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Sample records for fcc transition metals

  1. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  2. Structure and magnetism in fcc magnetic transition metals on (001) diamond (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, J. A.; Krebs, J. J.; Idzerda, Y. U.; Prinz, G. A.; Kemner, K. M.

    1996-04-01

    We have prepared single crystal face centered cubic (fcc) magnetic transition metal films (Co,Ni,Fe) on (001) diamonds, the thickness of the films varying between a few tenths of a nanometer to over 100 nm. The crystalline quality and fourfold symmetry of these layers was monitored in situ during the film growth with RHEED and a chemical analysis was performed using Auger spectroscopy. In addition, the structure of the samples was investigated ex situ using X-ray diffraction and EXAFS, demonstrating the single crystal, fcc (001) structure throughout each entire film. The magnetic characterization was performed with Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) hysteresis loops. The saturation magnetization of the Co films is only slightly lower than the literature values. The coercive fields are very small (˜25 Oe) and the magnetization reversal very sharp. The FMR yielded a fourfold anisotropy comparable to literature values. The observation of the first standing spinwaves underlines the good quality. The Ni films are tetragonally distorted due to the 1.2% mismatch. The FMR data indicate a significant perpendicular anisotropy slightly smaller than 4πM, the fourfold in-plane anisotropy being comparable to the bulk value. The saturation magnetization is reduced by 30% compared to bulk values, probably due to nickel-carbide which was observed in the XRD data from some samples. Neither the in-plane <110> nor the in-plane <100> axis show an easy axis behavior and both require fields in excess of 6000 Oe to saturate, the coercive fields being about 200 Oe. The RHEED patterns of the Fe films show single crystal growth with a lattice constant comparable to diamond, indicating an fcc structure. A similar structural and magnetic characterization of these films will also be presented.

  3. Linear-in-temperature resistivity close to a topological metal insulator transition in ultra-multi valley fcc-ytterbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlein, Carsten; Fontes, Magda; Baggio-Saitovich, Elisa; Continentino, Mucio A.

    2016-01-01

    The semimetal-to-semiconductor transition in fcc-Yb under modest pressure can be considered a picture book example of a metal-insulator transition of the Lifshitz type. We have performed transport measurements at low temperatures in the closest vicinity of the transition and related DFT calculations of the Fermi surface. Our resistivity measurements show a linear temperature dependence with an unusually low dρ / dT at low temperatures approaching the MIT. The calculations suggest fcc-ytterbium being an ultra-multi valley system with 24 electron and 6 hole pockets in the Brillouin zone. Such Fermi surface topology naturally supports the appearance of strongly correlated phases. An estimation of the quasiparticle-enhanced effective mass shows that the scattering rate is by at least two orders of magnitude lower than in other materials which exhibit linear-in-T behavior at a quantum critical point. However, we cannot exclude an excessive effective mass enhancement, when the van Hove singularity touches the Fermi level.

  4. Dissolving, trapping and detrapping mechanisms of hydrogen in bcc and fcc transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xue-Bang; Xu, Yi-Chun; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.; Liu, C. S.; Pan, B. C.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2013-01-01

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate the dissolving, trapping and detrapping of H in six bcc (V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W) and six fcc (Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au) metals. We find that the zero-point vibrations do not change the site-preference order of H at interstitial sites in these metals except Pt. One vacancy could trap a maximum of 4 H atoms in Au and Pt, 6 H atoms in V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Ni, Pd, Cu and Ag, and 12 H atoms in Mo and W. The zero-point vibrations never change the maximum number of H atoms trapped in a single vacancy in these metals. By calculating the formation energy of vacancy-H (Vac-Hn) complex, the superabundant vacancy in V, Nb, Ta, Pd and Ni is demonstrated to be much more easily formed than in the other metals, which has been found in many metals including Pd, Ni and Nb experimentally. Besides, we find that it is most energetically favorable to form Vac-H1 complex in Pt, Cu, Ag and Au, Vac-H4 in Cr, Mo and W, and Vac-H6 in V, Nb, Ta, Pd and Ni. At last, we examine the detrapping behaviors of H atoms in a single vacancy and find that with the heating rate of 10 K/min a vacancy could accommodate 4, 5 and 6 H atoms in Cr, Mo and W at room temperature, respectively. The detrapping temperatures of all H atoms in a single vacancy in V, Nb, Ta, Ni, Pd, Cu and Ag are below room temperature.

  5. Bcc and Fcc transition metals and alloys: a central role for the Jahn-Teller effect in explaining their ideal and distorted structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Hoffmann, Roald

    2002-05-01

    Transition metal elements, alloys, and intermetallic compounds often adopt the body centered cubic (bcc) and face centered cubic (fcc) structures. By comparing quantitative density functional with qualitative tight-binding calculations, we analyze the electronic factors which make the bcc and fcc structures energetically favorable. To do so, we develop a tight-binding function, DeltaE(star), a function that measures the energetic effects of transferring electrons within wave vector stars. This function allows one to connect distortions in solids to the Jahn-Teller effect in molecules and to provide an orbital perspective on structure determining deformations in alloys. We illustrate its use by considering first a two-dimensional square net. We then turn to three-dimensional fcc and bcc structures, and distortions of these. Using DeltaE(star), we rationalize the differences in energy of these structures. We are able to deduce which orbitals are responsible for instabilities in seven to nine valence electron per atom (e(-)/a) bcc systems and five and six e(-)/a fcc structures. Finally we demonstrate that these results account for the bcc and fcc type structures found in both the elements and binary intermetallic compounds of group 4 through 9 transition metal atoms. The outline of a theory of metal structure deformations based on loss of point group operation rather than translational symmetry is presented.

  6. Magnetic states, correlation effects and metal-insulator transition in FCC lattice.

    PubMed

    Timirgazin, M A; Igoshev, P A; Arzhnikov, A K; Yu Irkhin, V

    2016-12-21

    The ground-state magnetic phase diagram (including collinear and spiral states) of the single-band Hubbard model for the face-centered cubic lattice and related metal-insulator transition (MIT) are investigated within the slave-boson approach by Kotliar and Ruckenstein. The correlation-induced electron spectrum narrowing and a comparison with a generalized Hartree-Fock approximation allow one to estimate the strength of correlation effects. This, as well as the MIT scenario, depends dramatically on the ratio of the next-nearest and nearest electron hopping integrals [Formula: see text]. In contrast with metallic state, possessing substantial band narrowing, insulator one is only weakly correlated. The magnetic (Slater) scenario of MIT is found to be superior over the Mott one. Unlike simple and body-centered cubic lattices, MIT is the first order transition (discontinuous) for most [Formula: see text]. The insulator state is type-II or type-III antiferromagnet, and the metallic state is spin-spiral, collinear antiferromagnet or paramagnet depending on [Formula: see text]. The picture of magnetic ordering is compared with that in the standard localized-electron (Heisenberg) model.

  7. Magnetic states, correlation effects and metal-insulator transition in FCC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timirgazin, M. A.; Igoshev, P. A.; Arzhnikov, A. K.; Irkhin, V. Yu

    2016-12-01

    The ground-state magnetic phase diagram (including collinear and spiral states) of the single-band Hubbard model for the face-centered cubic lattice and related metal-insulator transition (MIT) are investigated within the slave-boson approach by Kotliar and Ruckenstein. The correlation-induced electron spectrum narrowing and a comparison with a generalized Hartree-Fock approximation allow one to estimate the strength of correlation effects. This, as well as the MIT scenario, depends dramatically on the ratio of the next-nearest and nearest electron hopping integrals {{t}\\prime}/t . In contrast with metallic state, possessing substantial band narrowing, insulator one is only weakly correlated. The magnetic (Slater) scenario of MIT is found to be superior over the Mott one. Unlike simple and body-centered cubic lattices, MIT is the first order transition (discontinuous) for most {{t}\\prime}/t . The insulator state is type-II or type-III antiferromagnet, and the metallic state is spin-spiral, collinear antiferromagnet or paramagnet depending on {{t}\\prime}/t . The picture of magnetic ordering is compared with that in the standard localized-electron (Heisenberg) model.

  8. Thermoreversible, epitaxial fcc<-->bcc transitions in block copolymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Bang, Joona; Lodge, Timothy P; Wang, Xiaohui; Brinker, Kristin L; Burghardt, Wesley R

    2002-11-18

    Uncharged block copolymer micelles display thermoreversible transitions between close-packed and bcc lattices for a range of concentration, solvent selectivity, and copolymer composition. Using small-angle x-ray scattering on shear-oriented solutions, highly aligned fcc crystals are seen to transform epitaxially to bcc crystals, with fcc/bcc orientational relationships that are well established in martensitic transformations in metals. The transition is driven by decreasing solvent selectivity with increasing temperature, inducing solvent penetration of the micellar core.

  9. Twinning in nanocrystalline fcc and bcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Vladimir S.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2013-03-01

    The deformation twinning in nanocrystalline (nc) face-centered cubic (fcc) metals, body-centered cubic (bcc) metals, and in nc Si is analyzed. The phenomenological approach is used to make a bridge between microscopical mechanisms of twin nucleation and macroscopical characteristics of twinning with different crystal structures and to calculate the grain size range of the twinning propensity, the requisite external stress for twinning propagation in nc polycrystals, and the grain size at which the slip begins to prevail over the twinning. The developed approach allows to derive analytical expressions and estimate lower and and upper limits of grain sizes at which a twinning propensity is occurred. Results of calculations for the nc fcc metals Al, Cu, Ni, Pd, Au, nc bcc metals Ta, Fe, Mo, W, Nb, and nc diamond-cubic Si are compared with the experimental data, otherwise predictions are made.

  10. Structure and Magnetism in fcc Magnetic Metals on (001) Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, J. A.; Krebs, J. J.; Idzerda, Y. U.; Prinz, G. A.; Kemner, K. M.

    1996-03-01

    We have prepared single crystal face centered cubic (fcc) magnetic transition metal films (Co, Ni, Fe) on (001) diamonds, the thickness of the films varying from ~1nm to over 100nm. The crystalline quality and fourfold symmetry of these layers was monitored in-situ during film growth with RHEED and a chemical analysis was performed using Auger spectroscopy. In addition, the structure of the samples was investigated ex-situ using X-ray diffraction and EXAFS, demonstrating the single crystal, fcc (001) structure throughout the entire film. The magnetic characterization of the Co-, Ni- and Fe-films was carried out with Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) hysteresis loops, yielding information on the cubic anisotropy constant K_1, the magnetic moment M and the magnetization reversal. The Co displays extremely high quality growth and magnetic characteristics up to thicknesses well in excess of 100nm, while the Ni is tetragonally distorted resulting in an out-of-plane anisotropy component. The fcc Fe is only stable up to ~2nm before the transition to the bcc crystal structure starts.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of FCC Metallic Nanowires: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Jijun; Naghdi Tam, Mehdi; Pinisetty, Dinesh; Gupta, Nikhil

    2013-02-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation studies are reviewed to understand the influence of strain rate, temperature, and cross-section size on the mechanical properties of face-centered cubic (FCC) metallic nanowires (MNWs). The yield stress of FCC MNWs is found to be 100 times higher than that of the corresponding bulk metals. The yield strain and fracture stress of MNWs are also found to be significantly higher compared with those of the bulk metals. The influence of deformation mechanisms (slip and twinning) on the mechanical properties of FCC MNWs is discussed. FCC MNWs are found to exhibit novel structural reorientation, phase transformation, elastic recovery, pseudoelasticity, and shape memory effect. MNWs with body-centered cubic (BCC) and hexagonal closed-packed crystal structures are compared with the FCC MNWs. Pseudoelasticity was also observed in BCC MNWs similar to that of FCC MNWs. Dense nano-twin arrays were found in Mg nanowires despite the high twin boundary energy.

  12. Fcc-bcc transition for Yukawa interactions determined by applied strain deformation.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Robert S; Robbins, Mark O

    2004-05-01

    Calculations of the work required to transform between bcc and fcc phases yield a high-precision bcc-fcc transition line for monodisperse point Yukawa (screened-Coulomb) systems. Our results agree qualitatively but not quantitatively with recently published simulations and phenomenological criteria for the bcc-fcc transition. In particular, the bcc-fcc-fluid triple point lies at a higher inverse screening length than previously reported.

  13. Transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo-Moreno, Ana; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals such as Iron (Fe) and Copper (Cu) are essential for plant cell development. At the same time, due their capability to generate hydroxyl radicals they can be potentially toxic to plant metabolism. Recent works on hydroxyl-radical activation of ion transporters suggest that hydroxyl radicals generated by transition metals could play an important role in plant growth and adaptation to imbalanced environments. In this mini-review, the relation between transition metals uptake and utilization and oxidative stress-activated ion transport in plant cells is analyzed, and a new model depicting both apoplastic and cytosolic mode of ROS signaling to plasma membrane transporters is suggested. PMID:23333964

  14. Calculation of thermodynamic potentials with the inclusion of fractional occupation numbers and investigation of FCC-BCC structural phase transitions in alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhivatenko, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    The smearing near the Fermi level has been taken into account in the calculations of the thermodynamic characteristics of metals in order to improve the convergence of the performed calculations and to increase the quality of the obtained results. The choice of the smearing parameter usually has not been explained, although the results of the calculations differ significantly for different values of this parameter. Possible schemes for calculating the thermodynamic potentials with the inclusion of the smearing parameter and additional parameters of the volume and energy shifts have been considered. The influence of these parameters on the calculations of the thermodynamic properties of alkaline-earth metals under pressure and on the description of the structural phase transition has been analyzed.

  15. Deformation twinning mechanisms in FCC and HCP metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Tome, Carlos N; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Mara, N

    2011-01-31

    We report the recent work on twinning and detwinning in fcc and hcp metals based on the in situ and ex situ TEM observations and molecular dynamics simulations. Three aspects are discussed in this paper. (1) Detwinning in single-phase Cu with respect to growth twins, (2) deformation twinning in Ag-Cu composites, and (3) deformation twinning mechanisms in hcp metals. The main conclusion is that atomic structures of interfaces (twin boundaries, two-phases interface, and grain boundaries) play a crucial role in nucleating and propagating of deformation twins.

  16. Synthesis of 4H/fcc-Au@Metal Sulfide Core-Shell Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Xiao; Yang, Jian; Wu, Xue-Jun; Liu, Zhengdong; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Hua

    2015-09-02

    Although great advances on the synthesis of Au-semiconductor heteronanostructures have been achieved, the crystal structure of Au components is limited to the common face-centered cubic (fcc) phase. Herein, we report the synthesis of 4H/fcc-Au@Ag2S core-shell nanoribbon (NRB) heterostructures from the 4H/fcc Au@Ag NRBs via the sulfurization of Ag. Remarkably, the obtained 4H/fcc-Au@Ag2S NRBs can be further converted to a novel class of 4H/fcc-Au@metal sulfide core-shell NRB heterostructures, referred to as 4H/fcc-Au@MS (M = Cd, Pb or Zn), through the cation exchange. We believe that these novel 4H/fcc-Au@metal sulfide NRB heteronanostructures may show some promising applications in catalysis, surface enhanced Raman scattering, solar cells, photothermal therapy, etc.

  17. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-07-27

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  18. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh; Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy

    1999-01-01

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  19. Formation of fivefold axes in the FCC-metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnichenko, Vladimir S.; Starostenkov, Mikhail D.

    2012-11-01

    Formation of atomistic structures of metallic Cu, Au, Ag clusters and bimetallic Cu-Au clusters was studied with the help of molecular dynamics using the many-body tight-binding interatomic potential. The simulation of the crystallization process of clusters with the number of atoms ranging from 300 to 1092 was carried out. The most stable configurations of atoms in the system, corresponding to the minimum of potential energy, was found during super-fast cooling from 1000 K. Atoms corresponding to fcc, hcp, and Ih phases were identified by the method of common neighbor analysis. Incomplete icosahedral core can be discovered at the intersection of one of the Ih axes with the surface of monometallic cluster. The decahedron-shaped structure of bimetallic Cu-Au cluster with seven completed icosahedral cores was obtained. The principles of the construction of small bimetallic clusters with icosahedral symmetry and increased fractal dimensionality were offered.

  20. Scaling Laws and Critical Properties for fcc and hcp Metals.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, Caroline; Widhalm, Leanna; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2016-06-16

    The determination of the critical parameters of metals has remained particularly challenging both experimentally, because of the very large temperatures involved, and theoretically, because of the many-body interactions that take place in metals. Moreover, experiments have shown that these systems exhibit an unusually strong asymmetry of their binodal. Recent theoretical work has led to new similarity laws, based on the calculation of the Zeno line and of the underlying Boyle parameters, which provided results for the critical properties of atomic and molecular systems in excellent agreement with experiments. Using the recently developed expanded Wang-Landau (EWL) simulation method, we evaluate the grand-canonical partition function, over a wide range of conditions, for 11 fcc and hcp metals (Ag, Al, Au, Be, Cu, Ir, Ni, Pb, Pd, Pt, and Rh), modeled with a many-body interaction potential. This allows us to calculate the binodal, Zeno line, and Boyle parameters and, in turn, obtain the critical properties for these systems. We also propose two scaling laws for the enthalpy and entropy of vaporization, and identify critical exponents of 0.4 and 1.22 for these two laws, respectively.

  1. Multiscale modeling of radiation effects in fcc and bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, E; Caturla, M; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Felter, T; Fluss, M; Perlado, J; Wall, M; Wirth, B

    1999-07-15

    The prospect of using computer simulations to calculate radiation-induced defect production and its influence on microstructure evolution and mechanical property changes during prolonged irradiation of nuclear materials has been a beckoning, yet elusive goal for many years. However, the enormous progress achieved in computational physics for calculating reliable, yet tractable interatomic potentials, coupled with vast improvements in computational power have brought this hope to near reality. In order to develop modeling and simulation tools for predicting the irradiation response of nuclear structural materials, models must be implemented and tested across all relevant length and time scales. We discuss the development and implementation of a modeling methodology that consists of the linkage and hierarchical use of ab initio electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. This methodology can describe length and time scales from nanometers to hundreds of microns and from picoseconds to years, respectively. The ideas are demonstrated in two applications. First, we describe simulations that describe the irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing of Pb, a low melting point fcc metal, and compare the results to experiments. Second, we show how these methods can be used to investigate damage production and freely migrating defect formation in irradiated V, the key component of candidate low activation alloys for fusion energy applications.

