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Sample records for fazenda brasileiro gabbro

  1. Drilling to gabbro in intact ocean crust.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Douglas S; Teagle, Damon A H; Alt, Jeffrey C; Banerjee, Neil R; Umino, Susumu; Miyashita, Sumio; Acton, Gary D; Anma, Ryo; Barr, Samantha R; Belghoul, Akram; Carlut, Julie; Christie, David M; Coggon, Rosalind M; Cooper, Kari M; Cordier, Carole; Crispini, Laura; Durand, Sedelia Rodriguez; Einaudi, Florence; Galli, Laura; Gao, Yongjun; Geldmacher, Jörg; Gilbert, Lisa A; Hayman, Nicholas W; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Hirano, Nobuo; Holter, Sara; Ingle, Stephanie; Jiang, Shijun; Kalberkamp, Ulrich; Kerneklian, Marcie; Koepke, Jürgen; Laverne, Christine; Vasquez, Haroldo L Lledo; Maclennan, John; Morgan, Sally; Neo, Natsuki; Nichols, Holly J; Park, Sung-Hyun; Reichow, Marc K; Sakuyama, Tetsuya; Sano, Takashi; Sandwell, Rachel; Scheibner, Birgit; Smith-Duque, Chris E; Swift, Stephen A; Tartarotti, Paola; Tikku, Anahita A; Tominaga, Masako; Veloso, Eugenio A; Yamasaki, Toru; Yamazaki, Shusaku; Ziegler, Christa

    2006-05-19

    Sampling an intact sequence of oceanic crust through lavas, dikes, and gabbros is necessary to advance the understanding of the formation and evolution of crust formed at mid-ocean ridges, but it has been an elusive goal of scientific ocean drilling for decades. Recent drilling in the eastern Pacific Ocean in Hole 1256D reached gabbro within seismic layer 2, 1157 meters into crust formed at a superfast spreading rate. The gabbros are the crystallized melt lenses that formed beneath a mid-ocean ridge. The depth at which gabbro was reached confirms predictions extrapolated from seismic experiments at modern mid-ocean ridges: Melt lenses occur at shallower depths at faster spreading rates. The gabbros intrude metamorphosed sheeted dikes and have compositions similar to the overlying lavas, precluding formation of the cumulate lower oceanic crust from melt lenses so far penetrated by Hole 1256D.

  2. Drilling to gabbro in intact ocean crust.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Douglas S; Teagle, Damon A H; Alt, Jeffrey C; Banerjee, Neil R; Umino, Susumu; Miyashita, Sumio; Acton, Gary D; Anma, Ryo; Barr, Samantha R; Belghoul, Akram; Carlut, Julie; Christie, David M; Coggon, Rosalind M; Cooper, Kari M; Cordier, Carole; Crispini, Laura; Durand, Sedelia Rodriguez; Einaudi, Florence; Galli, Laura; Gao, Yongjun; Geldmacher, Jörg; Gilbert, Lisa A; Hayman, Nicholas W; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Hirano, Nobuo; Holter, Sara; Ingle, Stephanie; Jiang, Shijun; Kalberkamp, Ulrich; Kerneklian, Marcie; Koepke, Jürgen; Laverne, Christine; Vasquez, Haroldo L Lledo; Maclennan, John; Morgan, Sally; Neo, Natsuki; Nichols, Holly J; Park, Sung-Hyun; Reichow, Marc K; Sakuyama, Tetsuya; Sano, Takashi; Sandwell, Rachel; Scheibner, Birgit; Smith-Duque, Chris E; Swift, Stephen A; Tartarotti, Paola; Tikku, Anahita A; Tominaga, Masako; Veloso, Eugenio A; Yamasaki, Toru; Yamazaki, Shusaku; Ziegler, Christa

    2006-05-19

    Sampling an intact sequence of oceanic crust through lavas, dikes, and gabbros is necessary to advance the understanding of the formation and evolution of crust formed at mid-ocean ridges, but it has been an elusive goal of scientific ocean drilling for decades. Recent drilling in the eastern Pacific Ocean in Hole 1256D reached gabbro within seismic layer 2, 1157 meters into crust formed at a superfast spreading rate. The gabbros are the crystallized melt lenses that formed beneath a mid-ocean ridge. The depth at which gabbro was reached confirms predictions extrapolated from seismic experiments at modern mid-ocean ridges: Melt lenses occur at shallower depths at faster spreading rates. The gabbros intrude metamorphosed sheeted dikes and have compositions similar to the overlying lavas, precluding formation of the cumulate lower oceanic crust from melt lenses so far penetrated by Hole 1256D. PMID:16627698

  3. [The archeology of slavery on Jesuit fazendas: first research notes].

    PubMed

    Symanski, Luís Cláudio P; Gomes, Flávio

    2012-12-01

    These preliminary research notes present theoretical and methodological questions regarding a recently inaugurated investigation in historical archeology that intends to analyze daily life under slavery, demographic regimes, cultural practices, and so on. A survey of archeological sites on former 'senzalas' (slave quarters) and slave-owning fazendas in the Paraíba Valley and northern part of the state of Rio de Janeiro is currently in progress. With the cooperation of historians, archeologists, and anthropologists, records of the material culture of slave populations, which originally comprised indigenes and later Africans, are being located at excavations underway on the fazenda that is part of the Jesuit school in Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro, first run by the clergy and later by members of the laity in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. PMID:23370111

  4. [The archeology of slavery on Jesuit fazendas: first research notes].

    PubMed

    Symanski, Luís Cláudio P; Gomes, Flávio

    2012-12-01

    These preliminary research notes present theoretical and methodological questions regarding a recently inaugurated investigation in historical archeology that intends to analyze daily life under slavery, demographic regimes, cultural practices, and so on. A survey of archeological sites on former 'senzalas' (slave quarters) and slave-owning fazendas in the Paraíba Valley and northern part of the state of Rio de Janeiro is currently in progress. With the cooperation of historians, archeologists, and anthropologists, records of the material culture of slave populations, which originally comprised indigenes and later Africans, are being located at excavations underway on the fazenda that is part of the Jesuit school in Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro, first run by the clergy and later by members of the laity in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.

  5. Shock wave properties of anorthosite and gabbro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Hugoniot data on San Gabriel anorthosite and San Marcos gabbro to 11 GPA are presented. Release paths in the stress-density plane and sound velocities are reported as determined from particl velocity data. Electrical interference effects precluded the determination of accurate release paths for the gabbro. Because of the loss of shear strength in the shocked state, the plastic behavior exhibited by anorthosite indicates that calculations of energy partitioning due to impact onto planetary surfaces based on elastic-plastic models may underestimate the amount of internal energy deposited in the impacted surface material.

  6. The Amphiolite Layers In The Cumulate Gabbros, (Northern-Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkan, Mutlu; Faruk Çelik, Ömer; Altıntaş, İsmail Emir; Sherlock, Sarah; Chelle-Michou, Cyril; Marzoli, Andrea; Ulianov, Alexey; Melih Çörtük, Rahmi; Topuz, Gültekin

    2016-04-01

    The Early-Middle Jurassic SSZ type dismembered ophiolite sequence, which is remnants of the Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, crop out in the accretionary complex around Tokat-Çamlıbel region (Northern Turkey). The main lithology of the ophiolite sequence are cumulate gabbros, isotropic gabbros and basalts. The amphibolite layers, which their thickness are up to 2 m, are observed in the cumulate gabbros. In this study, we aim to discuss a possible formation mechanism of the amphibolitic rocks in the cumulate gabbros, based on the field, mineralogical, geochemical and geochronological data. The cumulate gabbros (olivine-gabbro, gabbro-norite and gabbro) have generally well developed magmatic layers and they show cumulate texture. They are cross cut by pegmatite gabbros, dolerites and plagiogranite dikes. In terms of the mechanism of formation, the amphibolite layers in the cumulate gabbros are different from dolerite, pegmatite gabbro and plagiogranite dikes crosscutting the cumulate gabbros. Although the cumulate gabbros, the mafic and felsic dikes have not undergone any metamorphism (except the hydrothermal metamorphism), the amphibolite layers show well developed foliation and banded structure. Moreover, field and petrographic observations showed that the amphibolitic rocks were highly subjected to shearing. The amphibolitic rocks are mainly composed of magnesio-hornblende + plagioclase (andesine), ± biotite and opaque minerals and they exhibit nematoblastic texture. The amphibolite layers in the cumulate gabbros are crosscut by the plagiogranite dikes. The plagiogranites consist mainly of quartz, plagioclase, biotite and opaque minerals and they show granular texture. Undulose extinction and sub-grain formation in quartz minerals indicate to the presence of deformation phase affecting the plagiogranite dikes. LA-ICP-MS dating on zircon from plagiogranite dikes which is cross-cutting of the amphibolite layers, yielded Middle Jurassic ages. 40Ar/39Ar dating of

  7. Particle velocity experiments in anorthosite and gabbro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Shock wave experiments were conducted in San Gabriel anorthosite and San Marcos gabbra 10 11 GPa using a 40 mm-borne propellant gun. Particle velocities were measured directly at several points in each target by means of electromagnetic gauges. Hugoniot states were calculated by determining shock-transit time from the gauge records. Sound speeds indicate a loss of shear strength upon sock compression for both rocks, with the strength loss persisting upon release to zero stress om the anorthosite. Stress-density release paths in the anorthosite indicate possible transformation of albite to jadeite + (quartz or coesite), with the amount of material transformed increasing as a function of shock stress. Electrical interferene effects in the gabbro precluded the determination of accurate release paths for the rock.

  8. Impact cratering and spall failure at gabbro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.; Boslough, M. B.

    1983-01-01

    Both hypervelocity impact and dynamic spall experiments were carried out on a series of well-indurated samples of gabbro. The impact experiments carried out with 0.04 to 0.2g, 5-6 km/sec projectiles produced deci-centimeter-sized craters and demonstrated crater efficiencies of 6/10 to the - 9 g/erg, and order of magnitude greater than in metal and some two to three times that of previous experiments on less strong igneous rocks. Most of the crater volume (some 60 to 80%) is due to spall failure. Distribution of cumulative fragment number, as a function of mass of fragments with masses greater than 0.1 gram yield values of b = d(log10N sub f)dlog10(m)of -0.5 to -0.6, where N sub f is the cumulate number of fragments and m is the mass of fragments. These values are in agreement or slightly higher than those obtained for less strong rocks and indicate that a large fraction of the ejectra resides in a few large fragments.

  9. Impact cratering and spall failure of gabbro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.; Boslough, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    Both hypervelocity impact and dynamic spall experiments were carried out on a series of well-indurated samples of gabbro. The impact experiments carried out with 0.04 to 0.2 g, 5-6 km/sec projectiles produced deci-centimeter-sized craters and demonstrated crater efficiencies of 6/10 to the -9 g/erg, and order of magnitude greater than in metal and some two to three times that of previous experiments on less strong igneous rocks. Most of the crater volume (some 60 to 80 percent) is due to spall failure. Distribution of cumulative fragment number, as a function of mass of fragments with masses greater than 0.1 gram yield values of b = d(log10N sub f)dlog10(m) of -0.5 to -0.6, where N sub f is the cumulate number of fragments and m is the mass of fragments. These values are in agreement or slightly higher than those obtained for less strong rocks and indicate that a large fraction of the ejecta resides in a few large fragments.

  10. Gabbro microstructure and crystallography from Pito Deep: Evidence for Gabbro Glacier Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T. C.; Cheadle, M. J.; John, B. E.; Coogan, L. A.; Gee, J. S.; Karson, J.; Swapp, S.

    2012-12-01

    The processes of gabbroic lower ocean crust accretion at fast spreading ridges remain enigmatic; a key constraint, however, is the orientation and fabric of the gabbros themselves. Here we present a study of the microstructure and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of 23 gabbros from the upper 900m of fast-spread lower crust formed at the East Pacific Rise and exposed at the Pito Deep Rift. Samples include gabbros, olivine gabbros, troctolites, and one anorthosite; all with magmatic fabrics with varying strengths of mineral layering/foliation. Thin sections were cut parallel and perpendicular to observable mineral foliations in order to obtain accurate mineral shape preferred orientations (SPO) via hand tracing using an optical microscope. CPO was determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Eight oriented samples (3 using GeoCompass, and 5 from video footage) reveal a sub-vertical mineral foliation sub-parallel to the sheeted dikes/ridge axis from 335-863 meters below the gabbro-sheeted dike transition (mbsdt). Two GeoCompass-oriented samples were rotated to their original orientations using magnetic remanence vectors, and give CPO lineations dipping at 30° & 60° within the foliation plane. Petrographic inspection shows that crystal-plastic deformation in the form of deformation twins in plagioclase and undulose extinction /sub-grain development in olivine, is rare in the upper 72m, becomes noticeable at 177mbsdt, and is very common below 662mbsdt. Texturally equilibrated plagioclase with 120° triple junctions is common in the deepest samples. Mean 2D plagioclase axial ratios decrease with depth, indicating that plagioclase crystals become more equant, and likely equilibrated, deeper in the section. One sample at 72mbsdt shows relatively strong plagioclase alignment (Alignment Factor [AF] = 44), however, the deeper samples show a systematic increase in AF from a near random value of 6 at 248mbsdt, to an AF of 35 at 863mbsdt. The plagioclase

  11. The Fazenda Largo off-craton kimberlites of Piauí State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminsky, Felix V.; Sablukov, Sergei M.; Sablukova, Ludmila I.; Zakharchenko, Olga D.

    2009-10-01

    In the late 1990s, the Fazenda Largo kimberlite cluster was discovered in the Piauí State of Brazil. As with earlier known kimberlites in this area - Redondão, Santa Filomena-Bom Jesus (Gilbues) and Picos - this cluster is located within the Palaeozoic Parnaiba Sedimentary Basin that separates the São Francisco and the Amazonian Precambrian cratons. Locations of kimberlites are controlled by the 'Transbrasiliano Lineament'. The Fazenda Largo kimberlites are intensely weathered, almost completely altered rocks with a fine-grained clastic structure, and contain variable amounts of terrigene admixture (quartz sand). These rocks represent near-surface volcano-sedimentary deposits of the crater parts of kimberlite pipes. By petrographic, mineralogical and chemical features, the Fazenda Largo kimberlites are similar to average kimberlite. The composition of the deep-seated material in the Fazenda Largo kimberlites is quite diverse: among mantle microxenoliths are amphibolitised pyrope peridotites, garnetised spinel peridotites, ilmenite peridotites, chromian spinel + chromian diopside + pyrope intergrowths, and large xenoliths of pyrope dunite. High-pressure minerals are predominantly of the ultramafic suite, Cr-association minerals (purplish-red and violet pyrope, chromian spinel, chromian diopside, Cr-pargasite and orthopyroxene). The Ti-association minerals of the ultramafic suite (picroilmenite and orange pyrope), as well as rare grains of orange pyrope-almandine of the eclogite association, are subordinate. Kimberlites from all four pipes contain rare grains of G10 pyrope of the diamond association, but chromian spinel of the diamond association was not encountered. By their tectonic position, by geochemical characteristics, and by the composition of kimberlite indicator minerals, the Fazenda Largo kimberlites, like the others of such type, are unlikely to be economic.

  12. Magnetic anisotropy and fabric of some progressively deformed ophiolitic gabbros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.-J.; Hedley, I. G.; Steen, D.; Tinkler, C.; Vuagnat, M.

    1981-01-01

    The ophiolites, considered remnants of oceanic seafloor, provide a fruitful source of information on the physical and chemical behavior of the deeper uncored lithosphere. A study of the gabbros in a rather well-preserved ophiolite from the western Alps (Montgenèvre, France) shows strong evidence for intraoceanic plate deformation. To characterize the different steps of deformation observed in the outcrops, a magnetic fabric study was conducted using the anisotropy of initial magnetic susceptibility (Aims) method. The main conclusions are (1) the Aims is controlled by the paramagnetic ferromagnesian minerals, such as hornblende, resulting from the ocean floor metamorphism close to the spreading ridge (partial amphibolitization) and (2) the magnetic lineation and foliation of the gabbros show a deformation path with increasing strain. A good correspondence between petrofabric and magnetic anisotropies is observed; both suggest that the deformation mechanism was simple shear.

  13. On the origin of rhythmic layering in layered gabbros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmic layering of silicates (plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine), ilmenite and magnitite is a common feature in mafic-ultramafic intrusions. The origin of rhythmic layering has been hotly debated in the literatures. Proposed mechanisms include gravity differentiation, double-diffusive convection, oscillatory crystallization of magma, repeated injection and supplement of magma, etc. Here we provide detailed FTIR and EBSD studies on the water content and deformation microstructure of gabbros from the Panzhihua intrusion and experimentally deformed synthetic gabrros and magnetite aggregates with a volume ratio of 6:4. The FTIR analyses revealed a significant amount of hydroxyls in both clinopyroxene (411-775 ppm) and plagioclase (328-716 ppm), suggesting a high water content mantle plume source. The EBSD analyses show similar fabrics in constitutent minerals of natural and experimental specimens: a weak clinopyroxene fabric of (100) parallel to foliation and [001] parallel to lineation; a strong plagioclase fabric of (010) parallel to foliation and [100] parallel to lineation, a weak ilmenite fabric of (001) parallel to foliation and [hk0] parallel to lieantion; and a near random magnitite fabric. There is an obvious rhythmic layering in sheared gabrros and magnetite aggregates similar to natural observations. Our results revealed strong layer-parallel shearing deformation during the formation of the Panxi layered intructions. There is a significant strength contrast between gabbro and Fe-Ti oxides. We propose that the formation of the rhythmic layering in mafic-ultramafic intrusions is caused mainly by rheological stratification of Fe-Ti oxides and gabbros.

  14. Mass balance during gabbro-amphibolite transition, Bamble Sector, Norway: implications for petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the gabbros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alirezaei, Saeed; Cameron, Eion M.

    2002-01-01

    Mafic intrusions of mid-Proterozoic ages are widespread in the Bamble Sector, southern Norway, and elsewhere in the Baltic Shield. They vary from subordinate ultramafic rocks to troctolitic gabbros, olivine-ferrogabbro, olivine-free gabbros and norites. Ni-Cu sulfide ores locally occur in the marginal parts of the intrusions. Post-solidus retrograde reactions under prolonged high P- T conditions led to serial changes from corona development around ferromagnesian minerals, to replacement of olivine and pyroxenes by hornblende and to the formation of amphibolites. Variations of elements during the gabbro-amphibolite transformation are evaluated using a statistical approach that takes into consideration both initial magmatic differentiation effects, and metasomatic changes imprinted during metamorphism. This indicates that rare earth elements (REE), high field strength elements (HFSE), and transition metals were immobile. Large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and halogens were significantly introduced into the amphibolites. Sulfur, Se, Cu, Au, and As remained constant, or locally remobilized and reprecipitated; Sb was enriched in the amphibolites. The Bamble gabbros are tholeiitic, enriched in Fe (Mg#=35-70); on MORB-normalized plots, they show features typical of destructive margins setting (i.e. enriched LILE and LREE, low Th abundance, and Nb trough). They are further characterized by low Ce/Yb ratios (Ce/Yb<10) and nearly flat chondrite-normalized REE patterns (La N/Yb N=1-2). The absence of major Mg-rich cumulates, such as peridotites, argues against fractional crystallization as the main cause of the enrichment in LILE-LREE. Lack of crustal contamination is shown by the REE patterns as well as radiogenic and stable isotope data [Precambrian Research 64 (1993) 403; Chemical Geology 181/1-4 (2001) 23]. A model consistent with the geochemical data favors an early fractionation of olivine in a source area that had been metasomatized by LILE-LREE bearing fluids.

  15. Fluid infiltration of the Tudor Gabbro during regional metamorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.R.; Valley, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Tudor Gabbro (TG), an ovate body (4 x 9 km) 40 km SE of Bancroft. Ontario, was metamorphosed to upper greenschist facies along with surrounding sediments and volcanics. Allen (1976) delineated concentric isograds around the gabbro, including +sphene, +tremolite (to 1.5 km), +tremolite + clinozoisite, +diopside (approx. 120 m), and +garnet (approx. 80 m). Metamorphic conditions are inferred to be 490+/-50/sup 0/C, 5 kb with no thermal gradient. Allen suggested that H/sub 2/O infiltration of the marble and calc-schist accounts for the isograds. The gabbro mineralogy of titanaugite, andesine to labradorite, and minor hornblende is extensively recrystallized to albite and/or oligoclase + actinolite + epidote + ilmenite + calcite (up to 4 wt%) +/- biotite +/- chlorite +/- sphene +/- scapolite. Isotopic analyses of calcite from 39 TG samples show delta/sup 18/O = 9.4 to 16.6 and delta/sup 13/C = -1.9 to 3.4. Bulk silicate delta/sup 18/O of TG range from 7.1 to 10.2. Calcites in metasediment have delta/sup 18/O = 18.1 to 25.3 and delta/sup 13/C = 1.3 to 5.6. Two whole rock silicate analyses of a skarn developed locally at the contact show intermediate delta/sup 18/O of 16.2 and 17.3. The stability of Czo component in epidote requires H/sub 2/O-rich fluids. The delta/sup 13/C of TG calcites average +0.7 nearly identical to the average of 178 carbonates from Grenville marbles (+1.0), showing that metasediment-derived CO/sub 2/ pervasively infiltrated the TG. The infiltration of H/sub 2/O into both the TG and the metasediment suggests that H/sub 2/O-rich fluids migrated upward along the contact.

  16. Petrology and mineralogy of dredged gabbro from Gettysburg Bank, eastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prichard, H. M.; Cann, J. R.

    1982-04-01

    Gabbros have been dredged from Gettysburg Bank, 110 km west of Portugal on the Azores/Gibraltar fracture zone. Primary minerals in olivine, pyroxene and brown hornblende gabbros are partially replaced by metamorphic minerals. Igneous textures are inhomogeneously overprinted by a granular polyhedral deformation and a cataclastic deformation. Amphiboles show characteristics which indicate a transition from crystallisation in a magma chamber to formation of amphibole in solid gabbro under metasomatic conditions. Of the amphiboles analysed, chlorine was present in the green amphiboles but below 0.05% in the brown suggesting the penetration of sea water after the formation of the brown amphibole but during the formation of the green.

  17. Contribution of oceanic gabbros to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kikawa, E; Ozawa, K

    1992-10-30

    The contribution of oceanic gabbros, representative rocks for layer 3 of the oceanic crust, to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies has been controversial because of the large variation in magnetic properties. Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 118 contains a continuous 500.7-meter section of oceanic gabbro that allows the relations between magnetization and petrologic characteristics, such as the degree of metamorphism and the magmatic evolution, to be clarified. The data suggest that oceanic gabbros, together with the effects of metamorphism and of magmatic evolution, account for a significant part of the marine magnetic anomalies.

  18. Contribution of oceanic gabbros to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kikawa, E; Ozawa, K

    1992-10-30

    The contribution of oceanic gabbros, representative rocks for layer 3 of the oceanic crust, to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies has been controversial because of the large variation in magnetic properties. Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 118 contains a continuous 500.7-meter section of oceanic gabbro that allows the relations between magnetization and petrologic characteristics, such as the degree of metamorphism and the magmatic evolution, to be clarified. The data suggest that oceanic gabbros, together with the effects of metamorphism and of magmatic evolution, account for a significant part of the marine magnetic anomalies. PMID:17777035

  19. Physical, chemical, and thermal interactions in the Pleasant Bay Layered Gabbro-Diorite Intrusion, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, K.; Algeo, J.

    2012-12-01

    The approximately 3 km thick Pleasant Bay Layered Intrusion (PBLI) is interpreted to have formed (420 Ma) by repeated intrusions of gabbroic magma into a partly solidified dioritic magma chamber (Wiebe, 1993; Waight et. al., 2001) during the earliest stage of the Acadian orogeny (Tucker et. al., 2001). Typical field relationships in the PBLI include gradational gabbro-diorite layers of variable thicknesses with pipes of silicic composition intruding along the chilled lower contacts of gabbroic layers, chilled gabbroic blobs encased within diorite, and composite dikes consisting of intermingled gabbro blobs of rounded and/or angular geometries within a dioritic or granitic matrix. Detailed studies of similar relationships in the nearby Isle au Haut Igneous Complex (IHIC) have indicated that where diorite underlies gabbro, residual silicic melt was extracted from the underlying partly solidified diorite by compaction and migrated upwards to form a thin layer of buoyant melt that underwent a Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) type instability producing the silicic pipes which were subsequently arrested by solidification of the overlying gabbro (Chapman & Rhodes, 1992; Patwardhan & Marsh, 2011). Whereas in the IHIC pipes typically are 11-12 cm in diameter and spaced ~30 cm apart, instability features in the PBLI occur at varying scales with pipe diameters commonly ranging from 4 to 100 cm and pipe spacing varying between 20 to 150 cm. Strong compositional differences between the gabbro (~48 wt.% SiO2), diorite (~57 wt.% SiO2), and pipes (~66 wt.% SiO2) correspond to significant differences in estimated density, liquid viscosity, and temperature (near liquidus gabbro: 2.68 g/cm3, 102.3 poise, 1210 oC, partly crystallized diorite: 2.61 g/cm3, 990 oC, and silicic melt derived from partly crystallized diorite: 2.36 g/cm3, 105 poise). The thickness of the buoyant silicic layer and the ascent rate of the pipes emanating from this layer are calculated using estimated viscosity ratios and

  20. Spectral Effects of Hypervelocity Impact on Powdered Bushveldt Gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Beth Ellen; Ockert-Bell, M.; Cintala, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    Evidence of the role of impact in sculpting the histories of asteroids and other small bodies in the solar system mounts as each new object is examined by spacecraft. Not only have these objects attained their current dimensions by collisional disruption of larger bodies, but the majority of their subsequent evolution also can be attributed to impact. This investigation simulates the effects that hypervelocity impact may have on the asteroid regolith by exploring first the effect on terrestrial samples. South African Bushveldt Gabbro, a reasonable planetary analogue, was sieved to include grain sizes between 125 and 250 µm contained in a polyethylene holder and retained by a thin, microscope-slide cover; and impacted by a ceramic sphere (3.18-mm in diameter) at 5.7 km/s. The light-gas gun chamber and area up range of the target were lined with aluminum foil to collect ejecta. After the shot, all material was collected from the chamber. The spectra were measured at RELAB using the Bi-directional spectrometer (0.32 - 2.6 µm). Among the initial results are distinct changes in spectral slopes in the visible wavelengths from 0.4 to 0.7 microns, and reddening in the near-infrared from 1.1 to 2.5 microns. Absorption bands at 1 and 2 microns were not observed to change as a result of impact.

  1. Basalts and gabbros from Mare Crisium - Evidence for extreme fractional crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, F.; Taylor, L. A.; Jin, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Petrographic and electron microprobe techniques were used to examine igneous fragments in Luna 24 samples 24088 and 24105. It is the complex chemistry of the pyroxenes that distinguishes the different rock types. Basaltic pyroxenes exhibit an Fe-enrichment trend; the evolutionary trends are more complex in the gabbros, with enrichments in both Fe and Ti and a depletion in Cr. These chemical evolutionary trends are displayed by a progressive variation in rock types from Mg-rich olivine-gabbro to olivine-gabbro, and to ferrogabbro and ferrotroctolite. The low TiO2 content of the primary melt, possibly represented by the least-evolved Mg-rich olivine-gabbro, retarded the formation of early ilmenite and spinel, such that 'Fenner Trend' Fe enrichment occurred. The ferrotroctolite is probably the end product of chemical evolution by extreme fractional crystallization, controlled primarily by olivine and pyroxene crystallization.

  2. Gabbro-peridotite Interaction in the Northern Cache Creek Composite Terrane Ophiolite, British Columbia and Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorevski, A.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Cache Creek composite terrane comprises a thrust stack of chert, limestone, siltstone, basalt, gabbro and ultramafic complexes ranging in age from Mississippian to Triassic. Fields studies and geochemical investigations indicate that ophiolitic mafic-ultramafic complexes formed in a supra-subduction zone setting. Ophiolitic rocks in the southeast form a structurally disrupted Penrose-type ophiolite; however, northwestern ophiolitic rocks generally lack lower and middle crust in most sections, exhibit a direct contact between supracrustal and mantle sections and locally contain ophicalcites suggesting that supracrustal rocks were structurally emplaced over mantle along extensional detachment(s). Mantle peridotite in the footwall of the detachment is extensively intruded by vari-textured, fine-grained to pegmatitic gabbro sills, dykes and stocks. These gabbro intrusions are locally boudinaged within fresh peridotite suggesting that the host mantle was rapidly exhumed prior to emplacement of the gabbro. Intrusive relationships between gabbro and variably serpentinized mantle peridotite are observed throughout the northern Cache Creek terrane (>300 km) suggesting a presence of a regional-scale Middle Triassic ocean-core complex. Overall, these data indicate that parts of the northern Cache Creek terrane formed in a setting analogous to backarc ocean core complexes such as the Godzilla Megamullion in the Parece Vela backarc basin, western Pacific.

  3. A pristine eucrite-like gabbro from Descartes and its exotic kindred

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, U. B.; Warren, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    A coarse-grained plagioclase-pyroxene gabbro (61224,6) with a cumulate texture suggestive of a slowly cooled plutonic rock was recovered from the 4-10 mm fraction of an Apollo 16 soil. The rock is uncommonly poor in feldspar and rich in Na for a lunar highlands lithology. Trace element analyses show extremely low siderophile element concentrations which confirm the pristine character indicated by the texture. The composition of 61224,6 is compared with those of 3 other pristine, exceptionally mafic, nonmare gabbros and of certain eucrites. 61224,6 and the three other gabbros have notable chemical differences but share relatively high ratios of Ti/Sm and Sc/Sm which suggest a possible genetic relationship. We conclude that 61224,6 represents a Na-rich cumulate from a layered intrusion within the highlands crust.

  4. Stream water chemistry in a gabbro/granite watershed, Quabbin reservation, central Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.B. Jr.; Gallant, J.; Christensen, C.; Mengason, M. . School of Natural Science)

    1993-03-01

    While monitoring pH-alkalinity relationships in tributaries of the Quabbin Reservoir, the authors have discovered an anomalous brook whose waters become progressively more acidic downstream. The watershed's bedrock is roughly half Prescott hornblende gabbro and half Cooleyville granitic gneiss with the contact crossing the watershed diagonally; gabbroic bedrock dominates the stream's upper reaches. Outcrop density and topography suggest relatively thin till cover (< [approximately]2m). All parts of the stream get some contribution from both bedrock types, through gabbro contribution diminishes smoothly downstream. Springs in gabbro (pH [approximately]7, alk 20--30mg/1, cond [approximately]50[mu]mho) and in granite (pH [approximately]5, alk 2--6 mg/1, cond [approximately]15[mu]mho) retain these characteristics through dry and wet seasons; the stream's response to high rain events is more complex and can be used to estimate where surface water and groundwater each make their greatest contributions. Each point along the brook can be assigned a value of %gabbro characterizing the bedrock proportions in the watershed upstream of it; plots of major cations, alkalinity and conductivity vs. %gabbro show strong positive correlation. Two-week leaching experiments (initial pH = 4) with A, B and C soil horizons from both sides of the contact show greatest rises (to pH = 5.5) in gabbro soils distant from the contact, and progressively smaller increases crossing the contact to granite soils (pH rises to 4.5). The data suggest that bedrock and soil chemistry are primarily responsible for stream chemistry; topography and residence time here play secondary roles.

  5. Shock wave properties of anorthosite and gabbro. [to model hypervelocity impact cratering on planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Huyoniot data on San Gabriel anorthosite and San Marcos gabbro to 11 GPA are presented. Release paths in the stress-density plane and sound velocities are reported as determined from partial velocity data. Electrical interference effects precluded the determination of accurate release paths for the gabbro. Because of the loss of shear strength in the shocked state, the plastic behavior exhibited by anorthosite indicates that calculations of energy partitioning due to impact onto planetary surfaces based on elastic-plastic models may underestimate the amount of internal energy deposited in the impacted surface material.

  6. Comparison of Lunar Basalts and Gabbros with those of the Terrestrial Ocean Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Initial studies of lunar samples returned from the Apollo and Luna missions took place before rocks of the Earth's lower ocean crust, chiefly varieties of gabbro cumulates, were widely known or understood. Continuing exploration of the ocean crust invites some new comparisons. When volcanic rocks and glass from Apollo 11 and 17 were discovered to have very high TiO2 contents (8-14%), nothing comparable was known from Earth. The high-TiO2 lunar samples were soon described as primary melts derived from considerable depths in the lunar mantle. Other lunar samples have only very low TiO2 contents (~0.2%) and very low concentrations of highly incompatible elements such as Zr and Sr. Today, dredging and drilling results indicate that oxide gabbros rich in magmatic oxides and sulfides and with up to 12% TiO2 comprise a significant percentage of the gabbroic portion of the ocean crust especially at slowly spreading ridges. These are very late stage differentiates, and are commonly juxtaposed by high-temperature deformation processes with more primitive olivine gabbros and troctolites having only ~0.2% TiO2 and low concentrations of Zr and other incompatible elements. The rocks are mainly adcumulates, with very low concentrations of incompatible elements set by proportions of cumulus minerals, and with little contribution from the liquids that produced them. In addition, some lunar gabbros with highly calcic plagioclase (~An93-98) are similar to gabbros and troctolites found in island arcs. All of these similarities suggest that very few lunar basaltic rocks are pristine; instead they all could be nearly complete shock fusion products produced by meteorite impact into a diverse assemblage of lunar gabbros that included both low- and high-TiO2 gabbroic facies. On this hypothesis, no lunar basalt is a primary melt derived from the Moon's mantle. Although magmatic environments on the ancient Moon and in the modern ocean crust were different in important ways, the general

  7. Paleoproterozoic gabbro-diorite-granite magmatism of the Batomga Rise (NE Aldan Shield): Sm-Nd isotope geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, V. K.; Bogomolov, E. S.; Glebovitskii, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    The geochemical similarity and almost simultaneous (2055-2060 Ma) formation of Utakachan gabbro-amphibolite, Jagdakin granodiorite-diorite, Khoyunda granitoid, and Tygymyt leucogranite complexes, which inruded metamorphic formations of the Batomga Group are evidence of their formaton from unified magmatic source. All this makes it possibble to combine aforementioned complexes into the unified Early Proterozoic diferentiated gabbro-diorite-granite complex.

  8. Lherzolite, anorthosite, gabbro, and basalt dredged from the Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, C.G.; Fisher, R.L.

    1969-01-01

    The Central Indian Ridge is mantled with flows of low-potassium basalt of uniform composition. Gabbro, anorthosite, and garnet-bearing lherzolite are exposed in cross fractures, and lherzolite is the bedrock at the center of the ridge. The lherzolites are upper-mantle rock exposed by faulting.

  9. Lherzolite, anorthosite, gabbro, and basalt dredged from the mid-Indian ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Fisher, R L

    1969-11-28

    The Central Indian Ridge is mantled with flows of low-potassium basalt of uniform composition. Gabbro, anorthosite, and garnet-bearing lherzolite are exposed in cross fractures, and lherzolite is the bedrock at the center of the ridge. The Iherzolites are upper-mantle rock exposed by faulting.

  10. Lherzolite, anorthosite, gabbro, and basalt dredged from the mid-Indian ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Fisher, R L

    1969-11-28

    The Central Indian Ridge is mantled with flows of low-potassium basalt of uniform composition. Gabbro, anorthosite, and garnet-bearing lherzolite are exposed in cross fractures, and lherzolite is the bedrock at the center of the ridge. The Iherzolites are upper-mantle rock exposed by faulting. PMID:17775570

  11. Iodp Exp 345: Orthopyroxene Omnipresent in Layered Gabbros from the Hess Deep, EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, J.; Abe, N.; Akizawa, N.; Falloon, T.; Hoshide, T.; Jean, M. M.; Maeda, J.; Snow, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Drilling studies of the lower oceanic crust in the framework of the IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) have the objective of understanding the construction processes of the ocean crust. Currently, much attention is focused on the relatively inaccessible fast spreading lower ocean crust (IODP Hole 1256D, ODP Hole 894G, this study). At the Hess Deep Rift, propagation of the Cocos Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust generates extensive exposures of the plutonic lower crust. IODP Exp. 345 drilled a dismembered section of lower crust at ~4850 m water depth under challenging borehole conditions. We drilled three main holes between 35-110 mbsf with ~30% recovery, returning cores relevant to the igneous evolution of the lower crust. The drilled cores show spectacular modal and/or grain size layering present in >50% of the recovered core. Typical rocks are primitive (Mg# 75-89) olivine gabbro, troctolitic gabbro and olivine gabbronorite. A very significant first-order observation from this expedition is that orthopyroxene was found as an abundant phase in many of the layered primitive gabbroic rocks. This was unexpected, since experiments on the liquid line of descent of MORB show that orthopyroxene always crystallizes late, at low melt fractions, and commonly interstitially. Recovered rocks at Site U1415, however, show that orthopyroxene crystallization is common: both as an interstitial phase in primitive troctolite (crystallization even before clinopyroxene), as a cumulus phase coexisting with clinopyroxene in primitive olivine gabbros and as monomineralic bands in primitive gabbros of the Multitextured Layered Gabbro series in Hole U1415P. None of these features are commonly observed in ocean floor gabbros. The discovery of orthopyroxene in primitive lithologies in high quantities in the lower crustal section at Hess Deep is a novel finding, although the presence of orthopyroxene in one primitive gabbro sample from Hess Deep was reported

  12. Paleomagnetism of the Middle Proterozoic Electra Lake Gabbro, Needle Mountains, southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Geissman, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Electra Lake Gabbro is a small 1.435 Ga pluton that intrudes 1.7 to 1.6 Ga gneisses and schists of the Needle Mountains in southwestern Colorado. Paleomagnetic samples were collected from the main phases of the gabbro, diabase dikes, granite, and alaskite dikes that cut the gabbro and from a partially melted zone in gneiss along the southern margin of the pluton. Gabbro, diabase, and some melt zone samples have a single-polarity characteristic magnetization of northeast declination (D) and moderate negative inclination (I). Demagnetization behavior and rock magnetic characteristics indicate that the remanence is carried by nearly pure magnetite. After correction for the minor west dip of overlying Paleozoic strata, we obtain a mean direction of D = 32.1??, I = -41.9?? (k = 94, ??95 = 3.3??, N = 21 sites) and a paleomagnetic pole at 21.1?? S, 221.1 ??E, (K= 89, A95 = 3.4??). This pole is similar to poles from the Middle Proterozoic Belt Supergroup but is located at a higher southerly latitude than poles from other 1.47-1.44 Ga plutons from North America, most of which plot at equatorial latitudes. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear but may result from a combination of factors, including unrecognized tilting of the gabbro, the failure of this relatively small pluton to fully average paleosecular variation, and uncertainties in the overall reliability of other 1.5-1.4 Ga poles of the North American apparent polar wander path.

  13. Formation of anorthosite-Gabbro rhythmic phase layering: an example at North Arm Mountain, Bay of Isands ophiolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.; Elthon, D.

    1990-01-01

    Rhythmically layered anorthosite and gabbro are exposed in a 4-10-m thick interval at the base of the layered gabbro unit on North Arm Mountain, one of four massifs that compose the Bay of Islands ophiolite, Newfoundland. The rhythmically layered interval is sandwiched between thick layers of adcumulate to orthocumulate uniform gabbro. Calculated fractional crystallization paths and correlated cryptic variation patterns suggest that uniform and rhythmically layered gabbros represent 20-30% in situ crystallization of two distinct magma batches, one more evolved and the other more primitive. When the more primitive magma entered the crystallization site of the NA300-301 gabbros, it is estimated to have been ~40??C hotter than the resident evolved magma, and may have been chilled by contact with a magma chamber margin composed of uniform gabbro. In this model, chilling caused the liquid to become supercooled with respect to plagioclase nucleation temperatures, resulting in crystallization of gabbro deficient in plagioclase relative to equilibrium cotectic proportions. Subtraction of a plagioclase-poor melagabbro enriched the liquid in normative plagioclase, which in turn led to crystallization of an anorthosite layer. -from Authors

  14. Effect of Pressure and Stress on Water Transport in Intact and Fractured Gabbro and Granite

    SciTech Connect

    Trimmer, D.; Bonner, B.; Heard, H.C.; Duba, A.

    1980-12-10

    New laboratory data are reported on the effect of confining pressure (to 60 MPa), pore-water pressure (to 30 MPa), and stress difference (to 0.88 of the fracture stress) on permeability of intact and fractured White Lake gneissic granite. Westerly granite, and Creighton gabbro. Permeabilities as low as 10/sup -24/ m/sup 2/ (10/sup -2/ darcy) have been measured using a transient technique. Fracture displacement, electrical conductance, compressional velocity, and pulse amplitude are determined simultaneously. The loads applied to the 0.15-m-diameter by 0.28-m-length test sample are controlled automatically, and most data are taken by microprocessor. Tests on the intact gneissic granite indicated permeabilities of 10/sup -22/ to 10/sup -24/ m/sup 2/ that appeared to be unaffected either by effective pressure or by stress. The granite yielded permeabilities of 4 +- 10/sup -20/ m/sup 2/ that decreased by a factor of 2 as effective pressure increased to 25 MPa and varied by a factor of 2 as stress was increased to 0.5 of the fracture stress. Permeability of the gabbro linearly decreased from 2 x 10/sup -22/ to 8 x 10/sup -24/ m/sup 2/ with effective pressures to 25 MPa. Loading of the gabbro up to 0.88 of the fracture stress increased permeability by a factor of 7. The introduction of a throughgoing fracture increased the apparent permeability by 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 9/ over the intact values in both granite and gabbro. When compared to the initial value, compressional velocities increased by 5% with pressure to 30 MPa in the gneissic granite. For granite, pressurization from 2 to 25 MPa increased the velocity and pulse amplitude by 5 and 30%, and decreased the conductance by 50%. Velocity, amplitude, and conductance were weakly dependent on pressure in gabbro. The addition of stress decreased velocity and amplitude while increasing conductance markedly on both granite and gabbro.

  15. Shallow Mesozoic layered gabbros of the Shadow Mountains, San Bernardino County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David K.; Cohen, Lewis H.

    1996-10-01

    Jurassic hornblende gabbros intrude as a conspicuous 9 km 2 arcuate complex within Paleozoic metasedimentary pendants of the Shadow Mountains, San Bernardino County, California. This complex is significant because it: (1) displays evidence of processes active in magma chambers which are crystallizing cumulus phases; (2) resembles many mid-Mesozoic plutons described in the western and central Sierra Nevada and western Mojave desert which may all be petrologically related; and (3) may be used as a diagnostic tectonic marker for Mesozoic tectonic reconstructions of the Mojave Desert and western Cordillera. The gabbroic body is unusual for its compact, near-circular plan, conspicuous banding and layering and reverse geochemical zonation. The mafic complex was intruded as a hydrous magma and was emplaced as a concentric epizonal pluton. Oxygen isotopic data indicate the melt was mantle derived but has been contaminated by assimilation of metasediments. The gabbro was likely generated by reaction of olivine with fractionated melt from the melting of a low MgO basalt under water-saturated conditions. The banding and layering is ascribed to the cyclic ascent of felsic rejected solute along the walls of the chamber and its accumulation near the roof of the complex. Cooling was facilitated by conduction and the presence of pendant rocks at uppermost levels. The Shadow Mountains gabbros resemble other gabbroic bodies of similar Jurassic age throughout the Sierra Nevada, Mojave Desert and Transverse Ranges, California (Lahren and Schweickert, 1994; Miller and Glazner, 1995). These intrusions are useful as markers of subsequent large-scale tectonic crustal displacements affecting the western Mojave Desert and Sierra Nevada. In particular, the Shadow Mountains gabbros show age, mineralogie and textural affinities with correlative gabbroic complexes in the central Sierra Nevada 400 km to the north. All these plutonic bodies may represent subvolcanic sources of the Jurassic

  16. Characteristics and petrogenesis of Alaskan-type ultramafic-gabbro intrusions, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Loney, R.A. ); Himmelberg, G.R. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO )

    1993-04-01

    Alaskan-type ultramafic-gabbro intrusions occur along a belt that extends from Duke Island to Klukwan in southeastern Alaska and fall into two age groups, 400 to 440 Ma and 100 to 110 Ma. Most of the smaller bodies are magnetite-bearing hornblende clinopyroxenite; the larger ones consist of dunite, wehrlite, olivine clinopyroxenite, with some gabbro, in addition to hornblende clinopyroxenite and hornblendite. Textural, mineralogical, and chemical characteristics of the Alaskan-type ultramafic bodies indicate that they originated by fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma and accumulation in a crustal magma chamber. The Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] content of clinopyroxene shows a marked enrichment with differentiation, suggesting crystallization from progressively more hydrous melts like those characteristics of arc magmas. REE abundance levels and patterns are markedly similar for given rock units in all the bodies studied suggesting that all the bodies were derived by differentiation of closely similar parent magmas under near identical conditions. The exact composition of the primary melt is uncertain but the authors' preferred interpretation is that the parental magma of most Alaskan-type bodies was a subalkaline hydrous basalt. The striking similarity between the REE abundance levels and patterns of the Alaskan-type clinopyroxenites and gabbros, and the clinopyroxenite xenoliths and plutonic gabbros associated with Aleutian Island Arc volcanism, further suggests that the primary magma was probably a hydrous olivine basalt similar to the primary magma proposed for the Aleutian arc lavas. The mineral chemistry and phase equilibria of the ultramafic bodies suggest that they crystallized in magma chambers at depths greater than about 9 km. Except for the Duke Island body, which has sedimentary structures and shows evidence of ubiquitous current activity, most of the other bodies appear to have accumulated under static conditions.

  17. The gabbro-eclogite phase transition and the elevation of mountain belts on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namiki, Noriyuki; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    Among the four mountain belts surrounding Lakshmi Planum, Maxwell Montes is the highest and stands up to 11 km above the mean planetary radius and 7 km above Lakshmi Planum. The bulk composition and radioactive heat production of the crust on Venus, where measured, are similar to those of terrestrial tholeiitic basalt. Because the thickness of the low-density crust may be limited by the gabbro-garnet granulite-eclogite phase transitions, the 7-11 km maximum elevation of Maxwell Montes is difficult to understand except in the unlikely situation that the crust contains a large volume of magma. A possible explanation is that the base of the crust is not in phase equilibrium. It has been suggested that under completely dry conditions, the gabbro-eclogite phase transition takes place by solid-state diffusion and may require a geologically significant time to run to completion. Solid-state diffusion is a strongly temperature-dependent process. In this paper we solve the thermal evolution of the mountain belt to attempt to constrain the depth of the gabbro-eclogite transition and thus to assess this hypothesis quantitatively. The one-dimensional heat equation is solved numerically by a finite difference approximation. The deformation of the horizontally shortening crustal and mantle portions of the thermal boundary layer is assumed to occur by pure shear, and therefore the vertical velocity is given by the product of the horizontal strain rate and depth.

  18. Brittle Asperities and Stick-Slip Motion: Insight from Friction Experiments along A Gabbro/Marble Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Takizawa, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Kawakata, H.

    2015-12-01

    We conduct a series of meter-scale direct shear experiments along a gabbro/marble fault interface at NIED in Japan. Unlike the transitional behavior from stick-slip to stable sliding along a marble/marble interface under 1.3 MPa normal stress and 0.01 mm/s loading rate, the gabbro/marble case shows persistent stick-slip behavior under the same loading conditions as well as under 2.6 MPa normal stress in subsequent tests. Visual observations of the damage pattern reveal quite different features between the marble/marble case and the gabbro/marble case. For the former, the generated damage typically shows a low aspect ratio between loading-parallel and loading-perpendicular directions, suggesting that some diffusional deformation is effective during slip. For the latter, intruded gabbro pieces with preferred growing direction parallel to loading are distributed on top of the marble side, showing that hard rocks like gabbro can be partially fractured off when sheared against soft rocks like marble. Strain array data show that the apparent friction before failure is high or even above 1 near locations where fractured-off gabbro pieces are later observed, confirming that intact rock strength of gabbro has to be overcome upon the onset of fracture. Although at this moment we do not fully understand the behind mechanism, we believe that the brittleness of gabbro dominates in making the difference. If true, this result will highlight the role of brittle asperities in generating stick-slip fault behavior in a surrounding ductile-like environment. An analogous natural example may be found by the role of seamount in generating earthquakes through or underneath sediments in subduction zones (Cloos, 1992). However, instead of shearing off long-wavelength feature as illustrated by Cloos (1992), our study suggests that the collective behavior of tiny pieces along a nominally flat surface may also generate unstable ruptures macroscopically.

  19. Percussive tool use by Taï Western chimpanzees and Fazenda Boa Vista bearded capuchin monkeys: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Sirianni, Giulia; Fragaszy, Dorothy; Boesch, Christophe

    2015-11-19

    Percussive tool use holds special interest for scientists concerned with human origins. We summarize the findings from two field sites, Taï and Fazenda Boa Vista, where percussive tool use by chimpanzees and bearded capuchins, respectively, has been extensively investigated. We describe the ecological settings in which nut-cracking occurs and focus on four aspects of nut-cracking that have important cognitive implications, namely selection of tools, tool transport, tool modification and modulation of actions to reach the goal of cracking the nut. We comment on similarities and differences in behaviour and consider whether the observed differences reflect ecological, morphological, social and/or cognitive factors. Both species are sensitive to physical properties of tools, adjust their selection of hammers conditionally to the resistance of the nuts and to transport distance, and modulate the energy of their strikes under some conditions. However, chimpanzees transport hammers more frequently and for longer distances, take into account a higher number of combinations of variables and occasionally intentionally modify tools. A parsimonious interpretation of our findings is that morphological, ecological and social factors account for the observed differences. Confirmation of plausible cognitive differences in nut-cracking requires data not yet available.

  20. Oxygen-isotope exchange and mineral alteration in gabbros of the Lower Layered Series, Kap Edvard Holm Complex, East Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlhaber, K.; Bird, D.K. )

    1991-08-01

    Multiple intrusions of gabbros, mafic dikes, and syenites in the Kap Edvard Holm Complex gave rise to prolonged circulation of meteoric hydrothermal solutions and extreme isotope exchange and mineral alteration in the 3,600-m-thick Lower Layered Series gabbros. In the Lower Layered Series, {delta}{sup 18}O of plagioclase varies from +0.3{per thousand} to {minus}5.8{per thousand}, and it decreases with an increase in the volume of secondary talc, chlorite, and actinolite. In the same gabbros, pyroxenes have a more restricted range in {delta}{sup 18}O, from 5.0{per thousand} to 3.8{per thousand}, and values of {delta}{sup 18}O{sub pyroxene} are independent of the abundance of secondary minerals, which ranges from 14% to 30%. These relations indicate that large amounts of water continued to flow through the rocks at temperatures of < 500-600C, altering the gabbros to assemblages of talc + chlorite + actinolite {plus minus}epidote {plus minus}albite and causing significant oxygen-isotope exchange in plagioclase, but not in pyroxene. The extensive low-temperature secondary mineralization and {sup 18}O depletion of plagioclase in the Lower Layered Series are associated with the later emplacement of dikes and gabbros and syenites, which created new fracture systems and provided heat sources for hydrothermal fluid circulation. This produced subsolidus mineral alteration and isotope exchange in the Lower Layered Series that are distinct from those in the Skaergaard and Cuillin gabbros of the North Atlantic Tertiary province, but are similar to those observed in some oceanic gabbros.

  1. Partial eclogitization of the Ambolten gabbro-norite, north-east Greenland Caledonides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilotti, J.A.; Elvevold, S.

    1998-01-01

    Partially eclogitized igneous bodies composed of gabbro, leucogabbro, anorthosite and cross-cutting diabase dikes are well represented in the North-East Greenland Eclogite Province. A 200 x 100 meter intrusive body on Ambolten Island (78?? 20' N, 19?? 15' W) records a prograde transition from gabbro-norite to eclogite facies coronitic metagabro-norite surrounded by hydrated margins of undeformed to strongly foliated amphibolite. Igneous plagioclase + olivine + enstatite + augite + oxides convert to eclogite facies assemblages consisting of garnet, omphacite, diopside, enstatite, kyanite, zoisite, rutile and pargasitic amphibole through several coronitic reactions. Relict cumulus plagioclase laths are replaced by an outer corona of garnet, an inner corona of omphacite and an internal region of sodic plagioclase, garnet, kyanite, omphacite and zoisite. Olivine and intercumulus pyroxene are partly replaced by metamorphic pyroxenes and amphibole. The corona structures, zoning patterns, diversity of mineral compositions in a single thin section, and preservation of metastable asemblages are characteristic of diffusion-controlled metamorphism. The most extreme disequilibrium is found in static amphibolites, where igneous pyroxenes, plagioclase domains with eclogite facies, assemblages, and matrix amphibole coexist. Complete eclogitization was not attained at Ambolten due to a lack of fluids needed to drive diffusion during prograde and retrograde metamorphism. The P-T conditions of the high-pressure metamorphism are estimated at ??? 750??C and > 18 kbar. Well-equilibrated, foliated amphibolites from the margin of the gabbro-norite supports our contention that the entire North-East Greenland Eclogite Province experienced Caledonian high-pressure metamorphism, even though no eclogite facies assemblages have been found in the quartzofeldspathic host gneisses to date.

  2. Structure and petrology of the La Perouse gabbro intrusion, Fairweather Range, southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loney, R.A.; Himmelberg, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The gabbro was intruded during the Middle Tertiary into a Mesozoic granulite-facies metamorphic environment dominated by strike-slip fault movement, compression and possible minor subduction. The asymmetric funnel form of the intrusion is due to subsidence from magmatic loading at high T, coupled with control from pre-existing structures, and not from tectonic compression. The intrusion is 12 X 27 km and has exposed cumulate layering of approx 6000 m. Probe analyses of olivines (24), Ca-poor pyroxenes (28), augites (22) and plagioclases (35) are tabulated. Cumulus mineral compositions in the basal cumulates are: olivine Fo86-71, plagioclase An81-63, bronzite Ca3Mg82Fe15 - Ca4Mg75Fe21, augite Ca45Mg47Fe8 - Ca42Mg48Fe10. The layered gabbro above the basal cumulates consists dominantly of lenticularly interlayered plagioclase-augite-orthopyroxene-olivine, plagioclase-augite- olivine and plagioclase-orthopyroxene-augite cumulates, the composition ranges being olivine Fo75-50, plagioclase An78-42, orthopyroxene and inverted pigeonite Ca2.8Mg76.4Fe20.8 - Ca1.4Mg31.0Fe67.6, augite Ca43.1Mg46.9Fe10.0 - Ca40.5Mg27.1Fe32.4. The most iron-rich pyroxene and albite-rich plagioclase occur in a zone near the margin of the intrusion and are probably related to exchange reactions with the country rock. It is considered that the gabbro did not accumulate by simple fractional crystallization of a single or even several large batches of magma, but by numerous influxes of previously fractionated magma from a deeper reservoir. Conditions of crystallization are interpreted as approx 1055oC, 5.4 kbar and fO2 near the wustite-magnetite buffer.-R.A.H.

  3. The Atlantis Bank gabbro-suite was not a "normal" magma-chamber that produced basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvassnes, A. J.; Dick, H. J. B.; Grove, T. L.

    2003-04-01

    The differentiation of the basalts sampled at Atlantis II Fracture Zone, South-West Indian Ridge, is not the result of simple fractionation of gabbroic mineral-assemblages like those recovered from the adjacent Atlantis Bank and ODP Hole 735B. Large mineral data sets for the gabbros (Dick, et al 2002) are now available for analysis and comparison to spatially associated basalts. We have used Melts and pMelts (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995) to estimate the fractional crystallization trend gabbros from a primitive mantle melt or of the AII F.Z. MORB. Thermodynamic models (Grove et al (1992), Putirka (1999)) were also used to model the glasses hypothetical mafic and felsic mineral equilibrium-compositions. Our results show that while the basalts suggest 30-50% crystallization, the gabbros indicate 35-90% crystallization of a primary melt. It is therefore unlikely that the gabbros sampled from Atlantis Bank are the fossil magma-chambers that expelled melts that formed the spatially associated basalts. The models also show that the most primitive gabbros have elevated clinopyroxene Mg#s (Mg/(Mg+Fe)) relative to the coexisting plagioclase An%. This was unexpected, as the clinopyroxene frequently occurs as oikocrysts surrounding the plagioclase and encloses rounded olivine chadacrysts, indicating that the clinopyroxene precipitated late. Elthon (1992) noted the same problem for Cayman Trough gabbros; suggesting that this was the result of intermediate pressure fractionation. In our models, pressure does have some effect up to 5kbar, but is not enough to explain the discrepancy. We propose a model where melts are modified in a porous network or mush. Plagioclase-olivine networks form by accumulation of buoyant glomerocrysts and then work as filters as new melts pass through. Dissolution of the minerals would make the new melt appear to be more primitive with regards to increased Mg#s, as the dissolution happens fast without complete internal re-equilibration with the gabbro

  4. sup 40 Ar- sup 39 Ar dating of the Beja gabbro: Timing of the accretion of southern Portugal

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffet, G. )

    1990-11-01

    The {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar dating of the amphibole from the Beja gabbro (Southern Portugal) yields a plateau age at 336.4 {plus minus} 0.8 Ma (2{sigma} level). The corresponding calculated isotopic closure temperature is around 800C. The comparison of this temperature with the magnetic blocking temperature ({approximately}570C) allows an estimation of a probable thermoremanent acquisition age for the characteristic magnetization component of the Beja gabbro between 335Ma and 315Ma, assuming cooling rates between 10C/Ma and 100C/Ma. These results, combined wtih paleomagnetic results from the Beja gabbro and Late Paleozoic rocks from Southern Portugal (Perroud et al., 1985), suggest that the southermost part of Spain and Portugal was separated from Northern Iberia in Early Carboniferous times and was accreted to Europe during the Late Carboniferous.

  5. U-Pb Homogeneity of Duluth Gabbro Baddeleyite from Microgram to Nanogram Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, A. K.; Chamberlain, K.; Swapp, S. M.; Harrison, T. M.

    2009-12-01

    Baddeleyite has significant potential for U-Pb geochronology of mafic rocks, but due to small crystal sizes it can be exceedingly difficult to extract by conventional mineral separation techniques. We therefore developed in-situ dating of baddeleyite crystals with lateral dimensions between 5 and 20 μm (micro-baddeleyite) in polished petrographic thin sections using a CAMECA ims 1270 ion microprobe, and tested the homogeneity of a baddeleyite standard from Duluth gabbro complex over a wide range of grain sizes. Large (100 - 200 μm in diameter) baddeleyite crystals were separated from sample FC4-b from the Duluth gabbro complex and individually analyzed by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). Three FC-4b baddeleyite analyses overlap within error with a weighted mean 207Pb/206Pb date of 1099.6±1.5 Ma that closely agrees with published Duluth gabbro zircon dates. The weighted mean ID-TIMS 206Pb/238U date for FC4-b baddeleyite crystal separates (1096.8±0.3 Ma) is slightly younger than those for zircon. Large FC4-b baddeleyite crystals were also mounted along with pieces of polished thin-sections containing micro-baddeleyite and analyzed by ion microprobe using oxygen flooding to enhance sensitivity for positively charged Pb ions by a factor of ten. Ion microprobe 207Pb/206Pb ages for micro-baddeleyite (average 1096.9±2.6 Ma; MSWD = 1.2; n = 27) agree with the ID-TIMS age. With U-Pb relative sensitivities calibrated on FC4-b crystal separates, the weighted average 206Pb/238U micro-baddeleyite date is 1113±11 Ma (MSWD = 2.6; n = 27). This demonstrates that ion microprobe U-Pb baddeleyite analyses are unbiased by crystallographic orientation or grain size, and that 207Pb/206Pb and 206Pb/238U dates for Precambrian micro-baddeleyite are accurate and precise to within <0.3% and <2% relative uncertainty, respectively. For Phanerozoic samples, we anticipate similar 206Pb/238U age uncertainty if radiogenic yields are high. This opens new

  6. Zoned Cr, Fe-spinel from the La Perouse layered gabbro, Fairweather Range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Himmelberg, G.R.; Goff, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    Zoned spinel of unusual composition and morphology has been found in massive pyrrhotite-chalcopyrite-pent-landite ore from the La Perouse layered gabbro intrusion in the Fairweather Range, southeastern Alaska. The spinel grains show continuous zoning from cores with up to 53 wt.% Cr2O3 to rims with less than 11 wt.% Cr2O3. Their composition is exceptional because they contain less than 0.32 wt.% MgO and less than 0.10 wt.% Al2O3 and TiO2. Also notable are the concentrations of MnO and V2O3, which reach 4.73 and 4.50 wt.%, respectively, in the cores. The spinel is thought to have crystallized at low oxygen fugacity and at temperatures above 900??C, directly from a sulfide melt that separated by immiscibility from the gabbroic parental magma. ?? 1976.

  7. Petrogenesis of basalts and gabbros from an ancient continent ocean transition (External Liguride ophiolites, Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Alessandra; Tribuzio, Riccardo; Vernia, Luigi

    2008-03-01

    Remnants of a fossil continent-ocean transition similar to that of the modern non-volcanic continental margins are preserved in the Jurassic External Liguride units. They consist of fertile lherzolites of subcontinental origin, MOR-type basalts and rare gabbroic intrusives, together with continental crust bodies exhumed during the rifting phases preceding the oceanization. The gabbroic rocks include troctolites, (olivine) gabbros, Fe-Ti oxide-bearing gabbros and diorites. Trace element and Nd isotope compositions indicate that these rocks were derived from N-MORB melts variably evolved through fractional crystallisation. In the gabbroic rocks, high-temperature (˜ 900 °C) shearing along ductile shear zones is locally overprinted by amphibolite-facies recrystallization ( T ˜ 650 °C), which was most likely assisted by seawater-derived fluids. Basalts crop out as lava flows and as dykes crosscutting mantle lherzolites and gabbroic rocks. They display nearly flat REE patterns and high Y/Nb values (5-14), similar to modern N-MORB. Basalts are also characterised by weak Zr enrichment relative to neighbouring REE (Zr/Zr * = 1.1-1.7) and high (Sm/Yb) DM ratios (1.5-1.8). Their Nd isotope compositions are close to typical depleted mantle (initial ɛ Nd = +7.6 to + 9.4). The geochemical features of parental melts of basaltic and gabbroic rocks may be attributed to melting of a MORB-type asthenospheric source. Trace element modelling shows that low-degree (≤ 6%) fractional melting of a depleted spinel peridotite cannot account for the elevated Sm/Yb ratios of basalts. Low-degree melting of a mixed source of spinel peridotite with small amounts of garnet pyroxenite has been proposed to explain the trace element signature of basalts.

  8. Origin and age of the Eisenkappel gabbro to granite suite (Carinthia, SE Austrian Alps)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C.; Thöni, M.; Goessler, W.; Tessadri, R.

    2011-01-01

    The northern part of the Karawanken plutonic belt is a gabbro–granite complex located just north of the Periadriatic lineament near the Slovenian–Austrian border. Petrographic and geochemical studies of the Eisenkappel intrusive complex indicate that this multiphase plutonic suite developed by a combination of crystal accumulation, fractional crystallization and assimilation processes, magma mixing and mingling. The mafic rocks are alkaline and have within-plate geochemical characteristics, indicating anorogenic magmatism in an extensional setting and derivation from an enriched mantle source. The mafic melts triggered partial melting of the crust and the formation of granite. The granitic rocks are alkalic, metaluminous and have the high Fe/Fe + Mg characteristics of within-plate plutons. Temperature and pressure conditions, derived from amphibole-plagioclase and different amphibole thermobarometers, suggest that the analysed Eisenkappel gabbros crystallized at around 1000 ± 20 °C and 380–470 MPa, whereas the granitic rock crystallized at T ≤ 800 ± 20 °C and ≤ 350 MPa. Mineral-whole rock Sm–Nd analyses of two cumulate gabbros yielded 249 ± 8.4 Ma and 250 ± 26 Ma (εNd: + 3.6), garnet-whole rock Sm–Nd analyses of two silicic samples yielded well-constrained ages of 238.4 ± 1.9 Ma and 242.1 ± 2.1 Ma (εNd: − 2.6). PMID:26525511

  9. Evidence from gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite for lateral magma transport along a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Abelson, M; Baer, G; Agnon, A

    2001-01-01

    The lateral flow of magma and ductile deformation of the lower crust along oceanic spreading axes has been thought to play a significant role in suppressing both mid-ocean ridge segmentation and variations in crustal thickness. Direct investigation of such flow patterns is hampered by the kilometres of water that cover the oceanic crust, but such studies can be made on ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust accreted to a continent). In the Oman ophiolite, small-scale radial patterns of flow have been mapped along what is thought to be the relict of a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge. Here we present evidence for broad-scale along-axis flow that has been frozen into the gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus (thought to be representative of a slow-spreading ridge axis). The gabbro suite of Troodos spans nearly 20 km of a segment of a fossil spreading axis, near a ridge-transform intersection. We mapped the pattern of magma flow by analysing the rocks' magnetic fabric at 20 sites widely distributed in the gabbro suite, and by examining the petrographic fabric at 9 sites. We infer an along-axis magma flow for much of the gabbro suite, which indicates that redistribution of melt occurred towards the segment edge in a large depth range of the oceanic crust. Our results support the magma plumbing structure that has been inferred indirectly from a seismic tomography experiment on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  10. Evidence from gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite for lateral magma transport along a slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Abelson, M; Baer, G; Agnon, A

    2001-01-01

    The lateral flow of magma and ductile deformation of the lower crust along oceanic spreading axes has been thought to play a significant role in suppressing both mid-ocean ridge segmentation and variations in crustal thickness. Direct investigation of such flow patterns is hampered by the kilometres of water that cover the oceanic crust, but such studies can be made on ophiolites (fragments of oceanic crust accreted to a continent). In the Oman ophiolite, small-scale radial patterns of flow have been mapped along what is thought to be the relict of a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge. Here we present evidence for broad-scale along-axis flow that has been frozen into the gabbro of the Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus (thought to be representative of a slow-spreading ridge axis). The gabbro suite of Troodos spans nearly 20 km of a segment of a fossil spreading axis, near a ridge-transform intersection. We mapped the pattern of magma flow by analysing the rocks' magnetic fabric at 20 sites widely distributed in the gabbro suite, and by examining the petrographic fabric at 9 sites. We infer an along-axis magma flow for much of the gabbro suite, which indicates that redistribution of melt occurred towards the segment edge in a large depth range of the oceanic crust. Our results support the magma plumbing structure that has been inferred indirectly from a seismic tomography experiment on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge. PMID:11343114

  11. Mineral chemistry as a tool for understanding the petrogenesis of Cryogenian (arc-related)-Ediacaran (post-collisional) gabbros in the western Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surour, Adel A.; Ahmed, Ahmed H.; Harbi, Hesham M.

    2016-07-01

    Metagabbros and gabbros in the Ablah-Shuwas belt (western Saudi Arabia) represent part of significant mafic magmatism in the Neoproterozoic Arabian Shield. The metagabbros are Cryogenian, occasionally stratified and bear calcic amphiboles (hornblende, magnesio-hornblende and actinolite) typical of calc-alkaline complexes. These amphiboles suggest low pressure ( 1-3 kbar), high f_{O2 } and crystallization temperature up to 727 °C, whereas it is 247-275 °C in the case of retrograde chlorite. Rutile and titanite in metagabbros are Fe-rich and replace Mn-bearing ilmenite precursors at high f_{O2} . On the other hand, younger gabbros are fresh, layered and comprised of olivine gabbro and olivine-hornblende gabbro with an uppermost layer of anorthositic gabbro. The fresh gabbros are biotite-bearing. They are characterized by secondary magnetite-orthopyroxene symplectitic intergrowth at the outer peripheries of olivine. The symplectite forms by deuteric alteration from residual pore fluids moving along olivine grain boundaries in the sub-solidus state. In fresh gabbros, ortho- and clinopyroxenes indicate crystallization at 1300-900 and 800-600 °C, respectively. Geochemically, the Cryogenian metagabbros ( 850-780 Ma) are tholeiitic to calc-alkaline in composition and interpreted as arc-related. Younger, fresh gabbros are calc-alkaline and post-collisional ( 620-590 Ma, i.e., Ediacaran), forming during the late stages of arc amalgamation in the southern Arabian Shield. The calc-alkaline metagabbros are related to a lithospheric mantle source previously modified by subduction. Younger, fresh gabbros were probably produced by partial melting of an enriched mantle source (e.g., garnet lherzolite).

  12. Time scales of the dynamics of mafic-silicic magma interaction during solidification of the Isle au Haut gabbro-diorite layered complex, Maine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, K.; Marsh, B. D.

    2008-05-01

    The opportunity to examine in detail the in situ physical and chemical interaction of juxtapositioned mafic and silicic magma is vital to understanding the general dynamics of interaction of basaltic and silicic magmas. The Isle au Haut Igneous Complex (413 Ma) is one of many along the coast of Maine exhibiting a clear silicic-mafic magmatic association in the form of a layered gabbro-diorite sequence emplaced within granitic country rock (Chapman and Rhodes 1992, Wiebe 1994, 2001). Although, purely on the basis of density contrasts, the entire system should have undergone wholesale instability and mixing, that it has not and is instead arrested in a grossly unstable state with many indications of interaction while molten, makes this an especially valuable sequence. The entire sequence (~600 m thick) has five pairs of gabbro-diorite layers with individual units typically 20-40 m (gabbro) and 15-35 m (diorite) thick. Based on the mineral assemblage, chemical analyses and phase equilibria, the initial temperatures at the time of emplacement of the two magmas were ~1180 oC (gabbro) and ~1020 oC (diorite). A conductive thermal model for the solidification of a typical gabbroic layer (~20 m) indicates a timescale on the order of a few years, whereas the whole complex solidified in about a thousand years. Essentially crystal-free gabbro invaded the partially crystallized and lower temperature diorite, forming a series of large horizontal 'fingers' or layers. Evidence of this process is in the form of distinct chilled margins of gabbro against diorite and that the gabbro has not fallen into the diorite in spite of its higher density. Yet the diorite has spawned fields of evenly spaced finger-like siliceous plumes (~6 cm radius) penetrating the gabbro to high levels at every interface, reaching to within ~2 m of the upper gabbro contact. The flattened plumes at this horizon, compositionally similar to the underlying undifferentiated diorite, represent an early stage of

  13. Elastic wave velocities in anorthosite and anorthositic gabbros from Apollo 15 and 16 landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of ultrasonic velocities in lunar samples 15065, 15555, 15415, 60015, and 61016 as well as in synthetic materials corresponding to compositions of anorthositic gabbros are presented as a function of hydrostatic pressure to about 7 kb. The author examined the seismic velocity distributions in the moon with reference to the variations to be expected in a homogeneous medium. The lunar mantle begins about 60 km, and the velocity of P waves in this area is about 7.7 km/sec. Variation of the seismic parameter with depth in the upper crust (about 20 km thick) is much too rapid to be explained by compression of a uniform material and the departure from expectation is so great that no reasonable adjustment of the material parameters can bring agreement; therefore, this author concludes that this result in this region of the moon is not due to self-compression but to textural gradients. In the lower crust (about 40 km thick), the region is shown to be relatively homogeneous, consisting probably of anorthositic rocks.

  14. 'Melt welt' mechanism of extreme weakening of gabbro at seismic slip rates.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin M; Fialko, Yuri

    2012-08-30

    Laboratory studies of frictional properties of rocks at slip velocities approaching the seismic range (∼0.1-1 m s(-1)), and at moderate normal stresses (1-10 MPa), have revealed a complex evolution of the dynamic shear strength, with at least two phases of weakening separated by strengthening at the onset of wholesale melting. The second post-melting weakening phase is governed by viscous properties of the melt layer and is reasonably well understood. The initial phase of extreme weakening, however, remains a subject of much debate. Here we show that the initial weakening of gabbro is associated with the formation of hotspots and macroscopic streaks of melt ('melt welts'), which partially unload the rest of the slip interface. Melt welts begin to form when the average rate of frictional heating exceeds 0.1-0.4 MW m(-2), while the average temperature of the shear zone is well below the solidus (250-450 °C). Similar heterogeneities in stress and temperature are likely to occur on natural fault surfaces during rapid slip, and to be important for earthquake rupture dynamics.

  15. 'Melt welt' mechanism of extreme weakening of gabbro at seismic slip rates.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin M; Fialko, Yuri

    2012-08-30

    Laboratory studies of frictional properties of rocks at slip velocities approaching the seismic range (∼0.1-1 m s(-1)), and at moderate normal stresses (1-10 MPa), have revealed a complex evolution of the dynamic shear strength, with at least two phases of weakening separated by strengthening at the onset of wholesale melting. The second post-melting weakening phase is governed by viscous properties of the melt layer and is reasonably well understood. The initial phase of extreme weakening, however, remains a subject of much debate. Here we show that the initial weakening of gabbro is associated with the formation of hotspots and macroscopic streaks of melt ('melt welts'), which partially unload the rest of the slip interface. Melt welts begin to form when the average rate of frictional heating exceeds 0.1-0.4 MW m(-2), while the average temperature of the shear zone is well below the solidus (250-450 °C). Similar heterogeneities in stress and temperature are likely to occur on natural fault surfaces during rapid slip, and to be important for earthquake rupture dynamics. PMID:22932388

  16. The Permian Dongfanghong island-arc gabbro of the Wandashan Orogen, NE China: Implications for Paleo-Pacific subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Xu, Yi-Gang; Wilde, Simon A.; Chen, Han-Lin; Yang, Shu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    The Dongfanghong hornblende gabbro is located in the western part of the Wandashan Orogen and to the east of the Jiamusi Block in NE China. It was emplaced into Early Paleozoic oceanic crust (i.e. Dongfanghong ophiolite) at ~ 275 Ma and both later collided with the eastern margin of the Jiamusi Block. The Dongfanghong gabbro is sub-alkaline with high Na2O contents and is characterized by enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE), large ion lithosphile elements (LILE), Sr, Eu, and Ba, and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE). The enriched isotopic signatures (87Sr/86Sri = ~ 0.7065, εNd(t) = ~- 0.5, 208Pb/204Pbi = ~ 38.05, 207Pb/204Pbi = ~ 15.56, 206Pb/204Pbi = ~ 18.20 and zircon εHf(t) = ~+ 5.8) indicate an enriched mantle (EM2) source, with some addition of continental material. It has arc geochemical affinities similar to Permian arc igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Jiamusi Block, the Yakuno Ophiolite in SW Japan, arc rocks along the western margin of the North America Craton, and also the Gympie Group in eastern Australia. All these features, together with information from tectonic discrimination diagrams, suggest that the Dongfanghong gabbro formed in an immature island arc. The spatial configuration of ~ 290 Ma immature continental arc rocks in the eastern part of the Jiamusi Block and the ~ 275 Ma immature island arc Dongfanghong gabbro in the Wandashan Orogen to the east is best explained by eastward arc retreat and slab roll-back of the Paleo-Pacific Plate. This model is also supported by the Carboniferous-Permian stratigraphic transition in the Jiamusi Block from oceanic carbonate rocks to coal-bearing terrestrial clastic rocks and andesites. We thus suggest that both Paleo-Pacific subduction and roll-back occurred in the Early Permian along the eastern margin of Asia.

  17. Melt/rock reaction at oceanic peridotite/gabbro transition as revealed by trace element chemistry of olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Elisabetta; Borghini, Giulio; Godard, Marguerite; Ildefonse, Benoit; Crispini, Laura; Fumagalli, Patrizia

    2016-10-01

    Several recent studies have documented that reactions between melt and crystal mush in primitive gabbroic rocks (via reactive porous flow) have an important control in the formation of the lower oceanic crust and the evolution of MORBs. In this context, olivine-rich rocks can form either by fractional crystallization of primitive melts or by open system reactive percolation of pre-existing (possibly mantle-derived) olivine matrix. To address this question, we performed in-situ trace element analyses (by LA-ICP-MS) of olivine from the Erro-Tobbio ophiolite Unit (Ligurian Alps), where mantle peridotites show gradational contacts with an hectometer-scale body of troctolites and plagioclase wehrlites, and both are cut by later decameter-wide lenses and dykes of olivine gabbros. Previous studies inferred that troctolites and olivine gabbros represent variably differentiated crystallization products from primitive MORB-type melts. Olivines in the three rock types (mantle peridotites, troctolites, olivine gabbros) exhibit distinct geochemical signature and well-defined elemental correlations. As expected, compatible elements (e.g. Ni) show the highest concentrations in peridotites (2580-2730 ppm), intermediate in troctolites (2050-2230 ppm) and lowest in gabbros (1355-1420 ppm), whereas moderate incompatible elements (e.g. Mn, Zn) show the opposite behaviour. By contrast, highly incompatible elements like Zr, Hf, Ti, HREE are variably enriched in olivines of troctolites, and the enrichment in absolute concentrations is coupled to development of significant HFSE/REE fractionation (ZrN/NdN up to 80). AFC modelling shows that such large ZrN/NdN ratios in olivines are consistent with a process of olivine assimilation and plagioclase crystallization at decreasing melt mass, in agreement with textural observations. In-situ trace element geochemistry of olivine, combined with microstructural investigations, thus appears a powerful tool to investigate reactive percolation and the

  18. Distribution of Sc, Ta, Hf, Zr, Co, and Fe in the crust of weathering of metalliferous gabbro-norites in volodarsk-volyn rock body

    SciTech Connect

    Borisenko, L.F.; Chudinov, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    Nuclear physics methods are used to determine the Sc, Ta, Hf, Zr, Co, and Fe contents in gabbro-norites and the component minerals of these rocks, as well as in the various zones of the crusts of weathering developed on gabbro-norites. It has been established that Sc, Ta, Hf, and Zr accumulate in the kaolinite zone, but Co is partly washed out of it.

  19. Peninsular terrane basement ages recorded by Paleozoic and Paleoproterozoic zircon in gabbro xenoliths and andesite from Redoubt volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Historically Sactive Redoubt volcano is an Aleutian arc basalt-to-dacite cone constructed upon the Jurassic–Early Tertiary Alaska–Aleutian Range batholith. The batholith intrudes the Peninsular tectonostratigraphic terrane, which is considered to have developed on oceanic basement and to have accreted to North America, possibly in Late Jurassic time. Xenoliths in Redoubt magmas have been thought to be modern cumulate gabbros and fragments of the batholith. However, new sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb ages for zircon from gabbro xenoliths from a late Pleistocene pyroclastic deposit are dominated by much older, ca. 310 Ma Pennsylvanian and ca. 1865 Ma Paleoproterozoic grains. Zircon age distributions and trace-element concentrations indicate that the ca. 310 Ma zircons date gabbroic intrusive rocks, and the ca. 1865 Ma zircons also are likely from igneous rocks in or beneath Peninsular terrane basement. The trace-element data imply that four of five Cretaceous–Paleocene zircons, and Pennsylvanian low-U, low-Th zircons in one sample, grew from metamorphic or hydrothermal fluids. Textural evidence of xenocrysts and a dominant population of ca. 1865 Ma zircon in juvenile crystal-rich andesite from the same pyroclastic deposit show that this basement has been assimilated by Redoubt magma. Equilibration temperatures and oxygen fugacities indicated by Fe-Ti–oxide minerals in the gabbros and crystal-rich andesite suggest sources near the margins of the Redoubt magmatic system, most likely in the magma accumulation and storage region currently outlined by seismicity and magma petrology at ∼4–10 km below sea level. Additionally, a partially melted gabbro from the 1990 eruption contains zircon with U-Pb ages between ca. 620 Ma and ca. 1705 Ma, as well as one zircon with a U-Th disequilibrium model age of 0 ka. The zircon ages demonstrate that Pennsylvanian, and probably Paleoproterozoic, igneous rocks exist in, or possibly beneath, Peninsular

  20. Laboratory and Numerical Investigations of Frictional Properties of Gabbro at Low Normal Stress and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. K.; Brown, K. M.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a series of frictional sliding experiments on fine grained gabbro, a rock representative of oceanic crust, at low normal stress (5 MPa) and elevated temperatures (20 - 450 °C) to explore the rate and state frictional properties at conditions thought to be representative of slow slip events (SSEs) near the bottom of the seismogenic plate interface in subduction zones. We used a direct shear apparatus that is capable of producing large total slip (many tens of centimeters). The gouge layer is naturally introduced between solid rock samples during and after an initial long 'run-in' period. Since this apparatus has a relatively low stiffness (8 MPa/mm) compared to widely used triaxial types (100 MPa/mm), it more readily encourages stick-slip behavior under velocity-weakening conditions. In our experiments, we observed stable sliding at low temperatures (20 -150 °C), stick-slip at high temperatures (400 - 450 °C), and a transitional 'episodic slow slip' behavior at intermediate temperatures (200-350 °C). Our experimental results suggest that there is a continuum of slip modes, as predicted by rate-state theory, and observed on natural faults. The typical SSE velocity in our experiments is about ten times higher than the driving velocity ((0.01 and 0.001 mm/s, respectively). This is similar to the ratio of the geodetically inferred SSE velocity to the plate convergence rate. While the laboratory experiments were conducted at speeds three orders of magnitude greater than the plate convergence rate, the SSE characteristics exhibit intriguing similarities. At temperatures of 150 °C and below, we performed velocity stepping tests between 0.001 and 0.01 mm/s to directly measure the rate-state parameters a, b, Dc, and μo. Since the samples did not stably slide at temperatures above 150 °C, we could not directly measure the rate-state parameters. Instead, we solved the rate-state constitutive equations, and performed a grid search through the rate

  1. IODP Expedition 345: Primitive Layered Gabbros From Fast-Spreading Lower Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ildefonse, Benoit; Gillis, Kathryn M.; Snow, Jonathan E.; Klaus, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Three-quarters of the ocean crust formed at fast-spreading ridges is composed of plutonic rocks whose mineral assemblages, textures and compositions record the history of melt transport and crystallization between the mantle and the seafloor. However, owing to the nearly continuous overlying extrusive upper crust, sampling in situ the lower crust is challenging. Hence, models for understanding the formation of the lower crust are based essentially on geophysical studies and ophiolites. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 345 recovered the first significant sections of primitive, modally layered gabbroic rocks from the lowermost plutonic crust formed at a fast-spreading ridge, and exposed at the Hess Deep Rift (Gillis et al., Nature, 2014, doi:10.1038/nature12778). Drilling Site U1415 is located along the southern slope of the intrarift ridge. The primary science results were obtained from coring of two ~110 m deep reentry holes and one 35-m-deep single-bit hole, all co-located within an ~100-m-wide area. Olivine gabbro and troctolite are the dominant plutonic rock types recovered, with minor gabbro, clinopyroxene oikocryst-bearing gabbroic rocks, and gabbronorite. All rock types are primitive to moderately evolved, with Mg# 89-76, and exhibit cumulate textures similar to ones found in layered mafic intrusions and some ophiolites. Spectacular modal and grain size layering, prevalent in >50% of the recovered core, confirm a long held paradigm that such rocks are a key constituent of the lowermost ocean crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. Magmatic foliation is largely defined by the shape-preferred orientation of plagioclase. It is moderate to strong in intervals with simple modal layering but weak to absent in troctolitic intervals and typically absent in intervals with heterogeneous textures and/or diffuse banding. Geochemical analysis of these primitive lower plutonics, in combination with previous geochemical data for shallow-level plutonics

  2. IODP Exp 345: Primitive Layered Gabbros From Fast-Spreading Lower Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, K. M.; Snow, J. E.; Klaus, A.

