as either fished or non-fished based on their body size and reports from the published literature. Species diversity for both fished and non-fished groups decreases as the size of the local human population increases, and this relationship is stronger in species that are fished. Additionally, comparison of modern and museum collections show that modern reef communities have proportionally fewer fished species relative to 19th century ones. Together these findings show that the reef fish communities of Papua New Guinea experience multiple anthropogenic stressors and that even at low human population levels targeted species experience population declines across both time and space.

  10. Helminth communities of pademelons, Thylogale stigmatica and T. thetis from eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J E; Beveridge, I; Chilton, N B; Johnson, P M

    2000-12-01

    Gastrointestinal helminths were collected from pademelons of the genus Thylogale (Marsupialia: Macropodidae) in eastern Australia and Papua New Guinea. Examined were 12 Thylogale stigmatica stigmatica and 13 T. s. wilcoxi, the latter subdivided into eight specimens from the northern limit of their distribution and five from southern areas, all from eastern Queensland, Australia, one T. s. oriomo from Papua New Guinea and ten T. thetis from southeastern Queensland and northern New South Wales, Australia. Six species of cestodes and 40 species of nematodes were found. The helminth community of T. s. stigmatica was similar to that found in northern specimens of T. s. wilcoxi, while differences from the helminth community present in southern T. s. wilcoxi could be accounted for by parasites acquired from sympatric T. thetis. Thylogale thetis harboured a community of helminths distinct from but related to that in T. stigmatica. The evidence suggests that all subspecies of T. stigmatica examined share a common helminth community, but that in areas of sympatry, T. stigmatica and T. thetis share some of their parasites.

  11. The Gut Microbiota of Rural Papua New Guineans: Composition, Diversity Patterns, and Ecological Processes

    DOE PAGES

    Martínez, Inés; Stegen, James C.; Maldonado-Gómez, Maria X.; ...

    2015-04-01

    Comparisons between the fecal microbiota of humans from industrialized and non-industrialized communities indicate a pronounced impact of westernization on the diversity and composition of the human gut microbiota. However, the exact consequences of westernization on community characteristics are still insufficiently understood, and the ecological processes that drive differences have not been elucidated. Here we have compared the fecal microbiota of adults from two non-industrialized regions in Papua New Guinea (PNG) with that of United States (US) residents. Papua New Guineans harbor communities with greater bacterial diversity but lower inter-individual variation. Although the fecal microbiota in PNG and US was largelymore » dominated by shared bacterial lineages, the relative abundance of 25 families, 45 genera, and 230 species-level OTUs differed, and 47 core OTUs in PNG were undetectable in US residents. To gain insight into the ecological mechanisms that cause the observed differences, we quantified community assembly processes in PNG and US microbiomes using a null modeling approach. This analysis demonstrated a significant higher rate of bacterial dispersal in PNG and divergent selective environments in the US. Interestingly, equivalent findings were obtained for other datasets comparing industrialized and non-industrialized microbiomes. Overall, the findings demonstrate a dominant role for microbial dispersal in shaping the human gut microbiota in non-industrialized societies, and point to differential selection pressures across individuals as a major factor shaping microbiomes associated with modern lifestyle.« less

  12. The Gut Microbiota of Rural Papua New Guineans: Composition, Diversity Patterns, and Ecological Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez, Inés; Stegen, James C.; Maldonado-Gómez, Maria X.; Eren, A. Murat; Siba, Peter M.; Greenhill, Andrew R.; Walter, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Comparisons between the fecal microbiota of humans from industrialized and non-industrialized communities indicate a pronounced impact of westernization on the diversity and composition of the human gut microbiota. However, the exact consequences of westernization on community characteristics are still insufficiently understood, and the ecological processes that drive differences have not been elucidated. Here we have compared the fecal microbiota of adults from two non-industrialized regions in Papua New Guinea (PNG) with that of United States (US) residents. Papua New Guineans harbor communities with greater bacterial diversity but lower inter-individual variation. Although the fecal microbiota in PNG and US was largely dominated by shared bacterial lineages, the relative abundance of 25 families, 45 genera, and 230 species-level OTUs differed, and 47 core OTUs in PNG were undetectable in US residents. To gain insight into the ecological mechanisms that cause the observed differences, we quantified community assembly processes in PNG and US microbiomes using a null modeling approach. This analysis demonstrated a significant higher rate of bacterial dispersal in PNG and divergent selective environments in the US. Interestingly, equivalent findings were obtained for other datasets comparing industrialized and non-industrialized microbiomes. Overall, the findings demonstrate a dominant role for microbial dispersal in shaping the human gut microbiota in non-industrialized societies, and point to differential selection pressures across individuals as a major factor shaping microbiomes associated with modern lifestyle.

  13. Increasing resistance to ciprofloxacin and other antibiotics in Neisseria gonorrhoeae from East Java and Papua, Indonesia, in 2004 - implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Sutrisna, A; Soebjakto, O; Wignall, F S; Kaul, S; Limnios, E A; Ray, S; Nguyen, N-L; Tapsall, J W

    2006-12-01

    We examined gonococci isolated in 2004, in East Java and Papua, Indonesia, to review the suitability of ciprofloxacin-based and other treatment regimens. Gonococci from the two provinces were tested in Sydney for susceptibility to penicillin, tetracycline, spectinomycin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, azithromycin and rifampicin. Of 163 gonococcal isolates from East Java (91) and Papua (72), 120 (74%) of gonococci, 62 (68%) and 58 (80%) from East Java and Papua, respectively, were penicillinase-producing gonococci and 162 displayed high-level tetracycline resistance. Eighty-seven isolates (53%) were ciprofloxacin resistant, 44 (48%) from East Java and 43 (60%) from Papua. All isolates were sensitive to cefixime/ceftriaxone, spectinomycin and azithromycin. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of gentamicin were in the range 0.05-8 mg/L. Sixty-nine gonococci (42%) showed combined resistance, to penicillin, tetracycline and quinolones. Quinolone resistance has now reached unacceptable levels, and their use for the treatment of gonorrhoea in Indonesia should be reconsidered.

  14. Favourable changes of the risk-benefit ratio in alpine skiing.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, Martin; Ruedl, Gerhard

    2015-05-29

    During the past five decades recreational alpine skiing has become increasingly safer. The numerous annual media reports on ski injuries have to be interpreted on the basis of the tremendous numbers of skiers. These favourable changes seem primarily be due to the introduction of short carving skis, more rigid and comfortable ski boots, the use of protective gear like helmets, and the optimized preparation of ski slopes. The associated health benefits from skiing, especially arising from its association with a healthier life style, and possibly also from effects related to hypoxia preconditioning and increasing subjective vitality by natural elements clearly outweigh the health hazards. Technical improvements will likely help further reducing the injury risk. At least hypothetically, each individual skier could help to prevent injuries by the development of an appropriate physical fitness and responsible behaviour on ski slopes thereby optimizing the risk-benefit ratio of alpine skiing.

  15. Favourable Changes of the Risk-Benefit Ratio in Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, Martin; Ruedl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    During the past five decades recreational alpine skiing has become increasingly safer. The numerous annual media reports on ski injuries have to be interpreted on the basis of the tremendous numbers of skiers. These favourable changes seem primarily be due to the introduction of short carving skis, more rigid and comfortable ski boots, the use of protective gear like helmets, and the optimized preparation of ski slopes. The associated health benefits from skiing, especially arising from its association with a healthier life style, and possibly also from effects related to hypoxia preconditioning and increasing subjective vitality by natural elements clearly outweigh the health hazards. Technical improvements will likely help further reducing the injury risk. At least hypothetically, each individual skier could help to prevent injuries by the development of an appropriate physical fitness and responsible behaviour on ski slopes thereby optimizing the risk-benefit ratio of alpine skiing. PMID:26035659

  16. Locally favoured structures and dynamic length scales in a simple glass-former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royall, C. Patrick; Kob, Walter

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the static and dynamic properties of a weakly polydisperse hard sphere system in the deeply supercooled state, i.e. at densities higher than that corresponding to the mode-coupling transition. The structural analysis reveals the emergence of icosahedral locally favoured structures, previously only found in trace quantities. We present a new approach to probe the shape of dynamically heterogeneous regions, which is insensitive to particle packing effects that can hamper such analysis. Our results indicate that the shape of the dynamically heterogeneous regions changes only weakly and moreover hint that the often-used four-point correlation length may exhibit a growth in excess of that which our method identifies. The growth of the size of the dynamically heterogeneous regions appears instead to be in line with the one of structural and dynamic propensity correlations.

  17. Soft Gamma-ray selected radio galaxies: favouring giant size discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, Francesca; Bassani, Loredana

    2016-07-01

    Using the recent INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT surveys we have extracted a sample of radio galaxies selected in the soft gamma-ray band. The sample consists of known and candidate radio galaxies. The sample extraction criteria will be presented and its general properties outlined. In particular we provide strong evidence that this soft gamma-ray selection favours the discovery of large size radio objects, otherwise known as Giant Radio Galaxies or GRG. The main reasons and/or conditions leading to the formation of these sources are still unclear and this result suggests that they maybe related to exceptional internal properties of the source central engine, like a high jet power or a long activity time. Broad band analysis of new GRG, discovered during this work, will also be presented.

  18. The present and future of the most favoured inflationary models after Planck 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero, Miguel; Ramírez, Héctor; Boubekeur, Lotfi; Mena, Olga; Giusarma, Elena E-mail: hector.ramirez@ific.uv.es E-mail: elena.giusarma@roma1.infn.it

    2016-02-01

    The value of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in the region allowed by the latest Planck 2015 measurements can be associated to a large variety of inflationary models. We discuss here the potential of future Cosmic Microwave Background cosmological observations in disentangling among the possible theoretical scenarios allowed by our analyses of current Planck temperature and polarization data. Rather than focusing only on r, we focus as well on the running of the primordial power spectrum, α{sub s} and the running thereof, β{sub s}. If future cosmological measurements, as those from the COrE mission, confirm the current best-fit value for β{sub s} ∼> 10{sup −2} as the preferred one, it will be possible to rule-out the most favoured inflationary models.

  19. The present and future of the most favoured inflationary models after Planck 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Miguel; Ramírez, Héctor; Boubekeur, Lotfi; Giusarma, Elena; Mena, Olga

    2016-02-01

    The value of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in the region allowed by the latest Planck 2015 measurements can be associated to a large variety of inflationary models. We discuss here the potential of future Cosmic Microwave Background cosmological observations in disentangling among the possible theoretical scenarios allowed by our analyses of current Planck temperature and polarization data. Rather than focusing only on r, we focus as well on the running of the primordial power spectrum, αs and the running thereof, βs. If future cosmological measurements, as those from the COrE mission, confirm the current best-fit value for βs gtrsim 10-2 as the preferred one, it will be possible to rule-out the most favoured inflationary models.

  20. Carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation of amino acids in an avian marine predator, the gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua)

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kelton W; Polito, Michael J; Abel, Stephanie; McCarthy, Matthew D; Thorrold, Simon R

    2015-01-01

    Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of amino acids (AA) has rapidly become a powerful tool in studies of food web architecture, resource use, and biogeochemical cycling. However, applications to avian ecology have been limited because no controlled studies have examined the patterns in AA isotope fractionation in birds. We conducted a controlled CSIA feeding experiment on an avian species, the gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), to examine patterns in individual AA carbon and nitrogen stable isotope fractionation between diet (D) and consumer (C) (Δ13CC-D and Δ15NC-D, respectively). We found that essential AA δ13C values and source AA δ15N values in feathers showed minimal trophic fractionation between diet and consumer, providing independent but complimentary archival proxies for primary producers and nitrogen sources respectively, at the base of food webs supporting penguins. Variations in nonessential AA Δ13CC-D values reflected differences in macromolecule sources used for biosynthesis (e.g., protein vs. lipids) and provided a metric to assess resource utilization. The avian-specific nitrogen trophic discrimination factor (TDFGlu-Phe = 3.5 ± 0.4‰) that we calculated from the difference in trophic fractionation (Δ15NC-D) of glutamic acid and phenylalanine was significantly lower than the conventional literature value of 7.6‰. Trophic positions of five species of wild penguins calculated using a multi-TDFGlu-Phe equation with the avian-specific TDFGlu-Phe value from our experiment provided estimates that were more ecologically realistic than estimates using a single TDFGlu-Phe of 7.6‰ from the previous literature. Our results provide a quantitative, mechanistic framework for the use of CSIA in nonlethal, archival feathers to study the movement and foraging ecology of avian consumers. PMID:25859333

  1. The coherence and correlates of intermittent explosive disorder amongst West Papuan refugees displaced to Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Tay, Alvin Kuowei; Rees, Susan; Chen, Jack; Kareth, Moses; Silove, Derrick

    2015-05-15

    Questions remain about the nosological status of intermittent explosive disorder (IED) as a universal diagnosis. Cross-cultural studies are needed to establish whether IED symptoms form a coherent pattern and are distinguishable from other related symptom constellations. A study amongst a refugee population also allows further inquiry of the relationship between exposure to potentially traumatic events (PTEs) and other adversities with the IED constellation. In the present study amongst West Papuan refugees residing in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, we apply culturally adapted interview modules to assess symptoms of IED, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression, as well as the potentially traumatic events (PTEs) of conflict and ongoing adversity in the post-migration environment. Latent class analysis yielded a PTSD class (23%), a posttraumatic depressive class (14%), an IED class (12%), and a low/no symptom class (49%). Compared to the low/no-symptom class, the PTSD class had high levels of exposure to all PTE domains including childhood-related adversities, witnessing murder, human rights trauma, and traumatic losses, as well as ongoing adversity relating to displacement and separation from families, safety concerns, and lack of access to basic needs and health care. The posttraumatic depression class had greater exposure to traumatic losses and childhood-related adversities, higher levels of stress relating to material loss and deprivation, as well as to displacement and separation from families. In contrast, the IED class was distinguished only by the ongoing stress of displacement and separation from families in the homeland. Our findings provide support for the phenomenological distinctiveness of IED symptoms in this transcultural setting. Although not exclusive to IED, conditions of long-term displacement and separation appear to be a source of ongoing anger and explosive aggression amongst this population.

  2. Darwin's Arguments in Favour of Natural Selection and Against Special Creationism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nola, Robert

    2013-02-01

    In many places in The Origin of Species, Darwin compares his own theory of Natural Selection favourably with Special Creationism which comes off as a bad second best. He does this using some version of the argument form known as `Inference to the Best Explanation'. The first part of this paper is methodological. It considers Whewell's notion of consilience, that is, the way in which theories can get additional confirmation through unifying otherwise disparate and independent facts. Then it considers various forms of inference to the best explanation. The second part of the paper applies these methodological considerations to an analysis of some of the many passages in Origin where Darwin presents his case in favour of Natural Selection. This gives a far superior explanation of biological facts compared with Special Creationism which provides either an inferior explanation or no explanation at all. Contrary to the view that Creationism should not be taught, the passages from Darwin show at least that it should be understood if only to show that it offers no explanation of a wide range of obvious biological facts. As such the passages in Origin in which Darwin presents his case against Creationism can serve as a series of excellent exercises in getting students to think about Natural Selection as opposed to Creationism. For this reason alone they ought to be better known. In addition, Darwin's point in these passages can only be understood using principles of scientific method, such as inference to the best explanation, which are essential in showing that Natural Selection is to be preferred to Creationism.

  3. Multiple cores of Gleason score 6 correlate with favourable findings at radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Carla L.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Partin, Alan W.; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish whether the good prognosis of Gleason score 6 (GS6) is maintained in the setting of multiple involved cores. Patients and Methods In total, 6156 men (from 1 April 2000 to 30 April 2007) with GS6 on biopsy underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at our institution. The number of positive cores was correlated with the outcome at RP. Results More positive cores correlated with less organ-confined disease (P < 0.001), positive margins (P < 0.012), increasing RP grade (P < 0.001) and increased seminal vesicles/lymph node involvement (P = 0.012). For men with data available, the actuarial risk of being biochemically free of disease at 5 years was 93.2% when ≤6 cores were positive (812 men followed to 5 years) vs 89.1% if >6 cores were positive (41 men followed to 2 years) (P = 0.6). Although the predicted ‘cure rate’ of >75% probability of a tumour showing no evidence of biochemical recurrence at 10 years after RP was statistically different between cases with ≤6 vs >6 positive cores (P < 0.0001), the outcome in both groups was still favourable (90.5% vs 84%). Partin-like tables were generated factoring in the number of positive cores to predict organ-confined disease as a guide for urologists to perform nerve-sparing surgery. For example, with T1c disease, there was a ≥75% probability of organ-confined disease with one to three positive cores regardless of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and the same probability was present with four to six positive cores and a PSA level of 0–4 ng/mL. Conclusion A low Gleason score on biopsy is a powerful prognostic finding, such that this favourable outcome is maintained even in the setting of multiple positive cores with GS6. PMID:23350787

  4. Temporal and geochemical constraints on active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. P.; Baldwin, S.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Webb, L. E.; Hollocher, K.

    2010-12-01

    Active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea occurs on the Papuan Peninsula (Mt. Lamington and Mt. Victory), in the Woodlark Rift (Dobu Island, SE Goodenough Island, and Western Fergusson Island), and in the Woodlark Basin. In the Woodlark Basin seafloor spreading is active and decompression melting of the mantle produces basalts. However, the cause of volcanism on the Papuan Peninsula and immediately west of active seafloor spreading rift tip in the Woodlark Basin is controversial. Previous studies have suggested active volcanism there results from 1) southward subduction of Solomon Sea lithosphere at the Trobriand Trough or 2) decompression melting as the lithosphere is extended and eventually ruptures. To evaluate these possibilities 20 samples were collected from a bimodal basalt-rhyolite suite in the D’Entrecasteaux Islands approximately 80 km west of the sea floor spreading rift tip. Siliceous ash flow tuffs on Dobu Island, Sanaroa Island, and Eastern Fergusson Island consist of sanidine/anorthoclase + Fe/Ti oxides (illmenite/ magnetite) ± quartz ± nepheline ± clinopyroxene ± xenocrystic olivine. Sanidine and K-feldspar from these ash flow tuffs yielded flat age spectra with 40Ar/39Ar isochron ages of 0.008 ± 0.002 Ma and 0.553 ± 0.001 Ma. ICP-MS trace and REE geochemistry on felsic rocks from Dobu Island and Eastern Fergusson Island yielded multi-element diagrams with enriched incompatible elements, and corresponding negative Nb, Sr, Eu, and Ti anomalies. In contrast, mafic volcanics from SE Goodenough Island are comprised of plagioclase + olivine + Fe/Ti oxides ± orthopyroxene ± clinopyroxene ± hornblende ± biotite. Biotite yielded a 40Ar/39Ar isochron age of 0.376 ± 0.05 Ma. MORB-normalized multi-element diagrams of mafic rocks from SE Goodenough Island are LREE-enriched patterns with negative Nb and positive Sr anomalies. In comparison, multi-element diagrams from previous work on mafic rocks from the New Britain arc to the north also

  5. The Burden of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Papua New Guinea: Results of a Large Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Aia, Paul; Kal, Margaret; Lavu, Evelyn; John, Lucy N.; Johnson, Karen; Coulter, Chris; Ershova, Julia; Tosas, Olga; Zignol, Matteo; Ahmadova, Shalala; Islam, Tauhid

    2016-01-01

    Background Reliable estimates of the burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) are crucial for effective control and prevention of tuberculosis (TB). Papua New Guinea (PNG) is a high TB burden country with limited information on the magnitude of the MDR-TB problem. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in four PNG provinces: Madang, Morobe, National Capital District and Western Province. Patient sputum samples were tested for rifampicin resistance by the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and those showing the presence of resistance underwent phenotypic susceptibility testing to first- and second-line anti-TB drugs including streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin and capreomycin. Results Among 1,182 TB patients enrolled in the study, MDR-TB was detected in 20 new (2.7%; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.1–4.3%) and 24 previously treated (19.1%; 95%CI: 8.5–29.8%) TB cases. No case of extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) was detected. Thirty percent (6/20) of new and 33.3% (8/24) of previously treated cases with MDR-TB were detected in a single cluster in Western Province. Conclusion In PNG the proportion of MDR-TB in new cases is slightly lower than the regional average of 4.4% (95%CI: 2.6–6.3%). A large proportion of MDR-TB cases were identified from a single hospital in Western Province, suggesting that the prevalence of MDR-TB across the country is heterogeneous. Future surveys should further explore this finding. The survey also helped strengthening the use of smear microscopy and Xpert MTB/RIF testing as diagnostic tools for TB in the country. PMID:27003160

  6. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Gare, Janet; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Ryan, Claire E; David, Matthew; Kaima, Petronia; Imara, Ulato; Lote, Namarola; Crowe, Suzanne M; Hearps, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12) of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91), pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84) with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01) and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037) were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033). Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance.

  7. Refugees in Papua New Guinea: government response and assistance, 1984-1988.

    PubMed

    Preston, R

    1992-01-01

    The refugee situation after the 1984 movement from Indonesia is examined in terms of policy implications and assistance as well as the welfare and education of refugees. Information was collected from government sources and documents and from households in camps and communities over a 3-month period and was published in a government report in February, 1988. This article provides a review of the border issues, resistance and exodus, reactions within Papua New Guinea, 1984-85 border crossings, social and demographic refugee profiles, government response, UN involvement, border refugee camp conditions, repatriation and relocation, reasons for the exodus, and relocation to and conditions in East Awin and the implications. This exodus from West Papua New Guinea (a region now called Irian Jaya) after Indonesia's take over in 1962 represents a unique situation, which also has lessons for other asylum seekers looking for refuge status in friendly neighboring countries. International agreements, such as the Geneva Convention and Protocol, can disrupt social networks and households when the relocation they permit is implemented. Full economic and social participation is hampered by a low quality provision of education and social services. The gain is in removing "destabilizing threats to the host state and society," at the expense of the economic and residential security of the migrants. Humanitarianism hides inequalities; internationalism, in this case, confirmed Indonesian sovereignty and large scale economic exploitation. An estimated 300,000 Melanesians have died since the take over, which amounts to 30% of the total population in 1970. Persecution was the reason for migration to Papua New Guinea; migration numbers are not accurate and range from the official 2000-3000 to 12,000 in 1984. Reactions to the migration have been mixed, and fear of the military might of Indonesia is real. The government was not prepared to cope with the scale of migration and had no plans for

  8. Vernacular Education in Papua New Guinea: Is It Really Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Yasuko

    2004-01-01

    This paper is based on an observational study concerning the effectiveness of elementary education. It was conducted in a rural area near Alotau, the provincial capital of the Milne Bay Province, with a special focus on the Maiwala Elementary School. In this paper, the author first briefly describes what elementary education is and how it has been…

  9. Effects of land use changes on kinetics of potassium release in sweetpotato garden soils of the highlands, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekhar Rao, B. K.

    2014-09-01

    The present study attempts to employ K release parameters to identify soil quality degradation due to changed land use pattern in sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam) gardens of Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Soils with widely differing exchangeable and non-exchangeable K contents were successively extracted 569 h in 0.01 M CaCl2 and K release data was fitted to four mathematical models: first order, power, parabolic diffusion and Elovich equations. Results showed two distinct parts in the K release curves and 58-80% of total K were released to solution phase within 76 h (first 5 extractions) with 20-42% K released in the later parts (after 76 h). Soils from older gardens which were subjected to intensive and prolonged land use showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower cumulative K release potential than the gardens which are recently brought to cultivation (new gardens). Among four equations, first order and power equations best described the K release pattern and the constant b, an index of K+ release rates, ranged from 0.005-0.008 mg kg-1h-1 in first order model, and was between 0.14 and 0.83 mg kg-1h-1 in power model for the soils. In the non-volcanic soils, model constant b values were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the volcanic soils thus indicative of vulnerability of volcanic soils to K deficiency. The food garden soils need management interventions either through improved fallow management or through mineral fertilizers plus animal manures to sustain productivity.