  2. Kinetics study of crystallization with the disorder-bcc-fcc phase transition of charged colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Du, Xuan; Liu, Lixia

    2011-06-21

    Structure transformation (disorder-bcc-fcc) in charged colloidal dispersions, as a manifestation of the Ostwald's step rule, was confirmed by means of reflection spectrum (RS) measurements in our previous study. By taking advantage of a reflection spectrum containing plenty of information about the crystallization behaviors, time-dependent changes of parameters associated with the crystal structure and composition during the disorder-bcc-fcc transition are reported by treating the data from RS in this article. In addition, Avrami's model is adopted to analyze the transition process and investigate the transition rate. On the basis of the above investigations, associated kinetic features of crystallization with the disorder-bcc-fcc transition are described.

  3. Fcc r arrow bct phase transition in Th at extreme compressions: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, O. ); Soederlind, P. ); Wills, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The experimentally observed fcc{r arrow}bct crystallographic phase transition in Th, at {similar to}1 Mbar, is reproduced by means of full-potential, linear-muffin-tin-orbitals calculations. Both the calculated volume and pressure for which the transition occurs, agrees with the experimental data. The calculated pressure dependence of the {ital c}/{ital a} ratio of the bct structure is also in good agreement wtih experimental data. Calculations for La predict the fcc phase to be stable over the bct phase up to {similar to}7 Mbar.

  4. Thermal stability and hcp-fcc allotropic transformation in supported Co metal catalysts probed near operando by ferromagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreev, Andrey S; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Lapina, Olga B; Gerashenko, Alexander

    2015-06-14

    Despite the fact that cobalt based catalysts are used at the industrial scale for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, it is not yet clear which cobalt metallic phase is actually at work under operando conditions and what is its state of dispersion. As it turns out, the different phases of metallic cobalt, fcc and hcp, give rise to distinct ferromagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, within one Co metal particle, the occurrence of several ferromagnetic domains of limited sizes can be evidenced by the specific resonance of Co in multi-domain particles. Consequently, by ferromagnetic NMR, one can follow quantitatively the sintering and phase transitions of dispersed Co metal particles in supported catalysts under near operando conditions. The minimal size probed by ferromagnetic Co NMR is not precisely known but is considered to be in the order of 10 nm for supported Co particles at room temperature and increases to about 35 nm at 850 K. Here, in Co metal Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts supported on β-SiC, the resonances of the fcc multi-domain, fcc single-domain and hcp Co were clearly distinguished. A careful rationalization of their frequency and width dependence on temperature allowed a quantitative analysis of the spectra in the temperature range of interest, thus reflecting the state of the catalysts under near operando conditions that is without the uncertainty associated with prior quenching. The allotropic transition temperature was found to start at 600-650 K, which is about 50 K below the bulk transition temperature. The phase transition was fully reversible and a significant part of the hcp phase was found to be stable up to 850 K. This anomalous behavior that was observed without quenching might prove to be crucial to understand and model active species not only in catalysts but also in battery materials.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of melting and fcc-bcc transitions in Xe.

    PubMed

    Belonoshko, A B; Ahuja, R; Johansson, B

    2001-10-15

    We have investigated the phase diagram of Xe over a wide pressure-temperature range by molecular dynamics. The calculated melting curve is in good agreement with earlier experimental data. At a pressure of around 25 GPa and a temperature of about 2700 K we find a triple fcc-bcc liquid point. The calculated fcc-bcc boundary is in nice agreement with the experimental points, which, however, were interpreted as melting. This finding suggests that the transition from close-packed to bcc structure might be more common at high pressure and high temperature than was previously anticipated.

  6. Tight-binding study of stacking fault energies and the Rice criterion of ductility in the fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Michael J.; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Kioussis, Nicholas; Herbranson, M.

    2000-02-01

    We have used the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) tight-binding (TB) method to calculate the generalized stacking fault energy and the Rice ductility criterion in the fcc metals Al, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, Au, and Pb. The method works well for all classes of metals, i.e., simple metals, noble metals, and transition metals. We compared our results with full potential linear-muffin-tin orbital and embedded atom method (EAM) calculations, as well as experiment, and found good agreement. This is impressive, since the NRL-TB approach only fits to first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave equations of state and band structures for cubic systems. Comparable accuracy with EAM potentials can be achieved only by fitting to the stacking fault energy.

  7. A self-consistent plasticity theory for modeling the thermo-mechanical properties of irradiated FCC metallic polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiazi; Song, Dingkun; Xue, Jianming; Chu, Haijian; Duan, Huiling

    2015-05-01

    A self-consistent theoretical framework is developed to model the thermo-mechanical behaviors of irradiated face-centered cubic (FCC) polycrystalline metals at low to intermediate homologous temperatures. In this model, both irradiation and temperature effects are considered at the grain level with the assist of a tensorial plasticity crystal model, and the elastic-visocoplastic self-consistent method is applied for the scale transition from individual grains to macroscopic polycrystals. The proposed theory is applied to analyze the mechanical behaviors of irradiated FCC copper. It is found that: (1) the numerical results match well with experimental data, which includes the comparison of results for single crystals under the load in different directions, and for polycrystals with the influences of irradiation and temperature. Therefore, the feasibility and accuracy of the present model are well demonstrated. (2) The main irradiation effects including irradiation hardening, post-yield softening, strain-hardening coefficient (SHC) dropping and the non-zero stress offset are all captured by the proposed model. (3) The increase of temperature results in the decrease of yield strength and SHC. The former is attributed to the weakened dislocation-defect interaction, while the latter is due to the temperature-strengthened dynamic recovery of dislocations through the thermally activated mechanism. The present model may provide a theoretical guide to predict the thermo-mechanical behaviors of irradiated FCC metals for the selection of structural materials in nuclear equipment.

  8. Response of FCC and BCC Metals to High-Amplitude Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Marc; Remington, Bruce; Maddox, Brian; Bringa, Eduardo; Park, Hye-Sook; Lu, Chia-Hui

    2013-06-01

    The experimentally observed response of FCC and BCC metals to high-amplitude compressive waves is compared with analytical predictions using constitutive models based on dislocations and twinning and with molecular dynamics simulations. In FCC metals (Cu and Ni), the predictions of dislocation densities from a homogeneous nucleation model are close to those of molecular dynamics simulations. Both are orders of magnitude higher than experimentally observed residual dislocation densities. MD calculations predict a drastic decrease in dislocation densities upon unloading, bringing the values in agreement with measurements. For BCC metals (Ta), on the residual densities are close to predictions of Orowan dislocation multiplication. Due to the much higher Peierls-Nabarro stress, the MD simulations predict much lower dislocation densities than in FCC metals subjected to similar pressures. At higher amplitudes, both FCC and BCC metals experience extensive twinning. The threshold pressure for twinning is successfully modeled by constitutive model based on a critical shear stress for twinning, at the imposed strain rate and temperature. Research funded by UCOP/UC Labs Program.

  9. Multilayer Relaxation and Surface Energies of FCC and BCC Metals Using Equivalent Crystal Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Agustin M.; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1993-01-01

    The multilayer relaxation of fcc and bcc metal surfaces is calculated using equivalent crystal theory. The results for changes in interplanar spacings of planes close to the surface and the ensuing surface energies are discussed in reference to other theoretical results and compared to available experimental data. The calculation includes high-index surfaces for which no other theoretical results are known.

  10. Origin of the thermoreversible fcc-bcc transition in block copolymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Timothy P; Bang, Joona; Park, Moon Jeong; Char, Kookheon

    2004-04-09

    The thermoreversible fcc-bcc transition in concentrated block copolymer micellar solutions is shown to be driven by decreases in the aggregation number as the solvent penetrates the core, leading to a softer intermicelle potential. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements in a dilute solution are used to quantify the temperature-dependent micellar characteristics. The observed phase boundary is in excellent agreement with recent simulations of highly branched star polymers.

  11. Grain Size Dependence of Uniform Elongation in Single-Phase FCC/BCC Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiting; Shen, Yao; Ma, Jiawei; Zheng, Pengfei; Zhang, Lei

    2016-09-01

    We studied the dependence of uniform elongation on grain size in the range of submicron to millimeter for single-phase FCC/BCC metals by reviewing recent experimental results and applying crystal plasticity finite element method simulation. In the order of increasing grain size, uniform elongation can be divided into three stages, namely low elongation stage, nearly constant elongation stage, and decreased elongation with large scatters stage. Low elongation stage features a dramatic increase near the critical grain size at the end of the stage, which is primarily attributed to the emergence of dislocation cell size transition from ultrafine to mid-size grain. Other factors can be neglected due to their negligible influence on overall variation trend. In nearly constant elongation stage, uniform elongation remains unchanged at a high level in general. As grain size keeps growing, uniform elongation starts decreasing and becomes scattered upon a certain grain size, indicating the initiation of decreased elongation with large scatters stage. It is shown that the increase is not linear or smooth but rather sharp at the end of low elongation stage, leading to a wider range in nearly constant elongation stage. The grain size dependence of uniform elongation can serve as a guiding principle for designing small uniaxial tensile specimens for mechanical testing, where size effect matters in most cases.

  12. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  13. Adatom Ascending at Step Edges and Faceting on fcc Metal (110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; de Mongeot, F. B.; Valbusa, U.; Wang, E. G.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2004-01-01

    Using first-principles total-energy calculations, we show that an adatom can easily climb up at monatomic-layer-high steps on several representative fcc metal (110) surfaces via a place exchange mechanism. Inclusion of such novel adatom ascending processes in kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of Al(110) homoepitaxy as a prototypical model system can lead to the existence of an intriguing faceting instability, whose dynamical evolution and kinetic nature are explored in comparison with experimental observations.

  14. Comparison of void strengthening in fcc and bcc metals : large-scale atomic-level modelling.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2005-01-01

    Strengthening due to voids can be a significant radiation effect in metals. Treatment of this by elasticity theory of dislocations is difficult when atomic structure of the obstacle and dislocation is influential. In this paper, we report results of large-scale atomic-level modelling of edge dislocation-void interaction in fcc (copper) and bcc (iron) metals. Voids of up to 5 nm diameter were studied over the temperature range from 0 to 600 K. We demonstrate that atomistic modelling is able to reveal important effects, which are beyond the continuum approach. Some arise from features of the dislocation core and crystal structure, others involve dislocation climb and temperature effects.

  15. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  16. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  17. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-21

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  18. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft. More information at: http://windows.lbl.gov/materials/chromogenics/default.htm

  19. Transition Metal Switchable Mirror

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The switchable-mirrors technology was developed by Tom Richardson and Jonathan Slack of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. By using transition metals rather than the rare earth metals used in the first metal-hydride switchable mirrors, Richardson and Slack were able to lower the cost and simplify the manufacturing process. Energy performance is improved as well, because the new windows can reflect or transmit both visible and infrared light. Besides windows for offices and homes, possible applications include automobile sunroofs, signs and displays, aircraft windows, and spacecraft.

  20. Electronic structure and magnetism of strained bcc phases across the fcc to bcc transition in ultrathin Fe films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calloni, Alberto; Berti, Giulia; Bussetti, Gianlorenzo; Fratesi, Guido; Finazzi, Marco; Ciccacci, Franco; Duò, Lamberto

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the electronic structure of the bcc metastable phases involved in the fcc to bcc transition of Fe. Ultrathin Fe films were grown on a 2-monolayer (ML) Ni/W(110) substrate, where a fcc lattice is stabilized at low Fe coverages and the transition proceeds through the formation of bcc nuclei showing a specific "Kurdjumov-Sachs" orientation with the substrate. A comprehensive description of the electronic structure evolution is achieved by combining spin-resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. According to our results, an exchange-split band structure is observed starting from 2 ML of Fe, concomitant with the formation of ferromagnetic bcc nuclei. Continuous modifications are observed in the spin-resolved photoemission spectra for increasing Fe coverage, especially for what concerns the minority states, possibly indicative of the progressive relaxation of the strained bcc phase starting from the bcc/fcc interface.

  1. Coupled Simulations of Texture Evolution during Deformation and Recrystallization of FCC and BCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B

    2008-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical processing to produce optimum grain structure and texture is key to the successful utilization of commercial aluminum alloys and steels as sheet products. Several modeling techniques have been developed in the past with a reasonably good predictive capability for bulk deformation textures. However, prediction of texture evolution during recrystallization remains very challenging because of uncertainties involved in predicting the mechanisms that lead to nuclei formation and crystallographic orientations of the nuclei, and the uncertainties involved in predicting the grain boundary properties that determine the growth kinetics of the nuclei. We present some of our recent work in modeling the recrystallization textures following hot deformation in polycrystalline BCC and FCC metals.

  2. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: a general microscopic picture.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-11-10

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies.

  3. Electronic and geometric structure of transition-metal nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Jennison, D.R.; Schultz, P.A.; Sears, M.P.; Klitsner, T.

    1996-08-01

    A massively-parallel ab initio computer code, which uses Gaussian bases, pseudopotentials, and the local density approximation, permits the study of transition-metal systems with literally hundreds of atoms. We present total energies and relaxed geometries for Ru, Pd, and Ag clusters with N = 55, 135, and 140 atoms; we also used the DMOL code to study 13-atom Pd and Cu clusters, with and without hydrogen. The N = 55 and 135 clusters were chosen because of simultaneous cubo-octahedral (fcc) and icosahedral (icos) sub-shell closings, and we find icos geometries are preferred. Remarkably large compressions of the central atoms are observed for the icos structures (up to 6% compared with bulk interatomic spacings), while small core compressions ({approx} 1 %) are found for the fcc geometry. In contrast, large surface compressive relaxations are found for the fcc clusters ({approx} 2-3% in average nearest neighbor spacing), while the icos surface displays small compressions ({approx} 1%). Energy differences between icos and fcc are smallest for Pd, and for all systems the single-particle densities of states closely resembles bulk results. Calculations with N = 134 suggest slow changes in relative energy with N. Noting that the 135-atom fcc has a much more open surface than the icos, we also compare N = 140 icos and fcc, the latter forming an octahedron with close packed facets. These icos and fcc clusters have identical average coordinations and the octahedron is found to be preferred for Ru and Pd but not for Ag. Finally, we compare Harris functional and LDA energy differences on the N = 140 clusters, and find fair agreement only for Ag.

  4. Indium-defect interactions in FCC and BCC metals studied using the modified embedded atom method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacate, M. O.

    2016-12-01

    With the aim of developing a transferable potential set capable of predicting defect formation, defect association, and diffusion properties in a wide range of intermetallic compounds, the present study was undertaken to test parameterization strategies for determining empirical pair-wise interaction parameters in the modified embedded atom method (MEAM) developed by Baskes and coworkers. This report focuses on indium-solute and indium-vacancy interactions in FCC and BCC metals, for which a large set of experimental data obtained from perturbed angular correlation measurements is available for comparison. Simulation results were found to be in good agreement with experimental values after model parameters had been adjusted to reproduce as best as possible the following two sets of quantities: (1) lattice parameters, formation enthalpies, and bulk moduli of hypothetical equiatomic compounds with the NaCl crystal structure determined using density functional theory and (2) dilute solution enthalpies in metals as predicted by Miedema's semi-empirical model.

  5. <110> symmetric tilt grain-boundary structures in fcc metals with low stacking-fault energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittner, J. D.; Seidman, D. N.

    1996-09-01

    Twenty-one <110> symmetric tilt grain boundaries (GB's) are investigated with atomistic simulations, using an embedded-atom method (EAM) potential for a low stacking-fault energy fcc metal. Lattice statics simulations with a large number of initial configurations are used to identify both the equilibrium and metastable structures at 0 K. The level of difficulty in finding the equilibrium structures is quantitatively assessed. The stability of the structures at an elevated temperature is investigated by Monte Carlo annealing. A form of GB dissociation is identified in a number of the boundaries. These structures are used to develop a dislocation model of GB dissociation by stacking-fault emission. Also, an attempt is made to apply the structural unit model (SUM) to the simulated boundaries and problems that are encountered for GB structures in low stacking-fault energy metals are enumerated and discussed.

  6. Assessment of the dislocation bias in fcc metals and extrapolation to austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhongwen; Sandberg, Nils; Terentyev, Dmitry; Samuelsson, Karl; Bonny, Giovanni; Olsson, Pär

    2015-10-01

    A systematic study of dislocation bias has been performed using a method that combines atomistic and elastic dislocation-point defect interaction models with a numerical solution of the diffusion equation with a drift term. Copper, nickel and aluminium model lattices are used in this study, covering a wide range of shear moduli and stacking fault energies. It is found that the dominant parameter for the dislocation bias in fcc metals is the width of the stacking fault ribbon. The variation in elastic constants does not strongly impact the dislocation bias value. As a result of this analysis and its extrapolation, the dislocation bias of the widely applied austenitic stainless steels of 316 type is predicted to be about 0.1 at temperature close to the swelling peak (815 K) and typical dislocation density of 1014 m-2. This is in line with the bias calculated using the elastic interaction model, which implies that the prediction method can be used readily in other fcc systems even without EAM potentials. By comparing the bias values obtained using atomistic- and elastic interaction energies, about 20% discrepancy is found, therefore a more realistic bias value for the 316 type alloy is 0.08 in these conditions.

  7. Transition-sized Au92 nanoparticle bridging non-fcc-structured gold nanoclusters and fcc-structured gold nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lingwen; Chen, Jishi; Wang, Chengming; Zhuang, Shengli; Yan, Nan; Yao, Chuanhao; Xia, Nan; Li, Lingling; Bao, Xiaoli; Wu, Zhikun

    2016-10-04

    Herein, we report the intriguing structure, optical absorption and electrochemical properties of the transition-sized Au92(TBBT)44 (Au92 for short, TBBT = 4-tert-butylbenzenethiolate) nanoparticle. An interesting observation is the 4H phase array of Au92 nanoparticles in the unit cells of single crystals.

  8. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  9. Effect of vacancy defects on generalized stacking fault energy of fcc metals.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Ebrahim; Zaeem, Mohsen Asle; Moitra, Amitava; Tschopp, Mark A

    2014-03-19

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) studies were performed to investigate the influence of vacancy defects on generalized stacking fault (GSF) energy of fcc metals. MEAM and EAM potentials were used for MD simulations, and DFT calculations were performed to test the accuracy of different common parameter sets for MEAM and EAM potentials in predicting GSF with different fractions of vacancy defects. Vacancy defects were placed at the stacking fault plane or at nearby atomic layers. The effect of vacancy defects at the stacking fault plane and the plane directly underneath of it was dominant compared to the effect of vacancies at other adjacent planes. The effects of vacancy fraction, the distance between vacancies, and lateral relaxation of atoms on the GSF curves with vacancy defects were investigated. A very similar variation of normalized SFEs with respect to vacancy fractions were observed for Ni and Cu. MEAM potentials qualitatively captured the effect of vacancies on GSF.