    2013-12-01

    Plutonic rocks from the lower ocean crust formed at fast-spreading ridges provide a record of the history of melt transport and crystallization between the mantle and the seafloor. Despite the significance of these rocks, sampling them in situ has proven extremely challenging. This means our models for understanding the formation of the lower crust are based largely on geophysical studies and ophiolites that did not form at typical mid-ocean ridges. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 345 recovered the first significant recovery of primitive modally layered gabbroic rocks from the lowermost plutonic crust from a fast-spreading ridge exposed at the Hess Deep Rift. Drilling was focused at Site U1415, located along the southern slope of the intrarift ridge. The primary science results were obtained from coring of two ~110 m deep reentry holes and one 35-m-deep single-bit hole, all co-located within an ~100-m-wide area. Olivine gabbro and troctolite are the dominant plutonic rock types recovered, with minor gabbro, clinopyroxene oikocryst-bearing gabbroic lithologies, and gabbronorite. All rock types are primitive (Mg# 76-89) and exhibit cumulate textures similar to ones found in layered mafic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes. Spectacular modal and grain size layering, prevalent in >50% of the recovered core, confirm a long held paradigm that such rocks are a key constituent of the lowermost ocean crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. Magmatic foliation is largely defined by the shape-preferred orientation of plagioclase. It is moderate to strong in intervals with simple modal layering but weak to absent in troctolitic intervals and typically absent in intervals with heterogeneous textures and/or diffuse banding. Geochemical analysis of these primitive lower plutonics, in combination with previous geochemical data for shallow-level plutonics, sheeted dikes and lavas, provides the first robust estimate of the bulk composition of crust formed at a

  3. Effects of Stress Activated Positive-Hole Charge Carriers on Radar Reflectance of Gabbro-Diorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Dahlgren, R.; Cherukupally, A.; Freund, F. T.

    2011-12-01

    When load is applied to igneous or high-grade metamorphic rocks, trapped electron vacancy defects are activated and become mobile positive-hole charge carriers. These mobile charge carriers repel each other through Coulomb interactions and move outward from the stressed region. As large numbers of positive-holes reach the surface of the rock, this surface charge may cause an observable change in radar reflectance. In this experiment, a series of holes is drilled into a large gabbro-diorite boulder from the A.R. Wilson Quarry in Aromas, CA. Bustar, an expansive, non-explosive demolition agent, is poured into the holes while a 1.2 GHz radar system measures the amplitude of radar waves reflected from the rock's surface. Over the course of the experiment, the radar antenna is swept repeatedly across one face of the rock, pausing in one of twelve positions to collect data before moving to the next position. At the end of each sweep, the radar is calibrated against both a corner reflector and a flat-plate reflector. This sampling method is employed to detect and assign a cause to transient effects observed at any one location. An initial analysis of the radar data shows a high level of agreement between readings from the flat-plate and corner reflectors, supporting the use of flat-plate reflectors as a calibration source for this omnidirectional radar system. Fitting a trend to the amplitude of the wave reflected from the rock's surface is complicated by the presence of unexpected outliers and noise artifacts from the radar system itself. It appears that such a trend, if present, would likely indicate a change in amplitude of the reflected signal of less than 5 percent over the course of the experiment.

  4. Geochemistry of gabbros and basaltic dykes from the upper/lower oceanic crust boundary: New data from IODP Expedition 335 (ODP Site 1256, Cocos Plate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Adachi, Y.; Miyashita, S.; Kurz, M. D.; Roy, P.

    2012-12-01

    ODP Hole 1256D (Cocos plate), a borehole in a 15 m.y old oceanic crust formed at a superfast spreading ridge, was deepened down to 1521.6 meters below seafloor (mbsf) during IODP Expedition 335. The lower part of the borehole (>1340 mbsf) crosscuts a series of variably altered lithologies interpreted as marking the transition from upper to lower crust (top to bottom): basaltic sheeted then granoblastic dykes, a ~50 m gabbro screen (Gabbro 1), a ~20 m interval of granoblastic dykes (Dyke Screen 1), a ~20 m gabbro screen (Gabbro 2) then a second interval of granoblastic dykes. We present the results of an XRF and ICPMS study performed on 3 cored granoblastic dikes from this last interval, and on a basalt, 5 granoblastic dikes and two gabbroic rocks retrieved during junk basket runs during Expedition 335. The basalt and granoblastic dikes have MORB type compositions similar to that of the variably altered basalt samples and granoblastic dikes cored during the previous expeditions at Hole 1256D. Expedition 335 granoblastic dikes are characterized by their depletion in lithophile trace elements (Yb~2-3 ppm) similar to those of the granoblastic dikes cored below Gabbro 2, which represent the most depleted end-member of the basaltic dikes previously found at Site 1256 (Yb~2.5-6 ppm). We interpret this signature as evidence that the Expedition 335 granoblastic dikes come from the bottom of Hole 1256D (at Gabbro 2 lower interface and below) rather than from shallower levels. The two gabbros (olivine gabbronorite and olivine gabbro) have high LOI indicating that they were more affected by low temperature hydration processes than the neighboring granoblastic dikes. Their composition is similar to that of the less evolved end-members of the gabbroic rock suite previously sampled at Hole 1256D, which were found in the Gabbro 1 interval. They have relatively high Mg# (70-72) and Ni (200-280 ppm), reflecting their modal olivine content. Although they are slightly depleted

  5. Petrological characteristics of Opx-bearing primitive gabbros from the East Pacific Rise and the Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Python, Marie; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Godard, Marguerite; Ildefonse, Benoît; Koepke, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The Hess Deep rift is located at the junction between the fast spreading East Pacific Rise and the Cocos-Nazca Ridge. Lower crust is exposed along the southern slope of the intrarift ridge between 4675 and 4800 m depth and was sampled during IODP Expedition 345. Primitive troctolites and olivine-rich gabbros are the dominant recovered lithologies and shipboard data showed a high Mg# whole rock chemistry in concordance with their primitive nature. In a MOR system, olivine is a typical primitive mineral and orthoyroxene (Opx) usually appear late in the crystallisation sequence, when the magma already reached a significant degree of differentiation. In spite Opx is not expected in any primitive lithology, this mineral is commonly present in Hess Deep gabbros and may be associated with olivine. This curious association of cumulate Opx with olivine and other primitive minerals was also observed at a lower extent in some gabbros from ODP/IODP Hole 1256D, in the upper Hess Deep crustal section (ODP Hole 894G), and in the crustal section of the Oman ophiolite (Kahwad massif) where, in particular, Opx-bearing troctolites coexist with clinopyroxene oikocrysts-bearing troctolites and amphibole-bearing primitive olivine gabbros. Three types of Opx textures may be distinguished in Opx-bearing olivine gabbros and troctolites: (1) recrystallised coronæ around olivine, (2) exsolution within clinopyroxene and (3) large prismatic or poikilitic grains. Prismatic or poikilitic Opx are present at all level of the gabbroic crust, while exsolutions and coronæ were observed only in the lower crust. The mineral chemical compositions vary more with the structural level than with the lithological type and (Opx-bearing) olivine gabbros from Holes 894G, 1256D and from the upper crust of the Oman ophiolite show more differentiated characteristics than the same lithology in the Site 1415 and in the Oman lower crust. Pyroxenes in all samples from the lower crust show a relatively narrow range

  6. Recycled gabbro signature in Upper Cretaceous Magma within Strandja Massif: NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulusoy, Ezgi; Kagan Kadioglu, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    Basic magma intrusions within plate interiors upwelling mantle plumes have chemical signatures that are distinct from mid-ocean ridge magmas. When a basic magma interact with continental crust or with the felsic magma, the compositions of both magma changes, but there is no consensus as to how this interaction occurs. Here we analyse the mineral behavior and trace element signature of gabbroic rocks of the samples collected from the Strandja Massif. Srednogorie magmatic arc is a part of Apuseni- Banat-Timok-Srednogorie magmatic belt and formed by subduction and closure of the Tethys Ocean during Upper Cretaceous times. Upper Cretaceous magmatic rocks cutting Strandja Massif in NW Turkey belong to eastern edge of Srednogorie Magmatic arc. Upper Cretacous magmatic rocks divided into four subgroup in Turkey part of Strandja massif: (I) granitic rocks, (II) monzonitic rock, (III) syenitic rocks and (IV) gabbroic rocks. Gabbroic rocks outcropped around study area in phaneritic - equigranular texture. According to mineralogic - petrographic studies gabbros have mainly holocrystalline texture and ophitic to subophitic texture composed of plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, and rarely olivine and opaque minerals. Also because of special conditions there have been pegmatitic texture on mafic minerals with euhedral form up to 3 cm in size and orbicular texture which reach 15cm in size and rounded - elliptical form. Confocal Raman Spectroscopy studies reveals that plagioclase are ranging in composition from labradorite to bytownite, the pyroxene are ranging in composition from diopside to augite acting with uralitization processes and the olivine are generally in the composition of forsterite. Petrographic and mineralogical determination reveals some metasomatic magmatic epidote presence. Confocal Raman Spectroscopy studies on anhydrous minerals within gabbroic rocks shows affect of hydrous process because of magma mixing. The gabbroic rocks have tholeiitic and changed towards

  7. Multipolarity remanences in lower oceanic crustal gabbros recovered by drilling at Hess Deep (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Antony; Horst, Andrew; Friedman, Sarah; Nozaka, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    A long-term goal of the scientific ocean drilling community is to understand the processes by which the ocean crust is constructed through magmatism, deformation, metamorphism and hydrothermal cooling. Insights into the magnetic properties of the lower crust have come from drilling at oceanic core complexes and in tectonic windows. At the Hess Deep Rift, propagation of the Cocos-Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust exposes a dismembered, but nearly complete lower crustal section. Here, IODP Expedition 345 (Site U1415) recovered primitive plutonic lithologies including gabbro, troctolitic gabbro and olivine gabbronorite. These rocks exhibit cumulate textures similar to those found in layered basic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes. Metamorphism is dominated by background greenschist facies alteration associated with cataclastic deformation that likely results from Cocos-Nazca rifting. Some intervals display complex, multiple remanence components within individual samples. A high temperature component unblocks above 500°-520°C and an intermediate temperature component of nearly antipodal direction unblocks between 425°-450°C and 500°-520°C. In addition, a few samples display a third component that unblocks between 100-350°C that is nearly parallel to the highest temperature component. These multiple, nearly antipodal components suggest that remanence was acquired in different geomagnetic chrons, and represent the first multipolarity remanences seen in Pacific lower oceanic crust. Similar remanence structures, however, have been reported in lower crustal gabbros recovered from slow-spreading rate crust along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and have been interpreted to reflect protracted accretion or protracted cooling. In contrast, at Hess Deep unblocking temperatures appear consistent with temperatures inferred for successive phases of alteration, suggesting an alteration history spanning at least two polarity chrons.

  8. Multipolarity Remanences in Lower Oceanic Crustal Gabbros Recovered By Drilling at Hess Deep (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A.; Horst, A. J.; Friedman, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A long-term goal of the scientific ocean drilling community is to understand the processes by which the ocean crust is constructed through magmatism, deformation, metamorphism and hydrothermal cooling. Insights into the magnetic properties of the lower crust have come from drilling at oceanic core complexes and in tectonic windows. At the Hess Deep Rift, propagation of the Cocos-Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust exposes a dismembered, but nearly complete lower crustal section. Here, IODP Expedition 345 (Site U1415) recovered primitive plutonic lithologies including gabbro, troctolitic gabbro and olivine gabbronorite. These rocks exhibit cumulate textures similar to those found in layered basic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes. Metamorphism is dominated by background greenschist facies alteration associated with cataclastic deformation that likely results from Cocos-Nazca rifting. Some intervals display complex, multiple remanence components within individual samples. A high temperature component unblocks above 500°-520°C and an intermediate temperature component of nearly antipodal direction unblocks between 425°-450°C and 500°-520°C. In addition, a few samples display a third component that unblocks between 100-350°C that is nearly parallel to the highest temperature component. These multiple, nearly antipodal components suggest that remanence was acquired in different geomagnetic chrons, and represent the first multipolarity remanences seen in Pacific lower oceanic crust. Similar remanence structures, however, have been reported in lower crustal gabbros recovered from slow-spreading rate crust along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and have been interpreted to reflect protracted accretion or protracted cooling. In contrast, at Hess Deep unblocking temperatures appear consistent with temperatures inferred for successive phases of alteration, suggesting an alteration history spanning at least two polarity chrons.

  9. Evidence for hydrous melting along high-temperature veins within a gabbro from SWIR (ODP Leg 176)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feig, S. T.; Koepke, J.; Bremer, C.; Snow, J. E.

    2003-04-01

    The 1053 m long drilled gabbroic section of the Leg 176 from the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) contains numerous high-temperature veins composed of orthopyroxene (opx), pargasite (par), clinopyroxene (cpx), and plagioclase (plag). According to Maeda et al. (2002) these veins were formed by a water-rich fluid at temperatures up to 1000°C. New partial melting experiments using oceanic gabbros from the Leg 176 as starting material revealed, that at such conditions gabbros should melt (Feig et al., this volume). By carefully checking high-temperature veins with backscattered electron imaging, we actually found in one gabbro (R6a) from the Leg microstructures which are evident for hydrous partial melting. Plag in contact with a vein shows a few tens of microns thick, irregular zone significantly enriched in An (An76), while cpx along veins react to idiomorphic opx (Mg# = 75) and par (Na+K on A = 0.73; Mg# = 74). An-rich plag, opx, and par are regarded as restitic crystals of a partial melting reaction, while micron-sized "pools" of hornblende between cpx and par are probably related to former melt pockets. Striking is the compositional agreement with corresponding phases of those hydrous partial melting experiments using as starting material a gabbro (61a) showing a composition (olivine - Fo71, plag - An55, cpx - Mg# = 78), which matches well that of R6a (olivine - Fo71, plag - An55, cpx - Mg# = 80). That run performed at 940°C (P = 200 MPa, NNO oxygen buffer, water-saturated) shows as crystal phases opx (Mg# = 75), par (Na+K on A = 0.68; Mg# = 74), and plag (~ An75; extrapolated from a run performed at 980°C with An79, since the plag of the 940°C-run was too tiny for microprobe analysis). Cpx was not stable in that run at 940°C. The coexisting melt of this run is dioritc with a SiO2 content of 60.9 wt%. Our experiments imply melting temperatures of ~940°C under water-saturated conditions for the formation of the high-temperature vein minerals. The melt, once

  10. Diffusion-Reaction Between Basaltic Andesite and Gabbro at 0.5 GPa: an Explanation for Anorthitic Plagioclase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstrom, C. C.; Boudreau, A. E.; Pertermann, M.

    2004-12-01

    Despite the remarkably smooth variation in bulk composition of erupted lavas at Arenal volcano (1968-2003), mineral compositions vary widely. Plagioclase ranges from An52 to An95 while Cr2O3 in CPX varies from 0.7 to 0.05 wt % (Streck et al., 2003). To address the question "how do bulk compositions remain near-steady-state while crystal compositions vary widely," we have performed 2 diffusion-reaction experiments in the piston cylinder at 0.5 GPa. These juxtaposed Arenal basaltic andesite AR-8 at 1200° C with a Stillwater Complex gabbro, lying in a thermal gradient toward the piston. In one experiment, we synthesized a glass-plagioclase (An67-75) aggregate of AR-8 in a graphite-Pt-Ti capsule at P-T, polished one end, dried tracer solutions of 45Ca, 6Li, 84Sr and 136Ba on its surface, and juxtaposed it with gabbro for 13 days. Profiles of bulk composition as a function of distance from the interface show that AR-8 gains Al2O3, MgO and CaO from the gabbro and loses Na2O, K2O, SiO2 and FeO to it. Notably, a plagioclase rich (65%) layer develops at the interface between the two materials as CPX disappears. This layer and the compositional profiles are reproduced by diffusion-reaction models using IRIDIUM (Boudreau, 2003). Plagioclase at the interface develops a texture of homogeneous anorthitic cores (An90) that abruptly shift to 10μ m rims having compositions (An67) in Na-Ca exchange equilibrium with the co-existing melt. A beta track map shows that 45Ca is incorporated into the plagioclase cores while SIMS analyses indicate isotopic equilibration between core and melt. Thus, these anorthitic plagioclase result from diffusion-reaction with efficient chemical communication between the melt and the plagioclase core. Microchannels cutting through the rim, rather than solid-state diffusion, appear to control re-equilibration. Other observations from the experiment parallel Arenal lavas: Mg# variation in OPX is small in both experiments and lavas while profiles of Cr

  11. Petrogenesis of the Zhangmatun gabbro in the Ji'nan complex, North China Craton: Implications for skarn-type iron mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qiuhong; Zhang, Zhaochong; Hou, Tong; Santosh, M.; Jin, Ziliang; Han, Liu; Cheng, Zhiguo

    2015-12-01

    The Zhangmatun gabbro is part of the Ji'nan complex in the North China Craton. It is spatially and temporally associated with the Zhangmatun skarn-type high-grade iron deposit. U-Pb dating of zircons from the Zhangmatun gabbro yielded an age of 130.2 ± 1.8 Ma, indicating the emplacement time as Early Cretaceous. The Zhangmatun gabbro displays porphyritic texture with plagioclase and clinopyroxene as the major phenocryst phases, together with minor biotite, hornblende, and magnetite. The rocks show a restricted range of SiO2 (50.1-52.7 wt.%) and Al2O3 (14.7-16.0 wt.%), low TiO2 (0.69-0.86 wt.%), relatively variable FeOT (2.87-8.62 wt.%), high MgO (6.50-8.01 wt.%) and Na2O (3.36-5.13 wt.%). The gabbro is also characterized by marked enrichment of LREEs and other LILEs (e.g., Rb, Sr and Ba), and strong depletion in HFSEs (e.g., Nb, Ta, Ti, Zr and Hf), similar to arc-related magma. The plagioclase and clinopyroxene from the Ji'nan gabbro, Zhangmatun gabbro, as well as Yaoshan and Huashan gabbroic diorite exhibit higher oxygen isotopes than those of the primitive mantle, indicating involvement of crustal materials. The similarity in geology, geochronology and petrology of these rocks suggests that they are co-magmatic. The parent magma of the Zhangmatun gabbro was produced by partial melting of amphibole-bearing spinel lherzolite in the upper mantle which has been modified by the lower crustal materials beneath the North China Craton. In combination with the Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the Zhangmatun gabbro, we recognize EMI-type mantle source beneath the Ji'nan area. Moreover, the relatively high values as well as the relatively large variation of εHf(t) (-9.1 to +1.8) imply that asthenospheric material was also involved in the mantle-derived melt. The formation of iron concentration in the hydrothermal fluids is attributed to the exsolution of Fe-rich magmatic fluids and leaching from the solidified Zhangmatun gabbro at the retrograde alteration stage.

  12. A mineralogical investigation of the Late Permian Doba gabbro, southern Chad: Constraints on the parental magma conditions and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Lee, Tung-Yi; Yang, Chih-Cheng; Hu, Shin-Tai; Wu, Jong-Chang; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    The late Permian Doba (257 ± 1 Ma) gabbro was discovered at the base of an exploration well through the Cretaceous Doba Basin of Southern Chad. The gabbro is at least 250 m thick, has cumulus mineral textures and consists of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxide, apatite and quartz. The composition of the silicate minerals (i.e. plagioclase, pyroxenes) from the lowest part of the intrusion tend to be more primitive (i.e. An59, Wo40-44En33-47Fs12-25) than the upper part (i.e. An41, Wo39-43En30-44Fs14-29) suggesting the magmatic system differentiated internally by crystal fractionation and crystal redistribution. Based on the chemistry of the pyroxenes, the parental magma was compositionally similar to a Ti-rich, within-plate continental tholeiite that had a bulk Mg# of ˜44. The relative oxidation state of the magma was initially moderately reducing (i.e. ΔFMQ-0.3) and then became more reducing after a period of fractionation (i.e. ΔFMQ-1.2). The estimated initial magma temperature was at least 1100 °C. The within-plate composition suggests there was rifting-related magmatism near the boundary of the Saharan Metacraton that could be related to edge-driven mantle convection.

  13. Comagmatic contact relationships between the Rock Creek Gabbro and Round Valley Peak granodiorite, central Sierra Nevada, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.C.; Bown, C.J. . School of Natural Science)

    1993-03-01

    The Rock Creek Gabbro (RCG) in Little Lakes Valley, near Tom's Place, CA abuts three granodiorites with distinctive contact characteristics. Against within a cm in most places. The contact with Round Valley Peak (RVP) on the north, however, is a zone at least 3 km wide and records a mode of mafic magmatic enclave formation. A northward traverse of the zone begins 300--400 m within the RCG with progressively lighter, though still uniform rock. Next is a 100--200m wide jumble of sharp-edged angular 10--30m gabbroic xenoliths, variable in grainsize and plastic deformation and interspersed with stretched partially disaggregated enclaves in normal RVP granodiorite. Xenoliths are essentially absent from the RVP from here north; stretched enclaves with very consistent strikes paralleling (within 20[degree]) the mapped RCG-RVP contact and high angle dips (70--90[degree]), occur singly and in dense swarms and fall from 4% to 0.5% of outcrop area in the remaining traverse. Rock Creek gabbros including xenoliths at the contact cluster chemically with RVP enclaves on all major and trace element plots, suggesting a common parentage; some of each group show evidence of plagioclase flotation. Trace element data (esp. Zr/Nb) suggests that fractional crystallization dominates mixing in the evolution of the gabbroic/enclave magma.

  14. Ortigalita Peak gabbro, Franciscan complex: U-Pb dates of intrusion and high-pressure low-temperature metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattinson, James M.; Echeverria, Lina M.

    1980-12-01

    Paleontological and isotopic age data from the Franciscan complex in the Ortigalita Peak quadrangle, Diablo Range, California, provide new insight into the tectonic evolution of at least part of the Franciscan complex. Graywacke, shale, pillowed greenstone, and chert in the quadrangle were deposited in Late Jurassic (Tithonian) time, about 135 to 150 m.y. ago, on the basis of radiolaria. These rocks then were incorporated in an accretionary wedge prior to the intrusion of gabbroic magma 95 m.y. ago (U-Pb dating on zircons). Subduction (metamorphism of gabbro and surrounding sedimentary rocks to blueschist grade) closely followed intrusion at about 92 m.y. ago (U-Pb dating on metamorphic titanite and “plagioclase” = albite + pumpellyite ± quartz). The brief interval between intrusion and subduction confirms the idea that the gabbro was intruded into the accretionary wedge, essentially at the site of plate convergence. The much longer interval (about 40 to 55 m.y.) between deposition and subduction reveals that the Franciscan had a long presubduction history and provides a time frame within which more speculative concepts such as extensive northward translation of the Franciscan must be constrained.

  15. The Fazenda Gavião granodiorite and associated potassic plutons as evidence for Palaeoproterozoic arc-continent collision in the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Felipe G.; Oliveira, Elson P.; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2011-08-01

    Several granitic plutons have intruded the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, São Francisco craton, Brazil, in the time interval 2163-2080 Ma, but their tectonic significance is poorly understood. The Fazenda Gavião granodiorite (FGG) is one of a set of plutons emplaced along the western boundary of the greenstone belt with Archaean migmatite-gneiss basement. The pluton is mostly composed of hornblende granodiorite, occasionally crosscut by syn-plutonic mafic dykes. The FGG is metaluminous, medium- to high-K calc-alkaline with relatively constant silica abundances (SiO2 ˜ 63-66 wt%), high Sr (900-800 ppm) and high Ba (1000-1500 ppm). The associated mafic dykes are ultrapotassic, with high abundances of Ba, Sr, MgO, Ni, Cr, and light rare earth elements, suggesting derivation from partial melts of an enriched mantle source. The FGG originated probably by fractional crystallization from a primitive K-rich mafic magma that interacted with crustal melts. Its zircon U-Pb SHRIMP age of 2106 ± 6 Ma indicates that the FGG is younger than the early (2163-2127 Ma) tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) and calc-alkaline arc plutons of the greenstone belt, and is closely related in time and space with potassic to ultrapotassic plutons (ca. 2110-2105 Ma). The negative ɛNd(t) of FGG and coeval K-rich plutons of the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt contrasts markedly with the positive ɛNd(t) of the older arc plutons, indicating a major change of isotope signatures in granites of the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt with time. This isotope shift may be related to magma contamination with older continental material and/or derivation of the parental potassic magma from enriched lithospheric mantle sources. We suggest that the K-rich plutons were emplaced during or shortly after Palaeoproterozoic arc-continent collision.

  16. The Sondalo gabbro contact aureole (Campo unit, Eastern Alps): implications for mid-crustal mafic magma emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, B.; Mohn, G.; Štípská, P.; Schulmann, K.; Manatschal, G.

    2016-05-01

    Contact aureoles rimming plutonic rocks are the locus of metamorphism and deformations witnessing magma emplacement mechanisms in the crust. In this study, structural and petrological observations are combined to mineral equilibria modelling to unravel the polyphase tectono-metamorphic history of the Permian Sondalo gabbro and its host rock, the Campo unit (Eastern Alps). The Campo unit consists of Grt-St-Ms-Bt-Pl-Qtz ± Sil ± And ± Crd mica schists attesting of a Carboniferous prograde P- T path, reaching 6 kbar/600 °C and subsequently 5.6 kbar/650 °C. This metamorphism is coeval with the formation of a sub-vertical NE-SW trending foliation (S1) and its overprint by a sub-vertical NW-SE trending foliation (S2). The heat brought by the Permian intrusives subsequently caused heating of the Campo unit at around 3-4 kbar/540 °C reflected by regional static crystallization of cordierite and andalusite porphyroblasts. During the intrusion of the Sondalo gabbro, thermal peak conditions are recorded by Grt-Sil-Spl-Crd-Ilm granulitic xenoliths at ~5.5 kbar/930 °C, subsequently exhumed at ~4 kbar during the development of a new foliation (S3). This foliation is localized around the pluton and moderately dips away from the centre of the pluton. In the migmatitic contact aureole, Grt-Sil-Bt-Pl-Qtz-Ilm and Grt-Sil-Crd-Spl-Bt-Kfs-Ilm residual rocks bear the new foliation (S3) and document a decompression from 6 kbar/750 °C to 5 kbar/725 °C and from 5.2 kbar/800 °C to reach 4.8 kbar/770 °C, respectively. The P- T- d paths recorded by the host rock and the xenoliths point to a two-step magma emplacement. First the Sondalo gabbro intruded the Campo unit causing heating of the host rock without deformation at 3-4 kbar. Second, the ductile flow along the pluton margins developed a new foliation (S3) during exhumation of the pluton and its immediate contact aureole from 6 to 4 kbar. Altogether, it indicates a progressive increase in mechanical coupling between the pluton

  17. Fe-Ti-oxide textures and microstructures in shear zones from oceanic gabbros at Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, Jessica; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Rybacki, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Ocean drilling expeditions at several oceanic core complexes formed at slow- and ultra-slow-spreading ridges have recovered cores containing numerous zones of oxide-rich gabbros containing ilmenite and magnetite. In these cores, high modal concentrations of Fe-Ti-oxides are systematically associated with high-temperature plastic deformation features in silicates. We present observations of Fe-Ti-oxide mineral structures and textural characteristics from a series of oxide-rich shear zones from Atlantis Bank (ODP Site 735B) on the Southwest Indian Ridge aimed at determining how oxide mineral abundances relate to strain localization. Fe-Ti-oxide minerals in undeformed oxide gabbros and in highly deformed samples from natural shear zones generally have morphologies characteristic of crystallized melt, including highly cuspate grains and low dihedral angles. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in oxide-rich shear zones is very strong, with fabrics mainly characterized by strong magnetic foliations parallel to the macroscopic foliation. Crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in magnetite are generally weak, with occasionally well-defined textures. Ilmenite typically displays well-developed CPOs, however, the melt-like ilmenite grain shapes indicate that at least part of the crystallographic texture results from oriented ilmenite growth during post-deformation crystallization. The oxides are hypothesized to have initially been present as isolated pockets of trapped melt (intercumulus liquid) in a load-bearing silicate framework. Progressive plastic deformation of silicate phases at high-temperature mainly produced two features: (i) elongated melt pockets, which crystallized to form strings of opaque minerals and (ii), interconnected networks of melt regions. The latter lead to intense strain localization of the rock, which appears as oxide-rich mylonites in the samples. In some samples, abundant low-angle grain boundaries in both magnetite and ilmenite suggest

  18. Complementary trace-element fractionation in volcanic and plutonic rocks: imperfect examples from ocean-floor basalts and gabbros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delong, Stephen E.; Chatelain, Carole

    1989-06-01

    A simple trace-element model that is generalized from one devised by Albarede (1976) can be used to treat plutonic rocks as mixtures of cumulate phases and trapped liquid. The model is based on the Rayleigh fractionation law, mass balance, and modal data and, with certain assumptions, can give estimates of the mass fraction of the liquid component ( X l) in a cumulate rock and of some of the characteristics of that liquid, including trace-element concentrations and the mass fraction of the original liquid ( F) that remained in the magma chamber when some of it was trapped. Application of the model to Cr and Zr data for ten dredged gabbros from the Oceanographer Fracture Zone (OFZ) in the North Atlantic yields results in the range X l=0.014 0.17 and F=0.04 0.22. A more complex model extends the equations developed by Greenland (1970) and combines them with constraints from 1-atm experiments on ocean-floor basalts to effectively map phase-saturation boundaries onto trace-element variation diagrams. On a Zr-Sr plot, the model is capable of mimicking mixing chords and differences in liquid lines of descent (or parental compositions) inferred from major-element chemistry for several OFZ basalts. Qualitatively, the associated gabbros can also be rationalized as cumulate/melt mixtures on this diagram, although the allowable range of liquid compositions is large. In addition, there is some suggestion that the Zr-Sr liquid line of descent fitted to the OFZ basalts may have more general relevance to other ocean-floor rocks (e.g., Galapagos and FAMOUS glasses).

  19. Magnetic and microscopic features of silicate-hosted Fe-oxide inclusions in an oceanic gabbro section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, Jessica

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic mineralogy of oceanic gabbros is typically dominated by magnetite, which occurs in several forms: as a cumulus or intercumulus phase, as a secondary phase formed through alteration, or as exsolved inclusions in plagioclase and pyroxene. This study characterizes the contribution of magnetic inclusions in plagioclase and pyroxene to the bulk rock remanence and examines changes in the distribution of remanence carriers with crustal depth. Selected samples were taken throughout a 1500-m-long section of drilled oceanic gabbro cores collected from the Oceanic Drilling Program Site 735B at Atlantis Bank on the Southwest Indian Ridge. Hysteresis parameters and curves of isothermal remanence acquisition were measured for plagioclase and clinopyroxene mineral separates and compared with whole rock measurements for samples from various depths to determine the relative contributions of each to the bulk sample remanence properties. In whole-rock samples, bulk saturation magnetization decreases and coercivity distributions become dominated by harder magnetic components with increasing depth. The changes in rock magnetic properties with depth are interpreted to result from variations in composition as well as cooling rates. Coercivity distributions in both plagioclase and pyroxene systematically shift to higher coercivities with increasing depth in the section, although the change is more pronounced in plagioclase, indicating that the size distributions of magnetic inclusions in plagioclase become progressively finer. First-order reversal curves for plagioclase separates provide a striking example of non-interacting single-domain particles. Variations in exsolution textures and compositions of the inclusions were also investigated by microanalysis and electron microscopy. Microscopic examination revealed unexpected complexity in the structure of exsolution features, with several oxide phases commonly present as inclusions in plagioclase and multiple generations of

  20. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Ages for Northwest Africa 2977, A Young Lunar Gabbro from the PKT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 2977 is an olivine gabbro cumulate equivalent to one of the lithologies in lunar mare breccia NWA 773 [1,2,3]. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age is 2.77+/-0.04 Ga based on the last approx.57% of the gas release [4], similar to results for NWA 773 [5]. A Sm-Nd age (T) of 2.865+/-0.031 Ga and Epsilon(sub Nd) = -7.84+/-0.22 for the NWA 773 gabbro reported by [6] has been revised to T = 2.993+/-=0.032 Ga, Epsilon(sub Nd) -4.5+/-0.3 [7]. Sm-147-Nd-143 isochron for NWA 2977: Whole rock, pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, whole rock leachate (approx.phosphate) and the combined leachates from the mineral separates yield a well defined Sm-Nd isochron for an age T = 3.10+/-0.05 Ga and Epsilon(sub Nd-CHUR) = -3.74+/-0.26 [8], or Epsilon(sub Nd-HEDR) = -4.61+/-0.26 [9]. Rb-87-Sr-87 isochron: NWA 2977 contains only a modest amount of Rb and/or Sr contamination. The Sr-isotopic composition of the contaminant closely resembles that of seawater. The whole rock residue after leaching combined with leach residues for plagioclase and pyroxene define an isochron age of 3.29+/-0.11 Ga for initial Sr-87/Sr-86 = 0.70287+/-18. The olivine residue, with lower Sr abundance of approx 1.5 ppm, is only slightly displaced from the isochron. The relatively small uncertainties of the Rb-Sr isochron parameters and near-concordancy with the Sm-Nd age indicate that both the Rb-Sr and the Sm-Nd ages are reliable.

  1. Dependencies of pore pressure on elastic wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Uehara, S. I.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic refraction have found that there are high Vp/Vs ratio regions in oceanic crusts at subducting oceanic plates (e.g, Cascadia subduction zone (2.0-2.8) (Audet et al., 2009)). Previous studies based on laboratory measurements indicated that Vp/Vs ratio is high when porosity and/or pore pressure is high (Christensen, 1984; Peacock et al., 2011). Although several studies have investigated the relationships between fracture distributions and Vp, Vs (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Blake et al., 2013), the relationships for rocks (e.g., gabbro and basalt) composing oceanic crust are still unclear. This study reports the results of laboratory measurements of Vp, Vs (transmission method) at controlled confining and pore pressure and estimation of Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro which mimic highly fractured rocks in the high Vp/Vs ratio zone, in order to declare the dependence of fracture distributions on Vp/Vs. For the measurements, we prepared three type specimens; a non-heated intact specimen, specimens heated up to 500 °C and 700 °C for 24 hours. Porosities of intact, 500 °C and 700 °C specimens measured under the atmospheric pressure are 0.5, 3.4 and 3.5%, respectively. Measurements were conducted at a constant confining pressure of 50 MPa, with decreasing pore pressure from 49 to 0.1 MPa and then increasing to 49 MPa. While Vp/Vs for the intact specimen is almost constant at elevated pore pressure, the Vp/Vs values for the thermally cracked ones were 2.0~2.2 when pore pressure was larger than 30 MPa. In future, we will reveal the relationship between the measured elastic wave velocities and the characteristics of the microfracture distribution. This work was supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Number 26400492).

  2. Petrography and Geochemistry (Trace, Ree and Pge) of Pedda Cherlo Palle Gabbro-Diorite Pluton, Prakasam Igneous Province, Andhra Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Reddy, U. V. B.; Balaram, V.; Roy, Parijat

    2015-09-01

    Prakasam Igneous Province (PIP) is an important geological domain in the Eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC), found in the junction zone between the EDC and Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB). The Pedda Cherlo Palle (PCP) gabbros are massive, leucocratic-mesocractic, and show cumulus textures with minerals plagioclase, cpx, and amphiboles. Compositionally, plagioclase is a labradorite-bytownite, cpx is diopside to augite, olivines are hyalosiderites and amphiboles are magnesiohornblendes. PCP gabbros have normal SiO2, high Al2O3, moderate to high TiO2, Na2O and medium Fe2O3, so, classified as subalkaline tholeiitic gabbros. Fractionated rare earth element (REE) patterns, high abundance of large ion lithofile elements (LILE) and transitional metals coupled with light REE (LREE) relative enrichment over heavy REE (HREE) and Nb are characteristics of partial melting of depleted mantle and melts that have undergone fractional crystalisation. These partial melts are enriched in LREE and LILE, due to the addition of slab derived sediment and fluids. PCP gabbros contain low abundance (5.1 to 24.6 ng/g) of platinum group elements (PGE), and show an increase in the order Ir>Os>Pt>Ru»Pd>Rh. We propose that the subduction related intraoceanic island arc might have accreted to the southeastern margin of India to the east of Cuddapah basin in a collisional regime that took place during Ur to Rodinia amalgamations.

  3. Plagioclase zonation styles in hornblende gabbro inclusions from Little Glass Mountain, Medicine Lake volcano, California: Implications for fractionation mechanisms and the formation of composition gaps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brophy, J.G.; Dorais, M.J.; Donnelly-Nolan, J.; Singer, B.S.

    1997-01-01

    The rhyolite of Little Glass Mountain (73-74% SiO2) is a single eruptive unit that contains inclusions of quenched andesite liquid (54-61% SiO2) and partially crystalline cumulate hornblende gabbro (53-55% SiO2). Based on previous studies, the quenched andesite inclusions and host rhyolite lava are related to one another through fractional crystallization and represent an example of a fractionation-generated composition gap. The hornblende gabbros represent the cumulate residue associated with the rhyolite-producing and composition gap-forming fractionation event. This study combines textural (Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast, NDIC, imaging), major element (An content) and trace element (Mg, Fe, Sr, K, Ti, Ba) data on the style of zonation of plagioclase crystals from representative andesite and gabbro inclusions, to assess the physical environment in which the fractionation event and composition gap formation took place. The andesite inclusions (54-61% SiO2) are sparsely phyric with phenocrysts of plagioclase, augite and Fe-oxide??olivine, +/-orthopyroxene, +/-hornblende set within a glassy to crystalline matrix. The gabbro cumulates (53-55% SiO2) consist of an interconnected framework of plagioclase, augite, olivine, orthopyroxene, hornblende and Fe-oxide along with highly vesicular interstitial glass (70-74% SiO2). The gabbros record a two-stage crystallization history of plagioclase + olivine + augite (Stage I) followed by plagioclase+orthopyroxene + hornblende + Fe-oxide (Stage II). Texturally, the plagioclase crystals in the andesite inclusions are characterized by complex, fine-scale oscillatory zonation and abundant dissolution surfaces. Compositionally (An content) the crystals are essentially unzoned from core-to-rim. These features indicate growth within a dynamic (convecting?), reservoir of andesite magma. In contrast, the plagioclase crystals in the gabbros are texturally smooth and featureless with strong normal zonation from An74 at the

  4. Magmatic ^18O in Zircons From Gabbros and Serpentinized Peridotite at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (ODP Leg 153)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavosie, A. J.; Kita, N. T.; Valley, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    Zircons from gabbros and serpentinized ultramafic rocks from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the Kane Transform (MARK area) drilled during Leg 153 of the Ocean Drilling Program were analyzed for δ18O in situ in rock chips by ion microprobe. The gabbros contain clinopyroxene, plagioclase, apatite, Fe-oxides, with zircon occurring primarily along grain boundaries and as inclusions in other minerals (e.g. plagioclase). The mineralogy of the serpentinites is more complex, as they are comprised predominantly of a serpentine matrix that is cross-cut by multiple generations of intrusions, including zircon-bearing magmas emplaced as cm- to mm-scale gabbroic dikes and also lower temperature hydrothermal veins. The gabbroic dikes were pervasively altered at greenschist facies conditions, leaving zircon ± apatite as the only preserved magmatic phases. In some serpentinites it is difficult to distinguish altered magmatic veins from lower temperature hydrothermal veins. Zircons in serpentinite and gabbroic samples yield average δ18O values of 4.94±0.80‰ VSMOW (2 SD, N=33 analyses on 12 grains). This value would be in high temperature, magmatic equilibrium with MORB if δ18O (WR) ~ 5.3‰, or mantle peridotite if δ18O (Ol) = ~4.8‰. Equilibrium fractionation factors for δ18O between zircon-water (Zrc-H2O) were calculated by combining fractionation factors for Zrc-quartz (Valley et al. 2003) and quartz-H2O (Clayton et al., 1972; Matsuhisa et al., 1979). Over the temperature range of the calibrated fractionation factors (i.e. 500-800°C), calculated δ18O (zircon) values would be < 1 ‰ for zircon in equilibrium with previously measured MARK hydrothermal fluids (e.g. δ18O = 2.3‰). Zircon in equilibrium with seawater with δ18O = 0.0‰ would have 2.3‰ lower values. We note that extrapolation of the Zrc-H2O fractionation factors to temperatures below the calibrations of Zrc-Qtz and Qtz-H2O (e.g. <500°C) does not yield a typical mineral-water `crossover' at lower

  5. The Siquisique basalts and gabbros, Los Algodones, Venezuela: late Cretaceous oceanic plateau formed within the proto-Caribbean plate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, A. C.; Neill, I.; Urbani, F.; Spikings, R.; Barry, T.; Tarney, J.

    2009-12-01

    Basalts and gabbros, exposed near Siquisique, Venezuela have previously been interpreted as Jurassic mid-ocean ridge basalts, on the basis of an ammonite found in nearby, but not obviously intercalated, sediments (Bartok, 1985). This, combined with their current tectonic position, well within the continent, and because they accreted before the Cretaceous ‘Great Arc’ of the Caribbean, has led to the Siquisique igneous rocks being widely regarded as Jurassic ‘normal’ mid-ocean ridge basalts and gabbros formed as North and South America rifted apart. We present new geochemical and chronological data which shows that the Siquisique igneous rocks are 95-90Ma and have a chemistry which is more consistent with derivation from a deep mantle plume, than a mid-ocean ridge. It is clear that these basalts represent part of the original ocean floor of the Caribbean, which formed before the tectonic emplacement of the present-day Caribbean from the Pacific. Chemically similar basalts and gabbros at El Copey on Araya Peninsula and Sans Souci in northern Trinidad also accreted to the continental margin of South America before the ‘Great Arc’ of the Caribbean and may well be part of the same intra-Caribbean ‘plume event’. These exposures all indicate that the oceanic crust of the proto-Caribbean, was likely to have consisted (at least in part) of thickened oceanic crust formed by melting of a hot-mantle plume. Although the Siquisique rocks formed at a similar time to the Caribbean-Colombian oceanic plateau they were not derived from the same mantle plume. This supports previous suggestions (Kerr & Tarney, 2005; Snow et al. 2005) that the period around ~90Ma (like that around 120Ma) was marked by a significant upsurge in global plume-related magmatic activity. This activity is likely to have contributed significantly to the major worldwide oceanic anoxia event (OAE2) around the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (93.4Ma)(Kerr, 1998; Snow et al. 2005). Significantly, this

  6. Gravity and magnetic expression of the San Leandro gabbro with implications for the geometry and evolution of the Hayward Fault zone, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, D.A.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Jachens, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Hayward Fault, one of the most hazardous faults in northern California, trends north-northwest and extends for about 90 km along the eastern San Francisco Bay region. At numerous locations along its length, distinct and elongate gravity and magnetic anomalies correlate with mapped mafic and ultramafic rocks. The most prominent of these anomalies reflects the 16-km-long San Leandro gabbroic block. Inversion of magnetic and gravity data constrained with physical property measurements is used to define the subsurface extent of the San Leandro gabbro body and to speculate on its origin and relationship to the Hayward Fault Zone. Modeling indicates that the San Leandro gabbro body is about 3 km wide, dips about 75??-80?? northeast, and extends to a depth of at least 6 km. One of the most striking results of the modeling, which was performed independently of seismicity data, is that accurately relocated seismicity is concentrated along the western edge or stratigraphically lower bounding surface of the San Leandro gabbro. The western boundary of the San Leandro gabbro block is the base of an incomplete ophiolite sequence and represented at one time, a low-angle roof thrust related to the tectonic wedging of the Franciscan Complex. After repeated episodes of extension and attenuation, the roof thrust of this tectonic wedge was rotated to near vertical, and in places, the strike-slip Hayward Fault probably reactivated or preferentially followed this pre-existing feature. Because earthquakes concentrate near the edge of the San Leandro gabbro but tend to avoid its interior, we qualitatively explore mechanical models to explain how this massive igneous block may influence the distribution of stress. The microseismicity cluster along the western flank of the San Leandro gabbro leads us to suggest that this stressed volume may be the site of future moderate to large earthquakes. Improved understanding of the three-dimensional geometry and physical properties along the

  7. Carbon Species in Serpentinites and Gabbros Underlying the Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Southern Atlantis Massif (30°N, MAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, A.; Schaeffer, P.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frueh-Green, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    Serpentinization of oceanic peridotites results in the production of volatile-rich (methane and hydrogen) fluids and other light hydrocarbons, and is characteristic of the low-temperature (<90°C) fluids actively venting at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF; 30°N near the MAR). Carbon contents and carbon isotope compositions have been measured from serpentinized peridotites and gabbros in the basement of the LCHF with the goal to better understand carbon sources and carbon cycling during serpentinization and hydrothermal venting. The serpentinites have total carbon contents (TC) of 60 to 820 ppm, and up to 1.7 wt% in samples containing carbonate veins. C-isotope compositions of the TC range from -24.9 to +2.3‰, whereby positive δ13C values are correlated with serpentinites with carbonate veins and indicate a marine carbon input. The non-carbonate carbon content (TOC: total organic carbon and graphite residual after HCl dissolution) of the serpentinites is from 55 to 280 ppm, with δ13CTOC ranging from -29.5 to -21.5‰. The gabbros show a wider range of TC and δ13CTC, but have δ13CTOC in the same range as the serpentinites. The TOC isotopic compositions may reflect hydrocarbon production during serpentinization or the presence of organic compounds within the samples. To constrain the origin further, organic compounds were extracted from selected serpentinites. The saturated hydrocarbon fractions show a predominance of n-alkanes and an unresolved complex mixture. Long chain n- alkanes show no odd over even carbon number predominance, indicating no contamination by higher plants waxes from recent material. Although n-alkanes can be biogenic or be produced abiotically by Fischer Tropsch-type reactions, the occurrence of the isoprenoids norpristane, pristane, phytane and squalane clearly indicate a biogenic origin, possibly incorporated into the serpentinites during fluid-rock interaction. Compound- specific C-isotope analyses show relatively constant

  8. Slow Slip Predictions Based on Gabbro Dehydration and Friction Data Compared to GPS Measurements in Northern Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. R.; Liu, Y.

    2008-12-01

    For episodic slow slip transients in subduction zones, a large uncertainty in comparing surface deformations predicted by rate and state friction modeling [Liu and Rice, JGR, 2007] to GPS measurements lies in our limited knowledge of the frictional properties and fluid pore pressure along the fault. In this study, we apply petrological data [Peacock et al., USGS, 2002; Hacker et al., JGR 2003; Wada et al., JGR, 2008] and recently reported friction data [He et al., Tectonophys, 2006, 2007] for gabbro, as a reasonable representation of the seafloor, to a Cascadia-like 2D model in order to produce simulations which show spontaneous aseismic transients. We compare the resulting inter-transient and transient surface deformations to GPS observations along the northern Cascadia margin. An inferred region along dip of elevated fluid pressure is constrained by seismological observations where available, and by thermal and petrological models for the Cascadia and SW Japan subduction zones. For the assumed a and a-b profiles, we search the model parameter space, by varying the level of effective normal stress σ, characteristic slip distance L in the source areas of transients, and the fault width under that low σ, to identify simulation cases which produce transient aseismic slip and recurrence interval similar to the observed 20-30 mm and 14 months, respectively, in northern Cascadia. Using a simple planar fault geometry and extrapolating the 2D fault slip to a 3D distribution, we find that the gabbro gouge friction data allows a much better fit to GPS observations than is possible with the granite data [Blanpied et al., JGR, 1995, 1998] which, for lack of a suitable alternative, has been used as the basis for most previous subduction earthquake modeling, including ours. Nevertheless, the values of L required to reasonably fit the geodetic data during a transient event are somewhat larger than 100 microns, rather than in the range of 10 to a few 10s of microns as might be

  9. Stick-slip behavior of Indian gabbro as studied using a NIED large-scale biaxial friction apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, Tetsuhiro; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Urata, Yumi

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports stick-slip behaviors of Indian gabbro as studied using a new large-scale biaxial friction apparatus, built in the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED), Tsukuba, Japan. The apparatus consists of the existing shaking table as the shear-loading device up to 3,600 kN, the main frame for holding two large rectangular prismatic specimens with a sliding area of 0.75 m2 and for applying normal stresses σ n up to 1.33 MPa, and a reaction force unit holding the stationary specimen to the ground. The shaking table can produce loading rates v up to 1.0 m/s, accelerations up to 9.4 m/s2, and displacements d up to 0.44 m, using four servocontrolled actuators. We report results from eight preliminary experiments conducted with room humidity on the same gabbro specimens at v = 0.1-100 mm/s and σ n = 0.66-1.33 MPa, and with d of about 0.39 m. The peak and steady-state friction coefficients were about 0.8 and 0.6, respectively, consistent with the Byerlee friction. The axial force drop or shear stress drop during an abrupt slip is linearly proportional to the amount of displacement, and the slope of this relationship determines the stiffness of the apparatus as 1.15 × 108 N/m or 153 MPa/m for the specimens we used. This low stiffness makes fault motion very unstable and the overshooting of shear stress to a negative value was recognized in some violent stick-slip events. An abrupt slip occurred in a constant rise time of 16-18 ms despite wide variation of the stress drop, and an average velocity during an abrupt slip is linearly proportional to the stress drop. The use of a large-scale shaking table has a great potential in increasing the slip rate and total displacement in biaxial friction experiments with large specimens.

  10. Petrochemistry and mineral chemistry of Late Permian hornblendite and hornblende gabbro from the Wang Nam Khiao area, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand: Indication of Palaeo-Tethyan subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanka, Alongkot; Tsunogae, Toshiaki; Daorerk, Veerote; Tsutsumi, Yukiyasu; Takamura, Yusuke; Endo, Takahiro; Sutthirat, Chakkaphan

    2016-11-01

    In the Wang Nam Khiao area, Nakhon Ratchasima, northeastern Thailand, there are various mafic-ultramafic plutons composed of hornblendite, hornblende gabbro and hornblende microgabbro. The rocks are generally dominated by hornblende, plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The mineral chemistry and whole-rock geochemistry of hornblendite, hornblende gabbro and hornblende microgabbro show their similarities, suggesting a close relationship of their magmatic evolution. The flat REE pattern and low HREE concentration indicate fractional crystallization from hydrous magma. The enrichment in LILE (e.g. Ba, K, Sr) and depletion of HFSE (e.g. Nb, Ta, Zr) together with compositions of clinopyroxene and hornblende reflect arc-related subduction. Hornblende-plagioclase geothermometry and Al-in-hornblende geobarometry indicate the PT conditions of crystallization are 5.3-9.8 kbar and 670-1000 °C, 7.6-9.0 kbar and 850-950 °C, and 7.6-8.8 kbar and 750-850 °C for hornblendite, hornblende gabbro and hornblende microgabbro, respectively, at the lower crustal depth (28-31 km). Zircon U-Pb age of hornblende microgabbro dike, that intruded into hornblendite, yields 257 Ma of intrusion age, suggesting the emplacement of the mafic-ultramafic rock in this area is related to Late Permian arc magmatism resulted from subduction of Palaeo-Tethys beneath Indochina Terrane.

  11. Subduction of Indian continent beneath southern Tibet in the latest Eocene (˜ 35 Ma): insights from the Quguosha gabbros in southern Lhasa block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Wang, Qiang; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Wyman, Derek; Jiang, Zi-Qi

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical data illustrate that the Indian continental lithosphere has northward subducted beneath the Tibet Plateau. However, when the Indian continental lithosphere started to subduct remain unclear. Here we report new results from the Quguosha gabbros of southern Lhasa block, southern Tibet. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating of two samples gives a ca. 35 Ma formation age (i.e., the latest Eocene) for the Quguosha gabbros, which are within a magmatism gap of the Lhasa block. The Quguosha gabbros samples exhibit Sr-Nd isotopic compositions ([87Sr/86Sr]initial = 0.7056-0.7058 and ɛNd(t) = -2.2 - -3.6) different from those of the Jurassic-Eocene magmatic rocks with depleted Sr-Nd isotopic characteristics, but somewhat similar to those of Oligocene-Miocene K-rich magmatic rocks with enriched Sr-Nd isotopic characteristics. We interpret the Quguosha mafic magmas to have been generated by partial melting of lithospheric mantle metasomatized by subducted continental sediments, which entered continental subduction channel(s) and then probably accreted or underplated into the overlying mantle during the northward subduction of the Indian continent. Our data also suggest that the Indian continental crust has started to be underthrusted beneath the mantle lithosphere of the southern Lhasa sub-block by at least ca. 35 Ma.

  12. Timing and nature of the Xinlin-Xiguitu Ocean: constraints from ophiolitic gabbros in the northern Great Xing'an Range, eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yongjiang; Liu, Binqiang; Wen, Quanbo; Li, Weimin; Liu, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Jifeng ophiolitic mélange (ultramafic rocks, meta-basalts and gabbros) crops out in the northern segment of the Great Xing'an Range, the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, which marks the closure of the Xinlin-Xiguitu Ocean associated with the collision between the Erguna block and Xing'an block. In order to investigate the formation age and magma source of the Jifeng ophiolitic mélange, the gabbros from newly discovered the Jifeng ophiolitic mélange are studied with zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock geochemistry and zircon Hf isotopes. Zircon U-Pb dating from the ophiolitic gabbros yields U-Pb age of 647 ± 5.3 Ma, which may represent the formation age of the ophiolitic mélange. The gabbros display low SiO2, TiO2, K2O contents, high Na2O, LREE contents and indistinctive REE fractionation [(La/Yb)N = 1.97-2.98]. It shows an E-MORB-like affinity, while the element concentrations of the Jifeng samples are lower than that of E-MORB. More importantly, Nb displays negative anomaly in comparison with Th, which shows a transitional SSZ-type ophiolite signature. Moreover, the ɛ Hf ( t) values of ~647 Ma zircons in the gabbros range from +8.4 to +13.4, and the corresponding Hf single-stage ages ( T DM1) are between 687 and 902 Ma, which is obviously older than the crystallization age of 647 Ma. These geochemical features can be explained as melts from the partial melting of a depleted mantle source meta-somatized by fluids derived from a subducted slab. Accordingly, we conclude that the Jifeng ophiolitic mélange is probably related to transitional SSZ-type ophiolite and developed in an intra-oceanic subduction, which indicates that an ocean (the Xinlin-Xiguitu Ocean) existed between the Erguna block and Xing'an block. The Ocean's formation might be no later than the Neoproterozoic (647 Ma), and it was closed in the Late Cambrian because of the collision between the Erguna block and Xing'an block.

  13. Occurrences of Orthopyroxene in the "Multi-textured" Layered Gabbros from the Hess Deep Rift, East Pacific Rise (the Site U1415P, IODP Expedition 345)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshide, T.; Machi, S.; Maeda, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Exp.345 drilled three main holes (Holes U1415 I, J & P) from the lowermost plutonic crust exposed at the Hess Deep Rift, East Pacific Rise and primitive layered gabbroic rocks were newly discovered from these holes (Gillis et al., 2014). One of the mysteries about the layered gabbros is the fact that Opx, which is considered to appear in the late stage of crystallization on the basis of crystallization experiments of MORB, occurs as a dominant phase in many of the layered gabbros. In this presentation, we report the occurrence of Opx from the Hole U1415P and consider the significance of Opx in the origin of the layered gabbros. Hole U1415P (about 100m in thickness) is divided into two units, the upper Multi-textured Layered Gabbro Series (MLGS) and lower Troctolite Series (TS). Gabbroic rocks from the MLGS contain Opx (< 4 vol%) and are macroscopically classified into Opx-bearing olivine gabbro. However, these rocks are mesoscopically (on cm scale) inhomogeneous and have a great variation of mode, grain size and texture. On the other hand, TS consists of homogeneous troctolites and Opx rarely occurs in the series. The occurrences of Opx from the MLGS are as follows: (i) coarse-grained Opx+Cpx+Pl vein parallel to the layered structure of the surrounding troctolite (ii) undeformed Opx+Pl veinlets in kinked Ol (iii) Opx in the concave of anhedral Ol (iv) Opx rimming Cr-spl crystals in contact with Ol. The occurrence of Opx like (ii) and (iii) resembles the texture which is considered to be formed by the reaction between mantle peridotite and a SiO2-saturated melt (e.g, Piccardo et al., 2007). The facts that Opx is often found in association with Cr-spl and Cr-spl lamellae occur in pyroxenes of the Opx+Cpx+Pl vein suggest that the SiO2-saturated melt which reacted with Ol was rich in chromium. In addition, Cr-spl crystals rimmed by Opx contain multiphase-solid inclusions. The inclusions should be key in understanding the chemical composition of the reacted melt.

  14. Petrographical and geochemical characteristics of the sheeted dyke-gabbro transition zone in ODP/IODP Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Python, M.; France, L.; Abily, B.; Abe, N.; Alt, J. C.; Godard, M. M.; Ildefonse, B.; Koepke, J. H.; Kurtz, M. D.; Oizumi, R.; Payot, B. D.

    2012-04-01

    During IODP Expedition 335, high grade granoblastic hornfels were extensively recovered as drilling cuttings at the gabbro-sheeted dyke transition zone of ODP Hole 1256D (East Pacific Rise, 6°44.163'N, 91°56.061'W). This lithology probably results from high-temperature metamorphism of previously hydrothermally altered diabases and/or basalts; the heat source likely stems from the melt lens located at the top of the magmatic chambers imaged along present-day fast-spreading ridges. This lithology, associated with gabbroic bodies, characterises the transition zone between the sheeted dyke complex and the uppermost gabbroic section, and represents the interface between magmatic and hydrothermal convecting systems in an oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. In this study, 14 samples from the junk basket (cuttings) and 2 samples from cores obtained during Expedition 335 were observed and analysed. The petrological and chemical characteristics of 5 granoblastic samples collected during Expedition 312 at the root of the sheeted dyke complex and between two gabbroic horizons were also acquired for comparison. Samples collected during IODP Expedition 335 are mainly fine grained oxide grabbronorites composed of two pyroxenes, plagioclases and oxides (ilmenite, magnetite) with more or less amphiboles, sulphides, quartz and accessory minerals. Orthopyroxene Shape (roundish or anhedral), the amount of oxide inclusions in clinopyroxene and plagioclase morphology (laths or triple-junction mosaic) indicate various recrystallisation degrees. Plagioclases show a strong zoning in the less recrystallised samples, which tend to disappear with increasing recrystallisation degree. Samples show usually low alteration (less than 10%) with moderate transformation of pyroxenes into talc or actinolite. Samples from Expedition 312 show finer grains, higher degree of alteration (up to 30%), and weaker recrystallisation. They are mainly composed of plagioclases, amphibole and oxides

  15. Magnesium isotopic compositions of altered oceanic basalts and gabbros from IODP site 1256 at the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Ke, Shan; Gao, Yongjun; Xiao, Yilin; Li, Shuguang

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the behaviour of Mg isotopes during alteration of oceanic crust and constrain the Mg isotopic compositions of the altered oceanic crust (AOC), high-precision Mg isotope analyses have been conducted on forty-four altered basalts and gabbros recovered from IODP site 1256, which represent the carbonate-barren AOC formed at the East Pacific Rise (EPR). These samples were altered by interaction of seawater-derived fluids with oceanic crust at different temperatures and water/rock ratios. With the exception of one sample that has a slightly heavier Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg = 0.01 ± 0.08‰), all the other samples have relatively homogenous and mantle-like Mg isotopic compositions, with δ26Mg ranging from - 0.36 to - 0.14‰ (an average value of - 0.25 ± 0.11‰, 2SD, n = 43). This suggests that limited Mg isotope fractionation occurred during alteration of oceanic crust at the EPR at bulk rock scale, irrespective of highly variable alteration temperatures and variable water/rock ratios. Thus, our study suggests that the offset of δ26Mg values between seawater and global runoff dominantly results from the formation of marine dolomite as a sink for Mg. The mantle-like Mg isotopic composition further indicates that recycling of carbonate-barren AOC would not result in Mg isotope heterogeneity of the mantle at global scale. Consequently, the light Mg isotopic compositions of the mantle at local scale must result from incorporation of recycled Mg isotopically light carbonates.

  16. Study on the Hymenoptera parasitoid associated with Lepidoptera larvae in reforestation and agrosilvopastoral systems at Fazenda Canchim (Embrapa Pecuária Sudeste) São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A G; Silva, R B; Dias, M M; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the local fauna of Hymenoptera parasitoids associated with Lepidoptera larvae in areas of reforestation and agrosilvopastoral systems at Fazenda Canchim (Embrapa Pecuária Sudeste, São Carlos, SP, Brazil). Lepidoptera larvae collected with entomological umbrella were kept in the laboratory until emergence of adults or their parasitoids. From those collected in the agrosilvopastoral system, emerged 267 specimens of hymenopteran parasitoids belonging to 16 genera: Braconidae, Agathidinae (Alabagrus), Braconinae (Bracon), Microgastrinae (Cotesia, Diolcogaster, Glyptapanteles, Pholetesor and Protapanteles), Orgilinae (Orgilus); Ichneumonidae, Campopleginae (Casinaria, Charops and Microcharops); Chalcididae, Chalcidinae (Brachymeria and Conura); Eulophidae, Entedoninae (Horismenus), Eulophinae (Elachertus and Euplectrus). From the Lepidoptera larvae collected in the reforestation, emerged 68 specimens of hymenopteran parasitoids, belonging to 8 genera: Chalcididae, Chalcidinae (Conura); Ichneumonidae, Pimplinae (Neotheronia), Campopleginae (Charops and Microcharops) and Braconidae, Microgastrinae (Apanteles, Diolcogaster, Distatrix, Glyptapanteles and Protapanteles). The results of this study suggest the occurrence of a wide variety of Hymenoptera parasitoids in the studied environments.

  17. The Easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge: A Laboratory to Study MORB and Oceanic Gabbro Petrogenesis in a Very Low Melt Supply Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquet, M.; Cannat, M.; Hamelin, C.; Brunelli, D.

    2014-12-01

    Our study area is located at the ultra-slow Southwest Indian Ridge, east of the Melville Fracture Zone, between 61 and 67°E. The melt distribution in this area is very heterogeneous, with corridors of ultramafic seafloor where plate separation is accommodated by large offset normal faults [Sauter, Cannat et al., 2013]. These ultramafic corridors also expose rare gabbros and basalts. We use the major and trace elements composition of these magmatic rocks to document the petrogenesis of MORB in this exceptionnally low melt supply portion of the MOR system. Basalts from the easternmost SWIR represent a global MORB end-member for major element compositions [Meyzen et al., 2003], with higher Na2O and Al2O3 wt%, and lower CaO and FeO wt% at a given MgO. Within this group, basalts from the ultramafic corridors have particularly high Na2O, low CaO and FeO wt%. Best fitting calculated liquid lines of descent are obtained for crystallization pressures of ~8 kbar. Gabbroic rocks recovered in the ultramafic corridors include gabbros, oxide-gabbros and variably impregnated peridotites. This presentation focuses on these impregnated samples, where cpx have high Mg#, yet are in equilibrium with the nearby basalts in terms of their trace element compositions. Plagioclase An contents vary over a broad range, and there is evidence for opx resorption. These characteristics result from melt-mantle interactions in the axial lithosphere, which may explain several peculiar major element characteristics of the basalts. Similar interactions probably occur beneath ridges at intermediate to slow and ultraslow spreading rates. We propose that they are particularly significant in our study area due to its exceptionnally low integrated melt-rock ratio.

  18. Elastic moduli, thermal expansion, and inferred permeability of Climax quartz monzonite and Sudbury gabbro to 500/sup 0/C and 55 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.; Heard, H.C.

    1981-03-17

    Young's modulus (E), bulk modulus (K), and the coefficient of thermal linear expansion (..cap alpha..) have been determined for Climax quartz monzonite to 500/sup 0/C and pressures (P) to 55 MPa and for Sudbury gabbro to 300/sup 0/C and 55 MPa. For each rock, both E and K decreased with T and increased with P in a nonlinear manner. In the monzonite, E and K decreased by up to 60% as P decreased from 55.2 to 6.9 MPa isothermally, while the gabbro indicated a decrease up to 70% over the same pressure range. As T increased isobarically, E and K for the monzonite decreased by up to a factor of approx. 80% from 19 to 500/sup 0/C. The moduli of the gabbro decreased by as much as 70% from 19 to 300/sup 0/C. ..cap alpha.. for the monzonite increased with T and decreased with P in a nonmonotonic fashion, with most measured values for ..cap alpha.. greater than values calculated for the crack-free aggregate. Depending on P, ..cap alpha.. in the monzonite increased from 8 to 11.10/sup -6/ /sup 0/C/sup -1/ at 40/sup 0/C to 22 to 25.10/sup -6/C/sup -1/ at 475/sup 0/C. For the gabbro, ..cap alpha.. also generally decreased with increasing P. Values ranged from 6 to 11.10/sup -6/ /sup 0/C/sup -1/, showing a nonlinear trend and very little net increas over the T range from 19 to 300/sup 0/C. Calculated permeability of these rocks based on the ..cap alpha.. determinations indicated that permeabilities may increase by up to a factor of 3 over the temperature interval 19 to 300/sup 0/C, and the permeability of the monzonite is inferred to increase by up to a factor of 8 by 500/sup 0/C. In both rocks, most measurements are consistent with microcracks controlling the thermoelastic response by opening with T and closing with sigma and P.

  19. Rb‐Sr resonance ionization geochronology of the Duluth Gabbro: A proof of concept for in situ dating on the Moon

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Jonathan; Whitaker, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale We report new 87Rb‐87Sr isochron data for the Duluth Gabbro, obtained with a laser ablation resonance ionization mass spectrometer that is a prototype spaceflight instrument. The gabbro has a Rb abundance and a range of Rb/Sr ratios that are similar to those of KREEP‐rich basalts found on the nearside of the Moon. Dating of previously un‐sampled young lunar basalts, which generally have a KREEP‐rich composition, is critical for understanding the bombardment history of the Moon since 3.5 Ga, which in turn informs the chronology of the solar system. Measurements of lunar analogs like the Duluth Gabbro are a proof of concept for in situ dating of rocks on the Moon to constrain lunar history. Methods Using the laser ablation resonance ionization mass spectrometer we ablated hundreds of locations on a sample, and at each one measured the relative abundances of the isotopes of Rb and Sr. A delay between the resonant photoionization processes separates the elements in time, eliminating the potential interference between 87Rb and 87Sr. This enables the determination of 87Rb‐87Sr isochron ages without sophisticated sample preparation that would be impractical in a spaceflight context. Results We successfully dated the Duluth Gabbro to 800 ± 300 Ma using traditional isochron methods like those used in our earlier analysis of the Martian meteorite Zagami. However, we were able to improve this to 1100 ± 200 Ma, an accuracy of <1σ, using a novel normalization approach. Both these results agree with the age determined by Faure et al. in 1969, but our novel normalization improves our precision. Conclusions Demonstrating that this technique can be used for measurements at this level of difficulty makes ~32% of the lunar nearside amenable to in situ dating, which can complement or supplement a sample return program. Given these results and the scientific value of dating young lunar basalts, we have recently proposed a spaceflight mission called the Moon Age

  20. Olivine-gabbros and olivine-rich troctolites genesis through melt-rock reactions in oceanic spreading lithosphere: an experimental study up to 0.7 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francomme, Justine E.; Fumagalli, Patrizia; Borghini, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Extensive melt-rock reaction and melt impregnation significantly affect not only the physical and chemical properties at mantle-crust transition, but also control the evolution of migrating melts. We performed reactive dissolution and crystallization experiments at pressure ≤ 0.7 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus to provide experimental constraints on genesis of olivine-rich troctolites and olivine-gabbros at mantle-crust transition in oceanic spreading lithosphere by melt-rock reaction. Our experiments are carried out by using Salt-Pyrex-Graphite-Magnesium assemblies and graphite-lined platinum capsules. Experimental charges are prepared with three layers: (1) basalt powder, (2) fine powder (1-10μm) of San Carlos olivine (Fo90.1), and (3) carbon spheres used as a melt trap. Three synthetic MORB-type melts have been used, two tholeiitic basalts (Mg#: 0.62, SiO2: 47.70 wt%, Na2O: 2.28 wt% and Mg#: 0.58, SiO2: 49.25 wt%, Na2O: 2.49 wt%) and a primitive one (Mg#: 0.74, SiO2: 48.25 wt%, Na2O: 1.80 wt%), in order to investigate the effect of melt composition. A rock/melt ratio of 0.7 has been kept fixed. Experiments have been conducted at temperatures from 1200 to 1300°C, at both step cooling and isothermal conditions for different run durations (from 12 to 72 hrs). They resulted in layered samples in which all the initial San Carlos olivine powder, analog of a dunitic pluton infiltrated by basaltic melt, is replaced by different lithologies from olivine-rich troctolite to olivine gabbro. In isothermal experiments, reacted melts have been successfully trapped in the carbon spheres allowing their chemical analysis; as expected the reacted melt has a higher Mg# than the initial one (e.g. from Mg#=0.62 to 0.73). Across the different lithologies Mg# of olivine is decreasing from the olivine-rich troctolite to the gabbro. Replacive olivine-rich troctolite has a poikilitic texture with rounded euhedral olivine and interstitial poikilitic plagioclase and clinopyroxene

  1. Experimental investigation of gabbro partial melting in the presence of NaCl-rich fluid - implications for the genesis of oceanic plagiogranites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeev, R. R.; Koepke, J.; Silantyev, S. A.; Portnyagin, M.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.; Botcharnikov, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of the experimental study designed to assess the role of NaCl-rich hydrous fluids (modeled seawater-derived fluid) on partial melting of gabbroic rocks. Three contrasting compositions, i.e., olivine-bearing gabbro, gabbro-norite and Fe-Ti-gabbro, were investigated experimentally in the presence of the hydrous fluids with and without an excess of NaCl. The experiments were conducted in the range of pressures (100-200 MPa), temperatures (800-1040°C) and redox conditions (FMQ - FMQ+3). Partial melting in the presence of single aqueous fluid of low salinity (< 20 wt %NaCl) does not show any significant differences from the partial melting in the presence of salt-free aqueous fluid. In contrast, the presence of large amounts of NaCl (20-50 wt % in the fluid) and formation of saline-rich liquid (brine) causes the dramatic decrease in silica concentration of the partial melts and thus is not a premise to produce natural plagiogranites at investigated conditions. However the presence of NaCl may have played an important role at lower temperatures above the hydrous (only H2O-bearing fluid) solidus of the system in the presence of more complex fluids (saline and with low aH2O). Recently, J.Brophy proposed to use SiO2-REE diagrams for natural systems to decode the consequences of ideal fractionation of the basaltic melt and batch melting of the gabbro in application to the genesis of plagiogranites in mid-ocean ridge environments (e.g. Brophy, 2009). He argued that, for liquids with SiO2 greater than ~62 wt. %, hydrous melting of gabbroic cumulate should yield a negative correlation between REE abundances and increasing SiO2, while fractional crystallization of mid-ocean ridge basalt should produce a positive correlation. Our new experiments and trace element determinations in runs with large melt pools can be used to test this model. We observed the depletion of HREE (Yb) with increasing SiO2 (> 62 wt%) well predicted by the model of Brophy. In contrast

  2. A geochemical study of the Riddle Peaks Gabbro, North Cascades: Implications for amphibole accumulation in magmatic differentiation processes in the mid crust of an arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, A. C.; DeBari, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Riddle Peaks Pluton (~77 Ma) is an amphibole-rich layered gabbro situated within the Cretaceous and Paleogene North Cascades Crystalline Core (NCCC), emplaced at mid-crustal pressures (6 kbar). This pluton provides an opportunity to constrain the geochemical signature produced during amphibole fractionation in the mid-crust of an ancient arc. Amphibole fractionation is hypothesized to produce a distinctive geochemical signature in arc magmas and continental crust (e.g..high Mg- #s, low Dy/Yb and Nb/Ta ratios). Geochemical characterization of the Riddle Peaks cumulates supports these hypotheses. The Riddle Peaks Gabbro has 40.7-47.2 wt.% SiO2 and Mg-# (100xMg/Mg+Fe) 33-67. These low Mg#s contrast with commonly described primitive pyroxene cumulates, which have Mg# > 85. Fractionation of these low-Mg# amphibole cumulates may be responsible for producing high-Mg residual magmas - which have been noted in the NCCC and average continental crust. Garnet fractionation is commonly thought to produce high-Mg magmas, but crystallization of amphibole cumulates may also generate these magmas. Plots of whole rock chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element (REE) abundances show patterns consistent with amphibole accumulation, with relative enrichment of moderately heavy REE to either light or heavy REE. REE patterns of cumulate amphibole crystals show similar patterns but have higher abundances. REE concentrations of modeled liquids produced by crystallization of these gabbros closely resemble estimates for average continental crust and arc compositions. REE concentrations in calculated liquids were also compared to compositions from the dominantly tonalitic Cardinal Peak Pluton (72 Ma), which intrudes the Riddle Peaks on its Eastern side, and the tonalitic Ten Peak pluton, chosen to represent an average NCCC pluton. A range of compositions representing mafic and felsic end-members are found in each pluton. Calculated liquids match REE concentrations of the mafic diorites and

  3. U-Pb dating and composition of inclusions in zircon from ophiolitic gabbro of the Klyuchevsk massif (Middle Urals): Results and geological interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. N.; Ivanov, K. S.; Koroteev, V. A.; Erokhin, Yu. V.; Khiller, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    The U-Pb (SHRIMP) dating of zircon from the layered complex of ophiolitic gabbro in the Klyuchevsk massif yielded an age of 456 ± 6 Ma corresponding within the limits of error to zircon dates obtained for other petrographic varieties from this massif. The investigation of the composition of silicate inclusions in dated zircon grains revealed that they are represented by typical metamorphic minerals: albite, zoisite, and secondary amphiboles. The data indicate that zircon was crystallized during metamorphic transformations of gabbroids and its U-Pb age (Late Ordovician-Silurian) is characteristic of all rocks in the ophiolite association of the Klyuchevsk massif indicating the age of metamorphism, not their formation time.

  4. Petrology and tectonic significance of gabbros, tonalites, shoshonites, and anorthosites in a late Paleozoic arc-root complex in the Wrangellia Terrane, southern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, J.S. ); Barker, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Plutonic rocks intrusive into the late Paleozoic Tetelna Formation of southern Alaska are the underpinnings of the late Paleozoic Skolai arc of the Wrangellia Terrane. There are four groups of intrusive rocks within the Skolai arc: (1) Gabbro-diorite plutons that contain gabbroic to anorthositic cumulates along with a differentiated series of gabbros and diorites of basaltic to andesitic composition; (2) Silicic intrusions including tonalite, granodiorite, and granite; (3) Monzonitic to syenitic plutonic rocks of the Ahtell complex and related dikes and sills; (4) Fault-bounded bytownite anorthosite of uncertain age and association. These anorthosites may be related to post-Skolai, Nikolai Greenstone magmatism. The silicic rocks yield discordant U-Pb zircon ages of 290-320 Ma (early to late Pennsylvanian). The monzonitic rocks of the Ahtell complex have shoshonitic chemistry. Similar shoshonitic rocks are widespread in both the Wrangellia terrane and the neighboring Alexander terrane and intrude the contact between the two. In modern oceanic arcs, shoshonitic rocks are typically associated with tectonic instability occurring during the initial stages of subduction or just prior to or during termination or flip of an established subduction zone. The nature of any tectonic instability which may have led to the cessation of subduction in the Skolai arc is unclear. Possibilities include collision of the arc with a ridge, an oceanic plateau, another arc, or a continental fragment. One possibility is that the shoshonitic magmatism marks the late Paleozoic amalgamation of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane. The scarcity of arc rocks predating the shoshonites in the Alexander terrane supports this possibility, but structural corroboration is lacking.

  5. Insights into Oceanic Crust Accretion from a Comparison of Rock Magnetic and Silicate Fabrics from Lower Crustal Gabbros from Hess Deep Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A. J.; Morris, A.; Friedman, S. A.; Cheadle, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms of lower crustal accretion remain a long-standing question for those who study fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges. One of the goals of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 345 is to test accretionary models by investigating the structure of the lower oceanic crust exposed within the Hess Deep Rift. Located near the tip of the westward-propagating Cocos-Nazca spreading center, Hess Deep Rift exposes crust formed at the East Pacific Rise. During IODP Expedition 345, primitive gabbroic rocks were recovered from a dismembered lower crustal section at ~4850 meters below sealevel. Constraints on physical processes during magmatic accretion are provided by the relative orientation and strength of rock fabrics. We present anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabric data from gabbros recovered from the two deepest holes (U1415J and U1415P). AMS measurements provide petrofabric data that may be used to constrain magma emplacement and subsequent magmatic flow. Bulk susceptibility ranges from 1.15 x 10-4 to 5.73 x 10-2 SI, with a majority of the samples having susceptibility greater than 10-3 SI, suggesting magnetite is the dominant contributor to the AMS signal. Low-temperature demagnetization data show Verwey transitions near 125K indicating the presence of nearly stoichiometric magnetite in most samples. AMS reveals dominantly oblate fabrics with a moderate degree of anisotropy (P') ranging from 1.01 to 1.38 (average P' = 1.13). Fabric strength varies within each of the petrologically-defined units recovered from different crustal blocks. Additional remanence anisotropy fabric analyses of a few specimens reveal nearly identical directions of principal axes compared to AMS, but with larger degrees of anisotropy. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from one sample shows a moderate plagioclase crystallographic preferred orientation best defined by a b-axis maxima that is coincident with the AMS minimum principal axis. This comparison

  6. Unraveling protolith ages of meta-gabbros from Samos and the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline Belt, Greece: Results of a U-Pb zircon and Sr-Nd whole rock study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröcker, Michael; Löwen, Kersten; Rodionov, Nikolay

    2014-06-01

    The focus of this study is on meta-ophiolitic rocks from Samos and the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline Belt, Greece. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology, Sr-Nd isotope and bulk-rock geochemistry have been applied to meta-gabbros that occur as blocks and lenses in blueschist-facies mélanges on Samos and Evia, and in the greenschist-facies Upper Unit on Tinos. The geodynamic significance of these meta-ophiolite fragments within the overall pattern of the Eastern Mediterranean region is unclear. Regional correlations within the Cyclades archipelago and with the Jurassic meta-ophiolites of the Balkan region or the Cretaceous occurrences in Turkey are uncertain. Although field, petrological and geochemical similarities among some mélange occurrences suggest a common genetic relationship, such interpretations remain speculative if not supported by robust geochronological data. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating of three meta-gabbro blocks from Samos yielded Cretaceous ages with weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 78.3 ± 1.3 Ma, 76.8 ± 1.4 Ma and 77.8 ± 1.4 Ma and almost identical intercept ages, interpreted to indicate the time of magmatic crystallization. These results further substantiate models suggesting a correlative relationship with mélanges on the islands of Syros and Tinos, central Aegean Sea, where similar rocks yielded almost identical U-Pb zircon ages. Published and new Sr-Nd isotope data of meta-gabbros from Andros, Samos, Tinos (Lower Unit) and from mainland Greece (Pindos, Othris) reveal distinctive differences among ion probe-dated samples with Jurassic and Cretaceous protolith ages. Three groups can clearly be distinguished in a 87Sr/86Sr vs. 143Nd/144Nd diagram. However, these geochemical parameters do not allow assigning tentative age estimates for yet undated meta-gabbros from southern Evia and the Upper Unit of Tinos. The situation is further complicated by the observation that the Jurassic and Cretaceous meta-gabbros do not show other discriminating geochemical

  7. The Pikes Peak batholith, Colorado front range, and a model for the origin of the gabbro-anorthosite-syenite-potassic granite suite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Wones, D.R.; Sharp, W.N.; Desborough, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    , Mass., and syenite of Kungnat, Greenland, among others - allowing for different levels of erosion. A suite that includes gabbro or basalt, anorthosite, quartz syenite, fayalite granite, riebeckite granite, and biotite and/or hornblende granites is of worldwide occurrence. A model is proposed in which mantle-derived, convecting alkali olivine basaltic magma first reacts with K2O-poor lower crust of granulite facies to produce magma of quartz syenitic composition. The syenitic liquid in turn reacts with granodioritic to granitic intermediate crust of amphibolite facies to produce the predominant fayalite-free biotite and biotite-hornblende granites of the batholith. This reaction of magma and roof involves both partial melting and the reconstitution and precipitation of refractory phases, as Bowen proposed. Intermediate liquids include MgO-depleted and Na2O-enriched gabbro, which precipitated anorthosite, and alkali diorite. The heat source is the basaltic magma; the heat required for partial melting of the roof is supplied largely by heats of crystallization of phases that settle out of the liquid - mostly olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase. ?? 1975.

  8. Geological structure and ore mineralization of the South Sopchinsky and Gabbro-10 massifs and the Moroshkovoe Lake target, Monchegorsk area, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pripachkin, Pavel V.; Rundkvist, Tatyana V.; Miroshnikova, Yana A.; Chernyavsky, Alexey V.; Borisenko, Elena S.

    2015-08-01

    The South Sopchinsky massif (SSM), Gabbro-10 (G-10) massif, and Moroshkovoe Lake (ML) target Monchegorsk area, Kola Peninsula, are located at the junction of the Monchepluton and Monchetundra layered intrusions. The intrusions were studied in detail as they are targets for platinum-group element (PGE) mineralization. The rocks in these targets comprise medium- to coarse-grained mesocratic to leucocratic gabbronorites, medium-grained mesocratic to melanocratic norites and pyroxenites, and various veins mainly comprising norite, plagioclase-amphibole-magnetite rocks, and quartz-magnetite rocks. The veins contain Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization associated with magnetite and chromite. In all targets, the contacts between gabbronorite and norite-pyroxenite are undulating, and the presence of magmatic (intrusive) breccias suggests that these rocks formed through mingling of two distinct magmatic pulses. In places, the gabbronorites clearly crosscut the modal layering of the norites and pyroxenites. Trace element data indicate that the gabbronorites have similar compositions to rocks of the upper part of the Monchetundra intrusion, whereas the norites and pyroxenites resemble rocks from the lower to intermediate stratigraphic levels of the Monchepluton, such as in the Nude-Poaz and Sopcha massifs. Sulfide mineralization in the studied targets principally consists of secondary bornite, millerite, and chalcopyrite. In contrast, the primary sulfide assemblage within the layered sequence of the adjacent Monchepluton is characterized by pentlandite, chalcopyrite, and pyrrhotite. Therefore, the mineralization in the studied targets is interpreted to be of a contact style. We argue that the studied area represents the contact zone between gabbronorites of the Monchetundra intrusion and norites and pyroxenites of the Monchepluton. In addition, the rocks were overprinted by postmagmatic veining and remobilization of contact style sulfide and PGE mineralization.