  10. Host use and crop impacts of Oribius Marshall species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Wesis, P; Niangu, B; Ero, M; Masamdu, R; Autai, M; Elmouttie, D; Clarke, A R

    2010-04-01

    Oribius species are small flightless weevils endemic to the island of New Guinea and far northern Cape York, Australia. The adults feed externally on leaves, developing fruit and green bark, but their impact as pests and general host use patterns are poorly known. Working in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea, we carried out structured host use surveys, farmer surveys, shade-house growth trials and on-farm and on-station impact trials to: (i) estimate the host range of the local Oribius species; (ii) understand adult daily activity patterns; (iii) elucidate feeding habits of the soil dwelling larvae; and (iv) quantify the impacts of adult feeding damage. Oribius inimicus and O. destructor accounted for nearly all the Oribius species encountered locally, of these two O. inimicus was the most abundant. Weevils were collected from 31 of 33 plants surveyed in the Aiyura Valley, and a combination of farmer interviews and literature records provided evidence for the beetles being pestiferous on 43 crops currently or previously grown in the Highlands. Adult weevils had a distinct diurnal pattern of being in the upper plant canopy early in the morning and, to a lesser extent, again late in the afternoon. For the remainder of the day, beetles resided within the canopy, or possibly off the plant. Movement of adults between plants appeared frequent. Pot trials confirmed the larvae are root feeders. Quantified impact studies showed that the weevils are damaging to a range of vegetable and orchard crops (broccoli, capsicum, celery, French bean, Irish potato, lettuce, orange and strawberry), causing average yield losses of around 30-40%, but up to 100% on citrus. Oribius weevils pose a significant and, apparently, growing problem for Highland's agriculture.

  11. Health Worker Compliance with a ‘Test And Treat’ Malaria Case Management Protocol in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Pulford, Justin; Smith, Iso; Mueller, Ivo; Siba, Peter M.; Hetzel, Manuel W.

    2016-01-01

    The Papua New Guinea (PNG) Department of Health introduced a ‘test and treat’ malaria case management protocol in 2011. This study assesses health worker compliance with the test and treat protocol on a wide range of measures, examines self-reported barriers to health worker compliance as well as health worker attitudes towards the test and treat protocol. Data were collected by cross-sectional survey conducted in randomly selected primary health care facilities in 2012 and repeated in 2014. The combined survey data included passive observation of current or recently febrile patients (N = 771) and interviewer administered questionnaires completed with health workers (N = 265). Across the two surveys, 77.6% of patients were tested for malaria infection by rapid diagnostic test (RDT) or microscopy, 65.6% of confirmed malaria cases were prescribed the correct antimalarials and 15.3% of febrile patients who tested negative for malaria infection were incorrectly prescribed an antimalarial. Overall compliance with a strictly defined test and treat protocol was 62.8%. A reluctance to test current/recently febrile patients for malaria infection by RDT or microscopy in the absence of acute malaria symptoms, reserving recommended antimalarials for confirmed malaria cases only and choosing to clinically diagnose a malaria infection, despite a negative RDT result were the most frequently reported barriers to protocol compliance. Attitudinal support for the test and treat protocol, as assessed by a nine-item measure, improved across time. In conclusion, health worker compliance with the full test and treat malaria protocol requires improvement in PNG and additional health worker support will likely be required to achieve this. The broader evidence base would suggest any such support should be delivered over a longer period of time, be multi-dimensional and multi-modal. PMID:27391594

  12. Impact of male circumcision on the HIV epidemic in Papua New Guinea: a country with extensive foreskin cutting practices.

    PubMed

    Gray, Richard T; Vallely, Andrew; Wilson, David P; Kaldor, John; MacLaren, David; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Siba, Peter; Murray, John M

    2014-01-01

    The degree to which adult medical male circumcision (MC) programs can reduce new HIV infections in a moderate HIV prevalence country like Papua New Guinea (PNG) are uncertain especially given the widespread prevalence of longitudinal foreskin cuts among adult males. We estimated the likely impact of a medical MC intervention in PNG using a mathematical model of HIV transmission. The model was age-structured and incorporated separate components for sex, rural/urban, men who have sex with men and female sex workers. Country-specific data of the prevalence of foreskin cuts, sexually transmitted infections, condom usage, and the acceptability of MC were obtained by our group through related studies. If longitudinal foreskin cutting has a protective efficacy of 20% compared to 60% for MC, then providing MC to 20% of uncut males from 2012 would require 376,000 procedures, avert 7,900 HIV infections by 2032, and require 143 MC per averted infection. Targeting uncut urban youths would achieve the most cost effective returns of 54 MC per HIV infection averted. These numbers of MC required to avert an HIV infection change little even with coverage up to 80% of men. The greater the protective efficacy of longitudinal foreskin cuts against HIV acquisition, the less impact MC interventions will have. Dependent on this efficacy, increasing condom use could have a much greater impact with a 10 percentage point increase averting 18,400 infections over this same period. MC programs could be effective in reducing HIV infections in PNG, particularly in high prevalence populations. However the overall impact is highly dependent on the protective efficacy of existing longitudinal foreskin cutting in preventing HIV.

  13. The Papua New Guinea tsunamis from the 29 March and 5 May 2015 Mw 7.5 earthquake doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarzadeh, M.; Gusman, A. R.; Harada, T.; Satake, K.

    2015-12-01

    We characterized tsunamis from the 29 March and 5 May 2015 Kokopo, Papua New Guinea Mw 7.5 earthquake doublet by applying teleseismic body-wave inversion and tsunami simulation. These events are the first instrumentally-recorded tsunamis from the New Britain subduction zone. Seismic body-wave inversions using various rupture velocities (Vr) showed almost similar source-time functions and waveform agreements but the spatial distributions of the slips were different. In this study, the rupture velocities were reliably estimated from joint use of seismic and tsunami data for the earthquake doublet; and they (i.e., 1.75 and 1.5 km/s) were smaller than typical Vr values for tsunamigenic earthquakes. The largest slips on the fault were similar (2.1 m and 1.7 m), but the different depths and locations yielded maximum seafloor uplift of ~ 0.4 m and ~ 0.2 m, respectively, which resulted in different tsunami powers. This indicates that even though the earthquake size and rupture durations are similar for an earthquake doublet, the resultant tsunami would be different, depending on the location and depth of the earthquake source, as well as water depth around the source. Simulations of hypothetical tsunami scenarios with large magnitudes of Mw 8.4 and 8.5 from the New Britain subduction zone showed that the shoreline tide gauge zero-to-crest amplitude can reach up to 10 m in Rabaul. Most of the tsunami was confined within the Solomon Sea indicating low tsunami hazards for far-field destinations such as Australia and New Zealand in the south. For other regions, ocean submarine ridges and island chains can significantly reflect back tsunami waves and limit the far-field reach of tsunamis.

  14. Impact of Male Circumcision on the HIV Epidemic in Papua New Guinea: A Country with Extensive Foreskin Cutting Practices

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard T.; Vallely, Andrew; Wilson, David P.; Kaldor, John; MacLaren, David; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Siba, Peter; Murray, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The degree to which adult medical male circumcision (MC) programs can reduce new HIV infections in a moderate HIV prevalence country like Papua New Guinea (PNG) are uncertain especially given the widespread prevalence of longitudinal foreskin cuts among adult males. We estimated the likely impact of a medical MC intervention in PNG using a mathematical model of HIV transmission. The model was age-structured and incorporated separate components for sex, rural/urban, men who have sex with men and female sex workers. Country-specific data of the prevalence of foreskin cuts, sexually transmitted infections, condom usage, and the acceptability of MC were obtained by our group through related studies. If longitudinal foreskin cutting has a protective efficacy of 20% compared to 60% for MC, then providing MC to 20% of uncut males from 2012 would require 376,000 procedures, avert 7,900 HIV infections by 2032, and require 143 MC per averted infection. Targeting uncut urban youths would achieve the most cost effective returns of 54 MC per HIV infection averted. These numbers of MC required to avert an HIV infection change little even with coverage up to 80% of men. The greater the protective efficacy of longitudinal foreskin cuts against HIV acquisition, the less impact MC interventions will have. Dependent on this efficacy, increasing condom use could have a much greater impact with a 10 percentage point increase averting 18,400 infections over this same period. MC programs could be effective in reducing HIV infections in PNG, particularly in high prevalence populations. However the overall impact is highly dependent on the protective efficacy of existing longitudinal foreskin cutting in preventing HIV. PMID:25111058

  15. Late Quaternary coseismic uplift events on the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, deduced from coral terrace data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yoko; Chappell, John

    1996-03-01

    Up to six regressive terraces occur on the Holocene raised reef tract and up to 15 occur on late Pleistocene raised reef tracts along 40 km of coastline at Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. We suggest that the regressive terraces represent repeated episodic uplift caused by great earthquakes. Ages of Holocene coseismic uplift events are established by radiocarbon dating; the late Pleistocene events are bracketed by U series ages of the raised reef tracts on which they occur. The mean recurrence interval of great earthquakes that caused the uplift events is 970 to 1165 years in the Holocene and probably the same in the late Pleistocene; the interval ranged from about 200 to 1900 years. The uplift rate increases parallel to the coast from northwest to southeast, and the amplitude of coseismic uplifts generally increases similarly, although some events produced uplift with little shore-parallel tilting. The mean amplitude of coseismic uplifts throughout the study area is ˜3 m in for both Holocene and late Pleistocene sequences. Large, late Quaternary landslides are numerous, and some probably were triggered by the great earthquakes that caused coseismic uplift. There appears to be no continuum between historical large earthquakes at Huon Peninsula of magnitudes >7 that produced no or only minor uplift, and the great earthquakes represented by meter-scale coseismic uplifts and very large landslides. Two tectonic subregions are recognized, which were uplifted together by some Holocene events but not by others. There is no surface trace of Holocene faulting between the subregions, and a buried fault is thought to separate them.

  16. Landslide inventory development in a data sparse region: spatial and temporal characteristics of landslides in Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, J. C.; Petterson, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    In Papua New Guinea (PNG) earthquakes and rainfall events form the dominant trigger mechanisms capable of generating many landslides. Large volume and high density landsliding can result in significant socio-economic impacts, which are felt particularly strongly in the largely subsistence-orientated communities which reside in the most susceptible areas of the country. As PNG has undergone rapid development and increased external investment from mining and other companies, population and settled areas have increased, hence the potential for damage from landslides has also increased. Information on the spatial and temporal distribution of landslides, at a regional-scale, is critical for developing landslide hazard maps and for planning, sustainable development and decision making. This study describes the methods used to produce the first, country-wide landslide inventory for PNG and analyses of landslide events which occurred between 1970 and 2013. The findings illustrate that there is a strong climatic control on landslide-triggering events and that the majority (~ 61 %) of landslides in the PNG landslide inventory are initiated by rainfall related triggers. There is also large year to year variability in the annual occurrence of landslide events and this is related to the phase of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and mesoscale rainfall variability. Landslide-triggering events occur during the north-westerly monsoon season during all phases of ENSO, but less landslide-triggering events are observed during drier season months (May to October) during El Niño phases, than either La Niña or ENSO neutral periods. This analysis has identified landslide hazard hotspots and relationships between landslide occurrence and rainfall climatology and this information can prove to be very valuable in the assessment of trends and future behaviour, which can be useful for policy makers and planners.

  17. ENSO variability during MIS 11 (424-374 ka) from Tridacna gigas at Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayling, Bridget F.; Chappell, John; Gagan, Michael K.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Marine Isotope Stage 11 (MIS 11) from ∼424,000 to 374,000 yrs ago included one of the longest and warmest interglacials of the last 800,000 yrs, and is a potential analogue for the Holocene due to the similarity of Earth's orbital configuration at this time. The question of how the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) responds to warmer background climates remains unanswered and is critical to understand how the ENSO system will evolve under the influence of anthropogenic warming. In this study, we present a 35 yr-long, high-resolution record of MIS 11 climate variability in the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) based on coupled measurements of skeletal Mg/Ca and δ18O in giant Tridacna gigas clams from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. The δ18O of modern T. gigas from Huon Peninsula faithfully records sea surface temperature, salinity/rainfall and regional ENSO variability. The geochemical integrity of the MIS 11 T. gigas for recording paleo-ENSO events was established through trace element screening, detailed petrography and SEM analysis. The fossil T. gigas δ18O record indicates that ENSO was operating during a 35-yr window in MIS 11, but with fewer events of shorter duration compared to those experienced during the last 100 yrs. The suppressed ENSO variability in the MIS 11 T. gigas record corresponds with a reduction in the amplitude of the average annual cycle in δ18O values. Distinctive changes in local insolation seasonality, and T. gigas δ18O, brought about by changes in Earth's orbit, provide an additional geochronological constraint on the timing of reef growth at Huon Peninsula to around 402 ka during the MIS 11.3 sub-stage (∼424-395 ka).

  18. Biogenic and toxic elements in feathers, eggs, and excreta of Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua ellsworthii) in the Antarctic.

    PubMed

    Metcheva, Roumiana; Yurukova, Lilyana; Teodorova, Svetla E

    2011-11-01

    Feathers, eggs, and excreta of Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua ellsworthii), adults, from Livingston Island (South Shetlands), chosen as bioindicators, were used to test the quality of the Antarctic environment. Sex was not examined. The bioaccumulations of toxic trace elements (Cd, Pb, Al, and As), essential trace elements (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, V, Ni, and Sr), and major essential elements (Na, K, Mg, Ca, P, and S) were established. For the first time data about the element contents in Gentoo eggs is provided. Two hypotheses were tested: (1) there are differences in the metal levels among eggs and feathers; and (2) the element concentrations are highest in the excreta. The hypotheses were confirmed at 0.01-0.05 confidence levels. The concentrations of almost all trace elements were significantly higher in the feathers compared to those in the eggs. The following values of the concentrations ratio Fe/Zn were obtained: in the embryo, Fe/Zn = 1.5, and in the feathers, Fe/Zn = 0.5. The concentration of Pb in the embryo and excreta was below 0.4 μg/g, and Cd and As in eggs were below 0.05 and 0.3 μg/g, respectively. This indicates that there is no toxic risk for penguin offspring. Arsenic could be considered as a potential pollutant for Antarctic soil due to its relative high concentration in excreta, 5.13 μg/g. The present data (year 2007) were compared to the data for years 2002 and 2003. No trend of toxic element contamination was established. The concentrations of Pb, Cd, and As in representatives from the top of the food chain in the Antarctic (the present study) and Arctic (literature data) were compared. The data supports the hypothesis that there is an abnormality in cadmium levels in polar marine areas. Regarding Pb, the South Shetlands displayed 3-fold lower level compared to the Aleutians.

  19. Sequential Modelling of the Effects of Mass Drug Treatments on Anopheline-Mediated Lymphatic Filariasis Infection in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajendra K.; Bockarie, Moses J.; Gambhir, Manoj; Siba, Peter M.; Tisch, Daniel J.; Kazura, James; Michael, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) has been targeted by the WHO for global eradication leading to the implementation of large scale intervention programs based on annual mass drug administrations (MDA) worldwide. Recent work has indicated that locality-specific bio-ecological complexities affecting parasite transmission may complicate the prediction of LF extinction endpoints, casting uncertainty on the achievement of this initiative. One source of difficulty is the limited quantity and quality of data used to parameterize models of parasite transmission, implying the important need to update initially-derived parameter values. Sequential analysis of longitudinal data following annual MDAs will also be important to gaining new understanding of the persistence dynamics of LF. Here, we apply a Bayesian statistical-dynamical modelling framework that enables assimilation of information in human infection data recorded from communities in Papua New Guinea that underwent annual MDAs, into our previously developed model of parasite transmission, in order to examine these questions in LF ecology and control. Results Biological parameters underlying transmission obtained by fitting the model to longitudinal data remained stable throughout the study period. This enabled us to reliably reconstruct the observed baseline data in each community. Endpoint estimates also showed little variation. However, the updating procedure showed a shift towards higher and less variable values for worm kill but not for any other drug-related parameters. An intriguing finding is that the stability in key biological parameters could be disrupted by a significant reduction in the vector biting rate prevailing in a locality. Conclusions Temporal invariance of biological parameters in the face of intervention perturbations indicates a robust adaptation of LF transmission to local ecological conditions. The results imply that understanding the mechanisms that underlie locally adapted transmission

  20. Alternating seismic uplift and subsidence in the late Holocene at Madang, Papua New Guinea: Evidence from raised reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tudhope, A.W.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Chilcott, C.P.; Berryman, K.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Jebb, M.; Lipps, J.H.; Pearce, R.G.; Scoffin, T.P.; Shimmield, G.B.

    2000-01-01

    Well-preserved mid-late Holocene coral reefs are exposed in low coastal cliffs in the vicinity of the Madang lagoon on the north coast of Papua New Guinea. Results from U/Th and 14C dating of corals, surveying, and field mapping indicate several major changes in relative sea level over this period. Specifically, there is evidence for a relative sea level fall of ??? 4.5 m about 3000 calendar years B.P., followed by relative sea level rises of ???1.5 m about 2400 calendar years B.P. and ??? 0.5 m about 1200 calendar years B.P. and a subsequent relative sea level fall of ??? 3 m some time in the past 1000 years. Since regional eustatic sea levels are believed to have been dropping gradually over this time frame, these observed changes in relative sea level are interpreted as reflecting alternating tectonic uplift and subsidence. Furthermore, the detailed structure and age relationships of the coral deposits indicate that both uplift and subsidence occurred rapidly, most probably as coseismic events with vertical displacements of 0.5 to 4.5 m. These events may be related to rupture on NW-SE trending reverse faults which have been mapped in the nearby Adelbert Range and possibly on NE trending cross faults which have been inferred from seismicity. This interpretation implies a much greater degree of tectonic instability and potential seismic hazard in the region than previously recognized, although the inferred coseismic vertical displacements are shown to be consistent with present-day local seismicity. In a broader context, the study illustrates how detailed analysis of vertical changes in coral reef structure and assemblages may be used as a sensitive indicator of changing relative sea level, capable of resolving century timescale events and reversals. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Solving the supply of resveratrol tetramers from Papua New Guinean rainforest anisoptera species that inhibit bacterial type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Davis, Rohan A; Beattie, Karren D; Xu, Min; Yang, Xinzhou; Yin, Sheng; Holla, Harish; Healy, Peter C; Sykes, Melissa; Shelper, Todd; Avery, Vicky M; Elofsson, Mikael; Sundin, Charlotta; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-12-26

    The supply of (-)-hopeaphenol (1) was achieved via enzymatic biotransformation in order to provide material for preclinical investigation. High-throughput screening of a prefractionated natural product library aimed to identify compounds that inhibit the bacterial virulence type III secretion system (T3SS) identified several fractions derived from two Papua New Guinean Anisoptera species, showing activity against Yersinia pseudotuberculosis outer proteins E and H (YopE and YopH). Bioassay-directed isolation from the leaves of A. thurifera, and similarly A. polyandra, resulted in three known resveratrol tetramers, (-)-hopeaphenol (1), vatalbinoside A (2), and vaticanol B (3). Compounds 1-3 displayed IC50 values of 8.8, 12.5, and 9.9 μM in a luminescent reporter-gene assay (YopE) and IC50 values of 2.9, 4.5, and 3.3 μM in an enzyme-based YopH assay, respectively, which suggested that they could potentially act against the T3SS in Yersinia. The structures of 1-3 were confirmed through a combination of spectrometric, chemical methods, and single-crystal X-ray structure determinations of the natural product 1 and the permethyl ether analogue of 3. The enzymatic hydrolysis of the β-glycoside 2 to the aglycone 1 was achieved through biotransformation using the endogenous leaf enzymes. This significantly enhanced the yield of the target bioactive natural product from 0.08% to 1.3% and facilitates ADMET studies of (-)-hopeaphenol (1).

  2. Impact of Placental Malaria and Hypergammaglobulinemia on Transplacental Transfer of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Antibody in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Atwell, Jessica E.; Thumar, Bhagvanji; Robinson, Leanne J.; Tobby, Roselyn; Yambo, Phantica; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Siba, Peter M.; Unger, Holger W.; Rogerson, Stephen J.; King, Christopher L.; Karron, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Passively acquired respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) neutralizing antibody protects against RSV-associated lower respiratory infections, but placental malaria (PM) and maternal hypergammaglobulinemia might interfere with transplacental immunoglobulin transport. Methods. We measured RSV plaque-reduction neutralization (PRN) antibody in 300 full-term maternal/cord serum pairs in 2 cohorts in malaria-endemic Papua New Guinea: Alexishafen (2005–2008) and the Fetal Immunity Study (FIS) (2011–2013). We defined impaired transport as a cord-to-maternal titer ratio <1.0 and a protective RSV PRN titer (PRNT) ≥1:200. Results. PM and hypergammaglobulinemia occurred in 60% and 54% of Alexishafen mothers versus 8% and 9% of FIS mothers, respectively. 34% of Alexishafen and 32% of FIS pairs demonstrated impaired transport. Multivariate modeling revealed significant associations between increasing maternal IgG (log2) and impaired transport (adjusted OR, Alexishafen: 2.68 [1.17–6.14], FIS: 6.94 [1.94–24.8]) but no association with PM. 34% of Alexishafen and 31% of FIS cord PRNTs were <1:200. Conclusions. Impaired RSV antibody transport was observed in approximately one-third of maternal/cord pairs. Hypergammaglobulinemia, but not PM, was associated with impaired transport, particularly among women with low RSV PRNT. Detection of RSV PRNT <1:200 in one-third of cord sera confirms the need to increase levels of RSV neutralizing antibody in pregnant women through maternal immunization. PMID:26238686

  3. Improving paediatric and neonatal care in rural district hospitals in the highlands of Papua New Guinea: a quality improvement approach

    PubMed Central

    Sa’avu, Martin; Duke, Trevor; Matai, Sens

    2014-01-01

    Background In developing countries such as Papua New Guinea (PNG), district hospitals play a vital role in clinical care, training health-care workers, implementing immunization and other public health programmes and providing necessary data on disease burdens and outcomes. Pneumonia and neonatal conditions are a major cause of child admission and death in hospitals throughout PNG. Oxygen therapy is an essential component of the management of pneumonia and neonatal conditions, but facilities for oxygen and care of the sick newborn are often inadequate, especially in district hospitals. Improving this area may be a vehicle for improving overall quality of care. Method A qualitative study of five rural district hospitals in the highlands provinces of Papua New Guinea was undertaken. A structured survey instrument was used by a paediatrician and a biomedical technician to assess the quality of paediatric care, the case-mix and outcomes, resources for delivery of good-quality care for children with pneumonia and neonatal illnesses, existing oxygen systems and equipment, drugs and consumables, infection-control facilities and the reliability of the electricity supply to each hospital. A floor plan was drawn up for the installation of the oxygen concentrators and a plan for improving care of sick neonates, and a process of addressing other priorities was begun. Results In remote parts of PNG, many district hospitals are run by under-resourced non-government organizations. Most hospitals had general wards in which both adults and children were managed together. Paediatric case-loads ranged between 232 and 840 patients per year with overall case-fatality rates (CFR) of 3–6% and up to 15% among sick neonates. Pneumonia accounts for 28–37% of admissions with a CFR of up to 8%. There were no supervisory visits by paediatricians, and little or no continuing professional development of staff. Essential drugs were mostly available, but basic equipment for the care of sick

  4. Six new species of Philiris Röber, 1891 (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) from Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Six new species of the large lycaenid genus Philiris Röber, 1891 (Philiris petriei sp. n., Philiris bubalisatina sp. n., Philiris baiteta sp. n., Philiris radicala sp. n., Philiris hindenburgensis sp. n. and Philiris parsonsi sp. n.), from Papua New Guinea, are described and illustrated, as are the early stages of the former taxon, with Litsea sp. near callophyllantha K. Schum (Lauraceae) recorded as the larval food plant. The holotypes of all but the latter are deposited in the ANIC, with that of P. parsonsi located in the BMNH. The external facies and male genitalia of all new species are compared in detail to putative known related species, and the types of these, in nearly all cases, are also illustrated. PMID:24715788

  5. A new species of Choerophryne (Anura, Microhylidae) from the central cordillera of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Amy; Richards, Stephen; Oliver, Paul

    2014-01-09

    We describe a new species of very small microhylid frog in the genus Choerophryne from the upper Strickland River area, Western and Southern Highlands Provinces, Papua New Guinea. Choerophryne gracilirostris sp. nov. can be distinguished from congeners by the following combination of characters: small size (SUL 13.5-14.7 mm), moderately long and narrow snout, first finger without expanded disk and advertisement call consisting of 3-5 distinctly pulsed notes repeated in long sequences. Males in the type series were calling from within leaf litter in primary hill rainforest (213-1368 m a.s.l.). The new species is the third Choerophryne known from the southern side of New Guinea's central cordillera. Measurements of a juvenile specimen (rare because most Choerophryne collected are calling males) demonstrate that the distinctive rostral projection of this genus exhibits pronounced positive allometry.