  10. Temperature dependence of dynamic deformation in FCC metals, aluminum and invar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Laura; Swift, D. C.; Austin, R. A.; Florando, J. N.; Hawreliak, J.; Lazicki, A.; Saculla, M. D.; Eakins, D.; Bernier, J. V.; Kumar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-driven shock experiments were performed on fcc metals, aluminum and invar, at a range of initial temperatures from approximately 120-800 K to explore the effect of initial temperature on dynamic strength properties at strain rates reaching up to 107 s-1. In aluminum, velocimetry data demonstrated an increase of peak stress of the elastic wave, σE, with initial temperature. Alternatively, for invar, σE exhibits little-to-no decrease over the same initial temperature range. Aluminum's unusual deformation behavior is found to primarily be due to anharmonic vibrational effects. Differences in the magnetic structure of aluminum and invar can account for discrepancies in high rate deformation behavior.

  11. Ab initio calculations of generalized-stacking-fault energy surfaces and surface energies for FCC metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Zhi; Wang, Rui; Wang, Shao-Feng; Wei, Qun-Yi

    2010-08-01

    The ab initio calculations have been used to study the generalized-stacking-fault energy (GSFE) surfaces and surface energies for the closed-packed (1 1 1) plane in FCC metals Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Al, Rh, Ir, Pd, Pt, and Pb. The GSFE curves along <112> (1 1 1) direction and <110> (1 1 1) direction, and surface energies have been calculated from first principles. Based on the translational symmetry of the GSFE surfaces, the fitted expressions have been obtained from the Fourier series. Our results of the GSFEs and surface energies agree better with experimental results. The metals Al, Pd, and Pt have low γ/γI value, so full dislocation will be observed easily; while Cu, Ag, Au, and Ni have large γ/γI value, so it is preferred to create partial dislocation. From the calculations of surface energies, it is confirmed that the VIII column elements Ni, Rh, Ir, Pd, and Pt have higher surface energies than other metals.

  12. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Belyea, Dustin D; Lucas, M S; Michel, E; Horwath, J; Miller, Casey W

    2015-10-28

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based "high entropy alloys" in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants.

  13. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyea, Dustin D.; Lucas, M. S.; Michel, E.; Horwath, J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-10-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based “high entropy alloys” in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants.

  14. Tunable magnetocaloric effect in transition metal alloys

    PubMed Central

    Belyea, Dustin D.; Lucas, M. S.; Michel, E.; Horwath, J.; Miller, Casey W.

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictability of geopolitical tensions and resulting supply chain and pricing instabilities make it imperative to explore rare earth free magnetic materials. As such, we have investigated fully transition metal based “high entropy alloys” in the context of the magnetocaloric effect. We find the NiFeCoCrPdx family exhibits a second order magnetic phase transition whose critical temperature is tunable from 100 K to well above room temperature. The system notably displays changes in the functionality of the magnetic entropy change depending on x, which leads to nearly 40% enhancement of the refrigerant capacity. A detailed statistical analysis of the universal scaling behavior provides direct evidence that heat treatment and Pd additions reduce the distribution of exchange energies in the system, leading to a more magnetically homogeneous alloy. The general implications of this work are that the parent NiFeCoCr compound can be tuned dramatically with FCC metal additives. Together with their relatively lower cost, their superior mechanical properties that aid manufacturability and their relative chemical inertness that aids product longevity, NiFeCoCr-based materials could ultimately lead to commercially viable magnetic refrigerants. PMID:26507636

  15. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  16. Observation of the fcc-to-hcp transition in ensembles of argon nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Krainyukova, N V; Boltnev, R E; Bernard, E P; Khmelenko, V V; Lee, D M; Kiryukhin, V

    2012-12-14

    Macroscopic ensembles of weakly interacting argon nanoclusters are studied using x-ray diffraction in low vacuum. As the clusters grow by fusion with increasing temperature, their structure transforms from essentially face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonal close packed as the cluster size approaches ~10(5) atoms. The transformation involves intermediate orthorhombic phases. These data confirm extant theoretical predictions. They also indicate that growth kinetics and spatial constraints might play an important role in the formation of the fcc structure of bulk rare-gas solids, which still remains puzzling.

  17. Selenophene transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    White, Carter James

    1994-07-27

    This research shows that selenophene transition metal complexes have a chemistry that is similar to their thiophene analogs. Selenophene coordination has been demonstrated and confirmed by molecular structure in both the η5- and the η1(Se)-coordination modes. The reaction chemistry of selenophene complexes closely resembles that of the analogous thiophene complexes. One major difference, however, is that selenophene is a better donor ligand than thiophene making the selenophene complexes more stable than the corresponding thiophene complexes. The 77Se NMR chemical shift values for selenophene complexes fall within distinct regions primarily depending on the coordination mode of the selenophene ligand. In the final paper, the C-H bond activation of η1(S)-bound thiophenes, η1(S)-benzothiophene and η1(Se)-bound selenophenes has been demonstrated. The deprotonation and rearrangement of the η1(E)-bound ligand to the carbon bound L-yl complex readily occurs in the presence of base. Reprotonation with a strong acid gives a carbene complex that is unreactive towards nucleophilic attack at the carbene carbon and is stable towards exposure to air. The molecular structure of [Cp(NO)(PPh3)Re(2-benzothioenylcarbene)]O3SCF3 was determined and contains a Re-C bond with substantial double bond character. Methyl substitution for the thienylcarbene or selenylcarbene gives a carbene that rearranges thermally to give back the η1(E)-bound complex. Based on these model reactions, a new mechanism for the H/D exchange of thiophene over the hydrodesulfurization catalyst has been proposed.

  18. Analysis of defect structural evolution in fcc metals irradiated with neutrons under well defined boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Satoh, Y.; Xu, Q.

    2004-08-01

    Defect structural evolutions near pre-existing defects such as surfaces, grain boundaries and dislocations in fcc metals are studied to clarify point defect processes during irradiation. By the comparison of Au irradiated as thin foils with fission neutrons and fusion neutrons, the PKA energy to produce a stacking fault tetrahedron is determined to be 80 keV with a production efficiency of 0.05. Grain boundaries are effectively used to detect the existence of one-dimensional motion of interstitial clusters. In Ni and Ni binary alloys (2 at.% Si, Cu, Ge or Sn), there is a good coincidence between the void growth and one-dimensional motion of interstitial clusters. The coincidence is, however, not good for Cu. Screw dislocations with jogs turn into helical dislocations by absorbing one type of point defects. The difference of freely migrating defects between fission and fusion neutron irradiation is measured as a function of irradiation dose and it is concluded that the same number of freely migrating defects is generated from each subcascade in fission and fusion neutron irradiated Ni.

  19. Atomic-Scale Mechanisms of Void Hardening in BCC and FCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2010-01-01

    Strengthening due to voids can be a significant effect of radiation damage in metals, but treatment of this by elasticity theory of dislocations is difficult when the mechanisms controlling the obstacle strength are atomic in nature. Results are reported of atomic-scale modelling to compare edge dislocation-void interaction in fcc copper and bcc iron. Voids of up to 6 nm diameter in iron and 8 nm diameter in copper were studied over the temperature range 0 to 600 K at different applied strain rates. Voids in iron are strong obstacles, for the dislocation has to adopt a dipole-like configuration at the void before breaking away. The dipole unzips at the critical stress when the dislocation is able to climb by absorbing vacancies and leave the void surface. Dislocation dissociation into Shockley partials in copper prevents dislocation climb and affects the strength of small and large voids differently. Small voids are much weaker obstacles than those in iron because the partials break from a void individually. Large voids are at least as strong as those in iron, but the controlling mechanism depends on temperature.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation on generalized stacking fault energies of FCC metals under preloading stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Cheng, Lü; Kiet, Tieu; Zhao, Xing; Pei, Lin-Qing; Guillaume, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the effects of stress on generalized stacking fault (GSF) energy of three fcc metals (Cu, Al, and Ni). The simulation model is deformed by uniaxial tension or compression in each of [111], [11-2], and [1-10] directions, respectively, before shifting the lattice to calculate the GSF curve. Simulation results show that the values of unstable stacking fault energy (γusf), stable stacking fault energy (γsf), and unstable twin fault energy (γutf) of the three elements can change with the preloaded tensile or compressive stress in different directions. The ratio of γsf/γusf, which is related to the energy barrier for full dislocation nucleation, and the ratio of γutf/γusf, which is related to the energy barrier for twinning formation are plotted each as a function of the preloading stress. The results of this study reveal that the stress state can change the energy barrier of defect nucleation in the crystal lattice, and thereby can play an important role in the deformation mechanism of nanocrystalline material. Project supported by Australia Research Council Discovery Projects (Grant No. DP130103973). L. Zhang, X. Zhao and L. Q. Pei were financially supported by the China Scholarship Council (CSC).

  1. Structural Studies of Clean and Adsorbate-Covered Fcc Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statiris, Panayiotis Athanasiou

    We have used medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) to study the structural and vibrational properties of the clean metal surfaces of Ni(110) and Ag(111), the structural changes induced by the presence of small amounts ( {~}1 atomic layer) of heteroatoms on the Ni(001) and Ni(110) surfaces (Cs, K, K and CO on Ni(110) and Au on Ni(001)) as well as the arrangement of the heteroatoms on the surface. The thesis consists of five chapters two of which serve as an introduction and provide general information about metal surfaces and medium energy ion scattering (chapters 1 and 2) and three chapters (3, 4, 5) in which the experimental results are being presented, and structural models are proposed for the surfaces studied. The purpose of the material contained in chapter one is to familiarize the reader with the general concepts, and provide an overview of the progress (experimental and theoretical) in the field of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. The second chapter contains an extensive discussion about the principles and applications of medium energy ion scattering. A study of the structure of the clean Ni(001) surface and the K/Ni(110) and K/CO/Ni(110) surfaces is presented in chapter 3. Both the K/Ni(110) and K/CO/Ni(110) exhibit the missing row reconstruction. The change in the surface unit cell observed upon adsorption of CO atoms on the K/Ni(110) surface observed with low energy electron diffraction is due to the ordering of the CO molecules. The growth and structure of thin Au films (0.35 -3 layers) deposited on the Ni(001) surface is the subject of chapter 4. Au forms an almost incommensurate overlayer with a c(2 times 8) unit cell whose structure resembles that of fcc Au(111). The Au atoms exhibit unusually high vibrational amplitudes, indicating the presence of a soft phonon mode as predicted by theoretical work. The growth mode resembles the Stranski-Krastanov mode without exactly following it. The temperature dependence of the vibrational amplitudes

  2. Twin boundary spacing effects on shock response and spall behaviors of hierarchically nanotwinned fcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Fuping Chen, Liu Jiang, Ping Wu, Xiaolei

    2014-02-14

    Atomistic deformation mechanisms of hierarchically nano-twinned (NT) Ag under shock conditions have been investigated using a series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. For the same grain size d and the same spacing of primary twins λ{sub 1}, the average flow stress behind the shock front in hierarchically NT Ag first increases with decreasing spacing of secondary twins λ{sub 2}, achieving a maximum at a critical λ{sub 2}, and then drops as λ{sub 2} decreases further. Above the critical λ{sub 2}, the deformation mechanisms are dominated by three type strengthening mechanisms: (a) partial dislocations emitted from grain boundaries (GBs) travel across other boundaries; (b) partial dislocations emitted from twin boundaries (TBs) travel across other TBs; (c) formation of tertiary twins. Below the critical λ{sub 2}, the deformation mechanism are dominated by two softening mechanisms: (a) detwinning of secondary twins; (b) formation of new grains by cross slip of partial dislocations. Moreover, the twin-free nanocrystalline (NC) Ag is found to have lower average flow stress behind the shock front than those of all hierarchically NT Ag samples except the one with the smallest λ{sub 2} of 0.71 nm. No apparent correlation between the spall strength and λ{sub 2} is observed in hierarchically NT Ag, since voids always nucleate at both GBs and boundaries of the primary twins. However, twin-free NC Ag is found to have higher spall strength than hierarchically NT Ag. Voids can only nucleate from GBs for twin-free NC Ag, therefore, twin-free NC Ag has less nucleation sources along the shock direction when compared to hierarchically NT Ag, which requiring higher tensile stress to create spallation. These findings should contribute to the understandings of deformation mechanisms of hierarchically NT fcc metals under extreme deformation conditions.

  3. Non-linear modelling of the effects of strain on transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, I. G.

    2016-12-01

    A sequence of polynomial expressions have been shown to describe the strained surface energy of low-index hexagonal and square transition metal surfaces. Distinguishable functions describe the hexagonal FCC (1 1 1) and HCP (0 0 0 1) surfaces, but a single function describes the FCC (1 0 0) and BCC (1 0 0) surfaces. A far weaker dependence exists between the strained surface energy and the electronic state of the surface, and the competition between geometric and electronic states across is discussed.

  4. On the limitation of density functional theory (DFT) for the treatment of the anharmonicity in FCC metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifitokaldani, Ali; Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Dollé, Mickael

    2016-12-01

    It has been already shown that the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) overestimates the specific heat capacity (and in general the thermal properties) of fcc metals. DFT + QHA seemingly shows a large anharmonic contribution to the heat capacity. However, in this article we show that this anharmonicity has no physical origin and it is a consequence of the deviation of the QHA from the Maxwell relations. We show that one can simply avoid this overestimation by enforcing the QHA method to obey the Maxwell relations throughout the thermodynamically self-consistent (TSC) method, instead of considering non-real local anharmonic effects.

  5. Photochemistry of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Perutz, Robin N; Procacci, Barbara

    2016-08-10

    Photochemical reactivity associated with metal-hydrogen bonds is widespread among metal hydride complexes and has played a critical part in opening up C-H bond activation. It has been exploited to design different types of photocatalytic reactions and to obtain NMR spectra of dilute solutions with a single pulse of an NMR spectrometer. Because photolysis can be performed on fast time scales and at low temperature, metal-hydride photochemistry has enabled determination of the molecular structure and rates of reaction of highly reactive intermediates. We identify five characteristic photoprocesses of metal monohydride complexes associated with the M-H bond, of which the most widespread are M-H homolysis and R-H reductive elimination. For metal dihydride complexes, the dominant photoprocess is reductive elimination of H2. Dihydrogen complexes typically lose H2 photochemically. The majority of photochemical reactions are likely to be dissociative, but hydride complexes may be designed with equilibrated excited states that undergo different photochemical reactions, including proton transfer or hydride transfer. The photochemical mechanisms of a few reactions have been analyzed by computational methods, including quantum dynamics. A section on specialist methods (time-resolved spectroscopy, matrix isolation, NMR, and computational methods) and a survey of transition metal hydride photochemistry organized by transition metal group complete the Review.

  6. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  7. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  8. Transition metals in superheat melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, Petr; Wolfbauer, Michael-Patrick

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments with silicate melts doped with transition element oxides was carried out at atmospheric pressures of inert gas at temperatures exceeding liquidus. As predicted from the shape of fO2 buffer curves in T-fO2 diagrams the reducing conditions for a particular oxide-metal pair can be achieved through the T increase if the released oxygen is continuously removed. Experimental studies suggest that transition metals such as Cr or V behave as siderophile elements at temperatures exceeding liquidus temperatures if the system is not buffered by the presence of other oxide of more siderophile element. For example the presence of FeO prevents the reduction of Cr2O3. The sequence of decreasing siderophility of transition elements at superheat conditions (Mo, Ni, Fe, Cr) matches the decreasing degree of depletion of siderophile elements in mantle rocks as compared to chondrites.

  9. Pressure-induced fcc to hcp phase transition in Ni-based high entropy solid solution alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Fuxiang; Zhao, Shijun; Jin, Ke; ...

    2017-01-04

    In this research, pressure-induced phase transition from the fcc to a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure wasfound in NiCoCrFe solid solution alloy starting at 13.5 GPa. The phase transition is very sluggish and the transition did not complete at ~ 40 GPa. The hcp structure is quenchable to ambient pressure. Only a very small amount (<5%) of hcp phase was found in the isostructural NiCoCr ternary alloy up to the pressure of 45 GPa and no obvious hcp phase was found in NiCoCrFePd system till to 74 GPa. Ab initio Gibbs free energy calculations indicated the energy differences between the fccmore » and the hcp phases for the three alloys are very small, but they are sensitive to temperature. Finally, the critical transition pressure in NiCoCrFe varies from 1 GPa at room temperature to 6 GPa at 500 K.« less

  10. Why FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.

    1972-01-01

    Summaries are given of design characteristics and various advantages of FCC use. The information is presented in tables that include the following headings: (1) mechanical design, (2) electrical design, (3) manufacturing advantages, (4) inspection and reliability, and (5) cost savings. In addition, the results are summarized of a Saturn 4B FCC-RWC comparison study.

  11. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-14

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  12. Shear moduli in bcc-fcc structure transition of colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongwei; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruzeng

    2015-10-01

    Shear moduli variation in the metastable-stable structure transition of charged colloidal crystals was investigated by the combination techniques of torsional resonance spectroscopy and reflection spectrometer. Modulus of the system increases with the proceeding of the transition process and it finally reaches the maximum value at the end of the transition. For colloidal crystals in stable state, the experimental moduli show good consistence with theoretical expectations. However, in the transition process, the moduli are much smaller than theoretical ones and this can be chalked up to crystalline imperfection in the transition state.

  13. Reactivity of transition metal solvates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Boris D.

    1991-09-01

    Reactivity data are generalised for one of the most important classes of complexes, solvates, which are quantitatively nearly unstudied. Various approaches to studying and describing the reactivity are compared with respect to solvation of the reagents and the transition state. The specifics and mechanism of ligand substitution in pure and mixed organic solvents are found. The reactivity of simple (homoleptic) and mixed solvates toward macrocycles is examined in detail using porphyrins as an example. The kinetic method of indicator reactions is applied to porphyrins in order to study the state of transition metal salts in organic solvents and the stability of the coordination spheres of acidosalts (MXnn-2), acidosolvates (MX2Sn-2) and their transition states. The concentration dependence of the rate constant of an indicator reaction is demonstrated to be due to a change in the inner coordination sphere and a shift of equilibria between the various coordination complexes. The bibliography includes 38 references.

  14. Temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid <100> to <110> reorientation in FCC metallic nanowire: a molecular dynamic study.