  9. Halogens and noble gases in Mathematician Ridge meta-gabbros, NE Pacific: implications for oceanic hydrothermal root zones and global volatile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Mark A.; Honda, Masahiko; Vanko, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Six variably amphibolitised meta-gabbros cut by quartz-epidote veins containing high-salinity brine, and vapour fluid inclusions were investigated for halogen (Cl, Br, I) and noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) concentrations. The primary aims were to investigate fluid sources and interactions in hydrothermal root zones and determine the concentrations and behaviours of these elements in altered oceanic crust, which is poorly known, but has important implications for global volatile (re)cycling. Amphiboles in each sample have average concentrations of 0.1-0.5 wt% Cl, 0.5-3 ppm Br and 5-68 ppb I. Amphibole has Br/Cl of ~0.0004 that is about ten times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions and seawater, and I/Cl of 2-44 × 10-6 that is 3-5 times lower than coexisting fluid inclusions but higher than seawater. The amphibole and fluid compositions are attributed to mixing halogens introduced by seawater with a large halogen component remobilised from mafic lithologies in the crust and fractionation of halogens between fluids and metamorphic amphibole formed at low water-rock ratios. The metamorphic amphibole and hydrothermal quartz are dominated by seawater-derived atmospheric Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe and mantle-derived He, with 3He/4He of ~9 R/Ra (Ra = atmospheric ratio). The amphibole and quartz preserve high 4He concentrations that are similar to MORB glasses and have noble gas abundance ratios with high 4He/36Ar and 22Ne/36Ar that are greater than seawater and air. These characteristics result from the high solubility of light noble gases in amphibole and suggest that all the noble gases can behave similarly to `excess 40Ar' in metamorphic hydrothermal root zones. All noble gases are therefore trapped in hydrous minerals to some extent and can be inefficiently lost during metamorphism implying that even the lightest noble gases (He and Ne) can potentially be subducted into the Earth's mantle.

  10. High-temperature fracturing and subsequent grain-size-sensitive creep in lower crustal gabbros: Evidence for coseismic loading followed by creep during decaying stress in the lower crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okudaira, Takamoto; Jeřábek, Petr; Stünitz, Holger; Fusseis, Florian

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of shear zone formation in lower crustal, relatively "dry" rocks is still poorly understood. We have studied the high-temperature deformation of the Hasvik gabbro (northern Norway) which commences by fracturing. The 10-20 µm wide fractures show little displacement. The fine-grained plagioclase and orthopyroxene in the fractures lack a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) or a systematic crystallographic orientation with respect to the host grains. Fractures grade into narrow shear zones, which are composed of fine (10-20 µm), equant grains of recrystallized plagioclase, amphibole, and pyroxene. Recrystallized plagioclase and pyroxene have compositions different from the magmatic grains, suggesting that they have formed by nucleation and growth. Based on conventional plagioclase-amphibole thermobarometry, the shear zones have formed at temperatures and pressures of 700-750°C and 0.5-0.6 GPa. The observed primary minerals cut by fractures suggest high-temperature fracturing in the absence of high pore pressures, which implies a high strength of the lower crustal gabbros and high stresses at fracturing. The shear zones are characterized by the lack of CPO and a small grain size, suggesting that the mechanism of deformation of the fine-grained plagioclase and orthopyroxene has been grain boundary sliding accommodated by diffusive mass transfer. The amphibole grains have strong CPOs, which most likely result from oriented growth and/or rigid body rotations during deformation. The process that initiated the fracturing and subsequent viscous creep in the Hasvik gabbro may have resulted from a process of coseismic loading followed by creep during decaying stress in the lower crust.

  11. Middle Jurassic MORB-type gabbro, high-Mg diorite, calc-alkaline diorite and granodiorite in the Ando area, central Tibet: Evidence for a slab roll-back of the Bangong-Nujiang Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haoyu; Long, Xiaoping; Wang, Xuan-Ce; Li, Jie; Wang, Qiang; Yuan, Chao; Sun, Min

    2016-11-01

    Mesozoic intrusions, including MORB-type gabbros, high-Mg diorites, calc-alkaline diorites and granodiorites, were exposed in the Ando microcontinent that is bounded between the Qiangtang and Lhasa terranes. Discoveries of these Mesozoic intrusions have provided new petrogenetic constraints on our understanding of Bangong-Nujiang ocean evolution. Zircon U-Pb dating shows that these intrusions formed in the early-middle Jurassic (174-177 Ma). The gabbros have relatively flat REE distribution patterns, which is analogous to the geochemical features of MORB. Their positive εNd(t) values (εNd(t) = 4.4-5.5) are consistent with those of ophiolites along the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone. These gabbros are also characterized by enrichments of fluid-sensitive elements and negative to positive Nb anomalies, indicative of the influence of subduction-related compositions in their mantle source. These features suggest that the gabbros were most likely originated from asthenosphere-derived melts metasomatized by enriched lithospheric mantle during the upwelling. The high-Mg diorites are characterized by typical features of high compatible elements (MgO = 8.3-10.24 wt%, Cr = 400-547 ppm, Ni = 120-152 ppm), high Mg# (70-74) and low Sr/Y ratios. Their high initial 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios and negative εNd(t) values (- 10.5 to - 10.8), together with their sanukitic characteristics, imply that the high-Mg diorites were probably produced by partial melting of mantle peridotites metasomatized by slab-derived melts and aqueous fluids. The calc-alkaline diorites have relatively high MgO (4.04-5.50 wt%), Cr, Ni contents and Mg# (56-59), as well as high (86Sr/87Sr)i ratios and negative εNd(t) values (- 7.5 to - 7.3), suggesting that they were most likely formed by partial melting of the Ando basement rocks with significant input of mantle components. The granodiorites are peraluminous and have higher (86Sr/87Sr)i ratios and more negative εNd(t) values (- 10.6 to - 10.8), similar to

  12. New U-Pb and Sm-Nd isotope data of the age of formation and metamorphic alteration of the Kandalaksha-Kolvitsa gabbro-anorthosite complex (Baltic Shield)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steshenko, Ekaterina; Bayanova, Tamara; Serov, Pavel; Chashchin, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this research was to study the isotope U-Pb age of zircon and rutile and Sm-Nd (rock forming and sulphide minerals) in Kandalaksha-Kolvitsa gabbro-anorthosite complex. Kandalaksha-Kolvitsa gabbro-anorthosite complex is located in the N-E part of Baltic shield and consists of three parts. Marginal zone (mesocratic metanorite) lies at the base of the massif. Main zone is composed of leucocratic metagabbro. The upper zone is alteration of mataanorthosite and leucocratic metagabbro. All rocks were subjected to granulate metamorphism. New U-Pb and Sm-Nd isotopic and geochronological data for the rocks of the Kandalaksha-Kolvitsa Paleoproterozoic gabbro-anorthosite complex is presented. For the first time single zircon grains from metagabbros of Kolvitsa massif were dated 2448±5 Ma, using U-Pb method with an artificial 205Pb tracer. Sm-Nd isotopic age of the metamorphic minerals apatite, garnet and sulphide WR Kolvitsa array is 1985 ± 17 Ma, which is interpreted granulite metamorphism. Two fractions of single zircons from anorthosite of the Kandalaksha massif gave U-Pb age 2450± 3 Ma. Leucocratic gabbro-norite (Kandalaksha massif) were dated by U-Pb on single zircon, with age up to 2230±10 Ma. This age reflects the time of granulite metamorphism according to data of [1]. Two fractions of rutile from anorthosite of the Kandalaksha massif have been analyzed by U-Pb method and reflect age of 1700 ± 10 Ma. It is known that the closure temperature of U-Pb system rutile 400-450 ° C [2], thus cooling of the massif to these temperatures was about 1.7 Ga. These data suggested two stages of metamorphic transformations of the massif. Sm-Nd research Kandalaksha massif reflected the age of the high-temperature metasomatic transformations -1887 ± 37 Ma. Time of regional fluid processing - 1692 ± 71 Ma. A model Sm-Nd age metagabbros Kolvitsa massif is 3.3 Ga with a negative value ɛNd = -4.6, which corresponds to the most likely primary enriched mantle reservoir of

  13. Mineralogy, Petrology, Chemistry, and Ar-39 - Ar-40 and Ages of the Caddo County IAB Iron: Evidence for Early Partial Melt Segregation of a Gabbro Area Rich in Plagioclase-Diopside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Bogard, Donald D.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2000-01-01

    We found coarse-grained gabbroic material rich in plagioclase and diopside in the Caddo County IAB iron meteorite. The polished thin sections studied were made from areas rich in Al and Ca detected by a micro-focus X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping technique. The gabbro is not a clast within a breccia, but rather this area is located mainly at silicate-metal boundaries only a few cm away from an area with fine-grained, ultramafic silicate similar to winonaites. Medium-grained orthopyroxene and olivine are found in transitional areas showing no disturbance of their crystalline textures. A vein-like region, starting at the area rich in fine-grained mafic silicate, extends towards the gabbroic area with a gradual increase in abundance of plagioclase and diopside. This texture and our accumulated knowledge of the formation mechanism of IAB/winonaltes meteorites, suggest that the gabbroic materials were formed by inhomogeneous segregation of partial melts of chondritic source materials. Compositional data on two mineralogically distinct samples of the gabbro-rich portion of the inclusion were obtained by INAA. Compared to an average of LAB silicate inclusions or winonaites, the Caddo County gabbro is enriched in the incompatible lithophile elements Na, Ca, Sc, REE and Hf, which is consistent with a melt origin for the gabbro. The cosmogenic space exposure age of Caddo County (511 Ma) is significantly younger than exposure ages of some other IAB meteorites, An 39Ar-40Ar age determination of the gabbroic material indicates a series of upward steps in age from 4.516 Ga to 4.523 Ga, with a few high temperature ages up to 4.54 Ga. The older age could approximate the primary recrystallization age of silicates. The stepped Ar age spectrum may indicate differences in Ar closure temperatures during slow cooling of -2-20'C/Myr in the parent body. Alternatively, the younger Ar-Ar ages may date a shock event which occurred while Caddo County was hot and which also created textures

  14. Inferred paleotectonic settings and paleogeography at 500-450 Ma based on geochemical evaluation of Ordovician volcanics and gabbros of the Upper Allochthon, Mid Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollocher, K.; Roberts, D.; Robinson, P.; Walsh, E.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluation of major- and trace-element analyses of Ordovician volcanics and gabbros from the Støren Nappe of the Upper Allochthon, Mid Norway, including 87 new analyses, covers the Late Cambrian-earliest Ordovician ophiolite complexes and overlying Ordovician volcanics. The older rocks have mainly MORB-like compositions likely formed in a back-arc basin, plus less abundant oceanic-arc basalts and andesites. Compositions characteristic of fore-arc environments are absent. The Upper Allochthon has three elements: A) The Gula Nappe of probable Cambrian and Tremadocian, epicontinental sedimentary rocks, B) The Støren and Meråker nappes with their basal suprasubduction-zone ophiolitic volcanics and intrusions plus younger Ordovician successions, C) In northwestern parts of the Støren Nappe, a complex of predominantly calc-alkaline arc intrusive rocks 482 to 441 Ma. The structural and stratigraphic history indicates obduction of ophiolites occurred at 480-475 Ma soon after formation, followed by uplift, erosion, and deposition of conglomerates incorporating ophiolite debris. The overlying sequence includes shelly Toquima-Table Head faunas of Laurentian affinity and younger strata into Upper Ordovician. Field relations suggest that the ophiolites were obducted onto rocks of the Gula Complex. A Tremadocian, graptolite-bearing black shale/phyllite in the eastern part of the Gula has close geochemical affinities with the reducing V- and U-enriched Alum shale of the Baltoscandian margin, black shales in the lower Köli nappes of the Upper Allochthon in Sweden, and similar shales in the Gander and Avalon zones of Maritime Canada. Such shales originated in high-latitude (40-50° south) cool-water environments, as existed in Late Cambrian-earliest Ordovician Baltica, Avalonia, and Ganderia, and have not been recorded in equatorial paleolatitudes, such as the earliest Ordovician margin of Laurentia. Our paleotectonic account for these features is in three time slices: 1) A

  15. Trace element composition of olivine - implications for the evolution of the olivine gabbro-troctolite-hosted Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit, Labrador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulle, F.; Layne, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Voisey's Bay intrusion is part of the Nain Plutonic Suite, which transects the 1.85 Ga collisional boundary between the Proterozoic Churchill Province and the Archean Nain Province in Eastern Labrador. The intrusion comprises a group of troctolitic to olivine gabbroic bodies linked by olivine gabbro dikes; together these rocks host the world-class Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit. Zones of massive and disseminated sulfide mineralization (Reid Brook, Discovery Hill, Mini-Ovoid and Ovoid) occur within a dike and at the entry line of this dike into a larger intrusion termed the Eastern Deeps [1, 2, 3]. At least two pulses of magma have generated the intrusion and the associated sulfide mineralization; an initial surge that achieved sulfide saturation by interacting with upper crustal rocks, and a later pulse of fresh, undepleted magma that forced the initial magma upwards and both remobilized the immiscible sulfide liquid and upgraded it in metal content [1, 2, 3]. Previous research [1, 2] has shown that the Ni content of olivine from the distinct sulfide-bearing host rocks is highly variable, and also indicative of both magma mixing and interaction of silicate magmas with sulfide. To further validate the significance of the olivine chemistry as a tracer for ore-forming petrological processes, we have determined the abundances of Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zn in olivines from the various mafic lithologies of the Eastern Deeps intrusion using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. We present systematic variations in Mn, Co, Ni and Zn with Fo-content in olivines for both sulfide-free and sulfide-bearing zones. Olivines from mineralized and brecciated troctolitic/gabbroic zones display significantly higher Mn (up to 11,000 ppm) and Zn (up to 550 ppm) concentrations than those from nominally barren counterparts. The barren troctolite, broadly termed normal troctolite (NT), is a petrographically homogenous plagioclase and olivine cumulate. However, olivine

  16. The Temporal Relationship Between Alkaline and Tholeiitic Magmatism in the Paraná-Etendeka Igneous Province: ID-TIMS U-Pb Ages of the José Fernandes Gabbro and Dykes of the Ponta Grossa Arch, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, V. V.; Heaman, L. M.; Shaulis, B.; Janasi, V. A.; Faleiros, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Ponta Grossa Arch (PGA) region in S-SE Brazil hosts prominent NW-oriented lineaments with hundreds of tholeiitic dykes of the Ponta Grossa Dyke Swarm (PGDS) and also alkaline intrusions concentrated between the Guapiara and São Jerônimo-Curiúva lineaments. Many of these intrusions lack more robust geochronological data; the alkaline intrusions appear to be both coeval with (e.g. Jacupiranga, Juquiá with ~130 Ma) and much younger than (e.g. Tunas, Cananéia with ~85 Ma) the adjacent Paraná basaltic lavas. We present in this work the first ID-TIMS U-Pb baddeleyite-zircon ages for diabase dykes of the Guapiara Lineament and for an alkaline intrusion (José Fernandes Gabbro) in order to determine more precisely the space-time relation between alkaline and tholeiitic magmatism in the PGA. The dated diabase dykes show high TiO2 (up to 4.5 wt%) and variable Sr (405-890 ppm). Baddeleyite-zircon concordia ages are 130.3 ± 0.5 Ma (all uncertainties reported at 2σ) and 131.3 ± 0.7 Ma, within the range of previously reported step-heating 40Ar/39Ar ages (133.1 ± 0.5 to 130.8 ± 0.4 Ma), confirming a good coherency between crystallization and cooling ages. Three distinct samples of the José Fernandes Gabbro were investigated (melagabbro, banded gabbro and quartz monzogabbro). Preliminary baddeleyite U-Pb ages obtained for a crust-contaminated quartz monzogabbro (52-56% SiO2; ~4% K2O; δ18O= +6.7 to +7.5‰; eNd(T)= -10) yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U data of 133.56 ± 0.31 Ma as the age for the intrusion. The age is about 2 m.y. older than the U-Pb ages obtained for the diabase dykes of the PGA. FAPESP proc. 2012/06082-6; CNPq 202043/2014-2

  17. Timing, petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the Late Paleozoic gabbro-granodiorite-granite intrusions in the Shalazhashan of northern Alxa: Constraints on the southernmost boundary of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingjun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Castro, Antonio; Xiao, XuChang; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Jianjun; Guo, Lei; Yang, Qidi

    2014-11-01

    The Late Paleozoic tectonic setting and location of the southernmost boundary of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) with respect to the Alxa Block or Alxa-North China Craton (ANCC) are debated. This paper presents new geochronological, petrological, geochemical and zircon Hf isotopic data of the Late Paleozoic intrusions from the Shalazhashan in northern Alxa and discusses the tectonic setting and boundary between the CAOB and ANCC. Using zircon U-Pb dating, intrusions can be broadly grouped as Late Carboniferous granodiorites (~ 301 Ma), Middle Permian gabbros (~ 264 Ma) and granites (~ 266 Ma) and Late Permian granodiorites, monzogranites and quartz monzodiorites (254-250 Ma). The Late Carboniferous granodiorites are slightly peraluminous and calcic. The remarkably high zircon Hf isotopes (εHf(t) = + 6-+ 10) and characteristics of high silica adakites suggest that these granodiorites were mainly derived from "hot" basaltic slab-melts of the subducted oceanic crust. The Middle Permian gabbros exhibited typical cumulate textures and were derived from the partial melting of depleted mantle. The Middle Permian granites are slightly peraluminous with high-K calc-alkaline and low εHf(t) values from - 0.9 to + 2.9. These granites were most likely derived from juvenile materials mixed with old crustal materials. The Late Permian granodiorites, monzogranites and quartz monzodiorites are characterized as metaluminous to slightly peraluminous, with variable Peacock alkali-lime index values from calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic. These rocks were mainly derived from juvenile crustal materials, as evidenced by their high εHf(t) values (+ 3.3 to + 8.9). The juvenile sources of the above intrusions in the Shalazhashan are similar to those of the granitoids from the CAOB but distinct from the granitoids within the Alxa Block. These findings suggest that the Shalazhashan Zone belongs to the CAOB rather than the Alxa Block and that its boundary with the Alxa block can be

  18. Protótipo do primeiro interferômetro brasileiro - BDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecatto, J. R.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Neri, J. A. C. F.; Bethi, N.; Felipini, N. S.; Madsen, F. R. H.; Andrade, M. C.; Soares, A. C.; Alonso, E. M. B., Sawant, H. S.

    2004-04-01

    A interferometria é uma poderosa ferramenta usada para investigar estruturas espaciais de fontes astrofísicas fornecendo uma riqueza de detalhes inatingível pelas técnicas convencionais de imageamento. Em particular, a interferometria com ondas de rádio abre o horizonte de conhecimento do Universo nesta ampla banda do espectro eletromagnético, que vai de cerca de 20 kHz até centenas de GHz já próximo ao infravermelho, e que está acessível a partir de instrumentos instalados em solo. Neste trabalho, apresentamos o interferômetro designado por Arranjo Decimétrico Brasileiro (BDA). Trata-se do primeiro interferômetro a ser desenvolvido no Brasil e América Latina que já está em operação na fase de protótipo. Apresentamos o desenvolvimento realizado até o momento, o sítio de instalação do instrumento, o protótipo e os principais resultados dos testes de sua operação, as perspectivas futuras e a ciência a ser desenvolvida com o instrumento nas fases II e III. Neste trabalho é dada ênfase ao desenvolvimento, testes de operação e principais resultados do protótipo. É discutida brevemente a ciência que pode ser feita com o instrumento. Tanto os detalhes técnicos quanto os principais parâmetros estimados para o instrumento nas próximas fases de desenvolvimento e o desempenho do protótipo serão publicados em breve.

  19. Magmatic relationships between depleted mantle harzburgites, boninitic cumulate gabbros and subduction-related tholeiitic basalts in the Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex, Dominican Republic: Implications for the birth of the Caribbean island-arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Castillo-Carrión, Mercedes; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés

    2014-05-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Puerto Plata ophiolitic complex (PPC) occurs west of the main collisional suture between the Caribbean and North American plates in the northern Dominican Republic, and imposes important constraints on the geochemical and tectonic processes associated with the birth of the Caribbean island-arc. The PPC exposes a tectonically dismembered 3.0-km-thick section of upper mantle harzburgites, lower crustal cumulate gabbroic rocks and upper crustal basaltic pillow lavas, volcanic breccias and pelagic sediments. The harzburgites exhibit a highly depleted signature in terms of their modal compositions, mineral chemistry and whole rock major and trace element contents, suggesting that they are residues after high-degrees of partial melting. Melt modeling suggests that they were similar in trace element characteristics to a boninite. In the crustal sequence, three magmatic episodes have been recognized based on field, mineral and geochemical data. The first phase is composed of the lower layered gabbronorites, which are variably deformed and recrystallized at high-temperature conditions. Trace element modeling suggests that the gabbronorites crystallized from LREE-depleted island-arc tholeiitic (IAT) melts. The second phase is composed of the intermediate layered troctolites (126 Ma), which are undeformed and preserve igneous cumulate textures. Modeling indicates that the troctolites crystallized from boninitic melts. The gabronorite-troctolite substrate was intruded by a third, supra-subduction zone tholeiitic magmatic phase at < 126 Ma, which formed the upper olivine gabbros and gabbronorites. These gabbroic rocks formed from melts similar in composition to the IAT basalts and basaltic andesites of the overlying Los Caños Fm. Contemporaneous Aptian to lower Albian mafic volcanic rocks of the Los Ranchos Fm and Cacheal complex have comparable IAT geochemical and isotopic signatures, suggesting that all of them may have erupted over a single piece of the

  20. Primitive layered gabbros from fast-spreading lower oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Kathryn M.; Snow, Jonathan E.; Klaus, Adam; Abe, Natsue; Adrião, Álden B.; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Ceuleneer, Georges; Cheadle, Michael J.; Faak, Kathrin; Falloon, Trevor J.; Friedman, Sarah A.; Godard, Marguerite; Guerin, Gilles; Harigane, Yumiko; Horst, Andrew J.; Hoshide, Takashi; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jean, Marlon M.; John, Barbara E.; Koepke, Juergen; Machi, Sumiaki; Maeda, Jinichiro; Marks, Naomi E.; McCaig, Andrew M.; Meyer, Romain; Morris, Antony; Nozaka, Toshio; Python, Marie; Saha, Abhishek; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Three-quarters of the oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges is composed of plutonic rocks whose mineral assemblages, textures and compositions record the history of melt transport and crystallization between the mantle and the sea floor. Despite the importance of these rocks, sampling them in situ is extremely challenging owing to the overlying dykes and lavas. This means that models for understanding the formation of the lower crust are based largely on geophysical studies and ancient analogues (ophiolites) that did not form at typical mid-ocean ridges. Here we describe cored intervals of primitive, modally layered gabbroic rocks from the lower plutonic crust formed at a fast-spreading ridge, sampled by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program at the Hess Deep rift. Centimetre-scale, modally layered rocks, some of which have a strong layering-parallel foliation, confirm a long-held belief that such rocks are a key constituent of the lower oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. Geochemical analysis of these primitive lower plutonic rocks--in combination with previous geochemical data for shallow-level plutonic rocks, sheeted dykes and lavas--provides the most completely constrained estimate of the bulk composition of fast-spreading oceanic crust so far. Simple crystallization models using this bulk crustal composition as the parental melt accurately predict the bulk composition of both the lavas and the plutonic rocks. However, the recovered plutonic rocks show early crystallization of orthopyroxene, which is not predicted by current models of melt extraction from the mantle and mid-ocean-ridge basalt differentiation. The simplest explanation of this observation is that compositionally diverse melts are extracted from the mantle and partly crystallize before mixing to produce the more homogeneous magmas that erupt.

  1. Primitive layered gabbros from fast-spreading lower oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Kathryn M; Snow, Jonathan E; Klaus, Adam; Abe, Natsue; Adrião, Alden B; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Ceuleneer, Georges; Cheadle, Michael J; Faak, Kathrin; Falloon, Trevor J; Friedman, Sarah A; Godard, Marguerite; Guerin, Gilles; Harigane, Yumiko; Horst, Andrew J; Hoshide, Takashi; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jean, Marlon M; John, Barbara E; Koepke, Juergen; Machi, Sumiaki; Maeda, Jinichiro; Marks, Naomi E; McCaig, Andrew M; Meyer, Romain; Morris, Antony; Nozaka, Toshio; Python, Marie; Saha, Abhishek; Wintsch, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    Three-quarters of the oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges is composed of plutonic rocks whose mineral assemblages, textures and compositions record the history of melt transport and crystallization between the mantle and the sea floor. Despite the importance of these rocks, sampling them in situ is extremely challenging owing to the overlying dykes and lavas. This means that models for understanding the formation of the lower crust are based largely on geophysical studies and ancient analogues (ophiolites) that did not form at typical mid-ocean ridges. Here we describe cored intervals of primitive, modally layered gabbroic rocks from the lower plutonic crust formed at a fast-spreading ridge, sampled by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program at the Hess Deep rift. Centimetre-scale, modally layered rocks, some of which have a strong layering-parallel foliation, confirm a long-held belief that such rocks are a key constituent of the lower oceanic crust formed at fast-spreading ridges. Geochemical analysis of these primitive lower plutonic rocks--in combination with previous geochemical data for shallow-level plutonic rocks, sheeted dykes and lavas--provides the most completely constrained estimate of the bulk composition of fast-spreading oceanic crust so far. Simple crystallization models using this bulk crustal composition as the parental melt accurately predict the bulk composition of both the lavas and the plutonic rocks. However, the recovered plutonic rocks show early crystallization of orthopyroxene, which is not predicted by current models of melt extraction from the mantle and mid-ocean-ridge basalt differentiation. The simplest explanation of this observation is that compositionally diverse melts are extracted from the mantle and partly crystallize before mixing to produce the more homogeneous magmas that erupt.

  2. Aquisição fonológica do português brasileiro por crianças ouvintes bilíngues bimodais e surdas usuárias de implante coclear

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Carina Rebello; Finger, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Resumo O presente estudo investiga a aquisição fonológica do Português Brasileiro (PB) por 24 crianças ouvintes bilíngues bimodais, com acesso irrestrito à Língua Brasileira de Sinais (Libras), e por 6 crianças surdas que utilizam implante coclear (IC), com acesso restrito ou irrestrito à Libras. Para a avaliação do sistema fonológico das crianças em PB, foi utilizada a Parte A, Prova de Nomeação, do ABFW – Teste de Linguagem Infantil (ANDRADE et al. 2004). Os resultados revelaram que as crianças ouvintes bilíngues bimodais e a criança surda usuária de IC com acesso irrestrito à Libras apresentaram processo de aquisição fonológica esperada (normal) para a sua faixa etária. Considera-se que a aquisição precoce e o acesso irrestrito à Libras podem ter sido determinantes para o desempenho dessas crianças no teste oral utilizado. PMID:25506105

  3. A view into the Cretaceous geomagnetic field from analysis of gabbros and submarine glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Roi; Tauxe, Lisa; Gee, Jeffrey S.; Ron, Hagai

    2007-04-01

    The nature of the geomagnetic field during the Cretaceous normal polarity superchron (CNS) has been a matter of debate for several decades. Numerical geodynamo simulations predict higher intensities, but comparable variability, during times of few reversals than times with frequent reversals. Published geomagnetic paleointensity data from the CNS are highly scattered suggesting that additional studies are required. Here we present new paleointensity results from 18 sites collected from the lower oceanic crust of the Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus (92.1 Ma old). Together with recently published data from the Troodos upper crust we obtain three independent paleointensity time-series. These sequences reveal quasi-cyclic variations of intensities about a mean value of 54 ± 20 Z Am 2, providing insight into the fluctuating nature of the Cretaceous magnetic field. Our data suggest the CNS field was both weaker and more variable than predicted by geodynamo simulations. The large amplitudes of these variations may explain the wide range of dipole moments previously determined from the CNS.

  4. Chronology and isotopic geochemistry of apollo 14 basalts and Skaergard Gabbro, Eastern Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasch, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    Work completed on Apollo 14 basalts has been published. The two dates obtained from these rocks comprised the oldest and two of the three oldest ages (4.1 and 4.3 billion years) known for lunar maria basalts; thus their ages are important in understanding the moon's earliest history. Owing to the antiquity of these rocks, two more fragments have been dated as part of a second ASEE/NASA SFF program. The new ages are 3.95 and 4.12 billion years, thus further establishing and amplifying the earlier results. This work, although perhaps more interesting for its chronologic information, was begun as a test of chemical and petrographic models. Fragments of Apollo basalt were placed into five categories, based on petrologic and chemical, especially rare-earth element, composition. Isotopic studies were begun in an attempt to determine if the five groups of basalts were related by age or initial isotopic composition (isotopic composition of lava at time of extrusion). Although a few of the representatives of the five groups have the same age and/or initial strontium-isotopic composition, within the analtytical uncertainties, most apparently are unrelated. Petrologic implications of these data will be published in an appropriate journal.

  5. The gabbro-eclogite phase transition and the elevation of mountain belts on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namiki, Noriyuki; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis is explored that the crust-mantle boundary of Venus is not in phase equilibrium but rather is rate-limited by the temperature-dependent volume diffusion of the slowest ionic species. The 1D thermal evolution problem is solved assuming that the mountains formed by uniform horizontal shortening of the crust and the lithospheric mantle at a constant rate. The time-dependent density structure and surface elevation are calculated by assuming a temperature-dependent reaction rate and local Airy isostatic compensation. For a horizontal strain rate of 10 exp -15/s or greater, the temperature increase at the base of the crust during mountain formation is modest to negligible, the deepening lower crust is metastable, and the surface elevation increases as the crust thickens. For strain rates less than 10 exp -16/s, crustal temperature increases with time because of internal heat production and the lower crust is more readily transformed to the dense eclogite assemblage. For such models, a maximum elevation is reached during crustal shortening.

  6. Petrology and crystal chemistry of poikilitic anorthositic gabbro 77017. [lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.; Mathez, E. A.; Okamura, F. P.; Ghose, S.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of mineralogy are considered, taking into account the occurrence and the characteristics of plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine. Attention is also given to oxides, opaque minerals, and glass components. Questions regarding the temperature of formation and the origin of the considered lunar poikilitic rocks are discussed. It is pointed out that the presented hypothesis may not be applicable to other poikilitic lunar rocks.

  7. Grain-size reduction mechanisms and rheological consequences in high-temperature gabbro mylonites of Hidaka, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimbourg, Hugues; Toyoshima, Tsuyoshi; Harima, Yuta; Kimura, Gaku

    2008-03-01

    The study of microstructures and crystallographic fabrics in a granulite-facies shear zone of the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt showed that the strong shearing localized within the mylonite resulted in the asymmetrical elongation of the inherited orthopyroxene porphyroclasts and the generation of fine-grained plagioclase and orthopyroxene layers as asymmetric tails of orthopyroxene porphyroclasts. The orthopyroxene porphyroclasts and the coarse plagioclase matrix surrounding them have a strong crystallographic preferred orientation acquired through deformation by dislocation creep. In contrast, the small orthopyroxene and plagioclase grains located in the tails have equant shapes and random fabric that are interpreted as the result of deformation by grain-boundary sliding. The small orthopyroxene grains are generated on the sheared rims of the orthopyroxene porphyroclasts by subgrain rotation, inheriting the orientation of the porphyroclasts before deforming by grain-boundary sliding (GBS) and losing this fabric. Additional mechanism of grain-size reduction is the disruption of orthopyroxene porphyroclasts by synthetic shear zones localized on clinopyroxene exsolutions. The switch in deformation mechanism from dislocation creep to GBS, associated with the grain-size reduction, yielded estimates of deviatoric stress one order smaller than lithostatic pressure. Besides, such rheological evolution attests of the mechanical softening during deformation, which contributed to the localization of the strain within the mylonite.

  8. Kyanite/corundum eclogites from the Kaapvaal Craton: subducted troctolites and layered gabbros from the Mid- to Early Archean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Qiao; Brey, Gerhard P.; Hoefer, Heidi E.; Zhao, Zhidan; Pearson, D. Graham

    2016-02-01

    An oceanic crustal origin is the commonly accepted paradigm for mantle-derived eclogites. However, the significance of the aluminous members of the eclogite suite, containing kyanite and corundum, has long been underrated and their role neglected in genetic models of cratonic evolution. Here, we present a geochemical and petrological study of a suite of kyanite- and corundum-bearing eclogites from the Bellsbank kimberlite, S. Africa, which originate from depths between 150 and 200 km. Although clearly of high-pressure provenance, these rocks had a low-pressure cumulative origin with plagioclase and olivine as major cumulate phases. This is shown by the very pronounced positive Eu anomalies, low REE abundances, and δ 18O values lower than the Earth's mantle. Many chemical features are identical to modern-day troctolitic cumulates including a light REE depletion akin to MORB, but there are also distinguishing features in that the eclogites are richer in Na, Fe, and Ni. Two of the eclogites have a minimum age of ~3.2 Ga, defined by the extremely unradiogenic 87Sr/86Sr (0.7007) in clinopyroxene. Phase equilibria indicate that the parent melts were formed by partial melting below an Archean volcanic center that generated (alkali-)picritic to high-alumina tholeiitic melts from a mantle whose oxygen fugacity was lower than today. Fractional crystallization produced troctolites with immiscible sulfide melt droplets within the mafic crust. Instability of the mafic crust led to deep subduction and re-equilibration at 4-6 GPa. Phase relationships plus the presence of a sample with appreciable modal corundum but no Eu anomaly suggest that kyanite- and corundum-bearing eclogites may also originate as plagioclase-free, higher pressure cumulates of highly aluminous clinopyroxene, spinel, and olivine. This is consistent with the crystallizing phase assemblage from an olivine tholeiitic to picritic magma deeper in the Archean oceanic crust or uppermost mantle. We postulate that the magmatic and subduction processes driving modern plate tectonics already existed in the Meso- to Early Archean.

  9. Origin of paleosubduction-modified mantle for Silurian gabbro in the Cathaysia Block: Geochronological and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuejun; Zhang, Aimei; Fan, Weiming; Zhang, Yanhua; Zhang, Yuzhi

    2013-02-01

    In the eastern South China Block (SCB), the presence of middle Paleozoic volcanics and mafic rocks is poor in spite of the extensive occurrence of granites in response to the synchronous (Kwangsian) intracontinental orogen event. The nature of the lithosphere and its associated orogenic process are poorly known for such a major orogen. In this paper, a set of new U-Pb zircon geochronological, elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic data are presented for several gabbroic plutons, which were recently identified in the Cathaysia Block. The representative samples of the Longhugang, Xinchuan and Xinsi plutons yielded the weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 423 ± 8 Ma, 434 ± 6 Ma and 420 ± 3 Ma, respectively, and their gneissoid country-rocks are dated at 442-466 Ma. This evidences the presence of Silurian mafic rocks in the Cathaysia Block. These gabbroic rocks can be geochemically classified into three groups. Group 1 from the western Longhugang pluton exhibits flat REE patterns represented by (La/Yb)cn = 1.1-1.7, (Gd/Yb)cn = 0.99-1.15, and δEu = 1.29-1.51 with negative Nb-Ta and P and markedly positive Sr anomalies. It shows enrichment in LILEs and 87Sr/86Sr(t) ratios of 0.70412-0.70727 and ɛNd(t) values of - 2.6 to - 0.6. Group 2 from the Xinchuan, Zhouya and Yunlu plutons is characterized by high MgO (11.4-15.8 wt.%), mg-number (66-74) and Cr and Ni contents. It is marked by significantly negative Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and P-Ti anomalies with high 87Sr/86Sr(t) (0.70920-0.71072) and low ɛNd(t) values (- 3.9 to - 7.9). Group 3 from the Xinsi and eastern Longhugang plutons has ɛNd(t) values from - 2.8 to - 5.7 and shows high Nb content of 7.05-9.89 ppm with pronounced enrichment in LILE and weak depletion in HFSE, resembling Nb-enriched arc basalt in HFSE composition. A synthesis of these geochemical data points to the following petrogenesis: Groups 1 and 2 derived from a spinel-bearing, plagioclase-rich source and a garnet-bearing, orthopyroxene-rich source, respectively, proportionally modified by slab- and sediment-derived melts plus fluid fluxing from the earliest Neoproterozoic subduction. The HFSE composition for Group 3 inherited from a metasomatized mantle wedge column with the input of large-proportional slab melts and the absence of residual rutile during partial melting. In conjunction with other available observations, it is proposed that there preserved a paleosubduction-modified wedge column beneath the Cathaysia Block, which might be undisturbed until the Kwangsian intracontinental orogen. During the Silurian post-orogenic collapse of the event, the elevated lithosphere thermal boundary facilitated the partial melting of the column to generate these Silurian gabbroic rocks.

  10. A Astronomia no Ensino Superior Brasileiro entre 1808 e 1889

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretones, Paulo S.; Videira, Antonio A. P.

    2003-05-01

    Este artigo apresenta os principais eventos ocorridos na história do ensino de astronomia nos cursos superiores que existiram no Brasil desde a chegada da Família Real portuguesa em 1808 até o final do período monárquico. Para compor esse esboço histórico, utilizamos, principalmente, livros didáticos, regulamentos, decretos e leis responsáveis pelas organizações dos conteúdos oferecidos e das carreiras dos responsáveis pela disciplina. Na análise do material empregado, investigamos a presença de concepções filosóficas e científicas, que podem ter norteado os conteúdos disciplinares. Não realizamos nenhuma comparação com o ensino de astronomia em outros países. Concluímos mostrando que o estudo de astronomia, durante o período monárquico, foi mais direcionado para a formação d engenheiros do que astrônomos. Gostaríamos de observar que o presente artigo não tem a pretensão de abordar o assunto de maneira completa e detalhada.

  11. Rare earth abundances and Rb-Sr systematics of basalts, gabbro, anorthosite and minor granitic rocks from the Indian Ocean Ridge System, Western Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedge, C.E.; Futa, K.; Engel, C.G.; Fisher, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Basalts dredged from the Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge System have rare earth, Rb, and Sr concentrations like those from other mid-ocean ridges, but have slightly higher Sr87/Sr86 ratios. Underlying gabbroic complexes are similar to the basalts in Sr87/Sr86, but are poorer K, Rb, and in rare earths. The chemical and isotopic data, as well as the geologic relations suggest a cumulate origin for the bulk of the gabbroic complexes. ?? 1979 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Coincidence of gabbro and granulite formation and their implication for Variscan HT metamorphism in the Moldanubian Zone (Bohemian Massif), example from the Kutná Hora Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faryad, Shah Wali; Kachlík, Václav; Sláma, Jiří; Jedlicka, Radim

    2016-11-01

    Leucocratic metagabbro and amphibolite from a mafic-ultramafic body within migmatite and granulite in the Kutná Hora Complex were investigated. The mafic-ultramafic rocks show amphibolite facies metamorphism, but in the central part of the body some metagabbro preserves cumulus and intercumulus plagioclase, clinopyroxene and spinel. Spinel forms inclusions in both clinopyroxene and plagioclase and shows various degree of embayment structure, that was probably a result of reaction with melt during magmatic crystallization. In the metagabbro, garnet forms coronae around clinopyroxene at the contacts with plagioclase. Amphibolite contains garnet with prograde zoning and plagioclase. Phase relations of igneous and metamorphic minerals indicate that magmatic crystallization and subsequent metamorphism occurred as a result of isobaric cooling at a depth of 30-35 km. U-Pb dating on zircon from leucogabbro yielded a Variscan age (337.7 ± 2 Ma) that is similar or close to the age of granulite facies metamorphism (ca 340 Ma) in the Moldanubian Zone. Based on the calculated PT conditions and age data, both the mafic-ultramafic body and surrounding granulite shared the same exhumation path from their middle-lower crustal position at the end of Variscan orogeny. The coincidence of mafic-ultramafic intrusives and granulite-amphibolite facies metamorphism is explained by lithospheric upwelling beneath the Moldanubian Zone that occurred due to slab break-off during the final stages of subduction of the Moldanubian plate beneath the Teplá Barrandian Block. The model also addresses questions about the preservation of minerals and/or their compositions from the early metamorphic history of the rocks subjected to ultradeep subduction and subsequent granulite facies metamorphism.

  13. O Romantismo Brasileiro: Leitura e Transformacao Social (Brazilian Romanticism: Reading and Social Transformation).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augusti, Valeria

    1997-01-01

    Considers the set of representations that configure the images of the literature of Brazilian Romanticism. Notes the capacity of this literature to transform both values and social patterns of behavior. (PA)

  14. Prevalence of heart disease demonstrated in 60 years of the Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia.

    PubMed

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Nather, Julio Cesar; Rodrigues, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    Considering the historical and academic relevance of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology (ABC), as its MEDLINE indexing began in 1950, it was assumed as a hypothesis that the analysis of the publications over the last 60 years could reflect the changing trends of heart disease in Brazil. The study data were collected using a program developed for this purpose, allowing the automatic extraction of information from the MEDLINE database. The study information were collected by searching "Brazilian Archives of Cardiology AND selected parameter in English". Four observational groups were determined: (1) major groups of heart diseases (coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies); (2) relevant diseases in clinical practice (cardiac arrhythmias, cor pulmonale, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure); (3) cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis); and (4) group determined due to the growing trend of publications on congestive heart failure seen in previous groups (congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, rheumatic heart disease and Chagasic heart disease) All publications within the established groups were described, highlighting the increasing importance of heart failure and diabetes as risk factors. A relatively easy search was carried out, using the computer program developed for literature search covering six decades. Emphasizing the limitations of the study, we suggest the existence of an epidemiological link between cardiac diseases that are prevalent in Brazil and the publications of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology.

  15. Age constraints on felsic intrusions, metamorphism and gold mineralisation in the Palaeoproterozoic Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, NE Bahia State, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mello, E.F.; Xavier, R.P.; McNaughton, N.J.; Hagemann, S.G.; Fletcher, I.; Snee, L.

    2006-01-01

    U-Pb sensitive high resolution ion microprobe mass spectrometer (SHRIMP) ages of zircon, monazite and xenotime crystals from felsic intrusive rocks from the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt show two development stages between 2,152 and 2,130 Ma, and between 2,130 and 2,080 Ma. The older intrusions yielded ages of 2,152??6 Ma in monazite crystals and 2,155??9 Ma in zircon crystals derived from the Trilhado granodiorite, and ages of 2,130??7 Ma and 2,128??8 Ma in zircon crystals derived from the Teofila??ndia tonalite. The emplacement age of the syntectonic Ambro??sio dome as indicated by a 2,080??2-Ma xenotime age for a granite dyke probably marks the end of the felsic magmatism. This age shows good agreement with the Ar-Ar plateau age of 2,080??5 Ma obtained in hornblendes from an amphibolite and with a U-Pb SHRIMP age of 2,076??10 Ma in detrital zircon crystals from a quartzite, interpreted as the age of the peak of the metamorphism. The predominance of inherited zircons in the syntectonic Ambro??sio dome suggests that the basement of the supracrustal rocks was composed of Archaean continental crust with components of 2,937??16, 3,111??13 and 3,162??13 Ma. Ar-Ar plateau ages of 2,050??4 Ma and 2,054??2 Ma on hydrothermal muscovite samples from the Fazenda Brasileiro gold deposit are interpreted as minimum ages for gold mineralisation and close to the true age of gold deposition. The Ar-Ar data indicate that the mineralisation must have occurred less than 30 million years after the peak of the metamorphism, or episodically between 2,080 Ma and 2,050 Ma, during uplift and exhumation of the orogen. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  16. Um satélite brasileiro para observação do diâmetro solar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, M.; Leister, N. V.; Benevides Soares, P.; Teixeira, R.; Kuhn, J.

    2003-08-01

    Propomos uma missão espacial para medir a forma e o diâmetro solar com o objetivo de ajudar a determinar o potencial gravitacional do Sol e a sua rotação com precisão, testar modelos teóricos de variação de energia e pela primeira vez medir os modos g de oscilação. As observações serão obtidas através do instrumento denominado APT (Astrometric and Photometric Telescope) descrito por Kuhn(1983). A sensibilidade do instrumento é de 0,2 mas em 27 dias para as observações do diâmetro solar feitas a cada minuto. Esta é uma missão de três anos de duração e pode complementar as medidas que serão feitas pelo satélite PICARD (a ser lançado em 2007). Outros parâmetros físicos podem ser obtidos com as mesmas imagens o que certamente interessará à comunidade de física solar. Um primeiro contato foi realizado com a agência espacial brasileira que pretende lançar um satélite científico a cada dois anos.

  17. [The photographic archive of the Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística and Tibor Jablonszky's view of female labor].

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Vera Lucia Cortes

    2013-03-01

    Shining a light on the photographic archive of geographic missions assigned to do reconnaissance of the country's territory, sponsored by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, the article describes the conditions under which this archive was compiled and how it can serve as a historical source. It addresses the presentation of images and the range of topics and places found in Tibor Jablonszky's work as far as the representations that this photographer constructed of female labor in Brazil during the 1950s and 1960s, from the viewpoint of a photographer working for a government agency.

  18. Maskelynite: Formation by Explosive Shock.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J; de Carli, P S

    1963-05-10

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase.

  19. Graphitization of Organic Material in a Progressively Metamorphosed Precambrian Iron Formation.

    PubMed

    French, B M

    1964-11-13

    Organic matter in the sedimentary Biwabik iron formation in northern Minnesota shows a progressive increase in crystallinity where the formation is metamorphosed by the intrusive Duluth gabbro complex. X-ray diffraction of acid-insoluble residues shows that there is a complete range in crystallinity, from amorphous material in the unmetamorphosed sediments to completely crystalline graphite adjacent to the gabbro.

  20. Graphitization of Organic Material in a Progressively Metamorphosed Precambrian Iron Formation.

    PubMed

    French, B M

    1964-11-13

    Organic matter in the sedimentary Biwabik iron formation in northern Minnesota shows a progressive increase in crystallinity where the formation is metamorphosed by the intrusive Duluth gabbro complex. X-ray diffraction of acid-insoluble residues shows that there is a complete range in crystallinity, from amorphous material in the unmetamorphosed sediments to completely crystalline graphite adjacent to the gabbro. PMID:17777057

  1. Platinum potential of mafic-ultramafic massifs in the western part of the Dambuka ore district (Upper Amur Region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Stepanov, V. A.; Moiseenko, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    New data on the Pt potential of mafic-ultramafic massifs of the Khani-Maya, Uldegit, and Dzhalta complexes in the western part of the Dambuka ore district are discussed. The Khani-Maya Complex is represented by metamorphosed gabbro, gabbronorites, gabbro anorthosites, subordinate pyroxenites, hornblendites, and peridotites. The Uldegit Complex is composed of pyroxenites, hornblendites, gabbro, gabbronorites, norites, troctolites, peridotites, dunites, actinolite-tremolites, serpentinites, anthophyllites, and tremolite-plagioclase rocks. The Dzhalta Complex is formed of peridotites, gabbro, eclogitized gabbro, hornblendites, cortlandites, and pyroxenites. All these complexes differ from each other by the concentrations of Ni, Cu, Co, Au, and platinoids depending on the composition of the constituting rocks and the presence of sulfide minerals.

  2. [Epidemiologic aspects of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in an endemic area of the state of Paraná, Brazil

    PubMed

    Silveira; Teodoro; Lonardoni; Guilherme; Toledo; Ramos; Arraes; Bertolini; Spinoza; Barbosa

    1996-04-01

    An epidemiological investigation of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) was performed in 1992 and 1993 in an endemic area of Jussara and Terra Boa counties, in the Northern Paraná State. The study covered 684 individuals from a population of approximately 1,400 from six agricultural areas (Fazenda Palmital, Cerâmica Andirá, Fazenda Jussara, Fazenda Lagoa, Destilaria Melhoramentos, and Fazenda Mururê) in Northern Paraná, Brazil. The mean frequency of CL history was 19.9%. The highest frequency was at Fazenda Jussara (40.5%). Based on the indirect immunofluorescence test, 58 (8.5%) presented significant titers of anti-Leishmania antibody, 17 (29.3%) of whom had no history of CL. The Montenegro skin test was applied to 97 individuals with a history of CL and was positive in 80 (82.5%). During the survey, seven individuals presented lesions, four of which were positive for Leishmania sp. The strain isolated was identified as Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

  3. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-04-10

    We have measured Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr isotopic compositions in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite diabase dikes, and gabbro and websterite dikes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cummulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have mean /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios and standard deviations of 0.70314 +- 0.00030 and 0.70306 +- 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern midocean ridge basalt. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dikes range from 0.7034 to 0.7047, 0.7038 to 0.7046, and 0.7037 to 0.7061, respectively. These higher /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with seawater. Mineral separates from dikes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dikes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  5. Sr isotopic tracer study of the Samail ophiolite, Oman.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Hopson, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    Rb and Sr concentrations and Sr-isotopic compositions were measured in 41 whole-rock samples and 12 mineral separates from units of the Samail ophiolite, including peridotite, gabbro, plagiogranite, diabase dykes, and gabbro and websterite dykes within the metamorphic peridotite. Ten samples of cumulate gabbro from the Wadir Kadir section and nine samples from the Wadi Khafifah section have 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70314 + or - 0.00030 and 0.70306 + or - 0.00034, respectively. The dispersion in Sr- isotopic composition may reflect real heterogeneities in the magma source region. The average Sr-isotopic composition of cumulate gabbro falls in the range of isotopic compositions of modern MORB. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of noncumulate gabbro, plagiogranite, and diabase dykes range 0.7034-0.7047, 0.7038-0.7046 and 0.7037- 0.7061, respectively. These higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios are due to alteration of initial magmatic compositions by hydrothermal exchange with sea-water. Mineral separates from dykes that cut harzburgite tectonite have Sr-isotopic compositions which agree with that of cumulate gabbro. These data indicate that the cumulate gabbro and the different dykes were derived from partial melting of source regions that had similar long-term histories and chemical compositions.-T.R.

  6. Hydrous partial melting in the lower crust of the Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, F. I.; Koepke, J.; Nicolas, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Series of water-saturated melting experiments have been performed on natural gabbros between 900° and 1000°C, at crustal pressure up to 200MPa (Koepke et al., 2004), that put new constraints on the composition of melt and residual crystals at increasing temperature and melt fraction produced. In the gabbro section of the Oman ophiolite, the development of high-T secondary parageneses is ubiquist, represented by orthopyroxene+pargasite rims within contact between olivine and plagioclase, while clinopyroxene is replaced by pargasite. The reference to the experimental results, and isotopic tracing (Bosch et al., 2004) lead to interpret these reactions as representing initiation of hydrous partial melting by fluids circulating at grain boundaries. The inferred mechanism allowing supercritical water to penetrate the deep gabbro section is a strong anisotropy of thermal compression inducing microcracking in the cooling lower gabbros (Nicolas et al., 2003). In the Oman gabbros, another important petrologic feature is the local occurrence, in the deeper section, of large amounts of orthopyroxene bearing gabbros either interlayered with olivine gabbros or intrusive as pegmatitic patches, in association with wehrlites, or mixed with pargasitic gabbros. The corresponding upper levels are rich in dioritic or trondjemitic dikes. These occurrences are restricted to localized areas that coincide with tips and segments limits as deduced from the detailed mapping along the NW-SE paleospreading axis. The origin of these parageneses as products of hydrous melting of the gabbros, at various melt fraction, is explored by reference to the experimental data. Koepke, J., Feig, S.T., Snow, J., Freise, M., 2004. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 146, 414-432. Bosch, D.et al., 2004, J. Petrology, 45, 1181-1208. Nicolas, A., Mainprice, D., Boudier, F., 2003, J. Geophys. Res. 108 (B8) 2371.

  7. [The occurrence of Biomphalaria straminea (Pulmonata: Planorbidae) on an aquaculture farm of IBAMA in Uberlândia, MG. Instituto Brasileiro do Meio Ambiente a dos Recursos Naturais Renováveis].

    PubMed

    Silveira, E de P; Marçal Júnior, O; Machado, M I

    1997-01-01

    This work evaluates the occurrence of freshwater snails in the IBAMA's fish breeding station in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State. We verified the presence of Biomphalaria straminea in 39.5% of all breeding tanks. None of the snails were infected by Schistosoma mansoni, but further investigation should be done in the area.

  8. Dating the growth of oceanic crust at a slow-spreading ridge.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joshua J; John, Barbara E; Cheadle, Michael J; Miranda, Elena A; Grimes, Craig B; Wooden, Joseph L; Dick, Henry J B

    2005-10-28

    Nineteen uranium-lead zircon ages of lower crustal gabbros from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, constrain the growth and construction of oceanic crust at this slow-spreading midocean ridge. Approximately 75% of the gabbros accreted within error of the predicted seafloor magnetic age, whereas approximately 25% are significantly older. These anomalously old samples suggest either spatially varying stochastic intrusion at the ridge axis or, more likely, crystallization of older gabbros at depths of approximately 5 to 18 kilometers below the base of crust in the cold, axial lithosphere, which were uplifted and intruded by shallow-level magmas during the creation of Atlantis Bank.

  9. Dating the growth of oceanic crust at a slow-spreading ridge.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joshua J; John, Barbara E; Cheadle, Michael J; Miranda, Elena A; Grimes, Craig B; Wooden, Joseph L; Dick, Henry J B

    2005-10-28

    Nineteen uranium-lead zircon ages of lower crustal gabbros from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, constrain the growth and construction of oceanic crust at this slow-spreading midocean ridge. Approximately 75% of the gabbros accreted within error of the predicted seafloor magnetic age, whereas approximately 25% are significantly older. These anomalously old samples suggest either spatially varying stochastic intrusion at the ridge axis or, more likely, crystallization of older gabbros at depths of approximately 5 to 18 kilometers below the base of crust in the cold, axial lithosphere, which were uplifted and intruded by shallow-level magmas during the creation of Atlantis Bank. PMID:16254183

  10. Dating the growth of oceanic crust at a slow-spreading ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, J.J.; John, Barbara E.; Cheadle, Michael J.; Miranda, E.A.; Grimes, Craig B.; Wooden, J.L.; Dick, H.J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen uranium-lead zircon ages of lower crustal gabbros from Atlantis Bank, Southwest Indian Ridge, constrain the growth and construction of oceanic crust at this slow-spreading midocean ridge. Approximately 75% of the gabbros accreted within error of the predicted seafloor magnetic age, whereas ???25% are significantly older. These anomalously old samples suggest either spatially varying stochastic intrusion at the ridge axis or, more likely, crystallization of older gabbros at depths of ???5 to 18 kilometers below the base of crust in the cold, axial lithosphere, which were uplifted and intruded by shallow-level magmas during the creation of Atlantis Bank.

  11. Maskelynite: Formation by Explosive Shock.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J; de Carli, P S

    1963-05-10

    When high pressure (250 to 300 kilobars) was applied suddenly (shock-loading) to gabbro, the plagioclase was transformed to a noncrystalline phase (maskelynite) by a solid-state reaction at a low temperature, while the proxene remained crystalline. The shock-loaded gabbro resembles meteorites of the shergottite class; this suggests that the latter formed as a result of shock. The shock-loading of gabbro at 600 to 800 kilobars raised the temperature above the melting range of the plagioclase. PMID:17737107

  12. The Archean Dongwanzi ophiolite complex, North China craton: 2.505-billion-year-old oceanic crust and mantle.

    PubMed

    Kusky, T M; Li, J H; Tucker, R D

    2001-05-11

    We report a thick, laterally extensive 2505 +/- 2.2-million-year-old (uranium-lead ratio in zircon) Archean ophiolite complex in the North China craton. Basal harzburgite tectonite is overlain by cumulate ultramafic rocks, a mafic-ultramafic transition zone of interlayered gabbro and ultramafic cumulates, compositionally layered olivine-gabbro and pyroxenite, and isotropic gabbro. A sheeted dike complex is rooted in the gabbro and overlain by a mixed dike-pillow lava section, chert, and banded iron formation. The documentation of a complete Archean ophiolite implies that mechanisms of oceanic crustal accretion similar to those of today were in operation by 2.5 billion years ago at divergent plate margins and that the temperature of the early mantle was not extremely elevated, as compared to the present-day temperature. Plate tectonic processes similar to those of the present must also have emplaced the ophiolite in a convergent margin setting.

  13. Macquarie island and the cause of oceanic linear magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Varne, R; Gee, R D; Quilty, P G

    1969-10-10

    Macquarie Islands is formed of probably Pliocene oceanic crust. Intruded into pillow lavas is a belt of harzburgite and layered gabbro mnasses cut by dike swarms. Similar belt-like structures may cause the linear magnetic anomalies of the ocean.

  14. The Archean Dongwanzi ophiolite complex, North China craton: 2.505-billion-year-old oceanic crust and mantle.

    PubMed

    Kusky, T M; Li, J H; Tucker, R D

    2001-05-11

    We report a thick, laterally extensive 2505 +/- 2.2-million-year-old (uranium-lead ratio in zircon) Archean ophiolite complex in the North China craton. Basal harzburgite tectonite is overlain by cumulate ultramafic rocks, a mafic-ultramafic transition zone of interlayered gabbro and ultramafic cumulates, compositionally layered olivine-gabbro and pyroxenite, and isotropic gabbro. A sheeted dike complex is rooted in the gabbro and overlain by a mixed dike-pillow lava section, chert, and banded iron formation. The documentation of a complete Archean ophiolite implies that mechanisms of oceanic crustal accretion similar to those of today were in operation by 2.5 billion years ago at divergent plate margins and that the temperature of the early mantle was not extremely elevated, as compared to the present-day temperature. Plate tectonic processes similar to those of the present must also have emplaced the ophiolite in a convergent margin setting. PMID:11349144

  15. Successive episodes of reactive liquid flow through a layered intrusion (Unit 9, Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion, Scotland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuthold, J.; Blundy, J. D.; Holness, M. B.; Sides, R.

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed microstructural and geochemical study of reactive liquid flow in Unit 9 of the Rum Eastern Layered Intrusion, Scotland. Unit 9 comprises an underlying lens-like body of peridotite overlain by a sequence of troctolite and gabbro (termed allivalite), with some local and minor anorthosite. The troctolite is separated from the overlying gabbro by a distinct, sub-horizontal, undulose horizon (the `major wavy horizon'). Higher in the stratigraphy is another, similar, horizon (the `minor wavy horizon') that separates relatively clinopyroxene-poor gabbro from an overlying gabbro. To the north of the peridotite lens, both troctolite and gabbro grade into poikilitic gabbro. Clinopyroxene habit in the allivalite varies from thin rims around olivine in troctolite to equigranular crystals in gabbro and to oikocrysts in poikilitic gabbro. The poikilitic gabbros contain multiple generations of clinopyroxene, with Cr-rich (~1.1 wt% Cr2O3) anhedral cores with moderate REE concentrations ( core1) overgrown by an anhedral REE-depleted second generation with moderate Cr (~0.7 wt% Cr2O3) ( core2). These composite cores are rimmed by Cr-poor (~0.2 wt% Cr2O3) and REE-poor to -moderate clinopyroxene. We interpret these microstructures as a consequence of two separate episodes of partial melting triggered by the intrusion of hot olivine-phyric picrite to form the discontinuous lenses that comprise the Unit 9 peridotite. Loss of clinopyroxene-saturated partial melt from the lower part of the allivalite immediately following the early stages of sill intrusion resulted in the formation of clinopyroxene-poor gabbro. The spatial extent of clinopyroxene loss is marked by the minor wavy horizon. A second partial melting event stripped out almost all clinopyroxene from the lowest allivalite to form a troctolite, with the major wavy horizon marking the extent of melting during this episode. The poikilitic gabbro formed from clinopyroxene-saturated melt moving upwards and

  16. Petrology of gabbroic xenoliths in 1960 Kilauea basalt: crystalline remnants of prior (1955) magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fodor, R.V.; Moore, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    The 1960 Kapoho lavas of Kilauea's east rift zone contain 1-10 cm xenoliths of olivine gabbro, olivine gabbro-norite, and gabbro norite. Textures are poikilitic (ol+sp+cpx in pl) and intergranular (cpx+pl??ol??opx). Poikilitic xenoliths, which we interpret as cumulates, have the most primitive mineral compositions, Fo82.5, cpx Mg# 86.5, and An80.5. Many granular xenoliths (ol and noritic gabbro) contain abundant vesicular glass that gives them intersertal, hyaloophitic, and overall 'open' textures to suggest that they represent 'mush' and 'crust' of a magma crystallization environment. Their phase compositions are more evolved (Fo80-70, cpx Mg# 82-75, and An73-63) than those of the poikilitic xenoliths. Associated glass is basaltic, but evolved (MgO 5 wt%; TiO2 3.7-5.8 wt%). The gabbroic xenolith mineral compositions fit existing fractional crystallization models that relate the origins of various Kilauea lavas to one another. FeO/MgO crystal-liquid partitioning is consistent with the poikilitic ol-gabbro assemblage forming as a crystallization product from Kilauea summit magma with ???8 wt% MgO that was parental to evolved lavas on the east rift zone. For example, least squares calculations link summit magmas to early 1955 rift-zone lavas (???5 wt% MgO) through ???28-34% crystallization of the ol+sp+cpx+pl that comprise the poikilitic ol-gabbros. The other ol-gabbro assemblages and the olivine gabbro-norite assemblages crystallized from evolved liquids, such as represented by the early 1955 and late 1955 lavas (???6.5 wt% MgO) of the east rift zone. The eruption of 1960 Kapoho magmas, then, scoured the rift-zone reservoir system to entrain portions of cumulate and solidification zones that had coated reservoir margins during crystallization of prior east rift-zone magmas. ?? 1994 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Seawater Circulation and Thermal Sink at OCEAN Ridges - FIELD Evidence in Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A. A.; Boudier, F. I.; Cathles, L. M.; Buck, W. R.; Celerier, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Exceptionally, the lowermost gabbros in the Oman ophiolite are black and totally fresh, except for minute traces of impregnation by seawater fluids at very high temperature (~1000°C). These black gabbros sharply contrast with normal, whitish gabbros altered down to Low-T~500-350°C. These hydrous alterations are ascribed to an unconventional model of seawater circulation and cooling of the permanent magma chambers of fast spreading ocean ridges. In this model, gabbros issued from the magma chamber cross a ~100 m thick thermal boundary layer (TBL) before reaching a narrow, Low-T high permeability channel where the heated return seawater is flowing towards black smokers and the local gabbros are altered. Uprising mantle diapirs in Oman diverge at ~5 km on each side of the palaeo-ridge axis and feed an overlying magma chamber that closes at this distance from axis. Preservation of black gabbros along the Moho implies that the loop of seawater alteration locally does not reach Moho beyond this ~5km distance (otherwise black gabbros would be altered in whitish gabbros). This defines an internal "thermal sink" within ~5 km to the ridge axis. There, the sink is efficiently cooled by the active hydrothermal convection that is ridge transverse. This has been documented near the Galapagos ridge by marine geophysical data, within the same distance. Beyond this critical distance, the cooling system becomes dominantly conductive and ridge-parallel. The TBL and attached return flow channels must be rising into the overcooled, accreted crust. Beyond the thermal sink, the 500°C isotherm rebounds into the crust. It is only after ~ 1My of crustal drift that this isotherm penetrates into the uppermost mantle in a sustained fashion, developing serpentinites at the expense of peridotites.

  18. Metamorphism in oceanic layer 3, Gorringe Bank, eastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mevel, Catherine

    1988-12-01

    Gorringe Bank is an anomalously high structure of the eastern part of the north Atlantic, which was known to be composed of mantle-derived peridotites (layer 4) and gabbros (layer 3). During the submersible cruise CYAGOR II in 1981, the contact between layer 4 and layer 3 was observed on Mount Gettysburg and interpreted as tectonic. The overlying series of gabbro was extensively sampled on both mounts composing the bank, Gettysburg and Ormonde. Coarse-grained to pegmatoid clinopyroxene gabbros predominate and are associated with differentiated rocks (ferrogabbros and diorites). Cumulate gabbros are missing. The gabbroic section sampled is therefore interpreted as the upper part of the plutonic section. Most samples were strongly recrystallized during two distinct events. Metamorphism occurred close to the ridge axis, from interaction of a seawater-derived fluid with still hot gabbros. High temperature shear zones favoured fluid circulation, but the water/rock ratio — estimated from the sodium input — was very small in undeformed rocks (<1). The low W/R ratio explains the strong evolution of the fluid phase and therefore some particular compositions of secondary minerals. Low temperature alteration occurred when the gabbros were tectonically emplaced close to the sea bottom.

  19. Luna 24 - Opaque mineral chemistry of gabbroic and basaltic fragments from Mare Crisium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    Spinels and ilmenites are relatively sparse in the Luna 24 gabbro and basalts. Spinel compositions show some affinities to those of spinels in Apollo 12, Apollo 14 and Luna 16 basalts; a characteristic feature is high Al2O3, reaching a maximum of 19.8 wt%. A comparison of spinels in the Luna 24 gabbro with those in other deep-seated lunar intrusive rocks shows a characteristic trend for Fe/Mg. This trend is systematic from gabbro to anorthosite to troctolite and is interpreted to be P-T dependent. Compositions of spinels in the gabbro fall within the Cr/Al trend defined by the spinels of the basalts, but form a Fe/Mg trend parallel to that of the basalts; this relationship suggests that both the gabbro and the basalts are derived from a closely similar source region, with the basalts originating at a slightly greater depth than the gabbro. The spinels in both rock types are considered to have formed at high crustal levels, at low pressures. The Luna 24 data suggest that the compositional discontinuities which exist between chromian spinels and titanian spinels in a large proportion of mare basalts are the result of nucleation of chromian spinels at high crustal levels prior to eruption, and of titanian spinels during melt crystallization at the lunar surface.

  20. Constraints on the accretion of the gabbroic lower oceanic crust from plagioclase lattice preferred orientation in the Samail ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.; Hirth, G.; Kelemen, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    The debate over the processes of igneous accretion of gabbroic lower crust at submarine spreading centers is centered on two end-member hypotheses: Gabbro Glaciers and Sheeted Sills. In order to determine which of these two hypotheses is most applicable to a well-studied lower crustal section, we present newly published data (VanTongeren et al., 2015 EPSL v. 427, p. 249-261) on plagioclase lattice preferred orientations (LPO) in the Wadi Khafifah section of the Samail ophiolite, Oman. Based on our results we provide five critical observations that any model for the accretion of the lower oceanic crust must satisfy: (1) There is a distinctive change in the orientation of the outcrop-scale layering from near-vertical to sub-horizontal that is also reflected in the plagioclase fabrics in the uppermost ~1000-1500 m of the gabbroic crust; (2) The distinction between the upper gabbros and lower gabbros is not a geochemical boundary. Rather, the change in outcrop-scale orientation from near-vertical to sub-horizontal occurs stratigraphically lower in the crust than a change in whole-rock geochemistry; (3) There is no systematic difference in plagioclase fabric strength in any crystallographic axis between the upper gabbros and the lower gabbros; (4) Beneath the abrupt transition from sub-vertical to sub-horizontal fabric, there is no systematic change in the geographic orientation of the plagioclase fabric, or in the development of a dominant lineation direction within the upper gabbros or the lower gabbros; (5) In the lower gabbros, the obliquity between the (010) and the modal layering remains approximately constant and indicates a consistent top to the right sense of shear throughout the stratigraphy. Our observations are most consistent with the Sheeted Sills hypothesis, in which the majority of lower crustal gabbros are crystallized in situ and fabrics are dominated by compaction and localized extension rather than by systematically increasing shear strain with

  1. Temporal magma dynamics during solidification of the mafic-silicic complex of Isle au Haut, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Kaustubh

    The Isle au Haut Igneous Complex provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the in situ physical and chemical interactions between contemporaneously emplaced mafic and silicic magmas. The complex contains a 600 m thick sequence of 11 alternating layers of gabbro and diorite (typically 15--40 m thick). Purely on the basis of density contrasts (2.65 g/cm 3 gabbro vs. 2.55 g/cm3 diorite), the entire system should have undergone wholesale instability and mixing; it is instead arrested in a grossly unstable state of interaction while molten. Chilled margins along the lower contacts of the gabbros and structural integrity of the diorite layers indicate that near liquidus gabbroic magma invaded partly crystalline, cooler diorite. Mineral assemblages, chemical analyses, and phase equilibria calculations indicate initial temperatures during emplacement of ˜1180°C (gabbro) and ˜1000°C (diorite). Conductive thermal models yield solidification timescales of 15--60 years for individual gabbro layers and about a thousand years for the entire complex. There is ample evidence for two phases of small-scale interfacial Rayleigh-Taylor type instabilities of dioritic melt into the gabbros. Phase I occurred immediately upon gabbro emplacement whereas evenly spaced, slender more silicic pipes represent a much later stage (Phase II). Pipe geometry and spacing, estimated viscosities of the gabbroic magma and silicic melt, and the sudden increase in silica near the upper contact of the diorite, all indicate a thin (˜18--53 cm) buoyant layer at the upper contact of the diorite as the source of the pipes. Compaction of the diorite produced this layer over a period of about ten years. Simultaneous solidification along the lower contact of the overlying gabbro, thickening inwards, increased viscosity enough to arrest pipe ascent after a few meters. Crystal size distribution (CSD) analyses of the gabbro layers yield crystal growth rates (G0 = 2--4 x 10-10 cm/s) and nucleation rates

  2. The origin of rhythmic layering in the Cape Neddick Plutonic Complex, Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Cape Neddick Plutonic Complex located along the southwestern coast of Maine is a small layered gabbroic body. It contains four concentric gabbros of differing composition, From the center to the exterior these are Cortlandtitic, Anorthositic, Normal, and Pegmatitic gabbros. They vary slightly in the proportion of essential minerals; plagioclase, clinopyroxene, hornblende, and biotite [+-] opaques and olivine. Rhythmic layering is seen in all four gabbros. This layering is also concentric around the center of the complex. The best exposure of the layering is along the coast where non-graded and graded rhythmic layering is seen extensively in the Normal gabbro. Only non-graded layering is seen in the Anorthositic gabbro. Non-graded layers were sampled at two localities. One locality is on Cape Nubble Island in the Normal gabbro. The second locality is in the Anorthositic gabbro along the northern coast. The layers are roughly 5--8 cm in width and are continuous around the complex. They are identified on weathered surfaces as alternating bands of felsic and mafic minerals. Layers are not obvious in hand sample. Approximately 15--20 layers were sampled perpendicular to layering. Petrographic and geochemical studies will help constrain the origin of rhythmic layering in the Cape Neddick Complex. Crystal settling or structural processes seem highly unlikely due to the small distance between the layers and the fact that they are not graded. Possible models include multiple pulses of magma within the same magma chamber, density currents, or in situ fractionation by a nucleation-diffusion process. Modal and chemical analysis of mineral phases within individual layers will allow comparison of the bulk composition of each layer. Analysis of coexisting pyroxene and plagioclase can be used to estimate compositional variations in the parent liquid.

  3. IODP Expedition 345: Geochemical Characteristics of Fast Spread Lower East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R.; Godard, M.; Saha, A.; Gillis, K. M.; Snow, J. E.; Klaus, A.

    2013-12-01

    Drilling by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) at the Hess Deep Rift recovered young (ca. 1Ma) primitive gabbroic rocks that formed at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise. Olivine gabbro and troctolite are the dominant rock types recovered at Site U1415, with minor gabbro, clinopyroxene oikocryst-bearing troctolite, clinopyroxene oikocryst-bearing gabbro, and gabbronorite.Two rock series were identified, a layered series with simple layers to diffuse bands of gabbroic rock types and a troctolite series. Olivine gabbros, gabbros and gabbronorites from the layered series have high Mg-numbers (Mg/Mg+Fe) = 79-87), high Ni (130-570 ppm), and low TiO2 (0.1-0.3 wt.%)and incompatible element (e.g., Y <11 ppm) contents. The troctolite series overlaps the gabbroic compositions but are, on average, more primitive with high Mg-numbers (81-89), Ni (260-1500 ppm),and Cr (365-1100 ppm) concentrations,and low TiO2 (<0.1 wt.%)and incompatible element (e.g., Y <3 ppm) contents. The most primitive troctolites sampled have compositions overlapping the field of impregnated mantle peridotites, including those from the Hess Deep Rift. However, these samples are low in Ni relative to their high Mg-number, indicating formation by a dominantly cumulate process. The gabbroic rocks at Site U1415 are far more primitive than the shallow-level gabbros at the Hess Deep Rift and are similar in bulk composition to gabbros from the shallow gabbros from Pito Deep where fast-spreading EPR crust is exposed (Perk et al., 2007). These primitive rock types fall within the range of primitive oceanic gabbros from fast-spreading crust.The preliminary geochemical data are consistent with a petrogenesis as a cumulate sequence from parental mid-ocean ridge basaltic (MORB) melt. However, the occurrence of orthopyroxene in highly primitive rocks challenges current models for melt extraction and MORB crystallization, where orthopyroxene is believed to be only stable within a more evolved MORB

  4. Breccias 73215 and 73255 - Siderophile and volatile trace elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. W.; Petrie, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    Fifteen siderophile and volatile trace elements (Os, Re, Ir, Pd, Ni, Au, Sb, Ge, Se, Ag, In, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl) and U were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis in a spheroidal aphanitic clast and a clast of coarse-grained anorthositic gabbro from breccia 73215 and in three types of aphanite and two clasts of fine-grained anorthositic gabbro from breccia 73255. In common with most Apollo 17 fragment-laden melt rocks, the aphanites from 73215 and 73255 predominantly contain a Group 2 meteoritic component, which is apparently derived from the Serenitatis impact. All aphanitic lithologies contain the same meteoritic component, and are probably cogenetic. The clasts of fine-grained anorthositic gabbro contain substantial amounts (2% to 6% Cl equivalent based on Au) of a pre-Serenitatis Group 3 component. The clast of coarse-grained anorthositic gabbro is low in siderophile elements (0.4% Cl equivalent), and the meteoritic component (Group 5) is not well-defined. A strong correlation exists between Ir and Au in both the aphanites and the anorthositic gabbro clasts, which argues against the breccias 73215 and 73255 being open systems for Au

  5. Chemistry and petrology of Luna 24 lithic fragments and less than 250-micron soils - Constraints on the origin of VLT mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, M.-S.; Schmitt, R. A.; Taylor, G. J.; Warner, R. D.; Lange, D. E.; Keil, K.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported on a combined INAA-petrologic study of 17 small (0.2-1.5 mg) Luna 24 lithic and mineral fragments and INAA study of 5 bulk soils and mineral separates from gabbro 24170. Lithic and mineral fragments are classified into VLT mare basalts (ferrobasalt and metabasalts), low-Ti, variolitic mare basalt, gabbros, melt rock and soil breccia. Data indicate 5 possible magma types, represented by: (1) VLT ferrobasalt and gabbro fragments, with low-TiO2 (about 1%), slightly bow-shaped REE pattern, and low REE concentrations (5-10X chondritic); (2) a ferrobasalt (Laul et al., 1978) and metabasalt fragments with major and trace element contents similar to (1), but positive Eu anomalies; (3) one gabbro fragment with distinctive pyroxene compositional trend (increasing Ti with nearly constant Fe/Fe + Mg) and highest REE contents of any Luna 24 mare basaltic sample, (4) a gabbro fragment with considerably less V and Cr2O3 than ferrobasalt and metabasalt fragments; and (5) variolitic basalt fragment with higher Ti2(2.3%) than other Luna 24 basalts and pyroxene that has increasing then decreasing Ti with increasing Fe/Fe + Mg. Trace element data place constraints on the nature of the source region and possible parent magmas for the Luna 24 VLT ferrobasalt.

  6. Evolution of rodingites along stratigraphic depth in the Iti and Kallidromon ophiolites (Central Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsikouras, Basilios; Karipi, Sofia; Hatzipanagiotou, Konstantin

    2013-08-01

    Rodingitised rocks were collected from the neighbouring Iti and Kallidromon ophiolites. They comprise metasomatic assemblages after serpentinised lherzolite and harzburgite, gabbro and dolerite dykes. The main mineral phases in the metasomatised mantle and gabbroic rocks include grossularitic garnet, chlorite and diopside whereas epidote group minerals were mainly developed at the expense of the dolerite dykes. The fluid phase involved in the metasomatic reactions was highly alkaline in the metasomatising peridotites and less alkaline in the altered gabbro and dolerite. Under such conditions, Ti is assumed to have remained immobile in the whole process while Zr remained constant in the stratigraphically upper rodingitised gabbro and dolerite. Transportation of rare earth elements, Zr, Cr and Ni from the altered mantle segment to the upper gabbro level was assisted by the presence of carbonate and hydroxyl ligands. After consequent breakdown of the carbonate complexes, these elements were deposited in the rodingitised gabbro and dolerite. Rare earths were mainly integrated in the neoblastic diopside whereas Cr and Ni likely formed insoluble hydroxides in that less reducing environment. The metasomatic event happened in the mantle wedge close to the subduction of the Pelagonian carbonates that strongly enriched the fluid phase in CO2. The entrance of an externally derived hydrothermal fluid was responsible for the reduction of pH at the higher levels and the calculated influx of Si in the system.

  7. Formation and emplacement ages of the Masirah ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman

    SciTech Connect

    Smewing, J.D. ); Abbotts, I.L. ); Dunne, L.A. ); Rex, D.C. )

    1991-05-01

    Hornblende separates from gabbros and biotite separates from crosscutting potassic granites of the Masirah ophiolite have been analyzed by conventional K-Ar techniques. The gabbros have Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous ages (126-158 Ma), and the granites have broadly similar ages (124-146 Ma). Because the gabbros are likely to give ophiolite formation ages and the granites ophiolite emplacement ages, it can be concluded that the Masirah ophiolite was emplaced very soon after formation. The Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous ages contrast with the middle Cretaceous ages (90-95 Ma) of the Semail ophiolite, confirming earlier suggestions that the Masirah ophiolite cannot simply be a right-laterally displaced fragment of the Semail ophiolite, but is instead an uplifted block of Indian Ocean crust. The formation and emplacement of the Masirah ophiolite are discussed in the context of the late Mesozoic evolution of the western Indian Ocean.

  8. Basaltic volcanism on the eucrite parent body - Petrology and chemistry of the polymict eucrite ALHA80102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The polymict eucrite meteorite ALHA80102 is an unequilibrated breccia of basaltic and gabbroic clasts in a fragmental matrix. Clasts include basalts of many textural types, cumulate gabbro, black 'glass', and ferroan troctolite (plagioclase, silica, Fe-rich olivine, ilmenite, mesostasis). Ferroan troctolite has not been previously reported from eucrites or howardites; it is interpreted as the end-product of fractional crystallization of eucritic magmas. Bulk and trace element compositions (by electron microprobe and INAA) of clasts and matrix from ALHA80102 are similar to those of other eucrites; the meteorite contains clasts similar to Juvinas and to Stannern. A clast of cumulate eucrite gabbro is enriched in the light rare earths (La/Lu = 2XCI). This clast is interpreted as an unrepresentative sample of metamorphically equilibrated gabbro; LREE-enriched magmas need not be invoked. ALHA80102 is similar to other polymict eucrites from the Allan Hills and may be paired with ALHA76005, ALHA77302, and ALHA78040.

  9. Spatiotemporal Distribution and Population Structure of Monokalliapseudes schubarti (Tanaidacea: Kalliapseudidae) in an Estuary in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Freitas-Júnior, Felipe; Christoffersen, Martin Lindsey; de Araújo, Joafrâncio Pereira; Branco, Joaquim Olinto

    2013-01-01

    Monokalliapseudes schubarti is an endemic tanaidacean microcrustacean from southeastern Brazil to Uruguay inhabiting low energy estuaries. Saco da Fazenda is located in the estuary of the Itajaí-Açú River, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. It is exposed to strong anthropic impact and receives intensive flows of domestic wastewater, solid residues, and drainage activities. Specimens of M. schubarti were collected monthly, in the intertidal and subtidal regions of Saco da Fazenda, in four stations defined as a function of the physiography of the environment during the period of July 2003 to June 2004. Fecundity values were high, with continuous reproductive activity during the whole period of study. The greatest population densities were observed in the intertidal region, where they are nevertheless intensely consumed by birds, swimming crabs, and fish. This species represents a fundamental link in the food chain of Saco da Fazenda, transferring energy from the detritus level to higher trophic levels. Habitat disturbance and high organic matter may represent factors controlling the distribution of populations of M. schubarti. For this reason, the species may be used to monitor anthropic effects in estuarine areas. PMID:24298211

  10. 76 FR 58539 - Notice Pursuant to The National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Cooperative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on July 7, 2011 (76 FR 39901). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil... specified circumstances. Specifically, Petroleo Brasileiro S.A.--PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL;...

  11. Lithospheric Accretion and the Nature of Anomalously Thick Oceanic Moho Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedimovic, M.; Carbotte, S.; Tischer, M.; Diebold, J.; Babcock, J.; Harding, A.; Kent, G.; Canales, P.; Detrick, R.

    2004-12-01

    The oceanic Moho transition zone (MTZ) separates layered gabbros of the crust derived by magma crystallization from the uppermost residual peridotites, generally harzburgites, representing mantle rocks. Mapping of the Oman and the Bay of Islands ophiolite complexes, both of which are inferred to be composed of obducted oceanic lithosphere formed at fast spreading ridges, has shown that the MTZ is mostly composed of sills and lenses of gabbro intruded into dunite. Thickness of the MTZ can vary from a few meters to over two kilometres. Within the thick MTZ, individual gabbro sills and lenses can reach thickness of a few hundred meters. Thermal modelling, tomography, compliance and PmS converted wave studies support the geologic evidence and suggest presence of gabbroic melt accumulations within the MTZ, in the vicinity of fast and intermediate spreading centres. However, seismic reflection imaging, which has been instrumental for determining the structure of the oceanic crust and for defining the geometry of axial magma chambers, has not yet been successful at imaging the gabbro sills and gabbro-melt lenses imbedded into dunite, casting some doubt on their existence within the present day oceanic lithosphere. Here we show images of a series of groups of subcrustal reflection events that resulted from our analysis of some 1500 km of multichannel seismic data collected in 2002 across the Juan de Fuca ridge flanks as part of the EW0207 cruise. Because the Moho discontinuity is well imaged along most of the survey track and the inferred crustal thickness is remarkably uniform, the location of these events as being within the MTZ is well constrained. We provide evidence that the imaged events are true subcrustal reflections and discuss why imaging the structure of thick MTZs is challenging when both dunite - gabbro and dunite - gabbro-melt interfaces are strong reflectors of acoustic energy. We also discuss mechanisms for the emplacement of gabbro sills within the dunites

  12. Gabbroic and Peridotitic Enclaves from the 2008 Kasatochi Eruption, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentner, A.; Nadin, E. S.; Izbekov, P. E.; Nye, C. J.; Neill, O. K.

    2012-12-01

    Kasatochi volcano of the Andreanof Islands in the western Aleutian Arc violently erupted over a two day period from August 7-8, 2008. The eruption involved multiple explosive events generating pyroclastic flows, which included abundant mafic and ultramafic enclaves that have since weathered out and accumulated in talus along the coast. These and other mafic enclaves sampled by modern island arc lavas provide insight into subduction magmatism because they emerge from a section of the subduction system that is less likely than shallower zones to be modified by magmatic processes such as mixing, assimilation, or fractionation. We present new whole rock, clinopyroxene, amphibole, plagioclase, and melt compositions from Kasatochi enclaves of the 2008 eruption. The highly crystalline (~40 vol. % phenocryst content), medium-K basaltic andesite host rock contains ~52-55 wt. % SiO2 and 0.6-0.9 wt. % K2O, and is composed of plagioclase, ortho- and clinopyroxene, amphibole, and Ti-magnetite in a microlite-rich groundmass. Upon eruption, this magma sampled two distinct enclave populations: gabbro and peridotite. The gabbro has abundant amphibole (mostly magnesio-hastingsite) and plagioclase with minor clinopyroxene, olivine, and magnetite, while the peridotite is composed of olivine with minor amounts of clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. There is little textural variation amongst the peridotitic samples collected, but the gabbroic samples vary from layered to massive and cover a range in grain size from fine-grained to pegmatitic. The layered gabbros display centimeter-scale bands of alternating plagioclase- and amphibole-rich layers, with a strong preferential alignment of the amphibole grains. The coarser-grained samples are very friable, with ~10% pore space; disaggregation of these upon host-magma ascent likely formed the amphibole and plagioclase xenocrysts in the andesitic host. Based on the textural and compositional differences, we divide the enclaves into four groups

  13. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, D.S.; Frost, T.P.; Glazner, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  14. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in california.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D S; Glazner, A F; Frost, T P

    1992-12-18

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism.