  6. Potential transport pathways of terrigenous material in the Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Timothy R.; Ko, Dong Shan; Slingerland, Rudy L.; Riedlinger, Shelley; Flynn, Peter

    2006-02-01

    This work discusses potential transport pathways of terrigenous material in the Gulf of Papua (GoP), New Guinea, using Lagrangian tracers as proxies for clay minerals and finer particles. The tracers are transported by currents from the East Asia Seas implementation of the Navy Coastal Ocean Model. The results suggest that clay minerals input from rivers along the northwest coast of the GoP accumulate on the inner shelf with high concentrations near the mouth of the Fly and Purari Rivers. Finer particles, which are also representative of dissolved metals, are transported eastward along the GoP coast into the Solomon Sea as well as into the Torres Strait to the west. The results also suggest that some finer particles are entrained by eddies within the northern Coral Sea. These results are in qualitative agreement with observations from the region.

  7. Theopapuamide, a cyclic depsipeptide from a Papua New Guinea lithistid sponge Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Anokha S; Bugni, Tim S; Feng, Xidong; Harper, Mary Kay; Skalicky, Jack J; Mohammed, Kaleem A; Andjelic, Cynthia D; Barrows, Louis R; Ireland, Chris M

    2006-11-01

    Theopapuamide (1), a new cytotoxic peptide, has been isolated from the lithistid sponge Theonella swinhoei from Papua New Guinea. The structure was established by analysis of NMR, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The undecapeptide (1) contains several unusual amino acid residues, of which the occurrence of beta-methoxyasparagine and 4-amino-5-methyl-2,3,5-trihydroxyhexanoic acid (Amtha) is unprecedented in natural peptides. Compound 1 also contains an amide-linked fatty acid moiety, 3-hydroxy-2,4,6-trimethyloctanoic acid (Htoa). Theopapuamide (1) was cytotoxic against CEM-TART and HCT-116 cell lines, with EC50 values of 0.5 and 0.9 microM, respectively.

  8. Theopapuamide: a Cyclic Depsipeptide from a Papua New Guinea Lithistid Sponge Theonella swinhoei

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayake, Anokha S.; Bugni, Tim S.; Feng, Xidong; Harper, Mary Kay; Skalicky, Jack J.; Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Andjelic, Cynthia D.; Barrows, Louis R.; Ireland, Chris M.

    2008-01-01

    Theopapuamide (1), a new cytotoxic peptide has been isolated from the lithistid sponge Theonella swinhoei from Papua New Guinea. The structure was established by analysis of NMR, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. The undecapeptide (1) contains several unusual amino acid residues, of which the occurrence of β-methoxyasparagine and 4-amino-5-methyl-2,3,5-trihydroxy-hexanoic acid (Amtha) is unprecedented in natural peptides. Compound 1 also contains a amide linked fatty acid moiety, 3-hydroxy-2,4,6-trimethyl-octanoic acid (Htoa). Theopapuamide (1) was cytotoxic against CEM-TART and HCT-116 cell lines with EC50 values of 0.5 μM and 0.9 μM respectively. PMID:17125225

  9. Breaking silences and upholding confidences: responding to HIV in the Lihir Islands, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Hemer, Susan R

    2015-01-01

    Various forms of silence are understood to characterize the response to HIV/AIDS in the Lihir Islands in Papua New Guinea. While some efforts have been made to prevent HIV and educate residents, these seem not to have been in proportion to its classification as a high-risk setting for transmission, given social factors associated with the Lihir gold mine. Confidentiality is both practiced yet critiqued in Lihir as another form of silencing that detracts from efforts to emphasize the serious nature of HIV, promote its prevention, and care for those who live with it. 'Breaking the silence' has come to be seen as key to preventing HIV in Lihir, yet while certain silences are acknowledged, others have escaped scrutiny.

  10. The development of formal thought during pretertiary science courses in Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Audrey Hendry; Wilson, James Michael

    All students beginning either the two-year National High School or the one-year Preliminary Year program in Papua New Guinea in 1980 undertook a test of formal operational thought at the beginning of their programs. At the end of the programs they undertook the same test again. Piagetian cognitive levels obtained were compared with grades in science courses. Results showed: (1) considerable numbers of students at a transitional level on each occasion, (2) low correlations between cognitive level and science grades, and (3) significant development in levels of cognitive thought during the National High School program. It is suggested that a knowledge of the cognitive level of students could be of particular value to teachers at this stage.

  11. Elevational gradient of Hemiptera (Heteroptera, Auchenorrhyncha) on a tropical mountain in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen W.; Soulier-Perkins, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    Malaise trap sampling of Hemiptera (Heteroptera; Auchenorrhyncha) was conducted at 500 m intervals along an elevational gradient from 200 m to 3,700 m on the east slope of Mount Wilhelm, Madang Province, Papua New Guinea. Hemiptera had a decrease in morphospecies richness and overall abundance with increasing elevation, however, the Heteroptera did not exhibit either pattern. A few species were relatively abundant at each elevation, whereas the majority of species were represented by ≤5 specimens. Morphospecies richness of Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadomorpha, Fulgoromorpha, Cicadellidae, Cixiidae, and Derbidae also decreased with increasing elevation but abundance decline was not significant due to the large number of specimens captured at 200 m relative to those captured at higher elevations. The percentage of Cicadomorpha specimens decreased with increasing elevation relative to that of the Fulgoromorpha which increased with increasing elevation. Environmental factors that may influence patterns of species richness along the elevational gradient are discussed. PMID:26056617

  12. Tourism as science and science as tourism: environment, society, self, and other in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    West, Paige

    2008-08-01

    The experience of villagers in Maimafu, in the Crater Mountain Wildlife Management Area of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, calls attention to two forms of social interaction between rural people and outsiders that have been little examined in the anthropological literature. One of these is scientific research and the other is scientific tourism, a form of ecotourism that is linked not to science but to self-fashioning and individual gain. Scientific tourists may be seeking an educational adventure that they can turn into symbolic capital on their return home, a way into the world of science, or an experience that can be turned into economic capital through publication in popular magazines. For both researchers and scientific journalists, New Guinea combines the exotic, the about-to-be-lost, the primitive, the untouched, and the spectacular and is therefore a powerful space for imaginary and representational practice.

  13. Female spirit cults as a window on gender relations in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P J; Strathern, A

    1999-09-01

    Early writings on male cults in the highlands of Papua New Guinea tended to stress the exclusion of women and the collective agency of men. Looking at a subset of these cults from the Western and Southern Highlands Provinces, centering on Female Spirit figures, the authors argue that in these cases the cults are better understood as expressions of a collaborative model, in which gendered cooperation, both in practice and in terms of ritual symbolism, is activated in order to produce fertility and wealth. Positive collaboration is involved as well as structural complementarity. The collaborative model is therefore suggested as an alternative to the model of "male exclusivity" in the analysis of certain cult practices in these parts of the New Guinea highlands region.

  14. Village rural water supplies in the Western Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, D J; Kukyuwa, K

    1982-09-01

    The 1980's have been declared the "International Water Supply and Sanitation Decade". The Papua New Guinea (PNG) Government has committed itself to spending K2.5 million between 1982-1985 on rural water supplies. The experience for such a programme in the Western Highlands is reviewed. Between 1975 and June 1981 there were 101 installation, 69 of which were inspected. Of these, 40.6% were working. Within one year 40% had broken down; after 4 years, 90% had broken down. Contributing factors to break downs were; the use of a cheap and inefficient hand pump on wells; use of plastic rather than metal pipes in reticulated water supplies; weaknesses in the design of reticulated supplies; and difficulties with regular maintenance. It is recommended that the government take steps to solve these problems before it commits itself to a significantly increased expenditure on rural water supplies.

  15. The primacy of politics: charting the governance of the Papua New Guinea health system since independence.

    PubMed

    Day, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    To chart the course of health governance in Papua New Guinea (PNG) since Independence, this article identifies two arks of public sector administration in PNG. Each was instigated by the passing of an Organic Law. The reform periods presaged by the Organic Law on Provincial Government 1976 (OLPG) and the Organic Law on Provincial Governments and Local-level Governments 1995 (OLPGLLG) have fundamentally transformed the political and administrative structures governing the country, and in particularly those relating to health. Comparing the organization of the government-operated health system during each of these reform periods not only reveals why PNG's health services have struggled to improve since Independence, but also casts light on the key drivers of fundamental reforms in PNG. Ultimately, the exercise illustrates the 'primacy of politics', and why political concerns invariably trump service delivery concerns.

  16. Tropical West Pacific moisture dynamics and climate controls on rainfall isotopic ratios in southern Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Donaldi S.; Thompson, Lonnie G.; Setyadi, Gesang

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the controls on stable isotopologues of tropical rainfall is critical for paleoclimatic reconstruction from tropical ice core records. The southern Papua region, Indonesia, has a unique climate regime that allows for the evaluation of the influence of precipitation and convective activity on seasonal rainfall δ18O. The influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on interannual rainfall δ18O variation is also important for paleoclimate reconstruction. Here we present stable isotope analyses of 1332 rain samples collected daily during the period from January 2013 to February 2014 (ENSO-normal) and December 2014 to September 2015 (El Niño) at various elevation stations (9 to 3945 m above sea level) on the southern slope of the central mountain ranges in Papua. The results suggest an altitude effect with an isotopic lapse rate for δ18O (δD) of -2.4‰/km (-18.2‰/km). The temporal δ18O variability (daily to interannual) is controlled mostly by regional convective activity rather than local/regional precipitation amount. The intraseasonal δ18O variation resembles the Madden-Julian Oscillation cycle with major δ18O depletion events associated with active (wet) phases. Moisture origins, transport pathways, moisture convergence, and raindrop evaporation appear to have no significant seasonal effects on δ18O, leading to the conclusion that condensation temperature controls δ18O depletion associated with convective activity. Seasonal δ18O variation is likely associated with atmospheric temperature at the mean condensation level as indicated by the altitude of latent heat release in the troposphere. Rainfall δ18O (δD) is generally enriched by 1.6‰-2‰ (11‰-15‰) during El Niño than during ENSO-normal periods.

  17. Northern Papua New Guinea: Structure and sedimentation in a modern arc-continent collision

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.; Silver, E. )

    1990-05-01

    Northern Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Sea are the site of a modern oblique, arc-continent collision, which is progressing from northwest to southeast. By combining offshore seismic data from the Solomon Sea with geologic mapping in the Markham Valley area of northern Papua New Guinea the authors are predicting the outcome of this collision. The Huon Gulf is the present site of initial collision. Seismic profiles show this area is dominated by thin thrust sheets. Onshore, the bulk of the uplifted accretionary wedge is a melange with exotic blocks of a variety of lithologies. Structurally below the melange lies the Leron Formation composed of thick channelized sandstone and conglomerate. It dips north at approximately 40{degree} and is cut by several thrust fault with associated folds. Limestone blocks within the melange are reported to be 2 Ma, and Beryllium 10 anomalies from Bismarck arc volcanoes suggest that initial collision of the Finisterre block (375 km northwest of the present collision point) began no earlier than 3 Ma. This implies the collision is propagating laterally at about 125 km/m.y.. Large outcrops of basalt and gabbro within the melange suggest that segments of oceanic crust were incorporated into the accretionary wedge. Modern sedimentation within the collision zone grades from fluvial sediments in the Markham Valley to deep-water turbidites ponded behind a structural ridge near the point of incipient collision. The Markham submarine canyon occupies the collision front here, and efficiently erodes the accretionary wedge. This setting may serve as a modem analog for deposition of much of the Leron Formation which exhibits tremendous sediment reworking.

  18. Cockle emergence at the sediment surface: 'favourization' mechanism by digenean parasites?

    PubMed

    Desclaux, C; de Montaudouin, X; Bachelet, G

    2002-11-22

    The aim of the present work was to assess the effect of digenean trematodes on indirect mortality of the cockle Cerastoderma edule, an infaunal bivalve. The tested hypothesis was that parasites altered the burrowing capacity of cockles and thus exposed them at the sediment surface, where they are more vulnerable to predators. If the predator is the final host, this mechanism, which drives the cockle out of the sediment, is considered as a 'favourization'. Cockle populations from 2 stations in Arcachon Bay (France)-Banc d'Arguin (oceanic situation) and La Canelette (lagoonal situation)--were sampled for 1 yr. At La Canelette, monitoring every 2 d showed that 50% of adult cockles regularly migrated to the sediment surface at a rate of 5 cockles m(-2) yr(-1) and disappeared in a few days. In the laboratory, 67% of these 'surface cockles' did not burrow again, suggesting that they would die in the field. Moreover, mortality measured after 7 d in the laboratory was 2 to 5 times higher than mortality of 'buried cockles', at both stations and particularly during summer. Species richness and abundance of digeneans from both stations were compared in 'buried' and 'surface' individuals to determine whether parasites played a role in cockle migration and mortality. Ten and 9 digeneans were found at Banc d'Arguin and La Canelette, respectively, with Himasthla quissetensis and Labratrema minimus being the most prevalent and abundant species at both stations. The abundance of H. quissetensis was slightly higher in surface cockles at Banc d'Arguin, but the difference fluctuated with station and cockle age (or size). L. minimus prevalence was only higher in surface cockles at La Canelette. In the latter station, we estimated that L. minimus and H. quissetensis were responsible for the emergence of 9 and 2%, respectively, of the buried cockles. Although this favourization mechanism may induce some mortality in cockles, it does not alone explain the magnitude of the observed

  19. "Symmetrical" hermit crabs of the family Pylochelidae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) collected by the "BIOPAPUA" and "PAPUA NIUGINI" expeditions in the Papua New Guinea, with descriptions of two new species.

    PubMed

    Komai, Tomoyuki; Chan, Tin-Yam

    2016-03-09

    Collections made during the recent expeditions to Papua New Guinea ("BIOPAPUA", 2010; "PAPUA NIUGINI", 2012) yielded a total of 12 species from the "symmetrical" hermit crab family Pylochelidae, including two new to science: Bathycheles incisus (Forest, 1987), B. integer (Forest, 1987), Cheiroplatea laticauda Boas, 1926, C. pumicicola Forest, 1987, C. rotundioculus n. sp., Pylocheles mortensenii Boas, 1926, and Xylocheles macrops (Forest, 1987) (Pylochelinae); Parapylocheles scorpio (Alcock, 1894), Trizocheles manningi Forest, 1987, T. moosai Forest, 1987, T. sakaii Forest, 1987, and T. spinidigitus n. sp. (Trizochelinae). Affinities of the two new species are discussed. Parapylocheles scorpio, Trizocheles manningi and T. sakaii are recorded from the South Pacific for the first time. Revised identification keys to species of Cheiroplatea and Trizocheles are provided.

  20. Overexpression of SERBP1 (Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA binding protein) in human breast cancer is correlated with favourable prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) overexpression is an important prognostic and predictive biomarker in human breast cancer. SERBP1, a protein that is supposed to regulate the stability of PAI-1 mRNA, may play a role in gynaecological cancers as well, since upregulation of SERBP1 was described in ovarian cancer recently. This is the first study to present a systematic characterisation of SERBP1 expression in human breast cancer and normal breast tissue at both the mRNA and the protein level. Methods Using semiquantitative realtime PCR we analysed SERBP1 expression in different normal human tissues (n = 25), and in matched pairs of normal (n = 7) and cancerous breast tissues (n = 7). SERBP1 protein expression was analysed in two independent cohorts on tissue microarrays (TMAs), an initial evaluation set, consisting of 193 breast carcinomas and 48 normal breast tissues, and a second large validation set, consisting of 605 breast carcinomas. In addition, a collection of benign (n = 2) and malignant (n = 6) mammary cell lines as well as breast carcinoma lysates (n = 16) were investigated for SERBP1 expression by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, applying non-radioisotopic in situ hybridisation a subset of normal (n = 10) and cancerous (n = 10) breast tissue specimens from the initial TMA were analysed for SERBP1 mRNA expression. Results SERBP1 is not differentially expressed in breast carcinoma compared to normal breast tissue, both at the RNA and protein level. However, recurrence-free survival analysis showed a significant correlation (P = 0.008) between abundant SERBP1 expression in breast carcinoma and favourable prognosis. Interestingly, overall survival analysis also displayed a tendency (P = 0.09) towards favourable prognosis when SERBP1 was overexpressed in breast cancer. Conclusions The RNA-binding protein SERBP1 is abundantly expressed in human breast cancer and may represent a novel breast tumour

  1. Insecticidal Bed Nets and Filariasis Transmission in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Lisa J.; Thomsen, Edward K.; Tisch, Daniel J.; Henry-Halldin, Cara N.; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Baea, Manasseh E.; Dagoro, Henry; Susapu, Melinda; Hetzel, Manuel W.; Bockarie, Moses J.; Michael, Edwin; Siba, Peter M.; Kazura, James W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Global efforts to eliminate lymphatic filariasis are based on the annual mass administration of antifilarial drugs to reduce the microfilaria reservoir available to the mosquito vector. Insecticide-treated bed nets are being widely used in areas in which filariasis and malaria are coendemic. METHODS We studied five villages in which five annual mass administrations of antifilarial drugs, which were completed in 1998, reduced the transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti, one of the nematodes that cause lymphatic filariasis. A total of 21,899 anopheles mosquitoes were collected for 26 months before and 11 to 36 months after bed nets treated with long-lasting insecticide were distributed in 2009. We evaluated the status of filarial infection and the presence of W. bancrofti DNA in anopheline mosquitoes before and after the introduction of insecticide-treated bed nets. We then used a model of population dynamics to estimate the probabilities of transmission cessation. RESULTS Village-specific rates of bites from anopheline mosquitoes ranged from 6.4 to 61.3 bites per person per day before the bed-net distribution and from 1.1 to 9.4 bites for 11 months after distribution (P<0.001). During the same period, the rate of detection of W. bancrofti in anopheline mosquitoes decreased from 1.8% to 0.4% (P = 0.005), and the rate of detection of filarial DNA decreased from 19.4% to 14.9% (P = 0.13). The annual transmission potential was 5 to 325 infective larvae inoculated per person per year before the bed-net distribution and 0 after the distribution. Among all five villages with a prevalence of microfilariae of 2 to 38%, the probability of transmission cessation increased from less than 1.0% before the bed-net distribution to a range of 4.9 to 95% in the 11 months after distribution. CONCLUSIONS Vector control with insecticide-treated bed nets is a valuable tool for W. bancrofti elimination in areas in which anopheline mosquitoes transmit the parasite. (Funded by the U

  2. Cryptic female choice favours sperm from major histocompatibility complex-dissimilar males

    PubMed Central

    Løvlie, Hanne; Gillingham, Mark A. F.; Worley, Kirsty; Pizzari, Tommaso; Richardson, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptic female choice may enable polyandrous females to avoid inbreeding or bias offspring variability at key loci after mating. However, the role of these genetic benefits in cryptic female choice remains poorly understood. Female red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, bias sperm use in favour of unrelated males. Here, we experimentally investigate whether this bias is driven by relatedness per se, or by similarity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), genes central to vertebrate acquired immunity, where polymorphism is critical to an individual's ability to combat pathogens. Through experimentally controlled natural matings, we confirm that selection against related males' sperm occurs within the female reproductive tract but demonstrate that this is more accurately predicted by MHC similarity: controlling for relatedness per se, more sperm reached the eggs when partners were MHC-dissimilar. Importantly, this effect appeared largely owing to similarity at a single MHC locus (class I minor). Further, the effect of MHC similarity was lost following artificial insemination, suggesting that male phenotypic cues might be required for females to select sperm differentially. These results indicate that postmating mechanisms that reduce inbreeding may do so as a consequence of more specific strategies of cryptic female choice promoting MHC diversity in offspring. PMID:24004935

  3. Endoreduplication and fruit growth in tomato: evidence in favour of the karyoplasmic ratio theory.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Christian; Bourdon, Matthieu; Pirrello, Julien; Cheniclet, Catherine; Gévaudant, Frédéric; Frangne, Nathalie

    2014-06-01

    The growth of a plant organ depends upon the developmental processes of cell division and cell expansion. The activity of cell divisions sets the number of cells that will make up the organ; the cell expansion activity then determines its final size. Among the various mechanisms that may influence the determination of cell size, endopolyploidy by means of endoreduplication appears to be of great importance in plants. Endoreduplication is widespread in plants and supports the process of differentiation of cells and organs. Its functional role in plant cells is not fully understood, although it is commonly associated with ploidy-dependent cell expansion. During the development of tomato fruit, cells from the (fleshy) pericarp tissue become highly polyploid, reaching a DNA content barely encountered in other plant species (between 2C and 512C). Recent investigations using tomato fruit development as a model provided new data in favour of the long-standing karyoplasmic ratio theory, stating that cells tend to adjust their cytoplasmic volume to the nuclear DNA content. By establishing a highly structured cellular system where multiple physiological functions are integrated, endoreduplication does act as a morphogenetic factor supporting cell growth during tomato fruit development.

  4. Cryptic female choice favours sperm from major histocompatibility complex-dissimilar males.

    PubMed

    Løvlie, Hanne; Gillingham, Mark A F; Worley, Kirsty; Pizzari, Tommaso; Richardson, David S

    2013-10-22

    Cryptic female choice may enable polyandrous females to avoid inbreeding or bias offspring variability at key loci after mating. However, the role of these genetic benefits in cryptic female choice remains poorly understood. Female red junglefowl, Gallus gallus, bias sperm use in favour of unrelated males. Here, we experimentally investigate whether this bias is driven by relatedness per se, or by similarity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), genes central to vertebrate acquired immunity, where polymorphism is critical to an individual's ability to combat pathogens. Through experimentally controlled natural matings, we confirm that selection against related males' sperm occurs within the female reproductive tract but demonstrate that this is more accurately predicted by MHC similarity: controlling for relatedness per se, more sperm reached the eggs when partners were MHC--dissimilar. Importantly, this effect appeared largely owing to similarity at a single MHC locus (class I minor). Further, the effect of MHC similarity was lost following artificial insemination, suggesting that male phenotypic cues might be required for females to select sperm differentially. These results indicate that postmating mechanisms that reduce inbreeding may do so as a consequence of more specific strategies of cryptic female choice promoting MHC diversity in offspring.