    PubMed

    Sutrakar, Vijay Kumar; Roy Mahapatra, D; Pillai, A C R

    2012-01-11

    Atomistic simulation of initial <100> oriented FCC Cu nanowires shows a novel coupled temperature-pressure dependent reorientation from <100> to <110> phase. A temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid <100> to <110> reorientation diagram is generated for Cu nanowire with varying cross-sectional sizes. A critical pressure is reported for Cu nanowires with varying cross-sectional sizes, above which an initial <100> oriented nanowire shows temperature independent reorientation into the <110> phase. The effect of surface stresses on the <100> to <110> reorientation is also studied. The results indicate that above a critical cross-sectional size for a given temperature-pressure, <100> to <110> reorientation is not possible. It is also reported here that for a given applied pressure, an increase in temperature is required for the <100> to <110> reorientation with increasing cross-sectional size of the nanowire. The temperature-pressure-induced solid-solid <100> to <110> reorientation diagram reported in the present paper could further be used as guidelines for controlling the reorientations/shape memory in nano-scale applications of FCC metallic nanowires.

  15. Formation of Superlattices of Gold Nanoparticles Using Ostwald Ripening in Emulsions: Transition from fcc to bcc Structure.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Julien; Hajiw, Stéphanie; Lecchi, Amélie; Degrouard, Jéril; Salonen, Anniina; Impéror-Clerc, Marianne; Pansu, Brigitte

    2016-06-30

    An efficient method to form 3D superlattices of gold nanoparticles inside oil emulsion droplets is presented. We demonstrate that this method relies on Ostwald ripening, a well-known phenomenon occurring during the aging of emulsions. The key point is that the nanoparticle concentration inside the smaller droplets is increasing very slowly with time, thus inducing the crystallization of the nanoparticles into superlattices. Using oil-in-water emulsions doped with hydrophobic gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate that this method is efficient for different types of oils (toluene, cyclohexane, dodecane, and hexadecane). 3D superlattices of the nanoparticles are obtained, with dimensions reaching a hundred nanometers. The kinetics of the crystallization depends on the solubility of the oil in water but also on the initial concentration of the gold nanoparticles in oil. This method also provides an innovative way to obtain the complete phase diagram of nanoparticle suspensions with concentration. Indeed, during this slow crystallization process, a transition from a disordered suspension to a fcc structure is observed, followed by a transition toward a bcc structure. This evolution with time provides key results to understand the role played by the ligands located at the surface of the nanoparticles in order to control the type of superlattices which are formed.

  16. The metal-non-metal transition in compressed metal vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensel, F.; Marceca, E.; Pilgrim, W. C.

    1998-12-01

    Knowledge of the properties of hydrogen and helium and their mixtures, at temperatures and pressures prevailing in the giant planets is of considerable interest for planetary modelling. In the light of the unfavourable outlook for reliable measurements under these extreme conditions effort has been spent investigating the high-temperature high-pressure properties of fluid metals which are experimentally accessible in the laboratory and which might serve as models for compressed fluid hydrogen. The main emphasis of the paper is on the density dependence of the dynamic structure factor 0953-8984/10/49/026/img1 of liquid rubidium which reveals that a monoatomic-molecular transition occurs in the metal-non-metal transition region of the expanded liquid analogous to that suggested to occur in shock compressed hydrogen. Additional emphasis is on new results of the phase behaviour of dilute mixtures of helium in the near critical metal mercury.

  17. Mechanism of decrease in the strength of submicron-sized specimens of FCC metals with a nanocrystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of decrease in the strength of submicron-sized specimens of face-centered cubic (fcc) metals with a nanocrystalline structure and a cross-sectional size D < 5 d, as compared to the strength of the specimens with D ≫ 5 d (where d is the grain size), has been considered theoretically on the basis of the dislocation-kinetic equations and relationships. Previously, it has been found that this decrease is caused by the escape of a part of the dislocations through the surface of the specimen under the action of single-pole dislocation sources in grains adjacent to the surface. In this study, it has been shown that the absorption of lattice dislocations by grain boundaries and its accompanying grain boundary sliding lead to a further decrease in the flow stress of specimens, which is equally related to both thin ( D < 5 d) and thick ( D ≫ 5 d) specimens.

  18. Approximating metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Carlo; Rayanov, Kristian; Pavlov, Boris; Martin, Gaven; Flach, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step, the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate Metal-Insulator Transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges, which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-André model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase, similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  19. Synthesis of transition metal carbonitrides

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A. R.; Eslamloo-Grami, Maryam

    1994-01-01

    Transition metal carbonitrides (in particular, titanium carbonitride, TiC.sub.0.5 N.sub.0.5) are synthesized by a self-propagating reaction between the metal (e.g., titanium) and carbon in a nitrogen atmosphere. Complete conversion to the carbonitride phase is achieved with the addition of TiN as diluent and with a nitrogen pressure .gtoreq.0.6 MPa. Thermodynamic phase-stability calculations and experimental characterizations of quenched samples provided revealed that the mechanism of formation of the carbonitride is a two-step process. The first step involves the formation of the nonstoichiometric carbide, TiC.sub.0.5, and is followed by the formation of the product by the incorporation of nitrogen in the defect-structure carbide.

  20. Radiative transitions in metallic nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalin, A. S.

    2008-02-01

    In this article, a new theoretical approach to studying light-scattering characteristics of nanosized objects based on the solution to the Thomas-Fermi equation and quasi-classical approximation is considered. It is shown that the distribution of valence electrons in the volume of metallic clusters exhibits a specific structure of "spatial zones." With the aid of quasi-classical wave functions, expressions for the appropriate dipole moments of the transitions between the ground and excited states are obtained; the behavior of the spectrum of gold clusters depending on their sizes is studied; a comparison with existing experimental data is carried out.

  1. Topological Dirac nodal lines and surface charges in fcc alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Motoaki; Okugawa, Ryo; Miyake, Takashi; Murakami, Shuichi

    2017-01-11

    In nodal-line semimetals, the gaps close along loops in k space, which are not at high-symmetry points. Typical mechanisms for the emergence of nodal lines involve mirror symmetry and the π Berry phase. Here we show via ab initio calculations that fcc calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr) and ytterbium (Yb) have topological nodal lines with the π Berry phase near the Fermi level, when spin-orbit interaction is neglected. In particular, Ca becomes a nodal-line semimetal at high pressure. Owing to nodal lines, the Zak phase becomes either π or 0, depending on the wavevector k, and the π Zak phase leads to surface polarization charge. Carriers eventually screen it, leaving behind large surface dipoles. In materials with nodal lines, both the large surface polarization charge and the emergent drumhead surface states enhance Rashba splitting when heavy adatoms are present, as we have shown to occur in Bi/Sr(111) and in Bi/Ag(111).

  2. Topological Dirac nodal lines and surface charges in fcc alkaline earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Motoaki; Okugawa, Ryo; Miyake, Takashi; Murakami, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    In nodal-line semimetals, the gaps close along loops in k space, which are not at high-symmetry points. Typical mechanisms for the emergence of nodal lines involve mirror symmetry and the π Berry phase. Here we show via ab initio calculations that fcc calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr) and ytterbium (Yb) have topological nodal lines with the π Berry phase near the Fermi level, when spin-orbit interaction is neglected. In particular, Ca becomes a nodal-line semimetal at high pressure. Owing to nodal lines, the Zak phase becomes either π or 0, depending on the wavevector k, and the π Zak phase leads to surface polarization charge. Carriers eventually screen it, leaving behind large surface dipoles. In materials with nodal lines, both the large surface polarization charge and the emergent drumhead surface states enhance Rashba splitting when heavy adatoms are present, as we have shown to occur in Bi/Sr(111) and in Bi/Ag(111).

  3. Analysis of reversed torsion of FCC metals using polycrystal plasticity models

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiao Qian; Wang, Huamiao; Wu, Pei Dong; Mao, Xian Biao

    2015-06-19

    Large strain behavior of FCC polycrystals during reversed torsion are investigated through the special purpose finite element based on the classical Taylor model and the elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent (EVPSC) model with various Self-Consistent Schemes (SCSs). It is found that the response of both the fixed-end and free-end torsion is very sensitive to the constitutive models. The models are assessed through comparing their predictions to the corresponding experiments in terms of the stress and strain curves, the Swift effect and texture evolution. It is demonstrated that none of the models examined can precisely predict all the experimental results. However, more careful observation reveals that, among the models considered, the tangent model gives the worst overall performance. As a result, it is also demonstrated that the intensity of residual texture during reverse twisting is dependent on the amounts of pre-shear strain during forward twisting and the model used.

  4. Effect of stacking fault energy on mechanism of plastic deformation in nanotwinned FCC metals

    DOE PAGES

    Borovikov, Valery; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; King, Alexander H.; ...

    2015-05-15

    Starting from a semi-empirical potential designed for Cu, we have developed a series of potentials that provide essentially constant values of all significant (calculated) materials properties except for the intrinsic stacking fault energy, which varies over a range that encompasses the lowest and highest values observed in nature. In addition, these potentials were employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate how stacking fault energy affects the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. The results indicate that properties such as yield strength and microstructural stability do not vary systematically with stacking fault energy, but rather fall into twomore » distinct regimes corresponding to 'low' and 'high' stacking fault energies.« less

  5. Kinetics of segregation formation in the vicinity of edge dislocation in fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, A. V.; Mikheev, A. A.; Ershova, I. V.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    We use new equations for the interstitial impurity diffusion fluxes under strain to study impurity atom redistribution in the vicinity of dislocations taking into account the strain generated by mentioned defects. Two levels of simulation are applied. First one is evaluation of coefficients that determine the influence of strain tensor components on interstitial diffusion fluxes in fcc structures for different kinds of atom jumps. For this purpose we have developed a model into the framework of molecular static method taking into account an atom environment as near the interstitial site as for the saddle-point configuration. The second level is modeling of interstitial segregation formation based on nonlinear diffusion equations taking strains generated by defects. The results show, that the distributions of the interstitials near the dislocations have quite complicated characters and the vacancy distribution has qualitatively different character as compared with carbon distribution.

  6. Deformation and erosion of f.c.c. metals and alloys under cavitation attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental investigations have been conducted to determine the early stages of cavitation attack on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, electrolytic tough pitch copper, brass, and bronze, all having polycrystalline fcc matrices. The surface profiles and scanning electron micrographs show that the pits are initially formed at the grain boundaries, while the grain surfaces are progressively roughened by multiple slip and twinning. The initial erosion is noted to have occurred from the material in the grain boundaries, as well as by fragmentation of part of the grains. Further erosion occurred by shearing and necking of the surface undulations caused by plastic deformation. The mean penetration depth, computed on the basis of mass loss, was lowest on the bronze and greatest on the copper. Attention is given to the relation of cavitation attack to grain size, glide stress and stacking fault energy.

  7. Effect of stacking fault energy on mechanism of plastic deformation in nanotwinned FCC metals

    SciTech Connect

    Borovikov, Valery; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; King, Alexander H.; LeSar, Richard

    2015-05-15

    Starting from a semi-empirical potential designed for Cu, we have developed a series of potentials that provide essentially constant values of all significant (calculated) materials properties except for the intrinsic stacking fault energy, which varies over a range that encompasses the lowest and highest values observed in nature. In addition, these potentials were employed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate how stacking fault energy affects the mechanical behavior of nanotwinned face-centered cubic (FCC) materials. The results indicate that properties such as yield strength and microstructural stability do not vary systematically with stacking fault energy, but rather fall into two distinct regimes corresponding to 'low' and 'high' stacking fault energies.

  8. Atomic-level interaction of an edge dislocation and localized obstacles in fcc and bcc metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between a moving dislocation and localized obstacles determines microstructure-induced hardening. The mechanisms and parameters of such interactions are necessary inputs to large scale dislocation dynamics modelling. We have developed a model to investigate these characteristics at the atomic level for dislocation-obstacle interactions under both static (T=0K) and dynamic (T>0K) conditions. We present results on hardening due to pinning of edge dislocations at obstacles such as voids, coherent precipitates and stacking fault tetrahedra in bcc-iron and fcc-copper at temperatures from 0 to 600K. It is demonstrated that atomic-scale simulation is required to determine the effects of stress, strain rate and temperature and that such effects cannot always be rationalized within continuum theory.

  9. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC{sub 0.88} in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V{sub 8}C{sub 7} superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  10. Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. Presumably, in response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface. PMID:27617971

  11. Metal-organic pathways for anisotropic growth of a highly symmetrical crystal structure: example of the fcc Ni.

    PubMed

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Collière, Vincent; Amiens, Catherine; Fau, Pierre; Kahn, Myrtil L

    2013-11-05

    The control of the metallic nanocrystal shape is of prime importance for a wide variety of applications. We report a detailed research work on metal-organic chemical routes for the synthesis of a highly symmetrical crystal structure. In particular, this study shows the key parameters ensuring the anisotropic growth of nickel nanostructures (fcc crystal). Numerous reaction conditions are investigated (precursors, solvents, temperature, reducing agents, reaction time, and types and ratios of surfactants, such as alkyl amines, carboxylic acids, and phosphine oxides), and their effects on the size and shape of the final product are reported. The role of the growth modifiers and the structuring of the reaction media on the anisotropic growth are demonstrated. This metal-organic approach generates several novel anisotropic nanostructures in a wide size range depending on the reaction conditions. In this way, nanomaterials with reproducible size, shape, and composition are obtained with good yield. Transmission electron microscopy techniques (TEM and HRTEM) are the principal methods for monitoring the morphology.

  12. Topological Dirac nodal lines and surface charges in fcc alkaline earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Motoaki; Okugawa, Ryo; Miyake, Takashi; Murakami, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    In nodal-line semimetals, the gaps close along loops in k space, which are not at high-symmetry points. Typical mechanisms for the emergence of nodal lines involve mirror symmetry and the π Berry phase. Here we show via ab initio calculations that fcc calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr) and ytterbium (Yb) have topological nodal lines with the π Berry phase near the Fermi level, when spin–orbit interaction is neglected. In particular, Ca becomes a nodal-line semimetal at high pressure. Owing to nodal lines, the Zak phase becomes either π or 0, depending on the wavevector k, and the π Zak phase leads to surface polarization charge. Carriers eventually screen it, leaving behind large surface dipoles. In materials with nodal lines, both the large surface polarization charge and the emergent drumhead surface states enhance Rashba splitting when heavy adatoms are present, as we have shown to occur in Bi/Sr(111) and in Bi/Ag(111). PMID:28074835

  13. Analysis of reversed torsion of FCC metals using polycrystal plasticity models

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Xiao Qian; Wang, Huamiao; Wu, Pei Dong; ...

    2015-06-19

    Large strain behavior of FCC polycrystals during reversed torsion are investigated through the special purpose finite element based on the classical Taylor model and the elastic-viscoplastic self-consistent (EVPSC) model with various Self-Consistent Schemes (SCSs). It is found that the response of both the fixed-end and free-end torsion is very sensitive to the constitutive models. The models are assessed through comparing their predictions to the corresponding experiments in terms of the stress and strain curves, the Swift effect and texture evolution. It is demonstrated that none of the models examined can precisely predict all the experimental results. However, more careful observationmore » reveals that, among the models considered, the tangent model gives the worst overall performance. As a result, it is also demonstrated that the intensity of residual texture during reverse twisting is dependent on the amounts of pre-shear strain during forward twisting and the model used.« less

  14. Recrystallization as a controlling process in the wear of some f.c.c. metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed examination of copper specimens after sliding against 440 C steel in liquid methane at speeds up to 25 m/s and loads of up to 2 kg showed the metal comprising the wear surface to possess a fine cell recrystallized structure. Wear proceeded by the plastic shearing of metal in this near surface region without the occurrence of visible metal transfer. A dynamic balance between the intense shear process at the surface and the nucleation of recrystallized grains was proposed to account for the behavior of the metal at the wear surface. Sliding wear experiments were also conducted on Ag, Cu-10% Al, Cu-10% Sn, Ni and Al. It was found that low wear and the absence of heavy metal transfer were associated with those metals observed to undergo recrystallization nucleation without prior recovery.

  15. Analysis of the heat capacity of nanoclusters of FCC metals on the example of Al, Ni, Cu, Pd, and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafner, Yu. Ya.; Gafner, S. L.; Zamulin, I. S.; Redel, L. V.; Baidyshev, V. S.

    2015-06-01

    The heat capacity of ideal nickel, copper, gold, aluminum, and palladium fcc clusters with diameter of up to 6 nm has been studied in the temperature range of 150-800 K in terms of the molecular-dynamics theory using a tight-binding potential. The heat capacity of individual metallic nanoclusters has been found to exceed that characteristic of the bulk state, but by no more than 16-20%, even in the case of very small clusters. To explain the discrepancy between the simulated data and the experimental results on the compacted metals, aluminum and palladium samples with 80% theoretical density have also been investigated. Based on the simulation results and analysis of the experimental data, it has been established that the increased heat capacity of the compacted nanomaterials does not depend on the enhanced heat capacity of the individual clusters but rather, can be due to either the disordered state of the nanomaterial or a significant content of impurities (mainly, hydrogen).

  16. Phase transition of 2×2 adsorbates on FCC(1 1 1) and HCP(0 0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yoshifumi

    2003-04-01

    Order-disorder transition of adsorbates at metal surfaces is discussed based on Monte Carlo calculations for a lattice gas model on a triangular net. Repulsive interactions up to second neighbour sites and fixed concentration 1/4 of particles of lattice gas, are assumed for the 2×2 ordered structure. Calculated phase diagram and the critical exponent for susceptibility are presented. Stress is put on cases other than the second-order transition belonging to the four-state Potts universality class.

  17. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  18. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Baca, Albert G.; Esherick, Peter; Parmeter, John E.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Shul, Randy J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  19. Chemomechanical Origin of Hydrogen Trapping at Grain Boundaries in fcc Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Marchand, Daniel; McDowell, David L; Zhu, Ting; Song, Jun

    2016-02-19

    Hydrogen embrittlement of metals is widely observed, but its atomistic origins remain little understood and much debated. Combining a unique identification of interstitial sites through polyhedral tessellation and first-principles calculations, we study hydrogen adsorption at grain boundaries in a variety of face-centered cubic metals of Ni, Cu, γ-Fe, and Pd. We discover the chemomechanical origin of the variation of adsorption energetics for interstitial hydrogen at grain boundaries. A general chemomechanical formula is established to provide accurate assessments of hydrogen trapping and segregation energetics at grain boundaries, and it also offers direct explanations for certain experimental observations. The present study deepens our mechanistic understanding of the role of grain boundaries in hydrogen embrittlement and points to a viable path towards predictive microstructure engineering against hydrogen embrittlement in structural metals.