  15. Luminescence of apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Greenman, N N; Gross, H G

    1970-01-30

    Luminescence measurements were made of four lunar rocks, two terrestrial rocks (granite and gabbro), and one terrestrial mineral (willemite) by comparing the spectral curves with the curve of a barium sulfate standard. Efficiencies with 3000 angstrom excitation were < 6 x 10(-5) for the lunar samples, < 8 x 10(-5) for gabbro of very similar composition to the lunar samples, approximately 10(-4) for granite, and approximately 2 X 10(-2) for willemite. If these are typical values for other ultraviolet excitation wavelengths, the Apollo 11 site appears to contribute little to the observed lunar luminescence.

  16. Evidence from the lamarck granodiorite for rapid late cretaceous crust formation in california.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D S; Glazner, A F; Frost, T P

    1992-12-18

    Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for rocks from the voluminous 90-million-year-old Lamarck intrusive suite in the Sierra Nevada batholith, California, show little variation across a compositional range from gabbro to granite. Data for three different gabbro intrusions within the suite are identical within analytical error and are consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. Recognition of local involvement of enriched mantle during generation of the Sierran batholith modifies estimates of crustal growth rates in the United States. These data indicate that parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith may consist almost entirely of juvenile crust added during Cretaceous magmatism. PMID:17836186

  17. Luminescence of apollo 11 lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Greenman, N N; Gross, H G

    1970-01-30

    Luminescence measurements were made of four lunar rocks, two terrestrial rocks (granite and gabbro), and one terrestrial mineral (willemite) by comparing the spectral curves with the curve of a barium sulfate standard. Efficiencies with 3000 angstrom excitation were < 6 x 10(-5) for the lunar samples, < 8 x 10(-5) for gabbro of very similar composition to the lunar samples, approximately 10(-4) for granite, and approximately 2 X 10(-2) for willemite. If these are typical values for other ultraviolet excitation wavelengths, the Apollo 11 site appears to contribute little to the observed lunar luminescence. PMID:17781561

  18. Geochemistry of Fast-Spreading Lower Oceanic Crust: Results from Drilling at the Hess Deep Rift (ODP Leg 147 and IODP Expedition 345; East Pacific Rise)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Falloon, T.; Gillis, K. M.; Akizawa, N.; de Brito Adriao, A.; Koepke, J.; Marks, N.; Meyer, R.; Saha, A.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Hess Deep Rift, where the Cocos Nazca Ridge propagates into the young, fast-spread East Pacific Rise crust, exposes a dismembered, but nearly complete, lower crustal section. The extensive exposures of the plutonic crust were drilled at 3 sites during ODP Leg 147 (Nov. 1992-Jan. 1993) and IODP Expedition 345 (Dec. 2012-Feb. 2013). We report preliminary results of a bulk rock geochemical study (major and trace elements) carried out on 109 samples representative of the different drilled lithologies. The shallowest gabbroic rocks were sampled at ODP Site 894. They comprise gabbronorite, gabbro, olivine gabbro and gabbronorite. They have evolved compositions with Mg# 39-55, Yb 4-8 x chondrite and Eu/Eu* 1-1.6. Olivine gabbro and troctolite were dominant at IODP Site U1415, with minor gabbro, gabbronorite and clinopyroxene oikocryst-bearing troctolite and gabbro. All U1415 gabbroic rocks have primitive compositions except for one gabbronorite rubble that is similar in composition to the shallow gabbros. Olivine gabbro, gabbro and gabbronorite overlap in composition: they have high Mg# (79-87) and Ni (130-570 ppm), low TiO2 (0.1-0.3 wt.%) and Yb (1.3-2.3 x chondrite) and positive Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu*=1.9-2.7). Troctolite has high Mg# (81-89), Ni (260-1500 ppm) and low TiO2 (<0.1 wt.%) and Yb (~0.5xchondrite) and large Eu/Eu* (>4). ODP Site 895 recovered sequences of highly depleted harzburgite, dunite and troctolite (Yb down to <0.1xchondrite) that are interpreted as a mantle-crust transition zone. Basalts were recovered at Sites 894 and U1415: they have low Yb (0.5-0.9xN6MORB) and are depleted in the most incompatible elements (Ce/Yb=0.6-0.9xN-MORB). The main geochemical characteristics of Site U1415 and 894 gabbroic rocks are consistent with formation as a cumulate sequence from a common parental MORB melt; troctolites are the most primitive end-member of this sequence. They overlap in composition with the most primitive of slow and fast spread crust gabbroic rocks.

  19. 138-121 Ma asthenospheric magmatism prior to continental break-up in the North Atlantic and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schärer, Urs; Girardeau, Jacques; Cornen, Guy; Boillot, Gilbert

    2000-09-01

    Along the Galicia and Gorringe banks and in the Iberia Abyssal Plain of the North Atlantic, unroofed sub-continental mantle fills the gap between 'true' oceanic crust and the continental crust margin. These lithospheric peridotites are intruded by gabbros and dolerites, and locally covered by basalts. Primary magmatic zircons extracted from gabbros and meta-gabbros of the two banks were dated by the U-Pb chronometer, and initial hafnium isotope signatures ( ɛHf i) were determined on the same grains. For Mt. Gettysburg at Gorringe, gabbro emplacement ages of 137.5±0.5 (2σ) Ma and 135.7±0.8 Ma are obtained, and corresponding ɛHf i lie at +20.5±0.3 (2σ) and +19.5±0.4, substantiating magma formation from severely LILE-depleted mantle domains. Gabbro zircons from Mt. Ormonde at Gorringe yield a much younger age of 77.1±0.4 Ma and the Hf isotopes document an intermediately LILE-depleted mantle source having a ɛHf i of +7.6±0.4. Given its age and Hf signature, emplacement of this rock can be ascribed to the alkaline magmatic event that also affected the Iberian Continent in Upper Cretaceous time. Concerning the Galicia section, zircons from a meta-gabbro yield an emplacement age of 121.7±0.4 Ma and a ɛHf i of +14.0±0.2, and a ɛHf i of +14.6±0.2 is obtained for zircons from a previously dated meta-gabbro of identical age. These results indicate magma extraction from mantle reservoirs that are slightly less LILE-depleted than those sampled by the about 20 Myr older Gorringe gabbros. The data demonstrate that magmatism occurring prior to complete separation of Europe from America was essentially of asthenospheric origin. Both the 138-135 Ma ages for the Gorringe gabbros and 122 Ma ages for the Galicia gabbros are at least 5 Myr older than the oldest sediments on Gorringe, and the break-up unconformity at the Galicia Bank, respectively. Magma source signatures of the syn-rift gabbros are in agreement with values expected for differently depleted Cretaceous

  20. Insight in Ridge Axial Melt Lens in the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudier, F.; Nicolas, A.; Daignieres, M.

    2008-12-01

    As in fast spreading ridges, the Oman ophiolite had a melt lens perched on top of the magma chamber where the gabbro unit was crystallizing. This melt lens is now reduced to an horizon where its roof and floor are coinciding and this horizon is now identified in the field. It is generally marked by a sharp discordance between the isotropic gabbros from the root zone of sheeted dike complex (RZSDC) and steeply dipping foliated gabbros. These gabbros are issued from the mush settled on the floor of the melt lens, after subsidence inside the magma chamber. After stretching, compaction and rotation in the chamber, the mush has drifted through the wall of the chamber with, as a result, the observed steep foliated gabbros. Depending on its vertical distance beneath the lens horizon, a given gabbro derives from increasing distances inside the melt lens. Insights in the active melt lens are possible in three ways. 1) Looking at gabbros from the lens horizon, which virtually have not subsided. 2) Considering uncommon areas which display flat-lying foliated gabbros, below the contact with RZSDC and which grade down section into the steep foliated gabbros. Such situations are ascribed to a retreat of the melt lens, exposing gabbros which crystallized on its floor. Their good foliation points to a dynamic deposition on the floor, presumably by convection currents. 3) Considering the ubiquitous occurrence of anorthosites which are interlayered with the foliated gabbros. The anorthosites carry several important messages such as: - compaction of the mush at early stage of subsidence; - chemical nature of the rising melt which drops plagioclase first, followed by either olivine or clinopyroxene; - frequency and volume of melt intrusions, each one coming as short and massive melt surge; - spacing of areas of melt delivery on the lens floor. These results are essentially derived from anorthosites description and distribution in the field. It is concluded that melt lens activity is

  1. Geochemical and zircon U-Pb dating analysis of metamagmatic rocks from the Yuli belt in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chia-Chia

    2016-04-01

    The Tananao Schist Complex of the oldest rocks in Taiwan is exposed at the eastern limb of Backbone Range. Based on the lithologic and metamorphic characteristics, the complex can be divided into the Tailuko and Yuli belts. The Tailuko belt consists of marble, gneiss, and subordinate scattered metabasite; the Yuli belt is composed of greenschist, serpentinite, meta-tuff, meta-gabbro, metabasite, and glaucophane-schist blocks which enclosed by spotted schist of the host rocks. The metamorphic belts were inferred as a Mesozoic mélange. It's still controversial due to the difficulty of analyzing metamorphic rocks. In this study, we focus on the zircon U-Pb dating, geochemistry, and petrographic analysis of spotted schist, metabasite, meta-gabbro, and meta-tuff in order to constrain the formation and crystallization ages and interpret its tectonic setting. Based on zircon U-Pb dating, the host rocks of spotted schist and the exotic blocks of meta-tuff, meta-gabbro (the peak age of 14.4, 15.8, and 16.7 Ma), and metabasite occurred at Miocene. Geochemical characteristics for metabasite and meta-gabbro blocks show Ta-Nd-Ti depletion and LREE depletion in spidergram occurring volcanic arc and N-MORB type affinities, respectively. Results as above mentioned, we suggest that the metamagmatic rocks in the Yuli belt occur within a mélange during the Eurasia continental margin subduction at the Middle-Late Miocene.

  2. Feldspar basalts in lunar soil and the nature of the lunar continents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Harmon, R. S.; Warner, J.; Brett, R.; Jakes, P.; Brown, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    It is found that 25% on the Apollo-14 glasses have the same composition as the glasses in two samples taken from the Luna-16 column. The compositions are equivalent to feldspar basalt and anorthosite gabbro, and are similar to the feldspar basalts identified from Surveyor-7 analysis for lunar continents.

  3. Low-Velocity Zone of the Earth's Mantle: Incipient Melting Caused by Water.

    PubMed

    Lambert, I B; Wyllie, P J

    1970-08-21

    Experimental phase diagrams for the systems gabbro-water and peridotite-water indicate that, if there is any water in the upper mantle, then traces of hydrous interstitial silicate magma will be produced at depths corresponding to the beginning of the low-velocity zone. This explanation for the zone is more satisfactory than others proposed. PMID:17820306

  4. Geochemical characteristics of hydrous basaltic magmas due to assimilation and fractional crystallization: the Ikoma gabbroic complex, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, N.; Okudaira, T.; Ogawa, D.; Yamashita, K.; Suda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    To clarify the processes that occur in hydrous basaltic magma chambers, we have undertaken detailed petrological and geochemical analyses of mafic and intermediate rocks from the Ikoma gabbroic complex, southwest Japan. The complex consists mainly of hornblende gabbros, hornblende gabbronorites, and hornblende leucogabbros. The hornblende leucogabbros are characterized by low TiO2 and high CaO contents, whereas the hornblende gabbronorites have high TiO2 and low CaO contents. The initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (SrI) of the hornblende gabbronorites and hornblende gabbros are higher than those of the hornblende leucogabbros and plagioclase, and they may have resulted from a higher degree of assimilation of metasediments. The geochemical features of the hornblende leucogabbros and hornblende gabbronorites can be explained by accumulation of plagioclase and ilmenite, respectively, in a hybrid magma that formed by chemical interaction between mafic magma and metasediment, whereas the hornblende gabbros were produced by a high degree of crustal assimilation and fractional crystallization of this hybrid magma. As a result of the density differences between crystals and melt, the Ikoma gabbroic rocks formed by the accumulation of plagioclase in the middle of the magma chamber and by the accumulation of ilmenite in the bottom of the chamber. Taking into account the subsequent assimilation and fractional crystallization, our observations suggest an enriched mantle (SrI = ~0.7071) as the source material for the Ikoma gabbros.

  5. The crustal section of the Siniktanneyak Mountain ophiolite, Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Bickerstaff, D.; Harris, R.A.; Miller, M.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1993-04-01

    Fragments of the upper crustal section of the Brooks Range Ophiolite on the west flank of Siniktanneyak Mountain expose important contact relations and paleohorizontal indicators. The nearly complete crustal sequence faces northwest. Based on field observations, the crustal units encountered at Siniktanneyak Mountain from bottom to top are: (1) layered gabbro, (2) isotropic gabbro, (3) high level and late-stage intrusions of diorite and diabase, (4) rare sheeted dikes, (5) basalt, and (6) a bedded volcanic tuff. Potassium feldspar-bearing pegmatites are also found. Of particular interest is the orientation of the layered gabbro, sheeted dikes, and the bedded volcanic tuff. The steeply dipping gabbro layers strike N-S, the adjacent vertical sheeted dikes strike NE-SW. Bedded volcanic tuff and lavas are flat lying. Contacts within the upper crust units are often covered by talus. Contacts between various plutonic rocks are both sharp and gradational, suggesting syn- and post-cooling intrusions. Contacts between plutonic rock and higher volcanic rock appear to be fault contacts.

  6. Late orogenic mafic magmatism in the North Cascades, Washington: Petrology and tectonic setting of the Skymo layered intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, D.L.; Tepper, J.H.; Hirschmann, M.M.; Hurlow, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Skymo Complex in the North Cascades, Washington, is a layered mafic intrusion within the Ross Lake fault zone, a major orogen-parallel structure at the eastern margin of the Cascades crystalline core. The complex is composed dominantly of troctolite and gabbro, both with inclusions of primitive olivine gabbro. Low-pressure minerals in the metasedimentary contact aureole and early crystallization of olivine + plagioclase in the mafic rocks indicate the intrusion was emplaced at shallow depths (<12 km). The Skymo rocks have trace-element characteristics of arc magmas, but the association of Mg-rich olivine (Fo88-80) with relatively sodic plagioclase (An75-60) and the Al/Ti ratios of clinopyroxene are atypical of arc gabbros and more characteristic of rift-related gabbros. A Sm-Nd isochron indicates crystallization in the early Tertiary (ca. 50 Ma), coeval with the nearby Golden Horn alkaline granite. Mantle melting to produce Skymo magma likely occurred in a mantle wedge with a long history of arc magmatism. The Skymo mafic complex and the Golden Horn granite were emplaced during regional extension and collapse of the North Cascades orogen and represent the end of large-scale magmatism in the North Cascades continental arc. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  7. California earthquakes: why only shallow focus?

    PubMed

    Brace, W F; Byerlee, J D

    1970-06-26

    Frictional sliding on sawcuts and faults in laboratory samples of granite and gabbro is markedly temperature-dependent. At pressures from 1 to 5 kilobars, stick-slip gave way to stable sliding as temperature was increased from 200 to 500 degrees Celsius. Increased temperature with depth could thus cause the abrupt disappearance of earthquakes noted at shallow depths in California.

  8. Recycled oceanic crust observed in 'ghost plagioclase' within the source of Mauna Loa lavas

    PubMed

    Sobolev; Hofmann; Nikogosian

    2000-04-27

    The hypothesis that mantle plumes contain recycled oceanic crust is now widely accepted. Some specific source components of the Hawaiian plume have been inferred to represent recycled oceanic basalts, pelagic sediments or oceanic gabbros. Bulk lava compositions, however, retain the specific trace-element fingerprint of the original crustal component in only a highly attenuated form. Here we report the discovery of exotic, strontium-enriched melt inclusions in Mauna Loa olivines. Their complete trace-element patterns strongly resemble those of layered gabbros found in ophiolites, which are characterized by cumulus plagioclase with very high strontium abundances. The major-element compositions of these melts indicate that their composition cannot be the result of the assimilation of present-day oceanic crust through which the melts have travelled. Instead, the gabbro has been transformed into a (high-pressure) eclogite by subduction and recycling, and this eclogite has then been incorporated into the Hawaiian mantle plume. The trace-element signature of the original plagioclase is present only as a 'ghost' signature, which permits specific identification of the recycled rock type. The 'ghost plagioclase' trace-element signature demonstrates that the former gabbro can retain much of its original chemical identity through the convective cycle without completely mixing with other portions of the former oceanic crust.

  9. Magma mixing and mingling on Deer, Niblack, and Etolin Islands, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Lindline, J.; Crawford, W.A.; Crawford, M.L. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Intimately associated 20 m.a. hornblende-biotite granites and olivine gabbro norites occur on Etolin, Niblack and Deer Islands, southwest of Wrangell, Alaska. The field relationships suggest multiple injections of mafic and felsic phases within this igneous complex. Ellipsoidal to angular mafic magmatic enclaves occur in the granite, ranging in number from sparse to tightly packed swarms. Slightly curved decimeter sized rafts of fine grained mafic enclaves comprise a frozen fountain of mafic magma in the felsic host. Course-grained felsic dikes containing gabbroic zenoliths and ubiquitous fine-grained mafic pillows exhibiting sharp and sutured chilled borders intrude the layered gabbro. Synplutonic northeast trending fine-grained mafic and fine-grained felsic dikes mutually cross-cut the felsic pillow-bearing dikes. The granite consists of green hornblende, dark brown biotite, plagioclase and quartz. The mafic mineral assemblage changes from olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase in the gabbro through intermediate-grained phases containing altered clinopyroxene, brown hornblende, red-brown biotite, plagioclase and quartz. The increase in proportion of hydrous mafic minerals from the gabbro to the fine-grained mafic enclaves and changes in pleochroic colors of biotite and hornblende from the intermediate-grained phases to the fine-grained mafic enclaves suggest chemical interaction between the mafic enclaves and their felsic host.

  10. Shallow drilling investigation of contact relationships in the Wichita Mountains igneous province

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, M.C.; Hogan, J.P. . School of Geology and Geophysics); Luza, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Within the Wichita Mountains Igneous Province, a variety of mineralogically, texturally and compositionally diverse hybrid rock types (i.e. gabbro-diorites, monzonites and granodiorites) crop out at gabbro-grants contacts. Possible coeval sedimentary rocks associated with crustal rifting are restricted to a few scattered, isolated exposures of a mineralogically variable group of meta-quartzites (Meers Quartzite). Typically these outcrops of meta-quartzite are of limited areal extent and are surrounded by either gabbro, granite, rhyolite or a combination of these rock types. However, the origin of both the hybrid rock types and the Meers Quartzite remains enigmatic because outcrops containing complete and clear contact relationships are extremely rare. At present, direct testing of models is difficult as complete exposure of contacts between these units is extremely rare due to deposition of younger sedimentary units and severe degradation by weathering. Poor condition of existing samples has hampered geochemical and other petrologic methods in evaluating models. Four potential drilling sites have been selected where critical contacts between major geologic units are interpreted to be present in the shallow subsurface (<300 ft.). Objectives of drilling are (1) direct observation of contacts between rock units by retrieval of a complete core sample from the drill hole, (2) retrieval of freshest possible rock material for petrographic and geochemical analysis and (3) retrieval of a complete transect beginning in Mount Scott Granite or Meers Quartzite across the hybrid rock zone and into the substrate gabbro to document variations associated with the transition.

  11. Geochemical characteristics of hydrous basaltic magmas due to assimilation and fractional crystallization: the Ikoma gabbroic complex, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, N.; Okudaira, T.; Ogawa, D.; Yamashita, K.; Suda, Y.

    2016-10-01

    To clarify the processes that occur in hydrous basaltic magma chambers, we have undertaken detailed petrological and geochemical analyses of mafic and intermediate rocks from the Ikoma gabbroic complex, southwest Japan. The complex consists mainly of hornblende gabbros, hornblende gabbronorites, and hornblende leucogabbros. The hornblende leucogabbros are characterized by low TiO2 and high CaO contents, whereas the hornblende gabbronorites have high TiO2 and low CaO contents. The initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (SrI) of the hornblende gabbronorites and hornblende gabbros are higher than those of the hornblende leucogabbros and plagioclase, and they may have resulted from a higher degree of assimilation of metasediments. The geochemical features of the hornblende leucogabbros and hornblende gabbronorites can be explained by accumulation of plagioclase and ilmenite, respectively, in a hybrid magma that formed by chemical interaction between mafic magma and metasediment, whereas the hornblende gabbros were produced by a high degree of crustal assimilation and fractional crystallization of this hybrid magma. As a result of the density differences between crystals and melt, the Ikoma gabbroic rocks formed by the accumulation of plagioclase in the middle of the magma chamber and by the accumulation of ilmenite in the bottom of the chamber. Taking into account the subsequent assimilation and fractional crystallization, our observations suggest an enriched mantle (SrI = ~0.7071) as the source material for the Ikoma gabbros.

  12. Reactive flow as dominant evolution process in the lowermost oceanic crust: evidence from olivine of the Pineto ophiolite (Corsica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfilippo, Alessio; Tribuzio, Riccardo; Tiepolo, Massimo; Berno, Davide

    2015-10-01

    The Jurassic Pineto ophiolite from Corsica exposes a ~1-km-thick troctolite-olivine-gabbro sequence, interpreted to represent a lowermost sector of the gabbroic oceanic crust from a (ultra-)slow spreading system. To constrain the petrogenesis of the olivine-gabbros, minor and trace element analyses of olivine (forsterite = 84-82 mol%) were carried out. Olivine from the olivine-gabbros is depleted in incompatible trace elements (Sc, V, Ti, Y, Zr and heavy rare earth elements) with respect to olivines from associated troctolites. Depleted incompatible element compositions are also shown by olivine (forsterite = 86 mol%) from a clinopyroxene-rich troctolite. The incompatible element compositions of olivine argue against a petrogenetic process entirely driven by fractional crystallization. We propose that melts migrating through an olivine-plagioclase crystal mush chemically evolved by reaction with the existing minerals, changing in composition as it flowed upward. The melt residual from these interactions led to partial dissolution of preexisting olivine and to crystallization of clinopyroxene, generating olivine-gabbro bodies within a troctolite matrix. Reactive flow was the major evolution process active in the ~1-km crustal transect exposed at the Pineto ophiolite, producing lithological variations classically attributed to fractional crystallization processes.

  13. Recycled oceanic crust observed in 'ghost plagioclase' within the source of Mauna Loa lavas

    PubMed

    Sobolev; Hofmann; Nikogosian

    2000-04-27

    The hypothesis that mantle plumes contain recycled oceanic crust is now widely accepted. Some specific source components of the Hawaiian plume have been inferred to represent recycled oceanic basalts, pelagic sediments or oceanic gabbros. Bulk lava compositions, however, retain the specific trace-element fingerprint of the original crustal component in only a highly attenuated form. Here we report the discovery of exotic, strontium-enriched melt inclusions in Mauna Loa olivines. Their complete trace-element patterns strongly resemble those of layered gabbros found in ophiolites, which are characterized by cumulus plagioclase with very high strontium abundances. The major-element compositions of these melts indicate that their composition cannot be the result of the assimilation of present-day oceanic crust through which the melts have travelled. Instead, the gabbro has been transformed into a (high-pressure) eclogite by subduction and recycling, and this eclogite has then been incorporated into the Hawaiian mantle plume. The trace-element signature of the original plagioclase is present only as a 'ghost' signature, which permits specific identification of the recycled rock type. The 'ghost plagioclase' trace-element signature demonstrates that the former gabbro can retain much of its original chemical identity through the convective cycle without completely mixing with other portions of the former oceanic crust. PMID:10801125

  14. Macquarie island and the cause of oceanic linear magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Varne, R; Gee, R D; Quilty, P G

    1969-10-10

    Macquarie Islands is formed of probably Pliocene oceanic crust. Intruded into pillow lavas is a belt of harzburgite and layered gabbro mnasses cut by dike swarms. Similar belt-like structures may cause the linear magnetic anomalies of the ocean. PMID:17731490

  15. California earthquakes: why only shallow focus?

    PubMed

    Brace, W F; Byerlee, J D

    1970-06-26

    Frictional sliding on sawcuts and faults in laboratory samples of granite and gabbro is markedly temperature-dependent. At pressures from 1 to 5 kilobars, stick-slip gave way to stable sliding as temperature was increased from 200 to 500 degrees Celsius. Increased temperature with depth could thus cause the abrupt disappearance of earthquakes noted at shallow depths in California. PMID:17759338

  16. Low-Velocity Zone of the Earth's Mantle: Incipient Melting Caused by Water.

    PubMed

    Lambert, I B; Wyllie, P J

    1970-08-21

    Experimental phase diagrams for the systems gabbro-water and peridotite-water indicate that, if there is any water in the upper mantle, then traces of hydrous interstitial silicate magma will be produced at depths corresponding to the beginning of the low-velocity zone. This explanation for the zone is more satisfactory than others proposed.

  17. Triassic mafic and intermediate magmatism associated with continental collision between the North and South China Cratons in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sang-Bong; Oh, Chang Whan; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Choi, Seon-Gyu; Kim, Taesung; Yi, Keewook

    2016-03-01

    Triassic coeval mafic and intermediate magmatism occurred in the area suggested to be the southern margin of the North China Craton (NCC) in the Gyeonggi Massif (GM) of the Korean Peninsula. This study investigates aspects of the mafic and intermediate magmatism using SHRIMP zircon ages and whole-rock chemical and isotopic Sr-Nd data. The mafic and intermediate rocks intruded into a basement paragneiss in three areas (Yangpyeong, Odesan and Yangyang) within the GM at ca. 230 Ma. The paragneiss was metamorphosed in both the Paleoproterozoic and Triassic. Gabbros (hornblende gabbro and pyroxene-mica gabbro) from the study areas exhibit strong light REE (LREE) enrichment relative to chondrite (LaN/YbN = 11.1-30.6) and a high LILE/HFSE pattern, Ta-Nb-P-Ti troughs and positive Ba-K-Pb-Sr spikes on the N-MORB-normalized multi-element variation diagram. These features are typical characteristics of arc-related gabbros. The gabbros also show strongly enriched initial isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7100-0.7137; εNd(t) = - 13.1 to - 19.7). The coeval intermediate intrusive rocks also exhibit whole-rock chemical and isotopic features (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7099-0.7143; εNd(t) = - 10.8 to - 18.6) similar to those of the gabbros. The mafic and intermediate intrusive rocks plot in the within-plate and/or post-collisional fields on tectonic discrimination diagrams. These data indicate that the mafic and intermediate magmatism in the study areas occurred during the Triassic post-collisional relaxation period via partial melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) that was enriched in a subduction environment prior to (or during) the Permo-Triassic continental collision between the NCC and the South China Craton (SCC). The highly enriched mantle signatures revealed by the gabbros from the study areas are matched to the enriched features identified in Cretaceous mafic igneous rocks (ca. 130 Ma) on the southern margin of the NCC. Thus, this study suggests that the

  18. Lithological and structural investigations of the Finero back thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palzer, M.; Österle, J.; Klötzli, U.

    2012-04-01

    The Ivrea-Verbano-Zone (IVZ, Southern Alps, NW Italy) constitutes a renowned cross-section through the continental crust. It is one of the few places in the world where a complete crustal transect from the palaeo-surface to granulite facies lower crustal conditions and accompanying mantle melt intrusions can be studied directly. It has thus gained an enormous amount of interest and generated a wealth of literature. But the litho-tectonic evolution of the IVZ is still only partly understood and numerous problems remain unsolved. The IVZ is tectonically confined by the Insubric Line to the north and west and by the Cossato-Mergozzo-Brissago Line (CMB) as well as by the Pogallo Line to the east. The outcropping rocks are interpreted as a part of the Adriatic continental crust emplaced during the Alpine orogeny. Lithologies comprise a stratigraphically upper amphibolite facies "kinzigite series" and a lower granulite facies "stronalite series" (both with metapelites, basites, calcsilicate rocks), numerous ultrabasic mantle tectonites and a widespread suite of Permian mantle melt intrusions, the so-called "mafic complex". The largest mantle tectonite of the IVZ is the peridotite body of Finero. This comprises three main lithologies: phlogopite peridotite, "internal gabbro", hornblende peridotite (and minor amounts of pyroxenites, gabbroic dikes, ect.). In spite of many studies, the answers to numerous questions concerning the structure and history of the ultrabasic and basic rocks are still unsatisfying and need to be questioned. Peridotites, gabbros, stronalites and kinzigites can be found from north to south, interpreted as an extensionally thinned intersection through the lower crust. Problems arise from the difficult distinction between the "internal gabbro" within the peridotite body and the "external gabbro", as part of the "mafic complex", the unsatisfying structural interpretations concerning the peridotite body and the relationship between peridotite and "mafic

  19. Decoupling of Serpentinization and Prehnitization in Lower East Pacific Rise Crust at Hess Dee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deasy, R. T.; Wintsch, R. P.; Meyer, R.; Bish, D. L.; Gasaway, C.; Heimdal, T.

    2014-12-01

    Our down-hole mineralogical and geochemical analyses from the East Pacific Rise fast-spreading lower oceanic crust indicate that alteration of olivine to serpentine and of plagioclase to prehnite were independent, and neither alone monitors the total "alteration." The results are based on representative channel sub-samples recovered from every Hole J core during IODP Expedition 345 to the Hess Deep tectonic window. Samples have been analyzed for trace element, Sr isotopic, and quantitative mineralogical compositions (the latter by Rietveld refinement using X-ray diffraction data). Hole J is the most representative rock succession drilled at the Hess Deep as it penetrated the two principle plutonic lithologies: an upper gabbro and a lower troctolite. Units are significantly distinguished by XRD modal mineralogy and trace element abundances. The more heterogeneous gabbro contains 23-32 wt% clinopyroxene (cpx), 34-54 wt% plagioclase (plag), and <4 wt% olivine (ol). The troctolite contains 3-11% cpx, 14-36% plag, and ≤6% ol. Alteration minerals comprise together 18-31% in the gabbro versus 55-80% of the troctolite. The most abundant alteration products are prehnite and chlorite. Gabbro samples with lowest abundances of alteration minerals (18-20 wt%) preserve 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70275-0.7028) consistent with unaltered mantle. The abundance of plag in the gabbro, the major host for Sr, suggests retention of mantle Sr isotopic compositions there is due to the large reservoir of magmatic Sr. 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70300-0.70342 in the troctolite samples indicate seawater interaction, even where olivine is most abundant, and serpentine is at or below the ~1% detection limit by XRD. Significant alteration of the deep crust by seawater thus predates the first appearance of serpentine. These data suggest that the timing and operation of prehnite- and serpentine-producing alteration reactions are independent.

  20. Cognate xenoliths in Mt. Etna lavas: witnesses of the high-velocity body beneath the volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Rotolo, Silvio Giuseppe; Cocina, Ornella; Tumbarello, Gianvito

    2014-01-01

    Various xenoliths have been found in lavas of the 1763 ("La Montagnola"), 2001, and 2002-03 eruptions at Mt. Etna whose petrographic evidence and mineral chemistry exclude a mantle origin and clearly point to a cognate nature. Consequently, cognate xenoliths might represent a proxy to infer the nature of the high-velocity body (HVB) imaged beneath the volcano by seismic tomography. Petrography allows us to group the cognate xenoliths as follows: i) gabbros with amphibole and amphibole-bearing mela-gabbros, ii) olivine-bearing leuco-gabbros, iii) leuco-gabbros with amphibole, and iv) Plg-rich leuco gabbros. Geobarometry estimates the crystallization pressure of the cognate xenoliths between 1.9 and 4.1 kbar. The bulk density of the cognate xenoliths varies from 2.6 to 3.0 g/cm3. P wave velocities (V P ), calculated in relation to xenolith density, range from 4.9 to 6.1 km/s. The integration of mineralogical, compositional, geobarometric data, and density-dependent V P with recent literature data on 3D V P seismic tomography enabled us to formulate the first hypothesis about the nature of the HVB which, in the depth range of 3-13 km b.s.l., is likely made of intrusive gabbroic rocks. These are believed to have formed at the "solidification front", a marginal zone that encompasses a deep region (>5 km b.s.l.) of Mt. Etna's plumbing system, within which magma crystallization takes place. The intrusive rocks were afterwards fragmented and transported as cognate xenoliths by the volatile-rich and fast-ascending magmas of the 1763 "La Montagnola", 2001 and 2002-03 eruptions.

  1. Production of hybrid granitic magma at the advancing front of basaltic underplating: Inferences from the Sesia Magmatic System (south-western Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigoi, Silvano; Quick, James E.; Demarchi, Gabriella; Klötzli, Urs S.

    2016-05-01

    The Permian Sesia Magmatic System of the southwestern Alps displays the plumbing system beneath a Permian caldera, including a deep crustal gabbroic complex, upper crustal granite plutons and a bimodal volcanic field dominated by rhyolitic tuff filling the caldera. Isotopic compositions of the deep crustal gabbro overlap those of coeval andesitic basalts, whereas granites define a distinct, more radiogenic cluster (Sri ≈ 0.708 and 0.710, respectively). AFC computations starting from the best mafic candidate for a starting melt show that Nd and Sr isotopic compositions and trace elements of andesitic basalts may be modeled by reactive bulk assimilation of ≈ 30% of partially depleted crust and ≈ 15%-30% gabbro fractionation. Trace elements of the deep crustal gabbro cumulates require a further ≈ 60% fractionation of the andesitic basalt and loss of ≈ 40% of silica-rich residual melt. The composition of the granite plutons is consistent with a mixture of relatively constant proportions of residual melt delivered from the gabbro and anatectic melt. Chemical and field evidence leads to a conceptual model which links the production of the two granitic components to the evolution of the Mafic Complex. During the growth of the Mafic Complex, progressive incorporation of packages of crustal rocks resulted in a roughly steady state rate of assimilation. Anatectic granite originates in the hot zone of melting crust located above the advancing mafic intrusion. Upward segregation of anatectic melts facilitates the assimilation of the partially depleted restite by stoping. At each cycle of mafic intrusion and incorporation, residual and anatectic melts are produced in roughly constant proportions, because the amount of anatectic melt produced at the roof is a function of volume and latent heat of crystallization of the underplated mafic melt which in turn produces proportional amounts of hybrid gabbro cumulates and residual melt. Such a process can explain the

  2. Contrasted Origins For Gabbroic Cumulates Along The Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonnotte, P.; Benoit, M.; Ceuleneer, G.

    2005-12-01

    Gabbroic cumulates sampled along mid-ocean ridges are classically viewed as fractional crystallization products of primitive mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORB) in shallow axial magma chambers. Recent observations of deep horizons of the ocean crust have shown that, in slow spreading environments, crustal building proceeds by repeated injections of modest amounts of variously evolved melt batches. Such a discontinuous character of magma emplacement favors the development of complex petrogenetic evolutions triggered by the migration of various types of melts and fluids into formerly crystallized - or still crystallizing - gabbroic cumulates and into residual peridotite. In some occurrences, however, gabbros are clearly not issued from fractional crystallization of MORB-like melts. In order to better constrain the origin of various kinds of gabbronorites emplaced along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), we performed a geochemical study (trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes) of clinopyroxene (cpx) separates leached with a severe analytical protocol designed to remove the geochemical effects of post-crystallization water rock interaction. We focus on two sites: MAR off the FAMOUS area (DSDP Site 334) and MAR on both sides of the 15°20 N fracture zone (MODE98-Leg1 cruise). Cumulates sampled at DSDP Site 334 are orthopyroxene-rich gabbronorites which call for parent melts richer in SiO2, more "andesitic", than MORB at a given MgO content. They also show an extreme depletion in most incompatible major, minor and trace elements compared to MORB. We measured isotopic signatures to trace the source of the DSDP Site 334 cumulates. We find that Site 334 cpx depart from the global mantle correlation: normal MORB values for the 143Nd/144Nd ratio (0.51307-0.51315) are associated to highly radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr (0.7034-0.7067) ratios. These signatures show that the parent melts of Site 334 cumulates are issued from an ultra-depleted MORB source and that contamination with seawater occurred at

  3. Bi-cycles petrographic association in middle part of East Pana PGE layers deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavin, Alex; Veksler, Ilya; Gorbunov, Artem

    2016-04-01

    The PGE mineralization in the East Pana layered gabbroic intrusion forms three discrete layers at different stratigraphic levels, which are traditionally labeled as zones A, B and C. In order to investigate possible relationships of mineralization with magmatic layering we sampled a 120 m long drill core section across zone B in the middle part of the intrusion and carried out detailed petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical studies of the samples. The ore zone is located in medial part of the of East's Pana deposite. The samples represent mainly from a layered sequence of gabbro and gabbro-norite. This zone is composed of interlayers of gabbroic sequences and gabbro-norite of various color, with different structures and different relationship of rock-forming minerals of Ol-Opx-Cpx-Pl. We studied one of key's drill-hole section of ore zone, in which is located two ore horizons. Fundamental feature layered intrusions are presence in cross-section cycles includes of stable petrographic association. In section of ore zone it is possible to select two most contrast petrographic types. Whole-rock analyses and petrographic observations reveal two units of modal layering comprising, from bottom to top, melanocratic gabbro grading upwards into mesocratic gabbro and gabbro-norite overlain by pegmatoidal, gabbroic rock with has sharp footwall and hanging wall contacts.There is also an olivine-bearing gabbro at the bottom of the lower unit. The ore horizons are located in same gabbro-norite type rock. The ore horizons are located in same gabbro-norite type part. The second upper ore zone located in more differential species types. There is the common trend of system evolution of well distinguished on triangle of Ol-Pl-Di, Ol-Pl-Q and other. However composition of the rocks in the two parts of our section show us similar, but independent trends. For example on diagram differentiation of rocks composition, with normative content of anorthite on the X axis, trends of

  4. Crustal Heterogeneity and Stratigraphy on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 16°-17°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. J.; Smith, D. K.; Cann, J. R.; Schouten, H.; Marschall, H.; Parnell-Turner, R. E.; Yoerger, D.

    2013-12-01

    RV Knorr Cruise 210, Leg 5 conducted bathymetric, dredging and AUV surveys of a series of detachment faults along an ~120 km stretch of the MAR focused on the neovolcanic zone and western rift mountains from 16° to 17°N. Two major complexes, located to the north and south respectively, and an intervening smaller complex were studied. These complexes generally crested at and often were connected by linear back-tilted volcanic ridges that constituted breakaway zones. While bathymetrically very similar at first order, the southern complex is flanked by a large axial neovolcanic high, while a deep axial rift flanks the northern complex. Mantle peridotite, gabbro, dikes and pillow lavas were dredged at these complexes, but in entirely different proportions. Fresh or weathered pillow basalt was overall the most abundant rock dredged, both from outcrops at the crests of the core complexes and as hanging wall debris on fault surfaces. Other than extrusives, intermingled peridotite and gabbro, including high-temperature mylonites, were abundant at the northern complex with only minor diabase. Peridotite was abundant, with subordinate diabase at the central core complex, while gabbro was largely absent. At the southern complex abundant greenschist facies diabase was recovered along with minor peridotite, but again gabbro was absent. Moreover, greenschist facies pillow basalts and pillow breccias, while common in the south, were absent to the north. These results may seem counter-intuitive, as the detachment faulting in the south rooting beneath a robust magma center might be expected to expose abundant gabbro, while the opposite might seem likely to the north. However, the scarcity of dike rock and greenschist pillow lavas to the north, together with an abundance of peridotites and intermingled gabbros should be expected exposed from beneath a deep magma-poor rift. This is consistent with a crust consisting of a veneer of pillow lavas overlying scattered dikes and

  5. Monitoring of reforested areas using LANDSAT data. [Ribas do Rio Pardo, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Filho, P. H.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.

    1981-01-01

    Imagery obtained with channels 5 and 7 was visually interpreted in an effort to determine the spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics of a 105,000 hectare area of Fazenda Mutum which was reforested with various species of pine and eucalyptus. It was possible to map a reforested area as small as 6 hectare in its initial implantation using contrast with the surrounding targets. Five classes were mapped: nondeforested areas, partially deforested areas, deforested areas, partially reforested areas, and fully reforested areas. In 1979, 12,000 hectare were deforested, 4,330.83 hectare were partially reforested, and 42,744.71 hectare were reforested.

  6. A non-traditional isotope study of plagiogranite and rhyo-dacite suites: insights into mid ocean ridge magma chamber processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstrom, C.; Huggett, N.; Perfit, M. R.; Zambardi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The eruption of silicic volcanic rocks in the mid-ocean ridge environment, although rare, provides an important observation for understanding MOR magma chamber processes. Although axially erupted MORB are quite homogeneous geochemically, this likely reflects mixing and reaction from the magma lens axis at only slightly variable temperature. Differentiation occurs along the colder 'wings' of the magma lens and rhyo-dacite suites show mixing trends with normal MORB. Both plagiogranites in ophiolites and erupted rhyodacites provide evidence of extensive magma evolution at MORs. Yet, whether silicic eruptives in MOR environments are equivalent to plagiogranites is unknown. Here we compare the non-traditional isotope ratios of Fe and Si in a plagiogranite suite from Troodos (Cyprus) with rhyo-dacite suites from the Galapagos Spreading Center, the Juan de Fuca-Blanco ridge-transform intersection [RTI], and the 9°N EPR overlapping spreading center [OSC]) to shed light on the origin of oceanic silicic rocks. Within the eastern Troodos Ophiolite we collected 14 samples from a 700m transect from gabbros through to plagiogranites (which immediately transition to sheeted dikes). Indeed, Troodos geologic maps show plagiogranites ubiquitously occur at the upper gabbro-sheeted dike contact. Silica content ranges from ~45 wt. % in the gabbros to 75 wt. % in the most evolved plagiogranites. Notably, iron ratios increase (become heavier) with increasing, up-section distance from the gabbros (d56Fe ranges from -0.05 to 0.40). This spatial pattern is consistent with the prediction of thermal diffusion occurring within a temperature gradient in a MOR magma lens although other explanations are possible. Because there is a spatial progression in SiO2 from gabbro to plagiogranite, these isotope ratios also increase with SiO2. Notably, within the 3 silicic MOR systems, d56Fe and d30Si exhibit the same relationship becoming isotopically heavier with increasing silica content (d30Si ranges

  7. Geochemical investigation of Gabbroic Xenoliths from Hualalai Volcano: Implications for lower oceanic crust accretion and Hualalai Volcano magma storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruohan; Lassiter, John C.; Barnes, Jaime D.; Clague, David A.; Bohrson, Wendy A.

    2016-05-01

    The patterns of axial hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges both affect and are influenced by the styles of magma plumbing. Therefore, the intensity and distribution of hydrothermal alteration in the lower oceanic crust (LOC) can provide constraints on LOC accretion models (e.g., "gabbro glacier" vs. "multiple sills"). Gabbroic xenoliths from Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii include rare fragments of in situ Pacific lower oceanic crust. Oxygen and strontium isotope compositions of 16 LOC-derived Hualalai gabbros are primarily within the range of fresh MORB, indicating minimal hydrothermal alteration of the in situ Pacific LOC, in contrast to pervasive alteration recorded in LOC xenoliths from the Canary Islands. This difference may reflect less hydrothermal alteration of LOC formed at fast ridges than at slow ridges. Mid-ocean ridge magmas from slow ridges also pond on average at greater and more variable depths and undergo less homogenization than those from fast ridges. These features are consistent with LOC accretion resembling the "multiple sills" model at slow ridges. In contrast, shallow magma ponding and limited hydrothermal alteration in LOC at fast ridges are consistent with the presence of a long-lived shallow magma lens, which limits the penetration of hydrothermal circulation into the LOC. Most Hualalai gabbros have geochemical and petrologic characteristics indicating derivation from Hualalai shield-stage and post-shield-stage cumulates. These xenoliths provide information on the evolution of Hawaiian magmas and magma storage systems. MELTS modeling and equilibration temperatures constrain the crystallization pressures of 7 Hualalai shield-stage-related gabbros to be ∼2.5-5 kbar, generally consistent with inferred local LOC depth. Therefore a deep magma reservoir existed within or at the base of the LOC during the shield stage of Hualalai Volcano. Melt-crust interaction between Hawaiian melts and in situ Pacific crust during magma storage partially

  8. Magmatic origin of alkaline meta-igneous rocks from Chamberlindalen, SW Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluchowska, Karolina; Barker, Abigail; Manecki, Maciej; Czerny, Jerzy; Majka, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on the late Neoproterozoic meta-igneous rocks of SW Svalbard to determine their magmatic evolution, conditions of magma storage and origin. The samples from the Chamberlindalen area form an alkaline igneous suite, from which thin dikes and intrusive bodies have been collected. The rocks in question intrude Late Neoproterozoic metasediments and are surrounded by occurrences of Neoproterozoic metabasalts in contrast to highly alkaline the Chamberlindalen intrusions. The rocks from Chamberlindalen are divided into two groups based on their geochemistry, mineralogy and field relationships. The dikes, classify as minettes, belonging to the lamprophyre group and contain mainly euhedral, elongated phlogopite and additionally clinopyroxene and feldspar. The rest of the samples are highly magnesian and are classified as alkali gabbro. The alkali gabbros contain primary magmatic minerals such as clinopyroxene, calcic amphibole and mica in different proportions. The alkali gabbros are enriched in LREE and HFSE and depleted in P, K and HREE. The minette dikes are always more enriched in HFSE and REE in comparison to the alkali gabbros. The mineral chemistry of the alkali gabbros reveals that pyroxenes are represented by diopside with Wo46-51 En35-46 Fs6-14, and calcic amphibole by kaersutite. The Mg# number for diopside is from 72 - 88, whereas for kaersutite Mg# number is 51 - 74. Thermobarometry calculations for diopside and kaersutite have been performed. In the alkali gabbros from Chamberlindalen, diopside crystallized between 0.7 - 8 kbar and 1152 - 1233°C. Results for kaersutite reveal that they crystallized between 5 - 17 kbar and 1043 - 1215°C. For diopside the main crystallization was between 10 and 38 km, whereas for kaersutite, the main crystallization was between 30 and 50 km. Clinopyroxene and minor kaersutite also show a zone of crystallization at 2 to 10 km. This reflects a main crystallization zone at 10 - 50 km throughout the continental

  9. The relationships between geology and soil chemistry at the Apollo 17 landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Rodgers, K. V.; Bansal, B. M.; Wiesmann, H.; Shih, C.; Nyquist, L. E.; Hubbard, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    Within the wide compositional range of the Apollo 17 soils, three distinct chemical groups have been recognized, each one corresponding broadly with a major geological and physiographic unit. These groups are: (1) Valley Floor type soils, (2) South Massif type soils, and (3) North Massif type soils. The observed chemical variations within and between these three groups is interpreted by means of mixing models in terms of lateral transport and mixing of prevailing local rock types, such as high-titanium basalts, KREEP-like noritic breccias, anorthositic gabbro breccias and orange glass. According to these models, North Nassif types evolved on the lower slopes of the North Massif and Sculptured Hills where anorthositic gabbro predominates over noritic breccia and where lateral mixing with basalt is effective, whereas the South Massif type soils originally developed on the upper slopes of the South Massif, where anorthositic breccia and noritic breccias are equally abundant, and where lateral mixing with basalt was minimal.

  10. Mesosiderite clasts with the most extreme positive europium anomalies among solar system rocks.

    PubMed

    Mittlefehldt, D W; Rubin, A E; Davis, A M

    1992-08-21

    Pigeonite-plagioclase gabbros that occur as clasts in mesosiderites (brecciated stony-iron meteorites) show extreme fractionations of the rare-earth elements (REEs) with larger positive europium anomalies than any previously known for igneous rocks from the Earth, moon, or meteorite parent bodies and greater depletions of light REEs relative to heavy REEs than known for comparable cumulate gabbros. The REE pattern for merrillite in one of these clasts is depleted in light REEs and has a large positive europium anomaly as a result of metamorphic equilibration with the silicates. The extreme REE ratios exhibited by the mesosiderite clasts demonstrate that multistage igneous processes must have occurred on some asteroids in the early solar system. Melting of the crust by large-scale impacts or electrical induction from an early T-Tauri-phase sun may be responsible for these processes.

  11. Mesosiderite clasts with the most extreme positive europium anomalies among solar system rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Rubin, Alan E.; Davis, Andrew M.

    1992-01-01

    Pigeonite-plagioclase gabbros that occur as clasts in mesosiderites (brecciated stony-iron meteorites) show extreme fractionations of the rare-earth elements (REEs) with larger positive europium anomalies than any previously known for igneous rocks from the earth, moon, or meteorite parent bodies and greater depletions of light REEs relative to heavy REEs than known for comparable cumulate gabbros. The REE pattern for merrillite in one of these clasts is depleted in light REEs and has a large positive europium anomaly as a result of metamorphic equilibration with the silicates. The extreme REE ratios exhibited by the mesosiderite clasts demonstrate that multistage igneous processes must have occurred on some asteroids in the early solar system. Melting of the crust by large-scale impacts or electrical induction from an early T-Tauri-phase sun may be responsible for these processes.

  12. Alpine-type sensu strictu(ophiolitic) peridotites: Refractory residues from partial melting or igneous sediments? A contribution to the discussion of the paper: "The origin of ultramafic and ultrabasic rocks" by P.J. Wyllie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.

    1969-01-01

    Although Alpine peridotites and basaltic lavas are widely associated in eugeosynclines and oceanic areas, their genetic ties are obscure. Three major characteristics of olivine-rich Alpine peridotite and dunite-relict cumulus textures, aggregated masses of chromitite, and intimate association with magnesium-rich gabbro - cannot be explained by partial melting of garnet peridotite to form tholeiite. Association of magnesium-rich gabbro with the chromite-bearing and so-called high-temperature Alpine peridotites is believed to present problems that have not been considered by advocates of the partial-melting hypothesis. The chromite-bearing Alpine peridotites and related feldspathic rocks are believed to have formed near the top of the mantle by gravitational differentiation processes which are largely independent of the melting processes that produce basaltic magma at depths of 50 km or more. ?? 1969.

  13. Laser /39/Ar-/40/Ar dating of two clasts from consortium breccia 73215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Schaeffer, O. A.; James, O. B.; Mueller, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    A laser Ar-39-Ar-40 study of the components of an ANT-suite anorthositic gabbro and a black aphanite from a consortium breccia is reported. A wide range of K-Ar ages is found for the plagioclase in the anorthositic gabbro; at the centers of the largest grains is material showing the greatest age (older than 4.11 billion years) while the youngest material (3.81-3.88 billion years) is found near the grain margins. Partial outgassing of the clasts upon incorporation into the breccia could account for the age patterns. The black aphanite clast appears to be cogenetic with the aphanite that forms the breccia matrix. The time of crystallization of a lunar granite has also been measured by the laser technique.

  14. Origin and modal petrography of Luna 24 soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, A.; Mckay, D. S.; Fruland, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Petrographic modal analyses of polished grain mounts of fractions in the 20 to 250 micron size range from Luna 24 soil samples are presented and used to infer the nature and relative contributions of source rocks. It is found that more than 90% of the identifiable rock fragments are mare basalts, with about 11% of the soil consisting of the crystalline form. Soil breccias, which make up nearly 10% of the soil, are found to be immature. Electron probe analysis of glass particles reveals principle clusters conforming to anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro and mare basalts. More than half of the soil is composed of monomineralic particles, with pyroxene as the most abundant mineral. It is concluded that 85% of the regolith is derived from local mare basalts and gabbros and about 10% is derived from early cumulates of local mare basalt magma. Highland sources are considered to contribute not more than 3% of the regolith.

  15. AFBC bed material performance with low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, G.M.; Benson, S.A.; Karner, F.R.; Rindt, D.K.; Hajicek, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the reasons for carefully screening any candidate bed material for use in low-rank coal atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, before the final selection is made. The sections of this paper describe: (1) the experimental equipment used to obtain the data, as well as the experimental and analytical procedures used in evaluation; (2) the results of tests utilizing various bed materials with particular emphasis on the problem of bed material agglomeration; and (3) the conclusions and recommendations for bed material selection and control for use with low-rank coal. Bed materials of aluminum oxide, quartz, limestone, dolomite, granite, gabbro, and mixtures of some of these materials have been used in the testing. Of these materials, gabbro appears most suitable for use with high available sodium lignites. 17 figures, 8 tables. (DMC)

  16. Velocities of southern Basin and Range xenoliths: insights on the nature of lower crustal reflectivity and composistion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Christensen, Nikolas I.; Wilshire, Howard G.

    1995-01-01

    To reconcile differences between the assessments of crustal composition in the southern Basin and Range province on the basis of seismic refraction and reflection data and lower-crustal xenoliths, we measured velocities of xenoliths from the Cima volcanic field in southern California. Lower-crustal samples studied included gabbro, microgabbro, and pyroxenite. We find that the mafic xenolith velocities are compatible with regional in situ measurements from seismic refraction studies, provided that a mixture of gabbro and pyroxenite is present in the lower crust. Supporting this model are observations that many of the lower-crustal xenoliths from the Cima volcanic field are composites of these rock types, with igneous contacts. Vertical incidence synthetic seismograms show that a gabbroic lower crust with occasional pyroxenite layering can produce a reflective lower crust that is similar in texture to that shown by seismic reflection data recorded nearby.

  17. Magnetism of the oceanic crust: Evidence from ophiolite complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.K.

    1980-07-10

    The magnetic properties of six ophiolite complexes from around the world, ranging in age from Jurassic to Miocene, are presented. An emphasis is placed in our study on the petrologic and isotopic data from these ophiolite complexes in order to determine first whether the rock samples presently available represent the pristine ocean crust or whether they have been altered subaerially since their formation. Five of the ophiolites are found to be acceptable, and the conclusion is overwhelmingly in favor of a marine magnetic source layer that includes not only the pillow lavas but also the underlying dikes and gabbro. At the moment, however, our observations do not suggest that the magnetic contributions of the basaltic dikes should be overlooked in favor of gabbro. A second important conclusion is that nearly pure magnetite could indeed be a magnetic carrier which contributes to marine magnetic anomanies. It only awaits discovery by deeper ocean crustal penetration by future Deep Sea Drilling Project legs.

  18. Luna 24 - Mineral chemistry of 90-150 micron clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. O. A.; Hwang, J.-Y.; Mccallister, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    The mineralogy, composition and source relations of monomineralic clasts in the size range 0.09 to 0.15 mm have been studied for seven grain mounts from the Luna 24 core, obtained in Mare Crisium. One of the core horizons, which showed the greatest number of mafic mineral clasts, apparently represents a less reworked level or one which received a greater average influx of gabbroic and/or basaltic ejecta. Most of the mafic minerals in the core were probably derived from the comminution of clasts of very low titanium basalts and/or gabbros. A small number of mineral clasts may have originated from a Mg-rich gabbro. A mixture of local mare basalts and ejecta from Fahrenheit crater probably makes up most of the regolith at the Luna 24 site.

  19. The geometry and high-temperature brittle deformation of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Denis; Taylor, H. P., Jr.; Bird, Dennis K.

    1984-11-01

    The Skaergaard magma chamber formed approximately 55 m.y. ago along the embryonic rift between North America and Europe as tholeiitic basalt magma flowed upward along fractures in basement gneiss and then infiltrated the stratigraphic unconformity at the base of a 7- to 9-km-thick section of continental basalts. The magma deflected and faulted the overburden as it formed a 4.5-km-thick, 189 km3, laccolithlike chamber with elliptical form (a = 6 km, b = 4 km) in map view. As the chamber grew, its feeder pipes were eroded into conical depressions; blocks of gneiss were rafted to the chamber top, and some blocks were fused and entrained in the main magma as "immiscible" fluids. Crystallization and cooling produced at least four distinct fracture events: (1) At 1050°-1000°C, residual magma accumulated in fractures in the Layered Series, forming gabbro pegmatites, (2) at 1050°-700°C, near-vertical fractures were formed, providing channels for the main pulse of meteoric-hydrothermal activity; these fractures developed near the margin of the magma chamber, then expanded outward into the permeable basalts and inward, following the gabbro-magma interface. Ground waters derived from joints in the surrounding basalts flowed into the gabbro, were heated, lowered the 18O/16O ratio of the intrusion, and filled its fractures with hornblende, clinopyroxene, biotite, and magnetite-ilmenite, (3) at 800°-750°C, volatile-rich granophyric melts derived from sloped blocks of basement gneiss expanded and crystallized as both sill-like and dike-like bodies in the gabbro, and (4) below 700°C, fractures continued to form and hydrothermal activity continued to cool the intrusion. The relative age, abundance, continuity, and mineralogy of the veins are consistent with parameters used in previous studies of this intrusion that predict the occurrence of a high-temperature hydrothermal system and a time- and volume-averaged permeability of 10-13 cm2. Our new data indicate that the

  20. Results from the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathum, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Ewing, M.; Lammlein, D.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results from the Apollo seismic network suggest that primitive differentiation occurred in the outer shell of the moon to a depth of approximately 300 km; and the central region of the moon is presently molten to a radius of between 200 and 300 km. If early melting to a depth of 300 to 400 km was a consequence of accretional energy, very short accretion times are required. The best model for the zone of original differentiation appears to be a crust 40 to 80 km thick, ranging in composition from anorthositic gabbro to gabbro; overlying an ultramafic cumulate (olivine-pyroxene) about 250 km thick. The best candidate for the molten core appears to be iron or iron sulphide. A new class of seismic signals has recently been identified that may correspond to shallow moonquakes. These are rare, but much more energetic than the more numerous, deep moonquakes.

  1. Compositions of Normal and Anomalous Eucrite-Type Mafic Achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The most common asteroidal igneous meteorites are eucrite-type mafic achondrites - basalts and gabbros composed of ferroan pigeonite, ferroan augite, calcic plagioclase, silica, ilmenite, troilite, Ca-phosphate, chromite and Fe-metal. These rocks are thought to have formed on a single asteroid along with howardites and diogenites. However, high precision O-isotopic analyses have shown that some mafic achondrites have small, well-resolved, non-mass-dependent differences that have been interpreted as indicating derivation from different asteroids. Some of these O-anomalous mafic achondrites also have anomalous petrologic characteristics, strengthening the case that they hail from distinct parent asteroids. We present the results of bulk compositional studies of a suite of normal and anomalous eucrite-type basalts and cumulate gabbros.

  2. Results from the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Ewing, M.; Lammlein, D.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results from the Apollo Seismic Network suggest that primitive differentiation occurred in the outer shell of the moon to a depth of approximately 300 km and the central region of the moon is presently molten to a radius of between 200 and 300 km. If early melting to a depth of 300 to 400 km was a consequence of accretional energy, very short accretion times are required. It was shown that the best model for the zone of original differentiation is a crust 40 to 80 km thick, ranging in composition from anorthositic gabbro to gabbro, and overlying an ultramafic cumulate about 250 km thick. The best candidate for the molten core appears to be iron or iron sulphide. A new class of seismic signals recently were identified that may correspond to shallow moonquakes. These are rare, but much more energetic than the more numerous, deep moonquakes.

  3. Petrology of lunar rocks from the Sea of Fertility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlenko, A. S.; Tarasov, L. S.; Shevaleyevskiy, I. D.; Ivanov, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Based on a comparative analysis of the petrochemistry of an integrated sample of gabbro basalts and a fine fraction from regolith returned by Luna 16 automatic station from the Sea of Fertility, with the mean compositions of various types of mare basalts, anorthosites, and regolith from the Sea of Tranquillity and the Ocean of Storms, with reference to several data on rare elements, the nature of the fine fractions is discussed. It is shown that the integrated sample of gabbro basalt from the coarse fraction in the lower part of the core can be represented as a mixture of mare basalts of the Sea of Tranquillity and nonmare basalts of the krip type in the ratio of about 3 to 2. It is confirmed that the compositions of the Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 regolith are complementary with the compositions of basalts and anorthosites of the Sea of Tranquillity and the Ocean of Storms.

  4. Petrology of lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths from the Cima Volcanic Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.G.; McGuire, A.V.; Noller, J.S.; Turrin, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    Basaltic rocks of the Cima Volcanic Field in the southern Basin and Range province contain abundant gabbro, pyroxenite, and peridotite xenoliths. Composite xenoliths containing two or more rock types show that upper-mantle spinel peridotite was enriched by multiple dike intrusions in at least three episodes; the mantle was further enriched by intergranular and shear-zone melt infiltration in at least two episodes. Because of their high densities, the gabbros and pyroxenites can occupy the zone immediately above the present Moho (modeled on seismic data as 10-13 km thick, with Vp 6.8 km/s) only if their seismic velocities are reduced by the joints, partial melts, and fluid inclusions that occur in them. Alternatively, these xenoliths may have been derived entirely from beneath the Moho, in which case the Moho is not the local crust-mantle boundary. -from Authors

  5. Apollo 17 petrology and experimental determination of differentiation sequences in model moon compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, F. N.; Kushiro, I.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental studies of model moon compositions are discussed, taking into account questions related to the differentiation of the outer layer of the moon. Phase relations for a series of proposed lunar compositions have been determined and a petrographic and electron microprobe study was conducted on four Apollo 17 samples. Two of the samples consist of high-titanium mare basalts, one includes crushed anorthosite and gabbro, and another contains blue-gray breccia.

  6. Major chemical characteristics of Mesozoic Coast Range ophiolite in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, E.H.; Blake, Jr., M.C.

    1974-01-01

    Sixty-four major element analyses of rocks representative of the Coast Range ophiolite in California were compared with analyses of other onland ophiolite sequences and those of rocks from oceanic ridges. The rocks can be classed in five groups harzburgite-dunite, clinopyroxenite-wehrlite, gabbro, basalt-spilite, and keratophyre-quartz keratophyre which on various diagrams occupy nonoverlapping fields. The harzburgite-dunite from onland ophiolite and ocean ridges are comparable and very low in alkalies. Possible differentiation trends defined on AFM diagrams by other rocks from onland ophiolites and ocean ridges suggest two lines of descent: (1) A trend much like the calc-alkalic trend, though shifted somewhat toward higher iron, and (2) an iron-enrichment trend defined chiefly by the more iron-rich gabbros and amphibolite. MgO-variation diagrams for rocks from the Coast Range ophiolite further distinguish the iron-rich gabbros and amphibolite from the other rock groups and indicate that the iron enrichment, unlike that of the Skaergaard trend, is related to the formation of amphibole. Ophiolite sequences that include the most silicic rock types, such as quartz keratophyre, also exhibit the most pronounced dual lines of descent, suggesting that the silicic rocks and the amphibole-rich gabbros are somehow related. Although the major element chemistry of the Coast Range ophiolite is clearly like that of rocks dredged from oceanic ridges, it is not sufficiently diagnostic to discriminate among the choices of a spreading ridge, an interarc basin, or perhaps even the root zone of an island arc as the site of ophiolite formation.

  7. Geological and structural conditions of eclogitization of Paleoproterozoic basic dikes in the eastern Belomorian Mobile Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, V. M.; Aranovich, L. Ya.

    2008-07-01

    A new, Krasnaya Guba dike field that comprises more than 30 minor gabbronorite intrusions and dikes of “garnet” Fe-gabbro was revealed at the northeastern flank of the Belomorian Mobile Belt. Gabbronorite intrusions were emplaced along the faults that formed as a result of brittle failure under conditions of general extension. As follows from the structural relationships, dikes of Fe-gabbro are younger than gabbronorite. They were formed under compression and shearing. The mobile melt was pumped into gneisses that underwent ductile deformation. Eclogitization in the Krasnaya Guba dike field was selective and affected only dikes of Fe-gabbro and minor gabbronorite intrusions and did not develop in country rocks. The bodies of Fe-gabbro are eclogitized almost completely, whereas gabbronorite is transformed into eclogite only along shear zones. Eclogites were formed after the complete solidification of intrusive bodies, and their localization is controlled by the concentration of deformations owing to the different elastoplastic properties of gabbroic rocks and country gneisses and migmatites. The different degree of fracturing in basic dikes and country gneisses resulted in the concentration of fluid flows in fracture systems within competent rocks. Late Svecofennian pegmatites (1.86 Ga) distinctly crosscut eclogites that experienced retrograde metamorphism. The eclogitic rocks from the Krasnaya Guba are the youngest known in the Belomorye. The age of eclogitization is 2.12 1.86 Ga. A new finding of eclogitic rocks in the Belomorye, as well as previously known similar rocks near Gridino Village, emphasize tectonic activity of the northwestern Umba Collision Zone. The eclogitization of basic rocks in Krasnaya Guba is related to their desilification in shearing zones in the course of interaction of plagioclase with ortho-and clinopyroxene with the formation of garnet-omphacite aggregate and removal of silica. The currently observed texture, structure, and chemical

  8. Petrology of the Paloma Valley ring complex, southern California batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, D.M.; Bard, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The Paloma Valley ring complex is one of the numerous plutons that make up the Cretaceous southern California batholith. The complex is composite, consisting of (1) an older, single ring dike and two subsidiary short-arced inner dikes, and (2) a younger set of thin short-arced dikes largely inside the older ring dike. The older ring dike, composed of granodiorite-quartz monzonite, has nearly vertical walls and is elliptical in plan; its long axis (14 km) is oriented west-northwest. It was emplaced in and contains numerous fragments of gabbro. The more than 200 short-arced granitic pegmatite dikes, mainly ranging from 0.2 to 1 m in thickness, define a domal ring dike set with moderately to steeply dipping outer dikes and nearly horizontal inner dikes. The younger dikes cut both the older ring dike and the gabbro. Spatially associated with the younger dikes are bodies of fine-grained granophyre that contain stringers of granitic pegmatite. The granophyre has an Mg content similar to that of the younger ring-dike rock, but contains less K and more Fe. The older ring dike is interpreted to have been magmatically emplaced in an elliptical zone of ring fracturing in gabbro; the magma made room by stoping the denser gabbro with little assimilation. Upon a release of pressure, a set of domal fractures formed, along which volatile-rich magma was emplaced, forming the younger ring dikes. Granophyre resulted from pressure-quenching through a loss of volatiles. Residual volatiles, or volatiles that were introduced later, recrystallized parts of the granophyre and caused the formation of pegmatite stringers.

  9. The petrogenesis of late Neoproterozoic mafic dyke-like intrusion in south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azer, M. K.; Abu El-Ela, F. F.; Ren, M.

    2012-08-01

    New field, petrographical and geochemical studies are presented here for the late Neoproterozoic Rimm intrusion (˜15 km long) exposed in the southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt in the northernmost Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Field relations indicate that the Rimm intrusion is younger than the surrounding metamorphic rocks and calc-alkaline syn-tectonic granodiorite and it was not affected by regional metamorphism. The anorogenic peralkaline granite of Gebel Serbal crosscuts the Rimm intrusion. The Rimm intrusion is made up of several consanguineous rock types with gradational contacts. It is composed chiefly of pyroxene-hornblende gabbro, hornblende gabbro and minor quartz diorite. The chemical composition of the mafic minerals indicated that the studied rocks derived from calc-alkaline mafic magma. Geochemically, the studied rocks are characterized by enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and LREE relative to HREE [(Ce/Yb)N = 4.50-6.36]. Quartz diorite display slightly concave HREE pattern and slightly negative Eu-anomaly [(Eu/Eu*)n = 0.91] which may be the result of fractionation of amphibole and plagioclase from the source melt, respectively. The Rimm intrusion evolved from mafic mantle magma into different type rocks by fractional crystallization with minor crustal contamination. The initial magma corresponds to pyroxene-hornblende gabbro and the crystallization of hornblende was caused by slight H2O increase in magma after crystallization of near-liquidus clinopyroxene and Ca-rich plagioclase. Amphiboles geobarometer indicate that the gabbroic rocks of the Rimm intrusion crystallized at pressures between 4.8 and 6.4 Kb, while quartz diorite crystallized at 1.3-2.1 Kb. Crystallization temperatures range between 800 and 926 °C for the gabbros and between 667 and 784 °C for the quartz diorite. The Rimm intrusion represents a post-orogenic phase formed during the crustal thinning and extension of the Arabian-Nubian Shield.

  10. Magnetic anomalies in Bahia Esperanza: A window of magmatic arc intrusions and glacier erosion over the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; Pedrera, Antonio; Ghidella, Marta; Montes, Manuel; Nozal, Francisco; Rodríguez-Fernandez, Luis Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Bahia Esperanza, constituting the NE tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, is made up of Paleozoic clastic sedimentary rocks overlain by a Jurassic volcano-sedimentary series and intruded by Cretaceous gabbros and diorites. The area is located along the southern part of the Pacific Margin magnetic anomaly belt. Field magnetic researches during February 2010 contribute to determining the deep geometry of the intermediate and basic intrusive rocks. Moreover, the new field data help constrain the regional Pacific Margin Anomaly, characterized up to now only by aeromagnetic and marine data. Field magnetic susceptibility measurements of intrusive intermediate and basic rocks, responsible for magnetic anomalies, ranges from 0.5 × 10- 3 SI in diorites to values between 0.75 × 10- 3 SI and 1.3 × 10- 3 SI in gabbros. In addition, a significant remanent magnetism should also have contributed to the anomalies. The regional magnetic anomaly is characterized by a westward increase from 100 nT up to 750 nT, associated with large intrusive diorite bodies. They probably underlie most of the western slopes of Mount Flora. Gabbros in the Nobby Nunatak determine local residual rough anomalies that extend northwards and westwards, pointing to the irregular geometry of the top of the basic rocks bodies below the Pirámide Peak Glacier. However, the southern and eastern boundaries with the Buenos Aires Glacier are sharp related to deep glacier incision. As a result of the glacier dynamics, magnetic anomalies are also detected north of the Nobby Nunatak due to the extension of the anomalous body and the presence of gabbro blocks in the moraines. The Bahia Esperanza region is a key area where onshore field geological and magnetic research allows us to constrain the shape of the crustal igneous intrusions and the basement glacier geometry, providing accurate data that complete regional aeromagnetic research.

  11. Mineral resources of the Prospect Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    du Bray, E.A.; Bankey, V.; Hill, R.H.; Ryan, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Prospect Mountain Wilderness Study Area is about 20 mi east-southeast of Encampment in Carbon County, Wyoming. This study area is underlain by middle Proterozoic gabbro, granite, and hornblende gneiss, which is locally cut by pegmatite dikes. There are no identified resources and no potential for undiscovered energy resources in this study area. Resource potential for all undiscovered metallic commodities and for industrial mineral is low.

  12. Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task I, the physical nature of fracturing at depth. Technical progress report No. 1, 1 March 1980-30 November 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, N.L.

    1980-12-15

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the delineation of the boundary separating elastic-brittle and transient-1 semibrittle behavior of granite and of its volcanic and metamorphic equivalents, rhyolite and granite gneiss; (2) the variation of fracture permeability in Sioux Quartzite, Westerly Granite and a fine-1 grained gabbro as a function of effective pressure and hydrothermal alterations; and (3) determine the mechanical properties of selected rocks at high temperatures and pressures. (ACR)

  13. Isotopic evidence of source variations in commingled magma systems: Colorado River extensional corridor, Arizona and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, R.V.; Smith, E.I.; Martin, M.W. . Dept. of Geoscience); Gonzales, D.A.; Walker, J.D. . Isotope Geochronology Lab.)

    1993-04-01

    Mixing of mantle derived mafic and crustal derived felsic magmas is a major Province-wide process forming Tertiary intermediate magmas within the Basin and Range. Major variations in magma sources, however, may exist in temporally and spatially related systems. Such variations are exemplified by two closely spaced plutons within the northern Colorado River extensional corridor. The 15.96 Ma Mt. Perkins pluton (MPP) was emplaced in three major phases: phase 1 (oldest) gabbro; phase 2 quartz diorite to hornblende granodiorite; and phase 3 biotite granodiorite ([+-]hbld). Phases 2 and 3 contain mafic microgranitoid enclaves (MME) that exhibit evidence of magma mingling. Combined data from phase 2 and 3 rocks, including MMW, shows positive [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr and negative [var epsilon]Nd correlations vs. SiO[sub 2] (50--72 wt %). Phase 2 rocks, which plot between phase 2 MME and MME-free phase 3 granodiorite, represent hybrid magmas formed by mixing of mantle and crustal derived magmas. Phase 1 gabbro falls off isotope-SiO[sub 2] trends and represents a separate mantle derived magma. The 13.2 Ma Wilson Ridge pluton (WRP), <20 km north of MPP, is cogenetic with the river Mountains volcano (RMV). In WRP an early diorite was intruded by a suite of monzodiorite to quartz monzonite. The monzodiorite portion contains MME and mafic schlieren representing mingled and mixed mafic magmas. The WRP and MPP represent two closely spaced isotopically distinct and separate magma systems. There are five magma sources. The two felsic mixing end members represent two different crustal magma sources. Two mantle sources are presented by MPP phase 1 gabbro and phase 2 MME, reflecting lithospheric and asthenospheric components, respectively. The latter represents the oldest reported Tertiary asthenospheric component within the region. A single lithospheric mantle source, different from the MPP gabbro, is indicated for the mafic mixing end member in the WRP-RMV suite.

  14. The petrographic criteria of selection of geological environments for building high-level waste (HLW) repository

    SciTech Connect

    Omelyanenko, B.I.; Petrov, V.A.; Yudintsev, S.V.; Zaraisky, G.P.; Starostin, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    Igneous rocks of basic composition (basalts, diabases, gabbro-dolerites, dunites, etc.) are an appropriate geological environment for high-level waste disposal. During interaction with hot ground waters their isolation ability will increase due to the decrease of hydraulic permeability and increase of their sorption ability. According to petrophysical characteristics, such rocks are viscous-rigid media with the highest mechanical stability and do not undergo any changes in properties over the whole temperature range, which is possible in a HLW repository.

  15. Geochemistry and zircon geochronology of the Neoarchean volcano-sedimentary sequence along the northern margin of the Nilgiri Block, southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, Vinod O.; Santosh, M.; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Sajeev, K.

    2016-10-01

    The Nilgiri Block is one of the major Archean crustal blocks that define the tectonic framework of southern India. Here we report geologic, petrologic, geochemical, and zircon U-Pb, -REE, and -Lu-Hf data of a highly metamorphosed and disrupted sequence of amphibolite, meta-gabbro, websterite, volcanic tuff, meta-sediment, and banded iron formation (BIF) from the northern fringe of the Nilgiri Block. Geochemically, the amphibolite shows altered ocean floor basalt signature, whereas the meta-gabbro and the websterite samples form part of a volcanic arc. The metamorphosed volcanic tuff shows subalkaline rhyolitic signature. U-Pb isotope analysis of zircon grains from the volcanic tuff and meta-gabbro shows 207Pb/206Pb ages of 2490 ± 12 Ma and 2448 ± 16 Ma, respectively. Zircons from the meta-sediments show an age range of 2563 ± 33 Ma to 2447 ± 34 Ma. The dominantly positive εHf (t) values of the zircons in the analyzed rock suite suggest that the magmas from which the zircons crystallized evolved from a Neoarchean depleted mantle source. The Hf model ages (TDM) of volcanic tuff, meta-sediment and meta-gabbro samples are ranging between 2908-2706 Ma, 2849-2682 Ma, and 2743-2607 Ma, respectively. The ca. 2500 Ma ages for the arc-related magmatic rock suite identified along the northern periphery of Nilgiri Block suggest prominent Neoarchean arc magmatism and early Paleoproterozoic convergent margin processes contributing to the early Precambrian crustal growth in Peninsular India.

  16. The Mars Hill Terrane: An enigmatic southern Appalachian terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, L.A.; Johnson, P.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The Mars Hill Terrane (MHT) in the Appalachian Blue Ride Belt is bordered by complex, locally reactivated thrust and strike-slip faults. On the east, the MHT is bounded by the allochthonous, ensimatic Toe Terrane (TT) across the diachronous, ductile Holland Mountain-Soque River Fault System. The MHT is separated on the northwest from ensialic Laurentian basement (LB), by the Fries-Hayesville Fault System. On the south, the MHT is truncated by the Shope Fork Fault. The MHT is characterized by migmatitic biotite-pyroxene-hornblende gneiss, but contains 1--1.8 b.y. old quartz-feldspar gneisses, plus ultramafic rocks, calc-silicate rocks, mica schists and gneisses, and Neoproterozoic Bakersville gabbros. This rock assemblage contrasts with that of the adjoining terranes. The only correlative units between the MHT and adjoining terranes are Neoproterozoic gabbro, Ordovician-Devonian granitoid plutons, and ultramafic rocks. Gabbro links the MHT with LB rocks. Apparently similar calc-silicate rocks differ petrographically among terranes. During Taconic or Acadian events, both the TT and MHT reached amphibolite to granulite metamorphic grade, but the LB did not exceed greenschist grade. The data conflict. The O-D plutons, ultramafic rocks, and metamorphic histories suggest that the TT had docked with the MHT by Ordovician time. The premetamorphic character of the Holland Mtn.-Soque River Fault System supports that chronology. Neoproterozoic gabbros suggest a MHT-LB link by Cambrian time, but the LB experienced neither O-D plutonism nor Paleozoic amphibolite-granulite facies metamorphism.

  17. Breccias from the lunar highlands - Preliminary petrographic report on Apollo 16 samples 60017 and 63335.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kridelbaugh, S. J.; Mckay, G. A.; Weill, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    Lunar samples 60017,4 and 63335,14 are composed of microbreccias and devitrified glass. These components are predominantly anorthositic, with the exception of a cryptocrystalline clast found in the microbreccia portion of 63335,14 which contains 2.7% potassium oxide and 66.7% silicon dioxide. The samples have been subjected to extreme shock and thermal metamorphism. The parent materials of the microbreccias include both a coarse-grained anorthosite and a fine-grained subophitic anorthositic gabbro.

  18. Apollo 17, Station 6 boulder sample 76255 - Absolute petrology of breccia matrix and igneous clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J. L.; Phinney, W. C.; Simonds, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The matrix of 76255 is the finest-grained, most clast-laden, impact-melt polymict breccia sampled from the Station 6 boulder. The paper speculates on how the matrix of 76255 fits into and enhances existing thermal models of breccia lithification. Emphasis is on the detailed petrology of five lithic clasts, two of which display mineralogical and textural affinities to mare basalts, while three, a gabbro, a norite, and a troctolite are considered primitive plutonic rocks.

  19. Tectonic significance of the Dongqiao ophiolite in the north-central Tibetan plateau: Evidence from zircon dating, petrological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Zhai, Qing-guo; Wang, Jun; Bao, Pei-sheng; Qiangba, Zhaxi; Tang, Suo-han; Tang, Yue

    2016-02-01

    The Dongqiao ophiolite occurs in the central segment of the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, in north-central Tibet, China. It is still debated on the tectonic setting of the Dongqiao ophiolite despite after more than 30 years' studies. The Dongqiao ophiolite has a complete section of a typical ophiolite, composed of harzburgite, dunite, layered and isotropic gabbros, pillow and massive basalts, as well as radiolarian chert. Whole-rock geochemical analyses show that harzburgite displays a broad U-shaped REE pattern and has a fore-arc affinity, whereas basalts show affinities of E-MORB, OIB and IAB. The basalts were probably formed in different tectonic settings, that is, mid-ocean ridge, oceanic island and island arc. The gabbros and basalts are characterized by positive εNd(t) (+1.6 to +6.7) and εHf(t) (+8.1 to +13.9) values. Zircon U-Pb dating yielded ages of 188 ± 1 Ma for the layered gabbro and 181 ± 1 Ma for the amphibole gabbro. The new ages and the published age data of the Dingqing and Dong Co ophiolites led us to conclude that the Bangong-Nujiang Ocean existed from the Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous. The new geochemical data also suggested that the Dongqiao ophiolite was a typical SSZ-type ophiolite formed in an initial fore-arc oceanic basin. Fore-arc ophiolites are probably widely distributed along the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone. If so, the Tethys Ocean of the Bangong-Nujiang area probably existed as a fore-arc oceanic basin during the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic.

  20. The evolution of the Bangong-Nujiang Neo-Tethys ocean: Evidence from zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analyses of Early Cretaceous oceanic islands and ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jian-Jun; Li, Cai; Xie, Chao-Ming; Wang, Ming; Chen, Jing-Wen

    2015-08-01

    We conducted in situ U-Pb analyses of zircons from three basalts and one gabbro from the Zhonggang oceanic island, one basalt from the Zhaga oceanic island, and one gabbro from the Kangqiong ophiolite (all located in the middle segments of the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone of Tibetan Plateau), as well as in situ Hf isotope analyses of zircons from one gabbro from the Zhonggang oceanic island to constrain the tectonic evolution of the Bangong-Nujiang Neo-Tethys ocean. All samples contain numerous inherited zircons, and all the zircons contain magmatic oscillatory zoning and have Th/U ratios exceeding 0.4. Moreover, the average ΣREE content of these zircons is less than 2000 ppm, and they display clear negative Eu and variable positive Ce anomalies, indicating a magmatic origin. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating of the zircons revealed three clear peaks in the age distribution, at 248-255, 162-168, and 117-120 Ma; Lu-Hf isotopic analyses of zircons from the gabbro of the Zhonggang oceanic island yielded a 269 Ma crust-mantle separation age. Taking into account the regional geology, previous data, and our new analyses, we infer that the middle and western segments of the Bangong-Nujiang Neo-Tethys ocean had initially opened in the late Permian (254-269 Ma) and that the ocean opened substantially between the late Permian and the Early Triassic (248-255 Ma). In addition, we infer that the initiation of subduction of the Bangong-Nujiang Neo-Tethys ocean took place at ~ 162-168 Ma, which is Middle Jurassic. The 117-120 Ma age is the time when the oceanic islands and ophiolites were formed, indicating that the Bangong-Nujiang Neo-Tethys ocean was, to some extent, still open at that time.

  1. Solonker ophiolite in Inner Mongolia, China: A late Permian continental margin-type ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-wen; Xu, Bei; Shi, Guan-zhong; Zhao, Pan; Faure, M.; Chen, Yan

    2016-09-01

    The Solonker ophiolite is exposed along the border between Mongolia and China within the Solonker zone, the southeastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), and it is composed dominantly of serpentinized peridotite with subordinate gabbro, basaltic lava, radiolarian-bearing siliceous rocks, and minor plagiogranite. Meanwhile, layered mafic-ultramafic cumulates are not ubiquitous. In this study, zircon grains from two gabbros and a plagiogranite yield 206Pb/238U ages of 259 ± 6 Ma, 257 ± 3 Ma and 263 ± 1 Ma. These data were interpreted to represent the formation age of the Solonker ophiolite. The studied gabbros and basalts have a tholeiitic composition, showing a MORB affinity. They are also characterized by enrichment of Pb and depletion of Nb relative to La and Th. Furthermore, the studied gabbros contain inherited zircon grains and display a large range of zircon Hf isotopes (εHf(t) = - 5.27 to + 10.19). These features imply that crustal contamination played an important role in the generation of these mafic rocks. Major elements derived from the radiolarian-bearing siliceous rocks suggest a continental margin setting. This is confirmed by rock association. Terrigenous rocks (sandstones and siltstones) interstratified with siliceous rocks. U-Pb dating of detrital zircon grains in sandstones from both the northern and southern sides of the Solonker ophiolite belt, along with published data, reveals that the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian strata in fault contact with the Solonker ophiolite was deposited above Early Paleozoic orogens. The lines of petrological, geochemical, geochronological, and isotopic evidence led us to propose that the Solonker ophiolite is a Late Permian continental margin-type body formed during the early stages of opening of an ocean basin, following rifting and break-up of the Early Paleozoic orogens. Accordingly, the Permian Solonker zone is characterized by an intra-continental extensional setting.