  5. Deliberation favours social efficiency by making people disregard their relative shares: evidence from USA and India

    PubMed Central

    Corgnet, Brice; Espín, Antonio M.; Hernán-González, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Groups make decisions on both the production and the distribution of resources. These decisions typically involve a tension between increasing the total level of group resources (i.e. social efficiency) and distributing these resources among group members (i.e. individuals' relative shares). This is the case because the redistribution process may destroy part of the resources, thus resulting in socially inefficient allocations. Here we apply a dual-process approach to understand the cognitive underpinnings of this fundamental tension. We conducted a set of experiments to examine the extent to which different allocation decisions respond to intuition or deliberation. In a newly developed approach, we assess intuition and deliberation at both the trait level (using the Cognitive Reflection Test, henceforth CRT) and the state level (through the experimental manipulation of response times). To test for robustness, experiments were conducted in two countries: the USA and India. Despite absolute-level differences across countries, in both locations we show that: (i) time pressure and low CRT scores are associated with individuals' concerns for their relative shares and (ii) time delay and high CRT scores are associated with individuals' concerns for social efficiency. These findings demonstrate that deliberation favours social efficiency by overriding individuals' intuitive tendency to focus on relative shares. PMID:28386421

  6. Identifying the Environmental Conditions Favouring West Nile Virus Outbreaks in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Markus; Rosà, Roberto; Marini, Giovanni; Chadwick, Elizabeth; Neteler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a globally important mosquito borne virus, with significant implications for human and animal health. The emergence and spread of new lineages, and increased pathogenicity, is the cause of escalating public health concern. Pinpointing the environmental conditions that favour WNV circulation and transmission to humans is challenging, due both to the complexity of its biological cycle, and the under-diagnosis and reporting of epidemiological data. Here, we used remote sensing and GIS to enable collation of multiple types of environmental data over a continental spatial scale, in order to model annual West Nile Fever (WNF) incidence across Europe and neighbouring countries. Multi-model selection and inference were used to gain a consensus from multiple linear mixed models. Climate and landscape were key predictors of WNF outbreaks (specifically, high precipitation in late winter/early spring, high summer temperatures, summer drought, occurrence of irrigated croplands and highly fragmented forests). Identification of the environmental conditions associated with WNF outbreaks is key to enabling public health bodies to properly focus surveillance and mitigation of West Nile virus impact, but more work needs to be done to enable accurate predictions of WNF risk. PMID:25803814

  7. Physiological responses to increased brood size and ectoparasite infestation: Adult great tits favour self-maintenance.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Michele; Voegeli, Beatrice; Richner, Heinz

    2015-03-15

    Different types of stressors trigger responses of different physiological systems, and these responses may contribute differentially to the maintenance of homeostasis, to trade-offs and the evolution of life-history traits. To manipulate two common stressors during reproduction, we infested half of the nests in a naturally breeding great tit population with ectoparasites and simultaneously manipulated brood size, using a 2×2 experimental design. Parents in this model species commonly compensate for ectoparasites by an increase in food provisioning. We assessed parental responses to these concurrent stressors by measuring several physiological stress parameters such as changes in metabolic rate, oxidative stress and expression of heat-shock proteins (Hsp), and explored how these stressors affect the trade-off between self-maintenance and reproduction. Neither flea infestation nor brood size manipulation affected adult metabolic rate, oxidative damage or Hsp levels. Furthermore, we found no interactive effect of the two treatments on adults. However, nestlings in infested nests had lower body mass and lower survival. Nestlings in enlarged broods were lighter and had lower survival, although parents of enlarged broods increased food provisioning rate. The findings suggest that adults favour maintenance of cellular homeostasis, and physiological equilibrium over current reproduction, and that the costs induced by both stressors, flea infestation and increased brood size, are carried by the offspring. It emphasizes the importance of self-maintenance over reproduction in life-history decisions, and more generally the need of including physiological traits for understanding the evolution of life-histories.

  8. Identifying the environmental conditions favouring West Nile Virus outbreaks in Europe.

    PubMed

    Marcantonio, Matteo; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Metz, Markus; Rosà, Roberto; Marini, Giovanni; Chadwick, Elizabeth; Neteler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is a globally important mosquito borne virus, with significant implications for human and animal health. The emergence and spread of new lineages, and increased pathogenicity, is the cause of escalating public health concern. Pinpointing the environmental conditions that favour WNV circulation and transmission to humans is challenging, due both to the complexity of its biological cycle, and the under-diagnosis and reporting of epidemiological data. Here, we used remote sensing and GIS to enable collation of multiple types of environmental data over a continental spatial scale, in order to model annual West Nile Fever (WNF) incidence across Europe and neighbouring countries. Multi-model selection and inference were used to gain a consensus from multiple linear mixed models. Climate and landscape were key predictors of WNF outbreaks (specifically, high precipitation in late winter/early spring, high summer temperatures, summer drought, occurrence of irrigated croplands and highly fragmented forests). Identification of the environmental conditions associated with WNF outbreaks is key to enabling public health bodies to properly focus surveillance and mitigation of West Nile virus impact, but more work needs to be done to enable accurate predictions of WNF risk.

  9. The mammary ducts create a favourable microenvironment for xenografting of luminal and molecular apocrine breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Richard, Elodie; Grellety, Thomas; Velasco, Valerie; MacGrogan, Gaetan; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Iggo, Richard

    2016-11-01

    There is a paucity of models for hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer because of the difficulty of establishing xenografts from these tumours. We show that this obstacle can be overcome by injecting human tumour cells directly into the mammary ducts of immunodeficient mice. Tumours from 31 patients were infected overnight with a lentiviral vector expressing tdTomato and injected through the nipple into the mammary ducts of NOD-SCID-IL2RG-/- mice. Tumours formed in the mice in 77% of cases after the first injection (6/8 luminal A, 15/20 luminal B, and 3/3 molecular apocrine). Four luminal A and one molecular apocrine graft were tested in secondary and tertiary grafts: all were successfully passaged in secondary and 4/5 in tertiary grafts. None of the samples engrafted when injected subcutaneously. The morphology, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), androgen receptor (AR), and Ki-67 profiles of the clinical samples were maintained in the tertiary grafts. We also show that the intraductal approach can be used to test the response to targeted therapy with fulvestrant and palbociclib, using a genetically defined ER+ model. We conclude that the mammary ducts create a microenvironment that is uniquely favourable to the survival and growth of tumours derived from mammary hormone-sensing cells. This approach opens the door to testing genomically targeted treatment of HR+ tumours in precision medicine programmes. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Selection for distinct gene expression properties favours the evolution of mutational robustness in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Soto, C

    2016-11-01

    Mutational robustness is a genotype's tendency to keep a phenotypic trait with little and few changes in the face of mutations. Mutational robustness is both ubiquitous and evolutionarily important as it affects in different ways the probability that new phenotypic variation arises. Understanding the origins of robustness is specially relevant for systems of development that are phylogenetically widespread and that construct phenotypic traits with a strong impact on fitness. Gene regulatory networks are examples of this class of systems. They comprise sets of genes that, through cross-regulation, build the gene activity patterns that define cellular responses, different tissues or distinct cell types. Several empirical observations, such as a greater robustness of wild-type phenotypes, suggest that stabilizing selection underlies the evolution of mutational robustness. However, the role of selection in the evolution of robustness is still under debate. Computer simulations of the dynamics and evolution of gene regulatory networks have shown that selection for any gene activity pattern that is steady and self-sustaining is sufficient to promote the evolution of mutational robustness. Here, I generalize this scenario using a computational model to show that selection for different aspects of a gene activity phenotype increases mutational robustness. Mutational robustness evolves even when selection favours properties that conflict with the stationarity of a gene activity pattern. The results that I present support an important role for stabilizing selection in the evolution of robustness in gene regulatory networks.

  11. Future climate change will favour non-specialist mammals in the (sub)arctics.

    PubMed

    Hof, Anouschka R; Jansson, Roland; Nilsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Arctic and subarctic (i.e., [sub]arctic) ecosystems are predicted to be particularly susceptible to climate change. The area of tundra is expected to decrease and temperate climates will extend further north, affecting species inhabiting northern environments. Consequently, species at high latitudes should be especially susceptible to climate change, likely experiencing significant range contractions. Contrary to these expectations, our modelling of species distributions suggests that predicted climate change up to 2080 will favour most mammals presently inhabiting (sub)arctic Europe. Assuming full dispersal ability, most species will benefit from climate change, except for a few cold-climate specialists. However, most resident species will contract their ranges if they are not able to track their climatic niches, but no species is predicted to go extinct. If climate would change far beyond current predictions, however, species might disappear. The reason for the relative stability of mammalian presence might be that arctic regions have experienced large climatic shifts in the past, filtering out sensitive and range-restricted taxa. We also provide evidence that for most (sub)arctic mammals it is not climate change per se that will threaten them, but possible constraints on their dispersal ability and changes in community composition. Such impacts of future changes in species communities should receive more attention in literature.

  12. Micro-RNA dysregulation in multiple sclerosis favours pro-inflammatory T-cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Smith, Kristen M; Godlewski, Jakub; Liu, Yue; Winger, Ryan; Lawler, Sean E; Whitacre, Caroline C; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2011-12-01

    Pro-inflammatory T cells mediate autoimmune demyelination in multiple sclerosis. However, the factors driving their development and multiple sclerosis susceptibility are incompletely understood. We investigated how micro-RNAs, newly described as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, contribute to pathogenic T-cell differentiation in multiple sclerosis. miR-128 and miR-27b were increased in naïve and miR-340 in memory CD4(+) T cells from patients with multiple sclerosis, inhibiting Th2 cell development and favouring pro-inflammatory Th1 responses. These effects were mediated by direct suppression of B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (BMI1) and interleukin-4 (IL4) expression, resulting in decreased GATA3 levels, and a Th2 to Th1 cytokine shift. Gain-of-function experiments with these micro-RNAs enhanced the encephalitogenic potential of myelin-specific T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, treatment of multiple sclerosis patient T cells with oligonucleotide micro-RNA inhibitors led to the restoration of Th2 responses. These data illustrate the biological significance and therapeutic potential of these micro-RNAs in regulating T-cell phenotypes in multiple sclerosis.

  13. Gastrointestinal helminths (Cestoda, Chabertiidae and Heligmonellidae) of Pogonomys loriae and Pogonomys macrourus (Rodentia: Muridae) from Papua Indonesia and Papua New Guinea with the description of a new genus and two new species.

    PubMed

    Smales, L R

    2014-11-28

    Pieces of cestode, not indentified further, and 12 species of nematode including 1 new genus, 3 new species and 7 putative new species from the Families Chabertiidae and Heligmonellidae were collected from the digestive tracts of 16 Pogonomys loriae and 19 P. macrurous (Murinae: Hydromyini) from Papua, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. The chabertiid Cyclodontostomum purvisi and the heligmonellid Odilia mackerrasae have been described previously from endemic murids. Hasanuddinia pogonomyos n. sp. can be distinguished from its congeners by the number of ridges in the synlophe, length of spicules and having a vagina with a dorsal diverticulum. Odilia dividua n. sp. is larger than its congeners, has a longer oesophagus, relatively shorter spicules and larger eggs. Pogonomystrongylus domaensis n. gen., n. sp. differs from all other genera in the Heligmonellidae in the characters of the synlophe, 7-10 ridges oriented sub frontally with a single left ventral ridge hypertrophied. Species richness of the nematode assemblages of P. loriae and P. macrourus are comparable to those of Abeomelomys sevia, Chiruromys vates and Coccymys rummleri when numbers of hosts examined are considered. Species composition was distinctive with 12, including the 7 putative species, of 14 species presently known only from species of Pogonomys. Similarities between the nematode fauna of endemic rodent hosts from Indonesia and Papua New Guinea were noted.

  14. Evolutionary process of Bos taurus cattle in favourable versus unfavourable environments and its implications for genetic selection

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Christopher J; Swain, David L; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2010-01-01

    The evolutionary processes that have enabled Bos taurus cattle to establish around the globe are at the core to the future success of livestock production. Our study focuses on the history of cattle domestication including the last 60 years of B. taurus breeding programmes in both favourable and unfavourable environments and its consequences on evolution and fitness of cattle. We discuss the emergence of ‘production diseases’ in temperate production systems and consider the evolutionary genetics of tropical adaptation in cattle and conclude that the Senepol, N'Dama, Adaptaur and Criollo breeds, among others with similar evolutionary trajectories, would possess genes capable of improving the productivity of cattle in challenging environments. Using our own experimental evidence from northern Australia, we review the evolution of the Adaptaur cattle breed which has become resistant to cattle tick. We emphasize that the knowledge of interactions between genotype, environment and management in the livestock systems will be required to generate genotypes for efficient livestock production that are both economically and environmentally sustainable. Livestock producers in the 21st century will have less reliance on infrastructure and veterinary products to alleviate environmental stress and more on the animal's ability to achieve fitness in a given production environment. PMID:25567936

  15. Predictability of the Meteorological Conditions Favourable to Radiative Fog Formation During the 2011 ParisFog Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, Martial; Elias, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    Radiative fog formation is a complex phenomenon involving local physical and microphysical processes that take place when particular meteorological conditions occur. This study aims at quantifying the ability of a regional numerical weather model to analyze and forecast the conditions favourable to radiative fog formation at an instrumental site in the Paris area. Data from the ParisFog campaign have been used in order to quantify the meteorological conditions favorable to radiative fog formation (pre-fog conditions) by setting threshold values on the key meteorological variables driving this process: 2-m temperature tendency, 10-m wind speed, 2-m relative humidity and net infrared flux. Data from the ParisFog observation periods of November 2011 indicate that use of these thresholds leads to the detection of 87 % of cases in which radiative fog formation was observed. In order to evaluate the ability of a regional weather model to reproduce adequately these conditions, the same thresholds are applied to meteorological model fields in both analysis and forecast mode. It is shown that, with this simple methodology, the model detects 74 % of the meteorological conditions finally leading to observed radiative fog, and 48 % 2 days in advance. Finally, sensitivity tests are conducted in order to evaluate the impact of using larger time or space windows on the forecasting skills.

  16. Relax and refill: xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements favours embolism repair in stems and generates artificially low PLC values.

    PubMed

    Trifilò, Patrizia; Raimondo, Fabio; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Barbera, Piera M; Salleo, Sebastiano; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Diurnal changes in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC), with recorded values being higher at midday than on the following morning, have been interpreted as evidence for the occurrence of cycles of xylem conduits' embolism and repair. Recent reports have suggested that diurnal PLC changes might arise as a consequence of an experimental artefact, that is, air entry into xylem conduits upon cutting stems, even if under water, while under substantial tension generated by transpiration. Rehydration procedures prior to hydraulic measurements have been recommended to avoid this artefact. In the present study, we show that xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements might favour xylem refilling and embolism repair, thus leading to PLC values erroneously lower than those actually experienced by transpiring plants. When xylem tension relaxation procedures were performed on stems where refilling mechanisms had been previously inhibited by mechanical (girdling) or chemical (orthovanadate) treatment, PLC values measured in stems cut under native tension were the same as those measured after sample rehydration/relaxation. Our data call for renewed attention to the procedures of sample collection in the field and transport to the laboratory, and suggest that girdling might be a recommendable treatment prior to sample collection for PLC measurements.

  17. Organic farming favours insect-pollinated over non-insect pollinated forbs in meadows and wheat fields.

    PubMed

    Batáry, Péter; Sutcliffe, Laura; Dormann, Carsten F; Tscharntke, Teja

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative effects of landscape-scale management intensity, local management intensity and edge effect on diversity patterns of insect-pollinated vs. non-insect pollinated forbs in meadows and wheat fields. Nine landscapes were selected differing in percent intensively used agricultural area (IAA), each with a pair of organic and conventional winter wheat fields and a pair of organic and conventional meadows. Within fields, forbs were surveyed at the edge and in the interior. Both diversity and cover of forbs were positively affected by organic management in meadows and wheat fields. This effect, however, differed significantly between pollination types for species richness in both agroecosystem types (i.e. wheat fields and meadows) and for cover in meadows. Thus, we show for the first time in a comprehensive analysis that insect-pollinated plants benefit more from organic management than non-insect pollinated plants regardless of agroecosystem type and landscape complexity. These benefits were more pronounced in meadows than wheat fields. Finally, the community composition of insect-pollinated and non-insect-pollinated forbs differed considerably between management types. In summary, our findings in both agroecosystem types indicate that organic management generally supports a higher species richness and cover of insect-pollinated plants, which is likely to be favourable for the density and diversity of bees and other pollinators.

  18. The evolution of colour pattern complexity: selection for conspicuousness favours contrasting within-body colour combinations in lizards.

    PubMed

    Pérez I de Lanuza, G; Font, E

    2016-05-01

    Many animals display complex colour patterns that comprise several adjacent, often contrasting colour patches. Combining patches of complementary colours increases the overall conspicuousness of the complex pattern, enhancing signal detection. Therefore, selection for conspicuousness may act not only on the design of single colour patches, but also on their combination. Contrasting long- and short-wavelength colour patches are located on the ventral and lateral surfaces of many lacertid lizards. As the combination of long- and short-wavelength-based colours generates local chromatic contrast, we hypothesized that selection may favour the co-occurrence of lateral and ventral contrasting patches, resulting in complex colour patterns that maximize the overall conspicuousness of the signal. To test this hypothesis, we performed a comparative phylogenetic study using a categorical colour classification based on spectral data and descriptive information on lacertid coloration collected from the literature. Our results demonstrate that conspicuous ventral (long-wavelength-based) and lateral (short-wavelength-based) colour patches co-occur throughout the lacertid phylogeny more often than expected by chance, especially in the subfamily Lacertini. These results suggest that selection promotes the evolution of the complex pattern rather than the acquisition of a single conspicuous colour patch, possibly due to the increased conspicuousness caused by the combination of colours with contrasting spectral properties.

  19. Cumulative live birth rates following IVF in 41- to 43-year-old women presenting with favourable ovarian reserve characteristics.

    PubMed

    van Disseldorp, J; Eijkemans, M J C; Klinkert, E R; te Velde, E R; Fauser, B C; Broekmans, F J M

    2007-04-01

    For women aged 41-43 years old, success rates in IVF are generally poor. This study aimed to assess cumulative live birth rate related to treatment costs over a maximum of three IVF cycles in selected women who were considered to still have adequate ovarian reserve. Fifty-five patients (38% of the total cohort, n = 144) were excluded from IVF treatment based on low antral follicle count (<5 follicles) and/or elevated basal FSH (>15 IU/l). Of those admitted, 66 (74%) actually started and completed a total of 125 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles. Treatment resulted in 10 live births (8% per cycle). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a realistic cumulative live birth rate after three cycles of 17%. The direct medical costs per live birth were calculated to be approximately 44,000 euro. These results show that selection towards favourable ovarian reserve status in the female age group 41-43 years yielded disappointing results in terms of cumulative live birth rates after IVF. In view of the costs raised per live birth, improvement of selection parameters for treatment in this age group is warranted.

  20. Aurantosides G, H, and I: three new tetramic acid glycosides from a Papua New Guinea Theonella swinhoei.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Anokha S; Davis, Rohan A; Harper, Mary Kay; Veltri, Charles A; Andjelic, Cynthia D; Barrows, Louis R; Ireland, Chris M

    2005-01-01

    Aurantosides G-I (1-3) have been isolated from the lithistid sponge Theonella swinhoei from Papua New Guinea. Their structures were established by spectroscopic and chemical methods. Compounds 1-3 represent new monochloropentaenoyl tetramic acids with mono-, di-, and tri-N-saccharide substituents, respectively. Aurantosides G-I (1-3) failed to show any significant cytotoxicity against the human colon tumor cell line HCT-116.

  1. Hunting effects on favourable conservation status of highly inbred Swedish wolves.

    PubMed

    Laikre, Linda; Jansson, Mija; Allendorf, Fred W; Jakobsson, Sven; Ryman, Nils

    2013-04-01

    The wolf (Canis lupus) is classified as endangered in Sweden by the Swedish Species Information Centre, which is the official authority for threat classification. The present population, which was founded in the early 1980s, descends from 5 individuals. It is isolated and highly inbred, and on average individuals are more related than siblings. Hunts have been used by Swedish authorities during 2010 and 2011 to reduce the population size to its upper tolerable level of 210 wolves. European Union (EU) biodiversity legislation requires all member states to promote a concept called "favourable conservation status" (FCS) for a series of species including the wolf. Swedish national policy stipulates maintenance of viable populations with sufficient levels of genetic variation of all naturally occurring species. Hunting to reduce wolf numbers in Sweden is currently not in line with national and EU policy agreements and will make genetically based FCS criteria less achievable for this species. We suggest that to reach FCS for the wolf in Sweden the following criteria need to be met: (1) a well-connected, large, subdivided wolf population over Scandinavia, Finland, and the Russian Karelia-Kola region should be reestablished, (2) genetically effective size (Ne ) of this population is in the minimum range of Ne = 500-1000, (3) Sweden harbors a part of this total population that substantially contributes to the total Ne and that is large enough to not be classified as threatened genetically or according to IUCN criteria, and (4) average inbreeding levels in the Swedish population are <0.1.

  2. Harmful and favourable ultraviolet conditions for human health over Northern Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, Nataly; Zhdanova, Ekaterina

    2014-05-01

    We provide the analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of ultraviolet (UV) radiation over Northern Eurasia taking into account for both its detrimental (erythema and eye-damage effects) and favourable (vitamin D synthesis) influence on human health. The UV effects on six different skin types are considered in order to cover the variety of skin types of European and Asian inhabitants. To better quantifying the vitamin D irradiance threshold we accounted for an open body fraction S as a function of effective air temperature. The spatial and temporal distribution of UV resources was estimated by radiative transfer (RT) modeling (8 stream DISORT RT code) with 1x 1 degree grid and monthly resolution. For this purpose special datasets of main input geophysical parameters (total ozone content, aerosol characteristics, surface UV albedo, UV cloud modification factor) have been created over the territory of Northern Eurasia, which can be of separate interest for the different multidisciplinary scientific applications over the PEEX domain. The new approaches were used to retrieve aerosol and cloud transmittance from different satellite and re-analysis datasets for calculating the solar UV irradiance at ground. Using model simulations and some experimental data we provide the altitude parameterization for different types of biologically active irradiance in mountainous area taking into account not only for the effects of molecular scattering but for the altitude dependence of aerosol parameters and surface albedo. Based on the new classification of UV resources (Chubarova, Zhdanova, 2013) we show that the distribution of harmful (UV deficiency and UV excess) and favorable UV conditions is regulated by various geophysical parameters (mainly, total ozone, cloudiness and open body fraction) and can significantly deviate from latitudinal dependence. The interactive tool for providing simulations of biologically active irradiance and its attribution to the different

  3. Effects of cost sharing on physician utilization under favourable conditions for supplier-induced demand.

    PubMed

    Van de Voorde, C; Van Doorslaer, E; Schokkaert, E

    2001-07-01

    The effects of cost sharing on the demand for ambulatory care in experimental circumstances are well understood since the Rand Health Insurance Experiment (HIE). However, in a non-experimental real-world context, supplier-induced demand of doctors might erode some of the significant negative out-of-pocket price elasticity identified in the HIE. Belgium is an interesting test case for this hypothesis because it has relatively high rates of patient cost sharing in its public health insurance system and a very high density of physicians, all remunerated fee-for-service. We have exploited the price variation generated by a substantial increase in patient co-payment rates in 1994 to estimate out-of-pocket price elasticities for three groups of users, and for three types of services using a fixed-effects model in levels and in differences. We obtain significant out-of-pocket price elasticities for the general population in the range from -0.39 to -0.28 for GP home visits, -0.16 to -0.12 for GP office visits and -0.10 for specialist visits. The estimates were generally lower and less significant for the groups of elderly and disabled. The differences we find in price responsiveness appear to be fairly robust and consistent with the HIE predictions. These results suggest that--at least in the short run--non-experimental utilization effects of cost sharing are very similar to the experimental evidence, even in a situation of favourable conditions for supplier-induced demand.