  20. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  1. Photochemistry of Metal-Metal Bonded Transition Element Complexes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-12

    CONTRACT NO0014-75-C-0880 Task No. NR 051-579 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 25 PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF METAL-METAL BONDED TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPLEXES by Mark S . Wrighton...unlimited. 17, Di:- t. Ii t I / Avolil:J, ; Codc’s ! Photochemistry of Metal-Metal Bonded Transition Element Complexes Mark S . Wrighton, James L. Graff...publication in the ACS Symposium Series, "Reactivity of MetalrMetal Bonds", M. H. Chisholm, ed.) IA c*Addre~ s orrespondence to this author, ; r[ I . - - 1

  2. EAM potentials for BCC, FCC and HCP metals with farther neighbor atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hak-Son; An, Jong-Do; Jong, Yon-Song

    2015-07-01

    The modified analytic embedded atom method (EAM) theory considering farther neighbor atoms is improved. We not only adopt an end processing function and an enhanced smooth continuous condition of the pair potential, but also adjust model parameters of multi-body potential by fitting cohesion energies, mono-vacancy formation energies, Rose equation curves, energy differences between several structures, elastic parameters and the equilibrium conditions of crystals. The calculation results of structure energy differences misfit the experiment data for several metallic materials in the unimproved EAM, because its model parameters have not considered these differences. After the modification, the coincidence degree of the structure energy—the reduced distance r/r 1 from the present model with that from the Rose equation is greatly improved for Cr. The calculated results of structure stabilities are in good agreement with experiment data and other calculated results for all considered metals, significantly better than the unimproved model with farther neighbor atoms.

  3. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship. PMID:26961273

  4. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship.

  5. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-03-10

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship.

  6. Three-Dimensional Characterization and Modeling of Microstructural Weak Links for Spall Damage in FCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Kapil; Brown, Andrew; Wayne, Leda; Vo, Johnathan; Opie, Saul; Lim, Harn; Peralta, Pedro; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Byler, Darrin; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Koskelo, Aaron; Dickerson, Robert

    2014-11-25

    Local microstructural weak links for spall damage were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) characterization in multicrystalline copper samples (grain size ≈ 450 µm) shocked with laser-driven plates at low pressures (2 to 4 GPa). The thickness of samples and flyer plates, approximately 1000 and 500 µm respectively, led to short pressure pulses that allowed isolating microstructure effects on local damage characteristics. Electron Backscattering Diffraction and optical microscopy were used to relate the presence, size, and shape of porosity to local microstructure. The experiments were complemented with 3-D finite element simulations of individual grain boundaries (GBs) that resulted in large damage volumes using crystal plasticity coupled with a void nucleation and growth model. Results from analysis of these damage sites show that the presence of a GB-affected zone, where strain concentration occurs next to a GB, correlates strongly with damage localization at these sites, most likely due to the inability of maintaining strain compatibility across these interfaces, with additional effects due to the inclination of the GB with respect to the shock. Results indicate that strain compatibility plays an important role on intergranular spall damage in metallic materials.

  7. Three-Dimensional Characterization and Modeling of Microstructural Weak Links for Spall Damage in FCC Metals

    DOE PAGES

    Krishnan, Kapil; Brown, Andrew; Wayne, Leda; ...

    2014-11-25

    Local microstructural weak links for spall damage were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) characterization in multicrystalline copper samples (grain size ≈ 450 µm) shocked with laser-driven plates at low pressures (2 to 4 GPa). The thickness of samples and flyer plates, approximately 1000 and 500 µm respectively, led to short pressure pulses that allowed isolating microstructure effects on local damage characteristics. Electron Backscattering Diffraction and optical microscopy were used to relate the presence, size, and shape of porosity to local microstructure. The experiments were complemented with 3-D finite element simulations of individual grain boundaries (GBs) that resulted in large damage volumesmore » using crystal plasticity coupled with a void nucleation and growth model. Results from analysis of these damage sites show that the presence of a GB-affected zone, where strain concentration occurs next to a GB, correlates strongly with damage localization at these sites, most likely due to the inability of maintaining strain compatibility across these interfaces, with additional effects due to the inclination of the GB with respect to the shock. Results indicate that strain compatibility plays an important role on intergranular spall damage in metallic materials.« less

  8. Model of High Temperature Phase Transitions in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, E. S.

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of the assumption of the electron density fluctuation at the band degradation, a calculation parameter (the radius R) of the half-width of the probability distribution over the coordinate R is identified at the level of the maximum electron density fluctuation (at a maximum of the Gaussian function). Based on an analysis of the crystallization process and high polymorphic transformations bcc → fcc, the reasons for the formation of bcc, fcc, hexagonal, and tetragonal structures from the liquid phase, as well as for the high temperature bcc → hcp transition in the solid phase are established using the calculated parameter (the radius R) in the solid and liquid phases.

  9. Transition metal-free decarboxylative alkylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Guanghui; Sun, Peipei

    2016-11-22

    This review summarizes advances in the decarboxylative alkylation of carboxylic acids and their derivatives under transition metal-free conditions in recent years. Unlike most transition metal-catalyzed decarboxylative coupling reactions which tend to undergo catalytic cycles, the mechanisms of reactions under metal-free conditions are usually diverse and even ambiguous in some cases. This article offers an overview of reaction types and their corresponding mechanisms, highlights some of the advantages and limitations, and focuses on introducing UV and visible light-induced, organocatalyst and peroxide promoted radical processes for decarboxylative alkylation and the formation of C-C bonds.

  10. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  11. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi.

    1983-08-16

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB[sub 2], or CrB[sub 2]. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700 C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface. 4 figs.

  12. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container.

  13. Transition metal contacts to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Politou, Maria De Gendt, Stefan; Heyns, Marc; Asselberghs, Inge; Radu, Iuliana; Conard, Thierry; Richard, Olivier; Martens, Koen; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Tokei, Zsolt; Lee, Chang Seung; Sayan, Safak

    2015-10-12

    Achieving low resistance contacts to graphene is a common concern for graphene device performance and hybrid graphene/metal interconnects. In this work, we have used the circular Transfer Length Method (cTLM) to electrically characterize Ag, Au, Ni, Ti, and Pd as contact metals to graphene. The consistency of the obtained results was verified with the characterization of up to 72 cTLM structures per metal. Within our study, the noble metals Au, Ag and Pd, which form a weaker bond with graphene, are shown to result in lower contact resistance (Rc) values compared to the more reactive Ni and Ti. X-ray Photo Electron Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization for the latter have shown the formation of Ti and Ni carbides. Graphene/Pd contacts show a distinct intermediate behavior. The weak carbide formation signature and the low Rc values measured agree with theoretical predictions of an intermediate state of weak chemisorption of Pd on graphene.

  14. Transition Metal and Lanthanide Compounds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    hexamethylbenzene niobium and tantalum derivatives; and lanthanide nitrate complexes of certain macrocyclic polyethers and the use of macrocyclic polyether columns for lanthanide separations....New research results in the following areas are briefly described: The synthesis of polyphosphines and their metal complexes including polyphosphines...with terminal methyl and neopentyl groups; reactions of polypyrazolylborates with the metal complexes C5H5Co(CO)(R(f)I(R(f)= perfluoroalkyl group

  15. An insight into fluorescent transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chia, Y Y; Tay, M G

    2014-09-21

    The emission from transition metal complexes is usually produced from triplet excited states. Owing to strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the fast conversion of singlet to triplet excited states via intersystem crossing (ISC) is facilitated. Hence, in transition metal complexes, emission from singlet excited states is not favoured. Nevertheless, a number of examples of transition metal complexes that fluoresce with high intensity have been found and some of them were even comprehensively studied. In general, three common photophysical characteristics are used for the identification of fluorescent emission from a transition metal complex: emission lifetimes on the nanosecond scale; a small Stokes shift; and intense emission under aerated conditions. For most of the complexes reviewed here, singlet emission is the result of ligand-based fluorescence, which is the dominant emission process due to poor metal-ligand interactions leading to a small metal contribution in the excited states, and a competitive fluorescence rate constant when compared to the ISC rate constant. In addition to the pure fluorescence from metal complexes, another two types of fluorescent emissions were also reviewed, namely, delayed fluorescence and fluorescence-phosphorescence dual emissions. Both emissions also have their respective unique characteristics, and thus they are discussed in this perspective.

  16. Microwave-assisted synthesis of transition metal phosphide

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Tito

    2014-12-30

    A method of synthesizing transition metal phosphide. In one embodiment, the method has the steps of preparing a transition metal lignosulfonate, mixing the transition metal lignosulfonate with phosphoric acid to form a mixture, and subjecting the mixture to a microwave radiation for a duration of time effective to obtain a transition metal phosphide.

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Dislocation Networks During Harper-Dorn Creep of fcc, bcc, and hcp Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Przystupa, Marek A.

    2007-12-13

    Harper-Dorn (H-D) creep is observed in metals and geological materials exposed to very low stresses at temperatures close to the melting point. It is one of several types of creep processes wherein the steady-state strain rate is proportional to the applied stress, Nabarro-Herring creep and Coble creep being two other important processes. H-D creep can be somewhat insidious because the creep rates are much larger than those expected for Nabarro-Herring or Coble creep. Since the working conditions of structural components of power plants and propulsion systems, as well as the motion of the earth’s mantle all involve very low stresses, an understanding of the factors controlling H-D creep is critical in preventing failures associated with those higher-than-expected creep rates. The purpose of this investigation was to obtain missing microstructural information on the evolution of the dislocation structures during static annealing of materials with fcc, bcc and hcp structure and use obtained results to test predictive capabilities of the dislocation network theory of H-D creep. In our view the evolutionary processes during static annealing and during Harper-Dorn creep are intimately related. The materials used in this study were fcc aluminum, hcp zinc and bcc tin. All characterizations of dislocation structures, densities and dislocation link length distributions were carried out using the etch pit method. To obtain quantitative information on the evolution of the dislocation networks during annealing the pure fcc aluminum samples were pre-deformed by creep at 913 and 620 K and then annealed. The higher deformation temperature was selected to generate starting dislocation networks similar to those forming during Harper-Dorn creep and the lower, to obtain higher dislocation densities suitable for reliable estimates of the parameters of the network growth law. The measured experimental link length distribution were, after scaling, (1) the same for all annealing

  18. Nuclear Scattering from Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hira, Ajit; McKeough, James; Valerio, Mario; Cathey, Tommy

    2016-03-01

    In view of the continued interest in the scattering of light projectiles by metallic nuclei, we present a computational study of the interactions between different nuclear species of atoms such as H through F (Z <= 9) and the nuclei of Silver, Palladium and other metals. Recent work has shown that neutron scattering can be used to record holographic images of materials. We have developed a FORTRAN computer program to compute stopping cross sections and scattering angles in Ag and other metals for the small nuclear projectiles, using Monte Carlo calculation. This code allows for different angles of incidence. Next, simulations were done in the energy interval from 50 to 210 keV. The computational results thus obtained are compared with relevant experimental data. The data are further analyzed to identify periodic trends in terms of the atomic number of the projectile. Such studies also have potential applications in nuclear physics and in nuclear medicine. Funding from National Science Foundation.

  19. The influence of the dislocation distribution heterogeneity degree on the formation of a non-misoriented dislocation cell substructures in f.c.c. metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, D. N.; Selivanikova, O. V.; Matveev, M. V.

    2016-06-01

    Dislocation loops emitted by Frank-Reed source during crossing dislocations of the non-coplanar slip systems are accumulates jogs on the own dislocation line, resulting in the deceleration of the segments of dislocation loops with high jog density. As a result, bending around of the slowed segments the formation of dynamic dipoles in the shear zone occurs. In the present paper we consider formation mechanism of non-misoriented dislocation cell substructure during plastic deformation of f.c.c. metals and conclude that the increase in the degree heterogeneity of dislocation distribution leads to an increase in the jog density and reduce the mean value of arm dynamic dipoles.

  20. Dependence of Initial Grain Orientation on the Evolution of Anisotropy in FCC and BCC Metals Using Crystal Plasticity and Texture Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Daniel Selvakumar

    Abundant experimental analyses and theoretical computational analyses that had been performed on metals to understand anisotropy and its evolution and its dependence on initial orientation of grains have failed to provide theories that can be used in macro-scale plasticity. Ductile metals fracture after going through a large amount of plastic deformation, during which the anisotropy of the material changes significantly. Processed metal sheets or slabs possess anisotropy due to textures produced by metal forming processes (such as drawing, bending and press braking). Metals that were initially isotropic possess anisotropy after undergoing forming processes, i.e., through texture formation due to large amount of plastic deformation before fracture. It is therefore essential to consider the effect of anisotropy to predict the characteristics of fracture and plastic flow performances in the simulation of ductile fracture and plastic flow of materials. Crystal plasticity simulations carried out on grains at the meso-scale level with different initial orientations (ensembles) help to derive the evolution of anisotropy at the macro-scale level and its dependence on initial orientation of grains. This paper investigates the evolution of anisotropy in BCC and FCC metals and its dependence on grain orientation using crystal plasticity simulations and texture analysis to reveal the mechanics behind the evolution of anisotropy. A comparison of anisotropy evolution between BCC and FCC metals is made through the simulation, which can be used to propose the theory of anisotropy evolution in macro-scale plasticity. Keywords: ensembles; grains; initial orientation; anisotropy; evolution of anisotropy; crystal plasticity; textures; homogeneity; isotropy; inelastic; equivalent strain.

  1. Transition metal catalyzed transformations of unsaturated molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In this proposal, research in three areas of transition metal catalyzed transformations of small molecules is proposed. The first encompasses metal catalyzed processes for the synthesis of several classes of carbon monoxide containing polymers. This section describes plans for metal catalyzed synthesis of (a) new alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide and olefins, (b) block copolymers consisting of segments of the olefin homopolymer and the olefin- carbon monoxide alternating copolymer, and (c) polycarbonates, polyesters and polyamides. The second section involves the examination of the chemistry of metal complexes incorporating oxo and hydrocarbyl ligands as a model for the heterogeneous oxidation of olefins and alkanes by meal oxides. Specific plans are to mimic in solution two proposed key steps in the heterogeneous oxidations. These are (a) the heterolytic cleavage of an alkyl (or allyl) C-H bond that is assisted by an oxo group, and (a) the transfer of an oxo group to the resultant metal bound alkyl (or allyl) ligand. The third section concerned with the development of a hybrid catalyst system involving both homogeneous and heterogeneous components for the oxidative functionalization of alkanes. The basic idea is to employ a transition metal in the elemental state to activate C-H bonds of alkanes and form surface alkyl groups. An additional transition metal species will be present in solution which will serve to oxidize these surface alkyl groups to ultimately yield oxidatively functionalized organic products. 57 refs.

  2. Controlling the orientations of h-BN during growth on transition metals by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiqi; Zhao, Xiaolei; Liu, Zhirong; Ding, Feng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2017-03-09

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is crucial for many applications, and its synthesis over a large area with high quality is strongly desired. A promising approach to synthesize h-BN is chemical vapor deposition on transition metal catalysts, in which the alignments of BN clusters in the initial growth determine both the types and the amounts of defects in h-BN. In the search for a better catalyst, we systematically studied the interactions between h-BN clusters and various metal surfaces. Our results show that the clusters on nearly all catalyst surfaces, no matter whether the (111) facets of face-centered cubic (FCC) metals or the (0001) facets of hexagonal close packed (HCP) metals, have two local minima with opposite orientations. During the initial growth, h-BN clusters adopt the energy-favored sites, whose registry is well preserved upon further growth owing to the strong interaction between the edge atoms of h-BN and the underlying substrates. On FCC(111), the h-BN domains are always aligned in parallel orientations, while on HCP(0001) they are parallel on the same terrace and anti-parallel on neighboring terraces. Beyond this, on the (111) surfaces of Ir and Rh, the BhNt configuration is much more energy favorable than BfNt, where, the subscripts h, t, and f represent the adsorption sites, hcp, top and fcc, respectively. Thus, Ir(111) and Rh(111) might promote the growth of h-BN domains with the same alignments, which will greatly improve the quality of h-BN by reducing the possibility of formation of grain boundaries.

  3. Chirality effect on nearly half-metallic properties in systematic endo-doping of 3d transition metals of narrow carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, M.; Khoshnevisan, B.

    2016-10-01

    Spin polarized density functional calculations were employed to study chirality effect on electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transition metals (TMs) endo-doped co-diameter (∼7 Å) narrow (5,5) and (9,0) single walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Various magnetizations up to ∼6μB was obtained for different 3dTM-CNT systems (recall that the magnetization of fcc structure cobalt is ∼1.6μB). In addition nearly half-metallic magnetic behavior has been observed for the most of considered systems. These results would be useful for spintronic and nano-magnetic technology.

  4. Phase transition from fcc to bcc structure of the Cu-clusters during nanocrystallization of Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 soft magnetic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Masahiko; Matsuura, Makoto; Takenaka, Kana; Takeuchi, Akira; Ofuchi, Hironori; Makino, Akihiro

    2014-05-01

    A role of Cu on the nanocrystallization of an Fe85.2Si1B9P4Cu0.8 alloy was investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Cu K-edge XAFS results show that local structure around Cu is disordered for the as-quenched sample whereas it changes to fcc-like structure at 613 K. The fcc Cu-clusters are, however, thermodynamically unstable and begin to transform into bcc structure at 638 K. An explicit bcc structure is observed for the sample annealed at 693 K for 600 s in which TEM observation shows that precipitated bcc-Fe crystallites with ˜12 nm are homogeneously distributed. The bcc structure of the Cu-clusters transforms into the fcc-type again at 973 K, which can be explained by the TEM observations; Cu segregates at grain boundaries between bcc-Fe crystallites and Fe3(B,P) compounds. Combining the XAFS results with the TEM observations, the structure transition of the Cu-clusters from fcc to bcc is highly correlated with the preliminary precipitation of the bcc-Fe which takes place prior to the onset of the first crystallization temperature, Tx1 = 707 K. Thermodynamic analysis suggests that an interfacial energy density γ between an fcc-Cu cluster and bcc-Fe matrix dominates at a certain case over the structural energy between fcc and bcc Cu, ΔGfcc - bcc, which causes phase transition of the Cu clusters from fcc to bcc structure.

  5. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals.

    PubMed

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E; Wirth, Brian D; Kurtz, Richard J

    2015-06-10

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N(F) ~ E(MD)(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, μ, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of μ as a function of displacement threshold energy, E(d), is presented for bcc metals.