  2. Middle Jurassic U-Pb crystallization age for Siniktanneyak Mountain ophiolite, Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.E. ); Aleinikoff, J.N.; Walter, M. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors report here a U-Pb age for the Siniktanneyak Mountain Ophiolite klippe in the west-central Brooks Range, the first U-Pb ophiolite age in northern Alaska. Like klippen of mafic and ultramafic rocks in the Brooks Range, the Siniktanneyak Mountain klippe is composed of a lower allochthon of Devonian and younger( ) diabase and metabasalt with trace-element characteristics of seamount basalts and an upper allochthon of ophiolite. The ophiolite is partial, consisting of (1) abundant dunite and subordinate harzburgite and wehrlite; (2) cumulate clinopyroxene gabbro, and (3) minor noncumulate clinopyroxene gabbro and subordinate plagiogranite; no sheeted dikes or volcanic rocks are known in the ophilitic allochthon. The plagiogranite forms small dikes and stocks that intrude the noncumulate gabbro and consists of zoned Na-rich plagioclase + clinopyroxene with interstial quartz and biotite. Five fractions of subhedral, tan zircon from the plagiogranite yield slightly discordant U-Pb data with an upper intercept age of 170 [+-] 3 Ma. The U-Pb data indicate that the Siniktanneyak Mountain ophiolite crystallized in the Middle Jurassic and was emplaced by thrusting onto mafic accretionary prism rocks within about 10 m.y. of crystallization. The U-Pb data provide an upper limit to the age of initiation of the Brookian orogeny.

  3. Cretaceous crust-mantle interaction and tectonic evolution of Cathaysia Block in South China: Evidence from pulsed mafic rocks and related magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Hai-Xiang; Zhao, Kui-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Cretaceous tectono-magmatic evolution of the Cathaysia Block in South China is important but their mechanism and geodynamics remain highly disputed. In this study we carried out a detailed geochemical study on the recently found Kuokeng mafic dikes in the western Fujian Province (the Interior Cathaysia Block) to reveal the petrogenesis and geodynamics of the Cretaceous magmatism. Kuokeng mafic dikes were emplaced in three principal episodes: ~ 129 Ma (monzogabbro), ~ 107 Ma (monzodiorite), and ~ 97 Ma (gabbro). Geochemical characteristics indicate that the monzogabbros were derived from the unmodified mantle source, while gabbros were likely derived from metasomatized mantle by subducted slab (fluids and sediments). Sr-Nd isotope compositions indicate that the parental magmas of the monzodiorites were generated by mixing of enriched, mantle-derived, mafic magmas and felsic melts produced by partial melting of crustal materials. Until the Early Cretaceous (~ 123 Ma), the dominant ancient Interior Cathaysia lithospheric mantle exhibited insignificant subduction signature, indicating the melting of asthenospheric mantle and the consequent back-arc extension, producing large-scale partial melting of the crustal materials under the forward subduction regime of the paleo-Pacific plate. The monzodiorites and gabbros appear to be associated with northwestward subduction of Pacific plate under an enhanced lithospheric extensional setting, accompanying with mantle modification, which triggered shallower subduction-related metasomatically enriched lithospheric mantle to melt partially. After ca. 110 Ma, the coastal magmatic belts formed due to a retreat and rollback of the subducting Pacific Plate underneath SE China in the continental margin arc system.

  4. 40Ar/ 39Ar ages for the alkaline volcanism and the basement of Gorringe Bank, North Atlantic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féraud, Gilbert; Gastaud, Janine; Auzende, Jean-Marie; Olivet, Jean-Louis; Cornen, Guy

    1982-01-01

    Gorringe Bank is situated on the Europe-Africa plate boundary at the eastern end of the Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone. It has two summits, Gettysburg Bank to the Southwest and Ormonde Bank to the northeast. We applied the 40Ar/ 39Ar stepwise heating method to date six samples of the alkaline volcanic rocks, two gabbros from the Ormonde Bank and a dolerite from the Gettysburg Bank. The results that the alkaline volcanism lasted probably for less than 6 Ma(66-60 Ma). Although the nature of this volcanism precludes any subduction feature during its setting, the alkaline volcanism of Ormonde is probably linked to Upper Cretaceous/Eocene compressive tectonic events. The basement rocks of Gorringe Bank reveal distrubed 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra. One plagioclase and one biotite from a gabbro give evidence for a thermic event whose age is tentatively estimated at about 75 Ma, and related to a variation in the direction of the relative movement between Europe and Africa. The more probable age given by a plagioclase of another gabbro and by a dolerite (110 Ma) corresponds to tilting northeastward of the Gorringe massif.

  5. Feruvite from the Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, S.-Y.; Palmer, M.R.; McDonald, A.M.; Slack, J.F.; Leitch, C.H.B.

    1996-01-01

    Feruvite, an uncommon Ca- and Fe2+-rich tourmaline species, has been discovered in the footwall of the Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit (British Columbia) near gabbro sills and dikes. Its chemical composition varies according to occurrence: feruvite from the shallow footwall has lower Ca, higher Al, and higher X-site vacancies than that from the deep footwall. The major chemical substitution involved in the feruvite is the exchange vector CaMgO???-1Al-1(OH)-1. The most important factor controlling feruvite formation at Sullivan is likely the reaction of Fe-rich hydrothermal fluids with Ca-rich minerals in gabbro and host rocks. This reaction led to the breakdown of Ca-rich minerals (plagioclase and hornblende), with release of Ca to solution and its incorporation into feruvite. This process probably postdated the main stages of formation of fine-grained, intermediate schorl-dravite in the tourmalinite pipe in the footwall, and is attributed to postore intrusion of gabbro and associated albite-chlorite-pyrite alteration.

  6. Tectonic Evolution of the Careón Ophiolite (Northwest Spain): A Remnant of Oceanic Lithosphere in the Variscan Belt.

    PubMed

    Díaz García F; Arenas; Martínez Catalán JR; González del Tánago J; Dunning

    1999-09-01

    Analysis of the Careón Unit in the Ordenes Complex (northwest Iberian Massif) has supplied relevant data concerning the existence of a Paleozoic oceanic lithosphere, probably related to the Rheic realm, and the early subduction-related events that were obscured along much of the Variscan belt by subsequent collision tectonics. The ophiolite consists of serpentinized harzburgite and dunite in the lower section and a crustal section made up of coarse-grained and pegmatitic gabbros. An Early Devonian zircon age (395+/-2 Ma, U-Pb) was obtained in a leucocratic gabbro. The whole section was intruded by numerous diabasic gabbro dikes. Convergence processes took place shortly afterward, giving rise to a mantle-rooted synthetic thrust system, with some coeval igneous activity. Garnet amphibolite, developed in metamorphic soles, was found discontinuously attached to the thrust fault. The soles graded downward to epidote-amphibolite facies metabasite and were partially retrogressed to greenschist facies conditions. Thermobarometric estimations carried out at a metamorphic sole (T approximately 650 degrees C; P approximately 11.5 kbar) suggested that imbrications developed in a subduction setting, and regional geology places this subduction in the context of an early Variscan accretionary wedge. Subduction and imbrication of oceanic lithosphere was followed by underthrusting of the Gondwana continental margin.

  7. Age of the Mulcahy Lake intrusion, northwest Ontario, and implications for the evolution of greenstone-granite terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. A.; Bogard, D. D.; Phinney, W. C.; Davis, D. W.; Wooden, J. L.; Ashwal, L. D.; Maczuga, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of zircon data from the Mulcahy Lake gabbro, a 63 sq km layered mafic intrusion in the Wabigoon subprovince of Ontario, which show that the gabbro crystallized at 2733.2 +1.0, -0.9 Ma, is considered. It is shown that the gabbro intrudes tholeiites of the Crow Lake-Savant Lake greenstone belt. Whole rock samples and mineral separates from the Mulcahy Lake intrusion are dated by Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Ar-30-Ar-40 techniques. Disturbances in the system are revealed by the Rb-Sr data and an initial Sr ratio of 0.7007 for an age of 2733 Ma is indicated by samples with low Rb/Sr ratios. The age determined for the Sm-Nd data is 2744 + or 55 Ma with an epsilon Nd value of +2.6 + or - 1.2 which indicates a source region depleted in a light rare earth element. Primary hornblende is analyzed for Ar-40/Ar-39 and an age of 2703 + or - 20 is obtained. Some implications for the development of greenstone-granite belts are discussed.

  8. New evidence for Early Paleozoic orogeny in the eastern Klamath terrane, northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, P.H.

    1993-04-01

    The Grey Rocks outlier, in the east-central part of the Trinity mafic-ultramafic complex, has two localities in which metamorphosed and strongly deformed rocks lie unconformably between the Trinity complex and overlying, less deformed, volcanic and sedimentary sections. At one locality, a bouldery metaconglomerate and schistose sedimentary melange consist of detritus derived from Trinity serpentine, gabbros, and dikes. Foliation is vertical, striking discordantly beneath mafic submarine flows and a thick argillite section assigned questionably to the Mississippian Bragdon formation. At the second locality, interbedded argillite, thin discontinuous flows, and hyaloclastic lapilli tuffs are metamorphosed and isoclinally folded. Steep foliation is truncated beneath the gently dipping base of the Grey Rocks submarine volcanic pile. Undeformed dikes cut the folded sequence and enter the Grey Rocks volcanics, possibly as late feeders. The Grey Rocks lavas and volcanic breccias have been compared with the Early Devonian Copley greenstone of the Redding section. Timing of the orogenic event or events is poorly constrained. Accepting a questionable correlation between the submarine volcanics and the Copley greenstone, the orogenic event(s) would be Early Devonian or older. Clasts in the schists and conglomerates at the first locality are clearly derived from gabbros and dikes considered by some workers to be Silurian. The folded sequence at the second locality contains no Trinity complex detritus and rests on a strong, low-angle, schist and mylonite zone that truncates the Silurian( ) dike and gabbro complex.

  9. Rooted Brooks Range ophiolite: Implications for Cordilleran terranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Morin, R.L.; Hudson, T.L.

    2001-01-01

    Modeling of gravity and magnetic data shows that areally extensive mafic and ultramafic rocks of the western Brooks Range, Alaska, are at least 8 km thick, and that gabbro and ultramafic rocks underlie basalt in several places. The basalt, gabbro, and ultramafic rocks have been considered parts of a far-traveled ophiolite assemblage. These rocks are the highest structural elements in the Brooks Range thrust belt and are thought to be hundreds of kilometers north of their origin. This requires these rocks to be thin klippen without geologic ties to the continental shelf sedimentary rocks that now surround them. The geophysically determined, thick and interleaved subsurface character of the basalt, gabbro, and ultramafic rocks is inconsistent with this interpretation. An origin within an extensional setting on the continental shelf could produce the required subsurface geometries and explain other perplexing characteristics of these rocks. Early Mesozoic Alaska, from the North Slope southward to the interior, may have had many irregular extensional basins on a broad, distal continental shelf. This original tectonic setting may apply elsewhere in Cordilleran-type margins where appropriate mafic and ultramafic analogs are present.

  10. Thermal diffusivity of igneous rocks at elevated pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Mirkovich, V.V.; Heard, H.C.

    1987-10-10

    Thermal diffusivity measurements of seven igneous rocks were made to temperatures of 400 /sup 0/C and pressures of 200 MPa. The measuring method was based on the concept of cylindrical symmetry and periodic heat pulses. The seven rocks measured were Westerly (Rhode Island) granite, Climax Stock (Nevada) quartz monzonite, Pomona (Washington) basalt, Atikokan (Ontario, Canada) granite, Creighton (Ontario, Canada) gabbro, East Bull Lake (Ontario, Canada) gabbro, and Stripa (Sweden) granite. The diffusivity of all the rocks showed a positive linear dependence on inverse temperature and, excluding the East Bull Lake gabbro, showed a linear dependence on quartz content. (Quartz content varied from 0 to 31% by volume.) Diffusivity in all cases rose or remained steady with increasing confining pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at lowest pressures and vanished by levels between 10 and 100 MPa, depending on rock type. The pressure effect (measured as a percentage change in diffusivity) is stronger in the four rocks of granite composition than in the three of basaltic composition. Our results agree well with existing thermal diffusivity measurements at atmospheric pressure.

  11. The lunar highland melt-rock suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Size can be used as a criterion to select 18 large (larger than 1 cm) samples from among 148 melt-rock fragments of all sizes. This selection provides a suite of large samples which represent the important chemical variants among highland melt rocks; each large sample has enough material for a number of sample-destructive studies, as well as for future reference. Cluster analysis of the total data base of 148 highland melt rocks shows six distinct groups: anorthosite, gabbroic anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro ('highland basalt'), low K Fra Mauro, intermediate-K Fra Mauro, and high-K. Large samples are available for four of the melt-rock groups (gabbroic anorthosite, anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro, and intermediate-K Fra Mauro). This sample selection reveals two subgroups of anorthositic gabbro (one anorthite-poor with negative Eu anomaly and one anorthite-rich without Eu anomaly). There is a sharp distinction between those Apollo 16 melt rocks and glasses which have both been classified as 'gabbroic anorthosite'.

  12. Possible petrogenetic associations among igneous components in North Massif soils: Evidence in 2-4 mm soil particles from 76503

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, Bradley L.; Bishop, Kaylynn M.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of Apollo 17 highland igneous rocks and clasts in breccias from the North and South Massifs have described magnesian troctolite, norite, anorthositic gabbro, dunite, spinel cataclasites, and granulitic lithologies that may have noritic anothosite or anorthositic norite/gabbro as igneous precursors, and have speculated on possible petrogenetic relationships among these rock types. Mineral compositions and relative proportions of plagioclase and plagioclase-olivine particles in samples 76503 indicate that the precursor lithology of those particles were troctolitic anorthosite, not troctolite. Mineral and chemical compositions of more pyroxene-rich, magnesian breccias and granulites in 76503 indicate that their precursor lithology was anorthositic norite/gabbro. The combination of mineral compositions and whole-rock trace-element compositional trends supports a genetic relationship among these two groups as would result from differentiation of a single pluton. Although highland igneous lithologies in Apollo 17 materials have been described previously, the proportions of different igneous lithologies present in the massifs, their frequency of association, and how they are related are not well known. We consider the proportions of, and associations among, the igneous lithologies found in a North Massif soil, which may represent those of the North Massif or a major part of it.

  13. Igneous intrusions in coal-bearing sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.B.; Shishlov, S.B.

    1987-08-01

    Intrusions of various compositions, sizes, and shapes have been observed in 115 out of 620 coal basins or deposits on all the continents. They are mainly subvolcanic and hypabyssal, with depths of emplacement estimated as ranging from a few hundred meters to 6 km, but usually 3-4 km. Compositionally, 42% are basic, 31% intermediate, 23% acid, and 4% ultrabasic. Mafic (and related) rock types include dolerites, trachydolerites, gabbro-dolerites, gabbro-monzonites, monzonites, diabases, gabbrodiabases, and less often gabbros and basalts (subvolcanic bodies). These mafic intrusions occur in coal formations of various ages from Carboniferous through Neogene, but predominate in Paleozoic (47%) and Cenozoic beds (45%). They also occur in coal formations of all genetic types, apart from those on ancient stable platforms, where there are no signs of intrusive activity. The mafic intrusions are almost everywhere associated with comagmatic lavas and tuffs (mainly in the younger strata), and the coal beds themselves are to some extent enriched in pyroclastic material, particularly in the upper horizons. This paper gives a worldwide review of igneous intrusions in coal beds. 24 references.

  14. Rock types of South Pole-Aitken basin and extent of basaltic volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pieters, C.M.; Head, J. W.; Gaddis, L.; Jolliff, B.; Duke, M.

    2001-01-01

    The enormous pre-Nectarian South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin represents a geophysically and compositionally unique region on the Moon. We present and analyze the mineralogical diversity across this basin and discuss the implications for basin evolution. Rock types are derived from Clementine multispectral data based on diagnostic characteristics of ferrous absorptions in fresh materials. Individual areas are characterized as noritic (dominated by low-Ca pyroxene), gabbroic/basaltic (dominated by high-Ca pyroxene), feldspathic (<3-6% FeO), and olivine-gabbro (dominated by high-Ca pyroxene and olivine). The anorthositic crust has effectively been removed from the interior of the basin. The style of volcanism within the basin extends over several 100 Myr and includes mare basalt and pyroclastic deposits. Several areas of ancient (pre-Orientale) volcanism, or cryptomaria, have also been identified. The nonmare mafic lithology that occurs across the basin is shown to be noritic in composition and is pervasive laterally and vertically. We interpret this to represent impact melt/breccia deposits derived from the lower crust. A few localized areas are identified within the basin that contain more diverse lithologies (gabbro, olivine-gabbro), some of which may represent material from the deepest part of the lower crust and perhaps uppermost mantle involved in the SPA event. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Tectonic Evolution of the Careón Ophiolite (Northwest Spain): A Remnant of Oceanic Lithosphere in the Variscan Belt.

    PubMed

    Díaz García F; Arenas; Martínez Catalán JR; González del Tánago J; Dunning

    1999-09-01

    Analysis of the Careón Unit in the Ordenes Complex (northwest Iberian Massif) has supplied relevant data concerning the existence of a Paleozoic oceanic lithosphere, probably related to the Rheic realm, and the early subduction-related events that were obscured along much of the Variscan belt by subsequent collision tectonics. The ophiolite consists of serpentinized harzburgite and dunite in the lower section and a crustal section made up of coarse-grained and pegmatitic gabbros. An Early Devonian zircon age (395+/-2 Ma, U-Pb) was obtained in a leucocratic gabbro. The whole section was intruded by numerous diabasic gabbro dikes. Convergence processes took place shortly afterward, giving rise to a mantle-rooted synthetic thrust system, with some coeval igneous activity. Garnet amphibolite, developed in metamorphic soles, was found discontinuously attached to the thrust fault. The soles graded downward to epidote-amphibolite facies metabasite and were partially retrogressed to greenschist facies conditions. Thermobarometric estimations carried out at a metamorphic sole (T approximately 650 degrees C; P approximately 11.5 kbar) suggested that imbrications developed in a subduction setting, and regional geology places this subduction in the context of an early Variscan accretionary wedge. Subduction and imbrication of oceanic lithosphere was followed by underthrusting of the Gondwana continental margin. PMID:10504137

  16. Age of the Mulcahy Lake intrusion, northwest Ontario, and implications for the evolution of greenstone-granite terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D. A.; Bogard, D. D.; Phinney, W. C.; Davis, D. W.; Wooden, J. L.; Ashwal, L. D.; MacZuga, D. E.

    1985-05-01

    An investigation of zircon data from the Mulcahy Lake gabbro, a 63 sq km layered mafic intrusion in the Wabigoon subprovince of Ontario, which show that the gabbro crystallized at 2733.2 +1.0, -0.9 Ma, is considered. It is shown that the gabbro intrudes tholeiites of the Crow Lake-Savant Lake greenstone belt. Whole rock samples and mineral separates from the Mulcahy Lake intrusion are dated by Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Ar-30-Ar-40 techniques. Disturbances in the system are revealed by the Rb-Sr data and an initial Sr ratio of 0.7007 for an age of 2733 Ma is indicated by samples with low Rb/Sr ratios. The age determined for the Sm-Nd data is 2744 + or 55 Ma with an epsilon Nd value of +2.6 + or - 1.2 which indicates a source region depleted in a light rare earth element. Primary hornblende is analyzed for Ar-40/Ar-39 and an age of 2703 + or - 20 is obtained. Some implications for the development of greenstone-granite belts are discussed.

  17. Petrology of four clasts from consortium breccia 73215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, O. B.; Hammarstrom, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    One felsite ('granite') and three ANT-suite anorthositic gabbro clasts extracted from breccia 73215 are described. The felsite clast has two components - fragments of crystalline felsite and veins and patches of felsic glass. The crystalline felsite, which consists largely of a vermicular intergrowth of quartz and Ba-K-feldspar, crystallized from a highly differentiated melt between 3.90 and 4.05 b.y. The felsic glass component consists of crystallized brown and colorless glasses and uncrystallized colorless glass which are all K and Si rich. The relation of glass features to past heating and the breccia-forming event is considered. In the three anorthositic gabbros, which have similar mineralogies and gradational textures, plagioclase is dominant, and olivine and orthopyroxene are the major mafic minerals. The petrologic data suggest that the gabbros formed as heated, partly melted, and/or recrystallized polymict breccias. It is possible that the approximately 4.25 b.y. age obtained for the three rocks is the date of the melting/recrystallization event.

  18. Geology of the Zambales ophiolite, Luzon, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rossman, D.L.; Castanada, G.C.; Bacuta, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Zambales ophiolite of western Luzon, Philippines, exposes a typical succession of basalt flows, diabasic dikes, gabbro and tectonized harzburgite. The age established by limiting strata is late Eocene. Lack of evidence of thrust faulting and the general domal disposition of the lithologie units indicate that the ophiolitic rocks are exposed by uplift. Highly complex internal layered structures within the complex are related to processes developed during formation of the ophiolite and the Zambales ophiolite may be one of the least disturbed (by emplacement) ophiolitic masses known. The exposed mass trends north and the upper surface plunges at low angles (a few degrees) to the north and south. The chemistry and composition of the rocks in the northwest part of the Zambales area (Acoje block) is distinct from that in the southeastern segment (Coto block). The Acoje block, according to Evans (1983) and Hawkins and Evans (1983), resembles (on a chemical basis) arc-tholeiite series rocks from intra-island arcs and the rocks in the Coto block are typical back-arc basin rock series. The present writer believes that the ophiolite composes a single genetic unit and that the changes in composition are the result of changes that took place during the initial formation. The gabbro probably formed below a spreading center in an elongate, in cross section, V-shaped, magma chamber. The gabbro is estimated by the writer to be less than 2 km thick and may be less than 1 km in places. Numerous erosional windows through the gabbro in the northern and eastern side of the Zambales area show that the gabbro remaining in those areas is likely to be only a few hundred meters thick. Harzburgite is exposed to a depth of about 800 m in the Bagsit River area and this may be the deepest part of the ophiolite accessible for study on which there is any control on depth. A transitional zone, about 200 m thick lying between the gabbro and harzburgite, is composed of serpentinized dunite

  19. Consortium wins major Brazilian gas contract

    SciTech Connect

    O`Driscoll

    1994-08-16

    An international consortium of BHP of Australia, Tenneco Gas of the U.S. and British Gas was selected Monday by Petroleo Braileiro SA (Petrobras) to Monday by Petroleo Brasileiro SA (Petrobras) to develop a $2 billion natural gas pipeline linking reserves in Bolivia with markets in southern and southeastern Brazil.

  20. Photoproduction of charm particles at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Cumalat, John P.

    1997-03-15

    A brief description of the Fermilab Photoproduction Experiment E831 or FOCUS is presented. The experiment concentrates on the reconstruction of charm particles. The FOCUS collaboration has participants from several Central American and Latin American institutions; CINVESTAV and Universidad Autonoma de Puebla from Mexico, University of Puerto Rico from the United States, and Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas in Rio de Janeiro from Brasil.

  1. [Mortality in metropolitan regions].

    PubMed

    Simoes Ccds

    1980-01-01

    Data from the 1970 census and a 1974-1975 survey carried out in Brazil by the Fundacao Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica are used to examine recent mortality trends in urban areas. Specifically, life expectancy in nine metropolitan areas is analyzed in relation to income, diet, and sanitary facilities in the home.

  2. Literacy Training and the Brazilian Political Economy. An Essay on Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Philip R.

    An annotated bibliography is presented in essay form of sources concerning Brazil's literacy program for adults, MOBRAL (Movimento Brasileiro de Alfabetizacao), and its implications for the country's economy. General sources on literacy training are followed by works concerning Brazil's political system. Descriptions of the MOBRAL program, mostly…

  3. MOBRAL--Seminario Interamericano de Educacion de Adultos (MOBRAL--Interamerican Seminar on Adult Education). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerio da Educacao e Cultura, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Movimento Brasileiro de Alfabetizacao.

    The report contains the substance of the MOBRAL (Movimento Brasileiro de Alfabetizacao)--Interamerican Seminar on Adult Education held in Rio de Janeiro from April 9th to 18th, 1973, for invited representatives from 21 Latin America and Caribbean countries. The object was to make a contribution to the collective task of identifying, defining, and…

  4. Zircon and baddeleyite from the economic ultramafic-mafic Noril'sk-1 intrusion (Russia): Hf-isotope constraints on source composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitch, K. N.; Belousova, E. A.; Badanina, I. Yu.; Griffin, W. L.

    2012-04-01

    The ultramafic-mafic Noril'sk-1 intrusion in the northwestern part of the Siberian Craton (Russia) represents one of three known Noril'sk-type, ore-bearing intrusions, which host one of the world's major economic sulphide platinum-group-element (PGE)-Cu-Ni deposits. Zircon and baddeleyite dated previously both by SHRIMP (i.e. 248.0 ± 3.7 Ma, Campbell et al. 1992) and ID-TIMS (251.1 ± 3.6 Ma, Kamo et al. 1996) have been restricted to one lithology (e.g. leucogabbro) of the Noril'sk-1 intrusion. To better constrain the age of igneous event and sources involved in its generation our multi-technique study utilized ten rock samples characteristic of unmineralized and mineralized lithologies. The rocks investigated comprise (from top to bottom) gabbro-diorite (sample N1-1), leucogabbro (N1-3), olivine-free gabbro (N1-2 and N1-4), olivine-bearing gabbro (N1-5), olivine gabbro (N1-6), plagiowehrlite and plagiodunite (N1-7), taxitic-textured rocks comprising melanotroctolite, olivine gabbro with relics of ultramafic rocks (N1-8, N1-9) and contact fine-grained gabbro (N1-10). Sulphide PGE-Cu-Ni ores occur in ultramafic (N1-7) and taxitic-textured rocks (N1-8 and N1-9), which have thickness of about 17 m, whereas the low-sulphide horizon of about 1 m thick occurs in the upper part of intrusion (N1-3). In situ U-Pb analyses of zircon from these rocks, combined with detailed study of crystal morphology and internal structure, identify four zircon populations (Malitch et al. 2012). The U-Pb ages of baddeleyite and the defined zircon populations cover a significant time span, from Late Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic (e.g., 290 ± 2.8; 261.3 ± 1.6; 245.7 ± 1.1; 236.5 ± 1.8 and 226.7 ± 0.9 Ma). The established distribution of U-Pb ages implies that crystallization of baddeleyite and zircon corresponds to several stages of protracted evolution of ultramafic-mafic magmas at deep-seated staging chambers and/or probably characterizes interaction of distinct magmas during formation

  5. Modes and implications of mantle and lower-crust denudation at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Timothy John

    Slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (<5 cm/yr) have intermittent magma supply, and accommodate spreading by a combination of magmatism and tectonic extension (Smith and Cann, 1993, Cannat, 1993). Extension at mid-ocean ridges is most commonly manifested by slip on high angle (˜60°) normal faults that dip into, and define the rift valley walls (Smith and Cann, 1993). Less commonly, extension occurs by long periods of slip along low-angle normal faults that penetrate to structurally deep levels of oceanic lithosphere and denude gabbro and/or pendotite to the seafloor in domal massifs termed "oceanic core complexes" (Dick et al., 1981; Dick et al., 1991; Tucholke et al., 1998; Mutter and Karson, 1992; Cann et al., 1997; MacLeod et al., 2002). This dissertation addresses processes and implications of tectonic extension at two oceanic core complexes. Atlantis Massif (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) is formed dominantly of serpentinized peridotite with lesser gabbro, and Atlantis Bank (57°E, Southwest Indian Ridge) is dominated by gabbro. Localization of brittle strain at Atlantis Massif occurred by reaction-softening processes associated with metasomatic alteration of peridotite and serpentmite to amphibole-, chlorite- and talc-bearing assemblages. Ductile strain at Atlantis Massif and Atlantis Bank is localized into intervals of highly-fractionated, oxide-rich gabbro. Two-oxide geothermometry of gabbro indicates that it was not penetratively deformed below ˜500°C. Denuded peridotite at Atlantis Massif is host to hydrothermal circulation driven in part by exothermic serpentinization reactions. Serpentinization decreases the seismic velocity of peridotite and leads to acquisition of a magnetic signature. Venting of highly-alkaline, methane- and hydrogen-rich serpentinization-derived fluids leads to lithification of seafloor carbonate ooze by precipitation of carbonate cement in a zone of mixing with "normal" seawater. This process may be the primary depositional mechanism of

  6. Down Hole Variation in the Chemistry of Gabbroic Rocks From Atlantis Bank, ODP Hole 1105A, Southwest Indian Ridge: Magma Chamber Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerji, D.; Casey, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Geochemical studies on cored sections have been conducted on gabbroic rocks recovered from ODP Leg 179 Hole 1105A. Hole 1105A was drilled on the Atlantis Bank through the same gabbroic massif cored at Hole 735B (Leg 118 and 176). Both holes are located along the Atlantis II Transform, Southwest Indian Ridge. Hole 1105A is offset 1.2 Km from Hole 735B, the deepest hole ever drilled in to the plutonic foundation of the oceanic crust. Preliminary shipboard magnetic, resistivity, lithologic and geochemical data suggest a possible correlation of lithostratigraphic units identified in both holes. Four major rock types have been identified in the cored section of Hole 1105A. They are the gabbros, olivine gabbros, oxide olivine gabbros and the oxide gabbros. The cored section is divided into 4 major units based on the presence and absence of oxide minerals in the gabbroic rocks. The major rock types are distinguished on the basis of the presence of cumulus phases olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase. Whole rock Mg numbers range from 83.5 to 19.6 indicating extensive fractionation of magma. The oxide free gabbroic rocks have a very low abundance of incompatible elements like P2O5, TiO2, Zr and LREE indicating that they crystallized as adcumulates or mesocumulates with little to no trapped melt retained. The oxide gabbro layers have a higher abundance of Fe2O3 and TiO2.Textural variation is observed with changes in Mg number down hole. Clinopyroxenes show a wide range of composition, Mg number ranging from 50.86-83.78. The mineral chemistry matches closely with the whole rock data and shows down hole cryptic chemical variation. Variations in Mg numbers of CPX occur on thin section scale as well as in meter scales. Down hole cryptic chemical variations suggest periodic replenishment of the magma chamber, fractionation and magma mixing. The bulk rock major, trace, REE and the mineral chemistry suggest that gabbroic rocks formed as cumulates with low to negligible trap melt and

  7. Supra-subduction zone tectonic setting of the Muslim Bagh Ophiolite, northwestern Pakistan: Insights from geochemistry and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakar, Mohammad Ishaq; Kerr, Andrew C.; Mahmood, Khalid; Collins, Alan S.; Khan, Mehrab; McDonald, Iain

    2014-08-01

    The geology of the Muslim Bagh area comprises the Indian passive continental margin and suture zone, which is overlain by the Muslim Bagh Ophiolite, Bagh Complex and a Flysch Zone of marine-fluvial successions. The Muslim Bagh Ophiolite has a nearly-complete ophiolite stratigraphy. The mantle sequence of foliated peridotite is mainly harzburgite with minor dunite and contains podiform chromite deposits that grade upwards into transition zone dunite. The mantle rocks (harzburgite/dunite) resulted from large degrees of partial melting of lherzolite and have also been affected by melt-peridotite reaction. The Muslim Bagh crustal section has a cyclic succession of ultramafic-mafic cumulate with dunite at the base, that grades into wehrlite/pyroxenite with gabbros (olivine gabbro, norite and hornblende gabbro) at the top. The sheeted dykes are immature in nature and are rooted in crustal gabbros. The dykes are mainly metamorphosed dolerites, with minor intrusions of plagiogranites. The configuration of the crustal section indicates that the crustal rocks were formed over variable time periods, in pulses, by a low magma supply rate. The whole rock geochemistry of the gabbros, sheeted dykes and the mafic dyke swarm suggests that they formed in a supra-subduction zone tectonic setting in Neo-Tethys during the Late Cretaceous. The dykes of the mafic swarm crosscut both the ophiolite and the metamorphic sole rocks and have a less-marked subduction signature than the other mafic rocks. These dykes were possibly emplaced off-axis and can be interpreted to have been generated in the spinel peridotite stability zone i.e., < 50-60 km, and to have risen through a slab window. The Bagh Complex is an assemblage of Triassic-Cretaceous igneous and sedimentary rocks, containing tholeiitic, N-MORB-like basalts and alkali basalts with OIB-type signatures. Nb-Ta depletion in both basalt types suggests possible contamination from continental fragments incorporated into the opening Tethyan

  8. Reconnaissance geology of the Thaniyah Quadrangle, sheet 20/42 C, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    The Thaniyah quadrangle, sheet 20/42 C, is located in the transition zone between the Hijaz Mountains and the Najd Plateau of southwestern Saudi Arabia between lat 20?00' and 20?30' N., long 42?00' to 42?30' E. The quadrangle is underlain by Precambrian metavolcanic, metasedimentary, plutonic, and dike rocks. Metavolcanic rocks consist of metamorphosed basalt and andesite with minor dacite and rhyolite and underlie three discontinuous northwest-trending belts. Metasedimentary rocks are confined to small areas underlain by quartzite, metasandstone, marble, and calc-silicate rock. Plutonic rocks include an extensive unit of tonalite and quartz diorite and a smaller unit of diorite and quartz diorite, which occupy much of the central part of the quadrangle. A small body of diorite and gabbro and a two-part zone of tonalite gneiss are also present. All of these plutonic rocks are assigned to the An Nimas batholith. Younger plutonic rocks include extensive graphic granite and rhyolite in the northeastern part of the quadrangle and several smaller bodies of granitic rocks and of gabbro. The metavolcanic rocks commonly have strong foliation with northwest strike and steep to vertical dip. Diorite and quartz diorite are sheared and brecciated and apparently syntectonic. Tonalite and quartz diorite are both foliate and nonfoliate and were intruded in episodes both preceding and following shearing. The granitic rocks and gabbro are post-tectonic. Trends of faults and dikes are mostly related to the Najd faulting episode. Radiometric ages, mostly from adjacent quadrangles, suggest that the An Nimas batholith is 835 to 800 Ma, gabbro and granite, except the graphic granite and rhyolite unit, are about 640 to 615 Ma, and the graphic granite and rhyolite 575 to 565 Ma old. Metavolcanic rocks similar to those hosting copper and gold mineralization in the Wadi Shuwas mining district adjacent to the southwestern part of the quadrangle are abundant. An ancient copper mine was

  9. Paleozoic and Paleoproterozoic Zircon in Igneous Xenoliths Assimilated at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Vazquez, J. A.; Wooden, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Historically active Redoubt Volcano is a basalt-to-dacite cone constructed upon the Jurassic-early Tertiary Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith. New SHRIMP-RG U-Pb age and trace-element concentration results for zircons from gabbroic xenoliths and crystal-rich andesitic mush from a late Pleistocene pyroclastic deposit indicate that ~310 Ma and ~1865 Ma igneous rocks underlie Redoubt at depth. Two gabbros have sharply terminated prismatic zircons that yield ages of ~310 Ma. Zircons from a crystal mush sample are overwhelmingly ~1865 Ma and appear rounded due to incomplete dissolution. Binary plots of element concentrations or ratios show clustering of data for ~310-Ma grains and markedly coherent trends for ~1865-Ma grains; e.g., ~310-Ma grains have higher Eu/Eu* than most of the ~1865-Ma grains, the majority of which form a narrow band of decreasing Eu/Eu* with increasing Hf content which suggests that ~1865-Ma zircons come from igneous source rocks. It is very unlikely that detrital zircons from a metasedimentary rock would have this level of homogeneity in age and composition. One gabbro contains abundant ~1865 Ma igneous zircons, ~300-310 Ma fluid-precipitated zircons characterized by very low U and Th concentrations and Th/U ratios, and uncommon ~100 Ma zircons. We propose that (1) ~310 Ma gabbro xenoliths from Redoubt Volcano belong to the same family of plutons dated by Aleinikoff et al. (USGS Circular 1016, 1988) and Gardner et al. (Geology, 1988) located ≥500 km to the northeast in basement rocks of the Wrangellia and Alexander terranes and (2) ~1865 Ma zircons are inherited from igneous rock, potentially from a continental fragment that possibly correlates with the Fort Simpson terrane or Great Bear magmatic zone of the Wopmay Orogen of northwestern Laurentia. Possibly, elements of these Paleoproterozoic terranes intersected the Paleozoic North American continental margin where they may have formed a component of the basement to the Wrangellia

  10. Insights on the Formation and Evolution of the Upper Oceanic Crust from Deep Drilling at ODP/IODP Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teagle, D. A. H.

    2009-04-01

    Deep drilling of Hole 1256D on ODP Leg 206 and IODP Expeditions 309/312 provides the first complete section of intact upper oceanic crust down to gabbros. Site 1256 is located on ocean crust of the Cocos Plate that formed at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) 15 million years ago during an episode of superfast rate ocean spreading in excess of 200 mm/yr. Past deep drilling of intact ocean crust has been fraught with difficulties due to the highly fractured nature of oceanic lavas. Site 1256 was specifically chosen because the observed relationship between spreading rate and the depth to axial seismic low velocity zones at modern mid-ocean ridges (thought to be magma chambers), suggests that gabbroic rocks should occur at the shallowest levels in ocean crust formed at the highest spreading rates. In line with pre-drilling predictions, gabbroic rocks were first encountered 1157 m into the basement. Hole 1256D penetrates 754 m of lavas, a 57-m thick transition zone and a thin (346 m) sheeted dike complex. The lower ~60 m of the sheeted dikes are contact metamorphosed to granoblastic textures. After encountering gabbros the hole was deepened a further 100 m before the cessation of drilling operations and the plutonic section comprises two gabbroic sills, 52 and 24 m-thick, intruded into a 24 m screen of granoblastic dikes. The gabbro sills have chilled margins and compositions similar to the overlying lavas and dikes, precluding formation of the cumulate lower oceanic crust from the melt lenses so far penetrated by Hole 1256D. A vertical seismic experiment conducted in Hole 1256D indicates that the bottom of the Hole is still within seismic layer 2 despite gabbroic rocks having been recovered. These data together with 1-D and imaging wire-line logs, have been used to construct a continuous volcano-stratigraphy for Site 1256. Comparison of this data with the recovered cores and the styles of eruption occurring at the modern EPR indicate that ~50% of lava sequences were formed

  11. Open magma chamber processes in the formation of the Permian Baima mafic-ultramafic layered intrusion, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Wang, Christina Yan; Xing, Chang-Ming; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The Baima mafic-ultramafic layered intrusion of the 260-Ma Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) hosts the second largest Fe-Ti-(V) oxide deposit in the Panxi region, SW China. It is a ~ 1600-m-thick layered body intruded by slightly younger syenitic and granitic plutons. The intrusion includes the Lower and Upper Zones. Troctolite and olivine pyroxenite of the Lower Zone contains conformable oxide ore layers, whereas the Upper Zone consists of olivine gabbro and gabbro with abundant apatite in the higher level. The crystallization order of the silicates in the Baima intrusion is olivine → plagioclase → clinopyroxene. Fe-Ti oxides (titanomagnetite and ilmenite) crystallized after olivine, and possibly plagioclase. The oxide ores in the Lower Zone show slightly LREE enriched patterns with (La/Yb)N values between 2.0 and 6.4, and positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu*) of 1.0 to 2.7. In contrast, olivine gabbros in the Lower Zone display stronger LREE enrichments (La/YbN = 7.7-14.0) and positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 2.8-3.3). Gabbros in the Upper Zone have REE profiles characterized by intermediate LREE enrichments with (La/Yb)N values of 3.2 to 11.2 and positive Eu anomalies of 2.1 to 3.0. Primitive mantle-normalized trace element patterns are characterized by negative La-Ce, Th, Sm and positive Nb-Ta, Ba and Ti anomalies in oxide ores and negative Th-U, Zr-Hf and positive Ba, Sr and Ti anomalies in olivine gabbro and gabbro. Fo of olivine and An of plagioclase remain roughly constant from 0 to ~ 90 m in the Lower Zone, indicating that the magma chamber was continuously filled by compositionally similar magmas during the initial stage. Three magma replenishments occurred afterwards in the upper part of the Lower Zone and the Upper Zone based on compositional reversals of plagioclase, olivine and Sr isotope. Mass balance calculations show that the Baima parental magma can produce all oxide ores under closed system conditions. A wide range of An values of plagioclase

  12. Geophysical and geologic studies in southern Mecklenburg County and vicinity, North Carolina and South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederick A.

    1983-01-01

    Geophysical methods consisting of gravity, aeromagnetics and aeroradioactivity have been applied to part of the Charlotte and Carolina slate belts in southern Mecklenburg County and vicinity to help interpret geology, lithology and structure. High aeroradioactivity is associated with potassium-rich granitic plutons, muscovite-rich gneisses, schists, and metavolcanic rocks; positive gravity and magnetic anomalies are associated with gabbro plutons; and negative gravity anomalies are associated with granitic plutons. At the west side of the slate belt, the Tillery phyllite is interpreted as having undergone progressive metamorphism. The underlying Uwharrie Formation extends into the Charlotte belt where it is mapped as metavolcanic rocks. Gravity models of the Carolina slate belt indicate that it is a synform containing a wedge of metasedimentary and volcanoclastic rock on plutonic basement. The basement is exposed in the adjacent Charlotte belt antiform. The northern Charlotte belt contains mainly plutonic rocks which have been divided into 3 supergroups of plutons based upon chemistry, mineralogy, texture, and age. They are: 1. Old Plutonic supergroup - plutons 545-490 m.y. that are medium to coarse-grained tonalite, quartz diorite, and granodiorites. 2. Concord-Salisbury supergroup -- plutons 426-350 m.y. which form sheet-like intrusions of differentiated gabbro; local volcanic centers with ring complexes 13 km in diameter that suggest magma chambers 0 - 8 km deep; smaller bodies of diorite, monzonite, and syenite; and small Salisbury type granodiorites. 3. Landis supergroup -- plutons 350-280 m.y. that are usually very coarse-grained, porphyritic, 'big feldspar,' potassium-rich granites. The Mecklenburg-Weddington gabbro complex of the Concord-Salisbury supergroup, the largest feature in the study area, contains three large gabbro plutons. The gabbro intruded old Plutonic complex rocks and could-have produced the metamorphic reaction K-feldspar + sillimanite

  13. Initial Observations From the Talkeetna Arc Continental Dynamics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.

    2001-12-01

    The Jurassic Talkeetna arc section in Alaska lies north of the Border Ranges Fault in the northern Chugach Mtns, extending NW into the southern Talkeetna Mtns. Previous studies have demonstrated that the section formed in an island arc prior to accretion on the North American margin; mass balance estimates for a ``1D'' cross-section showed that it has a basaltic bulk composition; and garnet gabbros juxtaposed with pyroxenite overlying residual mantle harzburgite were interpreted as indicating a crustal thickness of about 30 km. Primary goals of this study are to extend mass balance calculations to 2D via mapping and thermobarometry, constrain the nature of primary magmas in the arc as a function of time during its (?) 20-30 Ma history, investigate the genesis of intermediate plutonic rocks, and evaluate the liklihood of lower crustal, convective instability (``delamination''). The project is designed to provide constraints on the evolution of continental crust via arc processes. After reconnaissance in 2000, 2001 field work focused on additional sampling for thermobarometry and laboratory based seismic velocity studies near the base of the section, mapping and sampling in the Klanelneechina klippe (gabbros in a thrust sheet overlying a metamorphosed accretionary complex south of the Border Ranges Fault, with uncertain affinity to the Talkeetna arc), extensive sampling of mid-crustal gabbros for petrological and ion probe analysis, detailed stratigraphic studies in the volcanic section, and investigating the relationship of extensive, Jurassic quartz diorite and granodiorite in the southern Talkeetna Mtns (K/Ar ages 160-170 Ma) to dominantly gabbroic plutonic rocks in the arc further south and east (K/Ar and our new U/Pb and Ar/Ar ages 170-195 Ma). Our preliminary thermobarometric estimates suggest that the crustal thickness may have been 20 to 25 km. This is important since an apparent discrepancy between the ~ 30 km crustal thickness estimate and the ~ 15 km

  14. Trace element partitioning in rock forming minerals of co-genetic, subduction-related alkaline and tholeiitic mafic rocks in the Ural Mountains, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, J.; Brügmann, G. E.; Pushkarev, E. V.

    2009-04-01

    The partitioning of trace elements between rock forming minerals in igneous rocks is largely controlled by physical and chemical parameters e.g. temperature, pressure and chemical composition of the minerals and the coexisting melt. In the present study partition coefficients for REE between hornblende, orthopyroxene, feldspars, apatite and clinopyroxene in a suite of co-genetic alkaline and tholeiitic mafic rocks from the Ural Mountains (Russia) were calculated. The results give insights to the influence of the chemical composition of the parental melt on the partitioning behaviour of the REE. Nepheline-bearing, alkaline melanogabbros (tilaites) are assumed to represent the most fractionated products of the melt that formed the ultramafic cumulates in zoned mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Ural Mountains. Co-genetic with the latter is a suite of olivine gabbros, gabbronorites and hornblende gabbros formed from a tholeiitic parental melt. Negative anomalies for the HFSE along with low Nb and Ta contents and a positive Sr anomaly indicate a subduction related origin of all parental melts. The nepheline gabbros consist predominantly of coarse-grained clinopyroxene phenocrysts in a matrix of fine grained clinopyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, K-feldspar and nepheline with accessory apatite. The tholeiitic gabbros have equigranular to porphyric textures with phenocrysts of olivine, pyroxene and hornblende in a plagioclase rich matrix with olivine hornblende, pyroxene and accessory apatite. Element concentrations of adjacent matrix grains and rims of phenochrysts were measured with LA-ICPMS. The distribution of REE between hornblende and clinopyroxene in the tholeiitic rocks is similar for most of the elements (DHbl•Cpx(La-Tm) = 2.7-2.8, decreasing to 2.6 and 2.4 for Yb and Lu, respectively). These values are about two times higher than published data (e.g. Ionov et al. 1997). Partition coefficients for orthopyroxene/clinopyroxene systematically decrease from the HREE

  15. Intermediate-depth earthquake generation: what hydrous minerals can tell us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deseta, N.; Ashwal, L.; Andersen, T. B.

    2012-04-01

    Subduction zone seismicity has commonly been causally related to the dehydration of minerals within the subducting slab(Hacker et al. 2004, Jung et al. (2004), Dobson et al. 2002, Rondenay et al. 2008). Other models for release of intermediate- and deep earthquakes include spontaneous reaction(s) affecting large rock-bodies along overstepped phase boundaries ( e.g. Green and Houston, 1995) and various shear heating-localization models (e.g. Kelemen and Hirth 2007, John et al. 2009). These concepts are principally reliant on seismic and thermo-petrological modeling; both of which are indirect methods of analysis. Recent discoveries of pseudotachylytes (PST) formed under high pressure conditions (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italy, Western Gneiss Region, Norway and Corsica) provide the first tangible opportunity to evaluate these models (Austrheim and Andersen, 2004, Lund and Austrheim, 2003, Obata and Karato, 1995, Jin et al., 1998). This case study focuses on observations based on ultramafic and mafic PST within the Ligurian Ophiolite of the high pressure-low temperature metamorphic (HP-LT) 'Shistes Lustres' complex in Cima di Gratera, Corsica (Andersen et al. 2008). These PST have been preserved in pristine lenses of peridotite and gabbro surrounded by schistose serpentinites. The PST range in thickness from 1mm to 25 cm (Andersen and Austrheim, 2006). Petrography and geochemistry on PST from the peridotite and gabbro samples indicates that total/near-total fusion of the local host rock mineral assemblage occurred; bringing up the temperature of shear zone from 350° C to 1400 - 1700° C; depending on the host rock (Andersen and Austrheim, 2006). The composition of the PST is highly variable, even at the thin section scale and this has been attributed to the coarse-grained nature of the host rock, its small scale inhomogeneity and poor mixing of the fusion melt. Almost all the bulk analyses of the PST are hydrous; the peridotitic PST is always hydrous (H2O content from 3

  16. Pollen analysis of honey and pollen collected by Apis mellifera linnaeus, 1758 (Hymenoptera, Apidae), in a mixed environment of Eucalyptus plantation and native cerrado in Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Simeão, C M G; Silveira, F A; Sampaio, I B M; Bastos, E M A F

    2015-11-01

    Eucalyptus plantations are frequently used for the establishment of bee yards. This study was carried on at Fazenda Brejão, northwestern region of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. This farm is covered both with native Cerrado vegetation (Brazilian savanna) and eucalyptus plantations. This paper reports on the botanic origin of pollen pellets and honey collected from honeybee (Apis mellifera) hives along a thirteen-month period (January 2004 to January 2005). The most frequent pollen types found in the pollen pellets during the rainy season were Trema micrantha (Ulmaceae), Copaifera langsdorffii (Fabaceae), an unidentified Poaceae, unidentified Asteraceae-2, Cecropia sp. 1 (Cecropiaceae) and Eucalyptus spp. (Myrtaceae); during the dry season the most frequent pollen types were Acosmium dasycarpum (Fabaceae), Cecropia sp. 1 (Cecropiaceae) and Eucalyptus spp. (Myrtaceae). Pollen grains of Baccharis sp. (Asteraceae), Cecropia sp. 1 (Cecropiaceae), Copaifera langsdorffii (Fabaceae), Mimosa nuda (Fabaceae), Eucalyptus spp. (Myrtaceae) and Trema micrantha (Ulmaceae) were present in the honey samples throughout the study period.

  17. Rainforest burning and the global carbon budget: Biomass, combustion efficiency, and charcoal formation in the Brazilian Amazon

    SciTech Connect

    Fearnside, P.M.; Leal, N. Jr.; Fernandes, F.M.

    1993-09-20

    Biomass present before and after burning was measured in forest cleared for pasture in a cattle ranch (Fazenda Dimona) near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Aboveground dry weight biomass loading averaged 265 t ha{sup {minus}1} (standard deviation (SD) = 110, n = 6 quadrats) at Fazenda Dimonas. Postburn aboveground biomass loading was evaluated by cutting and weighing of 100 m{sup 2} quadrats and by line intersect sampling. Quadrats had a mean dry weight of 187 t ha{sup {minus}1} (SD = 69, n = 10), a 29.3% reduction from the preburn mean in the same clearing. Line intersect estimates in 1.65 km of transects indicated that 265 m{sup 3} ha{sup {minus}1} (approximately 164 t ha{sup {minus}1} of aboveground dry matter) survived burning. Using carbon contents measured for different biomass components (all {approximately} 50% carbon) and assuming a carbon content of 74.8% for charcoal (from other studies near Manaus), the destructive measurements imply a 27.6% reduction of aboveground carbon pools. Charcoal composed 2.5% of the dry weight of the remains in the postburn destructive quadrats and 2.8% of the volume in the line intersect transects. Thus approximately 2.7% of the preburn aboveground carbon stock was converted to charcoal, substantially less than is generally assumed in global carbon models. The findings confirm high values for biomass in central Amazonia. High variability indicates the need for further studies in many localities and for making maximum use of less laborious indirect methods of biomass estimation. While indirect methods are essential for regional estimates of average biomass, only direct weighing such as that reported here can yield information on combustion efficiency and charcoal formation. Both high biomass and low percentage of charcoal formation suggest the significant potential contribution of forest burning to global climate changes from CO{sub 2} and trace gases. 66 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Textures and geochemistry of zircons in ODP holes 735B and 1105A, Atlantis Bank, SWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, B. E.; Cheadle, M. J.; Rioux, M. E.; Wooden, J. L.; Baines, G.

    2012-12-01

    Zircon is a common accessory mineral in ocean crust, and an important chronometer for studying the timing and duration of crustal accretion. Here, we present a comprehensive textural/geochemical study of zircon in 25 samples from the length of ODP Hole 735B (1508m) and adjacent Hole 1105A (158m) at Atlantis Bank, South West Indian Ridge (SWIR). Two zircon-bearing rock suites include i) a dioritic suite comprising amphibole granodiorite, quartz diorite and diorite dikes/veins, and ii) a suite of oxide gabbro segregations/veins. Combined TIMS U/Pb dating (Rioux et al, this meeting) and SIMS REE and other trace element (TE) chemical analyses of these zircons provide constraints on the growth and thermal history of ocean crust, and melt evolution. Zircons from both drill holes vary in morphology, but are typically pristine, colorless euhedral to anhedral grains from ~50-1000 μm in the long dimension. Over 90% show weak sector zoning, and ~50% show oscillatory zoning in CL. Additional textures include: 1. resorbed rims in two dioritic veins; 2. high U rims in two additional dioritic veins; 3. internal resorption/recrystallization boundaries in one diorite dike and one oxide gabbro; 4. a sub-population of high U grains hosting mottled/spongy interiors, possibly indicative of disequilibrium/reaction, in one diorite dike; and 5. mineral/melt inclusions in zircons in most of the dioritic veins, and in ~50% of oxide gabbros. SIMS analyses of 390 zircons (>750 spot analyses) confirm that the zircons have TE concentrations (including U/Yb vs Hf) typical of those from ocean crust. U ranges from <10 to >800 ppm in zircons from the dioritic veins (mean 123 ppm), and 5 to >500 ppm in zircons from the oxide gabbros (mean 59 ppm). All analyzed zircons have steep positive REE slopes with distinct positive Ce and negative Eu anomalies (Ce/Ce* and Eu/Eu*), similar to other oceanic zircons. Zircons from dioritic veins are REE-enriched (ΣREE = 216-15670; mean 3000 ppm) and have

  19. Decoding low dihedral angles in gabbroic layered intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holness, M. B.; Humphreys, M.; Veksler, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    Texturally equilibrated rocks are granular with a unimodal grain size, smoothly curved grain boundaries, and angles at three-grain junctions of 110-140°. Gabbros are not texturally equilibrated: primocrysts commonly have planar faces whereas later-formed phases fill in the interstitial spaces. Augite-plagioclase-plagioclase dihedral angles (Θcpp) rarely attain the equilibrium value in gabbros and the population of disequilibrium angles preserves otherwise inaccessible information about rock history. The Θcpp population varies significantly between different basaltic bodies. In a rapidly cooled dolerite Θcpp has a low median (60-70°) and a high standard deviation (20-25°). The plagioclase-augite grain boundaries are generally planar. In more slowly cooled gabbros in layered intrusions, the angle populations have a higher median (80-110°) with a low standard deviation (10-15°). The plagioclase-augite grain boundaries are generally planar far from the triple junction, but curve within 10 microns of the junction. This curvature is commonly asymmetric. The angle population in solidified gabbros infiltrated by low-temperature melts is similar to that in dolerites, although the low angles are associated with cuspate interstitial grains. The dihedral angle is a function of both the original solidification process and subsequent high-temperature (melt-absent) grain boundary migration. Infilling of a melt pocket by overgrowth of the bounding solid phases necessitates supersaturation, and this is easier to attain for planar faces, resulting in inhibition of augite growth into pores bounded by planar plagioclase grains and an asymmetry of the initial augite-plag-plag junction. If the solidified gabbro is kept sufficiently hot these initial junction geometries can change during textural equilibration. In the Skaergaard, Rum and Bushveld intrusions, the median Θcpp varies with liquidus assemblage, increasing step-wise on the addition of a new liquidus phase. Locally

  20. Seismic wave velocity of rocks in the Oman ophiolite: constraints for petrological structure of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Shibata, S.; Akizuki, R.; Arima, M.; Tatsumi, Y.; Arai, S.

    2010-12-01

    Evaluation of rock velocities and comparison with velocity profiles defined by seismic refraction experiments are a crucial approach for understanding the petrological structure of the crust. In this study, we calculated the seismic wave velocities of various types of rocks from the Oman ophiolite in order to constrain a petrological structure of the oceanic crust. Christensen & Smewing (1981, JGR) have reported experimental elastic velocities of rocks from the Oman ophiolite under oceanic crust-mantle conditions (6-430 MPa). However, in their relatively low-pressure experiments, internal pore-spaces might affect the velocity and resulted in lower values than the intrinsic velocity of sample. In this study we calculated the velocities of samples based on their modal proportions and chemical compositions of mineral constituents. Our calculated velocities represent the ‘pore-space-free’ intrinsic velocities of the sample. We calculated seismic velocities of rocks from the Oman ophiolite including pillow lavas, dolerites, plagiogranites, gabbros and peridotites at high-pressure-temperature conditions with an Excel macro (Hacker & Avers 2004, G-cubed). The minerals used for calculations for pillow lavas, dolerites and plagiogranites were Qtz, Pl, Prh, Pmp, Chl, Ep, Act, Hbl, Cpx and Mag. Pl, Hbl, Cpx, Opx and Ol were used for the calculations for gabbros and peridotites. Assuming thermal gradient of 20° C/km and pressure gradient of 25 MPa/km, the velocities were calculated in the ranges from the atmospheric pressure (0° C) to 200 MPa (160° C). The calculation yielded P-wave velocities (Vp) of 6.5-6.7 km/s for the pillow lavas, 6.6-6.8 km/s for the dolerites, 6.1-6.3 km/s for the plagiogranites, 6.9-7.5 km/s for the gabbros and 8.1-8.2 km/s for the peridotites. On the other hand, experimental results reported by Christensen & Smewing (1981, JGR) were 4.5-5.9 km/s for the pillow lavas, 5.5-6.3 km/s for the dolerites, 6.1-6.3 km/s for the plagiogranites, 6

  1. Augustine Volcano's late Pleistocene rhyolite eruption and its modern-day residuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, M. L.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The pre-Holocene eruptive history of Augustine Volcano, the most active volcano in the populated Cook Inlet region of Alaska, is poorly known due to the effects of glaciation and voluminous products of Holocene eruptions that cover the majority of this island volcano. Among its oldest known deposits, thought to be latest Pleistocene in age, are a basalt-rhyolite hyaloclastite, which is interbedded with an overlying pumiceous rhyolite tephra fall, that crop out on the south side of the island (Waitt and Beget, 2009). Dense and pumiceous rhyolite clasts from the deposits are compositionally similar (71-74 wt. % SiO2; Larsen et al., 2010) and contain phenocrysts of plagioclase, quartz, amphibole, and Fe-Ti oxides. These basalt-rhyolite deposits are the most compositionally extreme products of the volcano; Holocene eruptions, including historical eruptions in 1976, 1986, and 2006, produced andesites and dacites. In 2006, one such eruption produced gabbro inclusions (54.4-60.2 wt% SiO2) that consist of plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxenes, Fe-Ti oxides, and small amounts of interstitial glass, suggesting a cumulate origin. Both the Pleistocene-age rhyolite and the 2006 gabbro inclusions fall along a whole-rock compositional trend depleted in incompatible elements relative to mid-Holocene-present andesites and dacites. To investigate differentiation and the timing of rhyolite magma generation at Augustine, we have determined high-spatial resolution 238U-230Th ages of zircon crystallization for the rhyolite as well as for the gabbros and high-silica andesites erupted in 2006. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) analyses of indium-mounted, unpolished zircon rims from the rhyolite yield a single 238U-230Th isochron age of ca. 27 ka, which we interpret to reflect the final interval of crystallization immediately prior to eruption. Sectioned core ages for rhyolite zircon, however, fall into two populations: one at ca. 27 ka, and a second, smaller population that

  2. Battling through the thermal boundary layer: Deep sampling in ODP Hole 1256D during IODP Expedition 335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ildefonse, B.; Teagle, D. A.; Blum, P.; IODP Expedition 335 Scientists

    2011-12-01

    IODP Expedition 335 "Superfast Spreading Rate Crust 4" returned to ODP Hole 1256D with the intent of deepening this reference penetration of intact ocean crust several hundred meters into cumulate gabbros. This was the fourth cruise of the superfast campaign to understand the formation of oceanic crust accreted at fast spreading ridges, by exploiting the inverse relationship between spreading rate and the depth to low velocity zones seismically imaged at active mid-ocean zones, thought to be magma chambers. Site 1256 is located on 15-million-year-old crust formed at the East Pacific Rise during an episode of superfast ocean spreading (>200 mm/yr full rate). Three earlier cruises to Hole 1256D have drilled through the sediments, lavas and dikes and 100 m into a complex dike-gabbro transition zone. The specific objectives of IODP Expedition 335 were to: (1) test models of magmatic accretion at fast spreading ocean ridges; (2) quantify the vigor of hydrothermal cooling of the lower crust; (3) establish the geological meaning of the seismic Layer 2-3 boundary at Site 1256; and (4) estimate the contribution of lower crustal gabbros to marine magnetic anomalies. It was anticipated that even a shortened IODP Expedition could deepen Hole 1256D a significant distance (300 m) into cumulate gabbros. Operations on IODP Expedition 335 proved challenging from the outset with almost three weeks spent re-opening and securing unstable sections of the Hole. When coring commenced, the destruction of a hard-formation C9 rotary coring bit at the bottom of the hole required further remedial operations to remove junk and huge volumes of accumulated drill cuttings. Hole-cleaning operations using junk baskets returned large samples of a contact-metamorphic aureole between the sheeted dikes and a major heat source below. These large (up to 3.5 kg) irregular samples preserve magmatic, hydrothermal and structural relationships hitherto unseen because of the narrow diameter of drill core and

  3. Neoproterozoic oceanic arc remnants in the Moroccan Anti-Atlas: reconstructing deep to shallow arc crustal sequence and tracking Pan-African subduction-accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Baele, Jean-Marc; Bruguier, Olivier; Diot, Hervé; Ennih, Nasser; Plissart, Gaëlle; Monnier, Christophe; Spagna, Paul; Watlet, Arnaud; Vandycke, Sara

    2015-04-01

    The Pan-African belt of West and North Africa exposes many intra-oceanic arc complexes while they are rather uncommon in Phanerozoic orogenic belts. Intra-Oceanic Subduction Zone (IOSZ) in the Moroccan Anti-Atlas crop out in two tectonic windows moulded along the Anti-Atlas Major fault: the Sirwa (western-) and the Bou Azzer (eastern- part) inliers, associated with 760 Ma back-arc ophiolites. These arc sequences are located at the south of the ophiolites and are named the Iriri-Tachakoucht (Sirwa window) and the Asmlil arc complexes (Bou Azzer inlier). (i) The Iriri-Tachakoucht unit is composed of coarse grained hornblendite lenticular plugs, medium-grained hornblende gabbro dykes intruding andesitic to dacitic porphyroclastic gneiss. The contact between both lithologies is gradual and marked by an increasing migmatitization of the gneisses towards hornblendite intrusions. Phase diagram calculation were performed on garnet-bearing gneisses. Garnet cores have grown during a prograde P-T path up to upper amphibolite facies conditions (660°C at ~9 kbar) and recorded the burial of the Tachakoucht metavolcanics, while rims composition indicates that the rock recrystallized under higher temperature conditions (800°C at 4-5 kbar). These HT conditions match those for hornblendites igneous emplacement (850°C and 4 kbar) and this event leaded to more pronounced but still limited partial melting (< 10% melting) of the porphyroclastic gneisses. New geochronological data on the migmatitic gneiss (zircon U-Pb dating) constrain the protolith age at 733 ±7 Ma (zircons core) and the HT tectono-metamorphic event at 654 ±7 Ma (zircons rim). (ii) The Asmlil arc complex is made of hornblende gabbros and garnet-bearing gabbros intruded under HT conditions by dykes of medium-grained hornblendites, hornblende-gabbros and leucodiorites. These metagabbroic intrusions have been dated at 697 ± 8 Ma (U-Pb zircons). P-T pseudosections were calculated for garnet-bearing gabbros and

  4. Oceanic core complex and newly-formed basalts in axial part of Mid-Atlantic Ridge (5-7oN): Implications for formation and evolution of slow-spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Sharkov, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    Data on petrography, mineralogy and U-Pb and Sr isotope studies of rocks exposed in the axial valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 5oN to 7oN are discussed. Samples were collected in 10th cruise of R/V "Academik Ioffe" (2001-2002) and 22nd cruise of R/V "Professor Logachev" (2003). Dredged rocks are serpentinized mantle peridotites, gabbros, including ferrogabbros and trondhjemites as well as fresh basalts with chilled glassy crusts. Plutonic rocks are strongly altered and tectonized. The association of rocks is identical to that defined as oceanic core complexes (OCC), described by Tucholke et al. (1998), Escartin et al. (2003), Ildefonse et al. (2007), MacLeod et al. (2009). Two complexes of altered gabbros: (1) primitive magnesian gabbros, derived from MORB, and (2) hornblende-bearing ferrogabbros defined as siliceous Fe-Ti-oxide series were found. The latter are saturated and supersaturated with silica under relatively high water content. Such features are usually typical of subduction-related magmas, but they have high contents of Ti, Fe, Nb, Ta and P, which characterize plume-related magmas. SHRIMP-studies of the magmatic zircon grains with oscillatory zoning, extracted from the gabbros, showed that their U-Pb age range from 0.7 to 2.3 Ma. Newly-formed fresh basaltic flows covered protrusions in the rift valleys and fill in dips in axial valleys where they overlap both altered gabbros and serpentinites. Fresh basalts are close in composition to oceanic platobasalts. These basalts are considered to be derived due to crystallizing differentiation in shallow transitional magmatic chambers (intrusions). This assumes the present-day magmatic activity beneath the spreading zone in this area. Several centimeters-scale Sr-isotopic heterogeneity in basalts was discovered. It is considered as a result of incomplete dissolution in basaltic magmas of gabbro fragments, captured during rapid ascent of the melt through the lower crust. This is evidence that a magmatic

  5. Geology of the Alaska-Juneau lode system, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twenhofel, William Stephens

    1952-01-01

    The Alaska-Juneau lode system for many years was one of the worlds leading gold-producing areas. Total production from the years 1893 to 1946 has amounted to about 94 million dollars, with principal values in contained gold but with some silver and lead values. The principal mine is the Alaska-Juneau mine, from which the lode system takes its name. The lode system is a part of a larger gold-bearing belt, generally referred to as the Juneau gold belt, along the western border of the Coast Range batholith. The rocks of the Alaska-Juneau lode system consist of a monoclinal sequence of steeply northeasterly dipping volcanic, state, and schist rocks, all of which have been metamorphosed by dynamic and thermal processes attendant with the intrusion of the Coast Range batholith. The rocks form a series of belts that trend northwest parallel to the Coast Range. In addition to the Coast Range batholith lying a mile to the east of the lode system, there are numerous smaller intrusives, all of which are sill-like in form and are thus conformable to the regional structure. The bedded rocks are Mesozoic in age; the Coast Range batholith is Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous in age. Some of the smaller intrusives pre-date the batholith, others post-date it. All of the rocks are cut by steeply dipping faults. The Alaska-Juneau lode system is confined exclusively to the footwall portion of the Perseverance slate band. The slate band is composed of black slate and black phyllite with lesser amounts of thin-bedded quartzite. Intrusive into the slate band are many sill-like bodies of rocks generally referred to as meta-gabbro. The gold deposits of the lode system are found both within the slate rocks and the meta-gabbro rocks, and particularly in those places where meta-gabbro bodies interfinger with slate. Thus the ore bodies are found in and near the terminations of meta-gabbro bodies. The ore bodies are quartz stringer-lodes composed of a great number of quartz veins from 6

  6. New Paleomagnetic Data from the Wadi Abyad Crustal Section and their Implications for the Rotation History of the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M.; Morris, A.; Anderson, M.; MacLeod, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Oman ophiolite is an important natural laboratory for understanding the construction of oceanic crust at fast spreading axes and its subsequent tectonic evolution. Previous paleomagnetic research in lavas of the northern ophiolitic blocks (Perrin et al., 2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.) has demonstrated substantial clockwise intraoceanic tectonic rotations. Paleomagnetic data from lower crustal sequences in the southern blocks, however, have been more equivocal due to complications arising from remagnetization, and have been used to infer that clockwise rotations seen in the north are internal to the ophiolite rather than regionally significant (Weiler, 2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.). Here we demonstrate the importance and advantages of sampling crustal transects in the ophiolite in order to understand the nature and variability in magnetization directions. By systematically sampling the lower crustal sequence exposed in Wadi Abyad (Rustaq block) we resolve for the first time in a single section a pattern of remagnetized lowermost gabbros and retention of earlier magnetizations by uppermost gabbros and the overlying dyke-rooting zone. Results are supported by a positive fold test that shows that remagnetization of lower gabbros occurred prior to the Campanian structural disruption of the Moho. NW-directed remagnetized remanences in the lower units are consistent with those used by Weiler (2000, Mar. Geophys. Res.) to infer lack of significant rotation of the southern blocks and to argue, therefore, that rotation of the northern blocks was internal to the ophiolite. In contrast, E/ENE-directed remanences in the uppermost levels of Wadi Abyad imply a large, clockwise rotation of the Rustaq block, of a sense and magnitude consistent with intraoceanic rotations inferred from extrusive sections in the northern blocks. We conclude that without the control provided by systematic crustal sampling, the potential for different remanence directions being acquired at different times

  7. Subduction interface processes recorded by eclogite-facies shear zones (Monviso, W. Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angiboust, S.; Agard, P.; Raimbourg, H.; Yamato, P.; Huet, B.

    2011-11-01

    The Monviso ophiolite Lago Superiore Unit constitutes a well-preserved, almost continuous upper fragment of oceanic lithosphere subducted at c. 80 km depth, thereby providing a unique opportunity to study mechanical coupling processes and meter-scale fluid-rock interactions occurring at such depths in present-day subduction zones. It is made of (i) a variably thick (50-500 m) section of eclogitized basaltic crust (associated with minor calcschist lenses) overlying a 100-400 m thick metagabbroic body and of (ii) a c. 1 km thick serpentinite sole. We herein focus on the three major eclogite-facies shear zones found at the top of the unit, at the boundary between basalts and gabbros, and between gabbros and serpentinites, respectively. Strain localization occurred at lithological interfaces, irrespective of material strength. While ductile deformation dominates along the shear zones, local brittle behavior is demonstrated by the existence of numerous eclogite breccias of Fe-Ti metagabbros and widespread garnet fractures, possibly linked with intermediate-depth eclogite-facies (micro)seismicity. These m- to hm-sized fragments of Fe-Ti metagabbros were later sheared and disseminated within serpentinite schists along the gabbro-serpentinite boundary (Lower Shear zone; LSZ). Pervasive and focused fluid flow is attested in the LSZ by significant alteration of bulk rock compositions, weakening of the rocks and widespread crystallization of hydrous parageneses. By contrast, the Intermediate Shear zone (ISZ) shows evidence for more restricted, short-range fluid flow. The activity of both the ISZ and LSZ ceased during early lawsonite eclogite-facies exhumation, when deformation localized deeper within the serpentinite sole, allowing for the detachment (and preservation) of this large ophiolitic fragment.

  8. Insights into magmatic processes and hydrothermal alteration of in situ superfast spreading ocean crust at ODP/IODP site 1256 from a cluster analysis of rock magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekkers, Mark J.; Heslop, David; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Acton, Gary; Krasa, David

    2014-08-01

    analyze magnetic properties from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP)/Integrated ODP (IODP) Hole 1256D (6°44.1' N, 91°56.1' W) on the Cocos Plate in ˜15.2 Ma oceanic crust generated by superfast seafloor spreading, the only drill hole that has sampled all three oceanic crust layers in a tectonically undisturbed setting. Fuzzy c-means cluster analysis and nonlinear mapping are utilized to study down-hole trends in the ratio of the saturation remanent magnetization and the saturation magnetization, the coercive force, the ratio of the remanent coercive force and coercive force, the low-field magnetic susceptibility, and the Curie temperature, to evaluate the effects of magmatic and hydrothermal processes on magnetic properties. A statistically robust five cluster solution separates the data predominantly into three clusters that express increasing hydrothermal alteration of the lavas, which differ from two distinct clusters mainly representing the dikes and gabbros. Extensive alteration can obliterate magnetic property differences between lavas, dikes, and gabbros. The imprint of thermochemical alteration on the iron-titanium oxides is only partially related to the porosity of the rocks. Thus, the analysis complements interpretation based on electrofacies analysis. All clusters display rock magnetic characteristics compatible with an ability to retain a stable natural remanent magnetization suggesting that the entire sampled sequence of ocean crust can contribute to marine magnetic anomalies. Paleointensity determination is difficult because of the propensity of oxyexsolution during laboratory heating and/or the presence of intergrowths. The upper part of the extrusive sequence, the granoblastic dikes, and moderately altered gabbros may contain a comparatively uncontaminated thermoremanent magnetization.

  9. Styles of Deformation on Either Side of a Ridge-Transform Intersection, Troodos Ophiolite, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, S.; Wagner, C.; Alexander, S. O.; Scott, C. P.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Troodos ophiolite in Cyprus includes two orthogonal structures - the NS-striking Solea graben and the EW-striking Arakapas fault - that form a ridge-transform intersection. Sheeted dikes and gabbros are preserved on both the inside and outside corners providing a view of mid-crustal deformation in the system. We examine and model these patterns of deformation using existing map and paleomagnetic data combined with new rock magnetic data. The inside corner of the system has been well studied. The most notable feature is the changing orientation of sheeted dikes, which shift from NW- to NE- to E-striking with increasing proximity to the Arakapas fault. Paleomagnetic data from many studies, including our own, show declination anomalies that vary with distance from the ridge and the transform. The three principal axes from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) ellipsoids in the gabbros seem to be correlated with local sheeted dike orientations. The outside corner of the system has been less well studied. Sheeted dike orientations change more subtly; many are NS-striking and dip towards the Solea Graben, but near the inferred ridge-transform intersection, they are NNE-striking. Our new paleomagnetic data from 26 sites record declination and inclination anomalies that vary spatially within the outside corner. AMS data from the gabbros and sheeted dikes again seem loosely linked to sheeted dike orientations. To summarize, the structural and rock magnetic results on either side of the Solea Graben are distinct, confirming the idea that these rocks formed on different sides of a ridge-transform system. The paleomagnetic data yield insights about the styles of deformation following crystallization. The AMS data may yield insights about magmatic plumbing systems when combined systematically with paleomagnetic results. Our results from the outside corner show that patterns of deformation can be complex even on the non-plate boundary side of a ridge-transform system.

  10. Ultramafic inclusions and host alkali olivine basalts of the southern coastal plain of the Red Sea, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ghent, Edward D.; Coleman, Robert Griffin; Hadley, Donald G.

    1979-01-01

    A variety of mafic and ultramafic inclusions occur within the pyroclastic components of the Al Birk basalt, erupted on the southern Red Sea coastal plain of Saudi Arabia from Pleistocene time to the present. Depleted harzburgites are the only inclusions contained within the basalts that were erupted through Miocene oceanic crust (15 km thick) in the vicinity of Jizan, whereas to the north in the vicinity of Al Birk, alkali basalts that were erupted through a thicker Precambrian crust (48 km thick) contain mixtures of harzburgites, cumulate gabbro, and websterite inclusions accompanied by large (> 2 cm) megacrysts of glassy alumina-rich clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and spinel. Microprobe analyses of individual minerals from the harzburgites, websterites, and cumulate gabbros reveal variations in composition that can be related to a complex mantle history during the evolution of the alkali basalts. Clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts may represent early phases that crystallized from the alkali olivine basalt magma at depths less than 35 km. Layered websterites and gabbros with cumulate plagioclase and clinopyroxene may represent continuing crystallization of the alkali olivine basalt magma in the lower crust when basaltic magma was not rapidly ascending. It is significant that the megacrysts and cumulate inclusions apparently form only where the magmas have traversed the Precambrian crust, whereas the harzburgite-bearing basalts that penetrated a much thinner Miocene oceanic crust reveal no evidence of mantle fractionation. These alkali olivine basalts and their contained inclusions are related in time to present-day rifting in the Red Sea axial trough. The onshore, deep-seated, undersaturated magmas are separated from the shallow Red Sea rift subalkaline basalts by only 170 km. The contemporaneity of alkaline olivine and subalkaline basalts requires that they must relate directly to the separation of the Arabian plate from the African plate.

  11. New paleomagnetic data from the Wadi Abyad crustal section and their implications for the rotation history of the Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Matthew; Morris, Antony; Anderson, Mark; MacLeod, Chris

    2015-04-01

    The Oman ophiolite is an important natural laboratory for understanding the construction of oceanic crust at fast spreading axes and its subsequent tectonic evolution. Previous paleomagnetic research in lavas of the northern ophiolitic blocks (Perrin et al., 2000) has demonstrated substantial clockwise intraoceanic tectonic rotations. Paleomagnetic data from lower crustal sequences in the southern blocks, however, have been more equivocal due to complications arising from remagnetization, and have been used to infer that clockwise rotations seen in the north are internal to the ophiolite rather than regionally significant (Weiler, 2000). Here we demonstrate the importance and advantages of sampling crustal transects in the ophiolite in order to understand the nature and variability in magnetization directions. By systematically sampling the lower crustal sequence exposed in Wadi Abyad (Rustaq block) we resolve for the first time in a single section a pattern of remagnetized lowermost gabbros and retention of earlier magnetizations by uppermost gabbros and the overlying dyke-rooting zone. Results are supported by a positive fold test that shows that remagnetization of lower gabbros occurred prior to the Campanian structural disruption of the Moho. NW-directed remagnetized remanences in the lower units are consistent with those used by Weiler (2000) to infer lack of significant rotation of the southern blocks and to argue, therefore, that rotation of the northern blocks was internal to the ophiolite. In contrast, E/ENE-directed remanences in the uppermost levels of Wadi Abyad imply large, clockwise rotation of the Rustaq block, of a sense and magnitude consistent with intraoceanic rotations inferred from extrusive sections in the northern blocks. We conclude that without the control provided by systematic crustal sampling, the potential for different remanence directions being acquired at different times may lead to erroneous tectonic interpretation.

  12. Xenoliths of mafic/ultramafic igneous rocks as carriers of information on lower crust beneath Złotoryja - Jawor volcanic complex (SW Poland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajek, Michał; Matusiak-Malek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Lipa, Danuta; Ntaflos, Theodors

    2016-04-01

    The Cenozoic alkaline volcanic rocks in Lower Silesia (SW Poland) are known for their mantle peridotite xenoliths. However, the mafic and ultramafic xenoliths with cumulative textures and of composition of olivine- or hornblende clinopyroxenite, clinopyroxenite, websterite, norite and gabbro occur in some of the lavas (6 sites) of the Złotoryja-Jawor volcanic complex. The xenoliths are anhydrous, only in Wilcza Góra minor amount of amphibole occurs. The Mg# of clinopyroxene varies from 0.54 (Ostrzyca Proboszczowicka clinopyroxenite) to 0.89 (Góra Świątek clinopyroxenite). Forsterite content in olivine varies from 64% (Winna Góra gabbro) to 86% (Wilcza Góra hornblende clinopyroxenite). Anortite content in plagioclase in nortite and gabbros is 33-56%. The Mg# in amphibole is 0.43 to 0.76. Clinopyroxene trace element composition is typically LREE enriched, but in Wilcza Góra norite and Mnisza Góra clinopyroxenite it is LREE-depleted. The calculated pressures of clinopyroxene crystallization (calculated by the algorithm of Nimis and Ulmer, 1998, CMP, 1998, 122-135, assuming all Fe to be 2+) is from 0.45 to 0.96 GPa pointing to crystallization of the pyroxenitic rocks in lower crust or at crust/mantle boundary. Theoretical melts in equilibrium with clinopyroxene enriched in LREE resemble the alkaline lavas from the area and we suggest they are cognate with host magmas. We explain variations in composition of mafic xenoliths from Wilcza Góra, Winna Góra and Grodziec to be a result of magma fractionation. Xenoliths containing clinopyroxene impoverished in LREE may represent lithologies inherited from Variscan oceanic crust. Megacrysts of clinopyroxene present in some of the localities cannot result from disintegration of mafic xenoliths This study was possible thanks to project NCN UMO-2014/15/B/ST10/00095 of Polish National Centre for Science.

  13. Late Permian Melt Percolation through the Crust of North-Central Africa and Its Possible Relationship to the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.; Lee, T. Y.; Yang, C. C.; Wu, J. C.; Wang, K. L.; Lo, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Doba gabbro was collected from an exploration well through the Cretaceous Doba Basin of Southern Chad. The gabbro is comprised mostly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxide minerals and displays cumulus mineral textures. Whole rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating geochronology yielded a Late Permian plateau age of 257 ± 1 Ma. The major and trace elemental geochemistry shows that the gabbro is mildly alkalic to tholeiitic in composition and has trace element ratios (i.e. La/YbN > 7; Sm/YbPM > 3.4; Nb/Y > 1; Zr/Y > 5) indicative of a basaltic melt derived from a garnet-bearing sublithospheric mantle source. The moderately enriched Sr-Nd isotopes (i.e. ISr = 0.70495 to 0.70839; eNd(T) = -1.0 to -1.3) fall within the mantle array (i.e. OIB-like) and are similar to other Late Permian plutonic rocks of North-Central Africa (i.e. ISr = 0.7040 to 0.7070). The Late Permian plutonic igneous complexes of North-Central Africa are geologically associated with tectonic lineaments suggesting they acted as conduits for sublithospheric melts to migrate to middle/upper crustal levels. The source of the magmas may be related to the spatial-temporal association of North-Central Africa with the African large low shear velocity province (LLSVP). The African LLSVP has remained stable since the Late Carboniferous and was beneath the Doba basin during the Permian. We suggest that melts derived from deep seated sources related to the African LLSVP percolated through the North-Central African crust via older tectonic lineaments and form a discontiguous magmatic province.

  14. Evidence for multiple pulses of crystal-bearing magma during emplacement of the Doros layered intrusion, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen-Smith, T. M.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Doros Complex is a relatively small (maximum 3.5 km × 7.5 km) shallow-level, lopolithic, layered mafic intrusion in the early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province. The stratigraphy broadly comprises a minor, fine-grained gabbroic sill and a sequence of primitive olivine-cumulate melagabbros, with a basal chilled margin, an intermediate plagioclase-cumulate olivine gabbro, and a sequence of mineralogically and texturally variable, intermediate, strongly foliated, plagioclase-, olivine- or magnetite-cumulate gabbros. An evolved syenitic (bostonite) phase occurs as cross-cutting dykes or as enclaves within the foliated gabbros. Major element modelling of the liquid line of descent shows that the spectrum of rock types, including the bostonite, is consistent with the fractionation of a basaltic parental magma that crystallised olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, K-feldspar and apatite. However, the stratigraphic succession does not correspond to a simple progressive differentiation trend but instead shows a series of punctuated trends, each defined by a compositional reversal or hiatus. Incompatible trace element concentrations do not increase upwards though the body of the intrusion. The major units show similar, mildly enriched rare earth element patterns, with minimal Eu anomalies. Back-calculation of the rare earth element concentrations of these cumulate rocks produces relatively evolved original liquid compositions, indicating fractionation of this liquid from a more primitive precursor. Based on combined field, petrographic, geochemical and geophysical evidence, we propose an origin for the Doros Complex by a minimum of seven closely spaced influxes of crystal-bearing magmas, each with phenocryst contents between 5% and 55%. These findings represent a departure from the traditional single-pulse liquid model for the formation of layered mafic intrusions and suggest the presence of an underlying magmatic mush column, i.e., a large

  15. Early Permian East-Ujimqin mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks from the Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt, North China: Origin, chronology, and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yinhang; Teng, Xuejian; Li, Yanfeng; Li, Min; Zhang, Tianfu

    2014-12-01

    The East-Ujimqin complex, located north of the Erenhot-Hegenshan fault, North China, is composed of mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks including peridotite, gabbro, alkali granite, and syenite. We investigated the tectonic setting, age, and anorogenic characteristics of the Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt (XMOB) through field investigation and microscopic and geochemical analyses of samples from the East-Ujimqin complex and LA-MC-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating of gabbro and alkali granite. Petrographic and geochemical studies of the complex indicate that this multiphase plutonic suite developed through a combination of fractional crystallization, assimilation processes, and magma mixing. The mafic-ultramafic rocks are alkaline and have within-plate geochemical characteristics, indicating anorogenic magmatism in an extensional setting and derivation from a mantle source. The mafic-ultramafic magmas triggered partial melting of the crust and generated the granitic rocks. The granitic rocks are alkali and metaluminous and have high Fe/(Fe + Mg) characteristics, all of which are common features of within-plate plutons. Zircon U-Pb geochronological dating of two samples of gabbro and alkali granite yielded ages of 280.8 ± 1.5 and 276.4 ± 0.7 Ma, placing them within the Early Permian. The zircon Hf isotopic data give inhomogeneous εHf(t) values of 8.2-14.7 for gabbroic zircons and extraordinary high εHf(t) values (8.9-12.5) for the alkali granite in magmatic zircons. Thus, we consider the East-Ujimqin mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks to have been formed in an extensional tectonic setting caused by asthenospheric upwelling and lithospheric thinning. The sources of mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks could be depleted garnet lherzolite mantle and juvenile continental lower crust, respectively. All the above indicate that an anorogenic magma event may have occurred in part of the XMOB during 280-276 Ma.