  4. Higher maternal education is associated with favourable growth of young children in different countries

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, Rajalakshmi; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jianduan; Koch, Felix S; Marcus, Claude; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Ong, Ken K; Sobko, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood growth affects long-term health and could contribute to health inequalities that persist throughout life. Methods We compared growth data of 4-6 year old children born 1997-2002 in UK (n=15,168), Sweden (n=6,749) and rural China (n=10,327). Standard deviation scores (SDS) were calculated against the WHO Standard. Obesity and overweight were defined by International Obesity Taskforce cut-offs, and stunting, underweight and thinness by height, weight or BMI < −2 SDS. Associations with maternal education were standardised by calculating the Slope Index of Inequality (SII). Results Mean SDS height, weight and BMI in UK (−0.01; 0.42; 0.62, respectively) and Sweden (0.45; 0.59; 0.45) were higher than in China (−0.98, −0.82, −0.29). Higher maternal education was consistently associated with taller offspring height SDS (SII: UK 0.25; Sweden 0.17; China 1.06). Underweight and stunting were less common in UK (prevalence: 0.6% and 2.2%, respectively) and Sweden (0.3% and 0.6%) than in China (9.5% and 16.4%), where these outcomes were inversely associated with maternal education (SII: −25.8% and −12.7%). Obesity prevalence in UK, Sweden and China was 4.8%, 3.7% and 0.4%, respectively. Maternal education was inversely associated with offspring obesity in UK (SII: −3.3%) and Sweden (−2.8%), but not in China (+0.3%). Conclusions Higher maternal education was associated with more favourable growth in young children: lower obesity and overweight in UK and Sweden, and lower stunting and underweight in rural China. Public health strategies to optimize growth in early childhood need to acknowledge socioeconomic factors, but possibly with a different emphasis in different settings. PMID:23450064

  5. Soft γ-ray selected radio galaxies: favouring giant size discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, L.; Venturi, T.; Molina, M.; Malizia, A.; Dallacasa, D.; Panessa, F.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-09-01

    Using the recent INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT surveys we have extracted a sample of 64 confirmed plus three candidate radio galaxies selected in the soft gamma-ray band. The sample covers all optical classes and is dominated by objects showing a Fanaroff-Riley type II radio morphology; a large fraction (70 per cent) of the sample is made of `radiative mode' or high-excitation radio galaxies. We measured the source size on images from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at twenty-cm and the Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey images and have compared our findings with data in the literature obtaining a good match. We surprisingly found that the soft gamma-ray selection favours the detection of large size radio galaxies: 60 per cent of objects in the sample have size greater than 0.4 Mpc while around 22 per cent reach dimension above 0.7 Mpc at which point they are classified as giant radio galaxies (GRGs), the largest and most energetic single entities in the Universe. Their fraction among soft gamma-ray selected radio galaxies is significantly larger than typically found in radio surveys, where only a few per cent of objects (1-6 per cent) are GRGs. This may partly be due to observational biases affecting radio surveys more than soft gamma-ray surveys, thus disfavouring the detection of GRGs at lower frequencies. The main reasons and/or conditions leading to the formation of these large radio structures are still unclear with many parameters such as high jet power, long activity time and surrounding environment all playing a role; the first two may be linked to the type of active galactic nucleus discussed in this work and partly explain the high fraction of GRGs found in the present sample. Our result suggests that high energy surveys may be a more efficient way than radio surveys to find these peculiar objects.

  6. L2 Learning Opportunities in Different Academic Subjects in Content-Based Instruction -- Evidence in Favour of "Conventional Wisdom"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Yuen Yi

    2014-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) adopts a second language (L2) as the medium of instruction for some or all academic subjects to facilitate L2 learning. There seem however, no uniform policies concerning which academic subjects should be taught in L2, in case only some subjects are involved. Conventional wisdom tends to favour Humanities subjects…

  7. Vegetables’ juice influences polyol pathway by multiple mechanisms in favour of reducing development of oxidative stress and resultant diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashok K.; Kumar, D. Anand; Sweeya, Pisupati S.; Chauhan, H. Anusha; Lavanya, V.; Sireesha, K.; Pavithra, K.; Zehra, Amtul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced generation of free radicals and consequent development of oxidative stress by polyol pathway is one of the crucial mechanisms stirring up development of diabetic complications. We evaluated influence of ten vegetables’ juice on polyol pathway along with their antioxidant and antioxidative stress potentials. Materials and Methods: Aldose reductase activity was determined utilising goat lens and human erythrocytes. In goat lens, utilization of nicotinamine adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and aldose reductase inhibition was assayed. In human erythrocytes, sorbitol formation was measured as an index of aldose reductase activity under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Ability of juices in inhibiting oxidative damage to deoxyribose sugar and calf thymus DNA and inhibitory activity against hydrogen peroxide induced hemolysis of erythrocytes was also analysed. Phytochemical contents like total polyphenol, total flavonoid and total protein were measured to find their influence on biological activities. Results: Vegetables’ juice displayed varying degrees of inhibitory potentials in mitigating NADPH dependent catalytic activity of aldose reductase in goat lens, accumulation of sorbitol in human erythrocytes under different glucose concentrations; Fenton-reaction induced oxidative damage to deoxyribose sugar, and calf thymus DNA. Substantial variations in vegetables phytochemicals content were also noticed in this study. Conclusions: Vegetables’ juice possesses potent activities in influencing polyol pathway by various mechanisms in favour of reducing development of oxidative stress independent of their inherent antioxidative properties. Juice of ivy gourd followed by green cucumber and ridge gourd were among the most potent for they displayed strong activities on various parameters analysed in this study. These vegetables’ juice may become part of mechanism-based complementary antioxidant therapy to prevent

  8. Putative IL-10 Low Producer Genotypes Are Associated with a Favourable Etanercept Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schotte, Heiko; Schlüter, Bernhard; Schmidt, Hartmut; Gaubitz, Markus; Drynda, Susanne; Kekow, Jörn; Willeke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Outcome predictors of biologic therapeutic drugs like TNF inhibitors are of interest since side effects like serious infections or malignancy cannot be completely ruled out. Response rates are heterogeneous. The present study addressed the question whether in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter genotypes with potential relevance for IL-10 production capacity are associated with response to long-term treatment with etanercept. Caucasian RA patients that, according to the EULAR criteria, responded well (n = 25), moderately (n = 17) or not (n = 8) to etanercept therapy (median 36 months, range 4-52), and 160 matched controls were genotyped for the IL-10 promoter SNPs -2849 G>A (rs6703630), -1082 G>A (rs1800896), -819 C>T (rs1800871) and -592 C>A (rs1800872). Haplotypes were reconstructed via mathematic model and tested for associations with disease susceptibility and therapy response. We identified the four predominant haplotypes AGCC, GATA, GGCC, and GACC in almost equal distribution. Patients that responded well carried the putative IL-10 low producer allele -2849 A or the haplotypes AGCC and GATA (RR 2.1 and 4.0, respectively; 95% CI 1.1-4.0 and 1.1-14.8), whereas an unfavourable response was associated with carriage of the putative high producer haplotype GGCC (RR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3). No significant associations of alleles or haplotypes with disease susceptibility were observed. In RA, a low IL-10 production which is genetically determined rather by haplotypes than by SNPs may favour the response to etanercept treatment. Iatrogenic blockade of TNF may reveal proinflammatory effects of its endogeneous antagonist IL-10. Further studies are needed to correlate these genetic findings to direct cytokine measurements.

  9. The effects of defoliation on carbon allocation: can carbon limitation reduce growth in favour of storage?

    PubMed

    Wiley, Erin; Huepenbecker, Sarah; Casper, Brenda B; Helliker, Brent R

    2013-11-01

    There is no consensus about how stresses such as low water availability and temperature limit tree growth. Sink limitation to growth and survival is often inferred if a given stress does not cause non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations or levels to decline along with growth. However, trees may actively maintain or increase NSC levels under moderate carbon stress, making the pattern of reduced growth and increased NSCs compatible with carbon limitation. To test this possibility, we used full and half defoliation to impose severe and moderate carbon limitation on 2-year-old Quercus velutina Lam. saplings grown in a common garden. Saplings were harvested at either 3 weeks or 4 months after treatments were applied, representing short- and longer-term effects on woody growth and NSC levels. Both defoliation treatments maintained a lower total leaf area than controls throughout the experiment with no evidence of photosynthetic up-regulation, and resulted in a similar total biomass reduction. While fully defoliated saplings had lower starch levels than controls in the short term, half defoliated saplings maintained control starch levels in both the short and longer term. In the longer term, fully defoliated saplings had the greatest starch concentration increment, allowing them to recover to near-control starch levels. Furthermore, between the two harvest dates, fully and half defoliated saplings allocated a greater proportion of new biomass to starch than did controls. The maintenance of control starch levels in half defoliated saplings indicates that these trees actively store a substantial amount of carbon before growth is carbon saturated. In addition, the allocation shift favouring storage in defoliated saplings is consistent with the hypothesis that, as an adaptation to increasing carbon stress, trees can prioritize carbon reserve formation at the expense of growth. Our results suggest that as carbon limitation increases, reduced growth is not necessarily

  10. Heterosis may result in selection favouring the products of long-distance pollen dispersal in Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Costa E Silva, João; Potts, Brad M; Lopez, Gustavo A

    2014-01-01

    Using native trees from near the northern and southern extremities of the relatively continuous eastern distribution of Eucalyptus globulus in Tasmania, we compared the progenies derived from natural open-pollination (OP) with those generated from within-region and long-distance outcrossing. Controlled outcrossing amongst eight parents - with four parents from each of the northern and southern regions - was undertaken using a diallel mating scheme. The progeny were planted in two field trials located within the species native range in southern Tasmania, and their survival and diameter growth were monitored over a 13-year-period. The survival and growth performances of all controlled cross types exceeded those of the OP progenies, consistent with inbreeding depression due to a combination of selfing and bi-parental inbreeding. The poorer survival of the northern regional (♀N♂N) outcrosses compared with the local southern regional outcrosses (♀S♂S) indicated differential selection against the former. Despite this mal-adaptation of the non-local ♀N♂N crosses at both southern sites, the survival of the inter-regional hybrids (♀N♂S and ♀S♂N) was never significantly different from that of the local ♀S♂S crosses. Significant site-dependent heterosis was detected for the growth of the surviving long-distance hybrids. This was expressed as mid-parent heterosis, particularly at the more northern planting site. Heterosis increased with age, while the difference between the regional ♀N♂N and ♀S♂S crosses remained insignificant at any age at either site. Nevertheless, the results for growth suggest that the fitness of individuals derived from long-distance crossing may be better at the more northern of the planting sites. Our results demonstrate the potential for early-age assessments of pollen dispersal to underestimate realised gene flow, with local inbreeding under natural open-pollination resulting in selection favouring the products of

  11. Heterosis May Result in Selection Favouring the Products of Long-Distance Pollen Dispersal in Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    Costa e Silva, João; Potts, Brad M.; Lopez, Gustavo A.

    2014-01-01

    Using native trees from near the northern and southern extremities of the relatively continuous eastern distribution of Eucalyptus globulus in Tasmania, we compared the progenies derived from natural open-pollination (OP) with those generated from within-region and long-distance outcrossing. Controlled outcrossing amongst eight parents - with four parents from each of the northern and southern regions - was undertaken using a diallel mating scheme. The progeny were planted in two field trials located within the species native range in southern Tasmania, and their survival and diameter growth were monitored over a 13-year-period. The survival and growth performances of all controlled cross types exceeded those of the OP progenies, consistent with inbreeding depression due to a combination of selfing and bi-parental inbreeding. The poorer survival of the northern regional (♀N♂N) outcrosses compared with the local southern regional outcrosses (♀S♂S) indicated differential selection against the former. Despite this mal-adaptation of the non-local ♀N♂N crosses at both southern sites, the survival of the inter-regional hybrids (♀N♂S and ♀S♂N) was never significantly different from that of the local ♀S♂S crosses. Significant site-dependent heterosis was detected for the growth of the surviving long-distance hybrids. This was expressed as mid-parent heterosis, particularly at the more northern planting site. Heterosis increased with age, while the difference between the regional ♀N♂N and ♀S♂S crosses remained insignificant at any age at either site. Nevertheless, the results for growth suggest that the fitness of individuals derived from long-distance crossing may be better at the more northern of the planting sites. Our results demonstrate the potential for early-age assessments of pollen dispersal to underestimate realised gene flow, with local inbreeding under natural open-pollination resulting in selection favouring the products of

  12. Tropical Glaciers in the Common Era: Papua, Indonesia, Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru and Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L. G.; Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Davis, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution ice core stratigraphic records of δ18O (temperature proxy) demonstrate that the current warming at high elevations in mid- to lower latitudes is unprecedented for at least the last two millennia, although at many sites the Early Holocene was much warmer than at present. Here we discuss the interaction of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability and warming trends as recorded in ice core records from high-altitude tropical glaciers and the implications of the warming trends for the future of these glaciers. ENSO has strong impacts on meteorological phenomena that either directly or indirectly affect most regions on the planet and their populations, particularly throughout the Tropics. Here we examine similarities and differences among ice core records from Papua (Indonesia), Quelccaya Ice Cap (Peru) and Kilimanjaro (Tanzania). Quelccaya, Earth's largest tropical ice cap, has provided continuous, annually-resolved proxy records of climatic and environmental variability preserved in many measurable parameters, especially oxygen and hydrogen isotopic ratios (δ18O, δD) and the net mass balance (accumulation) spanning the last 1800 years. The remarkable similarity between changes in the highland and coastal cultures of Peru and climate variability in the Andes, especially with regard to precipitation, implies a strong connection between prehistoric human activities and climate in this region. The well-documented ice loss on Quelccaya, Kilimanjaro in eastern Africa and the ice fields near Puncak Jaya in Papua, Indonesia presents a possible analog for glacier response in the tropics during the Holocene. The ongoing melting of these ice fields is consistent with model predictions of a vertical amplification of temperature in the Tropics. A sequence of over 50 recently exposed, rooted, soft-bodied plant deposits collected between 2002 and 2011 from the retreating margins of the Quelccaya ice cap provide a longer term perspective for the recent

  13. The seminal coagulum favours passage of fast-moving sperm into the uterus in the black-handed spider monkey.

    PubMed

    Hernández-López, Leonor; Cerda-Molina, Ana Lilia; Páez-Ponce, Denisse L; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2008-10-01

    In addition to gametes, mammalian internal fertilisation has required the evolution of assorted anatomical, physiological and biochemical devices to deal with intra- and inter-sexual conflict such as sperm competition and female cryptic choice respectively. The seminal coagulum of primates and other mammals is viewed as one of such devices. Among primates, the seminal coagulum characteristically occurs in multi-male and multi-female species, leading us to suppose that it intervenes in sperm competition. However, it can also provide cues to the female reproductive tract about male desired or undesired traits, and therefore deter or favour sperm survival and migration. The present work investigates whether the seminal coagulum of the black-handed spider monkey enhances sperm fertilisation chances by improving the female reproductive tract conditions, and if the female reproductive tract is 'blind' to semen or behaves selectively towards ejaculates of different males. A series of artificial inseminations were done in five females, using the ejaculates of three different males, one at a time, and measuring the presence of distinct types of sperm inside the uteri at 10, 30 and 60 min following the insemination. The presence of coagulum, menstrual phase, and male and female identity only affected fast, straight-moving sperm, with larger amounts of fast sperm appearing inside the uteri when ejaculates had seminal coagulum, as well as when in the periovulatory phase. There was great intra-uterine fast-sperm variation regarding which male's semen inseminated which female. The results provide evidence to account for sexual conflict in the spider monkey as well as a methodological approach to this kind of study.

  14. Persuading, protesting and exchanging favours: strategies used by Indian sex workers to win local support for their HIV prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Flora; Shukla, Anuprita; Banerji, Riddhi

    2010-01-01

    Given that the communities which are most vulnerable to HIV often have little control over their own lives and their health-related behaviour, HIV prevention policies increasingly recommend that HIV prevention projects work to build relationships with powerful external groups (i.e., build "bridging social capital"). To aid conceptualisation of how community organisations may build such social capital, this paper outlines a typology of strategies for influencing local stakeholders. We present a study of two successful Indian sex workers' organisations, VAMP and DMSC, focusing on how the organisations have influenced three groups of stakeholders, namely police, politicians and local social organisations. Interviews with project employees (45), with representatives of the three groups of stakeholders (12) and fieldwork diaries recording 6 months of observation in each site provide the data. Three approaches emerged. "Persuading" refers to the practice of holding information-giving meetings with stakeholders and requesting their support. It appears to build "weak social ties". "Protesting" entails a collective confrontation with stakeholders, and appears to be useful when the stakeholder has a public image to protect that would be tarnished by protest, and when the protestors can stake a legitimate claim that their rights are being denied. In "exchanging favours", the sex workers' organisations find creative ways to position themselves as offering valued resources to their stakeholders (such as useful information on criminal activities for the police, a stage and audience for politicians or a celebration for local social organisations) as incentives for their support. In conclusion, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, the implications for social capital theorising and implications for community HIV prevention.

  15. Above- and below-ground vertebrate herbivory may each favour a different subordinate species in an aquatic plant community.

    PubMed

    Hidding, Bert; Nolet, Bart A; de Boer, Thijs; de Vries, Peter P; Klaassen, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    At least two distinct trade-offs are thought to facilitate higher diversity in productive plant communities under herbivory. Higher investment in defence and enhanced colonization potential may both correlate with decreased competitive ability in plants. Herbivory may thus promote coexistence of plant species exhibiting divergent life history strategies. How different seasonally tied herbivore assemblages simultaneously affect plant community composition and diversity is, however, largely unknown. Two contrasting types of herbivory can be distinguished in the aquatic vegetation of the shallow lake Lauwersmeer. In summer, predominantly above-ground tissues are eaten, whereas in winter, waterfowl forage on below-ground plant propagules. In a 4-year exclosure study we experimentally separated above-ground herbivory by waterfowl and large fish in summer from below-ground herbivory by Bewick's swans in winter. We measured the individual and combined effects of both herbivory periods on the composition of the three-species aquatic plant community. Herbivory effect sizes varied considerably from year to year. In 2 years herbivore exclusion in summer reinforced dominance of Potamogeton pectinatus with a concomitant decrease in Potamogeton pusillus, whereas no strong, unequivocal effect was observed in the other 2 years. Winter exclusion, on the other hand, had a negative effect on Zannichellia palustris, but the effect size differed considerably between years. We suggest that the colonization ability of Z. palustris may have enabled this species to be more abundant after reduction of P. pectinatus tuber densities by swans. Evenness decreased due to herbivore exclusion in summer. We conclude that seasonally tied above- and below-ground herbivory may each stimulate different components of a macrophyte community as they each favoured a different subordinate plant species.

  16. Quality of Antimalarial Drugs and Antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: A Survey of the Health Facility Supply Chain

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Manuel W.; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lavu, Evelyn K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Methods and Findings Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. Conclusions This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory

  17. Intravaginal practices and microbicide acceptability in Papua New Guinea: implications for HIV prevention in a moderate-prevalence setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The acceptability of female-controlled biomedical prevention technologies has not been established in Papua New Guinea, the only country in the Pacific region experiencing a generalised, moderate-prevalence HIV epidemic. Socio-cultural factors likely to impact on future product uptake and effectiveness, such as women’s ability to negotiate safer sexual choices, and intravaginal hygiene and menstrual practices (IVP), remain unclear in this setting. Methods A mixed-method qualitative study was conducted among women and men attending a sexual health clinic in Port Moresby. During in-depth interviews, participants used copies of a hand-drawn template to indicate how they wash/clean the vulva and/or vagina. Interviewers pre-filled commercially available vaginal applicators with 2-3mL KY Jelly® to create a surrogate vaginal microbicide product, which was demonstrated to study participants. Results A total of 28 IDIs were conducted (women=16; men=12). A diverse range of IVP were reported. The majority of women described washing the vulva only with soap and water as part of their daily routine; in preparation for sex; and following sexual intercourse. Several women described cleaning inside the vagina using fingers and soap at these same times. Others reported cleaning inside the vagina using a hose connected to a tap; using vaginal inserts, such as crushed garlic; customary menstrual ‘steaming’ practices; and the use of material fragments, cloth and newspaper to absorb menstrual blood. Unprotected sex during menstruation was common. The majority of both women and men said that they would use a vaginal microbicide gel for HIV/STI protection, should a safe and effective product become available. Microbicide use was considered most appropriate in ‘high-risk’ situations, such as sex with non-regular, transactional or commercial partners. Most women felt confident that they would be able to negotiate vaginal microbicide use with male sexual partners but

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of artemether, lumefantrine, and their respective metabolites in Papua New Guinean children with uncomplicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sam; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Griffin, Susan; Kose, Kaye; Siba, Peter M; Ilett, Kenneth F; Mueller, Ivo; Davis, Timothy M E

    2011-11-01

    There are sparse published data relating to the pharmacokinetic properties of artemether, lumefantrine, and their active metabolites in children, especially desbutyl-lumefantrine. We studied 13 Papua New Guinean children aged 5 to 10 years with uncomplicated malaria who received the six recommended doses of artemether (1.7 mg/kg of body weight) plus lumefantrine (10 mg/kg), given with fat over 3 days. Intensive blood sampling was carried out over 42 days. Plasma artemether, dihydroartemisinin, lumefantrine, and desbutyl-lumefantrine were assayed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or high-performance liquid chromatography. Multicompartmental pharmacokinetic models for a drug plus its metabolite were developed using a population approach that included plasma artemether and dihydroartemisinin concentrations below the limit of quantitation. Although artemether bioavailability was variable and its clearance increased by 67.8% with each dose, the median areas under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC(0-∞)s) for artemether and dihydroartemisinin (3,063 and 2,839 μg · h/liter, respectively) were similar to those reported previously in adults with malaria. For lumefantrine, the median AUC(0-∞) (459,980 μg · h/liter) was also similar to that in adults with malaria. These data support the higher dose recommended for children weighing 15 to 35 kg (35% higher than that for a 50-kg adult) but question the recommendation for a lower dose in children weighing 12.5 to 15 kg. The median desbutyl-lumefantrine/lumefantrine ratio in the children in our study was 1.13%, within the range reported for adults and higher at later time points because of the longer desbutyl-lumefantrine terminal elimination half-life. A combined desbutyl-lumefantrine and lumefantrine AUC(0-∞) weighted on in vitro antimalarial activity was inversely associated with recurrent parasitemia, suggesting that both the parent drug and the metabolite contribute to the

  19. Improving Health Worker Adherence to Malaria Treatment Guidelines in Papua New Guinea: Feasibility and Acceptability of a Text Message Reminder Service

    PubMed Central

    Kurumop, Serah F.; Bullen, Chris; Whittaker, Robyn; Betuela, Inoni; Hetzel, Manuel W.; Pulford, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether a text message reminder service designed to support health worker adherence to a revised malaria treatment protocol is feasible and acceptable in Papua New Guinea (PNG). The study took place in six purposively selected health facilities located in the Eastern Highlands Province (EHP) of PNG. Ten text messages designed to remind participants of key elements of the new NMTP were transmitted to 42 health workers twice over a two week period (two text messages per day, Monday to Friday) via the country’s largest mobile network provider. The feasibility and acceptability of the text message reminder service was assessed by transmission reports, participant diaries and group discussions. Findings indicate that the vast majority of text messages were successfully transmitted, participants’ had regular mobile phone access and that most text messages were read most of the time and were considered both acceptable and clinically useful. Nevertheless, the study found that PNG health workers may tire of the service if the same messages are repeated too many times and that health workers may be reluctant to utilize more comprehensive, yet complementary, resources. In conclusion, a text message reminder service to support health worker adherence to the new malaria treatment protocol is feasible and acceptable in PNG. A rigorous pragmatic, effectiveness trial would be justified on the basis of these findings. PMID:24116122

  20. The relationship of hookworm infection, anaemia and iron status in a Papua New Guinea highland population and the response to treatment with iron and mebendazole.

    PubMed

    Shield, J M; Vaterlaws, A L; Kimber, R J; Payne, R; Casey, G J; Blunden, R W; Kutkaite, D

    1981-03-01

    In 345 apparently healthy Papua New Guinea male subjects, predominantly highlanders, 89% of whom were infected with hookworm (Necator americanus), there was a statistically significant inverse correlation of hookworm egg count with haemoglobin and serum ferritin level, but no significant correlation with serum albumin, folate or B12 values. A sub-group of 128 was chosen for a six-month study on the effect of treatment with the anthelmintic mebendazole and/or parenteral iron on haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels. Mebendazole-treated subjects remained worm-free and the hookworm egg counts of the controls decreased during the study period. Parenteral iron treatment had the expected effect of raising haemoglobin to a normal level. There was a statistically significant improvement in haemoglobin level in all treated groups but not in the control. Serum ferritin levels decreased significantly in all groups, but more in the control than in the treated groups, although treatment groups were not significantly different. Although probable inadequate uptake of iron by the subjects and blood donation by some subjects was apparently more detrimental to iron status than hookworm infection, the results of this study support the view that hookworm infection in this country contributes to lowered haemoglobin levels and iron status.