  6. Mid-IR Transition Metal Lasers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    alexandrite was demonstrated in 1979. [2] Cr4+ and Cr2+ infrared laser materials took even longer to be discovered. However, transition metal laser...already been mentioned. Other transition metal laser ions such as Cr3+ in alexandrite [19] and Ti3+ in YAlO3 [20] have excited state absorption (ESA...Washington, DC. 19. Shand, M.L., J.C. Walling, and R.C. Morris, Excited-state absorption in the pump region of alexandrite , Journal of Applied Physics

  7. Metal oxide chemistry in solution: the early transition metal polyoxoanions.

    PubMed

    Day, V W; Klemperer, W G

    1985-05-03

    Many of the early transition elements form large polynuclear metal-oxygen anions containing up to 200 atoms or more. Although these polyoxoanions have been investigated for more than a century, detailed studies of structure and reactivity were not possible until the development of modern x-ray crystallographic and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques. Systematic studies of small polyoxoanions in inert, aprotic solvents have clarified many of the principles governing their structure and reactivity, and also have made possible the preparation of entirely new types of covalent derivatives such as CH(2)Mo(4)O(15)H(3-), C(5)H(5)TiMo(5)O(18)(3-), and (OC)(3)Mn(Nb(2)W(4)O(19))(3-). Since most early transition metal polyoxoanions have structures based on close-packed oxygen arrays containing interstitial metal centers, their chemistry offers a rare opportunity to study chemical transformations in detail on well-defined metal oxide surfaces.

  8. Dimensional diversity in transition metal trihalides

    SciTech Connect

    Jianhua Lin; Miller, G.J. )

    1993-04-14

    Structural variations of the second- and third-row transition metal trihalides are rationalized via tight-binding band calculations and evaluation of Madelung energetic factors. The observed structure for a given metal halide is controlled by both the coordination geometry at the anion and the d electron configuration at the metal. As the polarizability of the halide increases, the M-X-M angle, in general, decreases so that three-dimensional frameworks occur for the fluorides, while layer and chain structures are found for the chlorides, bromides, and iodides. Within a particular halide system, systematic structural trends also occur as the d electron configuration changes. 56 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. OH-transition metal bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The bonding in both CuOH and AgOH has a covalent component that leads to a bent structure. The larger electrostatic stabilization in CuOH leads to a larger D(e) (2.83 eV) compared with AgOH (2.20 eV). Using Ni5OH to model chemisorption of OH on a Ni surface, it is found that OH adsorption in the fourfold hollow of Ni(100) leads to an OH normal to the surface, while adsorption directly above a Ni atom leads to a tilted OH. These qualitative Ni5OH calculations allow for speculation on the observed variation of OH on metal surfaces.

  10. High Pressure Synthesis of Transition Metal Carbonyls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, A. P.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an experiment which uses readily available starting materials and inexpensive equipment for synthesis of transition metal carbonyls at 1000 atm and which is intended to give students experience in techniques used in research and industry. Safety precautions are emphasized. (Author/SA)

  11. Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxides for Supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ying-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, transition metal oxides, such as ruthenium oxide (RuO2), manganese dioxide (MnO2), nickel oxides (NiO) and cobalt oxide (Co3O4), have been widely investigated as electrode materials for pseudo-capacitors. In particular, these metal oxides with mesoporous structures have become very hot nanomaterials in the field of supercapacitors owing to their large specific surface areas and suitable pore size distributions. The high specific capacities of these mesoporous metal oxides are resulted from the effective contacts between electrode materials and electrolytes as well as fast transportation of ions and electrons in the bulk of electrode and at the interface of electrode and electrolyte. During the past decade, many achievements on mesoporous transition metal oxides have been made. In this mini-review, we select several typical nanomaterials, such as RuO2, MnO2, NiO, Co3O4 and nickel cobaltite (NiCo2O4), and briefly summarize the recent research progress of these mesoporous transition metal oxides-based electrodes in the field of supercapacitors. PMID:28347088

  12. Orbital physics in transition-metal oxides

    PubMed

    Tokura; Nagaosa

    2000-04-21

    An electron in a solid, that is, bound to or nearly localized on the specific atomic site, has three attributes: charge, spin, and orbital. The orbital represents the shape of the electron cloud in solid. In transition-metal oxides with anisotropic-shaped d-orbital electrons, the Coulomb interaction between the electrons (strong electron correlation effect) is of importance for understanding their metal-insulator transitions and properties such as high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance. The orbital degree of freedom occasionally plays an important role in these phenomena, and its correlation and/or order-disorder transition causes a variety of phenomena through strong coupling with charge, spin, and lattice dynamics. An overview is given here on this "orbital physics," which will be a key concept for the science and technology of correlated electrons.

  13. Syntheses of transition metal methoxysiloxides.

    PubMed

    Richers, Casseday P; Bertke, Jeffery A; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2017-01-31

    The paper describes three methods for the preparation of methoxysiloxide complexes, a rare class of complexes of relevance to room temperature vulcanization (RTV) of polysiloxanes. The salt metathesis reaction involves the use of the recently described reagent NaOSi(OMe)2Me with various metal chlorides to give Cp*2Ti[OSi(OMe)2Me](OMe), ((Me,Me)N2N)NiOSi(OMe)2Me, (IPr)CuOSi(OMe)2Me, and (triphos)CoOSi(OMe)2Me (Cp* = C5Me5, triphos = Me(CH2PPh2)3). Several attempted reactions gave methoxide complexes instead, a pathway that is attributed to the intermediacy of κ(2)-OSi(OMe)2Me species. The diol Cp*2Zr(OH)2 reacts with excess (MeO)3SiMe to give Cp*2Zr[OSi(OMe)2Me]2. In contrast the less nucleophilic Cp*2Ti(OH)2 was unreactive. The third route to methoxysiloxide complexes involves the reaction of Cp*2M(O)(py) with (MeO)3SiMe to give Cp*2M[OSi(OMe)2Me](OMe) in nearly quantitative yield (M = Ti, Zr). The structures of Cp*2Ti[OSi(OMe)2Me](OMe), Cp*2Zr[OSi(OMe)2Me](OMe), (IPr)CuOSi(OMe)2Me, and (triphos)CoOSi(OMe)2Me were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  14. Iodide effects in transition metal catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Maitlis, Peter M; Haynes, Anthony; James, Brian R; Catellani, Marta; Chiusoli, Gian Paolo

    2004-11-07

    The unique properties of I(-) allow it to be involved in several different ways in reactions catalyzed by the late transition metals: in the oxidative addition, the migration, and the coupling/reductive elimination steps, as well as in substrate activation. Most steps are accelerated by I(-)(for example through an increased nucleophilicity of the metal center), but some are retarded, because a coordination site is blocked. The "soft" iodide ligand binds more strongly to soft metals (low oxidation state, electron rich, and polarizable) such as the later and heavier transition metals, than do the other halides, or N- and O-centered ligands. Hence in a catalytic cycle that includes the metal in a formally low oxidation state there will be less tendency for the metal to precipitate (and be removed from the cycle) in the presence of I(-) than most other ligands. Iodide is a good nucleophile and is also easily and reversibly oxidized to I(2). In addition, I(-) can play key roles in purely organic reactions that occur as part of a catalytic cycle. Thus to understand the function of iodide requires careful analysis, since two or sometimes more effects occur in different steps of one single cycle. Each of these topics is illustrated with examples of the influence of iodide from homogeneous catalytic reactions in the literature: methanol carbonylation to acetic acid and related reactions; CO hydrogenation; imine hydrogenation; and C-C and C-N coupling reactions. General features are summarised in the Conclusions.

  15. The study of structural phase transitions and static properties using transition metal model pseudopotential (TMMP) for Ca and Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhecha, Shalu; Bhatt, N. K.; Vyas, P. R.; Gohel, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    In the present communication, we have computed static and dynamic properties (binding energy-E, bulk modulus-B and second moment- <ω2>) as well as first order pressure induced phase transition (FCC-BCC) using local form of pseudopotential for Calcium and Strontium. The form of pseudopotential used for the computation is directly extracted from Generalized Pseudopotential Theory (GPT) which contains three parameters (rc, rd and β). We have suggested a simple method using which pseudopotential is determined by single parameter (β). Our computed results for binding energy and bulk modulii are in excellent agreement with experimental findings and are better than other theoretical results. The present study confirms that s-d hybridization is accounted properly in the presently used pseudopotential and can be extended for the study of lattice mechanical properties of these metals.

  16. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atxabal, A.; Ribeiro, M.; Parui, S.; Urreta, L.; Sagasta, E.; Sun, X.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale.

  17. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules

    PubMed Central

    Atxabal, A.; Ribeiro, M.; Parui, S.; Urreta, L.; Sagasta, E.; Sun, X.; Llopis, R.; Casanova, F.; Hueso, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale. PMID:27941810

  18. Spin doping using transition metal phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Atxabal, A; Ribeiro, M; Parui, S; Urreta, L; Sagasta, E; Sun, X; Llopis, R; Casanova, F; Hueso, L E

    2016-12-12

    Molecular spins have become key enablers for exploring magnetic interactions, quantum information processes and many-body effects in metals. Metal-organic molecules, in particular, let the spin state of the core metal ion to be modified according to its organic environment, allowing localized magnetic moments to emerge as functional entities with radically different properties from its simple atomic counterparts. Here, using and preserving the integrity of transition metal phthalocyanine high-spin complexes, we demonstrate the magnetic doping of gold thin films, effectively creating a new ground state. We demonstrate it by electrical transport measurements that are sensitive to the scattering of itinerant electrons with magnetic impurities, such as Kondo effect and weak antilocalization. Our work expands in a simple and powerful way the classes of materials that can be used as magnetic dopants, opening a new channel to couple the wide range of molecular properties with spin phenomena at a functional scale.

  19. Silicide induced surface defects in FePt nanoparticle fcc-to-fct thermally activated phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu; Lee, Stephen L.; André, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MnPs) are relevant to a wide range of applications including high density information storage and magnetic resonance imaging to name but a few. Among the materials available to prepare MnPs, FePt is attracting growing attention. However, to harvest the strongest magnetic properties of FePt MnPs, a thermal annealing is often required to convert face-centered cubic as synthesized nPs into its tetragonal phase. Rarely addressed are the potential side effects of such treatments on the magnetic properties. In this study, we focus on the impact of silica shells often used in strategies aiming at overcoming MnP coalescence during the thermal annealing. While we show that this shell does prevent sintering, and that fcc-to-fct conversion does occur, we also reveal the formation of silicide, which can prevent the stronger magnetic properties of fct-FePt MnPs from being fully realised. This report therefore sheds lights on poorly investigated and understood interfacial phenomena occurring during the thermal annealing of MnPs and, by doing so, also highlights the benefits of developing new strategies to avoid silicide formation.

  20. Metal Induced Growth of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides at Controlled Locations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhendong; Huang, Qi; Chen, Peng; Guo, Shouhui; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liang, Xuelei; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Metal induced nucleation is adopted to achieve the growth of transition metal dichalcogenides at controlled locations. Ordered arrays of MoS2 and WS2 have successfully been fabricated on SiO2 substrates by using the patterned Pt/Ti dots as the nucleation sites. Uniform MoS2 monolayers with the adjustable size up to 50 μm are grown surrounding these metal patterns and the mobility of such layer is about 0.86 cm2/V·s. The crystalline flakes of WS2 are also fabricated extending from the metal patterns and the electron mobility of these flakes is up to 11.36 cm2/V·s. PMID:27910917

  1. Insulator to Metal Transition in Fluid Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, R Q; Galli, G

    2003-06-15

    The authors have investigated the insulator to metal transition (ITM) in fluid hydrogen using first principles simulations. Both density functional and quantum Monte Carlo calculations show that the electronic energy gap of the liquid vanishes at about 9 fold compression and 3000 K. At these conditions the computed conductivity values are characteristic of a poor metal. These findings are consistent with those of recent shock wave experiments but the computed conductivity is larger than the measured value. From the ab-initio results they conclude that the ITM is driven by molecular dissociation rather than disorder and that both temperature and pressure play a key role in determining structural changes in the fluid.

  2. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  3. Magnetic and Metal-Insulator Transition in natural Transition Metal Sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renxiong; Metz, Tristin; Liu, I.-Lin; Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Xiangfeng; Jeffries, J. R.; Saha, S. R.; Greene, R. L.; Paglione, J.; Santelli, C. C.; Post, J.,

    In collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, we present detailed studies of a class of natural minerals with potential to harbor correlated behavior. Transition metal sulfide minerals, such as Bornite (Cu5FeS4), are an important family of compounds known for their thermoelectric properties. We will present low temperature experimental studies of magnetic transitions and focus on a compound that exhibits a metal to insulator transition concident with entrance to an antiferromagnetic ground state, suggesting a potentially interesting system with promise for realizing new correlated states of matter in a naturally occurring mineral.

  4. Transitional Metal/Chalcogen Dependant Interactions of Hairpin DNA with Transition Metal Dichalcogenides, MX2.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Sofer, Zdenek; Pumera, Martin

    2015-08-03

    Owing to the attractive properties that transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) display, they have found recent application in the fabrication of biosensing devices. These devices involve the immobilization of a recognition element such as DNA onto the surface of TMDs. Therefore, it is imperative to examine the interactions between TMDs and DNA. Herein, we explore the effect of different transition metals (Mo and W) and chalcogens (S and Se) on the interactions between hairpin DNA and TMDs of both bulk and t-BuLi exfoliated forms. We discovered that the interactions are strongly dependent on the metal/chalcogen composition in TMDs.

  5. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    DOE PAGES

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P.; Juslin, Niklas; ...

    2015-01-01

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N-F similar to E-MD(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, mu, between the high-and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of mu as a function of displacement threshold energy, E-d,more » is presented for bcc metals.« less

  6. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, A.; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-06-10

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, $b$, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy ($N_F$$ \\sim$$E_{MD}^b$). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, $\\mu$, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of $\\mu$ as a function of displacement threshold energy, $E_d$, is presented for bcc metals.

  7. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P.; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E.; Wirth, Brian D.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N-F similar to E-MD(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, mu, between the high-and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of mu as a function of displacement threshold energy, E-d, is presented for bcc metals.

  8. Transition-Metal Substitution Doping in Synthetic Atomically Thin Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Kim, Young Duck; Liang, Liangbo; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Chow, Phil; Tan, Jiawei; Li, Baichang; Li, Lu; Sumpter, Bobby G; Lu, Toh-Ming; Meunier, Vincent; Hone, James; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-11-01

    Large-area "in situ" transition-metal substitution doping for chemical-vapor-deposited semiconducting transition-metal-dichalcogenide monolayers deposited on dielectric substrates is demonstrated. In this approach, the transition-metal substitution is stable and preserves the monolayer's semiconducting nature, along with other attractive characteristics, including direct-bandgap photoluminescence.

  9. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  10. Lanthanoid-transition-metal bonding in bismetallocenes.

    PubMed

    Butovskii, Mikhail V; Oelkers, Benjamin; Bauer, Tobias; Bakker, Jacinta M; Bezugly, Viktor; Wagner, Frank R; Kempe, Rhett

    2014-03-03

    Bismetallocenes [Cp2 LuReCp2 ] and [Cp*2 LaReCp2 ] (Cp=cyclopentadienyl; Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) were prepared using different synthetic strategies. Salt metathesis-performed in aromatic hydrocarbons to avoid degradation pathways caused by THF-were identified as an attractive alternative to alkane elimination. Although alkane elimination is more attractive in the sense of its less elaborate workup, the rate of the reaction shows a strong dependence on the ionic radius of Ln(3+) (Ln=lanthanide) within a given ligand set. Steric hindrance can cause a dramatic decrease in the reaction rate of alkane elimination. In this case, salt metathesis should be considered the better alternative. Covalent bonding interactions between the Ln and transition-metal (TM) cations has been quantified on the basis of the delocalization index. Its magnitude lies within the range characteristic for bonds between transition metals. Secondary interactions were identified between carbon atoms of the Cp ligand of the transition metal and the Ln cation. Model calculations clearly indicated that the size of these interactions depends on the capability of the TM atom to act as an electron donor (i.e., a Lewis base). The consequences can even be derived from structural details. The observed clear dependency of the LuRu and interfragment LuC bonding on the THF coordination of the Lu atom points to a tunable Lewis acidity at the Ln site, which provides a method of significantly influencing the structure and the interfragment bonding.

  11. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Minghui; Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T.; Ralston, Walter T.; MacLeod, Michelle J.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2013-09-15

    Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Å/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

  12. Ferroelectric control of metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xu; Jin, Kui-juan; Ge, Chen; Ma, Zhong-shui; Yang, Guo-zhen

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of controlling the metal-insulator transition of one perovskite material at its interface with another ferroelectric material based on first principle calculations. The operating principle is that the rotation of oxygen octahedra tuned by the ferroelectric polarization can modulate the superexchange interaction in this perovskite. We designed a tri-color superlattice of (BiFeO3)N/LaNiO3/LaTiO3, in which the BiFeO3 layers are ferroelectric, the LaNiO3 layer is the layer of which the electronic structure is to be tuned, and LaTiO3 layer is inserted to enhance the inversion asymmetry. By reversing the ferroelectric polarization in this structure, there is a metal-insulator transition of the LaNiO3 layer because of the changes of crystal field splitting of the Ni eg orbitals and the bandwidth of the Ni in-plane eg orbital. It is highly expected that a metal-transition can be realized by designing the structures at the interfaces for more materials.

  13. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen.