  16. A Proof of Concept for In-Situ Lunar Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F. S.; Whitaker, T.; Levine, J.; Draper, D. S.; Harris, W.; Olansen, J.; Devolites, J.

    2015-12-01

    We have obtained improved 87Rb-87Sr isochrons for the Duluth Gabbro, an analog for lunar KREEP rocks, using a prototype spaceflight laser ablation resonance ionization mass spectrometer (LARIMS). The near-side of the Moon comprises previously un-sampled, KREEP rich, young-lunar basalts critical for calibrating the <3.5 Ga history of the Moon, and hence the solar system, since 3.5 Ga. Measurement of the Duluth Gabbro is a proof of concept of lunar in-situ dating to constrain lunar history. Using a novel normalization approach, and by correcting for matrix-dependent isotope effects, we have been able to obtain a date of 1100 ± 200 Ma (Figure 1), compared to the previously established thermal ionization mass spectrometry measurement of 1096 ± 14 Ma. The precision of LARIMS is sufficient to constrain the current 1 Ga uncertainty of the lunar flux curve, allowing us to reassess the timing of peak lunar volcanism, and constrain lunar thermal evolution. Furthermore, an updated lunar flux curve has implications throughout the solar system. For example, Mars could have undergone a longer epoch of voluminous, shield-forming volcanism and associated mantle evolution, as well as a longer era of abundant volatiles and hence potential habitability. These alternative chronologies could even affect our understanding of the evolution of life on Earth: under the classic chronology, life is thought to have originated after the dwindling of bombardment, but under the alternative chronology, it might have appeared during heavy bombardment. In order to resolve the science questions regarding the history of the Moon, and in light of the Duluth Gabbro results, we recently proposed a Discovery mission called MARE: The Moon Age and Regolith Explorer. MARE would accomplish these goals by landing on a young, nearside lunar basalt flow southwest of Aristarchus that has a crater density corresponding to a highly uncertain absolute age, collecting >10 rock samples, and assessing their

  17. Plume-orogenic lithosphere interaction recorded in the Haladala layered intrusion in the Southwest Tianshan Orogen, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-Li; Huang, Xiao-Long; Xu, Yi-Gang; Li, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xue; Li, Wu-Xian

    2016-03-01

    The plume-orogenic lithosphere interaction may be common and important for the generation of large igneous provinces. The information regarding such a process is recorded by the Haladala gabbroic intrusion (~300 Ma), the largest layered ultramafic-mafic intrusion hosting V-Ti magnetite deposits in the Southwest Tianshan Orogen, NW China. The Haladala gabbros exhibit unfractionated chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns with negative Nb and Ta anomalies and positive Pb anomaly on the primitive mantle-normalized multielement variation diagram. They are characterized by low initial Sr isotopes, slightly decoupled but high positive bulk rock ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t), and high 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb relative to 206Pb/204Pb, delineating a DUPAL signature in the sources. The Haladala gabbros cannot be arc or postcollisional magmatism, given the lack of hydrous minerals and low K contents, respectively. This is further supported by the relatively low oxygen fugacity required for the gradual enrichment of V-Ti magnetite during the magma fractionation and by an overall anhydrous mantle source suggested by troctolite mineral assemblage (olivine + plagioclase). The emplacement age of the Haladala gabbros is identical to that of the Wajilitag kimberlites in the Tarim's interior, which have been interpreted as the first magmatic expression of the Tarim mantle plume. We thus propose that the Haladala gabbroic intrusion was generated in a hybrid geodynamic setting in which the Southwest Tianshan Orogen was impacted by an upwelling mantle plume. In this sense, the Haladala layered gabbroic intrusion records the early phase of magmatism of the Tarim plume, which was preferentially emplaced in a lithospheric weak zone.

  18. Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotopes in the Maloin Ranch Pluton, Wyoming: Implications for the origin of evolved rocks at anorthosite margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, A.; Hanson, G.N. ); Frost, C.D. ); Geist, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotopic data are used in this study to investigate the origin of chemically evolved rocks in the Maloin Ranch Pluton, a composite body that borders and intrudes the Laramie Anorthosite. In the Maloin Ranch Pluton, these include ferrodiorite at the base of the intrusion, overalain progressively by fine-grained monzonite, monzosyenite, and porphyritic granite. Biotite gabbro and fine-grained granitic dikes are present locally at various levels of this sequence. The origin of the evolved rocks and their possible relation to associated anorthositic bodies has been much debated. In the Maloin Ranch Pluton, each rock type has distinct isotopic characteristics which, together with trace-element data previously reported, suggest different source characteristics for each member. Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for Maloin Ranch ferrodiorite and Laramie anorthositic rocks show considerable overlap, consistent with a comagmatic relation. Biotite gabbro is chemically and isotopically the most primitive rock type in the Maloin Ranch Pluton. The data suggest that biotite gabbro has a mantle source, but has undergone extensive fractionation in the crust. The authors' results suggest that the remainder (and bulk) of the intrusion formed by partial melting of the lower crust due to the emplacement of the Laramie Anorthosite. Trace-element and isotopic characteristics of the fine-grained monzonite are explained by partial melting of mantle-dervied lower crust, added to the margin of the Archean Wyoming craton at about 1.8 Ga. Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotope data for Maloin Ranch monzosyenite and porphyritic granite also suggest a lower crustal source.

  19. Origin and interaction of some alkalic and silicic plutons in the Vermilion Granitic Complex, NE Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, G.W.; Nabelek, P.I.; Bauer, R.L.; Glascock, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Alkalic gabbros and tonalites comprise a significant portion of the Archaean crust in the Vermilion Granitic Complex of NE Minnesota. The origin of these and associated rocks has been modeled using major and trace element approaches. Samples of the alkalic gabbro collected from three different intrusions have similar major element, REE, and transition metal concentrations. The REE patterns of these rocks can be modeled as the result of 1% to 3% melting of an undepleted garnet herzolite mantle with REE concentrations three times that of chondrites. However, their Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//CaO ratios of 2 - 3, Sr content of 900-1400 ppm and Ba of 100 - 1600 ppm suggest that the source may have been an enriched, metasomatized mantle. The hornblendites associated with these alkalic rocks have REE patterns which are consistent with crystallization and accumulation from the gabbroic magma. Major and trace element modeling suggest that the granitic dikes which are common throughout the area may be residual liquids formed by 60% crystallization of plagioclase, biotite, hornblende and apatite from the nearby tonalites such as the Burntside of Wakemup Bay plutons. Porphyritic hornblende monzonites composed of centimeter sized hornblende crystals floating in a granitic matrix occur locally. The field relations as well as the major and trace element data are consistent with the formation of these monzonitic rocks by mixing of the granite with partially consolidated hornblendite. These results suggest a complex interaction between alkalic gabbros and tonalites involving fractionation and mixing during the development of the Archaean crust of NE Minnesota.

  20. Lateral variation in oxygen fugacity and halogen contents in early Cretaceous magmas in Jiaodong area, East China: Implication for triggers of the destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Long; He, Peng-Li; Wang, Xue; Zhong, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2016-04-01

    Pacific subduction has been suggested as the trigger of the destruction of the North China Craton, but evidence for it remains ambiguous. To further investigate this issue, we studied Wulian pyroxene monzonite (123 ± 1 Ma) in the west and Rushan gabbro-diorite (115 ± 1 Ma) in the east of the Sulu orogen, East China. The rocks of both locations are characterized by low TiO2 but high SiO2 and K2O, fractionated REE patterns with notable negative Ta-Nb-Ti anomalies, and by high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and strongly negative εNd (t) and εHf (t) values. These geochemical and isotopic characteristics can be interpreted to be formed by partial melting of enriched lithosphere mantle refertilized by recycled crustal materials that were associated with the Sulu orogeny. Oxygen fugacities of the Rushan gabbro-diorites, estimated based on magnetite-ilmenite equilibration, are significantly higher than those of Wulian pyroxene monzonite. This lateral difference is mirrored by lower F and F/Cl but higher Cl in biotite in the Rushan gabbro-diorite compared to Wulian pyroxene monzonite. All these data suggest a spatially heterogeneous Cretaceous mantle source in terms of halogens and water contents beneath the Sulu orogen, which was most likely caused by the subduction processes of the Pacific plate. H2O-rich fluid in the mantle beneath the east of the Sulu orogen closer to the mantle wedge was prominently from early dehydration of subducted slab at shallow depth, while F-bearing fluid to further west was released by dehydrated deeper slab or stagnant oceanic slab within the mantle transition zone.

  1. Petrogenesis and geodynamics of plagiogranites from Central Turkey (Ekecikdağ/Aksaray): new geochemical and isotopic data for generation in an arc basin system within the northern branch of Neotethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köksal, Serhat; Toksoy-Köksal, Fatma; Göncüoglu, M. Cemal

    2016-09-01

    In the Late Cretaceous, throughout the closure of the Neotethys Ocean, ophiolitic rocks from the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan ocean branch were overthrusted the northern margin of the Tauride-Anatolide Platform. The ophiolitic rocks in the Ekecikdaǧ (Aksaray/Central Turkey) region typify the oceanic crust of the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan branch of Neotethys. The gabbros in the area are cut by copious plagiogranite dykes, and both rock units are intruded by mafic dykes. The plagiogranites are leucocratic, fine- to medium-grained calc-alkaline rocks characterized mainly by plagioclase and quartz, with minor amounts of biotite, hornblende and clinopyroxene, and accessory phases of zircon, titanite, apatite and opaque minerals. They are tonalite and trondhjemite in composition with high SiO2 (69.9-75.9 wt%) and exceptionally low K2O (<0.5 wt%) contents. The plagiogranites in common with gabbros and mafic dykes show high large-ion lithophile elements/high-field strength element ratios with depletion in Nb, Ti and light rare-earth elements with respect to N-MORB. The plagiogranites together with gabbros and mafic dykes show low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70419-0.70647), high ƐNd(T) (6.0-7.5) values with 206Pb/204Pb (18.199-18.581), 207Pb/204Pb (15.571-15.639) and 208Pb/204Pb (38.292-38.605) ratios indicating a depleted mantle source modified with a subduction component. They show similar isotopic characteristics to the other supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites in the Eastern Mediterranean to East Anatolian-Lesser Caucasus and Iran regions. It is suggested that the Ekecikdaǧ plagiogranite was generated in a short time interval from a depleted mantle source in a SSZ/fore-arc basin setting, and its nature was further modified by a subduction component during intra-oceanic subduction.

  2. Geochemical studies of mafic and other low silica, Precambrian intrusive rocks in the Adirondack lowlands, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Antibus, J.; Carl, J.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Mafic metaigneous rocks in the Adirondack Lowlands include gabbros, amphibolites and diorites that are associated with, and hard to distinguish from, a host of dark colored, low-silica, alkali feldspar-bearing rocks that include syenogabbros, syenites and monzonites. All rocks intrude metasedimentary and metavolcanic host rocks and occur as isolated, pre- to syn-metamorphic bodies, generally with elongate, sheet-like form. Some occur within or marginal to deformation zones. Lacking are the massive igneous complexes of the Highlands where anorthosites, charnockites and mangerites comprise a common field association. Amphibolites vary from mappable sheets that are hundreds of meters thick to thin (<1 m) layers within the host gneisses. Gabbros and diorites vary from circular to oval-shaped bodies, generally <2 km across, that may be infolded with the host rocks. Pervasive shear in Lowland granitic rocks (Hyde School Gneiss) that resulted in major sheath folds, as proposed by Tewksbury, extends into the mafic bodies whose margins show strong gneissic textures and grain size reduction, but the cores are less deformed. The Balmat gabbro varies inwardly and systematically from monzonitic to gabbroic composition in decreasing Si, Na, K, Rb, Zr and Ba, and in increasing Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, P, Sr, Cr, V and Ni content. Y/Nb ratios remain constant at 3-4. Among explanations of assimilation and metasomatism, the authors tentatively prefer an hypothesis of exclusion of alkali material during crystallization of mafic magma. Calc alkali and low potassium tholeiites are indicated in plots of the Balmat and other mafic bodies on Ti/100-Zr-Yx3 and Ti-Zr discrimination diagrams, although there is much scatter of data. Within-plate basalts are lacking, and ocean floor basalts are indicated for some amphibolites.

  3. Dependence of frictional strength on compositional variations of Hayward fault rock gouges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The northern termination of the locked portion of the Hayward Fault near Berkeley, California, is found to coincide with the transition from strong Franciscan metagraywacke to melange on the western side of the fault. Both of these units are juxtaposed with various serpentinite, gabbro and graywacke units to the east, suggesting that the gouges formed within the Hayward Fault zone may vary widely due to the mixing of adjacent rock units and that the mechanical behavior of the fault would be best modeled by determining the frictional properties of mixtures of the principal rock types. To this end, room temperature, water-saturated, triaxial shearing tests were conducted on binary and ternary mixtures of fine-grained gouges prepared from serpentinite and gabbro from the Coast Range Ophiolite, a Great Valley Sequence graywacke, and three different Franciscan Complex metasedimentary rocks. Friction coefficients ranged from 0.36 for the serpentinite to 0.84 for the gabbro, with four of the rock types having coefficients of friction ranging from 0.67-0.84. The friction coefficients of the mixtures can be predicted reliably by a simple weighted average of the end-member dry-weight percentages and strengths for all samples except those containing serpentinite. For the serpentinite mixtures, a linear trend between end-member values slightly overestimates the coefficients of friction in the midcomposition ranges. The range in strength for these rock admixtures suggests that both theoretical and numerical modeling of the fault should attempt to account for variations in rock and gouge properties.

  4. Crystallization depth beneath an oceanic detachment fault (ODP Hole 923A, Mid-Atlantic Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissenberg, C. Johan; Rioux, Matthew; MacLeod, Christopher J.; Bowring, Samuel A.; Shimizu, Nobumichi

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic detachment faults are increasingly recognized as playing an integral role in the seafloor spreading process at slow and ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridges, with significant consequences for the architecture of the oceanic lithosphere. Although melt supply is considered to play a critical control on the formation and evolution of oceanic detachments, much less well understood is how melts and faults interact and influence each other. Few direct constraints on the locus and depth of melt emplacement in the vicinity of detachments are available. Gabbros drilled in ODP Hole 923A near the intersection of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Kane transform fault (23°N; the MARK area) represent magmas emplaced into the footwall of such a detachment fault and unroofed by it. We here present U-Pb zircon dates for these gabbros and associated diorite veins which, when combined with a tectonic reconstruction of the area, allow us to calculate the depths at which the melts crystallized. Th-corrected single zircon U-Pb dates from three samples range from 1.138 ± 0.062 to 1.213 ± 0.021 Ma. We find a crystallization depth of 6.4 +1.7/-1.3 km, and estimate that the melts parental to the gabbros were initially emplaced up to 1.5 km deeper, at <8 km below the seafloor. The tectonic reconstruction implies that the detachment fault responsible for the exposure of the sampled sequence likely crossed the ridge axis at depth, suggesting that melt emplacement into the footwall of oceanic detachment faults is an important process. The deep emplacement depth we find associated with "detachment mode" spreading at ˜1.2 Ma appears to be significantly greater than the depth of magma reservoirs during the current "magmatic mode" of spreading in the area, suggesting that the northern MARK segment preserves a recent switch between two temporally distinct modes of spreading with fundamentally different lithospheric architecture.

  5. Petrogenesis of the magmatic complex at Mount Ascutney, Vermont, USA - I. Assimilation of crust by mafic magmas based on Sr and O isotopic and major element relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foland, K.A.; Henderson, C.M.B.; Gleason, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Ascutney Mountain igneous complex in eastern Vermont, USA, is composed of three principal units with compositions ranging from gabbro to granite. Sr and O isotopic and major element relationships for mafic rocks, granites, and nearby gneissic and schistose country rock have been investigated in order to describe the petrogenesis of the mafic suite which ranges from gabbro to diorite. The entire complex appears to have been formed within a short interval 122.2??1.2 m.y. ago. The granites with ??18O near +7.8??? had an initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.70395(??6) which is indistinguishable from the initial ratio of the most primitive gabbro. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and ??18O values for the mafic rocks range from 0.7039 to 0.7057 and +6.1 to +8.6???, respectively. The isotopic ratios are highly correlated with major element trends and reflect considerable crustal contamination of a mantle-derived basaltic parent magma. The likely contaminant was Precambrian gneiss similar to exposed bedrock into which the basic rocks were emplaced. A new approach to modelling of assimilation during the formation of a cogenetic igneous rock suite is illustrated. Chemical and isotopic modelling indicate that the mafic rocks were produced by simultaneous assimilation and fractional crystallization. The relative amounts of fractionation and assimilation varied considerably. The mafic suite was not produced by a single batch of magma undergoing progressive contamination; rather, the various rocks probably were derived from separate batches of magma each of which followed a separate course of evolution. The late stage granite was apparently derived from basaltic magma by fractionation with little or no crustal assimilation. The early intrusive phases are much more highly contaminated than the final one. The observed relationships have important implications for the formation of comagmatic complexes and for isotopic modelling of crustal contamination. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Monzonitoid magmatism of the copper-porphyritic Lazurnoe deposit (South Primor'e): U-Pb and K-Ar geochronology and peculiarities of ore-bearing magma genesis by the data of isotopic-geochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhno, V. G.; Kovalenko, S. V.; Alenicheva, A. A.

    2011-05-01

    Magmatic rocks from the copper-porphyritic Lazurnoe deposit (Central Primor'e) have been studied. It has been found that rocks from the Lazurnyi massif are referred to gabbro-monzodiorites, monzodiorites, and monzo-granodiorites formed during two magmatic phases of different ages. The earlier phase is represented by gabbro-monzodiorites and diorites of the North Stock, and the later one, by gabbro-monzodiorites and monzo-grano-diorites of the South Stock. On the basis of isotopic dating by the U-Pb (SHRIMP) method for zircon and by the K-Ar method for hornblendes and biotites, the age of magmatic rocks is determined at 110 ± 4 for the earlier phase and at 103.5 ± 1.5 for the later one. Examination of the isotopic composition for Nd, Sr, Pb, Hf, δ18O, and REE spectra has shown that melts of the first phase are contaminated with crustal rocks and they are typical for a high degree of secondary alterations. Potassiumfeldspar, biotite, propylitic alterations, and sulfidization are manifested in these rocks. The rocks of the later stage of magmatism are characteristic for a primitive composition of isotopes and the absence of secondary alterations. They carry the features of adakite specifics that allows us to consider them derivatives of mantle generation under high fluid pressure. The intrusion of fluid-saturated melts of the second phase into the magmatic source of the first phase caused both an alteration pattern of rocks and copper-porphyritic mineralization. Isotopes of sulfur and oxygen allow us to consider the ore component to be of magmatic origin.

  7. Evidence for Paleocene-Eocene evolution of the foot of the Eurasian margin (Kermanshah ophiolite, SW Iran) from back-arc to arc: Implications for regional geodynamics and obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitechurch, H.; Omrani, J.; Agard, P.; Humbert, F.; Montigny, R.; Jolivet, L.

    2013-12-01

    The nature and significance of the Kermanshah ophiolite (Zagros Mountains, Iran), traditionally identified as one of the remnants of the Peri-Arabic ophiolite system obducted onto Arabia in the Late Cretaceous, is reinvestigated in this study. We assess the geochemistry of magmatic rocks from two distinct areas: the Kamyaran Paleocene-Eocene arc and the so-called Harsin-Sahneh ophiolite complex. Volcanic rocks associated with Triassic to Liassic sediments display a clear alkali signature, whereas the Paleocene volcanic rocks show a geochemical signature similar to that of tholeiitic back-arc basin basalts. The presumed ophiolitic gabbros of the Harsin-Sahneh complex and some of the associated dykes that intrude harzburgites or gabbros also have a back-arc basin signature. Eocene volcanics, gabbros and dykes intruding the harzburgites display clear low to medium-K calc-alkaline signatures with variable negative Nb, Ta, and Ti and positive Sr, Ba, Th, and U anomalies. Field relationships and geochemical evidence indicate that the Eocene magmatic rocks were intruded into a mantle substratum close to the ocean-continent transition. The geochemistry of magmatic rocks from Paleocene to Eocene suggests that an Eocene arc was constructed in a Paleocene back-arc basin along the Eurasian continental margin. In the Kermanshah region this magmatic activity, which extended further to the northwest into Turkey, coincided with a marked slowing down of the convergence of Arabia with Eurasia. Furthermore, it occurred after the Mesozoic Sanandaj-Sirjan magmatism had ceased but before the development of the Tertiary Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc. We tentatively relate this transient magmatic activity to a slab retreat and a back-arc extension at the Eurasian continental margin.

  8. Magmatic and tectonic evolution of the Ladakh Block from field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, U.; Honegger, K.

    1989-04-01

    The Ladakh Block is in an intermediate position between the Indian plate in the south and the Karakorum-Tibetan plate in the north. To the west it is separated from the Kohistan Arc by the Nanga Parbat Syntaxis, to the east it is cut off from the Lhasa Block by the Gartok-Nubra Fault. Present data, together with previously published results, show, that the Ladakh Block consists of an island arc in the south and a calc-alkaline batholith in the north with remnants of a continental crust. Migmatitic gneisses and metasedimentary sequences, such as quartzites and metapelites, interbedded with basaltic volcanics and overlain by thick platform carbonates were found as evidence of a continental crust. Remnants of megafossils ( Megalodon and Lithiotis) within the high-grade metamorphic marbles indicate a probable age of Late Triassic to Early Jurassic. These sediments were intruded by a faintly layered hornblende-gabbro, which preceded the calc-alkaline magmatic episode. Gabbro and gabbronorites are found as roof pendants and large inclusions within diorites and granodiorites. The major part of the batholith consists of granodiorite and biotite-granite plutons, ranging from Late Cretaceous to Tertiary. Associated with the intrusives are volcanic rocks with trachyandesite to alkalibasalt and basalt-andesite to rhyolite compositions. Garnet-bearing leucogranites succeeded the emplacement of the major plutons. The magmatic stage ended, finally, by intense fracturing and injections of NE-SW striking andesitic dykes. The southernmost unit of the Ladakh Block is formed by oceanic crust with serpentinized peridotite and hornblende-gabbro and is covered by volcanics of an island-arc type (Dras volcanics). These units are intruded by gabbronorite, as well as Middle and Upper Cretaceous granodiorite and coarse-grained biotite-granite. In a plate tectonic view the Ladakh Block represents a transitional sector between the pure island arc of Kohistan in the west and the Andean type

  9. Genesis of sulfide-rich chromite ores by the interaction between chromitite and pegmatitic olivine-norite dikes in the Potosí Mine (Moa-Baracoa ophiolitic massif, eastern Cuba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proenza, J.; Gervilla, F.; Melgarejo, J.; Vera, O.; Alfonso, P.; Fallick, A.

    2001-10-01

    The Potosí Mine is located in the Moa-Baracoa massif in the easternmost part of the Cuban Ophiolitic Belt. Chromite mineralization occurs within the mantle-crust transition zone. Two events of magma intrusion overprint the chromitite bodies: one gave rise to the crystallization of pegmatitic olivine-norite dikes, and the other produced pegmatitic gabbro dikes. Sulfide-poor chromite ores, brecciated chromite ores, and sulfide-rich chromite ores can be distinguished in the different chromitite bodies. Sulfide-poor ores represent more than 80 vol% of the chromitites. This type occurs far from the zones intruded by pegmatitic gabbro dikes and shows petrographic and chemical features similar to other chromitite bodies described in the Moa-Baracoa massif. Brecciated chromite ores occur within pegmatitic gabbro dikes. In this type, chromite crystals occur included within chromian diopside and plagioclase. These silicates often contain droplet-like sulfide aggregates. Sulfide-rich ores are spatially associated to the contacts between sulfide-poor chromite and pegmatitic olivine-norite dikes. These ores mainly consist of recrystallized (coarse) chromite with interstitial pyrrhotite, pentlandite, cubanite, and chalcopyrite. Chromite from sulfide-rich ores exhibits TiO2, FeO, V2O3, MnO, and especially, Fe2O3 contents, higher than those of chromite from brecciated ores and much higher than those of chromite from sulfide-poor ores. The sulfide-rich ores are PGE-rich (up to 1,113 ppb of total PGE), and show nearly flat chondrite-normalized PGE patterns, slightly above 0.1 times chondritic values. Mineralogical and chemical data indicate that the chromite ores of the Potosí Mine were modified by the intrusions of olivine-norite and gabbro dikes. The interaction between pre-existing sulfide-poor chromite ores and the intruding volatile-rich silicate melts produced strong brecciation, partial dissolution, and recrystallization (coarsening) of chromite. The sulfide assemblage

  10. Morphology and types of particles of regolith sample from the Sea of Fertility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Ivanov, A. V.; Tarasov, L. S.; Stakheyev, Y. I.; Rode, O. D.

    1974-01-01

    A brief description of the morphology of lunar surface material returned by Luna 16 automatic lunar station is given. Adhesiveness of the surface material and its ability to be electrified is noted. Two main genetic groups of regolith particles are differentiated: primary, represented mainly by fragments of magmatic rocks of the basalt and gabbro types, as well as mineralized grains of their constituent minerals, and secondary, particles subjected to appreciable exogenic transformation on the surface of the Moon. The second group, representing more than 70 percent of the material in coarse fractions, includes particles of breccias, sintered aggregates of complex dendritic form, and glass and vitrified particles of varied composition.

  11. The Eldivan ophiolite and volcanic rocks in the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone, Northern Turkey: Geochronology, whole-rock geochemical and Nd-Sr-Pb isotope characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Ömer Faruk; Chiaradia, Massimo; Marzoli, Andrea; Billor, Zeki; Marschik, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Gabbros and dolerite dikes of the Eldivan ophiolite and basaltic volcanic rocks of the ophiolitic mélange in the central part of the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan (IAE) suture zone were investigated for their 40Ar/39Ar age and whole-rock-major-trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions. Based on geological and geochemical characteristics basaltic volcanic rocks in the ophiolitic mélange are subdivided into two groups (Groups I and II) with ocean island basalts or enriched mid-ocean ridge basalt characteristics, respectively. Gabbros and dolerite dikes of the Eldivan ophiolite (Groups III and IV) have instead geochemical compositions indicative of a subduction-related environment. The volcanic rocks of Group I have 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7037 and 0.7044, ƐNd(i)-DM of - 4.5 to - 5.6, and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 18.35 and 18.75. Group II volcanic rocks have higher 87Sr/86Sr(i) values (0.7049-0.7055), ƐNd(i)-DM ranging between - 5.4 and - 6.0, and 206Pb/204Pb(i) between 18.14 and 18.62. The Nd isotopic signatures and 207Pb/204Pb(i) values of the volcanic rocks of both groups point to a different source with respect to those of the Eldivan ophiolite. The low 206Pb/204Pb(i) values relative to the ophiolitic rocks seem to exclude a significant contribution from a HIMU reservoir, whereas the 207Pb/204Pb(i) values slightly above the NHRL might indicate some contribution from an EM2-type reservoir. Gabbros (Group III) of the Eldivan ophiolite and dolerite dikes (Group IV) cross-cutting the ultramafic part of the ophiolite show 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7038 and 0.7053, ƐNd(i)-DM from - 2 to - 3.6 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) between 18.10 and 18.80. The gabbros yield ca. 150 Ma 40Ar/39Ar amphibole-plateau ages, which, together with the geochemical data, indicate that they were produced above subducted oceanic lithosphere in the IAE ocean domain in Late Jurassic times. Therefore, the Eldivan ophiolite in the IAE suture zone constitutes a link between the Hellenide

  12. Interaction between fluid flow, fracturing and mineral growth during eclogitization, an example from the Sunnfjord area, Western Gneiss Region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engvik, A. K.; Austrheim, H.; Erambert, M.

    2001-06-01

    In Sunnfjord, Western Gneiss Region of south Norway, a Proterozoic layered gabbro complex displays various degrees of transformation to eclogite. In the unreacted parts, layering in the gabbro is defined by modal variations of plagioclase, olivine, pyroxenes and minor Fe-Ti oxide and spinel. Coronitic and foliated eclogite formed from the gabbro by hydration reactions at T=510-620°C, causing a volume decrease of c. 13%. In the coronitic eclogite, the mafic magmatic phases are replaced by aggregates of omphacite, barroisite, tremolite, talc and rutile, whereas the plagioclase domains are pseudomorphed by omphacite, barroisite, clinozoisite, kyanite, paragonite and garnet. The felsic and mafic domains are separated by a garnet rim up to 5-mm thick. Garnet was also formed along dilational veins connecting and radiating out of coronas, including the same eclogite facies minerals. In addition, microfractures filled by amphibole and omphacite cut through the corona and vein garnet, oriented perpendicular to the garnet layering. The transformation of dry gabbro to eclogite with hydrous minerals requires supply of water. The timing of metamorphic reactions is therefore dependent on the timing of fluid introduction. The inclusion pattern of garnet in the Holt-Tyssedalsvatnet metagabbro complex indicates that transformation started under eclogite facies conditions. Brittle deformation, in form of fractures allowing infiltration of fluids and mobilisation of elements, is shown to be the most important process initiating transformation. Brittle deformation is thereby active in deep crustal levels corresponding to eclogite facies conditions. Fracturing is interpreted as having been caused by a combination of high fluid pressure, volume changes during mineral transformations and external stresses. Ductile deformation started after the initial metamorphic transformation. Garnet chemistry and zoning pattern are controlled by the chemistry of the growth place, the fluid influx and

  13. Rock preference of planulae of jellyfish Aurelia aurita (Linnaeus 1758) for settlement in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Won Duk; Choi, Sung-Hwan; Han, Changhoon; Park, Won Gyu

    2014-06-01

    Planulae of Aurelia aurita were exposed to 11 types of rocks (basalt, gabbro, granite, rhyolite, sandstone, limestone, conglomerate, gneiss, quartzite, marble and schist) to examine their attachment preference among rock material and position. Numbers of attached polyps was the highest on marble and the least on limestone. Their preference with regard to settling position was the same among the rocks, showing the highest density of polyps on the underside (88.5%) compared to upper (23.6%) and perpendicular sides (10.3%) of rock. The results showed that while position preference is more important than rock property, higher numbers of polyps were observed in rocks with a medium surface hardness.

  14. Lunar rock compositions and some interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1970-01-01

    Samples of igneous "gabbro," "basalt," and lunar regolith have compositions fundamentally different from all meteorites and terrestrial basalts. The lunar rocks are anhydrous and without ferric iron. Amounts of titanium as high as 7 weight percent suggest either extreme fractionation of lunar rocks or an unexpected solar abundance of titanium. The differences in compositions of the known, more "primitive" rocks in the planetary system indicate the complexities inherent in defining the solar abundances of elements and the initial compositions of the earth and moon.

  15. EFFECTS OF LITHOLOGY ON TELEVIEWER-LOG QUALITY AND FRACTURE INTERPRETATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Keys, W.S.; Hess, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Representative televiewer logs illustrating natural fractures in such common rock types as granite, gabbro, basalt, schist, sandstone, limestone and shale are presented in addition to photographs of the same fractures in core samples. These examples demonstrate the many difficulties in recognizing fractures on televiewer logs compared to fractures in logs because of the vertical scale distortion on televiewer logs and from drilling damage to the fractures at the borehole wall. All of these results demonstrate that significant fracture widening usually occurs during drilling, explaining why fractures described by the core logger as closed can be consistently detected on televiewer logs.

  16. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  17. Ophiolites and oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moores, E.M.; Jackson, E.D.

    1974-01-01

    OPHIOLITES consist of a pseudostratiform sequence, of harzburgite, tectonite, ultramafic and mafic cumulates sometimes including gabbro and quartz diorite (plagiogranite) intrusions, dolerite dyke swarms, pillow lava 1, and deep-sea sediments2-4. This assemblage occurs in all Phanerozoic mountain systems and is interpreted as fossil oceanic crust and uppermost mantle5-10. Outstanding problems include differences between the chemical properties of Ophiolites and rocks thought to represent present-day oceanic crust11,12, the lack in some complexes of recognised dyke swarms or cumulates, and the relative thinness of ophiolite mafic rocks compared with standard oceanic crustal sections5,8,13. ?? 1974 Nature Publishing Group.

  18. Character of High Temperature Mylonitic Shear Zones Associated with Oceanic Detachment Faults at the Ultra-Slow Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, C.; John, B. E.; Cheadle, M. J.; German, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Two well-preserved core complexes at the Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR), Mt Dent and Mt Hudson, provide an opportunity to examine the deformation history and rheology of detachment faults at an ultra-slow spreading ridge. Samples from the CAYTROUGH (1976-77) project and the Nautilus NA034 cruise (2013) were selected for detailed petrographic and microstructural study. Surface samples from Mt. Dent (near the center of the MCR) provide insight into lateral variation in footwall rock type and deformation history across a core complex in both the across and down dip directions. In contrast, sampling of Mt. Hudson (SE corner of the MCR) focuses on a high-angle, crosscutting normal fault scarp, which provides a cross section of the detachment fault system. Sampling across Mt Dent reveals that the footwall is composed of heterogeneously-distributed gabbro (47%) and peridotite (20%) with basaltic cover (33%) dominating the top of the core complex. Sampling of Mt Hudson is restricted to the normal fault scarp cutting the core complex and suggests the interior is dominated by gabbro (85% gabbro, 11% peridotite, 4% basalt). At Mt. Dent, peridotite is exposed within ~4km of the breakaway indicating that the Mt. Dent detachment does not cut Penrose-style oceanic crust. The sample set provides evidence of a full down-temperature sequence of detachment related-fault rocks, from possible granulite and clear amphibolite mylonitizatization to prehnite-pumpellyite brittle deformation. Both detachments show low-temperature brittle deformation overprinting higher temperature plastic fabrics. Fe-Ti oxide gabbro mylonites dominate the sample set, and plastic deformation of plagioclase is recorded in samples collected as near as ~4km from the inferred breakaway along the southern flank of Mt. Dent, suggesting the brittle-plastic transition was initially at ~3km depth. Recovered samples suggest strain associated with both detachment systems is localized into discrete mylonitic shear zones (~1-10cm

  19. Geochronology and geochemistry of late Paleozoic magmatic rocks in the Yinwaxia area, Beishan: Implications for rift magmatism in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Rongguo; Wu, Tairan; Zhang, Wen; Meng, Qingpeng; Zhang, Zhaoyu

    2014-09-01

    Mafic-ultramafic rocks are distributed widely in the Beishan rift, which is located in the southern Beishan, central southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The Yinwaxia study area is located in eastern Beishan rift, where mafic-ultramafic rocks occur along major faults. The zircon SHRIMP U-Pb age obtained of a gabbro is 281 ± 11 Ma, and the age of the basalt is constrained by the youngest xenocrystal with an age of 265 Ma, which substantiate that these mafic rocks formed in Permian. Basalts and gabbros exhibit similar geochemical characteristics including: high SiO2, total Fe2O3 and TiO2 contents; low MgO contents and Mg# values; and tholeiitic characteristics. Yinwaxia mafic rocks have relatively high total rare earth element contents, enrichment in light rare earth elements, enrichments in the high field strength elements, and obvious negative Nb-Ta-Ti anomalies. Basalts exhibit low (87Sr/86Sr)i and high εNd(t) values, while gabbros exhibit relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i and low εNd(t) values. Isotopic compositions of these mafic rocks display a mixed trend between depleted and enriched mantles. Meanwhile, differing εNd(t) values show that basalts were intensively contaminated by juvenile crustal materials, but gabbros were contaminated by older continental crust. We conclude that Yinwaxia mafic rocks were derived from lithospheric mantle metasomatized by fluids and/or melts from subducted slab; parental magmas underwent AFC processes, then emplaced along faults in a continental rift. We collected geochemical and geochronological data in the study area, and collated geochronological data from previous workers in the Beishan orogenic belt to develop a geochronological frequency diagram. From these data and analyses we deduced a model of tectonic evolution for the Beishan orogenic belt. Considering the geochemistry, sedimentological evidence for rifting, and the geochronological frequency diagram, we propose that the Beishan rift had entered a post-collision stage

  20. Rock types present in lunar highland soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Several investigators have studied soils from the lunar highlands with the objective of recognizing the parent rocks that have contributed significant amounts of material to these soils. Comparing only major element data, and thus avoiding the problems induced by individual classifications, these data appear to converge on a relatively limited number of rock types. The highland soils are derived from a suite of highly feldspathic rocks comprising anorthositic gabbros (or norites), high alumina basalts, troctolites, and less abundant gabbroic (or noritic) anorthosites, anorthosites, and KREEP basalts.

  1. Pd-BISMUTHOTELLURIDES and Other Tellurides from Some Cu-Ni-PGE Deposits, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmy, H. M.

    2003-04-01

    Pd-bismuthotellurides and other tellurides are described from three Cu-Ni-PGE deposits in the Eastern Desert, Egypt: Abu Swayl, Genina Gharbia, Gabbro Akarem. The deposits are hosted in Late Precambrian mafic-ultramafic rocks and have different geologic histories. The Abu Swayel deposit occurs in conformable, lens-like mafic-ultramafic rocks in metasediments. Mineralization and host rocks are metamorphosed (amphibolite facies; 550-650ºC, 4-5 kbar) and syn-metamorphically sheared. Metamorphism and associated fluid regimes resulted in remobilization and transport of Cu-sulfides and PGE, and development of hydrosilicates. Michenerite, merenskyite, Pd-Bi-melonite, (NiPdBi)Te2, melonite, hessite, altaite and joséite-B occur as inclusions in mobilized sulfides and along cracks in garnet and plagioclase. The Genina Gharbia and Gabbro Akarem deposits are hosted in concentrically zoned, Alaskan-type, complexes; neither is metamorphosed. At Genina Gharbia, ore forms either disseminations in peridotite or massive patches in hornblende-pyroxenite in the vicinity of metasediments. Important petrographic features are a dominance of hornblende, biotite and chlorapatite and alteration of plagioclase to epidote. Disseminated and network sulfide ores are dominated by po, pn, cp and minor py; accessories are cobaltite, molybdenite and valleriite. Sulfide textures and host rock petrography suggest a prolonged late-magmatic hydrothermal event. Michenerite, merenskyite, Pd-Bi-melonite, altaite, hessite, tsumoite and native-Te are mainly present at sulfide-silicate contacts. The Gabbro Akarem deposit is hosted in dunite pipes where net-textured and massive sulfides are associated with spinel and Cr-magnetite. Michenerite, merenskyite, Pd-Bi-melonite and hessite occur mainly as inclusions in sulfides. Typical magmatic textures indicate the limited role of late- and post-magmatic hydrothermal processes. Different geological history of the different deposits enables examination of the

  2. Earthquakes, Segments, Bends, and Fault-Face Geology: Correlations Within the San Andreas System, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachens, R. C.; Simpson, R. W.; Thurber, C. H.; Murray, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Three-dimensional geologic maps of regions surrounding parts of the San Andreas Fault system reveal correlations between fault face geology and both short- and long-term behavior of the faults. The Loma Prieta fault segment that ruptured during the 1989 M6.9 earthquake, as defined by its aftershocks, closely corresponds to the subsurface reach (80 km long) where a large body of Logan gabbro is truncated at the fault, as defined by its magnetic anomaly. This Jurassic ophiolitic gabbro and its related rocks occupy an unusual fault-bounded basement block within Salinaa, a largely Cretaceous granitic terrane SW of the San Andreas Fault. The along-fault reach of the Logan gabbro also coincides with essentially the entire Santa Cruz Mountains left-bend in the San Andreas Fault. Rejecting a chance coincidence, the position of the Logan gabbro with respect to the left bend implies that the bend is fixed relative to Salinia and that the block NE of the San Andreas Fault has been forced to negotiate around the bend as the blocks moved past each other. Thus the basement rocks of the Logan block appear to define (control?) the Loma Prieta segment in terms both of short-term behavior (earthquakes) and long-term behavior (restraining bend fault geometry). The Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault also closely corresponds to a characteristic geologic unit in the NE face of the fault, the greenstone-rich Permanente terrane of the Franciscan Complex. The along-fault subsurface extent of the Permanente terrane at the fault face, as inferred from a recent 3D tomographic wavespeed model, corresponds to the reach filled by the aftershocks of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Furthermore, the 2004 co-seismic slip inferred from geodetic observations also coincides with the Permanente terrane at the fault face. To test whether these observations are directly related to the presence of the Permanente terrane along the fault face, we looked at fault behavior at the location of its offset

  3. PERMEABILITY CHANGES IN CRYSTALLINE ROCKS DUE TO TEMPERATURE: EFFECTS OF MINERAL ASSEMBLAGE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Byerlee, J.D.; ,

    1985-01-01

    The change in permeability with time of granite, quartzite, anorthosite and gabbro was measured while these rocks were subjected to a temperature gradient. Permeability reductions of up to two orders of magnitude were observed, with the greatest reactions occurring in the quartzite. These changes are thought to be caused by dissolution of minerals at high temperatures, and redeposition of the dissolved material at lower temperatures. Quartz appears to be an important mineral in this self-sealing process. If very low permeability is desired around a nuclear waste repository in crystalline rocks, then a quartz-rich rock may be the most appropriate host.

  4. Geochronology and geochemistry of Late Pan-African intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China: Petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Ge, Wen-chun; Zhao, Guo-chun; Dong, Yu; Bi, Jun-hui; Wang, Zhi-hui; Yu, Jie-jiang; Zhang, Yan-long

    2014-11-01

    To constrain the early Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the Jiamusi-Khanka Block and its relationship to the Late Pan-African event in Gondwana, we undertook zircon U-Pb dating and geochemical analyses (major and trace elements, and Hf isotopic compositions) of early Paleozoic intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb age data demonstrate that these intrusive rocks were emplaced at three stages during the Late Pan-African event, represented by ~ 540 Ma syenogranite, ~ 515 Ma quartz syenite, and ~ 500 Ma monzogranite and gabbro. Geochemically, the ~ 500 Ma gabbros in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block have low SiO2 (50.26-51.21 wt.%), relatively high MgO (4.08-5.67 wt.%), Ni (13.1-14.1 ppm) and Cr (28.4-56.0 ppm), and are slightly enriched in LILEs (e.g., Ba, K) and LREEs, and depleted in Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta and P. The εHf(t) values of zircons in the gabbro range from + 2.6 to + 6.4. All these geochemical features indicate that the gabbros were likely produced by the partial melting of a depleted mantle that had been metasomatized by fluids derived from a subducted slab. In contrast, the ca.540-500 Ma granites and quartz syenites contain high SiO2 (64.49-72.20 wt.%) and low MgO (0.40-0.75 wt.%), Cr (1.69-6.88 ppm) and Ni (1.26-3.26 ppm). They have relatively low 176Hf/177Hf ratios of 0.282247-0.282599 with Hf two-stage model ages of 1173-2280 Ma, and most of the magmatic zircons have positive εHf(t) values varying from + 0.2 - + 4.8, indicating that these granites and quartz syenites were probably derived from a dominantly Paleo-Mesoproterozoic "old" crustal source with possible different degrees of addition of juvenile materials. According to the geochemical data and global geological investigations, we propose that the 541-498 Ma intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block formed in a post-collisional or post-orogenic extensional setting linked to the collapse of a Late Pan-African orogen associated within the Gondwana.

  5. A geochemical evaluation of the Ash Sha'ib mineral prospect, Asir quadrangle, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allcott, Glenn H.

    1970-01-01

    The mineralized zone at the remotely located Ash Sha'ib ancient mine contains only a small tonnage of moderately low grade sulfide- bearing rock. Based on present data the gross value of the deposit, with a value of $25.00 or more per ton, is $20,000,000. A belt of metasedimentary rocks, intruded by gabbro to the south and granite to the north, was the host for fissure vein-replacement type mineralization. Most of the mineralization is in a siliceous dolomite transected by fissures. The main sulfide mineral is sphalerite, but minor amounts of chalcopyrlte and argentlferous galena contribute to the value of the mineralized sections.

  6. Jurassic metabasic rocks in the Kızılırmak accretionary complex (Kargı region, Central Pontides, Northern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Ömer Faruk; Chiaradia, Massimo; Marzoli, Andrea; Özkan, Mutlu; Billor, Zeki; Topuz, Gültekin

    2016-03-01

    The Kızılırmak accretionary complex near Kargı is tectonically bounded by the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous metamorphic massives of the Central Pontides. It consists mainly of serpentinite, serpentinized peridotite, gabbro, basalt, metabasite and deep-marine sedimentary rocks. The metabasites in the Kızılırmak accretionary complex are tectonically located within a serpentinite, radiolarian chert, spilitized basalt, gabbro association and commonly display a steep contact with serpentinites. Amphiboles from metabasites yielded robust 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging between 159.4 ± 0.4 Ma and 163.5 ± 0.8 Ma. These are interpreted as cooling ages of the metabasites. The metabasites have 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7035 and 0.7044 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 18.18 and 18.92. The gabbros have higher 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7044 and 0.7060 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 17.98 and 18.43. Three basalt samples display 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7040 and 0.7059. Their 206Pb/204Pb(i) are unrealistically low (15.42 and 15.62), suggesting, most likely, Pb loss which results in over-corrected values for decay through time. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions for all samples consistently plot between the fields of MORB or the Depleted MORB Mantle reservoirs and enriched mantle reservoirs (EMII rather than EMI). All the samples (except one dolerite dike) have negative ɛNdDM(t = 160 Ma) values, suggesting derivation from a reservoir more enriched than the depleted mantle. The protoliths of metabasites correspond to diverse sources (N-MORB, E-MORB, OIB and IAT) based on whole rock major and trace element composition. An IAT-like protolith for the metabasites indicates that the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan ocean domain was subducting and the tectonic regime was compressional during Late Jurassic and before. The protoliths of these rocks were metamorphosed during the subduction/accretion processes, as observed in the metamorphic rocks located along the Balkan, Northern Turkey and

  7. Segmentation in Oman Ophiolite and Fast Spreading Ridges Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A. J.; Boudier, F. I.

    2004-12-01

    New, fine scale mapping in the large NW-SE ridge segment formerly identified in the Oman ophiolite (Nicolas and Boudier, 1995) has revealed that this structure is composed of smaller nestled segments, each being centered on the small mantle diapirs already mapped. The contacts with adjacent lithosphere and the tips of these segments have been mapped in detail. Their nature and structure depend on the difference in age between the two lithospheres. When the difference in age is in the range of 1 Myr, strike slip shear zones, 1-2 km wide, are developed in the mantle of the new segment. When this difference drops to ~0.5 Myr, the shear zones are small and diffuse but, in the mantle wedge at the tip of the segment which penetrates the older lithosphere, spectacular deformations are observed. The mantle and lower crust of the older lithosphere near the Moho are shoveled vertically and kilometer-sized folds develop in the gabbro unit. In contrast, the lid is not affected, suggesting that, at present day fast spreading ridges, similar major tectonic structures, seen in Oman thanks to deep sections, may also be present. Contacts and tips of new segments are invaded by mafic dikes and sills issued from the segment magmatic activity and trapped against these colder boundaries. An important contribution to this magmatism results from massive seawater penetration down to the Moho, possibly favored by the segment tectonic activity. Inside crystallizing magma chamber, the hydrous reaction (Koepke et al.,2004) generates orthopyroxene gabbros which are interlayered with the olivine gabbros. Outside the magma chamber, it generates, by hydrous anatexis, copious melts which mix and react with the indigenous segment melts and crystallize as pargasitic clinopyroxene gabbros and plagiogranites. It is suggested that their magmatic signature should be looked for in present day ridges. Nicolas, A. and Boudier, F., 1995, J.G.R., 100, 6179-6197. Koepke, J., Feig, S.T., Snow, J., Freise, M

  8. Petrologic and Oxygen-Isotopic Investigations of Eucritic and Anomalous Mafic Achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Greenwood, R. C.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.; Berger, E. L.; Barrett, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    The most common asteroidal igneous meteorites are eucrite-type basalts and gabbros rocks composed of ferroan pigeonite and augite, calcic plagioclase, silica, ilmenite, troilite, Ca-phosphate, chromite and Fe-metal. These rocks are thought to have formed on a single asteroid along with howardites and diogenites (HEDs). However, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011 is mineralogically identical to eucrites, but has an O-isotopic composition distinct from them and was derived from a different asteroid. Modern analyses with higher precision have shown that some eucrites have smaller O-isotopic differences that are nevertheless well-resolved from the group mean.

  9. On identifying parent plutonic rocks from lunar breccia and soil fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Lindstrom, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Breccia fragments expected from a well-studied boulder of Stillwater anorthosite have been modeled to test the ability to identify parental rock types from examination of breccia and soil fragments. Depending on their size, the boulder fragments give distributions that suggest mixtures of rock types, including monominerallic anorthosite with subordinant amounts of more gabbroic anorthosite, anorthosite, and gabbro for small fragments. The distribution of FeO in samples of lunar ferroan anorthosite (FAN) indicates that FAN has a heterogeneous distribution of mafic minerals like the boulder.

  10. Stratigraphy of the late Proterozoic Murdama Group, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    The Murdama group probably was deposited in a back-arc basin on a continental platform bounded on the west by an active volcanic arc above an east-dipping subduction zone. The position of the subduction zone, which was active during most of the deposition in the Afif belt, is marked by a belt of gabbro and ultramafic rocks herein named the jabal Burqah belt. The subduction zone later stepped out to the southwest to the Nabitah belt, and Murdama strata were deposited in the Jabal Hadhah, Mistahjed, and smaller basins.

  11. Mapping in the Oman ophiolite using enhanced Landsat Thematic Mapper images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Rothery, D. A.; Pontual, A.

    1988-01-01

    The level of apparent lithological discrimination possible with Landsat TM images in the Oman are discussed. It is found that by using parts of the short-wavelength IR spectrum, the discrimination revealed by the TM data is sufficiently uniform throughout the Oman ophiolite to produce lithological maps at 1:100,000 scale. Decorrelation stretching of the data produces images in which allows for the recognition of variations in gabbro composition, the identification of small acidic, gabbroic, and ultramafic intrusions, the discrimation of the uppermost mantle from the deeper mantle, the precise location of the Moho, and the delineation of gossans and areas subject to choritic-epidotic alteration.

  12. Processing technologies for extracting cobalt from domestic resources. Information Circular/1988

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    A summary of the cobalt processing technologies for the major domestic resources is presented. The processing technologies for the Blackbird, Madison Mine, Duluth Gabbro, iron ore pyrite, laterites, and manganese sea nodules are nearly complete, but the economics are not favorable. Research on these resources should be limited to approaches that promise to cut the total processing costs by at least 50 pct. The most-promising sources of cobalt are the spent-copper leach solutions and siegenite from the Missouri lead ores. Research on cobalt processing from these two sources needs to be completed.

  13. Breccias from the lunar highlands: preliminary petrographic report on apollo 16 samples 60017 and 63335.

    PubMed

    Kridelbaugh, S J; McKay, G A; Weill, D F

    1973-01-01

    Lunar samples 60017,4 and 63335,14 are composed of microbreccias and devitrified glass. These components are predominantly anorthositic, with the exception of a cryptocrystalline clast found in the microbreccia portion of 63335,14 which contains 2.7 percent potassium oxide and 66.7 percent silicon dioxide. The samples have been subjected to extreme shock and thermal metamorphism. The parent materials of the microbreccias include both a coarse-grained anorthosite and a fine-grained subophitic anorthositic gabbro.

  14. Morphostructure analysis of Sapaya ancient volcanic area based lineament data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massinai, Muhammad Altin; Kadir, Fitrah H.; Ismullah, Muh. Fawzy; Aswad, Sabrianto

    2016-05-01

    Morphostructure of Sapaya ancient volcanic have been analysis by using lineament models. In this models, two methods of retrieval data have been used. First, the field survey of the area, second, the satellite images analysis. The morphostructure of Sapaya ancient volcanic contribute to the crater, caldera, and shown an eroded cone morphology. The directions of eruption from Sapaya ancient volcanic have identified in region of Jeneponto and Takalar, which is had east - west and northeast - southwest structure. These eruptions also give contribution to the character of river in Jenelata watershed, by the presence of tuffs, pillow lava, basalt, andesite, diorite, granodiorite, granite, and gabbro, respectively.

  15. Cl-rich hydrous mafic mineral assemblages in the Highiș massif, Apuseni Mountains, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Bernard; Tatu, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    The Guadalupian (Mid-Permian) Highiș massif (Apuseni Mountains, Romania) displays a bimodal igneous suite of mafic (gabbro, diorite) and A-type felsic (alkali feldspar granite, albite granite, and hybrid granodiorite) rocks. Amphibole is widespread throughout the suite, and yields markedly high chlorine contents. Three groups are identified: Cl-rich potassic hastingsite (2.60-3.40 wt% Cl) within A-type felsic rocks and diorite, mildly Cl-rich pargasite to hornblende (0.80-1.90 wt% Cl) within gabbro, and low F-Cl hornblende within gabbro and hybrid granodiorite. Coexisting biotite is either Cl-rich within diorite, or F-Cl-poor to F-rich within A-type felsic rocks. Chlorine and fluorine are distributed in both mafic phases, according to the F-Fe and Cl-Mg avoidance rules. The low-Ti contents suggest subsolidus compositions. Cl-rich amphibole within diorite and A-type felsic rocks yields a restricted temperature range - from 575 °C down to 400 °C, whereas mildly Cl-rich amphibole within gabbro displays the highest range - from 675 to 360 °C. Temperatures recorded by Cl-rich biotite within diorite range from 590 to 410 °C. Biotite within A-type felsic rocks yields higher temperatures than amphibole: the highest values- from 640 to 540 °C - are recorded in low-F-Cl varieties, whereas the lowest values- from 535 to 500 °C - are displayed by F-rich varieties. All data point to halogen-rich hydrothermal fluids at upper greenschist facies conditions percolating through fractures and shear zones and pervasively permeating the whole Highiș massif, with F precipitating as interstitial fluorite and Cl incorporating into amphibole, during one, or possibly several, hydrothermal episodes that would have occurred during a ~ 150 My-long period of time extending from the Guadalupian (Mid-Permian) to the Albian (Mid-Cretaceous).

  16. Formation of agglutinate-like particles in an experimental regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, Thomas H.; Horz, Friedrich

    1988-01-01

    Agglutinate-like particles composed predominantly of glass were produced from a fragmental gabbro target that was repetitively impacted by Ni-alloy projectiles. The experimental glasses are much more heterogeneous in composition than their lunar counterparts, and they are dominated by incomplete mixing of melted component minerals and by plagioclase-rich compositions. Most of the particles are found to be highly enriched in feldspar and to be sustantially fractionated relative to the initial bulk target. It is suggested that fractionation trends within lunar agglutinitic glasses may be partly due to phase-specific melting.

  17. Lunar rock compositions and some interpretations.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1970-01-30

    Samples of igneous "gabbro," "basalt," and lunar regolith have compositions fundamentally different from all meteorites and terrestrial basalts. The lunar rocks are anhydrous and without ferric iron. Amounts of titanium as high as 7 weight percent suggest either extreme fractionation of lunar rocks or an unexpected solar abundance of titanium. The differences in compositions of the known, more "primitive" rocks in the planetary system indicate the complexities inherent in defining the solar abundances of elemizents and the initial compositions of the earth and moon.

  18. Impact spallation experiments - Fracture patterns and spall velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The spall velocities produced by nine experimental impacts of 1 to 6.5 km/sec into San Marcos gabbro targets, using projectiles of Fe, Al, Pb, and basalt of various sizes, have been measured in conjunction with fragment-velocity high-speed filmings of the events. A detailed comparison is made between measured spall velocities and those predicted by the model of Melosh (1984), with a view to the compatibility of small-scale results and large planetary impacts. Attention is also given to the patterns of internal fracture generated by impact within the targets.

  19. Lunar anorthosites.

    PubMed

    Wood, J A; Dickey, J S; Marvin, U B; Powell, B N

    1970-01-30

    Sixty-one of 1676 lunar rock fragments examined were found to be anorthosites, markedly different in composition, color, and specific gravity from mare basalts and soil breccias. Compositional similiarity to Tycho ejecta analyzed by Surveyor 7 suggests that the anorthosites are samples of highlands material, thrown to Tranquillity Base by cratering events. A lunar structural model is proposed in which a 25-kilometer anorthosite crust, produced by magmatic fractionation, floats on denser gabbro. Where early major impacts punched through the crust, basaltic lava welled up to equilibrium surface levels and solidified (maria). Mascons are discussed in this context.

  20. Crystal fractionation in the SNC meteorites: Implications for sample selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1988-01-01

    Almost all rock types in the SNC meteorites are cumulates, products of magma differentiation by crystal fractionation (addition or removal of crystals). If the SNC meteorites are from the surface of Mars or near subsurface, then most of the igneous units on Mars are differentiated. Basaltic units probably experienced minor to moderate differientation, but ultrabasic units probably experienced extreme differentiation. Products of this differentiation may include Fe-rich gabbro, pyroxenite, periodotite (and thus serpentine), and possibly massive sulfides. The SNC meteorites include ten lithologies (three in EETA79001), eight of which are crystal cumulates. The other lithologies, EETA79001 A and B are subophitic basalts.

  1. A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF A VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Dee, J.F.; Brigham, W.E.

    1985-01-22

    The purpose of the study is to develop a simplified model to match past performances of a vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir and to predict future production rates and ultimate reserves. The data are fictitious, but are based on real data. A lumped parameter model was developed for the reservoir that is similar to the model developed by Brigham and Neri (1979, 1980) for the Gabbro zone, and a deliverability model was developed to predict the life and future producing rate declines of the reservoir. This report presents the development and results of this geothermal reservoir analysis.

  2. Lithologic mapping of mafic intrusions in East Greenland using Landsat Thematic Mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naslund, H. Richard; Birnie, R. W.; Parr, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    The East Greenland Tertiary Igneous Province contains a variety of intrusive and extrusive rock types. The Skaergaard complex is the most well known of the intrusive centers. Landsat thematic mapping (TM) was used in conjunction with field spectrometer data to map these mafic intrusions. These intrusions are of interest as possible precious metal ore deposits. They are spectrally distinct from the surrounding Precambrian gneisses. However, subpixel contamination by snow, oxide surface coatings, lichen cover and severe topography limit the discrimination of lithologic units within the gabbro. Imagery of the Skaergaard and surrounding vicinity, and image processing and enhancement techniques are presented. Student theses and other publications resulting from this work are also listed.

  3. Melting and differentiation in Venus with a cold start: A mechanism of the thin crust formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomatov, Viatcheslav S.; Stevenson, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent works argue that the venusian crust is thin: less than 10-30 km. However, any convective model of Venus unavoidably predicts melting and a fast growth of the basaltic crust, up to its maximum thickness of about 70 km limited, by the gabbro-eclogite phase transition. The crust is highly buoyant due to both its composition and temperature and it is problematic to find a mechanism providing its effective recycling and thinning in the absence of plate tectonics. There are different ways to solve this contradiction. This study suggests that a thin crust can be produced during the entire evolution of Venus if Venus avoided giant impacts.

  4. Negligible effect of grain boundaries on the thermal conductivity of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersande, J.W.; Pohl, R.O.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of marble, gabbro, quartz-monzonite, basalt and of labradorite was measured between 0.3 and 80 K. In all cases, the phonon mean free paths l-bar were found to increase with decreasing temperature, but even at the lowest temperatures, l-bar was far smaller than the average grain sizes. This demonstrates that phonon scattering by grain boundaries has very little influence on the heat transport in these rocks. Evidence is presented that lamellae due to twinning or exsolution, rod-like large inclusions, and density fluctuations inside the grains mask the effect of grain boundaries.

  5. Impact spallation experiments - Fracture patterns and spall velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Polanskey, C.A.; Ahrens, T.J. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1990-09-01

    The spall velocities produced by nine experimental impacts of 1 to 6.5 km/sec into San Marcos gabbro targets, using projectiles of Fe, Al, Pb, and basalt of various sizes, have been measured in conjunction with fragment-velocity high-speed filmings of the events. A detailed comparison is made between measured spall velocities and those predicted by the model of Melosh (1984), with a view to the compatibility of small-scale results and large planetary impacts. Attention is also given to the patterns of internal fracture generated by impact within the targets. 29 refs.

  6. Partial melting of subducted paleo-Pacific plate during the early Cretaceous: Constraint from adakitic rocks in the Shaxi porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Lower Yangtze River Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianghong; Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Shuang; Gu, Huangling; Mastoi, Abdul Shakoor; Sun, Weidong

    2016-10-01

    A large porphyry Cu-Au deposit associated with early Cretaceous intrusive rocks has been discovered and explored in the Shaxi area, Lower Yangtze River Belt (LYRB), eastern China. We studied two types of intrusive rocks in the Shaxi area: Cu-Au mineralization related diorites and quartz-diorites (adakitic rocks), and newly found high Sr/Y ratio biotite-gabbros. They were formed almost simultaneously with crystallization ages of ca. 130 to 129 Ma, younger than the early stage shoshonitic rocks (Longmenyuan, Zhuanqiao and Shuangmiao Fm.) in the Luzong volcanic basin, ~ 10 km south of the Shaxi area. These intrusive rocks show similar distribution patterns of trace elements (enriched in LILEs and depleted in HFSEs) and REEs (enriched in LREEs and depleted in HREEs, no Eu negative anomaly, flat HREE patterns). The diorites and quartz-diorites are adakitic rocks with calc-alkaline affinity, distinguished from other adakitic rocks in the LYRB which are high-K calc-alkaline series. The biotite-gabbros are not adakitic rocks, although they are characterized by high Sr/Y ratios. Shaxi adakitic rocks show positive zircon εHf(t) values, which may be attributed to the contribution of subducted oceanic crust, while the εHf(t) values of the biotite-gabbros are mostly negative, indicating the involvement of old crustal materials. Although Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes of Shaxi adakitic rocks are more depleted than those of other adakitic rocks in the LYRB, they are still slightly enriched, similar to continental arc adakites in the Andean Austral Volcanic Zone. The Shaxi adakitic rocks are characterized by high Sr contents and Sr/Y ratios, medium (La/Yb)N, MgO contents and Mg#, and low K2O/Na2O ratios, decoupling of Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N, low Th/U values, exhibiting characteristics of slab-derived adakitic rocks. They were not produced by fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas like adakitic rocks in Edong-Jiurui and Tongling but originally generated from partial melting of subducted

  7. Lunar anorthosites.

    PubMed

    Wood, J A; Dickey, J S; Marvin, U B; Powell, B N

    1970-01-30

    Sixty-one of 1676 lunar rock fragments examined were found to be anorthosites, markedly different in composition, color, and specific gravity from mare basalts and soil breccias. Compositional similiarity to Tycho ejecta analyzed by Surveyor 7 suggests that the anorthosites are samples of highlands material, thrown to Tranquillity Base by cratering events. A lunar structural model is proposed in which a 25-kilometer anorthosite crust, produced by magmatic fractionation, floats on denser gabbro. Where early major impacts punched through the crust, basaltic lava welled up to equilibrium surface levels and solidified (maria). Mascons are discussed in this context. PMID:17781512

  8. Lunar rock compositions and some interpretations.

    PubMed

    Engel, A E; Engel, C G

    1970-01-30

    Samples of igneous "gabbro," "basalt," and lunar regolith have compositions fundamentally different from all meteorites and terrestrial basalts. The lunar rocks are anhydrous and without ferric iron. Amounts of titanium as high as 7 weight percent suggest either extreme fractionation of lunar rocks or an unexpected solar abundance of titanium. The differences in compositions of the known, more "primitive" rocks in the planetary system indicate the complexities inherent in defining the solar abundances of elemizents and the initial compositions of the earth and moon. PMID:17781481

  9. Breccias from the lunar highlands: preliminary petrographic report on apollo 16 samples 60017 and 63335.

    PubMed

    Kridelbaugh, S J; McKay, G A; Weill, D F

    1973-01-01

    Lunar samples 60017,4 and 63335,14 are composed of microbreccias and devitrified glass. These components are predominantly anorthositic, with the exception of a cryptocrystalline clast found in the microbreccia portion of 63335,14 which contains 2.7 percent potassium oxide and 66.7 percent silicon dioxide. The samples have been subjected to extreme shock and thermal metamorphism. The parent materials of the microbreccias include both a coarse-grained anorthosite and a fine-grained subophitic anorthositic gabbro. PMID:17731632

  10. The axial melt lens as a processor of evolved melts at fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loocke, M. P.; Lissenberg, J. C. J.; MacLeod, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The axial melt lens is a steady-state, generally magma-rich body located at the dyke-gabbro transition at mid-crustal levels beneath intermediate- and fast-spreading ridges. It is widely believed to be the reservoir from which mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupts. Using a remotely-operated vehicle, cruise JC21 to the Hess Deep Rift recovered the first comprehensive sample suite of the uppermost plutonics from a fast-spreading ridge. We present the results of a detailed microanalytical investigation of 23 samples (8 dolerites, 14 gabbronorites, and 1 gabbro) recovered by ROV dive 78 from a section traversing the transition from the uppermost gabbros into the sheeted dykes. With the exception of a single olivine-bearing sample (78R-6), dive 78 is dominated by evolved, varitextured (both in hand sample and thin section) oxide gabbronorites. Full thin section quantitative element maps were acquired on serial thin sections from each sample using the analytical scanning electron microscope in the at Cardiff University. The resulting maps were post-processed in MatlabTM to determine the full distribution of plagioclase compositions across entire thin sections (typically 500,000 analyses per sample); an approach we term 'quantitative assessment of compositional distribution' (QACD). By so doing we are able to conduct the first fully rigorous assessment of gabbro compositions, and, by extension, melt compositions present at this level beneath the ridge axis. Critically, we only found 2 grains of high-An plagioclase (An>80) in all of the samples (N = 51). These occur as cores within a sample dominated by lower-An plagioclase. Instead, the vast majority (75%) of plagioclase within the samples have compositions of An65 or lower; compositions too evolved to be in equilibrium with MORB. The most primitive sample, 78R-6, is an olivine-bearing gabbronorite with Fo67 olivine, and plagioclase ranging from An52-77 (median An = 65). These data are difficult to reconcile with models in

  11. IODP Expedition 345: Paleomagnetism and physical properties of primitive lower crustal rocks recovered from the Hess Deep Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A.; Ildefonse, B.; Horst, A. J.; Friedman, S. A.; Machi, S.; Adrião

    2013-12-01

    We report preliminary paleomagnetic and physical property results from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 345, which recovered primitive gabbroic rocks from the Hess Deep Rift, where propagation of the Cocos-Nazca Ridge into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise crust has exposed a dismembered, but nearly complete lower crustal section. Gabbros and troctolites hold stable magnetizations with a variety of remanence structures. In all samples, components that unblock close to the magnetite Curie temperature are considered to represent primary thermoremanent magnetizations acquired during crustal accretion. Downhole variations in the inclination of this stable, high temperature component indicate that at least two blocks have been sampled in each of the two deepest holes (U1415J and U1415P). The data provide evidence of relative displacements of individual, internally coherent blocks (10's metres in size), consistent with emplacement by mass-wasting on the southern slope of the Hess Deep intrarift ridge. In addition to high unblocking temperature components, thermal demagnetization experiments also identified more complex remanences in some core pieces sampled in Hole U1415J. These show nearly antipodal components of magnetization that unblock over different temperature ranges, indicating that magnetizations were acquired across a time interval spanning at least two geomagnetic polarity chrons. Such multicomponent remanences have been observed only rarely in oceanic crust, and post-cruise research aimed at understanding their origin may provide constraints on conditions and processes at the time of geomagnetic reversals. Grain density ranges from 2.77 g/cc in troctolites to 2.90 g/cc in gabbro-gabbronorites, on average. Density decreases with increasing olivine mode, because olivine is significantly more altered than other minerals. Porosity is relatively low (0.6 to 1.2% on average), does not depend on lithology, and is higher (>3%) in the

  12. Crystallographic Preferred Orientations and Seismic Properties of troctolitic rocks from fast-spread lower ocean crust (IODP Expedition 345 at Hess Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ildefonse, B.; Akizawa, N.; Mainprice, D.; Godard, M.; Arai, S.

    2014-12-01

    IODP Expedition 345 (Dec 2012 - Feb 2013) recovered the first significant sections of modally layered gabbroic rocks from fast-spread lower ocean crust exposed at the Hess Deep Rift (Gillis et al., 2014, doi:10.1038/nature12778). Olivine gabbro and troctolite are the dominant plutonic rock types recovered, with minor gabbro and gabbronorite. Magmatic foliation is moderate to strong in intervals with simple modal layering but weak to absent in troctolitic intervals, and typically absent in intervals with heterogeneous textures and/or diffuse banding. We present crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of primary igneous phases (plagioclase, olivine, cpx) in troctolitic samples, measured using the Electron-Backscattered Electron Diffraction (EBSD) technique at Géosciences Montpellier. The samples are divided into 12 coarse-grained troctolites, 3 fine-grained troctolites, 9 clinopyroxene oikocryst-bearing troctolites, 1 skeletal olivine-bearing troctolite, and 3 olivine gabbros. Plagioclase CPO are typical magmatic fabrics, dominantly axial-B, or intermediate between axial-B and type P (BA-index ranges from 0.1 to 0.6; Satsukawa et al., 2013, doi:10.5194/se-4-511-2013). BA increases when the [100] point maximum, indicating the mineral lineation, becomes better defined. The coarse-grained troctolite samples, from the troctolite series in Holes U1415 J and P, generally display too large grains for the CPO to be statistically meaningful; fabrics appear poorly defined at the scale of the thin sections. Large olivine grains commonly display subgrains resulting from crystal-plastic deformation. In the other troctolitic samples, the plagioclase fabrics are generally well defined, and vary in intensity (J-index) from 1.8 to 7. The olivine gabbros are from banded intervals in Hole U1415P; they display weak, oblate plagioclase CPO (J = 1.5 to 2, BA < 0.2). CPO are used to model seismic properties of the samples. The fast direction of elastic P-wave propagation in

  13. Apollo 16 exploration of Descartes - A geologic summary.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Cayley Plains at the Apollo 16 landing site consist of crudely stratified breccias to a depth of at least 200 meters, overlain by a regolith 10 to 15 meters thick. Samples, photographs, and observations by the astronauts indicate that most of the rocks are impact breccias derived from an anorthosite-gabbro complex. The least brecciated members of the suite include coarse-grained anorthosite and finer-grained, more mafic rocks, some with igneous and some with metamorphic textures. Much of the transverse area is covered by ejecta from North Ray and South Ray craters, but the abundance of rock fragments increases to the south toward the younger South Ray crater.

  14. Major element chemistry of glasses in Apollo 14 soil 14156.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Harmon, R. S.; Jakes, P.

    1973-01-01

    Glasses in a soil sample (14156) from the middle layer of the trench at the Fra Mauro landing site show a wide range of compositions clustered around certain preferred compositions. Ninety per cent of the glasses are of two major types - Fra Mauro basalt (63%) with high K and 17 wt % Al2O3 and Highland basalt or anorthositic gabbro (27%) with low K and 25 to 26 wt % Al2O3. The glass population is almost identical with that of the comprehensive soil 14259.

  15. Major element composition of Luna 20 glasses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J.; Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Brown, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Ten per cent of the 50 to 150-micron size fraction of Luna 20 soil is glass. A random suite of 270 of these glasses has been analyzed by electron microprobe techniques. The major glass type forms a strong cluster around a mean value corresponding to Highland basalt (anorthositic gabbro) with 70% normative feldspar. Minor glass groups have the compositions of mare basalts and of low-K Fra Mauro type basalts. The glass data indicate that Highland basalt is the major rock type in the highlands north of Mare Fecunditatis.

  16. Geochronology of the Voisey's Bay intrusion, Labrador, Canada, by precise U Pb dating of coexisting baddeleyite, zircon, and apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelin, Yuri; Li, Chusi; Naldrett, A. J.

    1999-06-01

    The emplacement history of the Voisey's Bay troctolite intrusion, that hosts the major Ni-Cu-Co sulfide deposit of the same name, has been studied using precise U-Pb geochronology of baddeleyite, zircon and apatite. The baddeleyite U-Pb ages of multiple drill core samples of troctolite and gabbro indicate that all of the mafic rocks studied from different components of the Voisey's Bay intrusion: Eastern Deeps, Discovery Hill Zone and Reid Brook Zone, and from the adjacent Red Dog area, were emplaced at 1332.7±1.0 Ma. On the basis of combined geological and geochronological evidence, it is suggested that the Voisey's Bay Ni-Cu-Co deposit was formed during the same period. The zircons coexisting with the ca. 1333 Ma baddeleyite show a diversity of ages. The zircons from normal troctolite and some of the olivine gabbro samples are coeval with the baddeleyite, while zircon from the varied textured troctolite and feeder olivine gabbro are much younger at 1305.0±0.8 Ma. The identical ages of the younger zircon population and the Voisey's Bay syenite that cuts the mafic rocks indicate a link between zircon growth in the mafic rocks and contact metamorphism, related to the emplacement of the syenite. Various mechanisms of zircon growth were probably involved, including reaction of the 1333 Ma baddeleyite with a silica-enriched fluid with formation of a secondary polycrystalline zircon, and zircon crystallization from syenite micro-veins in the mafic rocks. The mean 207Pb/ 206Pb age of 1303.5±2.6 Ma of the Voisey's Bay apatites is similar to the age of the younger zircon population. The apatite age may either be a result of resetting the U-Pb system in response to the syenite intrusion, or may reflect the closure of the system during regional cooling and cessation of fluid circulation. The presence of xenocrystic zircon in a Discovery Hill Zone feeder olivine gabbro indicates that the Voisey's Bay magmas were contaminated with 1.90 Ga crustal rocks.

  17. Zircon dating of oceanic crustal accretion.

    PubMed

    Lissenberg, C Johan; Rioux, Matthew; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Bowring, Samuel A; Mével, Catherine

    2009-02-20

    Most of Earth's present-day crust formed at mid-ocean ridges. High-precision uranium-lead dating of zircons in gabbros from the Vema Fracture Zone on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge reveals that the crust there grew in a highly regular pattern characterized by shallow melt delivery. Combined with results from previous dating studies, this finding suggests that two distinct modes of crustal accretion occur along slow-spreading ridges. Individual samples record a zircon date range of 90,000 to 235,000 years, which is interpreted to reflect the time scale of zircon crystallization in oceanic plutonic rocks.

  18. Geological setting, emplacement mechanism and igneous evolution of the Atchiza mafic-ultramafic layered suite in north-west Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibraimo, Daniel Luis; Larsen, Rune B.

    2015-11-01

    The Atchiza mafic and ultramafic-layered suite (hereafter, "Atchiza Suite) crops out in an area 330 km2 west of the Mozambican Tete province. In an early account of the geology of this intrusion, it was considered the continuation of the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe, an idea that was aborted after detailed studies. Nevertheless, the Ni concentrations in the Atchiza outcrop rocks are considerable. Our investigation used field evidence, hand specimens and petrography descriptions, mineral chemistry studies using electron microprobe analysis and tectonic analysis to arrive at a plausible mineralogical composition and understanding of the tectonic setting for the igneous evolution. The mineral composition from the Atchiza Suite indicates that these are cumulates. The magmatic segregation from the petrographic and mineral composition reasoning indicates that dunite-lherzolitic peridotite-olivine gabbro-gabbronorite-gabbro-pegmatitic gabbro is the rock formation sequence. Olivine and chromite were the first phases formed, followed by pyroxene and plagioclase. In addition, it is shown that these minerals are near-liquidus crystallization products of basaltic magma with olivine Fo: 87.06 in dunite, mean values of clinopyroxene are (Wo: 36.4, En: 48.0, Fs: 15.2), orthopyroxene (Wo: 2.95, En: 73.0, Fs: 24.2) and plagioclase An: 71.3, respectively. Opaque minerals comprise Fe-Ti oxides and (Fe, Cr) spinel up to 4.8 vol.%, but chromitite layers are not present. Most of the opaque minerals are interstitial to pyroxene. Sulphides are common in gabbros, with pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite, pyrite and covellite together comprising 0.4-2.0 vol.%. The whole rock Rare Earth Element (REE) concentrations are mainly a result of differentiation, but slight crustal contamination/assimilation contributed to the REE contents. In addition, they also show Eu enrichment, suggesting that plagioclase fractionation was important in the rock. The Atchiza Suite preserves a deep-seated plumbing

  19. Temperature emission spectrum of exoelectrons of lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mints, R. I.; Alimov, V. I.; Melekhin, V. P.; Milman, I. I.; Kryuk, V. I.; Petukhova, T. M.; Kunin, L. L.; Tarasov, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    Thermostimulated exoelectronic emission of eight fragments of regolith returned by the Soviet Luna 16 automatic station was studied. The nature of the exoemission glove-curves was determined by particle type. Fragments of breccia, sinter, slag, anorthosite, glass plate, and leucocratic gabbro after the first heating disclosed a single exoemission maximum, whose temperature position is in the range 115 to 200 C. The data obtained indicate the complex and inhomogeneous energy structure of some regolith fragments. The presence of surface states capable of forming sorptive bonds can be assumed for most particles. The exoemission of anorthosite, olivine, and the glass spherule is due to the presence of formation defects at their surfaces.

  20. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  1. Geochemistry and geochronology of mafic rocks from the Luobusa ophiolite, South Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Ji, Wei-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    This study presents geochemical compositions of mafic rocks outcropped in the Luobusa ophiolite that locates at the eastern part of the Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone (YZSZ). The studied mafic rocks include gabbroic/diabase dykes cutting the peridotites and foliated amphibolites embedded within the subophiolitic mélange. The diabases have low K2O contents and display N-MORB-like geochemical characteristics, i.e., with flat REE patterns and weak enrichment in LILE (e.g., Rb, Ba, Th and U). The gabbros show LREE-depleted patterns and variable enrichment in Rb and Ba. Foliated amphibolites mainly consist of hornblendes and plagioclases, with minor titanites. They commonly show LREE-depleted patterns, with strong enrichment in LILE. Three diabases have depleted Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions, with initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.703009-0.703502, εNd(t) of + 5.0 to + 8.5 and εHf (t) of ca + 14. Two gabbros have similar Nd-Hf isotopes with the diabases, but slightly higher initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (i.e., 0.704820 and 0.704550). Compared to both diabases and gabbros, the amphibolites have higher initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (i.e., 0.705131-0.705825), but more depleted Nd-Hf isotope compositions, with εNd(t) of + 9.1 to + 11.6 and εHf(t) of + 18.2 to + 21.9. Geochemical compositions of the diabase dykes indicate that they were formed in a mid-ocean ridge setting. Zircon SIMS U-Pb dating of the gabbroic dyke cutting the serpentinites yields an age of 128.4 ± 0.9 Ma, which is identical within uncertainty to the zircon U-Pb age of the amphibolite (i.e., 131.0 ± 1.2 Ma). Low U and Th contents of zircons in the amphibolite support their metamorphic origin. Titanites in the amphibolites have been dated by LA-ICPMS and give U-Pb ages of ~ 131-134 Ma, which are similar to the zircon U-Pb ages of the dated gabbro and amphibolite. Therefore, we suggest that the Luobusa ophiolite was generated at the Early Cretaceous and underwent the intra-oceanic emplacement immediately after its

  2. High- & Low-δ18O magma: Comparative study of crustal and mantle plagiogranites from the Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, R. C.; Grimes, C. B.; Koepke, J.; Erdmann, M.; Kitajima, K.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Valley, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Plagiogranite (PLGT) from the crust and mantle sections of the Oman ophiolite preserve widely varied δ18O values that monitor different processes occurring during ophiolite construction. Mantle-like δ18O values are expected if MORB fractionation played a dominant role in PLGT genesis. Magmatic values (monitored here by zircon) shifted away from the mantle-like range indicate open system processes which include partial melting of hydrothermally-altered crust or influx of subduction-related, sediment-derived melt. Zircon (zrn) and quartz (qtz) from twenty-four new samples of PLGT from the crustal and mantle sections of the Oman ophiolite were analyzed for δ18O. Rock-averaged δ18O from the sheeted dikes (zrn: 4.3-4.5‰, qtz: 6.7-6.9‰) and dike-gabbro transition (zrn: 3.9-4.8‰, qtz: 4.7-7.7‰) are mostly below values in magmatic equilibrium with MORB (zrn = 5.2±0.5‰, qtz = 7.0-7.5‰). δ18O for PLGT in the gabbro section (zrn: 4.8-5.1‰, qtz: 7.7-8.3‰) are mostly mantle-like. Quartz is generally found to be more variable than coexisting zrn and likely experienced some sub-solidus exchange. When organized into a relative structural position, δ18Ozrn values typically increase with depth. The lowest δ18Ozrn are observed near the dike-gabbro transition and are consistent with petrogenesis involving hydrous partial melting of mafic crust previously hydrothermally-altered at high-T. The return to nominally mantle-equilibrated δ18Ozrn deeper in the gabbro section may reflect decreasing seawater-signatures of fluids penetrating to depth, lower water/rock ratios, or extreme fractional crystallization. Crustal PLGT thus predate the development of high δ18O signatures in the upper oceanic crust as it cools and experiences low temperature hydrothermal alteration. Mantle PLGT intrusions (1-3 m thick) from the Haylayn block extend to considerably higher rock-averaged δ18O values (zrn: 5.1-15.4‰, qtz: 7.0-18.5‰). Individual rocks (5 samples) were uniform in

  3. Isotopic and trace element compositions of upper mantle and lower crustal xenoliths, Cima volcanic field, California: Implications for evolution of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukasa, S.B.; Wilshire, H.G.