  1. Survey of the capacity for essential surgery and anaesthesia services in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Janet; Tau, Goa; Cherian, Meena Nathan; Vergel de Dios, Jennifer; Mills, David; Fitzpatrick, Jane; Adu-Krow, William; Cheng, Davy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess capacity to provide essential surgical services including emergency, obstetric and anaesthesia care in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in order to support planning for relevant post-2015 sustainable development goals for PNG. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Hospitals and health facilities in PNG. Participants 21 facilities including 3 national/provincial hospitals, 11 district/rural hospitals, and 7 health centres. Outcome measures The WHO Situational Analysis Tool to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (WHO-SAT) was used to measure each participating facility's capacity to deliver essential surgery and anaesthesia services, including 108 items related to relevant infrastructure, human resources, interventions and equipment. Results While major surgical procedures were provided at each hospital, fewer than 30% had uninterrupted access to oxygen, and 57% had uninterrupted access to resuscitation bag and mask. Most hospitals reported capacity to provide general anaesthesia, though few hospitals reported having at least one certified surgeon, obstetrician and anaesthesiologist. Access to anaesthetic machines, pulse oximetry and blood bank was severely limited. Many non-hospital health centres providing basic surgical procedures, but almost none had uninterrupted access to electricity, running water, oxygen and basic supplies for resuscitation, airway management and obstetric services. Conclusions Capacity for essential surgery and anaesthesia services is severely limited in PNG due to shortfalls in physical infrastructure, human resources, and basic equipment and supplies. Achieving post-2015 sustainable development goals, including universal healthcare, will require significant investment in surgery and anaesthesia capacity in PNG. PMID:26674504

  2. Cash cropping, subsistence agriculture, and nutritional status among mothers and children in lowland Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Shack, K W; Grivetti, L E; Dewey, K G

    1990-01-01

    The influence of cash crop income, subsistence agriculture, and purchased foods on nutritional status was examined among three ethnic groups in lowland Papua New Guinea. In their home areas, these groups had been hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists, and hunter-gatherers with limited agriculture. Multiple regression revealed that cash crop income was positively associated with anthropometric status and energy intake among children. Expenditure on food was related to the child's arm circumference but not to nutrient intake. The amount of food planted in the garden was not related to child nutritional status. In contrast, the amount of food planted was positively associated with body mass index of mothers. Consumption of rice and fish was related to food expenditures. Nutritional status was better among families who were agriculturalists prior to resettlement than among hunter-gatherers. The former had more income from cash crops, smaller households, and planted more food in their gardens. Therefore, cash cropping need not decrease nutritional status if home gardens are maintained.

  3. Randomized, parallel placebo-controlled trial of primaquine for malaria prophylaxis in Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Baird, J K; Lacy, M D; Basri, H; Barcus, M J; Maguire, J D; Bangs, M J; Gramzinski, R; Sismadi, P; Krisin; Ling, J; Wiady, I; Kusumaningsih, M; Jones, T R; Fryauff, D J; Hoffman, S L

    2001-12-15

    Malaria causes illness or death in unprotected travelers. Primaquine prevents malaria by attacking liver-stage parasites, a property distinguishing it from most chemoprophylactics and obviating 4-week postexposure dosing. A daily adult regimen of 30 mg primaquine prevented malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax for 20 weeks in 95 of 97 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-normal Javanese transmigrants in Papua, Indonesia. In comparison, 37 of 149 subjects taking placebo in a parallel trial became parasitemic. The protective efficacy of primaquine against malaria was 93% (95% confidence interval [CI] 71%-98%); against P. falciparum it was 88% (95% CI 48%-97%), and >92% for P. vivax (95% CI >37%-99%). Primaquine was as well tolerated as placebo. Mild methemoglobinemia (mean of 3.4%) returned to normal within 2 weeks. Blood chemistry and hematological parameters revealed no evidence of toxicity. Good safety, tolerance, and efficacy, along with key advantages in dosing requirements, make primaquine an excellent drug for preventing malaria in nonpregnant, G6PD-normal travelers.

  4. Geochemistry and petrology of selected coal samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; Tewalt, S.J.; Hower, J.C.; Stucker, J.D.; O'Keefe, J. M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Indonesia has become the world's largest exporter of thermal coal and is a major supplier to the Asian coal market, particularly as the People's Republic of China is now (2007) and perhaps may remain a net importer of coal. Indonesia has had a long history of coal production, mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan, but only in the last two decades have government and commercial forces resulted in a remarkable coal boom. A recent assessment of Indonesian coal-bed methane (CBM) potential has motivated active CBM exploration. Most of the coal is Paleogene and Neogene, low to moderate rank and has low ash yield and sulfur (generally < 10 and < 1??wt.%, respectively). Active tectonic and igneous activity has resulted in significant rank increase in some coal basins. Eight coal samples are described that represent the major export and/or resource potential of Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. Detailed geochemistry, including proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, and major, minor, and trace element determinations are presented. Organic petrology and vitrinite reflectance data reflect various precursor flora assemblages and rank variations, including sample composites from active igneous and tectonic areas. A comparison of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) elements abundance with world and US averages show that the Indonesian coals have low combustion pollution potential.

  5. Hepatitis B surface antigen seroprevalence among children in Papua New Guinea, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Kitau, Russel; Datta, Siddhartha Sankar; Patel, Minal K; Hennessey, Karen; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Sui, Gerard; Lagani, William

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 8% of the population in Papua New Guinea (PNG) has chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. To decrease the burden of chronic HBV infection, a national 3-dose infant hepatitis B vaccination program was implemented starting in 1989, with a birth dose (BD) added to the schedule in 1992. To assess the impact of the hepatitis B vaccination program, we conducted a serosurvey among children born after vaccine introduction. During 2012-2013, a cross-sectional stratified four-stage cluster survey was conducted to estimate hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) prevalence among children 4-6 years of age. We collected demographic data, vaccination history, and tested children for HBsAg. Of 2,133 participants, 2,130 children had vaccination data by either card or recall: 28% received a BD; 81% received ≥ 3 vaccine doses. Of 2,109 children providing a blood sample, 60 (2.3%) tested positive for HBsAg. This is the largest, most geographically diverse survey of hepatitis B vaccination and HBsAg seroprevalence done in PNG. Progress has been made in PNG toward the Western Pacific Regional goal to reduce the prevalence of chronic HBV infection to < 1% by 2017 among 5-year-old children. Vaccination efforts should be strengthened, including increasing BD coverage and completing the 3-dose series.

  6. Selenium intakes of children from rural Malawi and Papua New Guinea (PNG)

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, U.; Gibson, R.S.; Ferguson, E.L.; Ounpuu, S.; Heywood, P. Papua New Guinea Inst. of Medical Research, Medang )

    1991-03-11

    Selenium intakes of 66 rural Malawian children aged 4-6 y consuming maize-based diets were compared with those of 67 Papua New Guinea (PNG) children aged 6-10 y with diets based on bananas, sweet potatoes, and sago. Representative samples of all staple foods consumed were collected, dried, ground and subsequently analyzed for Se by instrumental neutron activation analysis using {sup 77}Se. Median Se intakes for the Malawian children determined by weighed 3-day records at 3 seasons of the year were: harvest 20 {mu}g/d, 1.24 {mu}g/kg; postharvest 21 {mu}g/d, 1.24 {mu}g/kg; preharvest 15 {mu}g/d, 0.96 {mu}g/kg. For the PNG children the median intake during the rainy season, assessed from two 24 hr interactive recalls, was 20 {mu}g/d, 0.89 {mu}g/kg. Four food groups contributed to {ge}95% of the total Se intake for both the Malawian and the PNG children. Of the children, 55% of the Malawian and 87% of the PNG had average Se intakes {lt} US Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA); 16% and 48% respectively, had intakes {lt}66% US RDA. Average Se intakes were below those reported for US and Australian children but above those of children from New Zealand where Se intakes are low.

  7. Erosion and sedimentation from the 17 July, 1998 Papua New Guinea tsunami

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelfenbaum, G.; Jaffe, B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes erosion and sedimentation associated with the 17 July 1998 Papua New Guinea tsunami. Observed within two months of the tsunami, distinct deposits of a layer averaging 8-cm thick of gray sand rested on a brown muddy soil. In most cases the sand is normally graded, with more coarse sand near the base and fine sand at the top. In some cases the deposit contains rip-up clasts of muddy soil and in some locations it has a mud cap. Detailed measurements of coastal topography, tsunami flow height and direction indicators, and deposit thickness were made in the field, and samples of the deposit were collected for grain-size analysis in the laboratory. Four shore-normal transects were examined in detail to assess the shore-normal and along shore distribution of the tsunami deposit. Near the shoreline, the tsunami eroded approximately 10-25 cm of sand from the beach and berm. The sandy layer deposited by the tsunami began 50-150 m inland from the shoreline and extended across the coastal plain to within about 40 m of the limit of inundation; a total distance of up to 750 m from the beach. As much as 2/3 of the sand in the deposit originated from offshore. Across most of the coastal plain the deposit thickness and mean grain size varied little. In the along-shore direction the deposit thickness varied with the tsunami wave height; both largest near the entrance to Sissano Lagoon.

  8. Forest carbon in lowland Papua New Guinea: Local variation and the importance of small trees.

    PubMed

    Vincent, John B; Henning, Bridget; Saulei, Simon; Sosanika, Gibson; Weiblen, George D

    2015-04-01

    Efforts to incentivize the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation require accurate carbon accounting. The extensive tropical forest of Papua New Guinea (PNG) is a target for such efforts and yet local carbon estimates are few. Previous estimates, based on models of neotropical vegetation applied to PNG forest plots, did not consider such factors as the unique species composition of New Guinea vegetation, local variation in forest biomass, or the contribution of small trees. We analysed all trees >1 cm in diameter at breast height (DBH) in Melanesia's largest forest plot (Wanang) to assess local spatial variation and the role of small trees in carbon storage. Above-ground living biomass (AGLB) of trees averaged 210.72 Mg  ha(-1) at Wanang. Carbon storage at Wanang was somewhat lower than in other lowland tropical forests, whereas local variation among 1-ha subplots and the contribution of small trees to total AGLB were substantially higher. We speculate that these differences may be attributed to the dynamics of Wanang forest where erosion of a recently uplifted and unstable terrain appears to be a major source of natural disturbance. These findings emphasize the need for locally calibrated forest carbon estimates if accurate landscape level valuation and monetization of carbon is to be achieved. Such estimates aim to situate PNG forests in the global carbon context and provide baseline information needed to improve the accuracy of PNG carbon monitoring schemes.

  9. 'Good culture, bad culture': polygyny, cultural change and structural drivers of HIV in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Shih, Patti; Worth, Heather; Travaglia, Joanne; Kelly-Hanku, Angela

    2017-02-16

    Culture is often problematised as a key structural driver of HIV transmission in Papua New Guinea. Official HIV programmes, as well as church teachings, tend to focus on customary marital practices of polygyny and bride price payments as 'harmful traditions'. This focus can oversimplify the effects of current and historical nuances of cultural, political and economic change on sexual concurrency and gender inequality. Community-based healthcare workers in Southern Highlands Province explain that customary marital practices are now highly reconfigured from their traditional forms. A recent mining boom has financially advantaged local and travelling men, who are driving an increase of sexual concurrency, transactional sex and inflation of bride price payments. Healthcare workers suggest that the erosion of important social relationships and kinship obligations by the expanding cash economy has caused an intensification of individual male power while enhancing the vulnerability of women. Yet without the means to challenge the effects of uneven economic development, healthcare workers are left to target 'culture' as the central influence on individual behaviours. A commitment to address structural inequality by political leadership and in HIV prevention programmes and a careful contextualisation of cultural change is needed.

  10. Area effects of bednet use in a malaria-endemic area in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Hii, J L; Smith, T; Vounatsou, P; Alexander, N; Mai, A; Ibam, E; Alpers, M P

    2001-01-01

    Relationships between area coverage with insecticide-free bednets and prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum were investigated in 7 community-based surveys over a 33-month period in 1990-93 in 6 villages in the Wosera area of Papua New Guinea. Spatial patterns in circumsporozoite rates for P. falciparum, P. vivax isomorphs K210 and K247, and P. malariae, and the proportions of mosquito blood meals positive for specific human, goat, cat, dog and pig antigens were determined using ELISAs. P. falciparum prevalence in humans was better explained by bednet coverage in the immediate vicinity than by personal protection alone. Circumsporozoite rates for both P. falciparum and P. vivax were also inversely related to coverage with bednets. There was some increase in zoophagy in areas with high coverage, but relatively little effect on the human blood index or on overall mosquito densities. In this setting, protracted use of untreated bednets apparently reduces sporozoite rates, and the associated effects on prevalence are greater than can be accounted for by personal protection. Even at high bednet coverage most anophelines feed on human hosts, so the decreased sporozoite rates are likely to be largely due to reduction of mosquito survival. This finding highlights the importance of local vector ecology for outcomes of bednet programmes and suggests that area effects of untreated bednets should be reassessed in other settings.

  11. Ensuring economic, health, and social well-being for Papua New Guinea through trade.

    PubMed

    Fa'alili-Fidow, Jacinta

    2011-01-01

    The impacts of trade liberalization and open markets on global, regional, and local economies are a key consideration for those involved in government, business, and financial sectors. However, their impacts on health and social well-being of populations are not well-evidenced acknowledged within the health sector, let alone the impact on developing countries. As free trade becomes an inevitable outcome for many developing nations, the full implications of trade on economies, environments, and population health needs to be better articulated in order to ensure fully informed trade negotiations that support equitable outcomes. This article takes a broad look at the key issues for Papua New Guinea (PNG) in trade and how these translate to discrepancies in economic, health, and social benefits for its population. Despite its active trading and high GDP, only 10% of the population experience better economic and social outcomes. The bulk of PNG's population lives in poverty, challenged by geographical, cultural, and political barriers to better income, education, and health. Progress needs to be made to minimize these barriers and to allow more of PNG's population to experience the economic benefits generated through trade activities. A balance needs to be maintained between the desire of developed countries to broaden their markets, and the efforts of developing countries to promote and protect the health and well-being of their populations through increasing participation in global markets. PACER Plus presents an opportunity for pursuing alternative models of trade agreements that support and develop Pacific health.

  12. Age and nature of Triassic magmatism in the Netoni Intrusive Complex, West Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Max; White, Lloyd T.

    2016-12-01

    We report field observations together with petrological, geochemical and geochronological data from granitoids of the Netoni Intrusive Complex of West Papua. Until now, our knowledge of the timing of granitic magmatism in this region has been limited to a wide range of ages (241-6.7 Ma) obtained from K-Ar measurements of hornblende, biotite and plagioclase, primarily from samples of river detritus. We collected in situ samples along several traverses into the intrusive complex to: (1) develop a better understanding of the lithologies within the intrusive complex; and (2) determine the timing of magmatism using U-Pb dating of zircon. We also dated zircons from two river sand samples to identify other potential pulses of magmatism that may have been missed due to a sampling bias. The zircons extracted from the river sands yield age spectra similar to those obtained from the in situ samples. The combined data demonstrate that magmatism in the Netoni Intrusive Complex occurred between 248 Ma and 213 Ma. The petrological and geochemical data indicate that the granitoids were most likely emplaced in an ocean-continent (Andean style) subduction setting. This builds on previous work which suggests that a magmatic belt extended along eastern Gondwana (now New Guinea and eastern Australia) throughout much of the Paleozoic. The volcanic ejecta that were produced along this arc and the subsequent erosion of the mountain chain are a potential source of detritus for Triassic and younger sedimentary rocks in New Guinea, eastern Indonesia and north/northwestern Australia.

  13. GPS measurements of crustal deformation in eastern Indonesia and Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Colleen Whitney

    Here we present crustal velocities from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made. between 1991 and 1997 at 56 sites throughout eastern Indonesia and Papua New Guinea (PNG). From these measurements, we interpret the relative motions of the plates and fault slip rates in the region. Results indicate the tectonics of eastern Indonesia are defined by the interactions of plates and microplates whose boundaries appear to be largely discrete. In a few regions the plate boundaries encompass broad zones of deformation. We identify five distinct tectonic blocks in eastern Indonesia. These include the Northern Australia Block, the Southeast Asia Block, the Bird's Head Block, The South Banda Basin Block, and the East Sulawesi Block. We quantify the motions along the boundaries that bound these blocks, and estimate poles of rotation to define how these blocks move. Two large shear zones exist in eastern Indonesia. The Banda Sea comprises a large deforming region dominated by north-northeast trending left-lateral shear. It appears that shearing is accommodated by the relative motion of several crustal slivers. The southeastern Eurasian plate boundary is therefore broadly distributed. A shear zone also separates Bird's Head from Australia. We estimate about 80 mm/yr of left-lateral shear is needed to accommodate the rapid westward motion of Bird's Head, making this the fastest continental shear zone in the world.

  14. Peopling of Sahul: mtDNA variation in aboriginal Australian and Papua New Guinean populations.

    PubMed Central

    Redd, A J; Stoneking, M

    1999-01-01

    We examined genetic affinities of Aboriginal Australian and New Guinean populations by using nucleotide variation in the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region (CR). A total of 318 individuals from highland Papua New Guinea (PNG), coastal PNG, and Aboriginal Australian populations were typed with a panel of 29 sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes. The SSO-probe panel included five new probes that were used to type an additional 1,037 individuals from several Asian populations. The SSO-type data guided the selection of 78 individuals from Australia and east Indonesia for CR sequencing. A gene tree of these CR sequences, combined with published sequences from worldwide populations, contains two previously identified highland PNG clusters that do not include any Aboriginal Australians; the highland PNG clusters have coalescent time estimates of approximately 80,000 and 122,000 years ago, suggesting ancient isolation and genetic drift. SSO-type data indicate that 84% of the sample of PNG highlander mtDNA belong to these two clusters. In contrast, the Aboriginal Australian sequences are intermingled throughout the tree and cluster with sequences from multiple populations. Phylogenetic and multidimensional-scaling analyses of CR sequences and SSO types split PNG highland and Aboriginal Australian populations and link Aboriginal Australian populations with populations from the subcontinent of India. These mtDNA results do not support a close relationship between Aboriginal Australian and PNG populations but instead suggest multiple migrations in the peopling of Sahul. PMID:10441589

  15. Pliocene eclogite exhumation at plate tectonic rates in eastern Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Suzanne L; Monteleone, Brian D; Webb, Laura E; Fitzgerald, Paul G; Grove, Marty; Hill, E June

    2004-09-16

    As lithospheric plates are subducted, rocks are metamorphosed under high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure conditions to produce eclogites and eclogite facies metamorphic rocks. Because chemical equilibrium is rarely fully achieved, eclogites may preserve in their distinctive mineral assemblages and textures a record of the pressures, temperatures and deformation the rock was subjected to during subduction and subsequent exhumation. Radioactive parent-daughter isotopic variations within minerals reveal the timing of these events. Here we present in situ zircon U/Pb ion microprobe data that dates the timing of eclogite facies metamorphism in eastern Papua New Guinea at 4.3 +/- 0.4 Myr ago, making this the youngest documented eclogite exposed at the Earth's surface. Eclogite exhumation from depths of approximately 75 km was extremely rapid and occurred at plate tectonic rates (cm yr(-1)). The eclogite was exhumed within a portion of the obliquely convergent Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone, in an extending region located west of the Woodlark basin sea floor spreading centre. Such rapid exhumation (> 1 cm yr(-1)) of high-pressure and, we infer, ultrahigh-pressure rocks is facilitated by extension within transient plate boundary zones associated with rapid oblique plate convergence.

  16. A new species of the cardinalfish genus Siphamia (Perciformes, Apogonidae) from West Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gon, Ofer; Allen, Gerald R; Erdmann, Mark V; Gouws, Gavin

    2014-11-06

    A new species of the cardinalfish genus Siphamia is described from specimens collected in the Province of West Papua, Indonesia, at depths of 50-72 m. Siphamia papuensis n. sp. has a striated light organ which makes it a member of the S. tubifer species group. Within this group it is closely related to S. argentea, sharing with the latter 13 pectoral-fin rays, 9 developed gill rakers and an irregular pattern of yellowish green bars on the body. It differs from S. argentea in having an incomplete lateral line and in lacking dark marks on the head, and at the origin and end of the dorsal-fin and anal-fin bases, as well as the absence of red spots along the light organ and along the back. Japanese records of S. tubulata are reidentified as S. argentea, and new locality records for S. argentea and S. stenotes are reported. Analysis of sequence data from a 16S rDNA fragment revealed the clear separation of S. papuensis n. sp., S. argentea and other included Siphamia species (S. jebbi, S. tubifer and S. stenotes). 

  17. The timing of Late Pleistocene glaciation at Mount Wilhelm, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Stephanie; Barrows, Timothy; Hope, Geoff; Pillans, Brad; Fifield, Keith

    2016-04-01

    The highlands of New Guinea were the most extensively glaciated area in the Asian tropical region during the Late Pleistocene. Evidence for glaciation is widespread on most of the mountain peaks above ~3500 m. Glacial landforms include both valley and ice cap forms, but the timing of glaciation remains constrained to only a few local areas. This paper focuses on Mount Wilhelm, which is situated in the central southern region of Papua New Guinea at 5.78°S and is the highest peak (4510 m a.s.l.) We focus on a south easterly valley (Pindaunde Valley) emanating from the peak, where large moraines indicate the maximum ice extent of a valley glacier ~5 km long. Within this extensive moraine complex, recessional moraines document the retreat of the glacier towards the summit region. In order to determine the timing of deglaciation, we collected samples for surface exposure dating using 36Cl and 10Be from diorite boulders positioned on moraine crests. The ages indicate that maximum ice extent was attained during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that ice remained near its maximum extent until after 15 ka but persisted at higher elevations almost until the Holocene. These results are similar to those described from Mt Giluwe to the northwest of Mount Wilhelm, where an ice cap reached its maximum extent at the LGM and remained there for around 3-4,000 years. This indicates that full glacial conditions were only brief in this region of the tropics.

  18. Prehistoric birds from New Ireland, Papua New Guinea: Extinctions on a large Melanesian island

    PubMed Central

    Steadman, David W.; White, J. Peter; Allen, Jim

    1999-01-01

    At least 50 species of birds are represented in 241 bird bones from five late Pleistocene and Holocene archaeological sites on New Ireland (Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea). The bones include only two of seabirds and none of migrant shorebirds or introduced species. Of the 50 species, at least 12 (petrel, hawk, megapode, quail, four rails, cockatoo, two owls, and crow) are not part of the current avifauna and have not been recorded previously from New Ireland. Larger samples of bones undoubtedly would indicate more extirpated species and refine the chronology of extinction. Humans have lived on New Ireland for ca. 35,000 years, whereas most of the identified bones are 15,000 to 6,000 years old. It is suspected that most or all of New Ireland’s avian extinction was anthropogenic, but this suspicion remains undetermined. Our data show that significant prehistoric losses of birds, which are well documented on Pacific islands more remote than New Ireland, occurred also on large, high, mostly forested islands close to New Guinea. PMID:10051683

  19. Neogene Basin Evolution Along the Northern Flank of the Papuan Peninsula, Goodenough Bay, Eastern Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, B. K.; Gillis, R. J.; Mann, P.