  14. Catabolism of hyaluronan: involvement of transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Šoltés, Ladislav; Kogan, Grigorij

    2009-01-01

    One of the very complex structures in the vertebrates is the joint. The main component of the joint is the synovial fluid with its high-molar-mass glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, which turnover is approximately twelve hours. Since the synovial fluid does not contain any hyaluronidases, the fast hyaluronan catabolism is caused primarily by reductive-oxidative processes. Eight transition metals – V23, Mn25, Fe26, Co27, Ni28, Cu29, Zn30, and Mo42 – naturally occurring in living organism are essential for the control of various metabolic and signaling pathways. They are also the key elements in catabolism of hyaluronan in the joint. In this overview, the role of these metals in physiological and pathophysiological catabolism of hyaluronan is described. The participation of these metals in the initiation and propagation of the radical degradation hyaluronan is critically reviewed. PMID:21217859

  15. Spinning around in Transition-Metal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Swart, Marcel; Gruden, Maja

    2016-12-20

    The great diversity and richness of transition metal chemistry, such as the features of an open d-shell, opened a way to numerous areas of scientific research and technological applications. Depending on the nature of the metal and its environment, there are often several energetically accessible spin states, and the progress in accurate theoretical treatment of this complicated phenomenon is presented in this Account. The spin state energetics of a transition metal complex can be predicted theoretically on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) or wave function based methodology, where DFT has advantages since it can be applied routinely to medium-to-large-sized molecules and spin-state consistent density functionals are now available. Additional factors such as the effect of the basis set, thermochemical contributions, solvation, relativity, and dispersion, have been investigated by many researchers, but challenges in unambiguous assignment of spin states still remain. The first DFT studies showed intrinsic spin-state preferences of hybrid functionals for high spin and early generalized gradient approximation functionals for low spin. Progress in the development of density functional approximations (DFAs) then led to a class of specially designed DFAs, such as OPBE, SSB-D, and S12g, and brought a very intriguing and fascinating observation that the spin states of transition metals and the SN2 barriers of organic molecules are somehow intimately linked. Among the many noteworthy results that emerged from the search for the appropriate description of the complicated spin state preferences in transition metals, we mainly focused on the examination of the connection between the spin state and the structures or coordination modes of the transition metal complexes. Changes in spin states normally lead only to changes in the metal-ligand bond lengths, but to the best of our knowledge, the dapsox ligand showed the first example of a transition-metal complex where a

  16. Laser materials based on transition metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncorgé, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to review the spectroscopic properties of the main laser materials based on transition metal ions which lead to noticeable laser performance at room temperature and, for very few cases, because of unique properties, when they are operated at cryogenic temperatures. The description also includes the materials which are currently being used as saturable absorbers for passive-Q-switching of a variety of other near- and mid-infrared solid state lasers. A substantial part of the article is devoted first to the description of the energy levels and of the absorption and emission transitions of the transition metal ions in various types of environments by using the well-known Tanabe-Sugano diagrams. It is shown in particular how these diagrams can be used along with other theoretical considerations to understand and describe the spectroscopic properties of ions sitting in crystal field environments of near-octahedral or near-tetrahedral symmetry. The second part is then dedicated to the description (positions and intensities) of the main absorption and emission features which characterize the different types of materials.

  17. Ultrafast photophysics of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2015-03-17

    The properties of transition metal complexes are interesting not only for their potential applications in solar energy conversion, OLEDs, molecular electronics, biology, photochemistry, etc. but also for their fascinating photophysical properties that call for a rethinking of fundamental concepts. With the advent of ultrafast spectroscopy over 25 years ago and, more particularly, with improvements in the past 10-15 years, a new area of study was opened that has led to insightful observations of the intramolecular relaxation processes such as internal conversion (IC), intersystem crossing (ISC), and intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR). Indeed, ultrafast optical spectroscopic tools, such as fluorescence up-conversion, show that in many cases, intramolecular relaxation processes can be extremely fast and even shorter than time scales of vibrations. In addition, more and more examples are appearing showing that ultrafast ISC rates do not scale with the magnitude of the metal spin-orbit coupling constant, that is, that there is no heavy-atom effect on ultrafast time scales. It appears that the structural dynamics of the system and the density of states play a crucial role therein. While optical spectroscopy delivers an insightful picture of electronic relaxation processes involving valence orbitals, the photophysics of metal complexes involves excitations that may be centered on the metal (called metal-centered or MC) or the ligand (called ligand-centered or LC) or involve a transition from one to the other or vice versa (called MLCT or LMCT). These excitations call for an element-specific probe of the photophysics, which is achieved by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this case, transitions from core orbitals to valence orbitals or higher allow probing the electronic structure changes induced by the optical excitation of the valence orbitals, while also delivering information about the geometrical rearrangement of the neighbor atoms around the atom of

  18. Bulk Properties of Transition Metals: A Challenge for the Design of Universal Density Functionals.

    PubMed

    Janthon, Patanachai; Luo, Sijie Andy; Kozlov, Sergey M; Viñes, Francesc; Limtrakul, Jumras; Truhlar, Donald G; Illas, Francesc

    2014-09-09

    Systematic evaluation of the accuracy of exchange-correlation functionals is essential to guide scientists in their choice of an optimal method for a given problem when using density functional theory. In this work, accuracy of one Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) functional, three meta-GGA functionals, one Nonseparable Gradient Approximation (NGA) functional, one meta-NGA, and three hybrid GGA functionals was evaluated for calculations of the closest interatomic distances, cohesive energies, and bulk moduli of all 3d, 4d, and 5d bulk transition metals that have face centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal closed packed (hcp), or body centered cubic (bcc) structures (a total of 27 cases). Our results show that including the extra elements of kinetic energy density and Hartree-Fock exchange energy density into gradient approximation density functionals does not usually improve them. Nevertheless, the accuracies of the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) and M06-L meta-GGAs and the MN12-L meta-NGA approach the accuracy of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) GGA, so usage of these functionals may be advisable for systems containing both solid-state transition metals and molecular species. The N12 NGA functional is also shown to be almost as accurate as PBE for bulk transition metals, and thus it could be a good choice for studies of catalysis given its proven good performance for molecular species.

  19. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R.; Tatsumi, Y.; Huang, S.; Ling, X.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs.

  20. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Saito, R; Tatsumi, Y; Huang, S; Ling, X; Dresselhaus, M S

    2016-09-07

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs.

  1. Size-dependent structural transition from multiple-twinned particles to epitaxial fcc nanocrystals and nanocrystal decay

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Huang, W. J.; Bohra, F.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Tedjasaputra, A. P.; Zuo, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    The size dependence of structural transition from multiple-twinned particles (MTP) to epitaxial face centered cubic nanocrystals was investigated for Ag nanoparticles formed on Si(001) surfaces by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The transition from MTP to nanocrystals was promoted by postdeposition annealing. Clear particle size dependence is found in the epitaxial formation temperatures (T{sub E}), which is about 2/3 of the calculated, size-dependent, melting temperature (T{sub M}) using the value of surface energy {gamma}{sub S}=1.2 J/m{sup 2} for larger particles (>2 nm). Once nanocrystals are formed, they decay and disappear in a narrow temperature range between 795 and 850 K. No evidence of nanocrystal melting was detected from the reflection high-energy electron diffraction observations.

  2. Size-dependent structural transition from multiple-twinned particles to epitaxial fcc nanocrystals and nanocrystal decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Huang, W. J.; Bohra, F.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Tedjasaputra, A. P.; Zuo, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    The size dependence of structural transition from multiple-twinned particles (MTP) to epitaxial face centered cubic nanocrystals was investigated for Ag nanoparticles formed on Si(001) surfaces by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex situ transmission electron microscopy. The transition from MTP to nanocrystals was promoted by postdeposition annealing. Clear particle size dependence is found in the epitaxial formation temperatures (TE) , which is about 2/3 of the calculated, size-dependent, melting temperature (TM) using the value of surface energy γS=1.2J/m2 for larger particles (>2nm) . Once nanocrystals are formed, they decay and disappear in a narrow temperature range between 795 and 850K . No evidence of nanocrystal melting was detected from the reflection high-energy electron diffraction observations.

  3. Multifunctional Ligands in Transition Metal Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Sophisticated ligands are now being designed that do far more than just fulfil their traditional spectator roles by binding to the metal and providing a sterically-defined binding pocket for the substrate in homogeneous transition metal catalysis. This Focus review emphasizes selected cases in which ligands carry additional functional groups that change the properties of the ligand as a result of an external stimulus or undergo catalytically-relevant ligand-based reactivity. These include proton responsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more protons, ligands having a hydrogen bonding function, electroresponsive ligands capable of gaining or losing one or more electrons, and photoresponsive ligands capable of undergoing a useful change of properties upon irradiation. Molecular recognition ligands and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) are briefly discussed.

  4. Switchable Metal-Insulator Phase Transition Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Hajisalem, Ghazal; Nezami, Mohammadreza S; Gordon, Reuven

    2017-04-06

    We investigate the switching of a gap plasmon tunnel junction between conducting and insulating states. Hysteresis is observed in the second and the third harmonic generation power dependence, which arises by thermally induced disorder ("melting") of a two-carbon self-assembled monolayer between an ultraflat gold surface and metal nanoparticles. The hysteresis is observed for a variety of nanoparticle sizes, but not for larger tunnel junctions where there is no appreciable tunneling. By combining quantum corrected finite-difference time-domain simulations with nonlinear scattering theory, we calculate the changes in the harmonic generation between the tunneling and the insulating states, and good agreement is found with the experiments. This paves the way to a new class of metal-insulator phase transition switchable metamaterials, which may provide next-generation information processing technologies.

  5. Relative edge energy in the stability of transition metal nanoclusters of different motifs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X J; Xue, X L; Guo, Z X; Li, S F

    2016-07-07

    When a structure is reduced to a nanometer scale, the proportion of the edge atoms increases significantly, which can play a crucial role in determining both their geometric and electronic properties, as demonstrated by the recently established generalized Wulff construction principle [S. F. Li, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2013, 111, 115501]. Consequently, it is of great interest to clarify quantitatively the role of the edge atoms that dominate the motifs of these nanostructures. In principle, establishing an effective method valid for determining the absolute value of the surface energy and particularly the edge energy for a given nanostructure is expected to resolve such a problem. However, hitherto, it is difficult to obtain the absolute edge energy of transition metal clusters, particularly when their sizes approach the nanometer regime. In this paper, taking Ru nanoclusters as a prototypical example, our first-principles calculations introduce the concept of relative edge energy (REE), reflecting the net edge atom effect over the surface (facet) atom effect, which is fairly powerful to quasi-quantitatively estimate the critical size at which the crossover occurs between different configurations of a given motif, such as from an icosahedron to an fcc nanocrystal. By contrast, the bulk effect should be re-considered to rationalize the power of the REE in predicting the relative stability of larger nanostructures between different motifs, such as fcc-like and hcp-like nanocrystals.

  6. Approximate Dependence of Diffusion Barriers on Nearest-Neighbor Configurations on fcc(100) Metals, and Some Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Jacobsen, J.; Schiff, C.

    1997-03-01

    To simulate epitaxial growth, one needs an a priori understanding of how atomic diffusion barriers depend on the occupation of near-neighbor sites of the initial and final positions. From a histogram of such barriers computed for Cu/Cu(100) using the embedded atom method (EAM), Karimi et al.(M. Karimi, T. Tomkowski, G. Vidali, and O. Biham, Phys. Rev. B 52), 5364 (1995); O. Biham et al., preprint found that these energies fell into four groups. They proposed a simple approximation for the local-configuration dependence of the energy barriers. From a reexamination of these energies, using effective medium theory, we propose an approximation which also depends solely on near-neighbor occupations but accounts better for the energy barriers. The scheme is comparably accurate for Ag/Ag(100), but requires some modification for Ni/Ni(100). We also describe some noteworthy effects of fcc geometry in this approximation, particularly a mechanism which, like the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier, enhances roughness with increasing temperature. In the next talk we describe and compare simulations using both approximations.

  7. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scalettar, Richard T.; Pickett, Warren E.

    2004-07-01

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  8. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  9. Simple transition metal oxides (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Basaran, Ali C.; de la Venta, Jose; Ramirez, Juan Gabriel; Saerbeck, Thomas; Valmianski, Ilya; Wang, Siming

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid materials allow the engineering of new material properties by creative uses of proximity effects. When two dissimilar materials are in close physical proximity the properties of each one may be radically modified or occasionally a completely new material emerges. In the area of magnetism, controlling the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic thin films without magnetic fields is an on- going challenge with multiple technological implications for low- energy consumption memory and logic devices. Interesting possibilities include ferromagnets in proximity to dissimilar materials such as antiferromagnets or oxides that undergo metal-insulator transitions. The proximity of ferromagnets to antiferromagnets has given rise to the extensively studied Exchange Bias[1]. Our recent investigations in this field have addressed crucial issues regarding the importance of the antiferromagnetic [2-3] and ferromagnetic [4] bulk for the Exchange Bias and the unusual short time dynamics [5]. In a series of recent studies, we have investigated the magnetic properties of different hybrids of ferromagnets (Ni, Co and Fe) and oxides, which undergo metal-insulator and structural phase transitions. Both the static as well as dynamical properties of the ferromagnets are drastically affected. Static properties such as the coercivity, anisotropy and magnetization [6-8] and dynamical properties such as the microwave response are clearly modified by the proximity effect and give raise to interesting perhaps useful properties. Work supported by US-AFOSR and US-DOE

  10. Metal Insulator transition in Vanadium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovaini, Azita; Fujita, Shigeji; Suzuki, Akira; Godoy, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    MAR12-2011-000262 Abstract Submitted for the MAR12 Meeting of The American Physical Society Sorting Category: 03.9 (T) On the metal-insulator-transition in vanadium dioxide AZITA JOVAINI, SHIGEJI FUJITA, University at Buffalo, SALVADOR GODOY, UNAM, AKIRA SUZUKI, Tokyo University of Science --- Vanadium dioxide (VO2) undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 340 K with the structural change from tetragonal to monoclinic crystal. The conductivity _/ drops at MIT by four orders of magnitude. The low temperature monoclinic phase is known to have a lower ground-state energy. The existence of the k-vector k is prerequisite for the conduction since the k appears in the semiclassical equation of motion for the conduction electron (wave packet). The tetragonal (VO2)3 unit is periodic along the crystal's x-, y-, and z-axes, and hence there is a three-dimensional k-vector. There is a one-dimensional k for a monoclinic crystal. We believe this difference in the dimensionality of the k-vector is the cause of the conductivity drop. Prefer Oral Session X Prefer .

  11. Methane activation on supported transition metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstens, Jason Ned

    At present, there is considerable interest in utilizing methane more efficiently as both a fuel source and as a starting material for the production of other, more valuable products. However, methane is a very stable molecule with strong C-H bonds that are difficult to break. This makes methane combustion or the formation of carbon-carbon bonds quite difficult. The present work focuses on the use of supported transition metal catalysts as a means of activating methane (i.e. breaking C-H bonds) at low temperatures to produce valuable products or energy. The conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons. A low temperature (<750 K), direct process to effectively convert methane into higher hydrocarbons would be quite desirable. Such a process is thermodynamically feasible if the reaction is broken up into two separate steps. The first step is the adsorption of methane onto a transition metal catalyst at temperatures above about 600 K to produce a surface carbon species. The second step is a low temperature (<373 K) hydrogenation to convert the carbon species into higher hydrocarbons. T. Koerts et al. have pursued this approach by dissociatively absorbing methane onto silica supported transition metal catalysts at temperatures ranging between 573 K and 773 K. The result was a surface carbonaceous species and hydrogen. In the second step, the carbonaceous intermediates produced small alkanes upon hydrogenation around 373 K. A maximum yield to higher hydrocarbons of 13% was obtained on a ruthenium catalyst. The present study was conducted to further investigate the nature of the carbonaceous species reported by Koerts. Methane combustion. This investigation was conducted in an effort to better understand the mechanism of methane combustion on Pd catalysts. In the first part of this study, temperature programmed reduction (TPR) was used to investigate the oxidation and reduction dynamics of a 10 wt% Pd/ZrOsb2 catalyst used for methane combustion. TPR experiments indicate

  12. Holographic disorder driven superconductor-metal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areán, D.; Pando Zayas, L. A.; Landea, I. Salazar; Scardicchio, A.

    2016-11-01

    We implement the effects of disorder on a holographic superconductor by introducing a random chemical potential on the boundary. We demonstrate explicitly that increasing disorder leads to the formation of islands where the superconducting order is enhanced and subsequently to the transition to a metal. We study the behavior of the superfluid density and of the conductivity as a function of the strength of disorder. We find explanations for various marked features in the conductivities in terms of hydrodynamic quasinormal modes of the holographic superconductors. These identifications plus a particular disorder-dependent spectral weight shift in the conductivity point to a signature of the Higgs mode in the context of disordered holographic superconductors. We observe that the behavior of the order parameter close to the transition is not mean-field type as in the clean case; rather we find robust agreement with exp (-A |T -Tc|-ν), with ν =1.03 ±0.02 for this disorder-driven smeared transition.

  13. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field.

  14. Validation of density functionals for transition metals and intermetallics using data from quantitative electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xiahan; Kulovits, Andreas; Wang, Guofeng; Wiezorek, Jörg

    2013-02-28

    Accurate low-order structure factors (Fg) measured by quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction (QCBED) were used for validation of different density functional theory (DFT) approximations. Twenty-three low-order Fg were measured for the transition metals Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu, and the transition metal based intermetallic phases γ-TiAl, β-NiAl, and γ1-FePd using a multi-beam off-zone axis QCBED method and then compared with Fg calculated by ab initio DFT using the local density approximation (LDA) and LDA + U, and different generalized gradient approximations (GGA) functionals. Different functionals perform very differently for different materials and crystal structures regarding prediction of low-order Fg. All the GGA functionals tested in the paper except for EV93 achieve good overall agreement with the experimentally determined low-order Fg for BCC Cr and Fe, while EV93 performs the best for FCC Ni and Cu. The LDA and GGA functional fail to predict accurately the low-order Fg for β-NiAl and γ1-FePd. The LDA + U approach, through tuning of U, can achieve excellent matches with the experimentally measured Fg for all the metallic systems investigated in this paper. The use of experimentally accessible low order Fg as an additional set of metrics in approaches of validation of DFT calculations is discussed and has potential to assist in and to stimulate development of improved functionals.

  15. Validation of density functionals for transition metals and intermetallics using data from quantitative electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Xiahan; Kulovits, Andreas; Wang, Guofeng; Wiezorek, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Accurate low-order structure factors (Fg) measured by quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction (QCBED) were used for validation of different density functional theory (DFT) approximations. Twenty-three low-order Fg were measured for the transition metals Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu, and the transition metal based intermetallic phases γ-TiAl, β-NiAl, and γ1-FePd using a multi-beam off-zone axis QCBED method and then compared with Fg calculated by ab initio DFT using the local density approximation (LDA) and LDA + U, and different generalized gradient approximations (GGA) functionals. Different functionals perform very differently for different materials and crystal structures regarding prediction of low-order Fg. All the GGA functionals tested in the paper except for EV93 achieve good overall agreement with the experimentally determined low-order Fg for BCC Cr and Fe, while EV93 performs the best for FCC Ni and Cu. The LDA and GGA functional fail to predict accurately the low-order Fg for β-NiAl and γ1-FePd. The LDA + U approach, through tuning of U, can achieve excellent matches with the experimentally measured Fg for all the metallic systems investigated in this paper. The use of experimentally accessible low order Fg as an additional set of metrics in approaches of validation of DFT calculations is discussed and has potential to assist in and to stimulate development of improved functionals.