    1997-01-01

    Ultramafic and mafic xenoliths from the Cima volcanic field, southern California, provide evidence of episodic modification of the upper mantle and underplating of the crust beneath a portion of the southern Basin and Range province. The upper mantle xenoliths include spinel peridotite and anhydrous and hydrous pyroxenite, some cut by igneous-textured pyroxenite-gabbro veins and dikes and some by veins of amphibole ?? plagioclase. Igneous-textured pyroxenites and gabbros like the dike rocks also occur abundantly as isolated xenoliths inferred to represent underplated crust. Mineral and whole rock trace element compositions among and within the different groups of xenoliths are highly variable, reflecting multiple processes that include magma-mantle wall rock reactions, episodic intrusion and it filtration of basaltic melts of varied sources into the mantle wall rock, and fractionation. Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic compositions mostly of clinopyroxene and plagioclase mineral separates show distinct differences between mantle xenoliths (??Nd = -5.7 to +3.4; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7051 - 0.7073; 206Pb/204Pb = 19.045 - 19.195) and the igneous-textured xenoliths (??Nd = +7.7 to +11.7; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7027 - 0.7036 with one carbonate-affected outlier at 0.7054; and 206Pb/204Pb = 18.751 - 19.068), so that they cannot be related. The igneous-textured pyroxenites and gabbros are similar in their isotopic compositions to the host basaltic rocks, which have ??Nd of+5.1 to +9.3; 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7028 - 0.7050, and 206Pb/204Pb of 18.685 - 21.050. The igneous-textured pyroxenites and gabbros are therefore inferred to be related to the host rocks as earlier cogenetic intrusions in the mantle and in the lower crust. Two samples of peridotite, one modally metasomatized by amphibole and the other by plagioclase, have isotopic compositions intermediate between the igneous-textured xenoliths and the mantle rock, suggesting mixing, but also derivation of the metasomatizing magmas from two separate and

  4. Ophiolitic association of Cape Fiolent area, southwestern Crimea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promyslova, M. Yu.; Demina, L. I.; Bychkov, A. Yu.; Gushchin, A. I.; Koronovsky, N. V.; Tsarev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    An ophiolitic association consisting of serpentinized ultramafic rocks and serpentinite, layered mafic-ultramafic complex, gabbro and gabbrodolerite, fragments of parallel dike complex, pillow lava, black bedded chert, and jasper has been identified for the first time by authors in the Cape Fiolent area. The chemistry of pillow lavas and dolerites, including REE patterns and a wide set of other microelements, indicates suprasubduction nature of the ophiolites and their belonging to a backarc basin that has reached the stage of spreading in its evolution.

  5. Paleogeography of the Amazon craton at 1.2 Ga: early Grenvillian collision with the Llano segment of Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, Eric; van der Pluijm, B. A.; Van der Voo, R.; Rizzotto, G.; Scandolara, J. E.

    2002-05-01

    A paleomagnetic, geochronologic and petrographic study was undertaken on the flat-lying gabbros and basalts of the Nova Floresta Formation of Rondônia state, western Brazil in order to constrain the Mesoproterozoic paleogeography of the Amazon craton. Measurement of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility on the gabbroic samples reveals a flat-lying foliation with a radiating pattern of lineations, supporting the field evidence that the gabbros are part of a large, undeformed sill. Petrographic observations of oxides in the gabbros reveals two populations of magnetite grains produced during the original cooling of the sill: large, oxyexsolved titanomagnetite grains and fine-grained magnetite in igneous reaction rims. New 40Ar/ 39Ar age dating of biotite and plagioclase yield ages of ˜1.2 Ga, which represent the rapid cooling following emplacement of the mafic magma. Whole rock dating of basalt samples yields total gas ages of 1062±3 Ma, similar to the ˜1.0 Ga K/Ar ages reported by previous workers. However, the strong compositional dependence of the age spectrum renders this younger whole rock age unreliable except as a minimum constraint. A single magnetic component is found in the basalts, indistinguishable from the characteristic remanence found in the gabbros that is oriented WNW and steeply upward. This magnetization is considered to be primary and was acquired during the cooling of the sill and associated lavas. A paleomagnetic pole calculated from the Nova Floresta Formation ( n=16 sites, Plat.=24.6°N, Plong.=164.6°E, A95=5.5°, Q=5), the first reported pole for the Amazon craton for the 1200-600 Ma Rodinia time period, constrains the paleogeographic position of Amazonia at ˜1.2 Ga. Juxtaposition of the western Amazon craton with the Llano segment of the Laurentia's Grenville margin causes the NF pole to lie on the 1.2 Ga portion of the combined APWP for Laurentia and Greenland, which indicates that a collision with the Amazon craton could have

  6. [The Brazilian Nurses Association and the development of nursing in Brazil--a path under construction].

    PubMed

    Cocco, M I; Monteiro, M S

    2001-01-01

    Through the concept of memory by Walter Benjamin, the authors of the present study identify relevant facts of the Brazilian Association of Nursing (ABEn) that affected the development of nursing in Brazil. The investigation points out the participation of ABEn in the regulation of the nursing field, creation of Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem (Brazilian Journal of Nursing), promotion of the Congressos Brasileiros de Enfermagem (Brazilian Congresses of Nursing) and its importance on the political struggle for better health conditions in Brazil.

  7. A review of cardiopulmonary research in Brazilian medical journals: clinical, surgical and epidemiological data.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Carlos; Rocha e Silva, Mauricio

    2010-04-01

    Research in the field of cardiopulmonary disease in Brazil has been very active in recent decades. The combination of PUBMED, SCieLO, open access and online searching has provided a significant increase in the visibility of Brazilian journals. This newly acquired international visibility has in turn resulted in the appearance of more original research reports in the Brazilian scientific press. This review is intended to highlight part of this work for the benefit of the readers of "Clinics." We searched through PUBMED for noteworthy articles published in Brazilian medical journals included in the Journal of Citation Reports of the Institute of Scientific Information to better expose them to our readership. The following journals were examined: "Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia," "Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia e Metabologia," "Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Reviews," "Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia," "Jornal de Pediatria," "Revista Brasileira de Cirurgia Cardiovascular," "Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira," Revista da Escola de Enfermagem U.S.P." and "São Paulo Medical Journal." These journals publish original investigations in the field of cardiopulmonary disease. The search produced 71 references, which are briefly examined.

  8. A review of cardiopulmonary research in Brazilian medical journals: clinical, surgical and epidemiological data.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Carlos; Rocha e Silva, Mauricio

    2010-04-01

    Research in the field of cardiopulmonary disease in Brazil has been very active in recent decades. The combination of PUBMED, SCieLO, open access and online searching has provided a significant increase in the visibility of Brazilian journals. This newly acquired international visibility has in turn resulted in the appearance of more original research reports in the Brazilian scientific press. This review is intended to highlight part of this work for the benefit of the readers of "Clinics." We searched through PUBMED for noteworthy articles published in Brazilian medical journals included in the Journal of Citation Reports of the Institute of Scientific Information to better expose them to our readership. The following journals were examined: "Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia," "Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia e Metabologia," "Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Reviews," "Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia," "Jornal de Pediatria," "Revista Brasileira de Cirurgia Cardiovascular," "Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira," Revista da Escola de Enfermagem U.S.P." and "São Paulo Medical Journal." These journals publish original investigations in the field of cardiopulmonary disease. The search produced 71 references, which are briefly examined. PMID:20454503

  9. Magmatic lineations inferred from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility fabrics in Units 8, 9, and 10 of the Rum Eastern Layered Series, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, B.; Hargraves, R. B.; Emeleus, C. H.; Troll, V. R.; Donaldson, C. H.; Reavy, R. J.

    2007-10-01

    The Eastern Layered Series of the Rum Layered Suite, NW Scotland, comprises a sequence of sixteen (30-150 m thick) cyclic units. The upper troctolite-olivine gabbro parts of each of these units exhibit small-scale modal layering and a pervasive, layer-parallel mineral lamination that is often associated with 'soft-sediment' deformation structures. A sporadic, macroscopic magmatic lineation measurable on mineral lamination surfaces is also observed in places. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabrics were studied in three of these cyclic units, (8, 9, and 10) in the northern part of the Eastern Layered Series. Magnetic fabrics measured in the troctolites and gabbros yield one dominant trend in which magnetic foliations parallel magmatic layering and magnetic lineations trend NW-SE and plunge gently. Magnetic fabrics measured for two detailed traverses through Unit 10 on the northern side of Hallival also yield one dominant trend, similar to that measured elsewhere in the Eastern Layered Series. However, toward the centre of Unit 10 in each traverse, magnetic lineations sometimes plunge approximately downdip (SW) on the magnetic foliation planes. The implications of these results are discussed with reference to previous textural and fabric observations on Rum. A model is suggested in which weak linear arrangements of cumulus olivine and plagioclase crystals are developed due to slumping and soft-sediment deformation of unconsolidated crystal mushes during central sagging of the Rum Layered Suite.

  10. Palaeopermeability structure within fault-damage zones: A snap-shot from microfracture analyses in a strike-slip system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, Rodrigo; Arancibia, Gloria; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Cembrano, Jose M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding fault zone permeability and its spatial distribution allows the assessment of fluid-migration leading to precipitation of hydrothermal minerals. This work is aimed at unraveling the conditions and distribution of fluid transport properties in fault zones based on hydrothermally filled microfractures, which reflect the ''frozen-in'' instantaneous advective hydrothermal activity and record palaeopermeability conditions of the fault-fracture system. We studied the Jorgillo Fault, an exposed 20 km long, left-lateral strike-slip fault, which juxtaposes Jurassic gabbro against metadiorite belonging to the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile. Tracings of microfracture networks of 19 oriented thin sections from a 400 m long transect across the main fault trace was carried out to estimate the hydraulic properties of the low-strain fault damagezone, adjacent to the high-strain fault core, by assuming penny-shaped microfractures of constant radius and aperture within an anisotropic fracture system. Palaeopermeability values of 9.1*10-11 to 3.2*10-13 m2 in the gabbro and of 5.0*10-10 to 1.2*10-13 m2 in the metadiorite were determined, both decreasing perpendicularly away from the fault core. Fracture porosity values range from 40.00% to 0.28%. The Jorgillo Fault has acted as a left-lateral dilational fault-bend, generating large-scale dilation sites north of the JF during co-seismic activity.

  11. Reconnaissance geology of the Jabal Hashahish Quadrangle, sheet 17/41 B, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hadley, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The Jabal Hashahish quadrangle (sheet 17/41 B) lies between lat 17?30' and 18?00' N. and long 41?30' and 42?00' E. and encompasses an area of 2,950 km2, of which only about 600 km2 is land; the remainder is covered by the Red Sea. The geologic formations exposed in the quadrangle include Precambrian layered and intrusive rocks, Tertiary gabbro dikes, Quaternary basaltic lavas and pyroclastic rocks, and Quaternary surficial deposits. The Precambrian rocks include layered sedimentary and volcanic rocks that have been assigned to the Baish, Bahah, and Ablah groups. These rocks have been folded, metamorphosed, and invaded by intrusions. They are cut by Miocene gabbro dikes that were intruded during the initial stages of the opening of the Red Sea rift. The Quaternary rocks also include basalt that was extruded during a continuation of that opening, after the uplift that formed the escarpment that parallels the eastern shore of the Red Sea, but before the Holocene erosional cycle. Coastal, pediment, and alluvial, and eolian deposits of various kinds are also of Quaternary age. The economic potential of the quadrangle lies essentially in the agricultural value of its flood-plain deposits, though these are not so widely used as those in Wadi Hali and Wadi Yiba, which are located in the Manjamah quadrangle. The coral reefs possibly could provide raw materials for use in a cement industry, if any such industry were ever required in this area.

  12. Petrology of some lithic fragments from Luna 20

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1973-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies were made of polished thin sections of part of a 30-mg sample of 250-500 ??m lunar soil returned by Luna 20 from a point between Mare Fecunditatis and Mare Crisium. Very fine-grained lithic (crystalline) rock fragments, composing about one fifth of the total sample, have mineralogical compositions equivalent to various types of gabbro, anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite and troctolite, with minor basalt. The textures now observed in these fragments are in large part metamorphic. Twentyseven electron microprobe analyses of minerals from these fragments are presented, including olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, spinel, nickel-iron and a Zr-Ti-REE mineral possibly similar to 'phase B' of Lovering and Wark (1971). Analyses of seven melt inclusions and twenty-eight defocused beam analyses of lithic fragments are also given. Some of the fragments contain 'gas' inclusions which, along with the fine grain size, are believed to indicate final crystallization under low pressure near surface conditions. The almost complete absence of granophyric material in this sample raises the question of whether or not there are at least two distinct magmas for the plagioclase-rich terrae rocks from which this soil sample was derived in part. ?? 1973.

  13. Effects of fractional crystallization and cumulus processes on mineral composition trends of some lunar and terrestrial rock series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J.

    1982-01-01

    A plot of Mg of mafic minerals versus An of plagioclase in cumulate rocks from various lunar and terrestrial rock series shows each series to have a distinct curvilinear trend. The slopes of these trends vary from nearly vertical in the case of lunar anorthosites and Mg-norites to nearly horizontal in the case of gabbros from the mid-Atlantic ridge. Calculations based upon known major element partitioning between mafic minerals, plagioclase and subalkaline basaltic liquids indicate that fractional crystallization coupled with cotectic accumulation of mafic minerals and plagioclase will produce mineral composition trends on the Mg versus An diagram with slopes greater than 1 for cases where An is approximately greater than Mg. Furthermore, fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas with alkali concentrations approaching zero will produce near vertical Mg versus An trends. Therefore, the steep slopes of the lunar rock series are consistent with relatively simple fractionation processes. The relatively flat slope of mineral compositions from gabbros collected from the mid-Atlantic ridge at 26 deg N is inconsistent with simple fractionation processes, and calculations show that periodic refilling of a fractionating magma chamber with picritic magma cannot simply explain this flat slope either.

  14. Cambrian Kherlen ophiolite in northeastern Mongolia and its tectonic implications: SHRIMP zircon dating and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Laicheng; Baatar, Munkhtsengel; Zhang, Fochin; Anaad, Chimedtseren; Zhu, Mingshuai; Yang, Shunhu

    2016-09-01

    The Kherlen terrane, which contains the Kherlen ophiolitic complex, is located between two Precambrian continental blocks in the northeastern Mongolia. We present new geochemical and SHRIMP zircon U-Pb data for the Kherlen ophiolitic complex and for granitic plutons intruding the complex, providing constraints on the regional evolution in Early Paleozoic time. The Kherlen ophiolite, which is geochemically similar to SSZ-type ophiolites, was originated from two distinct mantle sources, a N-MORB-like source and an E-MORB-like source. A gabbro and a plagiogranite dike intruding the gabbro from the Kherlen ophiolite yielded similar SHRIMP zircon U-Pb ages of ca. 500 Ma, suggesting that the ophiolite formed in Late Cambrian time. Post- or syn-collisional granites intruding the ophiolitic complex yielded crystallization ages of ca. 440 Ma, which is interpreted to record the minimum age of the tectonic emplacement of the ophiolite. These new data demonstrate that the Kherlen ophiolite belt is an Early Paleozoic suture between the Ereendavaa and the Idermeg continental terranes, which is generally coeval with the Bayankhongor belt in central Mongolia, indicating that they are regionally correlated, and thus they define a major Early Paleozoic suture between two Precambrian continental blocks in the central-northeastern Mongolia.

  15. Young cumulate complex beneath Veniaminof caldera, Aleutian arc, dated by zircon in erupted plutonic blocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Sison, T.W.; Mazdab, F.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mount Veniaminof volcano, Alaska Peninsula, provides an opportunity to relate Quaternary volcanic rocks to a coeval intrusive complex. Veniaminof erupted tholeiitic basalt through dacite in the past ???260 k.y. Gabbro, diorite, and miarolitic granodiorite blocks, ejected 3700 14C yr B.P. in the most recent caldera-forming eruption, are fragments of a shallow intrusive complex of cumulate mush and segregated vapor-saturated residual melts. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) analyses define 238U-230Th isochron ages of 17.6 ?? 2.7 ka, 5+11/-10 ka, and 10.2 ?? 4.0 ka (2??) for zircon in two granodiorites and a diorite, respectively. Sparse zircons from two gabbros give 238-230Th model ages of 36 ?? 8 ka and 26 ?? 7 ka. Zircons from granodiorite and diorite crystallized in the presence of late magmatic aqueous fluid. Although historic eruptions have been weakly explosive Strombolian fountaining and small lava effusions, the young ages of plutonic blocks, as well as late Holocene dacite pumice, are evidence that the intrusive complex remains active and that evolved magmas can segregate at shallow levels to fuel explosive eruptions. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Experimental and geochemical evidence for derivation of the El Capitan Granite, California, by partial melting of hydrous gabbroic lower crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratajeski, K.; Sisson, T.W.; Glazner, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Partial melting of mafic intrusions recently emplaced into the lower crust can produce voluminous silicic magmas with isotopic ratios similar to their mafic sources. Low-temperature (825 and 850??C) partial melts synthesized at 700 MPa in biotite-hornblende gabbros from the central Sierra Nevada batholith (Sisson et al. in Contrib Mineral Petrol 148:635-661, 2005) have major-element and modeled trace-element (REE, Rb, Ba, Sr, Th, U) compositions matching those of the Cretaceous El Capitan Granite, a prominent granite and silicic granodiorite pluton in the central part of the Sierra Nevada batholith (Yosemite, CA, USA) locally mingled with coeval, isotopically similar quartz diorite through gabbro intrusions (Ratajeski et al. in Geol Soc Am Bull 113:1486-1502, 2001). These results are evidence that the El Capitan Granite, and perhaps similar intrusions in the Sierra Nevada batholith with lithospheric-mantle-like isotopic values, were extracted from LILE-enriched, hydrous (hornblende-bearing) gabbroic rocks in the Sierran lower crust. Granitic partial melts derived by this process may also be silicic end members for mixing events leading to large-volume intermediate composition Sierran plutons such as the Cretaceous Lamarck Granodiorite. Voluminous gabbroic residues of partial melting may be lost to the mantle by their conversion to garnet-pyroxene assemblages during batholithic magmatic crustal thickening. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  17. Reinterpretation of Mesozoic ophiolite arc, and blueschist terranes in southwestern Baja California

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlock, R.L. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The nature and significance of disrupted Mesozoic oceanic rocks on Isla Santa Margarita and Isla Magdalena, western Baja California Sur, have been reinterpreted on the basis of detailed mapping and petrologic studies. Three structural units are recognized. (1) The upper plate consists of ophiolitic, arc, and forearc basin rocks. Ophiolitic rocks, including metamorphosed ultramafic rocks, gabbro, dikes, volcanic rocks, and chert, underwent strong contractional deformation and penetrative greenschist-facies metamorphism. Arc rocks, including gabbro, a dike and sill complex, compositionally diverse volcanic rocks, lahars, and volcaniclastic strata, lack a penetrative fabric and are weakly metamorphosed. Forearc basin rocks consist of unmetamorphosed conglomerated and rhythmically bedded siliciclastic turbidites. (2) The lower plate is a subduction complex consisting of weakly to moderately foliated and metamorphosed pillow and massive lavas, breccia, and tuff( ), interbedded red and green siliceous argillite, and rare radiolarian ribbon chert and limestone. Blueschist-facies metamorphism is indicated by lawsonite, aragonite, sodic amphibole, and sodic clino-pyroxene. (3) Serpentine-matrix melange crops out in shallowly dipping fault zones between the upper and lower plates. The structural and petrologic characteristics of the Mesozoic units, the geometry of contacts between them, and the age of extension are similar to those in the Isla Cedros-Vizcalno Peninsula region, 400 km to the northwest. The author infers that syn-subduction extension was a regional event that affected much of the western Baja forearc during the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene.

  18. Oceanic, island arc, and back-arc remnants into eastern Kamchatka accretionary complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchuk, A.V.; Vishnevskaya, V.S.; Izvekov, I.N. )

    1990-06-01

    The Kamchatsky Mts. accretionary complex in the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt was studied for identification of the oceanic and suprasubduction components into accretionary wedges. That complex is divided into two tectonic units. The Lower unit is formed sedimentary and tectonic melanges containing arc-related components (Late Senonian volcaniclastics and boninitic gabbro) and oceanic fragments (Fe-Ti-tholeiites, ocean island basalts, and pelagic sediments of Valanginian to Turonian age). The Upper unit consists of ductile deformed oceanic cumulates from troctolites to Fe-Ti-gabbro, 151 to 172 Ma, which are intruded MORB-like diabases with suprasubduction characteristics, 122 to 141 Ma, and are overlain by basalts similar to latter. The Lower and Upper units are separated by a SW-dipping thrust, which is related by an ophiolitoclastic olistostrome of Late Campanian to Early Maestrichtian age. Both units are covered by Paleocene authoclastic deposits. They are all thrusted over the early Neogene island arc complex, 16 to 20 Ma. The Lower unit of the Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was originated in a shear zone between a Late Cretaceous island arc and an Early Cretaceous oceanic plate. The Upper unit represents a Jurassic oceanic remnant that formed a basement of Early Cretaceous back-arc or fore-arc basin. Both units were superposed in the latest Cretaceous. The Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was emplaced into the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt during late Neogene by collision of the early Neogene island arc.

  19. Anatomy of a deep crustal volcanic conduit system; The Reinfjord Ultramafic Complex, Seiland Igneous Province, Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Thomas B.; Larsen, Rune B.; Anker-Rasch, Lars; Grannes, Kim Rune; Iljina, Markku; McEnroe, Suzanne; Nikolaisen, Even; Schanche, Mona; Øen, Endre

    2016-05-01

    The Reinfjord Ultramafic Complex, Seiland Igneous Province represents a lower crustal magma chamber (25-30 km depth) that likely records a deep conduit system for mantle derived melts ascending through the continental crust. It consists of cumulates of dunite, wehrlite, olivine clinopyroxene as well as subordinate lherzolite and websterites, intruded into gabbro-norite and metasediment gneisses. Field, petrographic and geochemical data show that the intrusion developed through fractional crystallization and interactions between new batches of magma and partially solidified cumulates. This resulted in a 'reverse fractionation sequence' whereby cumulates became progressively more MgO and olivine rich with time. Contamination by partial melting of the gabbro-norite is evident in the marginal zones, but is limited in the central parts of the intrusion. Interrupted crystallization sequences of olivine → olivine + clinopyroxene and the absence of significant amounts of more evolved melts, suggests that large volumes of melt passed through the system to shallower levels in the crust leaving behind the cumulate sequences observed at Reinfjord. Therefore, the Reinfjord Ultramafic Complex represents a deep crustal conduit system, through which mantle derived melts passed. The parent melts are likely to have formed from partial melting of mantle with residual garnet and clinopyroxene.

  20. Influence of biofilms on heavy metal immobilization in sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS).

    PubMed

    Feder, Marnie; Phoenix, Vernon; Haig, Sarah; Sloan, William; Dorea, Caetano; Haynes, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This paper physically and numerically models the influence of biofilms on heavy metal removal in a gravel filter. Experimental flow columns were constructed to determine the removal of Cu, Pb and Zn by gabbro and dolomite gravel lithologies with and without natural biofilm from sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS). Breakthrough experiments showed that, whilst abiotic gravel filters removed up to 51% of metals, those with biofilms enhanced heavy metal removal by up to a further 29%, with Cu removal illustrating the greatest response to biofilm growth. An advection-diffusion equation successfully modelled metal tracer transport within biofilm columns. This model yielded a permanent loss term (k) for metal tracers of between 0.01 and 1.05, correlating well with measured data from breakthrough experiments. Additional 16S rRNA clone library analysis of the biofilm indicated strong sensitivity of bacterial community composition to the lithology of the filter medium, with gabbro filters displaying Proteobacteria dominance (54%) and dolomite columns showing Cyanobacteria dominance (47%).

  1. Compositional Evidence for Launch Pairing of the YQ and Elephant Moraine Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, R. L.; Jollitt, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.; Haskin, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Arai and Warren provide convincing evidence that QUE (Queen Alexandra Range) 94281 derives from the same regolith as Y (Yamato) 793274 and, therefore, that the two meteorites were likely ejected from the Moon by the same impact. Recently discovered Y981031 is paired with Y793274. The "YQ" meteorites (Y793274/Y981031 and QUE 94281 are unique among lunar meteorites in being regolith breccias composed of subequal amounts of mare volcanic material (a VLT [very-low-Ti] basalt or gabbro) and feldspathic highland material. EET (Elephant Moraine) 87521 and its pair EET 96008 are fragmental breccias composed mainly of VLT basalt or gabbro. Warren, Arai, and colleagues note that the volcanic components of the YQ and EET meteorites are texturally similar more similar to each other than either is to mare basalts of the Apollo collection. Warren and colleagues address the issue of possible launch pairing of YQ and EET, but note compositional differences between EET and the volcanic component of YQ, as inferred from extrapolations of regressions to high FeO concentration. We show here that: (1) EET 87/96 consists of fragments of a differentiated magma body, (2) subsamples of EET represent a mixing trend between Fe-rich and Mg-rich differentiates, and (3) the inferred volcanic component of YQ is consistent with a point on the EET mixing line. Thus, there is no compositional impediment to the hypothesis that YQ is launch paired with EET.

  2. Petrogenesis of mesosiderites. I - Origin of mafic lithologies and comparison with basaltic achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1990-01-01

    New petrologic and trace element data on basaltic and gabbroic clasts in mesosiderites and basaltic achondrites, combined with existing petrologic and trace element data, have served as a basis for interpretation of the petrogenesis of mesosiderite clasts. Compared with the basaltic achondrites, the mesosiderite basaltic and gabbroic clasts contain more abundant modal tridymite and merrilite, and more commonly contain augite as a late magmatic phase. Their pyroxenes tend to be more MgO-rich, and have lower Fe/Mn ratios which are positively correlated with the Fe/Mg ratio. Some of the mesosiderite basaltic and gabbroic clasts contain xenocrystic plagioclase. The basaltic clasts commonly show superchondritic Eu/Sm ratios and slight LREE depletions. The cumulate gabbro clasts are extremely depleted in LIL, have very high Eu/Sm ratios and high Lu/Sm ratios. All of these features can be explained by a model in which the mafic lithologies of mesosiderites were formed by remelting of a mixed basalt-cumulate gabbro-metal source region near the parent body surface.

  3. Chemical and Sr-isotopic characteristics of the Luna 24 samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Mckay, G.; Wiesmann, H.; Bansal, B.; Wooden, J.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical and Sr isotopic characteristics of Luna 24 bulk soil samples are determined and interpreted within the framework of lunar mare basalt evolution. Major and trace element compositions lead to the suggestion of candidate rock types consisting of a basalt/gabbro with very low TiO2 and MgO content (52%), a very low TiO2 basalt with 10% MgO (23%), olivine vitrophyre (20%), low K Fra Mauro basalt (4%) and anorthositic gabbro (1%). The proposed compositions are supported by the agreement of mixing models based on the proposed compositions with observed soil compositions. Sr ratios for plagioclase samples imply a lower Sr-87/Sr-86 value for low Mg soils than for other mare basalts and higher Rb/Sr and a more evolved Sr ratio in high Mg basalts. Rb, Sr and rare earth element compositions for low Mg basalts fit a model of partial remelting of cumulates containing small amounts of plagioclase.

  4. Characterisation and origin of New Zealand nephrite jade using its strontium isotopic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C. J.; Beck, R. J.; Campbell, H. J.

    2007-09-01

    Nephrite jade occurs in three terranes (Dun Mountain-Maitai, Caples and Torlesse) in New Zealand, where it is associated with ultramafic and ophiolitic rocks in narrow metasomatic reaction zones at the margins of serpentinite (having harzburgite/gabbro/dolerite precursors) with silicic metasediments and metavolcanics. True nephrite fabrics are developed only locally where marginal shearing is intense, and late in the metamorphic history. 87Sr/ 86Sr values of these nephrites do not display the primitive values of their gabbro/dolerite precursor component i.e. 0.7030-0.7035, as expected if formed during serpentinisation. Rather, the nephrites have more evolved 87Sr/ 86Sr values inherited from the metasediment component at a later stage, and which fall within particular terrane groups: Dun Mountain-Maitai 0.7045-0.7060, Caples 0.7058-0.7075 and Torlesse 0.7085-0.7110. Rb-Sr ages and initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of the metasediment component from in situ nephrite localities, when compared with their counterparts throughout the host terrane, show that nephrite Sr isotopic compositions are characteristic of the host terrane.

  5. Distribution and origin of igneous rocks from the landward slopes of the Mariana Trench: Implications for its structure and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, S.H.

    1983-09-10

    The landward slope of the Mariana Trench is composed largely of igneous rocks. Serpentinites and serpentinized ultramafic rocks occur at nearly all structural levels on the slope from depths of 8000 to 1200 m. Seamountlike features on the trench slope break are the surface expression of serpentinite diapirs. Cumulate and massive gabbros are found; several varieties of volcanic rocks are common including boninites, altered and metamorphosed basalts, andesites, and dacites. The chemical characteristics of the volcanic rocks indicate that nearly all are products of island arc volcanism. Together with the gabbros, these volcanic rocks represent what is probably a late Eocene arc complex. These rocks were probably the first volcanic products to result from the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the Phillippine Sea plate; their exposure on the trench slope today implies a significant amount of tectonic erosion of the landward slope since Eocene time. Most of this removal of material appears to have occurred during the early stages of subduction. There are isolated occurrences on the landward slope of rock assemblages including alkalic basalts, chert, hyaloclastites, upper Cretaceous siliceous sediments, and shallow water limestones. These assemblages are very similar to rocks dredged from seamounts on the offshore flank of the trench, and their presence on the landward slope suggests that since the cessation of vigorous tectonic erosion, there has been episodic accretion of seamount fragments to the landward slope.

  6. Influence of biofilms on heavy metal immobilization in sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS).

    PubMed

    Feder, Marnie; Phoenix, Vernon; Haig, Sarah; Sloan, William; Dorea, Caetano; Haynes, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This paper physically and numerically models the influence of biofilms on heavy metal removal in a gravel filter. Experimental flow columns were constructed to determine the removal of Cu, Pb and Zn by gabbro and dolomite gravel lithologies with and without natural biofilm from sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS). Breakthrough experiments showed that, whilst abiotic gravel filters removed up to 51% of metals, those with biofilms enhanced heavy metal removal by up to a further 29%, with Cu removal illustrating the greatest response to biofilm growth. An advection-diffusion equation successfully modelled metal tracer transport within biofilm columns. This model yielded a permanent loss term (k) for metal tracers of between 0.01 and 1.05, correlating well with measured data from breakthrough experiments. Additional 16S rRNA clone library analysis of the biofilm indicated strong sensitivity of bacterial community composition to the lithology of the filter medium, with gabbro filters displaying Proteobacteria dominance (54%) and dolomite columns showing Cyanobacteria dominance (47%). PMID:25982923

  7. Impact jetting of geological materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenbo; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1995-08-01

    To understand jetting of earth materials, gabbro slabs (5 mm thick) were accelerated to 1.5-2 km sec -1 and impacted gabbro (5-10 mm thick), novaculite (10 mm thick), and porous sandstone (12 mm thick) targets at inclination angles of 30°-60°. The ejecta were collected using a catcher box filled with styrofoam and the particles are extracted using chloroform. Jetting angles are determined by the relative positions of the target and the crater produced by the ejecta. The mass of the ejected particles per unit area (˜50 mg cm -2) of the impactor remains almost independent of the impact velocity, inclination angle, thickness of the target and sample mineralogy, and density. Hydrodynamic models are used to calculate the jetting mass, angle, and velocity. Theoretical models predict ˜6 times more ejecta than the experimentally measured as the inclination angle increases. X-ray diffraction of the recovered ejecta shows that it is still in crystalline form, which agrees with thermodynamic calculations. Because the experimental results indicate that the theoretical jetting model for thin metal plates provides a poor description of the experiments, the application of metal plate theory to planet-sized objects appears to be questionable.

  8. Mineralogy and geochemistry of altered rocks associated with Lemitar carbonatites, central New Mexico, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLemore, V.T.; Modreski, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The intrusion of more than 100 Cambrian-Ordovician carbonatite dikes caused minor alteration of Proterozoic granitic and mafic rocks in the Lemitar Mountains, although hematization, carbonatization and fenitization caused extensive alteration locally. Ampibolites within 15-20 m of the carbonatite dike contacts were highly altered by carbonatization. Locally the Lemitar diorite/gabbro adjacent to some carbonatites were altered in a thin, discontinuous zone by sodic-potassic fenitization. The granite at Polvadera Peak was locally altered by potassic fenitization. Most of the altered rocks have been further altered by hematization and carbonatization. The altered rocks show increases in loss on ignition and in one or more the elements Ca, K, Na and Al. Only granitic fenites in the Lemitar Mountains lost silica and some diorite/gabbro fenites gained silica. Petrologic and geochemical studies clearly indicate that the types and degree of alteration differ notably in different rock types. The fenitizing fluids were oxidizing, slightly acidic, high in volatiles (especially CO2) and possibly fairly low in alkali elements. ?? 1990.

  9. Geology of the El Recodo Cu-Mo prospect, SE. Cordille-ra central, Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, H.S.; Lewis, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The main intrusive phase in the El Recodo area is a small stock of leucocractic quartz diorite which intrudes an unmetamorphosed Upper Cretaceous sequence of andesites, tuffs, agglomerates, breccias and minor interbedded limestones. At least three other intrusive phases might be related to the emplacement of the main quartz diorite stock: 1) porphyritic andesites, 2) a series of gabbros and hornblende gabbros and 3) late stage aplite, porphyritic dacite and mineralized quartz-epidote veins. Emplacement of this last phase was accompanied by extensive brecciation and hydrothermal alteration.Three distinct stages of hydrothermal alteration are recognized in the andesites an associated basic to intermediate intrusives: 1) pyroxene-hornblende alteration to chlorite +/- epidote-magnetite, 2) incipient plagioclase alteration to kaolinite-quartz and 3) advanced plagioclase alteration to sericite-quartz +/- chamosite. In altered quartz diorite and dacite porphyries the association K-feldspar-biotite indicates the highest grade of hydrothermal alteration. Mineralization is ubiquitous. Pyrite, chalcopyrite and bornite occur as thin stringers, disseminations and replacements of original mafic minerals. Throughout the area mineralized outcrops are thoroughly stained with a mixture of secondary limonite-hematite and minor chalcocite-malachite. The strongest mineralized areas correspond with significant soil, rock and stream sediment Cu and Mo Anomalies.

  10. Pt-Pd reefs in magnetitites of the Stella layered intrusion, South Africa: A world of new exploration opportunities for platinum group elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, W. D.; Barnes, S.-J.; Gartz, V.; Andrews, G.

    2003-10-01

    The 3033 Ma Stella layered intrusion of South Africa consists largely of magnetite gabbros and gabbros that are hosted by greenstones of the Kraaipan belt. The intrusion contains a 100-m-thick, platinum group element (PGE) enriched interval that includes a number of laterally continuous PGE reefs constituting the oldest mineralization of this type known on Earth. The richest of the reefs is hosted by magnetitite and contains 10 15 ppm Pt + Pd over 1 m, representing by far the highest PGE grades known up to this time in magnetitite-hosted Pt-Pd reefs. The PGEs are interpreted to have been concentrated by sulfide melt, after S saturation had been reached in the advanced stages of magmatic differentiation, in response to magnetite crystallization. Reaction between sulfide melt and oxides led to late magmatic S loss, causing a paucity of sulfides in most of the PGE mineralized interval. As a result, the reefs cannot be distinguished macroscopically from their unmineralized host rocks, and we suggest that similar mineralization may have been overlooked in the upper parts of other tholeiitic intrusions elsewhere.

  11. Petrology of some lithic fragments from Luna 20.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Microscopic and electron microprobe studies were made of polished thin sections of part of a 30-mg sample of 250- to 500-micron lunar soil returned by Luna 20 from a point between Mare Fecunditatis and Mare Crisium. Very fine-grained lithic (crystalline) rock fragments, composing about one-fifth of the total sample, have mineralogical compositions equivalent to various types of gabbro, anorthositic gabbro, gabbroic anorthosite, and troctolite, with minor basalt. The textures now observed in these fragments are in large part metamorphic. Twenty-seven electron microprobe analyses of minerals from these fragments are presented, including olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, spinel, nickel-iron, and a Zr-Ti-REE mineral possibly similar to 'phase B' of Lovering and Wark (1971). Analyses of seven melt inclusions and 28 defocused beam analyses of lithic fragments are also given. Some of the fragments contain 'gas' inclusions which, along with the fine grain size, are believed to indicate final crystallization under low pressure near surface conditions.

  12. Structural anatomy of a dismembered ophiolite suite from Gondwana: The Manamedu complex, Cauvery suture zone, southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetty, T. R. K.; Yellappa, T.; Nagesh, P.; Mohanty, D. P.; Venkatasivappa, V.; Santosh, M.; Tsunogae, T.

    2011-08-01

    Detailed geological and structural mapping of the Manamedu ophiolite complex (MOC), from the south-eastern part of the Cauvery suture zone (CSZ) within the Gondwana collisional suture in southern India reveals the anatomy of a dismembered ophiolite succession comprising pyroxenite actinolite-hornblendite, hornblendite, gabbro-norite, gabbro, anorthosite, amphibolite, plagiogranite, mafic dykes, and associated pelagic sediments such as chert-magnetite bands and carbonate horizons. The magmatic foliation trajectory map shows inward dipping foliations and a variety of fold structures. Structural cross-sections of the MOC reveal gentle inward dips with repetition and omission of different lithologies often marked by curvilinear hinge lines. The succession displays imbricate thrust sheets and slices of dismembered ophiolite suites distributed along several localities within the CSZ. The MOC can be interpreted as a deformed large duplex structure associated with south-verging back thrust system, consistent with crustal-scale 'flower structure'. The nature and distribution of ophiolitic rocks in the CSZ suggest supra-subduction zone setting associated with the lithospheric subduction of the Neoproterozoic Mozambique Ocean, followed by collision and obduction during the final stage of amalgamation of the Gondwana supercontinent in the end Precambrian.

  13. Petrology and geochemistry of the Eastern Loma de Cabrera Batholith, Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Cribb, J.W.; Lewis, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Eastern Loma de Cabrera Batholith, located in the NW Cordillera Central, Dominican Republic, is a heterogeneous intrusive complex composed of a zoned ultramafic-mafic core surrounded by tonalite and diorite. The batholith intrudes metasbasaltic rocks of the Duarte Complex of early Cretaceous age. The ultramafic-mafic core consists of peridotite, olivine-pyroxenite, pyroxenite, and augite-hypersthene gabbro-norite. Pyroxenites and gabbro-norites exhibit large scale interlayering and small scale layering involving a regular variation in the proportions of ortho- and clinopyroxene. Tonalities and diorites are mafic to leucocratic, some being porphyritic. Petrographic types include hornblende, hornblende-pyroxene, hornblende-biotite, and muscovite-biotite types. Aplites are abundant. Intrusive relations suggest that ultramafic-mafic complex is the oldest intrusive phase, and was partially amphibolitized during later intrusion of the felsic rocks. Ultramafic-mafic rocks contain 43-54% SiO/sub 2/ and MgO ranges from 8-45%. Trace and REE in these rocks are relatively depleted. Tonalitic rocks range in SiO/sub 2/ from 53-76%, with K/sub 2/O varying from 0.15-2.9%. In addition, they are LREE enriched. A small Eu anomaly is best explained by fractionation of plagioclase and hornblende. Trends shown by Rb-Sr data suggest that fractional crystallization of hornblende and plagioclase, that is high level fractionation, is the important factor in controlling chemical variation in the tonalites.

  14. Petrology, geochemistry and geochronology of the magmatic suite from the Jianzha Complex, central China: Petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Mo, Xuanxue; Bader, Thomas; Scheltens, Mark; Yu, Xuehui; Dong, Guochen; Huang, Xiongfei

    2014-12-01

    The intermediate-mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Jianzha Complex (JZC) at the northern margin of the West Qinling Orogenic Belt have been interpreted to be a part of an ophiolite suite. In this study, we present new geochronological, petrological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data and provide a different interpretation. The JZC is composed of dunite, wehrlite, olivine clinopyroxenite, olivine gabbro, gabbro, and pyroxene diorite. The suite shows characteristics of Alaskan-type complexes, including (1) the low CaO concentrations in olivine; (2) evidence of crystal accumulation; (3) high calcic composition of clinopyroxene; and (4) negative correlation between FeOtot and Cr2O3 of spinels. Hornblende and phlogopite are ubiquitous in the wehrlites, but minor orthopyroxene is also present. Hornblende and biotite are abundant late crystallized phases in the gabbros and diorites. The two pyroxene-bearing diorite samples from JZC yield zircon U-Pb ages of 245.7 ± 1.3 Ma and 241.8 ± 1.3 Ma. The mafic and ultramafic rocks display slightly enriched LREE patterns. The wehrlites display moderate to weak negative Eu anomalies (0.74-0.94), whereas the olivine gabbros and gabbros have pronounced positive Eu anomalies. Diorites show slight LREE enrichment, with (La/Yb)N ratios ranging from 4.42 to 7.79, and moderate to weak negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.64-0.86). The mafic and ultramafic rocks from this suite are characterized by negative Nb-Ta-Zr anomalies as well as positive Pb anomalies. Diorites show pronounced negative Ba, Nb-Ta and Ti spikes, and typical Th-U, K and Pb peaks. Combined with petrographic observations and chemical variations, we suggest that the magmatism was dominantly controlled by fractional crystallization and crystal accumulation, with limited crustal contamination. The arc-affinity signature and weekly negative to moderately positive εNd(t) values (-2.3 to 1.2) suggest that these rocks may have been generated by partial melting of the juvenile

  15. High and Low Temperature Oceanic Detachment Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarenko, Sofya; McCaig, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    One of the most important discoveries in Plate Tectonics in the last ten years is a "detachment mode" of seafloor spreading. Up to 50% of the Atlantic seafloor has formed by a combination of magmatism and slip on long-lived, convex-up detachment faults, forming oceanic core complexes (OCC). Two end-member types of OCC can be defined: The Atlantis Bank on the Southwest Indian Ridge is a high temperature OCC sampled by ODP Hole 735b. Deformation was dominated by crystal-plastic flow both above and below the solidus at 800-950 °C, over a period of around 200 ka. In contrast, the Atlantis Massif at 30 °N in the Atlantic, sampled by IODP Hole 1309D, is a low temperature OCC in which crystal plastic deformation of gabbro is very rare and greenschist facies deformation was localised onto talc-tremolite-chlorite schists in serpentinite, and breccia zones in gabbro and diabase. The upper 100m of Hole 1309D contains about 43% diabase intruded into hydrated fault breccias. This detachment fault zone can be interpreted as a dyke-gabbro transition, which was originally (before flexural unroofing) a lateral boundary between active hydrothermal circulation in the fault zone and hangingwall, and intrusion of gabbroic magma in the footwall. Thus a major difference between high and low temperature detachment faults may be cooling of the latter by active hydrothermal circulation. 2-D thermal modelling suggests that if a detachment fault is formed in a magmatically robust segment of a slow spreading ridge, high temperature mylonites can be formed for 1-2 ka provided there is no significant hydrothermal cooling of the fault zone. In contrast, if the fault zone is held at temperatures of 400 °C by fluid circulation, cooling of the upper 1 km of the fault footwall occurs far too rapidly for extensive mylonites to form. Our models are consistent with published cooling rate data from geospeedometry and isotopic closure temperatures. The control on this process is likely a combination of

  16. Stagnation and Storage of Strongly Depleted Melts in Slow-Ultraslow Spreading Oceans: Evidence from the Ligurian Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa; Padovano, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    Our studies of Alpine-Apennine ophiolite massifs (i.e., Lanzo, Voltri, Ligurides, Corsica) show that the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys oceanic basin was a slow-ultraslow spreading basin, characterized by the exposures on the seafloor of mantle peridotites with extreme compositional variability. The large majority of these peridotites are made of depleted spinel harzburgites and plagioclase peridotites. The former are interpreted as reactive peridotites formed by the reactive percolation of under-saturated, strongly trace element depleted asthenospheric melts migrated by porous flow through the mantle lithosphere. The latter are considered as refertilized peridotites formed by peridotite impregnation by percolated silica-saturated, strongly trace element depleted melts. Strongly depleted melts were produced as low-degrees, single melt increments by near fractional melting of the passively upwelling asthenosphere during the rifting stage of the basin. They escaped single melt increment aggregation, migrated isolated through the mantle lithosphere by reactive porous or channeled flow before oceanic opening, and were transformed into silica-saturated derivative liquids that underwent entrapment and stagnation in the shallow mantle lithosphere forming plagioclase-enriched peridotites. Widespread small bodies of strongly depleted gabbro-norites testify for the local coalescence of these derivative liquids. These melts never reached the surface (i.e., the hidden magmatism), since lavas with their composition have never been found in the basin. Subsequently, aggregated MORB melts upwelled within replacive dunite channels (as evidenced by composition of magmatic clinopyroxenes in dunites), intruded at shallow levels as olivine gabbro bodies and extruded as basaltic lavas, to form the crustal rocks of the oceanic lithosphere (i.e., the oceanic magmatism). Km-scale bodies of MORB olivine gabbros were intruded into the plagioclase-enriched peridotites, which were formed in the

  17. Experimental Impacts into Chondritic Targets. Part 1; Disruption of an L6 Chondrite by Multiple Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Horz, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    A fragment of an L6 chondrite (ALH 85017,13) with an initial mass (M(sub 0)) of 464.1 g was the target in a series of experimental impacts in which the largest remaining fragment (M(sub R)) after each shot was impacted by a 3.18-mm ceramic sphere at a nominal speed of 2 km/s. This continued until the mass of the largest remaining piece was less than half the mass of the target presented to that shot (M(sub S)). Two chunks of Bushveldt gabbro with similar initial masses were also impacted under the same conditions until M(sub R) was less than half M(sub 0). The two gabbro targets required a total of 1.51x10(exp 7) and 1.75x10(exp 7) erg/g to attain 0.27 and 0.33 M(sub R)/M(sub 0), respectively; the chondrite, however, was considerably tougher, reaching 0.40 and 0.21 M(sub R)/M(sub 0) only after receiving 2.37x10(exp 7) and 3.10x10(exp 7) erg g-1, respectively. The combined ejecta and spallation products from the gabbro impacts were coarser than those from the chondrite and in sufficient quantities that the new surface areas exceeded those from the meteorite until the fifth shot in the chondrite series, which was the number of impacts required to disrupt each gabbro target (i.e., MR/M0 = 0.5). Unlike the behavior shown in previous regolith-evolution series, neither gabbro target produced an enhancement in the size fraction reflecting the mean size of the crystals composing the rock (about 3 mm), an effect possibly related to the width of the shock pulse. The original chondrite was so fine-grained and fractured, and the variance in its grain-size distribution so large, that effects related to grain-size were relegated to the <63- m fraction. Impacts into ALH 85017 produced abundant, fine-grained debris, but otherwise the slopes of its size distributions were comparable to those from other experiments involving natural and fabricated terrestrial targets. The characteristic slopes of the chondrite's size distributions, however, were notably more constant over the entire

  18. U-Pb zircon isotope system in mingled and mixed magmas:an example from Central Srednogorie, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peytcheva, I.; von Quadt, A.

    2003-04-01

    Mingling and mixing of granitic and gabbroic magma occur often in volcanic-arc and postcollisional geodynamic environments. Good opportunities for studying the different stages of reaction of the two magmas provide the Srednogorie zone in Bulgaria -- elongated belt of intensive Late Cretaceous magmatic activity and related important Cu-Au-Mo ore-deposits. Present study concentrate on the behavior of the U-Pb-zircon isotope system in mingled and mixed magmas. Zircons are separated from plutons of southern part of Central Srednogorie. According to Ivanov et al. (2001) the plutons show characteristics of layered intrusions (Wiebe &Collins, 1998): their lower parts consist of crystal rich phase porphyry granodiorites, and the upper ones -- of felsic, crystal poor phase granites. Between these two not entirely crystallized parts sheet-like gabbro or gabbro-diorites bodies are intruded. Boshulya pluton represents the middle levels of the complex. Samples are collected from outcrops with sharp contact between gabbro and granodiorite and from mingled/mixed layers. The granodiorite contains concordant zircons, three of them determining a mean 206Pb/238U age of 84.6 ± 0.3 Ma. Abraded grains point to contamination of the Cretaceous magma with crustal material of different age -- Early Paleozoic (?) and older one. Calculated initial (87Sr/86Sr)T-90Ma ratio is 0.70577. Three types of accessory zircons are distinguished in the gabbro. Brown zircons are prevailing in the sample. They show negligible lead inheritance and lead loses and only for the concordant two grains a mean 206Pb/238U age of 82.16 ± 0.10 Ma is calculated. Milky zircons are about 25% in the sample and for 3 concordant grains a mean 206Pb/238U value of 85.0 ± 0.5 Ma is determined. Colorless sparkle zircons from the small size fractions give an upper intercept age of 442.7 ± 8.3 Ma. The e-HfT-440Ma of 0.85 to 1.20 suggest the hosting gneisses of the metamorphic fundament or the lower crust as possible source

  19. Perspectives on basaltic magma crystallization and differentiation: Lava-lake blocks erupted at Mauna Loa volcano summit, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarter, R.L.; Fodor, R.V.; Trusdell, F.

    2006-01-01

    Explosive eruptions at Mauna Loa summit ejected coarse-grained blocks (free of lava coatings) from Moku'aweoweo caldera. Most are gabbronorites and gabbros that have 0-26??vol.% olivine and 1-29??vol.% oikocrystic orthopyroxene. Some blocks are ferrogabbros and diorites with micrographic matrices, and diorite veins (??? 2??cm) cross-cut some gabbronorites and gabbros. One block is an open-textured dunite. The MgO of the gabbronorites and gabbros ranges ??? 7-21??wt.%. Those with MgO > 10??wt.% have some incompatible-element abundances (Zr, Y, REE; positive Eu anomalies) lower than those in Mauna Loa lavas of comparable MgO; gabbros (MgO < 10??wt.%) generally overlap lava compositions. Olivines range Fo83-58, clinopyroxenes have Mg#s ??? 83-62, and orthopyroxene Mg#s are 84-63 - all evolved beyond the mineral-Mg#s of Mauna Loa lavas. Plagioclase is An75-50. Ferrogabbro and diorite blocks have ??? 3-5??wt.% MgO (TiO2 3.2-5.4%; K2O 0.8-1.3%; La 16-27??ppm), and a diorite vein is the most evolved (SiO2 59%, K2O 1.5%, La 38??ppm). They have clinopyroxene Mg#s 67-46, and plagioclase An57-40. The open-textured dunite has olivine ?????Fo83.5. Seven isotope ratios are 87Sr/86Sr 0.70394-0.70374 and 143Nd/144Nd 0.51293-0.51286, and identify the suite as belonging to the Mauna Loa system. Gabbronorites and gabbros originated in solidification zones of Moku'aweoweo lava lakes where they acquired orthocumulate textures and incompatible-element depletions. These features suggest deeper and slower cooling lakes than the lava lake paradigm, Kilauea Iki, which is basalt and picrite. Clinopyroxene geobarometry suggests crystallization at < 1??kbar P. Highly evolved mineral Mg#s, < 75, are largely explained by cumulus phases exposed to evolving intercumulus liquids causing compositional 'shifts.' Ferrogabbro and diorite represent segregation veins from differentiated intercumulus liquids filter pressed into rigid zones of cooling lakes. Clinopyroxene geobarometry suggests < 300??bar P

  20. Immiscible Fe- and Si-rich silicate melts in plagioclase from the Baima mafic intrusion (SW China): Implications for the origin of bi-modal igneous suites in large igneous provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Ren, Zhongyuan; Wang, Christina Yan; Wang, Kun

    2016-09-01

    The Emeishan large igneous province (ELIP) in SW China is characterized by voluminous high-Ti and low-Ti basalts and spatially associated Fe-Ti oxide-bearing mafic-ultramafic and syenitic/granitic intrusions. The Baima layered mafic intrusion in the central part of the ELIP is surrounded by syenitic and granitic rocks and contains a Lower Zone of interlayered Fe-Ti oxide ores, troctolites and clinopyroxenites and an Upper Zone of isotropic olivine gabbros and gabbros (UZa) and apatite gabbros and Fe-Ti-P oxide ores (UZb). Polycrystalline mineral inclusions, for the first time, were observed in primocryst plagioclase from the basal part of the UZa through to the top of the UZb and consist mostly of clinopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite and apatite with minor orthopyroxene, sulfide and hornblende. These minerals are commonly anhedral and form irregular shapes. Daughter plagioclase usually crystallizes on the walls of host primocryst plagioclase and has An contents typically 3-6 An% lower than the host plagioclase. Daughter clinopyroxene has similar Mg# but lower TiO2 and Al2O3 contents than primocryst clinopyroxene. These polycrystalline mineral inclusions are considered to crystallize from melts contemporaneous with host plagioclase. The compositional differences between daughter and primocryst minerals can be attributed to equilibrium crystallization in a closed system of the trapped melt inclusions in contrast to fractional crystallization and possible magma replenishment in an open system typical for primo-cumulates of large layered intrusions. Heated and homogenized melt inclusions have variable SiO2 (33-52 wt%), CaO (7-20 wt%), TiO2 (0.1-12 wt%), FeOt (5-20 wt%), P2O5 (0.2-10 wt%) and K2O (0-2.2 wt%). The large ranges of melt compositions are interpreted to result from heterogeneous trapping of different proportions of immiscible Si-rich and Fe-Ti-rich silicate liquids, together with entrapment of various microphenocrysts. The separation of micrometer

  1. Samail Ophiolite plutonic suite: Field relations, phase variation, cryptic variation and layering, and a model of a spreading ridge magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; Hopson, C. A.

    1981-04-01

    Geologic mapping of an intact plutonic sequence within the Samail ophiolite in the Ibra area, southeastern Oman Mountains, reveals stratigraphic, structural, and petrologic details of oceanic layer 3. Four measured stratigraphic sections, each spaced about 5 km apart across the southern flank of Jabal Dimh, define a time-transgressive progression within the ophiolite and reveal geometric and petrologic features of a spreading-ridge magma chamber. The sections show the following vertical sequence: (1) dunite (chr-ol cumulates ± harzburgite xenoliths) 0-200 m thick, grading up from a transition zone with harzburgite tectonite, (2) interlayered wehrlite-melagabbro-gabbro (cpx-ol and ol-cpx-pl cumulates) 0-100 m thick, (3) layered gabbro (chiefly ol-cpx-pl cumulates but including recurrent intervals of cumulus wehrlite and melagabbro) 2.6-5.5 km thick, (4) planar laminated nonlayered gabbro (chiefly ol-cpx-pl cumulates) 100-400 m thick, (5) hypidiomorphic (ol)-hb-cpx gabbro (high-level gabbro) 200-800 m thick, (6) small, discontinous diorite to plagiogranite bodies at or near the top of the gabbro. Cumulus textures (adcumulus > mesocumulus), planar lamination, and cumulus layering (phase, ratio, and grain size layers at mm to 10-m scale, commonly graded) within this sequence show that crystals accumulated from the base of the magma chamber upward to within a few hundred meters of the top; downward solidification from the roof was minor. Cyclicity within the cumulus sequence is represented by the recurrence of olivine-rich intervals (melagabbo and wehrlite) up to high stratigraphic levels and by hundreds of phase-graded layers (ol-rich at the bases to pl-rich at the tops), individually up to 5 m thick. Limited cryptic variation relative to closed-system layered intrusions and the limited range in solid-solution components of olivine (Fo69-90), plagioclase (An62-95) and clinopyroxene (En40-54, Fs4-16, Wo37-49) from the cumulus suite require replenishment of the magma

  2. Plagiogranites from Markov Deep, Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR): physical conditions and alternative modes of origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranovich, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    Very fresh samples of plagiogranites (PG) hosted by gabbro and peridotite, were collected from the slopes of slow spreading MAR within the Markov Deep area. The PG form pockets, lenses and veins ranging in size from a few mm to first few cm, and are structurally very similar to the migmatites found in ophiolite complexes. The PG veinlets in peridotite contain no quartz (Qtz) and are separated from the host by clearly seen reaction zones. Their bulk composition (56-58 wt.% SiO2) plots at the extreme SiO2-poor end of the PG compositional range from literature, what could be related to the consumption of SiO2 due to reaction with the host. The PG hosted by gabbro are characterized by the presence of Qtz, and, correspondingly, much higher bulk SiO2 (70-76 wt.%). Some PG-containing gabbro samples show textures indicative of the incipient felsic melt formation via partial melting of the host. In both gabbroic and peridotite samples certain textural and mineral composition changes point to interaction with the PG melt. Pressure (P)-temperature (T) estimates for the melt-forming conditions based on the microprobe analyses of coexisting minerals and multi-mineral thermobarometry approach (TWQ; Berman, 1990) along with the Berman and Aranovich (1996) thermodynamic data set correspond to 2-2.5 kbar and 800-830оС. The consistent (in the sense of TWQ) results could be obtained only taking into account a decreased silica activity in the rocks, which was estimated (relative to the beta-Qtz standard state) at a(SiO2)=0.7 for gabbro and at a(SiO2)=0.5 for peridotite. Under these P-T, generation of felsic melt is only possible in the presence of a water-rich fluid phase. Water activity values (aН2О) were evaluated with two independent methods: (1) TWQ calculations (at a constant P=2.2 kbar and a(SiO2)=0.5) employing compositions of orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and pargasitic amphibole coexisting in the reaction zones between the PG veinlets and peridotite; (2) model granite melt

  3. Igneous to metamorphic evolution of mafic rocks from a fossile ocean-continent transition (External Liguride ophiolites, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, A.; Tribuzio, R.

    2003-04-01

    Remnants of the ocean-continent transition between the Jurassic Ligurian Tethys and the Adria margin are preserved in the External Liguride units (EL) of the Northern Apennine. The EL ophiolites crop out as gravity slide blocks within Late Cretaceous sedimentary mèlanges and sometimes preserve evidence of primary relations with continental crust rocks. These ophiolites mainly consist of subcontinental mantle ultramafics and basaltic rocks. The latter crop out as (i) massive and pillow lavas, locally erupted over slices of Variscan granitoids and covered by radiolarian cherts, (ii) dykes crosscutting mantle peridotites. The basaltic rocks display nearly flat REE pattern and initial eNd of +7.7 to +10.2. These geochemical features can be related to low degree of melting of a depleted asthenospheric mantle in the spinel stability field. The ophiolitic gabbros are rare and occur as small bodies intruding mantle lherzolites or as decametric to hectometric slide-blocks. The latter are crosscut by discordant microgabbro bodies and doleritic dykes. The gabbroic sequence mostly consists of troctolites, olivine-bearing gabbros and Fe-Ti oxide-bearing diorites. Trace element and Nd isotope compositions are consistent with crystallization from N-MORB liquids. Metamorphic evolution started with syn-kinematic crystallization of neoblastic clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± titanian pargasite ± ilmenite ± spinel along granulite-facies ductile shear zones (˜850^oC), followed by widespread development of subgreenschist metamorphic assemblages under static conditions. One of the gabbroic bodies is covered by radiolarian cherts, thus testifying exhumation to ocean-floor, and show an intermediate metamorphic stage under amphibolite-facies conditions (T ˜650^oC). This stage is mainly testified by syn-kinematic growth of plagioclase and Mg-hornblende (± ilmenite) in ductile shear zones, and was accompanied by infiltration of aqueous fluids, probably seawater-derived. The onset of

  4. High-resolution geological mapping and sampling using wireline rock drills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. J.; Allerton, S.; Dick, H. J. B.; Escartin, J.

    2003-04-01

    High-resolution sampling is key to most fine-scale geological investigations of the ocean floor. However, devices that can take large numbers of precisely-located, geographically oriented samples from hard substrates have not previously been available. Portable rock drills, mounted vertically on a tripod frame and operated by wireline from a conventional ship, are a way of obtaining such material in a cost-effective manner. They allow efficient assessment of x-y (horizontal) variability and thereby complement much deeper ODP-type drilling operations, which primarily assess z-axis (vertical) variations. Few wireline drills have been built and/or operated successfully to date, a notable exception being the 5m drill built and run by the British Geological Survey, which has been used - mostly for industrial applications - for many years. This drill takes cores up to 5m long in water depths of less than 2000m. A second drill, funded through the BRIDGE programme, has been built by BGS specifically for scientific use. This device takes geographically oriented cores up to 1m long in full ocean depths, and has a video link to aid site selection. It is of light weight, and is operated on a conventional conducting cable. On-bottom time is similar to that of a rock dredge. The rock drills have recently been used with great success on two cruises on RRS James Clark Ross: cruise JR31, to Atlantis Bank, on the SW Indian Ridge; and cruise JR63 to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the Fifteen-Twenty fracture zone. On both cruises seafloor exposures of lower crustal gabbros and mantle peridotites were targetted, with the aim of understanding the primary lithological variability of slow-spread ocean lithosphere and the mechanisms of their exhumation. Altogether 115 successful sites were drilled in a little over three weeks of shiptime, on slopes of up to 44 degrees and water depths of 4500m. Scientific highlights include the demonstration that peridotites and gabbros in both regions were

  5. Decoupling of whole-rock Nd-Hf and zircon Hf-O isotopic compositions of a 284 Ma mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the Beishan Terrane, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ben-Xun; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Lu, Ying-Huai; Sun, He; Sakyi, Patrick Asamoah

    2015-10-01

    Abundant Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Beishan Terrane, NW China, are parts of the Tarim large igneous province. Among these intrusions, Luodong intrusion is composed of dunite, wehrlite and gabbro. These rocks have whole-rock Sr-Nd-Hf and zircon Hf-O isotope compositions that display significant decoupling. The decoupling of these generally well-correlated systems demonstrates contrasting evolving trends. Systematic compositional and mineralogical controls on decoupling have been investigated. Wehrlites and gabbros show MORB-like trace element patterns with negligible crustal contamination. They have high initial 143Nd/144Nd [ɛNd(t) = +6.6 to +11.2] and 176Hf/177Hf [ɛHf(t) = +12.2 to +16.9] and low initial 87Sr/86Sr [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.702949-0.704098] ratios and plot within the MORB field, indicating that their parental magmas were derived from a depleted mantle source. The enrichment features are present in the zircon crystals separated from the gabbro. These homogeneously unzoned zircon crystals have high U concentrations, low Th/U ratios and a U-Pb age of 284.0 ± 2.3 Ma. They are therefore interpreted as having formed rapidly in a highly fractionated/evolved magma. Their ɛHf(t) and δ18O values range from -9.3 to -6.7 and +10.25 ‰ to +11.42 ‰, respectively. The decoupling is linked with crustal contamination by ancient crust (probably Proterozoic schist in the Beishan Terrane) that occurred during zircon crystallization. However, the contamination signature in the whole-rock composition was soon overprinted by magma mixing process. The inference is evidenced by zoning textures preserved in plagioclase, clinopyroxene, spinel and particularly olivine, and the presence of coeval diabase dykes cutting through the intrusion. The isotope decoupling observed in this mantle-plume-related mafic-ultramafic intrusion supports the idea that Nd-Hf decoupling and Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd parent/daughter variations exist only on a small hand-size scale in a

  6. Geochronology of the Birim Supergroup of the West African craton in the Wa-Bolé region of west-central Ghana: Implications for the stratigraphic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kock, G. S.; Armstrong, R. A.; Siegfried, H. P.; Thomas, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Birim rocks of the West African craton comprise belts of greenschist- to amphibolite-grade gneiss and schist, and subparallel basins of greenschist-grade phyllite of volcaniclastic and epiclastic origin, which were intruded by igneous rocks. The granitoids intruded between 2213 and 2060 Ma and overlap with the volcaniclastic units dated between 2211 and 2064 Ma. The simultaneous occurrence of the magmatic events and irregular distribution of the rock ages hamper the formulation of a stratigraphic succession. SHRIMP spot analyses were done on older cores, crystals and rims from 23 rocks from the Bolé-Wa region in west-central Ghana. The crystallization ages range from 2195 to 2118 Ma, the inherited ages from 2876 to 2130 Ma, and metamorphic ages from 2114 to 2090 Ma. Aided by metamorphic, structural and chemical studies an older geotectonic cycle (2195-2150 Ma), containing the Dole and Guropie Suite and Bolé Group, was established. These units were subjected to several orthogonal and shear deformation events. These events were followed by the contemporaneous Sawla calc-alkaline monzonitic plutonism (2132-2126 Ma) and deposition of the epiclastic Maluwe Group (2137-2125 Ma) of calc-alkaline felsic to tholeiitic volcanic origin. Deformation of the basin beds was succeeded by the intrusion of the Tanina Suite granitoids of 2122-2120 Ma, which, themselves, were deformed prior to 2119 Ma. At 2118 Ma syenite and gabbro intruded along conjugate extension fractures. The gabbro and syenite of the Wakawaka Suite were only affected by three events of brittle strike-slip faulting. The first had significant displacement along NNE- to NE-directed shear zones, while the latter only formed conjugate joint systems with limited transport. Palaeo- to Neoarchaean cores, the oldest yet reported in the Baoulé Mossi domain, are restricted to the gneissic Dole Suite biotite granites. The presence of Dole-, Guropie-, Sawla-, and Tanina-aged older cores and grains in younger rocks

  7. Untangling Magmatic Processes and Hydrothermal Alteration of in situ Superfast Spreading Ocean Crust at ODP/IODP Site 1256 with Fuzzy c-means Cluster Analysis of Rock Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekkers, M. J.; Heslop, D.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Acton, G.; Krasa, D.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean Drilling Program (ODP)/Integrated ODP (IODP) Hole 1256D (6.44.1' N, 91.56.1' W) on the Cocos Plate occurs in 15.2 Ma oceanic crust generated by superfast seafloor spreading. Presently, it is the only drill hole that has sampled all three oceanic crust layers in a tectonically undisturbed setting. Here we interpret down-hole trends in several rock-magnetic parameters with fuzzy c-means cluster analysis, a multivariate statistical technique. The parameters include the magnetization ratio, the coercivity ratio, the coercive force, the low-field susceptibility, and the Curie temperature. By their combined, multivariate, analysis the effects of magmatic and hydrothermal processes can be evaluated. The optimal number of clusters - a key point in the analysis because there is no a priori information on this - was determined through a combination of approaches: by calculation of several cluster validity indices, by testing for coherent cluster distributions on non-linear-map plots, and importantly by testing for stability of the cluster solution from all possible starting points. Here, we consider a solution robust if the cluster allocation is independent of the starting configuration. The five-cluster solution appeared to be robust. Three clusters are distinguished in the extrusive segment of the Hole that express increasing hydrothermal alteration of the lavas. The sheeted dike and gabbro portions are characterized by two clusters, both with higher coercivities than in lava samples. Extensive alteration, however, can obliterate magnetic property differences between lavas, dikes, and gabbros. The imprint of thermochemical alteration on the iron-titanium oxides is only partially related to the porosity of the rocks. All clusters display rock magnetic characteristics in line with a stable NRM. This implies that the entire sampled sequence of ocean crust can contribute to marine magnetic anomalies. Determination of the absolute paleointensity with thermal techniques is

  8. Magmatic geochemistry and relict textures in blueschist-eclogite facies rocks on the island of Syros, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, J. C.; Brady, J. B.; Prinkey, D. R.; Walton, A. J.; Able, L. M.; Sinitsin, A. G.; Cheney, J. T.

    2004-05-01

    The island of Syros is part of the Attic-Cycladic blueschist belt and high-P mineral assemblages indicating peak metamorphic conditions of at least 15-16 kbar and 500 C are common. Two main marble units, which locally contain Mississippian fossils, are partly dolomitic, contain abundant calcite pseudomorphs after aragonite (Dixon, 1969), and are intercalated with the glaucophane (Glau)-schists, retrograde greenschists, and minor quartzites and Mn-cherts. Discrete, fault-bounded packages of blueschist/eclogite-facies mafic rocks with minor serpentinite are also present. The mineral compositions and assemblages in marbles and associated rocks tightly constrain the metamorphic P, T and the fluid compositions and suggest X(H2O) in the range 0.97-0.99. In general, the mafic rocks have a variety of textures and modes, but most are either fine-grained, blueschists with a well-developed fabric (S approx.=L) or coarse-grained (>1 cm), massive omphacite- or Glau-rich rocks. Based on textures, mineralogy and field relations, previous workers (Dixon and Ridley, 1987) have interpreted the mafic rocks as meta-basalt and metagabbros. Evidence of pillow structures, as well as metamorphosed alteration zones which are interpreted as evidence of ocean-floor metamorphism (?) have survived locally. We obtained whole-rock XRF and INAA analyses for fine- and coarse-grained mafic and felsic rocks and some mica-rich samples. Low chemical index of alteration (CIA) for most samples suggest very minor weathering. On a TAS diagram, mafic rocks span the basalt - basaltic andesite - trachy-basalt - basaltic trachy-andesite fields. REE patterns generally fall between 10-100 times chondrite and show flat to moderately LREE-enriched patterns. Coarse-grained rocks have positive Eu anomalies, consistent with their interpretation by other investigators as fractionally crystallized gabbros. Felsic rocks (now epidote-mica-schists) that are associated with the metamorphosed gabbros have negative Eu

  9. Timing of mafic magmatism in the Tapajós Province (Brazil) and implications for the evolution of the Amazon Craton: evidence from baddeleyite and zircon U Pb SHRIMP geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, João Orestes Schneider; Hartmann, Léo Afraneo; McNaughton, Neal Jesse; Fletcher, Ian Robert

    2002-09-01

    The precise timing and possible sources of the mafic rocks in the Amazon craton are critical for reconstruction of the Atlantica supercontinent and correlation of mafic magmatism worldwide. New SHRIMP U-Pb baddeleyite and zircon ages and the reinterpretation of 207 existing dates indicate one orogenic (Ingarana) and four postorogenic (Crepori, Cachoeira Seca, Piranhas, and Periquito) basaltic events in the Tapajós Province, south central Amazon craton. Orogenic gabbro dikes that host gold mineralization are 1893 Ma and interpreted as associated with the Ingarana gabbro intrusions of the bimodal calk-alkalic Parauari intrusive suite. The age of 1893 Ma can be used as a guide to discriminate older and mineralized orogenic dikes from younger and nonmineralized Crepori- and Cachoeira Seca-related mafic dikes. The baddeleyite U-Pb age of the postorogenic Crepori dolerite (gabbro-dolerite sills and dikes) is 1780±9 Ma, ˜150 my older than the ages provided by K-Ar. This value correlates well with the Avanavero tholeiitic intrusions in the Roraima group, in the northern part of the craton in Guyana, Venezuela, and Roraima in Brazil. Early Statherian tholeiitic magmatism was widespread not only in the Amazon craton, but also in the La Plata craton of southern South America, where it is known as the giant Piedra Alta swarm of Uruguay and the post-Trans-Amazonian dikes of Tandil in Argentina. The Cachoeira Seca troctolite represents laccoliths, Feixes, and São Domingos, whose baddeleyite U-Pb age is 1186±12 Ma, 120-150 my older than the known K-Ar ages. This age is comparable to other Stenian gabbroic rocks with alkalic affinity in the craton, such as the Seringa Formation in NE Amazonas and the basaltic flows of the Nova Floresta formation in Rondônia. Dolerite from the giant Piranhas dike swarm in the western Tapajós Province has a Middle Cambrian age (507±4 Ma, baddeleyite) and inherited zircons in the 2238-1229 Ma range. The Piranhas dikes fill extensional NNE and

  10. The Influence of High Seawater Fluxes on Sulfur Compositions of the Serpentinized Peridotites at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, A.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Kelley, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of the actively venting carbonate chimneys at the Lost City hydrothermal vent field (LCHF) on the Atlantis Massif (MAR 30°N) has stimulated great interest in the role of serpentinization in driving hydrothermal circulation in peridotite-hosted systems and in the biological communities that may be supported in these systems. The southern wall of the massif exposes serpentinized peridotites with interspersed gabbroic rocks that have undergone several phases of serpentinization, talc-metasomatism and carbonate veining related to the uplift history and to the formation of the LCHF. We present petrological and isotope data from the serpentinized peridotites and gabbros that provide constraints on the history of seawater-rock interaction, changes in oxygen and sulfur fugacities during serpentinization, and the role of serpentinization as a sink for seawater sulfur. Sr- and Nd-isotope analyses of the basement rocks of the Atlantis Massif show large, systematic changes towards seawater compositions and indicate high seawater fluxes during successive phases of serpentinization. The consequence of these high fluid-rock ratios is a change in the sulfur mineralogy and chemistry of the rocks. Most of the analyzed basement rocks show lower sulfide-sulfur and higher sulfate-sulfur contents compared to fertile mantle. Sulfate in the serpentinites is present as barite and various hydroxysulfates. The distinct absence of anhydrite provides important constraints on upper temperature limits of late-stage serpentinization and hydrothermal activity at the LCHF. The sulfates are dominated by seawater sulfur isotope signatures, which indicate that serpentinization is an important sink of seawater sulfur at the Atlantis Massif. A few samples with lower sulfur isotope compositions suggest an additional local contribution of sulfate produced by sulfide oxidation. Sulfide assemblages are dominated by pyrite, pentlandite, pyrrhotite in the serpentinites and by pyrite, pyrrhotite

  11. New data for paleoprotherozoic PGE-bearing anorthosite of Kandalaksha massif (Baltic shield): U-Pb and Sm-Nd ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steshenko, Ekaterina; Bayanova, Tamara; Serov, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this researches were to study the isotope U-Pb age of zircon and rutile and Sm-Nd (rock forming and sulphide minerals) on Kandalaksha anorthosite massif due to study of polimetamorphic history. In marginal zone firstly have been obtained the presence of sulphide mineralization with PGE (Chashchin, Petrov , 2013). Kandalaksha massif is located in the N-E part of Baltic shield and consists of three parts. Marginal zone (mesocratic metanorite) lies at the base of the massif. Main zone is composed of leucocratic metagabbro. The upper zone is alteration of mataanorthosite and leucocratic metagabbro. All rocks were subjected to granulate polymetamorphism. Two fractions of single grains from anorthosite of the massif gave precise U-Pb age, which is equal to 2450± 3 Ma. Leucocratic gabbro-norite were dated by U-Pb method, with age up to 2230 ± 10 Ma. This age reflects the time of granulite metamorphism according to data of (Mitrofanov, Nirovich, 2003). Two fractions of rutile have been analyzed by U-Pb method and reflect age of 1700 ± 10 Ma. It is known that the closure temperature of U-Pb system rutile is 400-450 ° C (Mezger et.al., 1989), thus cooling processes of massif rocks to these temperatures was about 1.7 Ga. These data reflect one of the stages of metamorphic alteration of the massif. Three stages of metamorphism are distinguished by Sm-Nd method. Isotope Sm-Nd dating on Cpx-WR line gives the age of 2311 Ma which suggested of high pressure granulite metamorphism. Moreover Cpx-Pl line reflect the age 1908 Ma of low pressure granulite metamorphism. Also two-points (Grt-Rt) Sm-Nd isochrone yield the age 1687 Ma of the last metamorphic alterations in Kandalaksha anorthosite massif. Model Sm-Nd age of the leucocratic gabbro-norite is 2796 Ma with positive ɛNd (+0.32). It means that the source of gabbro-norite was mantle reservoir. All investigations are devoted to memory of academician PAS F. MItrofanov which was a leader of scientific school for

  12. Reconnaissance geology of the Jabal Dalfa Quadrangle, sheet 21/43 C, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    The Jabal Dalfa quadrangle (sheet 21/43 C) is part of the Najd province in west-central Saudi Arabia. The quadrangle is mostly a plain, tilted gently northeastward, but local inselbergs and two areas of dissected uplands rise as much as 200 m above the plain. Wadi Bishah and Wadi Ranyah terminate in the quadrangle. The quadrangle is underlain by Precambrian metavolcanic, metasedimentary, and plutonic rocks. The gneiss outcrops in the northeast and east-central parts of the quadrangle are apparently the oldest rocks. After they were emplaced, a wide variety of metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks were deposited at Jabal Dalfa and Umm Shat, and in the northeast part of the quadrangle as the Arfan formation. Subsequently, granite gneiss was emplaced in the west part of the quadrangle and intruded by gabbro. Metabasalt and meta-andesite were extruded in a wide north-trending belt through the middle of the quadrangle and at Jabal Silli. Intrusion of small bodies of granitic rocks and Najd faulting conclude the Precambrian history of the area. Surficial deposits include sand and gravel covering the plains, alluvial fans, and voluminous dune sands. In the southeast part of the quadrangle, the layered rocks strike north and dip steeply. They are oriented parallel to the Nabitah fault zone. In the northeast and east-central parts of the quadrangle, layered rocks and gneiss are sheared into slices by the southernmost faults of the major Najd fault zone. Bedding and foliation in these slices strike northwest, parallel to the faults. Gneiss in the west part of the quadrangle also strikes northwest, and dips steeply to vertically; layered rocks underlying Jabal Silli strike northeast. Layered metamorphic rocks in the Jabal Dalfa quadrangle are mostly in the greenschist facies. Projection of data from other quadrangles suggests that the oldest gneiss is about 780 Ma old and the Arfan formation, Umm Shat, and Jabal Dalfa layered rocks are about 775 to 745 Ma old. The gneiss of

  13. Effects of chemical alteration on fracture mechanical properties in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, O. A.; Eichhubl, P.; Olson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fault and fracture networks often control the distribution of fluids and heat in hydrothermal and epithermal systems, and in related geothermal and mineral resources. Additional chemical influences on conduit evolution are well documented, with dissolution and precipitation of mineral species potentially changing the permeability of fault-facture networks. Less well understood are the impacts of chemical alteration on the mechanical properties governing fracture growth and fracture network geometry. We use double-torsion (DT) load relaxation tests under ambient air conditions to measure the mode-I fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical fracture growth index (SCI) of variably altered rock samples obtained from outcrop in Dixie Valley, NV. Samples from southern Dixie Valley include 1) weakly altered granite, characterized by minor sericite in plagioclase, albitization and vacuolization of feldspars, and incomplete replacement of biotite with chlorite, and 2) granite from an area of locally intense propylitic alteration with chlorite-calcite-hematite-epidote assemblages. We also evaluated samples of completely silicified gabbro obtained from the Dixie Comstock epithermal gold deposit. In the weakly altered granite KIC and SCI are 1.3 ±0.2 MPam1/2 (n=8) and 59 ±25 (n=29), respectively. In the propylitic assemblage KIC is reduced to 0.6 ±0.1 MPam1/2 (n=11), and the SCI increased to 75 ±36 (n = 33). In both cases, the altered materials have lower fracture toughness and higher SCI than is reported for common geomechanical standards such as Westerly Granite (KIC ~1.7 MPam1/2; SCI ~48). Preliminary analysis of the silicified gabbro shows a significant increase in fracture toughness, 3.6 ±0.4 MPam1/2 (n=2), and SCI, 102 ±45 (n=19), compared to published values for gabbro (2.9 MPam1/2 and SCI = 32). These results suggest that mineralogical and textural changes associated with different alteration assemblages may result in spatially variable rates of fracture

  14. Experiments on phase equilibria in hydrous tholeiitic systems: implications for the genesis of oceanic plagiogranites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, J.; Berndt, J.; Feig, S. T.

    2003-04-01

    For the genesis of oceanic plagiogranites at mid-ocean spreading systems, two models are under discussion: (1) Late-stage differentiation of a MORB-type melt and (2) partial melting of pre-existing gabbros within high-temperature shear zones. In this study, we have applied recent experimental data of the experimental lab in Hannover to the plagiogranite petrogenesis in order to test both models. The role of water during the genesis of these rocks (presence of amphibole as mafic phase in natural plagiogranites) was assessed by including water to the systems. Crystallization experiments were performed in a MORB system doped with different water contents at different redox conditions at 200 MPa (Berndt, 2002), and hydrous partial melting experiments were performed at 200 MPa on typical oceanic gabbros (Feig et al., this volume). For the experiments we have used an internally heated pressure vessel for high temperatures (up to 1250°C) equipped with a rapid-quench system and a hydrogen membrane for controlling the oxygen fugacity. Liquid lines of descent obtained via crystallization experiments are mainly controlled by oxygen fugacity and only to a little extent by water activity. SiO2-rich residual melts can be obtained under both oxidizing and reducing redox condition at low temperatures, but at least one fractionation step is required to reach high-silicic plagiogranites (SiO2 > 70 wt%). The partial melting of typical oceanic gabbro leads at low temperatures also to plagiogranitic melts. At 940°C, the normalized SiO2 contents of the experimental melts of the three investigated systems range between 60 and 61 wt%, and at 900°C from 63 and 68 wt%. These melts coexist with orthopyroxene, amphibole, plagioclase and in one sample also with olivine. The experimental melt compositions are compared with those of natural plagiogranites of different tectonic settings and show in general a broad compositional overlap with those. Our experiments imply, in concordance with the

  15. Hydrous Partial Melting Within the Deep Oceanic Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, J.; Feig, S. T.; Snow, J.

    2003-12-01

    Our knowledge on the structure, composition, and mineralogy of the in-situ lower oceanic crust (layer 3) and the mechanism how it is formed is poor. Petrological models for its generation, seismic and thermal models require an effective cooling of the deep oceanic crust. The current model implies a conductive mechanism for the cooling, and hydrothermal circulation is regarded to play a small role in transport of heat and masses in the deep oceanic crust (Wilcock, 2003). Here we demonstrate that hydrothermal circulation within the gabbroic layer starts at much higher temperatures (900° - 1000° C) as up to now believed. Water-rich fluids causes hydrous partial melting in a large scale, which is manifested by characteristic microtextures visible within many investigated rocks of all reference locations for oceanic gabbros (sampled by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP Legs 147, 153, 176) and from the Oman ophiolite). The observed process has the potential for significant transfer of heat and masses between the upper and lower oceanic crust. The interpretation of the observed microstructures as products of hydrous partial melting is based on experimental work. Water-saturated melting experiments on a variety of natural gabbros between 900 and 1000° C at 200 MPa produced silicic melts similar in composition to oceanic plagiogranites (Koepke et al., 2003 in press). The newly formed minerals form a characteristic paragenesis consisting of plagioclase, orthopyroxene and pargasitic amphibole. In all experiments the An content of the new plagioclases is higher compared to that of the protolith, even at the lowest investigated temperature. It can be observed that olivine and clinopyroxene of the protolith react to orthopyroxene and pargasite. Very similar features can be observed in the natural gabbros. The most striking feature are zones within the plagioclase grains showing a strong enrichment in An component, often with An contents which are 20 to 25 mol% higher than those

  16. Variable sediment flux in generation of Permian subduction-related mafic intrusions from the Yanbian region, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Hongxia; Fan, Weiming; Li, Jingyan; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Miwei

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents petrology, mineralogy, zircon U-Pb ages, and whole-rock major, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of four Permian (273-253 Ma) subduction-related mafic intrusions (including the Qinggoushan and Qianshan gabbros, and the Wangqing and Shuguang diorites) from the Yanbian region, NE China, with aims to understand the role of subducted sediment flux in generation of arc mafic cumulates. These intrusions have mineral assemblages crystallized in water-saturated parental magmas and show variable degrees of crystal accumulation as observed in mafic cumulates in subduction zones. Mass-balance consideration indicates that their parental magmas were calc-alkaline with arc-type trace element features (enrichments in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) and depletions in Nb-Ta). They also have Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions, i.e., 87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7029-0.7047, εNd(t) = + 0.9 ~ + 6.8, εHf(t) = + 5.6 ~ + 14.6, similar to modern arc basalts. The parental magmas were likely derived from a mantle wedge variably metasomatized by sediment melt and fluid from the subducting paleo-Asian Oceanic slab. Combined trace elemental and isotopic modeling results suggest that the parental magma of Qinggoushan gabbro was formed through 5-20% melting of the mantle wedge with 1% and 1.5% additions of sediment fluid and sediment melt, respectively; 5-10% melting of the mantle wedge through inputs of 1% sediment fluid and 2% sediment melt produced the Qianshan gabbro; 10-20% melting of the mantle wedge with additions of 1% sediment fluid and 3% sediment melt formed the Wangqing diorite; whereas 5-20% melting of the mantle wedge through an input of 1.5% sediment melt produced the Shuguang diorite. The Hf-Nd isotopic array of the Yanbian Permian mafic intrusions reflected the existence of an Indian Ocean-type mantle, which was isotopically distinct from the Pacific-type mantle during early Paleozoic in the Central Asian Orogenic

  17. Mafic and ultramafic rocks of the northwestern Brooks Range of Alaska produce nearly symmetric gravity anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, R.L. )

    1993-04-01

    An arc of mafic and ultramafic rocks is mapped from Asik Mountain to Siniktanneyak Mountain in the northwestern Brooks Range of Alaska. Gravity data, although not very detailed, have been collected over the region and show some very conspicuous circular or oval gravity highs over portions of the mapped mafic-ultramafic bodies. Bodies which have large associated gravity anomalies are Asik Mountain (80 mGal), Avon Hills (20 mGal), Misheguk Mountain (30 mGal), and Siniktanneyak Mountain (20 mGal). Gabbros of the Siniktanneyak Mountain complex, where the gravity coverage is best, have densities of about 3.0 g/cm[sup 3] while the densities of the surrounding sedimentary rocks are about 2.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Volcanic rocks in the area have average densities of about 2.7 g/cm[sup 3]. Three-dimensional modeling indicates that the largest anomaly, on the southwestern part of the complex, could be caused by a polygonal prism of gabbro with vertical sides, about 6 km across and about 4.5 km deep. A smaller lobe of the anomaly on the northeast of the complex could be caused by another oblong polygonal prism about 4 km long and 2 km wide trending northeast and about 1.5 km deep. Modeling this anomaly with densities lower than gabbro would require greater thicknesses to produce the same anomaly. Modeling each anomaly along this arc in 2 1/2-dimensions shows many possible solutions using different body shapes and different density contrasts. There are several other gravity anomalies in this vicinity which could represent unexposed high density rocks. One such anomaly is in the Maiyumerak Mountains northeast of Asik Mountain (30 mGal). Another anomaly is to the northwest of Asik Mountain (20 mGal). There is also an anomaly at Uchugrak (20 mGal) east of Avan Hills. Although many of the anomalies in this region are poorly controlled, an attempt has been made to interpret the data to show possible solutions.