    2009-12-01

    Although large-magnitude extension in the Woodlark Rift of eastern Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the D’Entrecasteaux Islands has been addressed through previous research on the late Cenozoic structure and cooling history of metamorphic domes, few studies have evaluated the exhumational record contained within adjacent sedimentary basins. Onshore exposures of Neogene basin fill in PNG along the northern flank of the Papuan peninsula (east of the Dayman metamorphic dome and west-southwest of the domes of the D’Entrecasteaux Islands) provide a record of basin evolution prior to and during growth of the active spreading center that defines the boundary between the Australian plate and Woodlark microplate. Along the northern margin of the Papuan peninsula, a collection of lithofacies associations consisting of sandstone and subordinate conglomerate and mudstone represent deposition in bottomset, foreset, and topset subenvironments in a series of marine Gilbert-type deltas. Internal angular unconformities within the basin-fill succession indicate slope instability likely related to syndepositional deformation. This deformation is attributed to principally down-to-the north motion along extensional and strike-slip structures bordering the northern margin of Papuan peninsula, notably the ESE-striking Goodenough fault zone. Small-scale folding is interpreted as the product of late Miocene to Quaternary fault-related folding in an extensional setting, although we cannot rule out possible contraction coeval with significant collision-related shortening on the southern flank of the Papuan peninsula within the south-directed Papuan fold-thrust belt. Differences in sandstone petrographic results for the northern margin of the Papuan peninsula and the smaller Vogel peninsula suggest a multiphase history of basin evolution, with early Neogene subsidence of uncertain origin and late Neogene subsidence linked to regional extension. The timing of basin evolution will be assessed

  20. New Insights into the present-day kinematics of the central and western Papua New Guinea from GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulali, A.; Tregoning, P.; McClusky, S.; Stanaway, R.; Wallace, L.; Lister, G.

    2015-08-01

    New Guinea is a region characterized by rapid oblique convergence between the Pacific and Australian tectonic plates. The detailed tectonics of the region, including the partitioning of relative block motions and fault slip rates within this complex boundary plate boundary zone are still not well understood. In this study, we quantify the distribution of the deformation throughout the central and western parts of Papua New Guinea (PNG) using 20 yr of GPS data (1993-2014). We use an elastic block model to invert the regional GPS velocities as well as earthquake slip vectors for the location and rotation rates of microplate Euler poles as well as fault slip parameters in the region. Convergence between the Pacific and the Australian plates is accommodated in northwestern PNG largely by the New Guinea Trench with rates exceeding 90 mm yr-1, indicating that this is the major active interplate boundary. However, some convergent deformation is partitioned into a shear component with ˜12 per cent accommodated by the Bewani-Torricelli fault zone and the southern Highlands Fold-and-Thrust Belt. New GPS velocities in the eastern New Guinea Highlands region have led to the identification of the New Guinea Highlands and the Papuan Peninsula being distinctly different blocks, separated by a boundary through the Aure Fold-and-Thrust Belt complex which accommodates an estimated 4-5 mm yr-1 of left-lateral and 2-3 mm yr-1 of convergent motion. This implies that the Highlands Block is rotating in a clockwise direction relative to the rigid Australian Plate, consistent with the observed transition to left-lateral strike-slip regime observed in western New Guinea Highlands. We find a better fit of our block model to the observed velocities when assigning the current active boundary between the Papuan Peninsula and the South Bismark Block to be to the north of the city of Lae on the Gain Thrust, rather than on the more southerly Ramu-Markham fault as previously thought. This may

  1. The gastrointestinal helminths of Rattus niobe (Rodentia: Muridae) with descriptions of two new genera and three new species (Nematoda) from Papua New Guinea and Papua Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Smales, L R

    2016-05-31

    Cestodes, to be identified elsewhere, the acanthocephalan Moniliformis moniliformis and 15 species of nematode including 2 new genera, a new species and 2 putative new species from the families Heligmonellidae and Oxyuridae, as well as juveniles and a putative heligmonellid that could not be fully identified, were collected from the digestive tracts of 34 Rattus niobe (Muridae: Murinae: Rattini) from Papua, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. The ascaridid, Toxocara mackerrasae, the chabertiid Cyclodontostomum purvisi, the heterakid Heterakis sp., the spirurids Protospirura kaindiensis and P. muricola the subulurid Subulura andersoni and the trichurids Eucoleus sp. and Trichuris muris have been reported previously from endemic Rattus spp. Syphacia (Syphacia) niobe n. sp. was distinguished from its congeners by a combination of characters including a round cephalic plate, the lack of cervical and lateral alae, a longer male tail and an attenuated female tail. Nugininema titokis n. gen., n. sp. differs from all other genera in the Heligmonellidae in the characters of the synlophe, 10-17 ridges orientated subfrontally at mid body and 2 right ventral ridges hypertrophied anteriorly. Rodentanema aenigma n. gen., n. sp. differs from all other genera in the Heligmonellidae in the characters of the synlophe 6-7 ridges at mid body not symmetrical in relation to frontal axis. Species richness of the nematode assemblage was similar to that reported for Rattus leucopus in Papua New Guinea, with about 90% of possible species found as indicated by bootstrap analysis. Species composition included 6 species unique to R. niobe and 7 species reported from at least one other species of Rattus indigenous to New Guinea, as well as juvenile worms, probably ascaridids.

  2. Four New Species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Emoia spp. Skinks (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea and the Insular Pacific.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Austin, Christopher C; Fisher, Robert N

    2017-02-01

    Between September and November 1991, 54 adult skinks from 15 species were collected by hand or blowpipe from several localities on Rarotonga, Cook Islands, Ovalau Island, Fiji, and Papua New Guinea (PNG), and their feces were examined for coccidians. Species included 5 seaside skinks (Emoia atrocostata), 1 Pacific blue-tailed skink (Emoia caeroleocauda), 2 Fiji slender treeskinks (Emoia concolor), 15 white-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia cyanura), 1 Bulolo River forest skink (Emoia guttata), 6 dark-bellied copper-striped skinks (Emoia impar), 5 Papua five-striped skinks (Emoia jakati), 2 Papua slender treeskinks (Emoia kordoana), 3 Papua robust treeskinks (Emoia longicauda), 1 brown-backed forest skink (Emoia loveridgei), 3 Papua black-sided skinks (Emoia pallidiceps), 2 Papua white-spotted skinks (Emoia physicae), 2 Papua yellow-head skinks (Emoia popei), 1 Papua brown forest skink (Emoia submetallica), and 5 Fiji barred treeskinks (Emoia trossula) Species of Eimeria (Ei.) were detected from these Emoia (Em.) spp. and are described here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria iovai n. sp. from Em. pallidiceps from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall (L × W) 26.5 × 18.1 μm, with a length/width ratio (L/W) of 1.1. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian also was found in Em. atrocostata from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria kirkpatricki n. sp. from Em. atrocostata from PNG were ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.6 × 13.5 μm, L/W 1.4. A micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a fragmented polar granule was present. This eimerian was also shared by Em. cyanura from the Cook Islands and Fiji, Em. impar from the Cook Islands, Em. loveridgei from PNG, Em. pallidiceps from PNG, Em. popei from PNG, and Em. submetallica from PNG. Oocysts of Eimeria stevejayuptoni n. sp. from Em. longicauda were subspheroidal to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall, 18.7 × 16.6 μm, L/W 1.1. A micropyle and oocyst residuum

  3. Favouring butyrate production for a new generation biofuel by acidogenic glucose fermentation using cells immobilised on γ-alumina.

    PubMed

    Syngiridis, Kostas; Bekatorou, Argyro; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Larroche, Christian; Kanellaki, Maria; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2014-06-01

    The effect of γ-alumina as a fermentation advancing tool and as carrier for culture immobilisation, regarding VFAs and ethanol production during acidogenic fermentation of glucose, was examined at various process conditions (sugar concentration, pH) and operation modes (continuous with and without effluent recirculation and batch). The results showed that at high initial pH (8.9) the continuous acidogenic fermentation of glucose led to high yields of VFAs and favoured the accumulation of butyric acid. The batch process on the other hand at pH 6.5, favoured the ethanol-type fermentation. The results indicate that in the frame of technology development for new generation biofuels, using γ-alumina as a process advancing tool at optimum process conditions (pH, initial glucose concentration and mode of operation), the produced VFAs profile and ethanol concentration may be manipulated.

  4. BCL2 in breast cancer: a favourable prognostic marker across molecular subtypes and independent of adjuvant therapy received

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, S-J; Makretsov, N; Blows, F M; Driver, K E; Provenzano, E; Le Quesne, J; Baglietto, L; Severi, G; Giles, G G; McLean, C A; Callagy, G; Green, A R; Ellis, I; Gelmon, K; Turashvili, G; Leung, S; Aparicio, S; Huntsman, D; Caldas, C; Pharoah, P

    2010-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is heterogeneous and the existing prognostic classifiers are limited in accuracy, leading to unnecessary treatment of numerous women. B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), an antiapoptotic protein, has been proposed as a prognostic marker, but this effect is considered to relate to oestrogen receptor (ER) status. This study aimed to test the clinical validity of BCL2 as an independent prognostic marker. Methods: Five studies of 11 212 women with early-stage breast cancer were analysed. Individual patient data included tumour size, grade, lymph node status, endocrine therapy, chemotherapy and mortality. BCL2, ER, progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) levels were determined in all tumours. A Cox model incorporating the time-dependent effects of each variable was used to explore the prognostic significance of BCL2. Results: In univariate analysis, ER, PR and BCL2 positivity was associated with improved survival and HER2 positivity with inferior survival. For ER and PR this effect was time dependent, whereas for BCL2 and HER2 the effect persisted over time. In multivariate analysis, BCL2 positivity retained independent prognostic significance (hazard ratio (HR) 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66–0.88, P<0.001). BCL2 was a powerful prognostic marker in ER− (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.54–0.74, P<0.001) and ER+ disease (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.48–0.65, P<0.001), and in HER2− (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.49–0.61, P<0.001) and HER2+ disease (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.57–0.85, P<0.001), irrespective of the type of adjuvant therapy received. Addition of BCL2 to the Adjuvant! Online prognostic model, for a subset of cases with a 10-year follow-up, improved the survival prediction (P=0.0039). Conclusions: BCL2 is an independent indicator of favourable prognosis for all types of early-stage breast cancer. This study establishes the rationale for introduction of BCL2 immunohistochemistry to improve prognostic stratification. Further work

  5. Genetic diversity in captive and wild Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, based on mtDNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Husband, Thomas P

    2009-05-01

    The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) population is at a critical point for assessing long-term viability. This population, established from 19 genetically uncharacterized D. matschiei, has endured a founder effect because only four individuals contributed the majority of offspring. The highly variable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was sequenced for five of the female-founders by examining extant representatives of their maternal lineage and compared with wild (n = 13) and captive (n = 18) D. matschiei from Papua New Guinea (PNG). AZA female-founder D. matschiei control region haplotype diversity was low, compared with captive D. matschiei held in PNG. AZA D. matschiei have only two control region haplotypes because four out of five AZA female-founder D. matschiei had an identical sequence. Both AZA haplotypes were identified among the 17 wild and captive D. matschiei haplotypes from PNG. Genomic DNA extracted from wild D. matschiei fecal samples was a reliable source of mtDNA that could be used for a larger scale study. We recommend a nuclear DNA genetic analysis to more fully characterize AZA D. matschiei genetic diversity and to assist their Species Survival Plan((R)). An improved understanding of D. matschiei genetics will contribute substantially to the conservation of these unique animals both in captivity and the wild.

  6. Examining the broader psychosocial effects of mass conflict on PTSD symptoms and functional impairment amongst West Papuan refugees resettled in Papua New Guinea (PNG).

    PubMed

    Tay, Alvin Kuowei; Rees, Susan; Chan, Jack; Kareth, Moses; Silove, Derrick

    2015-05-01

    Mass conflict and displacement erode the core psychosocial foundations of society, but there is a dearth of quantitative data examining the long-term mental health effects of these macrocosmic changes, particularly in relation to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. In 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional community study (n = 230) of West Papuan refugees residing in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, testing a moderated-mediation structural equation model of PTSD symptoms in which we examined relationships involving the psychosocial effects of mass conflict and displacement based on the Adaptation and Development after Persecution and Trauma (ADAPT) model, a trauma count (TC) of traumatic events (TEs) related to mass conflict, and a count index of current adversity (AC). A direct and an indirect path via AC led to PTSD symptoms. The ADAPT index exerted two effects on PTSD symptoms, an indirect effect via AC, and a moderating effect on TC. PTSD symptoms were directly associated with functional impairment. Although based on cross-sectional data, our findings provide support for a core prediction of the ADAPT model, that is, that undermining of the core psychosocial foundations of society brought about by mass conflict and displacement exerts an indirect and moderating influence on PTSD symptoms. The path model supports the importance of repairing the psychosocial pillars of society as a foundation for addressing trauma-related symptoms and promoting the functioning of refugees.

  7. Microbial and metal water quality in rain catchments compared with traditional drinking water sources in the East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Horak, Helena M; Chynoweth, Joshua S; Myers, Ward P; Davis, Jennifer; Fendorf, Scott; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2010-03-01

    In Papua New Guinea, a significant portion of morbidity and mortality is attributed to water-borne diseases. To reduce incidence of disease, communities and non-governmental organizations have installed rain catchments to provide drinking water of improved quality. However, little work has been done to determine whether these rain catchments provide drinking water of better quality than traditional drinking water sources, and if morbidity is decreased in villages with rain catchments. The specific aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of water produced by rain catchments in comparison with traditional drinking water sources in rural villages in the East Sepik Province. Fifty-four water sources in 22 villages were evaluated for enterococci and Escherichia coli densities as well as 14 health-relevant metals. In addition, we examined how the prevalence of diarrhoeal illness in villages relates to the type of primary drinking water source. The majority of tested metals were below World Health Organization safety limits. Catchment water sources had lower enterococci and E. coli than other water sources. Individuals in villages using Sepik River water as their primary water source had significantly higher incidence of diarrhoea than those primarily using other water sources (streams, dug wells and catchments).

  8. Bundled turbidite deposition in the central Pandora Trough (Gulf of Papua) since Last Glacial Maximum: Linking sediment nature and accumulation to sea level fluctuations at millennial timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorry, StéPhan J.; Droxler, André W.; Mallarino, Gianni; Dickens, Gerald R.; Bentley, Sam J.; Beaufort, Luc; Peterson, Larry C.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2008-03-01

    Since Last Glacial Maximum (23-19 ka), Earth climate warming and deglaciation occurred in two major steps (Bølling-Allerød and Preboreal), interrupted by a short cooling interval referred to as the Younger Dryas (12.5-11.5 ka B.P.). In this study, three cores (MV-33, MV-66, and MD-40) collected in the central part of Pandora Trough (Gulf of Papua) have been analyzed, and they reveal a detailed sedimentary pattern at millennial timescale. Siliciclastic turbidites disappeared during the Bølling-Allerød and Preboreal intervals to systematically reoccur during the Younger Dryas interval. Subsequent to the final disappearance of the siliciclastic turbidites a calciturbidite occurred during meltwater pulse 1B. The Holocene interval was characterized by a lack of siliciclastic turbidites, relatively high carbonate content, and fine bank-derived aragonitic sediment. The observed millennial timescale sedimentary variability can be explained by sea level fluctuations. During the Last Glacial Maximum, siliciclastic turbidites were numerous when the lowstand coastal system was located along the modern shelf edge. Although they did not occur during the intervals of maximum flooding of the shelf (during meltwater pulses 1A and 1B), siliciclastic turbidites reappear briefly during the Younger Dryas, an interval when sea level rise slowed, stopped, or perhaps even fell. The timing of the calciturbidite coincides with the first reflooding of Eastern Fields Reef, an atoll that remained exposed for most of the glacial stages.

  9. Characterization of a variant of human T-lymphotropic virus type I isolated from a healthy member of a remote, recently contacted group in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, R; Nerurkar, V R; Garruto, R M; Miller, M A; Leon-Monzon, M E; Jenkins, C L; Sanders, R C; Liberski, P P; Alpers, M P; Gajdusek, D C

    1991-01-01

    We report the characterization of a variant of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) isolated from an interleukin 2-dependent, CD8+ T-cell line derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy member of a remote, recently contacted hunter-horticulturalist group (Hagahai) in Madang province of Papua New Guinea. Antigenic characterization of this variant, designated PNG-1, by immunofluorescence, indicated no expression of gag-encoded proteins p19 and p24 (even after incubation with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine), using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against HTLV-I gag gene products. Virus-specific proteins of 15, 19, 46, 53, and 61/68 kDa were demonstrated by Western blot analysis, using sera from patients with serologically and/or virologically confirmed HTLV-I myeloneuropathy, sera from HTLV-I-infected rabbits, and antibodies prepared against the C terminus of the major envelope glycoprotein gp46. Restriction endonuclease maps of PNG-1 proviral DNA differed from that of a prototype strain of HTLV-I (MT-2), but, as verified by polymerase chain reaction, PNG-1 was definitely HTLV-I, not HTLV-II. Nucleotide sequencing and further molecular genetic studies of this variant may provide insights into the origin and evolution of HTLV-I. Images PMID:1996344

  10. The gastrointestinal helminths of Lorentzimys nouhuysi (Rodentia: Muridae) with descriptions of two new genera and three new species (Nematoda) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Smales, L R

    2010-06-01

    Helminths, 3 cestode and 8 nematode species, including 2 new genera, 5 new species, and 1 putative new species, of nematode were collected from the digestive tracts of 23 Lorentzimys nouhuysi (Murinae; Hydromyini) from Papua New Guinea. Odilia wauensis n. sp. (Heligmonellidae) most closely resembles Odilia mallomyos Hasegawa and Syafruddin, 1994, but differs from this species in the detail of the synlophe ridges, the length and tip shape of the spicules, the absence of a gubernaculum, and the size of the eggs. Papuastrongylus kishinamiae n. gen., n. sp. differs from all other genera in the Herpetostrongylidae in the form of the synlophe and spicules, the lack of a gubernaculum, and in being monodelphic. Syphacia lorentzimyos n. sp. and Syphacia mamelonitenuis n. sp. (Oxyuridae) differ from all other species in having a circular cephalic plate and from each other in that S. mamelonitenuis lacks lateral alae. Lorentzicola woolleyae n. gen., n. sp. differs from all other genera in the Oxyuridae (Syphaciini) in having the peribuccal wall with denticles, a simple esophagus, and males with 3 mamelons of the Syphacia type. The helminth assemblage of L. nouhuysi did not resemble that of any other hydromyin rodent from the region studied thus far.

  11. Thermal effects on activity patterns and behavioural switching in a concourse of foragers on Stachytarpheta mutabilis (Verbenaceae) in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Stone, G N; Amos, J N; Stone, T F; Knight, R L; Gay, H; Parrott, F

    1988-10-01

    1. The foraging activities of the papilionid butterflies Ornithoptera priamus poseidon and Papilio ulysses, and the solitary bee Amegilla sapiens (Apoidea, Anthophoridae) on the shrub Stachytarpheta mutabilis were studied in highland Papua New Guinea. 2. The insects' activity patterns were analysed at three sites with differing diurnal microclimate variation. O. priamus and A. sapiens foraged in the morning (after a period of basking and wing-whirring) and late afternoon when temperatures were well below daily maxima, whereas P. ulysses showed foraging peaks during the hottest part of the day. 3. Site choice by all 3 species appeared to be determined primarily by temperature, but within the limits imposed by temperature, nectar supplies probably determined which site was visited. 4. P. ulysses showed interspersed foraging and courtship behaviour, and no behavioural switching was observed for this species. At high temperatures, both O. priamus and A. sapiens ceased foraging and showed territorial and courtship behaviour. This behavioural change allowed avoidance of heat stress, and occurred even when nectar supplies were maintained at high levels. 5. Thermal effects on behavioural switching in these insects are compared with related phenomena in other bees and butterflies.

  12. Monitoring of river water for free cyanide pollution from mining activity in Papua New Guinea and attenuation of cyanide by biochar.

    PubMed

    Sawaraba, Ian; Rao, B K Rajashekhar

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide (CN) pollution was reported in the downstream areas of Watut and Markham Rivers due to effluent discharges from gold mining and processing activities of Hidden Valley mines in Morobe province of Papua New Guinea. We monitored free cyanide levels in Watut and Markham River waters randomly three times in years for 2 years (2012 and 2013). Besides, a short-term static laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the potential of river sediment to attenuate externally added cyanide, with and without the presence of biochar material. Results indicated that the free cyanide content ranged between 0.17 and 1.32 μg L(-1) in the river waters. The free cyanide content were found to be significantly (p < 0.05) greater in June (0.87 μg L(-1)) and May (0.77 μg L(-1)) months of 2012 and 2013, respectively, than the rest of the months. However, free cyanide levels in all four monitoring sites across three sampling intervals were lower than 0.20 mg L(-1) which is the maximum contaminant level (MCL) permitted according to US Environmental Protection Agency. Under laboratory conditions, the biochar-impregnated sediment showed ∼3 times more attenuation capacity for cyanide than non-amended sediment, thus indicating possibility of using biochar to cleanse cyanide from spills or other sources of pollution.

  13. Geochemical and 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the evolution of volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Joseph P.

    The tectonic mechanisms producing Pliocene to active volcanism in eastern Papua New Guinea (PNG) have been debated for decades. In order to assess mechanisms that produce volcanism in the Woodlark Rift, we evaluate the evolution of volcanism in eastern PNG using 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology and whole rock geochemistry. Active volcanism in southeastern Papua New Guinea occurs on the Papuan Peninsula (Mt. Lamington, Mt. Victory and Waiwa), in the Woodlark Rift (Dobu Island, SE Goodenough Island, and Western Fergusson Island), and in the Woodlark Basin. In the Woodlark Basin, seafloor spreading is active and decompression melting of the upper mantle is producing basaltic magmatism. However, the cause of Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift is controversial. Two hypotheses for the tectonic setting have been proposed to explain Pliocene and younger volcanism in the Woodlark Rift: (1) southward subduction of Solomon Sea lithosphere beneath eastern PNG at the Trobriand Tough and (2) decompression melting of mantle, previously modified by subduction, as the lithosphere undergoes extension associated with the opening of the Woodlark Basin. A comparison of 40Ar/39Ar ages with high field strength element (HFSE) concentrations in primary magmas indicates that HFSE concentrations correlate with age in the Woodlark rift. These data support the hypothesis that Pliocene to active volcanism in the Woodlark Rise and D'Entrecasteaux Islands results from decompression melting of a relict mantle wedge. The subduction zone geochemical signatures (negative HFSE anomalies) in Woodlark Rift lavas younger than 4 m.y. are a relict from older subduction beneath eastern Papua, likely in the middle Miocene. As the lithosphere is extended ahead of the tip of the westward propagating seafloor spreading center in the Woodlark Basin, the composition of volcanism is inherited from prior arc magmatism (via flux melting) and through time evolves toward magmatism associated with a rifting

  14. A reassessment of the pycnogonid genus Cheilopallene (Arthropoda, Callipallenidae) with description of a new species from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Staples, David A

    2015-08-05

    The genus Cheilopallene is reviewed. Three species are assigned to species incertae sedis pending further analysis. Specimens from Lizard Island, Queensland, previously identified as C. nodulosa are reassigned to C. brevichela. Suspected sexual dimorphism represented by the presence of a chelifore scape node in female C. nodulosa is supported by the finding of the same dimorphism in C. brevichela and in a new species from Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea. It is likely that the presence of a chelifore scape node is a diagnostic character of all females in the genus Cheilopallene. An amended diagnosis is provided.

  15. Protospirura kaindiensis n. sp. (Spirura: Spiruridae) and other helminths from Pseudohydromys (Muridae: Hydromyinae) from Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Smales, L R

    2001-02-01

    One cestode and 3 species of nematodes are recorded from Pseudohydromys murinus and Pseudohydromys occidentalis (Muridae: Hydromyinae), from Papua New Guinea, for the first time. Heterakis fieldingi (Ascaridida: Heterakidea) has previously been known from Australia. Odilia sp. resembles Odilia praeputialis in the orientation of the synlophe and the number and size of ridges but differs in the length of spicule and lack of a praepuce. Protospirura kaindiensis n. sp. (Spirurida: Spiruridae) is readily distinguished from all other members of the genus by the number and arrangement of caudal papillae and the length of the spicules.

  16. Mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC) in relation to other indices of nutritional status in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Smith, T; Heywood, P

    1991-03-01

    Mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC) measurements made during the 1982-1983 National Nutrition Survey were compared to other anthropometrics indices of nutritional status and it was found that MUAC was a poor predictor of the other measures. Whilst this does not necessarily imply that MUAC cannot be used to identify children at high risk it is one of a number of considerations which limit its utility in Papua New Guinea. Low MUAC measurements were particularly common in middle-altitude zones, where malnutrition is more frequent; this suggests that MUAC may be more useful in identifying malnourished groups than individuals.

  17. Late quaternary deltaic and carbonate sedimentation in the Gulf of Papua foreland basin: Response to sea-level change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, P.T.; Pattiaratchi, C.B.; Keene, J.B.; Dalrymple, R.W.; Gardner, J.V.; Baker, E.K.; Cole, A.R.; Mitchell, D.; Gibbs, P.; Schroeder, W.W.

    1996-01-01

    The rivers that drain the wet, mountainous island of New-Guinea discharge about 1.5 billion tonnes/yr of sediments into the adjacent seas, including the foreland basin between New Guinea and Australia. Despite this huge sediment input, there appears to have been only limited deposition in the Gulf of Papua during the (Holocene) postglacial rise in sea level. Seismic and core data indicate that the transgressive systems tract in the Gulf of Papua is thin and patchy. It is confined to regions within and north of an incised, east-west-trending shelf-valley system. Of the possible explanations for the absence of a significant transgressive systems tract, inland storage and along- and off-shelf transport of the sediment are of greatest significance. Reef growth up to the latitude of the east-west-trending incised-valley system in the southern Gulf of Papua is considered to have been facilitated by a northward-flowing coastal boundary current, the Coral Sea Coastal Current. This current now sweeps turbid, brackish waters and terrigenous sediments discharged by the rivers northwards away from the reefs. An observed northward offset in transgressive sediments in relation to the axis of the shelf valleys suggests that such a northward-flowing shelf current operated during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene. The northern limit of the Great Barrier Reef could thus be controlled by the balance between fluvial sediment supply and northward advection of suspended sediment by the Coral Sea Coastal Current. This current may also be important in maintaining a supply of clear water to the eastern Gulf of Papua, thus enabling photosynthesis and the flourishing of calcareous-algae (Halimeda) bioherms or biostromes at depths of up to 100 m over much of the middle and outer shelf, directly offshore of the modern Fly Delta. These carbonate sediments represent the exposed maximum flooding surface and condensed section. Modern highstand delta deposits have begun to prograde over this

  18. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-10-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.). Therefore, we collected twigs from the field during a period of mild winter conditions and after a sudden cold period. After both periods, the state of the photosynthetic machinery was tested in the laboratory by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). The responses of Vc, max and Jmax were highly species specific, with Q. ilex exhibiting the highest and P

  19. Late Pleistocene glaciation of the Mt Giluwe volcano, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Hope, Geoffrey S.; Prentice, Michael L.; Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G.

    2011-09-01

    The Mt Giluwe shield volcano was the largest area glaciated in Papua New Guinea during the Pleistocene. Despite minimal cooling of the sea surface during the last glacial maximum, glaciers reached elevations as low as 3200 m. To investigate changes in the extent of ice through time we have re-mapped evidence for glaciation on the southwest flank of Mt Giluwe. We find that an ice cap has formed on the flanks of the mountain on at least three, and probably four, separate occasions. To constrain the ages of these glaciations we present 39 new cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages complemented by new radiocarbon dates. Direct dating of the moraines identifies that the maximum extent of glaciation on the mountain was not during the last glacial maximum as previously thought. In conjunction with existing potassium/argon and radiocarbon dating, we recognise four distinct glacial periods between 293-306 ka (Gogon Glaciation), 136-158 ka (Mengane Glaciation), centred at 62 ka (Komia Glaciation) and from >20.3-11.5 ka (Tongo Glaciation). The temperature difference relative to the present during the Tongo Glaciation is likely to be of the order of at least 5 °C which is a minimum difference for the previous glaciations. During the Tongo Glaciation, ice was briefly at its maximum for less than 1000 years, but stayed near maximum levels for nearly 4000 years, until about 15.4 ka. Over the next 4000 years there was more rapid retreat with ice free conditions by the early Holocene.

  20. Late Pleistocene glaciation of the Mt Giluwe volcano, Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrows, T.T.; Hope, G.S.; Prentice, M.L.; Fifield, L.K.; Tims, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    The Mt Giluwe shield volcano was the largest area glaciated in Papua New Guinea during the Pleistocene. Despite minimal cooling of the sea surface during the last glacial maximum, glaciers reached elevations as low as 3200 m. To investigate changes in the extent of ice through time we have re-mapped evidence for glaciation on the southwest flank of Mt Giluwe. We find that an ice cap has formed on the flanks of the mountain on at least three, and probably four, separate occasions. To constrain the ages of these glaciations we present 39 new cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages complemented by new radiocarbon dates. Direct dating of the moraines identifies that the maximum extent of glaciation on the mountain was not during the last glacial maximum as previously thought. In conjunction with existing potassium/argon and radiocarbon dating, we recognise four distinct glacial periods between 293-306 ka (Gogon Glaciation), 136-158 ka (Mengane Glaciation), centred at 62 ka (Komia Glaciation) and from >20.3-11.5 ka (Tongo Glaciation). The temperature difference relative to the present during the Tongo Glaciation is likely to be of the order of at least 5 ??C which is a minimum difference for the previous glaciations. During the Tongo Glaciation, ice was briefly at its maximum for less than 1000 years, but stayed near maximum levels for nearly 4000 years, until about 15.4 ka. Over the next 4000 years there was more rapid retreat with ice free conditions by the early Holocene. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Petroleum prospects for offshore sedimentary basins in the eastern Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands regions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, T.R.; Vedder, J.G. )

    1990-06-01

    Intra-arc basins in the Buka-Bougainville region of Papua New Guinea and in the Solomon Islands contain thick sedimentary sequences that may be prospective for petroleum. The Queen Emma basin, between Bougainville and New Ireland, contains as much as 8 km of deformed Oligocene and younger strata. The Central Solomons Trough, which underlies New Georgia Sound, is a composite intra-arc basin that contains late Oligocene and younger strata as much as 7 km thick. Farther east, beneath Indispensable Strait, the down-faulted Indispensable basin locally contains as much as 5.4 km of Miocene( ) and younger strata, and the offshore part of Mbokokimbo basin off eastern Guadalcanal includes 6 km or more of late Miocene and younger strata. All of these basins have some of the attributes necessary to generate and trap petroleum. Structural and stratigraphic traps are common, including faulted anticlines, sedimentary wedges, and carbonate reefs and reef-derived deposits on submarine ridges and along the basin margins. The thickness of the basin deposits ensures that some strata are buried deeply enough to be within the thermal regime required for hydrocarbon generation. However, little source or reservoir rock information is available because of the lack of detailed surface and subsurface stratigraphy. Moreover, much of the basin sediment is likely to consist of volcaniclastic material, derived from uplifted volcanogenic rocks surrounding the basins, and may be poor in source and reservoir rocks. Until additional stratigraphic information is available, analysis of the petroleum potential of these basins is a matter of conjecture.

  2. Deformation regime and long-term precursors to eruption at large calderas: Rabaul, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robert M.; Kilburn, Christopher R. J.

    2016-03-01

    Eruptions at large calderas are normally preceded by variable rates of unrest that continue for decades or more. A classic example is the 1994 eruption of Rabaul caldera, in Papua New Guinea, which began after 23 years of surface uplift and volcano-tectonic (VT) seismicity at rates that changed unevenly with time by an order of magnitude. Although the VT event rate and uplift rate peaked in 1983-1985, eruptions only began a decade later and followed just 27 hours of anomalous changes in precursory signal. Here we argue that the entire 23 years of unrest belongs to a single sequence of damage accumulation in the crust and that, in 1991-1992, the crust's response to applied stress changed from quasi-elastic (elastic deformation with minor fault movement) to inelastic (deformation predominantly by fault movement alone). The change in behaviour yields limiting trends in the variation of VT event rate with deformation and can be quantified with a mean-field model for an elastic crust that contains a dispersed population of small faults. The results show that identifying the deformation regime for elastic-brittle crust provides new criteria for using precursory time series to evaluate the potential for eruption. They suggest that, in the quasi-elastic regime, short-term increases in rates of deformation and VT events are unreliable indicators of an imminent eruption, but that, in the inelastic regime, the precursory rates may follow hyperbolic increases with time and offer the promise of developing forecasts of eruption as much as months beforehand.

  3. Composition and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of alkaline arc lavas: Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, A.K.; Hart, S.R.; Frey, F.A. )

    1990-05-10

    The SiO{sub 2}-undersaturated lavas from Lihir island, Papua New Guinea, like most arc lavas are highly enriched in Sr, Ba, K, Rb, and Cc and depleted in Hf, Ta, Nb, and Ti relative to ocean floor basalts and oceanic island basalts. These alkali-rich lavas have arc trace element signatures and Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic systematics. However, they are not a product of present-day subduction, as this volcanism has tapped mantle which was enriched by prior subduction episodes. The narrow range of Pb isotopic compositions suggest a cogenetic origin for these lavas. During the fractionation of the primitive Lihir lavas, elements normally considered incompatible (i.e., the light rare earth elements (LREE), Rb, Th, and P) have high bulk solid/melt partition coefficients (0.15-1.5). Relatively higher partition coefficients during formation of the evolved lavas produced crossing rare earth element (REE) patterns, and primitive lavas have higher incompatible elements abundances than evolved lavas. The Lihir lavas have lower alkali, Sr, Ba, K, Rb, Cs, and LREE abundances than other Tabar-Feni lavas. They are derived from a less enriched mantle source rather than by a higher degree of melting of a source similar to that of the other islands. The similarity of Sm/Nd ratios of these undersaturated arc lavas to those of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline arc lavas and the moderate chondrite-normalized La/Yb (la/Yb{sub cn} = 3-7) indicates that there has been limited enrichment of the LREE relative to the heavy REE during generation of the arc-modified source mantle. The alkaline nature of these lavas reflects their generation, in a tensional tectonic environment, from a fossil arc mantle region that has undergone extreme arc enrichment of alkali and alkaline earth elements during two earlier subduction episodes.

  4. Malaria morbidity in Papua Indonesia, an area with multidrug resistant Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Karyana, Muhammad; Burdarm, Lenny; Yeung, Shunmay; Kenangalem, Enny; Wariker, Noah; Maristela, Rilia; Umana, Ketut Gde; Vemuri, Ram; Okoseray, Maurits J; Penttinen, Pasi M; Ebsworth, Peter; Sugiarto, Paulus; Anstey, Nicholas M; Tjitra, Emiliana; Price, Richard N

    2008-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance has emerged to both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum and yet the comparative epidemiology of these infections is poorly defined. Methods All laboratory-confirmed episodes of malaria in Timika, Papua, Indonesia, presenting to community primary care clinics and an inpatient facility were reviewed over a two-year period. In addition information was gathered from a house-to-house survey to quantify the prevalence of malaria and treatment-seeking behaviour of people with fever. Results Between January 2004 and December 2005, 99,158 laboratory-confirmed episodes of malaria were reported, of which 58% (57,938) were attributable to P. falciparum and 37% (36,471) to P. vivax. Malaria was most likely to be attributable to pure P. vivax in children under one year of age (55% 2,684/4,889). In the household survey, the prevalence of asexual parasitaemia was 7.5% (290/3,890) for P. falciparum and 6.4% (248/3,890) for P. vivax. The prevalence of P. falciparum infection peaked in young adults aged 15–25 years (9.8% 69/707), compared to P. vivax infection which peaked in children aged 1 to 4 years (9.5% 61/642). Overall 35% (1,813/5,255) of people questioned reported a febrile episode in the preceding month. Of the 60% of people who were estimated to have had malaria, only 39% would have been detected by the surveillance network. The overall incidence of malaria was therefore estimated as 876 per 1,000 per year (Range: 711–906). Conclusion In this region of multidrug-resistant P. vivax and P. falciparum, both species are associated with substantial morbidity, but with significant differences in the age-related risk of infection. PMID:18673572

  5. Submicroscopic and Asymptomatic Plasmodium Parasitaemia Associated with Significant Risk of Anaemia in Papua, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Handayuni, Irene; Trianty, Leily; Utami, Retno A. S.; Tirta, Yusrifar Kharisma; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel; Kusuma, Andreas; Wirjanata, Grennady; Kho, Steven; Simpson, Julie A.; Auburn, Sarah; Douglas, Nicholas M.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R.; Marfurt, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Submicroscopic Plasmodium infections are an important parasite reservoir, but their clinical relevance is poorly defined. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted in southern Papua, Indonesia, using cluster random sampling. Data were recorded using a standardized questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for haemoglobin measurement. Plasmodium parasitaemia was determined by blood film microscopy and PCR. Between April and July 2013, 800 households and 2,830 individuals were surveyed. Peripheral parasitaemia was detected in 37.7% (968/2,567) of individuals, 36.8% (357) of whom were identified by blood film examination. Overall the prevalence of P. falciparum parasitaemia was 15.4% (396/2567) and that of P. vivax 18.3% (471/2567). In parasitaemic individuals, submicroscopic infection was significantly more likely in adults (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 3.82 [95%CI: 2.49–5.86], p<0.001) compared to children, females (AOR = 1.41 [1.07–1.86], p = 0.013), individuals not sleeping under a bednet (AOR = 1.4 [1.0–1.8], p = 0.035), and being afebrile (AOR = 3.2 [1.49–6.93], p = 0.003). The risk of anaemia (according to WHO guidelines) was 32.8% and significantly increased in those with asymptomatic parasitaemia (AOR 2.9 [95% 2.1–4.0], p = 0.007), and submicroscopic P. falciparum infections (AOR 2.5 [95% 1.7–3.6], p = 0.002). Asymptomatic and submicroscopic infections in this area co-endemic for P. falciparum and P. vivax constitute two thirds of detectable parasitaemia and are associated with a high risk of anaemia. Novel public health strategies are needed to detect and eliminate these parasite reservoirs, for the benefit both of the patient and the community. PMID:27788243

  6. Maternal work and childhood nutritional status among the Purari, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Ulijaszek, Stanley J

    2003-01-01

    In traditional economies, body size, physical work capacity, subsistence productivity, and nutrition of adults may be interrelated, and one cross-generational effect of these relationships may operate through the household, influencing nutritional status of children. In this analysis, the relationships among adult body size, work productivity in terms of time spent making sago starch, dietary diversity, nutrient availability, and childhood nutritional status are examined in the Purari population of Papua New Guinea, a group largely dependent on the starchy staple palm sago, which is devoid of all nutrients apart from energy. Observations of work scheduling, household food and nutrient availability, and nutritional status were carried out for 16 women, their households, and their children. A multiple regression model of hours spent in sago making on a particular day with days spent in other subsistence activities showed a negative relationship with the number of days spent in sago-making and a positive relationship with the number of days spent fishing. The number of hours spent in sago-making on a particular day was also positively related to daily per capita availability of protein at the household level. This is not a function of maternal nutritional status, however, since there is no association between body size of adult females and the number of hours spent making sago on a particular day. Nor does the greater per capita protein availability at the household level in households where women spend longer on a particular day in sago-making result in improved childhood nutritional status. Since relationships among adult body size, work productivity, dietary diversity, nutrient availability, and childhood nutritional status are only partially demonstrated in this population, it may be that these linkages may only be important if physically arduous work is needed more consistently than is the case in the Purari delta.

  7. Situation Report--Australia, Burundi, Cambodia, Mexico, Montserrat, Nicaragua, Papua & New Guinea, Republic of Vietnam, Sabah, Sarawak, Sierra Leone, Tahiti, Tonga.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in fourteen foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Australia, Burundi, Cambodia, Mexico, Montserrat, Nicaragua, Papua and New Guines, Republic of Vietnam, Sabah, Sarawak, Sierra Leone, Tahiti (French Polynesia), and Tonga. Information is provided under two…

  8. Making the most of Papua New Guinea's biodiversity: Establishment of an integrated set of programs that link botanical survey with pharmacological assessment in "The Land of the Unexpected"

    PubMed

    Barrows, L R; Matainaho, T K; Ireland, C M; Miller, S; Carter, G T; Bugni, T; Rai, P; Gideon, O; Manoka, B; Piskaut, P; Banka, R; Kiapranis, R; Noro, J N; Pond, C D; Andjelic, C D; Koch, M; Harper, M K; Powan, E; Pole, A R; Jensen, J B

    2009-08-01

    An integrated and coordinated set of programs has been established to meet ICBG goals in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Here we give an overview of the PNG ICBG and focus on the key elements and major steps taken to establish a program necessary for the pharmacological assessment of botanicals and traditional medicines in PNG and, by extrapolation, in other developing countries.

  9. Cherax (Astaconephrops) pulcher, a new species of freshwater crayfish (Crustacea, Decapoda, Parastacidae) from the Kepala Burung (Vogelkop) Peninsula, Irian Jaya (West Papua), Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Lukhaup, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species, Cherax (Astaconephrops) pulcher sp. n., from Hoa Creek, close to the village Teminabuan in the southern-central part of the Kepala Burung (Vogelkop) Peninsula, West Papua, Indonesia, is described, figured and compared with the morphologically closest species, Cherax boesemani Lukhaup & Pekny, 2008. PMID:26019660

  10. Views on the Philosophy of Science among Undergraduate Science Students and Their Tutors at the University of Papua New Guinea: Origins, Progression, Enculturation and Destinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kichawen, Pongie; Swain, Julian; Monk, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Using a schedule originated by Nott and Wellington to explore science teachers' views on the philosophy of science, data were gathered at the University of Papua New Guinea. Similarities in response were established for successive first year intakes of science undergraduates (1999-2000). Students with experience in national high schools or…

  11. Understanding Learning and Teaching in Papua New Guinea: Elementary Teacher Trainers Engaged in Cultural Authorship in the Context of National Educational Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, Joanne M.; Farrell, Ann; Davis, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, Papua New Guinea (PNG) has pursued educational reform in elementary teacher education. Because elementary teachers and teacher education are central to the reform agenda, there is a need to gain empirical evidence about how PNG teacher trainers' understandings about learning and teaching impact on their practice. The study…

  12. Three cases of neonatal tetanus in Papua New Guinea lead to development of national action plan for maternal and neonatal tetanus elimination.

    PubMed

    Datta, Siddharta Sankar; Barnabas, Roland; Sitther, Adeline; Guarenti, Laura; Toikilik, Steven; Kariwiga, Grace; Sui, Gerard Pai

    2013-01-01

    Maternal or neonatal tetanus causes deaths primarily in Asia and Africa and is usually the result of poor hygiene during delivery. In 2011, three neonatal tetanus cases were investigated in Papua New Guinea, and all three cases were delivered at home by untrained assistants. The babies were normal at birth but subsequently developed spasms. A neonatal tetanus case must be viewed as a sentinel event indicating a failure of public health services including immunization, antenatal care and delivery care. The confirmation of these cases led to the drafting of the Papua New Guinea National Action Plan for Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination. This included three rounds of a tetanus toxoid supplementary immunization campaign targeting women of childbearing age (WBCA) and strengthening of other clean delivery practices. The first immunization round was conducted in April and May 2012, targeting 1.6 million WBCA and achieved coverage of 77%. The government of Papua New Guinea should ensure detailed investigation of all neonatal tetanus cases reported in the health information system and perform subprovincial analysis of tetanus toxoid coverage following completion of all three immunization rounds. Efforts also should be made to strengthen clean delivery practices to help eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus in Papua New Guinea.

  13. What Is Our Culture? What Is Our Language? Dialogue towards the Maintenance of Indigenous Culture and Language in Papua New Guinea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Yasuko; Lister, Ronah

    2003-01-01

    Three local elementary school teachers in the Milne Bay province of Papua New Guinea are trying to determine their real culture and language in order t devise better ways to maintain them. Portrays the experience of these teachers' dilemmas and frustrations, as well as their joys throughout the process of innovation. (Author/VWL)

  14. Seeing with Our Own Eyes, Speaking in Our Own Voices: An Experiment in Language, Culture and Education in Papua New Guinea. Discussion Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delpit, Lisa D.

    A recently implemented program in a decentralized provincial district of Papua New Guinea delays the entry of children into English-medium primary school for two years, during which time the children are taught literacy in a village-based school in their indigenous language, a pidgin, with the local customs and culture as the basis of the…

  15. Transformations in Kinship, Land Rights and Social Boundaries among the Wampar in Papua New Guinea and the Generative Agency of Children of Interethnic Marriages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schworer, Doris Bacalzo

    2012-01-01

    Among the Wampar in Papua New Guinea, children are active participants in the dynamics of kinship and identity construction. This article explores the transformative capabilities of children of interethnic marriages, particularly those with non-Wampar fathers. It examines children's notions of belonging and rights through their practices and…

  16. The Concept of Proportionality as a Predictor of Success at the University of Papua and New Guinea. E.R.U. Report 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John

    A main problem encountered by science and mathematics students at secondary and tertiary institutions throughout Papua New Guinea is that of dealing with ratio and proportion. The problem is most clearly defined in science, since this is the area in which the quantitative manipulation of physical variables is most frequently carried out. An…

  17. Health assessment of free-ranging and captive Matschie's tree kangaroos (Dendrolagus matschiei) in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Travis, Erika K; Watson, Patricia; Dabek, Lisa

    2012-03-01

    Medical evaluations were performed on free-ranging and captive Matschie's tree kangaroos (Dendrolagus matschiei) in Papua New Guinea. The health assessment included physical examination, morphometrics, cloacal swab; and blood, hair, and feces collection. Radio-collars were placed on free-ranging tree kangaroos to determine home range and forest habitat use. The free-ranging tree kangaroos were lightly anesthetized with tiletamine/zolazepam for the data collection. A total of nine free-ranging and seven captive tree kangaroos were evaluated; medical samples were collected from six and five animals, respectively. Results of physical examination, anesthetic monitoring, serum vitamin, mineral, trace nutrient, and electrolytes, whole blood heavy metal analysis, mycobacterial screening, and fecal examinations are presented. Free-ranging tree kangaroos had significantly lower values for beta carotene, copper, selenium, molybdenum, lead, and arsenic and significantly higher values for vitamin E than captive individuals. Cloacal swabs were all negative for Mycobacterium avium via polymerase chain reaction. Some free-ranging and captive individuals had positive coprologic exams revealing Eimeria spp. oocysts and strongyle spp. type ova. These are the first medical and anesthetic data published on Matschie's tree kangaroos from Papua New Guinea.

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation and mortality reduction after myocardial infarction: the emperor's new clothes? Evidence in favour of cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Robert; Doherty, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    This piece highlights the strength of evidence in favour of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and postulates that the emperor is indeed well dressed. The reason why a single negative trial, in the UK, has caused such hullabaloo in the literature and clinical practice is examined against overwhelming evidence from over 40 positive randomised controlled trials. The lack of motivation to promote lifestyle change and the role of patients in determining outcome is also explored. To conclude, we set the scene for the final chapter of this story by outlining what needs to be done to answer the question about the real-world effectiveness of CR.

  19. Historical and Linguistic Evidence in Favour of the Relexification Theory in the Formation of Creoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhoeve, Jan

    1973-01-01

    First draft of this paper presented at the Language and History in Africa Seminar of the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, England, February 17, 1972; research supported by a grant from the Netherlands Foundation for the Advancement of Tropical Research. (RS)

  20. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-06-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.) during a period of mild winter conditions and their responses to a sudden cold period. The state of the photosynthetic machinery in both periods was thus tested by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials similar to those under spring conditions. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). This change persisted for several weeks after the cold period despite the recovery of the temperature to the conditions