  18. Airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly signatures of serpentinite in relation to soil geochemistry, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, A.E.; Van Gosen, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    Serpentinized ultramafic rocks and associated soils in northern California are characterized by high concentrations of Cr and Ni, low levels of radioelements (K, Th, and U) and high amounts of ferrimagnetic minerals (primarily magnetite). Geophysical attributes over ultramafic rocks, which include airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly data, are quantified and provide indirect measurements on the relative abundance of radioelements and magnetic minerals, respectively. Attributes are defined through a statistical modeling approach and the results are portrayed as probabilities in chart and map form. Two predictive models are presented, including one derived from the aeromagnetic anomaly data and one from a combination of the airborne K, Th and U gamma-ray data. Both models distinguish preferential values within the aerogeophysical data that coincide with mapped and potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks. The magnetic predictive model shows positive probabilities associated with magnetic anomaly highs and, to a lesser degree, anomaly lows, which accurately locate many known ultramafic outcrops, but more interestingly, locate potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks, possible extensions of ultramafic bodies that dip into the shallow subsurface, as well as prospective buried ultramafic rocks. The airborne radiometric model shows positive probabilities in association with anomalously low gamma radiation measurements over ultramafic rock, which is similar to that produced by gabbro, metavolcanic rock, and water bodies. All of these features share the characteristic of being depleted in K, Th and U. Gabbro is the only rock type in the study area that shares similar magnetic properties with the ultramafic rock. The aerogeophysical model results are compared to the distribution of ultramafic outcrops and to Cr, Ni, K, Th and U concentrations and magnetic susceptibility measurements from soil samples. Analysis of the soil data indicates high positive correlation between

  19. Petrology of ultramafic, mafic, and felsic xenoliths from Ruddon's Point basanite, Fife, Scotland, UK - preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobczak, Paweł; Matusiak-Malek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Upton, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Numerous dykes of Carboniferous alkaline volcanic rocks occur in the county of Fife, Scotland, United Kingdom. Basanitic dyke from Ruddon's Point encloses mafic, ultramafic, and felsic xenoliths as well as megacryts of alkali feldspar and xenoliths of felsic rocks. The studied set of rocks comprises wehrlite, clinopyroxenites, gabbro, anorthosite, and anorthoclasite. Wehrlite contains pseudomorphs after biotite, the Mg# of clinopyroxene varies from 0.78 to 0.81, the Fo content in olivine is 0.68-0.71. Clinopyroxenites have cumulative textures and are typically olivine± sulfides bearing. Most of them contained biotite which is now replaced by brownish aggregates formed of chlorite with scarce biotite intergrowths. The Mg# of clinopyroxene (Al, Ti - augite) varies from 0.77 to 0.84. The Fo content in olivine is 0.81-0.85 in plagioclase-free clinopyroxenites, but in xenolith where minor amounts of plagioclase (Ab48-51An47-48) occur, the Fo content is 0.70 - 0.72. Biotite's Mg# is ~70%. Gabbro is titanite-bearing and contains trace amounts of amphibole. Diopside forming the gabbro is characterized by Mg#=0.56-0.64, plagioclase is potassium-free (Ab14-22An77-86). Anorthosite also encloses brownish post-biotitic aggregates. Plagioclase has composition of Ab35-43An54-64. Anorthoclasite (Or65-72 Ab65-72) is characterized by unusual mineral composition - it contains corundum, zircon, apatite, and niobates. Previous study on the felsic xenoliths from Scotland showed their lower crustal origin, but with possible ultramafic affinity (e.g. Upton et al., 2009, Min.Mag., 73, 943-956). Crystallization from met- and peraluminous melts was also suggested. Mantle-derived xenoliths from Scotland are from almost primitive to strongly depleted (Upton et al.; 2010, J. Geol. Soc. London, 168, 873-886), but more data from individual localities are necessary for precise description and interpretation of mantle and lower crustal processes beneath Scotland. This study was possible thanks to

  20. Trace element composition of rutile and Zr-in-rutile thermometry in meta-ophiolitic rocks from the Kazdağ Massif, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengün, Fırat; Zack, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In northwest Turkey, ophiolitic meta-gabbros are exposed on the Kazdağ Massif located in the southern part of the Biga Peninsula. Trace element composition of rutile and Zr-in-rutile temperatures were determined for meta-gabbros from the Kazdağ Massif. The Zr content of all rutiles range from 176 to 428 ppm and rutile grains usually have a homogeneous Zr distribution. The rutile grains from studied samples in the Kazdağ Massif are dominated by subchondritic Nb/Ta (11-19) and Zr/Hf ratios (20-33). Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf show positive correlation, which is probably produced by silicate fractionation. The Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios increase with a decrease in Ta and Hf contents. The core of rutile grains are generally characterized by low Nb/Ta ratios of 17-18 whereas the rims exhibit relatively high Nb/Ta ratios of 19-23. Trace element analyses in rutile suggest that these rutile grains were grown from metamorphic fluids. The P-T conditions of meta-gabbros were estimated by both Fe-Mg exchange and Zr-in-rutile thermometers, as well as by the Grt-Hb-Plg-Q geothermobarometer. The temperature range of 639 to 662 °C calculated at 9 kbar using the Zr-in-rutile thermometer is comparable with temperature estimates of the Fe-Mg exchange thermometer, which records amphibolite-facies metamorphism of intermediate P-T conditions. The P-T conditions of meta-ophiolitic rocks suggest that they occur as a different separate higher-pressure tectonic slice in the Kazdağ metamorphic sequence. Amphibolite-facies metamorphism resulted from northward subduction of the İzmir-Ankara branch of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean under the Sakarya Zone. Metamorphism was followed by internal imbrication of the Kazdağ metamorphic sequence resulting from southerly directed compression during the collision.

  1. Petrogenesis of Early-Middle Jurassic intrusive rocks in northern Liaoning and central Jilin provinces, northeast China: Implications for the extent of spatial-temporal overprinting of the Mongol-Okhotsk and Paleo-Pacific tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Hong; Wang, Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Cao, Hua-Hua; Pei, Fu-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The Mesozoic tectonic evolution of NE China was controlled mainly by the Mongol-Okhotsk and Paleo-Pacific tectonic regimes. However, the extent of the spatial and temporal overprinting of these two regimes is poorly understood. Here, we report new zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating and geochemical analyses of Jurassic intrusive rocks in northern Liaoning and central Jilin provinces, northeast China, to discuss their petrogenesis and outline the extent of spatial and temporal overprinting of these two tectonic regimes. Dating results indicate that Jurassic magmatism occurred in two stages during the Early (ca. 175 Ma) and Middle Jurassic (170-163 Ma). These rocks represent two-stage typical bimodal igneous rock associations composed mainly of olivine gabbro, gabbro, and gneissic granitoids. The Early and Middle Jurassic gabbros have low rare earth element (REE) abundances, positive Eu anomalies, depletion in high field strength elements (HFSEs), and positive εHf(t) values (+ 4.0 to + 10.3, except for one value of - 17.8), suggesting that the primary magma was derived from partial melting of depleted lithospheric mantle metasomatized by subducted-slab-derived fluids. The Early Jurassic monzogranite exhibit high REE abundances (195-201 ppm), weak negative Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.63-0.64), and negative εHf(t) values (- 11.9 to - 8.2), suggesting a primary magma that was derived from partial melting of lower continental crust of the NCC. The Middle Jurassic granodiorites are enriched in light REEs (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), and are depleted in heavy REEs (HREEs) and HFSEs, as well as high Sr/Y (29-132) and (La/Yb)N (15-44) ratios. In addition, the Middle Jurassic granitoids near or within the NCC exhibit negative εHf(t) values (- 18.9 to + 0.2), whereas those within the Xing'an-Mongolia Orogenic Belt (XMOB) have generally positive εHf(t) values (- 0.6 to + 6.4), suggesting their origin from partial melting of thickened ancient NCC and newly accreted

  2. Timescale of Petrogenetic Processes Recorded in the Mount Perkins Magma System, Northern Colorado River Extension Corridor, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Lisa R.; Metcalf, Rodney V.; Miller, Calvin F.; Rhodes Gregory T.; Wooden, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Miocene Mt. Perkins Pluton is a small composite intrusive body emplaced in the shallow crust as four separate phases during the earliest stages of crustal extension. Phase 1 (oldest) consists of isotropic hornblende gabbro and a layered cumulate sequence. Phase 2 consists of quartz monzonite to quartz monzodiorite hosting mafic microgranitoid enclaves. Phase 3 is composed of quartz monzonite and is subdivided into mafic enclave-rich zones and enclave-free zones. Phase 4 consists of aphanitic dikes of mafic, intermediate and felsic compositions hosting mafic enclaves. Phases 2-4 enclaves record significant isotopic disequilibrium with surrounding granitoid host rocks, but collectively enclaves and host rocks form a cogenetic suite exhibiting systematic variations in Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes that correlate with major and trace elements. Phases 2-4 record multiple episodes of magma mingling among cogenetic hybrid magmas that formed via magma mixing and fractional crystallization at a deeper crustal. The mafic end-member was alkali basalt similar to nearby 6-4 Ma basalt with enriched OIB-like trace elements and Nd-Sr-Pb isotopes. The felsic end-member was a subalkaline crustal-derived magma. Phase 1 isotropic gabbro exhibits elemental and isotopic compositional variations at relatively constant SiO2, suggesting generation of isotropic gabbro by an open-system process involving two mafic end-members. One end-member is similar in composition to the OIB-like mafic end-member for phases 2-4; the second is similar to nearby 11-8 Ma tholeiite basalt exhibiting low epsilon (sub Nd), and depleted incompatible trace elements. Phase 1 cumulates record in situ fractional crystallization of an OIB-like mafic magma with isotopic evidence of crustal contamination by partial melts generated in adjacent Proterozoic gneiss. The Mt Perkins pluton records a complex history in a lithospheric scale magma system involving two distinct mantle-derived mafic magmas and felsic magma sourced in the

  3. Stable isotopic constraints on fluid-rock interaction and Cu-PGE-S redistribution in the Sonju Lake intrusion, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, Y.-R.; Ripley, E.M.; Miller, J.D.; Li, C.; Mariga, J.; Shafer, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Sonju Lake intrusion, part of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift-related Beaver Bay Complex, is a 1,200-m-thick, strongly differentiated, layered sequence of mafic cumulates located in northeastern Minnesota. Basal melatroctolite and dunite layers are overlain by troctolite, gabbro, Fe-Ti oxide-rich gabbro, apatite diorite, and monzodiorite. Stratigraphic intervals rich in Pt + Pd, Cu, and S occur over ???500 m in the Fe-Ti oxide-rich gabbro and apatite diorite units. Peak concentrations show offsets that are similar to those found in other tholeiitic layered intrusions. Concentrations of Pd in excess of 100 ppb are confined to the lowermost 25 m of the interval. Copper shows a sharp increase to 630 ppm above the Pd-rich interval. Sulfur contents are low (<375 ppm) in the Cu-rich interval, but they increase to values as high as 3,150 ppm above in the apatite diorite. Disseminated sulfides in the intrusion have ??34S values that range from -2.2 to 3 per mil Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) and suggest that contamination by country rock sulfur was not an important process in the formation of the metal-rich interval. ??18O values of plagioclase from the intrusion range from 5.6 to 12.0 per mil (V-SMOW) and indicate that a relatively low-18O fluid (??18O ???3-5 ???) interacted with the rocks of the intrusion at temperatures less than ???275??C. Clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides (ilmenite with minor amounts of titanomagnetite) show much more restricted ranges in ??18O values (4.6-5.7 and 5.5-6.7 per mil, respectively) and attest to the kinetic control of the oxygen isotope exchange process. The externally derived fluid that interacted with rocks now enriched in platinum group elements (PGE) + Cu- and Fe-sulfide minerals locally liberated sulfur and replaced chalcopyrite and pyrite with goethite. In the Cu-rich zone, goethite that replaces chalcopyrite may contain up to 8.5 weight percent Cu. It is evident that hydrothermal alteration resulted in a decoupling of copper

  4. Field and Microstructure Study of Transpressive Jogdadi shear zone near Ambaji, Aravalli- Delhi Mobile Belt, NW India and its tectonic implication on the exhumation of granulites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sudheer Kumar; Biswal, Tapas Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Aravalli- Delhi mobile belt is situated in the northwestern part of Indian shield. It comprises tectono- magmatic histories from Archean to Neoproterozoic age. It possesses three tectono- magmatic metamorphic belts namely Bhilwara Supergroup (3000 Ma), Aravalli Supergorup (1800 Ma) and Delhi Supergroup (1100 -750Ma). The Delhi Supergroup is divided in two parts North Delhi and South Delhi; North Delhi (1100 Ma to 850 Ma) is older than South Delhi (850 Ma to 750 Ma). The study area falls in the South Delhi terrane; BKSK granulites are the major unit in this terrane. BKSK granulites comprise gabbro- norite-basic granulite, pelitic granulite, calcareous granulite and occur within the surrounding of low grade rocks as meta- rhyolite, quartzite, mica schist and amphibolites. The high grade and low grade terranes share a sheared margin. Granulites have undergone three phases of folding, intruded by three phases of granites and traversed by many shear zones. One of the shear zones is Jogdadi shear zone which consists of granitic mylonites and other sheared rocks. Jogdadi shear zone carries the evidence of both ductile as well as brittle shearing. It strikes NW- SE; the mylonitic foliation dip moderately to SW or NE and stretching lineations are oblique towards SE. The shear zone is folded and gabbro- norite - basic granulite occurs at the core. One limb of fold passes over coarse grained granite while other limb occurs over gabbro- norite- basic granulite. Presence of mylonitic foliation, asymmetric folding, S-C fabrics, porphyroclasts, mica fishes and book shelf- gliding are indicative of ductile deformation. Most of the porphyroclasts are sigmoidal and delta types but there are also some theta and phi type porphyroclasts. Book shelf-gliding structures are at low angle to the C plane. The shear zone successively shows protomylonite, mylonite and ultramylonites from margin to the centre. As the mylonitization increases recrystallized quartz grains appear. Porphyroclasts

  5. Adakite-like geochemical signature produced by amphibole-dominated fractionation of arc magmas: An example from the Late Cretaceous magmatism in Gangdese belt, south Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wang-Chun; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Luo, Bi-ji; Guo, Liang; Yang, He

    2015-09-01

    Late Cretaceous (~ 106-76 Ma) adakite-like intrusive rocks in the middle-eastern Gangdese belt occur in an E-W trending belt paralleling the Indus-Yarlung suture, south Tibet. Their petrogenesis and geodynamic processes have been a subject of debate. We report here U-Pb zircon ages, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data for adakite-like intrusive rocks as well as the normal arc rocks (gabbros and gabbroic diorites) in the middle Gangdese belt. LA-ICPMS U-Pb zircon analyses yielded an identical age of ~ 88 Ma for two adakite-like rocks, which are slightly younger than the gabbro and gabbroic diorite (ca. 94-90 Ma). Both the adakite-like rocks and the normal arc rocks have similar whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotope compositions, indicating that they have been derived from a common source. Similarly, the adakite-like and normal arc intrusive rocks in the eastern Gangdese belt also show similar Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions. In the middle-eastern Gangdese belt, the > 85 Ma Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks consist of a magma series from gabbro to granodiorite, including both normal arc rocks and adakite-like rocks. These rocks overlap in space and time that conform to a normal arc differentiation trend. In terms of major and trace elements, they also show a clear evolution from the normal arc magmatic into adakitic field. Thus, we suggest that these > 85 Ma Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks were ultimately derived from melting of the hydrated mantle wedge and the adakite-like rocks can be generated in normal arc magmas by amphibole-dominated fractionation. Taking into accounting for the spatial and temporal distribution of the Cretaceous magmatic rocks in the Lhasa terrane, we prefer a model of early Late Cretaceous rollback following Early Cretaceous low-angle oceanic slab subduction. At intermediate pressure and H2O-rich conditions, fractionation of amphibole changes the major and trace element compositions of arc magmas, and will efficiently drives basaltic

  6. Discovery of a Devonian mafic magmatism on the western border of the Murzuq basin (Saharan metacraton): Paleomagnetic dating and geodynamical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derder, M. E. M.; Maouche, S.; Liégeois, J. P.; Henry, B.; Amenna, M.; Ouabadi, A.; Bellon, H.; Bruguier, O.; Bayou, B.; Bestandji, R.; Nouar, O.; Bouabdallah, H.; Ayache, M.; Beddiaf, M.

    2016-03-01

    Intraplate deformation is most often linked to major stress applied on plate margins. When such intraplate events are accompanied by magmatism, the use of several dating methods integrated within a multidisciplinary approach can bring constraints on the age, nature and source mobilized for generating the magma and in turn on the nature of the intraplate deformation. This study focuses on the large gabbro Arrikine sill (35 km in extension) emplaced within the Silurian sediments of the western margin of the Murzuq cratonic basin in southeastern Algeria. Its emplacement is dated during the early Devonian (415-400 Ma) through the determination of a reliable paleomagnetic pole by comparison with the Gondwana Apparent Polar Wander Path (APWP). This age can be correlated with deep phreatic eruptions before Pragian time thought to be at the origin of sand injections and associated circular structures in Algeria and Libya. For the sill, the K-Ar age of 325.6 ± 7.7 Ma is related to a K-rich aplitic phase that has K-enriched by more than 20% the Devonian gabbro. Laser-ICP-MS U-Pb method dates only inherited zircons mostly at c. 2030 Ma with additional ages at c. 2700 Ma and younger ones in the 766-598 Ma age range. The Arrikine sill is a high-Ti alkaline gabbro having the geochemical composition of a hawaiite akin to several intraplate continental and oceanic provinces, including the contemporaneous Aïr ring complexes province in Niger, but also to the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii. This peculiar composition akin to that of the contemporaneous Aïr province is in agreement with a lower Devonian age for the Arrikine sill. The lower Devonian Arrikine sill emplacement is related to a "Caledonian" transtensive reactivation of the western metacratonic boundary of the Murzuq craton. This event also generated in the Saharan platform the so-called "Caledonian unconformity" of regional extension, the Aïr ring complexes and magmatic rocks that produced sand injections. It could be

  7. IODP Expedition 345: Slow cooling of the lowermost gabbroic crust from the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise determined from Mg-in-Pl and Ca-in-Ol geospeedometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faak, K.; Gillis, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Models of crustal accretion along fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges differ in the proportion of crystallization at different depths within the lower oceanic crust. Therefore, these models predict different thermal evolution, and most significantly, different depths to which hydrothermal fluids circulate in the oceanic crust. As a consequence, this implies different rates of cooling as a function of depth. ';Gabbro glacier' type models require most of the latent heat of crystallization to be removed by hydrothermal circulation at the top of the axial magma chamber, leading to fast cooling rates in the upper gabbros. With increasing depth, heat conduction becomes the dominant process of heat removal. Since heat conduction is a less efficient mechanism of heat removal than hydrothermal circulation, it is expected that cooling rates decrease with increasing depth. In contrast, in ';sheeted sill' type models, the mechanism for heat removal (hydrothermal circulation) is the same over the entire depth of the gabbroic crust and, therefore, cooling rates are not expected to change as a function of depth. The determination of cooling rates of rocks from different depths within the oceanic crust therefore provides insights in the processes involved in its formation. IODP Expedition 345 recovered primitive layered gabbroic rocks that originated in the lower half to two thirds of the plutonic crust at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise and exposed at the Hess Deep Rift (HDR). The freshest gabbroic rock samples from Site U1415 were chosen to obtain subsolidus cooling rates using the recently developed Mg-in-Plagioclase geospeedometer and the well-established Ca-in-Olivine geospeedometer. Geospeedometers make use of the temperature dependence of the diffusive exchange of elements between different phases and thus allow the determination of cooling rates from diffusion modeling. Both methods were carried out in the same samples and yield results that are in very good agreement

  8. IODP Expedition 345: Characterizing Hydrothermal Alteration of Fast-Spreading EPR Lower Crust using O, Sr and Nd isotopics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, N.; Gillis, K. M.; Lindvall, R. E.; Schorzman, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 345 sampled lower crustal primitive gabbroic rocks that formed at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) and are exposed at the Hess Deep Rift. The metamorphic mineral assemblages in the rocks recovered at Site U1415 record the cooling of primitive gabbroic lithologies from magmatic (>1000°C) to zeolite facies conditions (<200°C) associated with EPR spreading, Cocos-Nazca rifting and exposure onto the seafloor. The dominant alteration assemblage is characterized by lower grade greenschist (<400°C) and subgreenschist facies (<200°C) alteration of olivine to talc, serpentine, or clay minerals, and is commonly accompanied by prehnite microveins in plagioclase. The intensity of alteration varies with igneous lithology, in particular, the modal abundance of olivine, as well as proximity to zones of brittle fracturing and cataclasis. We have attempted to characterize the nature and extent of isotopic exchange associated alteration and cooling and present a record of variations in O, Sr, and Nd isotopic compositions in altered rocks from the lower plutonic crust at Hess Deep. The Rb-Sr and 18O/16O systems exhibit sensitivity to hydrothermal interactions with seawater; whereas the Sm-Nd system appears essentially undisturbed by the minimal alteration experienced by the rocks drilled at Site U1415. The 87Sr/86Sr isotopic compositions of olivine gabbros (Mg# 0.81-0.89) range from 0.702536-0.703950 (±0.000008). Higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios are strongly correlated with percentage of hydrous minerals, and are higher in samples with a greater modal abundance of olivine. These rocks have somewhat higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios than upper plutonic rocks from the Northern Escarpment at Hess Deep (Kirchner and Gillis, 2012), although their percentage of hydrous phases is apparently similar. The d18O in these rocks ranges from 0.23‰ to 4.65‰ (±0.67); troctolites have systematically lower d18O than the gabbro and gabbronorites

  9. Melt flow and hypersolidus deformation in the lower ocean crust: Preliminary observations from IODP Leg 345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, J. E.; Koepke, J.; Falloon, T.; Abe, N.; Hoshide, T.; Akizawa, N.; Maeda, J.; Jean, M. M.; Cheadle, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Models for the construction of the fast-spreading lower ocean crust include the gabbro glacier model (GGM), in which most crystallization occurs within a shallow melt lens and the resulting crystal mush subsides downwards and outwards by crystal sliding. Second, the Sheeted Sill Model (SSM) predicts magmatic injection at many levels in the crust, and requires rapid cooling of the lithosphere. A second set of models seeks to reconcile the relatively unevolved nature of most MORB with the existence of an extensive lower crust with both layering (in the lower crust) and highly evolved gabbros (in the upper plutonic sequence). The mechanisms involved here are melt aggregation during vertical porous flow in the lower crust as opposed to lateral sill injection and in-situ crystallization. Here we report new observations from IODP Expedition 345 to the Hess Deep Rift, where propagation of the Cocos Nazca Ridge (CNR) into young, fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) crust exposes a dismembered lower crustal section. Drilling in ~4850 m water depth produced 3 holes of 35 to 100 mbsf with ~30% recovery of primitive (Mg# 79-87) plutonic lithologies including troctolite, olivine gabbro, and olivine gabbronorite, showing cumulate textures found in layered mafic intrusions and some ophiolite complexes including: 1. Spectacular modal layering 2. Orthopyroxene very early on the liquidus compared to canonical MORB. 3. Delicate large (2-5 cm) skeletal and hopper structures in olivine. 4. Oikocrystic clinopyroxene enclosing chadacrysts different from the host assemblage. These complex relationships are only hinted at in the existing observations from the ocean floor, and will require significant lab study, however some preliminary inferences can be drawn from the petrographic observations. First, the textures observed in olivine throughout the cores are consistent with rapid crystallization, possibly due to steep thermal gradients in the lower crust. They occur early in the

  10. A Dual-Porosity, In Situ Crystallisation Model For Fast-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge Magma Chambers Based Upon Direct Observation From Hess Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, C. J.; Lissenberg, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a revised magma chamber model for fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges based upon a synthesis of new data from a complete section of lower crust from the East Pacific Rise, reconstructed from samples collected from the Hess Deep rift valley during cruise JC21. Our investigation includes detailed sampling across critical transitions in the upper part of the plutonic section, including the inferred axial melt lens (AML) within the dyke-gabbro transition. We find that an overall petrological progression, from troctolite and primitive gabbro at the base up into evolved (oxide) gabbro and gabbronorite at the top of the lower crustal section, is mirrored by a progressive upward chemical fractionation as recorded in bulk rock and mineral compositions. Crystallographic preferred orientations measured using EBSD show that the downward increase in deformation of mush required in crystal subsidence models is not observed. Together these observations are consistent only with a model in which crystallisation of upward migrating evolving melts occurs in situ in the lower crust. Over-enrichment in incompatible trace element concentrations and ratios above that possible by fractional crystallisation is ubiquitous. This implies redistribution of incompatible trace elements in the lower crust by low porosity, near-pervasive reactive porous flow of interstitial melt moving continuously upward through the mush pile. Mass balance calculations reveal a significant proportion of this trace element enriched melt is trapped at mid-crustal levels. Mineral compositions in the upper third to half of the plutonic section are too evolved to represent the crystal residues of MORB. Erupted MORB therefore must be fed from melts sourced in the deeper part of the crystal mush pile, and which must ascend rapidly without significant modification in the upper plutonics or AML. From physical models of mush processes we posit that primitive melts are transported through transient, high porosity

  11. Evaluation of the Variation in Cooling Rate with Depth in the Lower Oceanic Crust at Fast-Spreading Ridges Using a Newly Developed Mg in Plagioclase Geospeedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faak, K.; Chakraborty, S.; Coogan, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    The crystallization and cooling of new oceanic crust is regenerating two thirds of the Earth's surface continuously but the processes that occur during the cooling and crystallization of the magma are still poorly understood. Two end-member models have been proposed for lower crustal accretion at intermediate- to fast-spreading ridges (the "gabbro glacier" and "sheeted sill" models). These require different depth distributions of hydrothermal circulation and are likely to result in different variations of cooling rates with depth. Mapping cooling rates of samples of the lower oceanic crust as a function of depth can, therefore, allow us to distinguish between the models and constrain the thermal evolution during the generation of oceanic crust. We have developed a new geospeedometer, based on the exchange of Mg between plagioclase and clinopyroxene, to address this problem. New experiments demonstrate that the partitioning of Mg between clinopyroxene and plagioclase is strongly temperature dependent, changing by a factor of 4 between 1200°C and 900°C, such that during cooling Mg diffuses out of plagioclase into adjacent clinopyroxene grains. A finite difference diffusion model of Mg redistribution during cooling is applied to natural samples from the north wall of the Hess Deep Rift at the East Pacific Rise. 90 concentration profiles (rim - rim) from 45 crystals in 14 samples (from a depth range 0-520m below the sheeted dikes) were measured using an electron microprobe. For obtaining reliable cooling rates, Mg concentration profiles were measured along two crystallographic directions in a grain, and profiles from several crystals in one thin section are modeled. Cooling rate determinations are considered reliable only when results from all of these calculations are consistent. Fresh plagioclase crystals in coarse grained gabbros (mean grain size ~ 1mm) were chosen for the measurement of Mg contents. The shapes of these measured concentration profiles are very

  12. Late Triassic intrusive complex in the Jidong region, Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China: Geochemistry, zircon U-Pb ages, Lu-Hf isotopes, and implications for magma mingling and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Ge, Wen-chun; Zhao, Guo-chun; Dong, Yu; Xu, Wen-liang; Ji, Zheng; Yu, Jie-jiang

    2015-05-01

    Whole-rock major and trace element geochemistry together with zircon U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf isotope compositions are reported for a Late Triassic intrusive complex in the Jidong region, Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China. Zircon U-Pb dating yields ages between 211 and 208 Ma for enclaves of microgranular diorite and quartz diorite, and between 211 and 209 Ma for the host granitoids. These ages correlate with a previously established intensive Late Triassic magmatic event along the eastern Asian margin. Field observations, together with petrographic features, geochemistry, and zircon Hf isotope data, preclude simple crystal fractionation or restite unmixing as a genetic link for the various rock types within the intrusive complex. The syenogranite suite has high SiO2 (75.5-76.3 wt.%) and low MgO (0.15-0.19 wt.%), and yields enriched LILE and LREE patterns. Most of the zircons in the syenogranites have two-stage model ages of 766 and 1461 Ma, together with positive εHf(t) values of + 0.6 to + 9.1. These results indicate that the granitoid magmas were generated by partial melting of Meso- to Neoproterozoic lower crust. The gabbro suite has a restricted range of SiO2 (46.1-51.9 wt.%) together with high Mg# values (49-70) and high concentrations of Ni, Co, and Cr. Zircons from two diorite samples have single-stage Hf model ages of 557-787 Ma and εHf(t) values of + 1.9 to + 8.3 that are consistent with the coeval gabbros previously studied in the Jidong region. These features, together with the observation that all the gabbros are enriched in LREE and LILE, suggest that the mafic magmas were derived from melting of depleted Neoproterozoic lithospheric mantle that had been metasomatized by slab-derived fluids. It is concluded that the dominant igneous suites within the Late Triassic intrusive complex formed by mingling/mixing of felsic and mafic magmas. The geochemical data, combined with regional geological investigations, indicate that the Late Triassic intrusive complex

  13. Misho mafic complex - A part of paleotethyan oceanic crust or a magmatism in continental rift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimzadeh, Zohreh; Jahangiri, Ahmad; Saccani, Emilio; Dilek, Yildirim

    2013-04-01

    Misho Mafic Complex (NW Iran) represents a significant component of the West Cimmerian domain in Paleo-Tethys. The Misho Mafic Complex (MMC) consists of gabbro (mainly) and norıte,olivine gabbro, anorthosite and diorite with the east- west sereight. MMC has ıntrussıved ın Kahar sedımrtery Infta- Cambrıan rocks, crosscut by abundant basaltic dykes and the overlying basaltic sheeted dyke complex. Kahar sedimentary rocks are representing the northern margin of Gondwana. Misho mafic complex are covered by Permian sedimentary rocks. The gabbros and basaltic dykes have MORB affinities. MMC formed as a product of interactions between a depleted MORB-type asthenosphere and plume-type material. Mafic rocks represent an early Carboniferous magmatic event developed during the continental break-up of the northern edge of Gondwanaland that led to the opening of Paleotethys. Alternatively, these magmas may have been emplaced into the continental crust at the continental margin soon after the oceanic crust was formed (that is the oceanic crust was still narrow). There is no data for discriminating between these two hypotheses. In first hypothesis MMC is a part of ophiolites related to paleotethyan oceanic crust and the rocks that were above this crustal level should have necessarily been eroded. In another hypothesis Misho complex represents an aborted rift in a triple junction. Above a mantle plume, the continental crust breaks along three directions at 120 degrees. But, soon after, the extension proceeds along two of these three direction. Between them is formed the oceanic crust. The continental extension along the third direction is aborted. Here no oceanic crust if formed and there is only rifted, thinned continental crust. But, also in the aborted branch MORB magmatism can occur for short time. In this hypothesis, the Misho complex was never associated with oceanic crust, but was anyway associated with the opening of the Paleotethys. This magmatism was originally

  14. Building monument materials during the 3rd-4rd millennium (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moita, Patricia; Pedro, Jorge; Boaventura, Rui; Mataloto, Rui; Maximo, Jaime; Almeida, Luís; Nogueira, Pedro

    2014-05-01

    Dolmens are the most conspicuous remains of the populations of the 4th and first half of 3rd millennia BCE. These tombs are impressive not only for their monumentality, but also because of the socioeconomic investment they represent for those Neolithic communities, namely from the Central-South of Portugal, who built them. Although dolmens have been studied for their funerary content and typologies, an interdisciplinary approach toward the geological characterization and sourcing of stones used in these constructions has not received enough attention from researchers. With MEGAGEO project a multidisciplinary group of geologist and archaeologists intends to assess the relationship between the distribution of dolmens in Central-South Portugal, their source materials, and the geological landscape. GIS will map the information gathered and will be used to analyse these relationships. The selection of the areas, with distinctive geologies (limestone vs granite), will allow to verify if human patterns of behaviour regarding the selection of megaliths are similar or different regionally. Geologically the first target area (Freixo, Alentejo) is dominated by a small intrusion of gabbro mingled/mixed within a granodioritic intrusion both related with variscan orogeny. Granodiorite exhibit several enclaves of igneous and metamorphic nature attesting the interaction between both igneous rocks as well with enclosing gneisses. Despite Alentejo region have a reduced number of outcrops the granodiorite provides rounded to tabular metric blocks. The gabbro is very coarse grained, sometimes with a cumulate texture, and their fracturing and weathering provide very fresh tabular blocks. The five studied dolmens (Quinta do Freixo #1 to #5) are implanted in a large granodioritic intrusion, around the gabbroic rocks, within an area of approximately 9km2. The medium grained granodiorite is ubiquity in all the dolmens slabs and occasionally it can be observed features of mixing and

  15. Petrographic and Geochemical Characterization of the Cambumbia STOCK in Andean Central Cordillera, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Lequerica, S.; Jaramillo Mejía, J.; Concha Perdomo, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes. The goals of this study were to petrographic and geochemically characterize the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenetic history. 41 samples were collected, 28 for petrographic analysis and 14 for elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS. Petrographically the samples were classified as hornblende and pyroxene-gabbros varying to diorites, gabbronorites and tonalites, the rock texture varies from medium to coarse granular grain, with local microporfiritic texture. It was concluded from the major elements analysis that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series, within the gabbros and diorites fields. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2 (Jaramillo, 1980), Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb (Pearce, 1984) (Fig. 1) and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 (Wood, 1979) diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Petrographic and geochemical comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (Giraldo, 2009) (located about 25 km to the north-west) may postulate a possible genetic link between them. Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Middle Triassic). This age is consistent with the global event of the extension and fragmentation of Pangea supercontinent. In addition, the mantle nature of the source and the petrogenetic evolution of the magmatic system were established. References GIRALDO, M.I., (2009): Esquema geodinámica de la parte noroccidental de la cordillera Central de Colombia. (Thesis). p.56-68. Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellín. JARAMILLO, J.M. (1980): Petrology and geochemistry of the Nevado del Ruiz Volcano northern Andes, Colombia (Thesis). 167 p. University of Houston

  16. Plagioclase-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions From the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.; Wenk, H.

    2004-12-01

    Gabbros from the Main Zone of the 2.064 Ga Bushveld Complex have long been known to possess unusually stable magnetizations due to the presence of high coercivity, exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The paleomagnetic pole for these rocks has been used to anchor apparent polar wander paths for the Kaapval craton during the Early-Mid Proterozoic. To better understand the rock magnetic properties of silicate-hosted magnetite inclusions, oriented paleomagnetic samples of gabbro were collected from quarries near Belfast and Rustenberg, South Africa, sampling the eastern and western limbs of the Complex, respectively. Plagioclase composition at both sites ranges from An55 (rims) to An65 (cores) based on optical and electron microprobe data. Four kinds of inclusions are present within the plagioclase: elongate magnetite needles, nanometer-scale magnetite particles (responsible for the "cloudy" appearance of some crystals), translucent brown hematite/ilmenite platelets, and colorless euhedral inclusions of pyroxene and/or feldspar. Magnetite inclusions are most abundant at the cores of the plagioclase crystals. Orientations of the needles and the platelets are crystallographically controlled by the silicate host. Although the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusions can occur in any of five possible orientations, only two or three of these directions dominates each plagioclase crystal. Alternating field demagnetization of bulk samples (NRM = 1.5 x 101 A m-1) shows univectorial remanence with average median destructive fields (MDF) of 115 mT (Belfast) and 90 mT (Rustenberg). AF demagnetization of single plagioclase crystals (NRM = 100 A m-1) also shows single component remanence with average MDFs >150 mT. The NRM coercivity spectra of single plagioclase crystals are indistinguishable from that of the bulk samples. When normalized to their abundance in bulk samples the magnetite-bearing plagioclase fully accounts for the NRM of Bushveld

  17. Geochronology- and Geochemistry of Late Carboniferous-Middle Permian I- and A-Type Granites and Gabro-Diorites in the Eastern Jimausi Massif, NE, China: Implications for a Tectonic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Junhui; Ge, Wenchun

    2016-04-01

    The late Paleozoic magmatism in the Jiamusi Massif of northeast China, located in the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), was dominated by an active continental margin environment due to subduction of the paleo-oceanic plate. Nevertheless, what deep geodynamic processes controlled the late Paleozoic evolution of the Jiamusi Massif are still poorly constrained. In this contribution, we present zircon U-Pb ages and geochemical data of late Carboniferous-middle Permian magmatism in the Jiamusi Massif, aiming to provide constraints on the question. Precise LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages indicate that the granitoids and gabbro-diorites were emplaced in the late Carboniferous-middle Permian (302-267 Ma). The granites belong to a high-potassium calc-alkaline series, are weakly peraluminous I- and A-type granites, and show high SiO2 and K2O contents; they are depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs), enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), show weakly to mildly fractionated REE patterns, and on spidergrams show arc-type affinities with strong depletions in Nb, Ta, and Ti. The combination of heterogeneous values of ɛHf(t) for magmatic zircons in all granitoids (ranging from +7.9 to -5.6) and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) of 0.8-1.7 Ga suggests that the granites originated from partial melting of a predominantly "old" Meso-Neoproterozoic crustal source. The gabbro-diorites of the Longtouqiao pluton are depleted in Nb, Ta, P, and Ti, and show flat distributions of most LILEs and HFSEs, except for marked large positive anomalies in Ba, K, and Pb. These features reflect limited degrees of crustal contamination associated with subduction-related magma processes. These data, together with previously reported data and the occurrence of arc magmatic rocks along the eastern part of the Jiamusi Massif, suggest that the intrusive rocks formed during westward subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean lithosphere

  18. Stress-stimulated current of dry rocks with constant clamping stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, R. P.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Johnston, M. J. S.

    2014-12-01

    A set of nominally dry rocks (gabbro, granite, limestone, marble, and sandstone) were subjected to asymmetric loading with a large hydraulic press. A pair of precision platens made from 1018 low carbon steel were used to apply uniaxial compressive stress (σ) to the sample, via a thin electrical insulator made from ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene. Self-adhesive copper electrodes were applied and burnished on the end faces and the stress-stimulated current (SSC) was monitored using a Keithley 617 instrument. A preload stress level of 5.5 MPa was applied to firmly clamp the assembly throughout the experiment. From this baseline, σ was increased to 22.25 MPa and held for 100 seconds before returning to the clamping stress level. This loading profile was repeated for four or more cycles, with a stress rate on the order of 5MPa/sec. After the first load cycle, the SSC transients (and SSV offsets) are reversible when σ returned to its baseline level. All samples showed alternating unipolar SSC transients at the beginning and end of each load cycle. SSC from limestone, Westerly granite and marble were at, or below, the measurement limit (±1 pA). All other samples except sandstone showed a negative SSC with increasing stress. For stress-stimulated voltage (SSV) there was a richer variety of transients observed such as unipolar, bipolar and more complex transient dynamics. Limestone was the only sample tested with no SSV transients although this particular rock had a major calcite inclusion in the sample. White granite tended to have the least stable SSC and SSV values. Of the six different rock samples tested under identical conditions, the SSC and SSV observed were not greater than -15 pA, presumably due to improved experimental procedures. The response for rocks with semiconductor properties (gabbro, granite) is the same as those without semiconductor properties (limestone, marble), although the values for marble were below the noise. For repetitive

  19. Reconstructing Rodinia: the view from Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohver, E.; van der Pluijm, B.; Van der Voo, R.; Scandolara, J.; Rizzotto, G.

    2001-05-01

    Many Rodinia reconstructions propose that the North American Grenville orogeny at c.1.1 Ga was due to collision between Laurentia and the western Amazon craton, the position of which is presently unrestricted by paleomagnetic data. New paleomagnetic data was collected from the flat-lying basalts and gabbros of the Nova Floresta Formation (K-Ar whole rock, 982 +/-10 Ma, 1038 +/-14 Ma) of Rondonia, western Brazil to constrain the paleogeography of the proposed Laurentia-Amazonia link. Measurement of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) on the gabbroic samples reveals a flat-lying foliation with a radiating pattern of lineations, demonstrating that the gabbros are part of a large, undeformed sill. Thermal and alternating field (AF) demagnetization of the basalt samples reveals a single component that is oriented WNW and steeply upward. For the gabbro samples, AF demagnetization is more successful than thermal demagnetization at resolving individual components. A characteristic remanence isolated in fields commonly above 40 mT is identical to the single component recorded in the basalts, suggesting that this magnetization was acquired at the same time. A paleomagnetic N-pole calculated from the Nova Floresta Formation (n = 16 sites, Plat. = 26.1N, PLon. = 163.4E, A95 = 5.9) can be matched to the Laurentia APWP for the 1150-750 Ma interval and permits geographic proximity of the two cratons during Grenvillian times. However, the orientation of the Aguapee-Sunsas belt based on this pole suggests a N-S oriented belt, in contrast with the E-W orientation of the Grenville belt on the Laurentian margin. It is proposed that the Amazon craton was rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise from the orientation required by the Laurentia-Amazonia connection. This N-S orientation of the Sunsas-Aguapei belt suggests that the western margin of the Amazon craton was juxtaposed with the Namaqua belt of the western Kalahari craton. This configuration is supported by a common

  20. Thermobarometry in the Hadean: The Nuvvuagittuq Greenstone Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scher, S.; Minarik, W.

    2009-05-01

    The 4.28 Ga 142Nd model age of the faux-amphibolite formation makes it the oldest assemblage of the Nuvvuagittuq Greenstone Belt (Northeastern Superior Province, Quebec, Canada) and the oldest rocks yet found on Earth. The protolith of the faux-amphibolite, however, is uncertain. The bulk chemistry suggests that it is most likely mafic and basaltic to basaltic-andesite in composition (samples have 36-63 wt% SiO2 and 3.5- 14 wt% MgO), although it has very low Ca-content compared to typical basalt. This low-Ca content is reflected in the crystallization of the amphibole cummingtonite, as opposed to hornblende, that is characteristic of the faux-amphibolite's adjacent gabbro sill. This suggests that Ca and other elements were mobile, perhaps during metamorphism. On the other hand, we do not see low-Ca in the adjacent gabbro sill suggesting either a more complex history for the faux-amphibolite, i.e. a metamorphic event before the emplacement of the gabbro sill, or Ca-depletion as the result of weathering processes. The faux-amphibolite is a heterogeneous gneiss with the mineral assemblage: cummingtonite + quartz + biotite + plagioclase ± anthophyllite ± garnet ± alkali-feldspar with the majority of the biotite replaced by retrograde chlorite. The garnets are heavily fractured, poikioblastic and, apart from the rims, are not zoned with respect to Fe and Mg. The garnets, as well as the groundmass, contain inclusions of zircon, rutile, ilmenite, monazite and other REE phosphates, and iron sulfides. Preliminary garnet-biotite geothermometry has been done that supports upper amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism. Unzoned garnets from different parts of the faux-amphibolite record distinct Fe-Mg exchange temperatures that range from 730 to 940 °C (assuming a constant pressure of 5 kbar) suggesting the preservation of a metamorphic field gradient. Further geothermobarometry with trace element and accessory phases will be used to further describe the PT path as the

  1. Impact of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination program on HIB meningitis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Miranzi, Sybelle de Souza Castro; de Moraes, Suzana Alves; de Freitas, Isabel Cristina Martins

    2007-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b (HIB) in Brazil on the morbidity, mortality, and case fatality of HIB meningitis, using the Ministry of Health database and population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística--IBGE). Impact was evaluated through a time series analysis (1983-2002), using regression forecasting (RF) by dividing the time series into two periods: (a) historical (1983-1998) and (b) validation (1999-2002). Impact of the vaccination was positive, although more significant for incidence and mortality than for case fatality rates.

  2. V Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villas da Rocha, J. F.; Canalle, J. B. G.; Wuesnche, C. A.; de Medeiros, J. R., Silva, A. V. R.; Lavouras, D. F.; Dottori, H. A.; Maia, M. A. G.; Vieira Martins, R.; Poppe, P. C. R.

    2003-08-01

    Neste trabalho apresentamos os resultados da V Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia, a qual ocorreu em 11/05/2002 em todos os estabelecimentos de ensino fundamental ou médio previamente cadastrados. Participaram do evento 60.338 alunos distribuídos por 1469 escolas pertencentes a todos os Estados brasileiros. Uma equipe de 5 alunos foi escolhida para representar o Brasil na VII Olimpíada Internacional de Astronomia que ocorreu na Rússia em 2002 e dois de nossos alunos ganharam a medalha de bronze naquele evento.

  3. Composition of the gases associated with the magmas that produced rocks 15016 and 15065

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, C.

    1974-01-01

    Gases may be trapped in crystallizing minerals in many different ways but gas analyses can provide geologically meaningful information only if the gases can be related to their specific locations in the host mineral. The gases trapped in glass inclusions can be representative samples of the gases associated with the magma adjacent to the mineral at the time it crystallized. Analyses of the gases in glass inclusions in gabbro 15065,44 and basalt 15016,48 show that in both cases the gases in the parent magma started with a composition close to 46% oxygen, 42% carbon and 12% hydrogen and became more water-rich as crystallization progressed. This enrichment is probably due to a selective removal of the less soluble carbon compounds into the vapor phase. Some of the volatile components may react with the rock as temperature falls to give siderite and possibly hydrous phases.

  4. Measurement of density and porosity of lunar rocks based on samples of Luna 16 automatic lunar station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volynets, V. F.; Florenskiy, K. P.; Ivanov, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Three fragments of holocrystalline igneous rocks of the gabbro type, weighing 30 to 50 mg each, were investigated. The density of the fragments was established with a mercury pycnometer and was found to be 3.05 to 3.12 g/cu cm, with a relative error not more than 2 percent. The porosity was found for the difference between the volumes determined with the mercury and with the gas techniques; for all three samples together it was 13 percent, and the error of determination was 70 percent owing to the small volumes. It can be anticipated that the porosity of the rock in bulk will be higher than the value obtained based on small fragments. The porosity of lunar rocks can markedly affect the isostatic distribution of rocks and must be taken into account when developing models of lunar structure.

  5. X-ray electron study of lunar regolith from the Sea of Fertility and the Sea of Tranquillity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Nefedov, V. I.; Urusov, V. S.; Zhavoronkov, N. M.

    1974-01-01

    X-ray electron spectra were obtained of the 2p-levels of Fe, Ti, Si, Al, and Mg, and of the 1s-level in lunar regolith from the Sea of Fertility and the Sea of Tranquillity. The spectra of the same elements were recorded for approximately 30 rock forming minerals, oceanic gabbro, meteoritic eucrite, and several iron meteorites. Analysis of the results based on line positions showed that all the elements studied have the usual degrees of oxidation, and that oxygen atoms are their nearest neighbors. The predominant coordination number of Al is 4. Analysis and comparison of the Fe2p spectra in regolith, various iron meteorites, and stainless steel leads to these conclusions: Metallic iron in lunar regolith is in a highly dispersed state and is unusually stable with respect to oxidation by the oxygen of the earth's atmosphere.

  6. Trace geochemistry of lunar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    The lunar samples from the Apollo 16 and 17 flights which were analyzed include soil, igneous rock, anorthositic gabbro, orange soil, subfloor basalt, and norite breccia. Up to 57 elements including majors, minors, rare earths and other trace elements were determined in the lunar samples. The analytical techniques used were spark source mass spectrometry and neutron activation analysis. The latter was done either instrumentally or with group radiochemical separations. The differences in abundances of the elements in lunar soils at the various sites are discussed. With regard to the major elements only Si is about the same at all the sites. A detailed analysis which was performed on a sample of the Allende meteorite is summarized.

  7. Phase chemistry of Apollo 14 soil sample 14259

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    0.26 gm of Apollo 14 soil sample 14259 has been investigated by optical, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe techniques. The mineral abundances in the soil are 45% plagioclase, 41% pyroxene, 7% olivine, 3% oxides, 2% K-feldspar, 1% nickel-iron and less than 1% troilite. Eleven percent of the glasses have compositions like those of mare basalts or mare soils and are believed to be mare-derived. Eighty-six percent of the glasses are equivalent in composition to basalts that have higher Al, and lower Ca/Al and Fe/Mg ratios than mare basalts. The most abundant compositional type is named Fra Mauro basaltic glass and is subdivided into three related types. The other major glass type in the soil corresponds in composition to anorthositic gabbro.

  8. Importance of neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis in relatively dry, low-porosity rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Philbin, P.W.; Boynton, G.R.; Wager, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of variations in the neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis, capture gamma-ray measurements were made in relatively dry, low-porosity gabbro of the Duluth Complex. Although sections of over a meter of solid rock were encountered in the borehole, there was significant fracturing with interstitial water leading to a substantial variation of water with depth in the borehole. The linear-correlation coefficients calculated for the peak intensities of several elements compared to the chemical core analyses were generally poor throughout the depth investigated. The data suggest and arguments are given which indicate that the variation of the thermal-to-intermediate-to-fast neutron flux density as a function of borehole depth is a serious source of error and is a major cause of the changes observed in the capture gamma-ray peak intensities. These variations in neutron energy may also cause a shift in the observed capture gamma-ray energy.

  9. New wireline seafloor drill augers well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allerton, S.; Wallis, D.; Derrick, J.; Smith, D.; MacLeod, C. J.

    The first trials of a new wireline seafloor drill (Figure 1) have been a resounding success, and the new technology is expected to open up the ocean basins for in-depth studies in microtectonics and paleomagnetism. Structural and paleomagnetic work has been extremely important for tectonics on the continents, and extending such studies into the ocean basins, through development of wireline drilling, puts us on the brink of a new phase in research.Funded through the British Mid-Ocean Ridge Initiative (BRIDGE), the drill is known as the BRIDGE drill. On its very first deployment from a ship, it recovered over half a meter of oriented gabbro core from the Atlantis Bank on the South West Indian Ridge (Figure 2). In the course of the research cruise, the drill took short oriented hardrock cores from 11 different seafloor sites [MacLeod et al., 1998].

  10. Phlogopite-bearing peridotite from the 25°S oceanic core complex, along the Central Indian Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soda, Y.; Igarashi, M.; Ogasawara, Y.; Takagi, H.; Sawaguchi, T.; Neo, N.; Morishita, T.; Nakamura, K.; Kumagai, H.; Yk05-16Leg1 Scientific Party

    2010-12-01

    The 25°S oceanic core complex (OCC) is located nearby the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean. We performed three dives of manned submersible, SHINKAI 6500, during YK05-16 (Kumagai et al., 2008, Morishita et al., 2009), and corrected samples directly from the surface of the OCC. Deformed rocks described here are peridotite, gabbro, basalt, breccia and their metasomatic products. Peridotite is altered to talc-rich rocks and amphibole schist. Weakly metasomatized part of peridotite consists of olivine, orthopyroxene, phlogopite and Cr-spinel. Olivine and orthopyroxene grains show ductile deformation textures. Phlogopite exists in grain boundaries and fractures of olivine grains. Most of phlogopite grains have undergone chloritization with various degrees. In the phlogopite abounding part, array of them are made up of the foliation. Cr-spinel (altered to ferrite chromite) is surrounded by phlogopite. Serpentine (chrysotile; identified by Laser Raman spectroscopy) occurs only in talc vein walls and solid inclusions (<0.01mm) in the olivine of healed micro-cracks. Talc replaces olivine and orthopyroxene at the margin of peridotite sample. Amphiboles also occur, and show syn-tectonic deformation textures. Gabbro consists of plagioclase and Fe-rich amphiboles (0.3gabbro is the protolith of amphibole schist, and which is formed under retrogressive deformation. Breccia consists of many kinds of clasts such as gabbro, amphibole schist and basalt. Although peridotite and serpentinite are not recognized as clasts in the breccia, Cr-spinel is found in the breccia; this indicates that peridotite is also one of the sources of the breccia. Similarly to the previous studies of deformed rocks from the other OCC regions (e.g., Escartin et al., 2003, Schroeder and John, 2004, Boschi et al., 2006, Schroeder et al., 2007), the fault rocks from the 25°S OCC show that the strong

  11. Metamorphism of deep-seated rocks from the Garrett Ultrafast Transform (East Pacific Rise near 13°25‧S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bideau, Daniel; Hebert, Rejean; Hekinian, Roger; Cannat, Mathilde

    1991-06-01

    In spite of 10 years of extensive exploration of the East Pacific Rise, the petrology of the fast slipping transforms remains poorly documented. In 1980, metagabbros and serpentinites were dredged from the deepest trough (4616-4820 m in depth) of the Garrett ultrafast transform which intersects the East Pacific Rise near 13°25'S (16 cm/yr total spreading rate). Previous works on their protolith concluded that the samples consist of serpentinized refractory upper mantle and lower crust gabbroic cumulates. In addition, several ultramafic rocks showing evidences of magmatic impregnation were believed to represent mantle-crust transition zone as observed in ophiolite complexes. The present work focuses on the postigneous evolution of the rocks affected by hydrothermal circulation. An early stage of amphibolitization occurred at about 700°-400°C and probably down to 300°C in the most evolved gabbros (Ti-Fe gabbros). The amphibole compositional variations suggest evolution of the metasomatic solution and temperature through time from the amphibolite facies down to the lower greenshist facies. High-chlorine ferruginous hornblendes (3-5 wt % Cl) found in veins of the ferrogabbros suggests that pore fluids in this type of material evolved in situ to a ferruginous brine. The decreasing temperature (300°-200°C) and further fracturing favored more or less pervasive serpentinization of the olivine-rich samples (ultramafics and olivine-gabbros). The release of Ca++ in the solution contributed to the alteration of the plagioclase-bearing rocks (troctolites and gabbros) which were invaded by calc-silicates (hydrogrossular, prehnite, pumpellyite, and epidote), a process which is referred to as "rodingitization". The occurrence of monomineralic veins of Al-pumpellyite in some metagabbros suggests very low ƒO2 conditions in the lower ocean crust (PH2O<2 kbar). Low ƒO2 also inferred from the composition of the other calc-silicates and indicates low permeability and limited

  12. Evolution and geochemistry of the Tertiary calc-alkaline plutons in the Adak Island region of the central Aleutian oceanic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Suzanne; Citron, Gary P.; Kay, Robert W.; Jicha, Brian; Tibbetts, Ashley

    2014-05-01

    Calc-alkaline plutons are major crustal building blocks of continental margin mountain belts like the Mesozoic to Tertiary Andes and the Sierra Nevada, but are rare in oceanic island arcs. Some of the most calc-alkaline I-type island arc plutons are in the Central Aleutians with the most extreme signatures, as indicated by FeO/MgO ratios of < ~2 at 48-70% wt. % SiO2, in the ~10 km wide Oligocene Hidden Bay pluton on southern Adak Island and the 10 km wide Miocene Kagalaska pluton to the north on eastern Adak and the adjacent Kagalaska Island. Although small compared to most continental plutons, similarities in intrusive units, mineralogy and chemistry suggest common formation processes. The Aleutian calc-alkaline plutonic rocks mainly differ from continental plutons in having more oceanic like isotopic (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703-0.7033; Epsilon Nd = 9-7.8) and LIL (e.g., higher K/Rb) ratios. The Adak region plutons differ from Tertiary plutons on Unalaska Island further east in being more K-rich and in having a more oxidized and lower-temperature mineralogy. From a regional perspective, the Adak area plutons intrude Eocene/Oligocene Finger Bay Formation mafic volcanic and sedimentary rocks and postdate the small ~38 Ma tholeiitic Finger Bay pluton. The chemistry of these older magmatic rocks is basically similar to that of young Central Aleutian magmatic rocks with boninites and arc tholeiitic magmas seemingly being absent. The formation of the calc-alkaline plutons seems to require a sufficient crustal thickness, fluid concentration and contractional stress such that magma chambers can stabilize significant amounts of pargasitic hornblende. Seismic receiver function analyses (Janiszewski et al., 2013) indicate the modern Adak crust is ~ 37 km thick. Existing and new hornblende, plagioclase and biotite Ar/Ar ages from 16 Hidden Bay pluton and Gannet Lake stock gabbro, porphyritic diorite, diorite, granodiorite, leucogranodiorite and aplite samples range from 34.6 to 30

  13. The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    The fracture strength and frictional strength of Weber Sandstone have been measured as a function of confining pressure and pore pressure. Both the fracture strength and the frictional strength obey the law of effective stress, that is, the strength is determined not by the confining pressure alone but by the difference between the confining pressure and the pore pressure. The fracture strength of the rock varies by as much as 20 per cent depending on the cement between the grains, but the frictional strength is independent of lithology. Over the range 0 2 kb, ??=0??5 + 0??6??n. This relationship also holds for other rocks such as gabbro, dunite, serpentinite, granite and limestone. ?? 1975.

  14. Interplay between magmatic accretion, spreading asymmetry and detachment faulting at a segment end: Crustal structure south of the Ascension Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialas, Jörg; Dannowski, Anke; Reston, Timothy J.

    2015-12-01

    A wide-angle seismic section across the Mid-Atlantic Ridge just south of the Ascension transform system reveals laterally varying crustal thickness, and to the east a strongly distorted Moho that appears to result from slip along a large-offset normal fault, termed an oceanic detachment fault. Gravity modelling supports the inferred crustal structure. We investigate the interplay between magmatism, detachment faulting and the changing asymmetry of crustal accretion, and consider several possible scenarios. The one that appears most likely is remarkably simple: an episode of detachment faulting which accommodates all plate divergence and results in the westward migration of the ridge axis, is interspersed with dominantly magmatic and moderately asymmetric (most on the western side) spreading which moves the spreading axis back towards the east. Following the runaway weakening of a normal fault and its development into an oceanic detachment fault, magma both intrudes the footwall to the fault, producing a layer of gabbro (subsequently partially exhumed).

  15. Early Jurassic mafic dykes from the Xiazhuang ore district (South China): Implications for tectonic evolution and uranium metallogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lian-Xun; Ma, Chang-Qian; Lai, Zhong-Xin; Marks, Michael A. W.; Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Yu-Fang

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive study on zircon U-Pb age dating, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope data has been conducted on the mafic rocks of the Xiazhuang uranium ore district and adjacent regions in South China. Based on field work and petrographic features, three rock types (the Kuzhukeng gabbro, the WNW-trending dolerite dykes and the NNE-trending lamprophyre dykes) are distinguished. Early Jurassic SHRIMP and LA-ICPMS ages of zircon for the Kuzhukeng gabbro (198 ± 1 Ma) and WNW-trending dolerite dykes (193 ± 4 Ma) have been obtained, which are 50 Ma older than previously thought (being Cretaceous). These geochronologic data provide new evidence for the rarely identified Early Jurassic magmatisms in South China. Whole-rock geochemical data for the Kuzhukeng gabbro and WNW-trending dolerite dykes are similar, both of which being higher in FeO and TiO2 but lower in SiO2 and K2O than the NNE-trending lamprophyre dykes. Trace element characteristics and Sr-Nd isotope data indicate arc-like signatures similar to the Cretaceous southeast coast basalts of China for the lamprophyre dykes, but an OIB-like geochemical affinity for the high-TiO2 mafic rocks similar to the Permo/Triassic Emeishan flood basalts and the Middle Jurassic Ningyuan alkaline basalts. We propose that the lamprophyre dykes formed in an arc volcanic system driven by the subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate. In contrast, the Kuzhukeng gabbro and associated dolerite dykes record the post-orogenic (Indosinian) extension event in the Tethyan tectonic regime. This further implies that the Indosinian extension may have lasted until the Early Jurassic, and therefore, the subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate in south China was probably later than this period. Most U deposits of the Xiazhuang area are located at the intersection between the WNW-trending dolerite dykes and the NNE-trending faults within the Triassic granites of eastern Guidong complex, South China. Previous metallogenesis studies assumed that

  16. Magmatic history of Red Sea rifting: perspective from the central Saudi Arabian coastal plain.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    An early stage of magmatism related to Red Sea rifting is recorded by a Tertiary dyke complex and comagmatic volcanic rocks exposed on the central Saudi Arabian coastal plain. Field relations and new K/Ar dates indicate episodic magmatism from approx 30 m.y. to the present day and rift-related magmatism as early as 50 m.y. Localized volcanism and sheeted dyke injection ceased at approx 20 m.y. and were replaced by the intrusion of thick gabbro dykes, marking the onset of sea-floor spreading in the central Red Sea. Differences in the depths and dynamics of mantle-melt extraction and transport may account for the transition from mixed alkaline-subalkaline bimodal magmatism of the pre-20 m.y. rift basin to exclusively subalkaline (tholeiitic) magmatism of the Red Sea spreading axis and the alkali basalt volcanism inland.-L.C.H.

  17. Geochemical recognition of a captured back-arc basin metabasaltic complex, southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    An extensive fault-bounded amphibolite terrane of Late Jurassic (145 ?? 2 Ma) metamorphic age occurring in the northeastern Klamath Mountains of southern Oregon has been recognized as the remnants of an ancient back-arc basin. In spite of thorough metamorphic recrystallization under amphibolite-facies conditions, the amphibolite locally displays relict igneous textures which suggest that the protoliths included basaltic dikes or sills, shallow diabase intrusions, and gabbros. The geochemical data, together with the present-day geologic context, indicate that the tectonic setting of eruption/intrusion was probably within a back-arc basin that existed inboard (east) of a pre-Nevadan volcanic arc. The basalt (now amphibolite) and the overlying sediments (now the May Creek Schist) were metamorphosed and deformed during accretion to North America during the Late Jurassic Nevadan orogeny. -from Author

  18. Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes of the intrusive rocks in the Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolite, southern Tibet: Constraints on its formation setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Zhang, Chang; Ji, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Gang

    2016-08-01

    The Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolite is best exposed at the central part of the Yarlung-Zangbo Suture Zone, Tibet Plateau. It consists of a thick section of mantle peridotites, but a relatively thin mafic sequence. This study presents geochronological and geochemical data for intrusive dykes (both mafic and felsic) and basalts to revisit the formation setting of the Xigaze ophiolite. The rodingites are characterized by high CaO and low Na2O contents relative to mafic dykes and show big variations in trace element compositions. Both gabbros and diabases have similar geochemical compositions, with MgO contents of 6.42-11.48 wt% and Mg# of 0.56-0.71. They display REE patterns similar to N-MORB and are variably enriched in large ion lithophile elements. Basalts have fractionated compositions and display LREE-depleted patterns very similar to N-MORB. They do not show obvious enrichment in LILE and depletion in high-field-strength elements, but a negative Nb anomaly is present. The studied plagiogranites have compositions of trondhjemite to tonalite, with high Na2O and low K2O contents. They have low TiO2 contents less than 1 wt%, consistent with melts formed by anatexis of gabbros rather than by differentiation of basalts. Zircons from seven samples, including three rodingites, three plagiogranites, and one gabbro, have been dated and yielded U-Pb ages of 124.6 ~ 130.5 Ma, indicating the Xigaze ophiolite was formed during the Early Cretaceous. They have mantle-like δ18O values of + 4.92 ~ + 5.26‰ and very positive εHf(t) values of + 16 ~ + 13.3. Ages of the rodingites and less altered gabbros indicate that serpentinization was occurred at ~ 125 Ma. Occurrence of both gabbroic and diabase dykes within the serpentinites suggests that the mantle lithosphere of the Xigaze ophiolite was rapidly exhumed. Both mafic and felsic dykes have slightly more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios relative to MORB, but depleted Hf-Nd isotpe compositions. They have a limited range of ε

  19. Ocean plateau-seamount origin of basaltic rocks, Angayucham terrane, central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Jones, D.L.; Budahn, J.R.; Coney, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Angayucham terrane of north-central Alaska (immediately S of the Brooks Range) is a large (ca. 500 km E-W), allochthonous complex of Devonian to Lower Jurassic pillow basalt, diabase sills, gabbro plutons, and chert. The mafic rocks are transitional normal-to-enriched, mid-ocean-ridge (MORB) type tholeiites (TiO2 1.2-3.4%, Nb 7-23 ppm, Ta 0.24-1.08 ppm, Zr 69-214 ppm, and light REE's slightly depleted to moderately enriched). Geologic and geochemical constraints indicate that Angayucham terrane is the upper "skin' (ca. 3-4 km thick) of a long-lived (ca. 170-200 ma) oceanic plateau whose basaltic-gabbroic rocks are like those of seamounts of the East Pacific Rise. -Authors

  20. Survey of existing underground openings for in-situ experimental facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.; Graf, A.; Strisower, B.; Korbin, G.

    1981-07-01

    In an earlier project, a literature search identified 60 underground openings in crystalline rock capable of providing access for an in-situ experimental facility to develop geochemical and hydrological techniques for evaluating sites for radioactive waste isolation. As part of the current project, discussions with state geologists, owners, and operators narrowed the original group to 14. Three additional sites in volcanic rock and one site in granite were also identified. Site visits and application of technical criteria, including the geologic and hydrologic settings and depth, extent of the rock unit, condition, and accessibility of underground workings, determined four primary candidate sites: the Helms Pumped Storage Project in grandiodorite of the Sierra Nevada, California; the Tungsten Queen Mine in Precambrian granodiorite of the North Carolina Piedmont; the Mount Hope Mine in Precambrian granite and gneiss of northern New Jersey; and the Minnamax Project in the Duluth gabbro complex of northern Minnesota.

  1. Exploring the plutonic crust at a fast-spreading ridge:new drilling at Hess Deep

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis, Kathryn M.; Snow, Jonathan E.; Klaus, Adam; Guerin, Gilles; Abe, Natsue; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Ceuleneer, Georges; Cheadle, Michael J.; Adriao, Alden de Brito; Faak, Kathrin; Falloon, Trevor J.; Friedman, Sarah A.; Godard, Marguerite M.; Harigane, Yumiko; Horst, Andrew J.; Hoshide, Takashi; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jean, Marlon M.; John, Barbara E.; Koepke, Juergen H.; Machi, Sumiaki; Maeda, Jinichiro; Marks, Naomi E.; McCaig, Andrew M.; Meyer, Romain; Morris, Antony; Nozaka, Toshio; Python, Marie; Saha, Abhishek; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2013-02-28

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hess Deep Expedition 345 was designed to sample lower crustal primitive gabbroic rocks that formed at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) in order to test models of magmatic accretion and the intensity of hydrothermal cooling at depth. The Hess Deep Rift was selected to exploit tectonic exposures of young EPR plutonic crust, building upon results from ODP Leg 147 as well as more recent submersible, remotely operated vehicle, and near-bottom surveys. The primary goal was to acquire the observations required to test end-member crustal accretion models that were in large part based on relationships from ophiolites, in combination with mid-ocean ridge geophysical studies. This goal was achieved with the recovery of primitive layered olivine gabbros and troctolites with many unexpected mineralogical and textural relationships, such as the abundance of orthopyroxene and the preservation of delicate skeletal olivine textures.

  2. A new integrated tectonic model for the Mesozoic-Early Cenozoic subduction, spreading, accretion and collision history of Tethys adjacent to the southern margin of Eurasia (NE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Parlak, Osman; Ustaömer, Timur; Taslı, Kemal; İnan, Nurdan; Dumitrica, Paulian; Karaoǧlan, Fatih

    2014-05-01

    A major Tethyan suture zone (İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan-Kars Suture Zone) borders the southern margin of Eurasia throughout the Pontides. In eastern Turkey the suture zone includes a range of redeposited terrigenous and volcanogenic sedimentary rocks, pelagic sedimentary rocks and also igneous/metamorphic rocks. The igneous rocks are mostly basaltic blocks and thrust sheets within melange, plus relatively intact, to dismembered, ophiolitic rocks (oceanic crust). Two alternative hypotheses have been developed and tested during this work: 1. The suture zone preserves a single Andean-type active continental margin associated with northward subduction, accretion and arc magmatism during Mesozoic-early Cenozoic time; 2. The suture zone preserves the remnants of two different subduction zones, namely a continental margin subduction zone (as above) and an intra-ocean subduction zone (preferred model). To determine the age of the oceanic crust, relevant to both hypotheses, zircons were extracted from basic ophiolitic rocks (both intact and dismembered) and dated by the U/Pb method (U238/U236) using an ion probe at Edinburgh University. This yielded the following results for the intact ophiolites (Ma): plagiogranite cutting sheeted dykes of the Refahiye ophiolite (east of Erzincan), 183.6±1.7 (2σ); isotropic gabbro from the Karadaǧ ophiolite (northeast of Erzurum), 179.4±1.7 (2σ). In addition, dismembered ophiolites gave the following ages: gabbro cumulate (Bayburt area), 186.2±1.4 (2σ), gabbro cumulate (N of Horasan), 178.1±1.8 (2σ). Furthermore, two samples from a kilometre-sized (arc-related) tonalite body, mapped as cutting a thrust sheet of ophiolitic isotropic gabbro in the Kırdaǧ area, yielded ages of 182.1±3.2 (2σ) and 185.1±3.0 (2σ) Ma. We infer that the ophiolitic and related magmatic arc rocks formed by spreading in a supra-subduction zone setting during the late Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian-Toarcian). This amends former assumptions of a Late

  3. Feasible metabolisms in high pH springs of the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Cardace, Dawn; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Woycheese, Kristin M; Arcilla, Carlo A

    2015-01-01

    A field campaign targeting high pH, H2-, and CH4-emitting serpentinite-associated springs in the Zambales and Palawan Ophiolites of the Philippines was conducted in 2012-2013, and enabled description of several springs sourced in altered pillow basalts, gabbros, and peridotites. We combine field observations of pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and oxidation-reduction potential with analyses of major ions, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved gas phases in order to model the activities of selected phases important to microbial metabolism, and to rank feasible metabolic reactions based on energy yield. We document changing geochemical inventories in these springs between sampling years, and examine how the environment supports or prevents the function of certain microbial metabolisms. In all, this geochemistry-based assessment of feasible metabolisms indicates methane cycling, hydrogen oxidation, some iron and sulfur metabolisms, and ammonia oxidation are feasible reactions in this continental site of serpentinization.

  4. Petrogenetic characteristics of mafic-ultramafic massifs in Nizhne-Derbinsk complex (East Sayan Mountains)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, T.; Chernishov, A.; Goltsova, Yu; Timkin, T.; Abramova, R.

    2015-11-01

    The article describes the results of petrographic, petrochemical, petrofabric, mineralogical and geochemical studies of the major rock groups potentially Cu, Ni, Pt ore- bearing mafic-ultramafic massifs in the Nizhne- Derbinsk complex (Eastern Sayan Mountains). Based on the data interpretation the investigated massifs can be classified as peridotite- pyroxenite-gabbronorite formation of geosynclinal regime in Altai-Sayan folding area. Significant massif deformation occurred during the final post-consolidation formation stage. The petrographic features of gabbro and petrofabric patterns of the rock-forming minerals in the Burlakski and Nizhne-Derbinsk massifs indicated the fact that massifs were involved in the accretion-collisional development stage of the Central Asian folding belt during the final formation stages the Nizhne-Derbinsk complex.

  5. Comparison of orbital chemistry with crustal thickness and lunar sample chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, E.

    1977-01-01

    A correlation between orbital chemistry (FeO, Al2O3, Mg/Al, MgO/FeO, Th) and the lunar crustal thickness is examined. The correlation suggests either lack of complete homogenization by lateral or vertical mixing, or lateral variation in the differentiation process. In addition, links between orbital chemistry and lunar sample chemistry are investigated. In regions with crustal thickness between 100 and 110 km, gabbroic anorthosites are very abundant, while in regions with crustal thickness of about 80 km anorthositic gabbros are frequent. Special attention is given to the distribution of low-potassium Fra Mauro basalt, found in high concentrations in regions with 50 to 60 km crustal thickness.

  6. Eclogitic breccia from the Monviso meta-ophiolite complex: field and petrographic evidences of multiple-stage eclogite-facies brecciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Michele; Verlaguet, Anne; Federico, Laura; Agard, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The Monviso meta-ophiolite complex (Northern Italy, Western Alps) represents a coherent portion of oceanic lithosphere metamorphosed up to eclogite-facies peak metamorphic conditions during the Alpine orogeny (2.6 GPa - 550 °C, Lago Superiore Unit), and exhibits from bottom to top a thick serpentinite sole capped by metasediments, Mg-Al-rich metagabbros, then Fe-Ti-metagabbros and metabasalts. This section is disrupted by three main shear zones. Our study focusses on the Lower Shear Zone (LSZ), extending from the serpentinite sole (to the East) to the Mg-metagabbro bodies (to the West), composed of blocks of both Fe-Ti and Mg-Al variably brecciated metagabbros embedded in a talc and tremolite-rich serpentinite matrix. The origin of these breccias is debated, being interpreted either as eclogitic breccias resulting from (potentially seismic) intermediate-depth rupture or as sedimentary-derived breccias inherited from Oceanic Core Complex stages. Here we present new field data on the distribution and petrographic characterization of these eclogitic blocks that demonstrate their univocal formation at eclogite-facies conditions. In the LSZ the occurrence of eclogite blocks is uniform along the strike of the shear-zone, resulting in a 16 km-long belt of outcropping eclogitic bodies embedded in serpentinite matrix (from Pian del Re to Colle di Luca). Shear-zone thickness, by contrast, varies from 1 km to 0.6 km and a marked decrease in block size from top to base occurs. Three types of eclogitic blocks can be distinguished: (1) intact (not brecciated) blocks of Fe-Ti-metagabbros restricted to the lower part of the shear zone; (2) numerous brecciated Fe-Ti-metagabbros scattered in the intermediate to upper levels of the LSZ; (3) blocks of gabbros showing compositional variations and complex structures. Brecciation in type 3 blocks occurs in Fe-Ti rich gabbro layers embedded in Mg-Al gabbro bodies. The surrounding Mg-Al gabbros show no brecciation, but rather folding

  7. Autonomous anorthosites of the Anabar Shield: Age, geochemistry, and formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhovskii, M. Z.; Kuz'min, M. I.; Bayanova, T. B.; Bazhenova, G. N.; Lyalina, L. M.; Serov, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    The new high-accuracy data on U-Pb zircon geochronology, Sm-Nd systematics, and geochemistry of anorthosites of the Anabar Shield are discussed. It is established that anorthosite massifs are composed of gabbro-anorthosites (1.96 Ga old) and oligoclasites (1.93 Ga old) in association with monzodiorites (1.84-1.90 Ga old) and porphyroblastic granites. These rocks were generated in the Archean (3.2-2.7 Ga ago) in the lower crust from quartz-diorite melts under the plume tectonics regime in line with the filterpressing mechanism. The rocks were successively exhumed to upper levels of the crust owing to the Paleoproterozoic impact-triggered process to form a tectonically juxtaposed complementary magmatic complex.

  8. Global petrologic variations on the moon: a ternary-diagram approach.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, P.A.; Spudis, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    A ternary-diagram approach for determination of global petrologic variations on the lunar surface is presented that incorporates valuable improvements in our previous method of using geochemical variation diagrams. Our results are as follows: 1) the highlands contain large areas of relatively pure ferroan anorthosite; 2) the average composition of the upper lunar crust is represented by an 'anorthositic gabbro' composition; 3) KREEP/Mg-suite rocks are a minor fraction of the upper lunar crust; 4) within the farside highlands, areas of KREEP/Mg-suite rocks coincide mostly with areas of crustal thinning; 5) portions of the E limb and farside highlands have considerable amounts of a mafic, chondritic Th/Ti component (like mare basalt) whose occurrences coincide with mapped concentrations of light plains that display dark-halo craters.- from Authors

  9. Petrology and geochemistry of mafic and ultramafic cumulates occurring as xenoliths in volcanic rocks from Polish part of Central European Volcanic Province.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajek, Michał; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2015-04-01

    Mafic xenoliths coexisting with the peridotitic ones in rocks from Polish part of Cenozoic European Volcanic Province have been scarcely examined. (Bakun-Czubarow and Białowolska, 2003, Mineralogical Society of Poland- Spec. Pap. and references therein; Matusiak, 2006, Min. Polonica- Spec. Pap.; Puziewicz et al., 2011, JoP). In this study we present new results on mafic and ultramafic xenolithic rocks from the Wilcza Góra, Winna Góra, Góra Świątek, Mnisia Górka and Grodziec volcanic rocks in the Złotoryja-Jawor Volcanic Complex. The studied xenoliths are either plagioclase-free (clinopyroxenite, websterite) or plagioclase-bearing (anorthosite, gabbro, olivine-bearing gabbro and norite). Both the types may occur in the same volcanic rock. The cumulative xenoliths are smaller than peridotitic ones, blackish and show clear cumulative, coarse grained textures. Beside the rock-forming phases, the xenoliths occasionally contain spinel, sulfides and amphibole. Usually clinopyroxene grains occurring in gabbros are strongly corroded or disintegrated, while other phases are well-preserved. Contacts between xenolith and host volcanic rock are usually sharp with subhedral crystals of clinopyroxene growing at the xenolith surface. The mineral grains are usually zoned and chemical equilibrium between phases is scarce. Clinopyroxene in plagioclase-free rocks has composition of diopside with occasionally elevated Al, Ti and Cr contents. It's mg# varies from 0.89 to 0.79. It is slightly to moderately enriched in LREE; the REE patterns are concave, and the normalized values vary significantly between localities. It shows negative Sr anomaly, depth of Ti anomaly is variable. Orthopyroxene is Al-rich enstatite with mg# varying from 0.85 down to 0.75. Orthopyroxene in websterites is LREE depleted and show strong positive Ti and Zr-Hf anomalies. Opaques are ilmenite - Ti-magnetite solid solution and/or sulfides Clinopyroxene forming plagioclase-bearing rocks also has composition

  10. Syn-collision Hairhan layered intrusion, Lakes Zone, Western Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskiy, A. V.; Izokh, A. E.; Kalugin, V. M.; Gertner, I. F.

    2012-04-01

    In the structure of the Lakes Zone of Western Mongolia, which is reconstructed as the Early Cambrian island arc (Lakes island arc terrane), there are several groups of contiguous space gabbroic intrusions, merged in Hirgisnuur complex. The largest (70 km2) is Hairhan intrusion, located in the central part of the Lake Zone in the Bumbat-Hairhan ridge. The structure of the intrusion disturbed by later tectonic movements and the subsequent formation of Cambrian granitoids Tohtoginshil complex. The structures of the body are two groups of rocks: layered series and marginal facies, fragmentary spread to the periphery of intrusion. Gabbronorites of marginal facies have intrusive contacts with the sedimentary rocks of Early Cambrian age Burgastay formation. The marginal facies, apparent thickness which is 1.5 km, is composed primarily of non-olivine gabbronorites in which there is trachytoid and sometimes bedding. Layered series composes the central part of the Hairhan intrusion, the direction of layering has a northwest strike, coaxial with the long axis of the intrusion. The lower part of the layered series consists mainly troctolites with minor olivine gabbroids. The upper part of the layered series consists mainly of olivine gabbro, troctolite occur here less frequently also observed small schlieren anorthosites. Of particular interest is the horizon taxitic gabbro and being above it - the horizon orbicular gabbro at the top of the layered series. The rocks are widely manifested magmatic disruptive and plastic deformation - both macro and micro levels. They are expressed in the collapse of layering of elements in small folds of varying amplitude (typically to a few tens centimeters), often passing into areas and zones taxitic disruption. The greatest number of these structural elements characteristic of the upper part of the layered series, including the orbicular gabbro and troctolites taxitic horizons. These features indicate intensive tectonic processes that

  11. Complex ridge-transform evolution and mantle exhumation at the St. Paul fracture zone system, Equatorial Alantic. Preliminary results from the COLMEIA cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, M.; Sichel, S. E.; Santos, R.; Birot, D.; Brachet, C.; Brehme, I.; Briais, A.; Brunelli, D.; Campos, T.; Colosio, A.; de Moraes, E.; Donval, J.; Fontes, F.; Gaspar, F.; Guyader, V.; Hemond, C.; Konn, C.; Marcondes, M.; Motoki, A.; berengere, M.; Moura, D.; Pessanha, I.; Scalabrin, C.; Vale, E.

    2013-12-01

    The COLMEIA cruise, held in the Equatorial Atlantic, in the area of the St. Paul transform system, is part of a joint effort between France and Brazil for the study of the Mid-Atlantic ridge near the St. Peter & St. Paul's Rocks. The scientific objective of the cruise was to study in detail the temporal evolution of the complex transform plate boundary, and the origin of the St. Peter-St. Paul mylonitic massif. This area of the Mid-Atlantic ridge was considered to be a mantle 'cold spot', thus a magma-starved region with large occurrences of mantle-derived units outcropping at the seafloor. During the cruise we acquired multibeam echosounder bathymetry, backscattering, water column acoustic data, gravity, magnetics and seismics. 31 dredges successfully returned a wide variety of rocks, including basalts, gabbros and peridotites. The 15 CTD stations with nephelometric profiles casted in the transform region returned a single hydrothermal plume signal, probably sourced in the MAR segment south of the St. Paul system, while no hydrothermal activity was directly detected inside the transform system. 5 autonomous hydrophones were moored in the SOFAR channel around the study area in order to monitor the seismic activity and whale presence; they will be recovered mid-2014. Both