  16. Theoretical studies of transition metal dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The CASSCF approach was used to perform the MCSCF calculations for a number of transition metal dimers, including the Sc2, Ti2, Cr2, Cu2, TiV, Y2, Nb2, and Mo2 molecules; in addition, CASSCF/CI calculations were carried out for Sc2, Ti2, Cu2, and Y2. The CASSCF procedure is shown to provide a consistent set of calculations for these molecules, from which trends and a simple qualitative picture of the electronic structure may be derived. In particular, the calculations confirmed the ground states of the Sc2 and the TiV, and led to predictions for other molecules in this series. In addition to specific predictions, the study provides a simple qualitative picture of the bonding in these dimers.

  17. Transition metal-ligand bonding. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of the bonding of CO, H2O, and NH3 to transition metal atoms is analyzed using the constrained-space-orbital-variation (CSOV) technique. The cooperative effects for Ni(CO)2 are found to be different than those for Ni(H2O)2. The bonding between neutral systems and the positive ions is found to be quite different; NiCO(+) has little pi bonding, while NiCO has strong pi bonding. The positive ion of NiH2O is far more strongly bound than the neutral, while for NiCO the positive ion and neutral are bound by about the same energy.

  18. Transition metal catalysis and nucleophilic fluorination.

    PubMed

    Hollingworth, Charlotte; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2012-03-21

    Transition metal catalyzed transformations using fluorinating reagents have been developed extensively for the preparation of synthetically valuable fluorinated targets. This is a topic of critical importance to facilitate laboratory and industrial chemical synthesis of fluorine containing pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Translation to (18)F-radiochemistry is also emerging as a vibrant research field because functional imaging based on Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is increasingly used for both diagnosis and pharmaceutical development. This review summarizes how fluoride sources have been used for the catalytic nucleophilic fluorination of various substrates inclusive of aryl triflates, alkynes, allylic halides, allylic esters, allylic trichloroacetimidates, benzylic halides, tertiary alkyl halides and epoxides. Until recently, progress in this field of research has been slow in part because of the challenges associated with the dual reactivity profile of fluoride (nucleophile or base). Despite these difficulties, some remarkable breakthroughs have emerged. This includes the demonstration that Pd(0)/Pd(II)-catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination to access fluoroarenes from aryl triflates is feasible, and the first examples of Tsuji-Trost allylic alkylation with fluoride using either allyl chlorides or allyl precursors bearing O-leaving groups. More recently, allylic fluorides were also made accessible under iridium catalysis. Another reaction, which has been greatly improved based on careful mechanistic work, is the catalytic asymmetric hydrofluorination of meso epoxides. Notably, each individual transition metal catalyzed nucleophilic fluorination reported to date employs a different F-reagent, an observation indicating that this area of research will benefit from a larger pool of nucleophilic fluoride sources. In this context, a striking recent development is the successful design, synthesis and applications of a fluoride-derived electrophilic late stage

  19. New Gallides and Germanides of Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of the average atomic volumes (AAV) of the intermediate phases from the concentration was done in many two-component systems. It was shown that in some systems (namely transition metal with non-transition element from the IIIrd or IVth group of the periodic table) the AAV of the intermediate phases are much more less than the sum of the volumes of the pure components. It means that the formation of the intermediate phases in such systems is accompanied by a rather large decreasing of the volume in comparison with the mixture of elements. For this reason the high pressure conditions are favourable for the formation of the intermediate phases in such systems from the thermodynamical point of view. On the ground of these data the systems W-Ga, W-Ge, Re-Ga, Os-Ga, Sc-Ga, Ta-Ga, were investigated at high pressures and temperatures. It was found that many new phases are crystallised in these systems. All of them are metastable at room pressure. The composition and crystal structures of these phases were investigated at ordinary conditions.

  20. Transition Metal Phosphide Hydroprocessing Catalysts: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, S.; Gott, T; Zhao, H; Lee, Y

    2009-01-01

    The diminishing quality of oil feedstocks coupled with increasingly more stringent environmental regulations limiting the content of sulfur in transportation fuels have given rise to a need for improved hydroprocessing technology. This review begins with a summary of the major improvements in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) catalysts and processes that have been reported in recent years. It then describes a new class of hydroprocessing catalysts, the transition metal phosphides, which have emerged as a promising group of high-activity, stable catalysts. The phosphides have physical properties resembling ceramics, so are strong and hard, yet retain electronic and magnetic properties similar to metals. Their crystal structures are based on trigonal prisms, yet they do not form layered structures like the sulfides. They display excellent performance in HDS and HDN, with the most active phosphide, Ni{sub 2}P, having activity surpassing that of promoted sulfides on the basis of sites titrated by chemisorption (CO for the phosphides, O{sub 2} for the sulfides). In the HDS of difficult heteroaromatics like 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene Ni{sub 2}P operates by the hydrogenation pathway, while in the HDN of substituted nitrogen compounds like 2-methylpiperidine it carries out nucleophilic substitution. The active sites for hydrogenation in Ni{sub 2}P have a square pyramidal geometry, while those for direct hydrodesulfurization have a tetrahedral geometry. Overall, Ni{sub 2}P is a promising catalyst for deep HDS in the presence of nitrogen and aromatic compounds.

  1. Polytypism in superhard transition-metal triborides

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yongcheng; Yang, Jiong; Yuan, Xun; Qiu, Wujie; Zhong, Zheng; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    The quest of novel compounds with special structures and unusual functionalities continues to be a central challenge to modern materials science. Even though their exact structures have puzzled scientists for decades, superhard transition-metal borides (TMBs) have long been believed to exist only in simple crystal structures. Here, we report on a polytypic phenomenon in superhard WB3 and MoB3 with a series of energetically degenerate structures due to the random stacking of metal layers amongst the interlocking boron layers. Such polytypism can create a multiphase solid-solution compound with a large number of interfaces amongst different polytypes, and these interfaces will strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movement within each polytype, thereby further increase the hardness of this particular material. Furthermore, in contrast to the conventional knowledge that intrinsically strong chemical bonds in superhard materials should lead to high lattice thermal conductivity, the polytypic TMB3 manifest anomalously low lattice thermal conductivity due to structural disorders and phonon folding. These findings promise to open a new avenue to searching for novel superhard materials with additional functionalities. PMID:24863493

  2. Polytypism in superhard transition-metal triborides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yongcheng; Yang, Jiong; Yuan, Xun; Qiu, Wujie; Zhong, Zheng; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-05-27

    The quest of novel compounds with special structures and unusual functionalities continues to be a central challenge to modern materials science. Even though their exact structures have puzzled scientists for decades, superhard transition-metal borides (TMBs) have long been believed to exist only in simple crystal structures. Here, we report on a polytypic phenomenon in superhard WB3 and MoB3 with a series of energetically degenerate structures due to the random stacking of metal layers amongst the interlocking boron layers. Such polytypism can create a multiphase solid-solution compound with a large number of interfaces amongst different polytypes, and these interfaces will strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movement within each polytype, thereby further increase the hardness of this particular material. Furthermore, in contrast to the conventional knowledge that intrinsically strong chemical bonds in superhard materials should lead to high lattice thermal conductivity, the polytypic TMB3 manifest anomalously low lattice thermal conductivity due to structural disorders and phonon folding. These findings promise to open a new avenue to searching for novel superhard materials with additional functionalities.

  3. Electronic transitions and multiferroicity in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haidong

    Four systems have been studied for the localized-itinerant electronic transition in transition-metal oxides: (i) In CaV1- xTixO3, substitution of Ti(IV) introduces Anderson-localized states below a mobility edge mu c that increases with x, crossing epsilon F in the range 0.2 < x< 0.4 and also transforms the strong-correlation fluctuations to localized V(IV): t1e0 configurations for x ≥ 0.1. (ii) The properties of LaTiO3+delta reveal that a hole-poor, strongly correlated electronic phase coexists with a hole-rich, itinerant-electron phase. With delta ≥ 0.03, the hole-rich phase exists as a minority phase of isolated, mobile itinerant-electron clusters embedded in the hole-poor phase. With delta ≥ 0.08, isolated hole-poor clusters are embedded in an itinerant-electron matrix. As delta > 0.08 increases, the hole-poor clusters become smaller and more isolated until they are reduced to super-paramagnetic strong-correlation fluctuations by delta = 0.12. (iii) The data of Y1-xLaxTiO 3 appears to distinguish an itinerant-electron antiferromagnetic phase in the La-rich samples from a localized-electron ferromagnetic phase with a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion in the Y-rich phase. (iv) The transition at Tt in Mg[Ti2]O4 is a semiconductor-semiconductor transition associated with Ti-Ti dimerization instabilities. The dimerization is caused by lattice instabilities resulting from a double-well Ti-Ti bond potential at a crossover from localized to itinerant electronic behavior. RMn1-xGaxO 3 (R = Ho, Y) and Ho1-xY xMnO3 have been studied for the multiferroicity of RMnO3. Ga doping raises the ferrielectric Curie temperature TC and the Mn-spin reorientation temperature TSR while lowering TN of the Mn spins and the Ho magnetic ordering temperature T 2. The data show an important coupling between the Mn3+-ion and HO3+-ion spins as well as a TSR that is driven by a cooperative MnO5 site rotation and R 3+-ion displacements that modify the c lattice parameter. The data also

  4. A unified relation for the solid-liquid interface free energy of pure FCC, BCC, and HCP metals.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S R; Mendelev, M I

    2016-04-14

    We study correlations between the solid-liquid interface (SLI) free energy and bulk material properties (melting temperature, latent heat, and liquid structure) through the determination of SLI free energies for bcc and hcp metals from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Values obtained for the bcc metals in this study were compared to values predicted by the Turnbull, Laird, and Ewing relations on the basis of previously published MD simulation data. We found that of these three empirical relations, the Ewing relation better describes the MD simulation data. Moreover, whereas the original Ewing relation contains two constants for a particular crystal structure, we found that the first coefficient in the Ewing relation does not depend on crystal structure, taking a common value for all three phases, at least for the class of the systems described by embedded-atom method potentials (which are considered to provide a reasonable approximation for metals).

  5. A unified relation for the solid-liquid interface free energy of pure FCC, BCC, and HCP metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, S. R.; Mendelev, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    We study correlations between the solid-liquid interface (SLI) free energy and bulk material properties (melting temperature, latent heat, and liquid structure) through the determination of SLI free energies for bcc and hcp metals from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Values obtained for the bcc metals in this study were compared to values predicted by the Turnbull, Laird, and Ewing relations on the basis of previously published MD simulation data. We found that of these three empirical relations, the Ewing relation better describes the MD simulation data. Moreover, whereas the original Ewing relation contains two constants for a particular crystal structure, we found that the first coefficient in the Ewing relation does not depend on crystal structure, taking a common value for all three phases, at least for the class of the systems described by embedded-atom method potentials (which are considered to provide a reasonable approximation for metals).

  6. Pristine and intercalated transition metal dichalcogenide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Richard A.

    2015-07-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are quasi-two-dimensional layered compounds that exhibit strongly competing effects of charge-density wave (CDW) formation and superconductivity (SC). The weak van der Waals interlayer bonding between hexagonal layers of octahedral or trigonal prismatic TMD building blocks allows many polytypes to form. In the single layer 1 T polytype materials, one or more CDW states can form, but the pristine TMDs are not superconducting. The 2 H polytypes have two or more Fermi surfaces and saddle bands, allowing for dual orderings, which can be coexisting CDW and SC orderings, two SC gaps as in MgB2, two CDW gaps, and possibly even pseudogaps above the onset TCDW s of CDW orderings. Higher order polytypes allow for multiple CDW gaps and at least one superconducting gap. The CDW transitions TCDW s usually greatly exceed the superconducting transitions at their low Tc values, their orbital order parameters (OPs) are generally highly anisotropic and can even contain nodes, and the SC OPs can be greatly affected by their simultaneous presence. The properties of the CDWs ubiquitously seen in TMDs are remarkably similar to those of the pseudogaps seen in the high-Tc cuprates. In 2H-NbSe2, for example, the CDW renders its general s-wave SC OP orbital symmetry to be highly anisotropic and strongly reduces its Josephson coupling strength (IcRn) with the conventional SC, Pb. Hence, the pristine TMDs are highly "unconventional" in comparison with Pb, but are much more "conventional" than are the ferromagnetic superconductors such as URhGe. Applied pressure and intercalation generally suppress the TMD CDWs, allowing for enhanced SC formation, even in the 1 T polytype materials. The misfit intercalation compound (LaSe)1.14(NbSe2) and many 2 H -TMDs intercalated with organic Lewis base molecules, such as TaS2(pyridine)1/2, have completely incoherent c-axis transport, dimensional-crossover effects, and behave as stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions

  7. Specific features of magnetostriction at electron topological transitions in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitik, G. P.; Sharlai, Yu. V.

    2017-01-01

    The properties of magnetostriction in metals are studied in cases when the chemical potential of electrons is close to the critical energy of the electron energy spectrum, at which there is an electron topological transition of 2½ or 3½ kind. It is shown that the experimental study of magnetostriction can be an effective method for detecting these transitions in metals.

  8. Trends in Ionization Energy of Transition-Metal Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    A rationale for the difference in the periodic trends in the ionization energy of the transition-metal elements versus the main-group elements is presented. The difference is that in the transition-metal elements, the electrons enter an inner-shell electron orbital, while in the main-group elements, the electrons enter an outer-shell electron…

  9. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  10. Synthesis of transition metal nitride by nitridation of metastable oxide precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huamin; Wu, Zijie; Kong, Jing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Minghui

    2012-10-15

    Metastable transition metal oxides were used as precursors to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Amorphous MoO{sub 2} was prepared by reduction of (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24} solution with hydrazine. As-synthesized amorphous MoO{sub 2} was transformed into fcc {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N at 400 Degree-Sign C and then into hexagonal {delta}-MoN by further increasing the temperature to 600 Degree-Sign C under a NH{sub 3} flow. The nitridation temperature employed here is much lower than that employed in nitridation of crystalline materials, and the amorphous materials underwent a unique nitridation process. Besides this, the bimetallic nitride Ni{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N was also synthesized by nitridating amorphous bimetallic precursor. These results suggested that the nitridation of amorphous precursor possessed potential to be a general method for synthesizing many interstitial metallic compounds, such as nitrides and carbides at low temperature. - graphical abstract: Amorphous oxide was used as new precursor to prepare nitride at low temperature. Pure {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN were obtained at 400 Degree-Sign C and at 600 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We bring out a new method to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both mono- and bimetallic molybdenum nitrides were synthesized at a mild condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of two different molybdenum nitrides {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN can be controlled from the same metastable precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitridation temperature was much lower than that reported from crystalline precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metastable precursor had different reaction process in comparison with crystalline precursor.

  11. Critical behavior in the hydrogen insulator-metal transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Mao, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The vibrational Raman spectrum of solid hydrogen has been measured from 77 to 295 K in the vicinity of the recently observed insulator-metal transition and low-temperature phase transition at 150 gigapascals. The measurements provide evidence for a critical point in the pressure-temperature phase boundary of the low-temperature transition. The result suggests that below the critical temperature the insulator-metal transition changes from continuous to discontinuous, consistent with the general criteria originally proposed by Mott (1949) for metallization by band-gap closure. The effect of temperature on hydrogen metallization closely resembles that of the lower-pressure insulator-metal transitions in doped V2O3 alloys.

  12. Transition metals and their carbides and nitrides: Trends in electronic and structural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, J.C.; Mizel, A.; Cote, M.; Cohen, M.L.; Louie, S.G. Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 )

    1999-09-01

    A study of the structural and electronic properties of selected transition metals and their carbides and nitrides is presented. We focus on assessing trends of possible importance for understanding their hardness. Lattice constants, bulk moduli (B[sub o]), and charge densities are calculated using the local density approximation with a pseudopotential plane wave approach. An fcc lattice is employed for the transition metal elements in order to make comparisons and study trends relateable to their carbides and nitrides. Our results show that both increasing the number of valence d electrons and the presence of f electrons in the core lead to larger (B[sub o]). Charge density plots and histograms enable us to explain the nature of the charge distribution in the interstitial region for the different compounds considered. In addition, we include the heavier elements seaborgium, bohrium, and hasnium in order to test further trends. Surprisingly, the calculated B[sub o] for Hs is comparable to that of diamond. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  13. Transition Metal-Involved Photon Upconversion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shi; Song, En-Hai; Zhang, Qin-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Upconversion (UC) luminescence of lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)) has been extensively investigated for several decades and is a constant research hotspot owing to its fundamental significance and widespread applications. In contrast to the multiple and fixed UC emissions of Ln(3+), transition metal (TM) ions, e.g., Mn(2+), usually possess a single broadband emission due to its 3d(5) electronic configuration. Wavelength-tuneable single UC emission can be achieved in some TM ion-activated systems ascribed to the susceptibility of d electrons to the chemical environment, which is appealing in molecular sensing and lighting. Moreover, the UC emissions of Ln(3+) can be modulated by TM ions (specifically d-block element ions with unfilled d orbitals), which benefits from the specific metastable energy levels of Ln(3+) owing to the well-shielded 4f electrons and tuneable energy levels of the TM ions. The electric versatility of d(0) ion-containing hosts (d(0) normally viewed as charged anion groups, such as MoO6(6-) and TiO4(4-)) may also have a strong influence on the electric dipole transition of Ln(3+), resulting in multifunctional properties of modulated UC emission and electrical behaviour, such as ferroelectricity and oxide-ion conductivity. This review focuses on recent advances in the room temperature (RT) UC of TM ions, the UC of Ln(3+) tuned by TM or d(0) ions, and the UC of d(0) ion-centred groups, as well as their potential applications in bioimaging, solar cells and multifunctional devices.

  14. Terahertz spectroscopy of the metal insulator transition in vanadium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, David; Prasankumar, Rohit; Cavalleri, Andrea; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Taylor, Antoinette; Averitt, Richard

    2006-03-01

    We employ terahertz spectroscopy to study the metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2 ). We measure the terahertz frequency conductivity in the metallic phase that has a real conductivity of 1000 &-1circ; cm-1 and a negligible imaginary conductivity. The observed conductivity dynamics are consistent with a photoinduced transition in spatially inhomogeneous regions of the film, followed by a thermally driven transition to the maximum conductivity.

  15. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-01-01

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements. PMID:27762334

  16. A liquid-liquid transition can exist in monatomic transition metals with a positive melting slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongchan; Lee, Geun Woo

    2016-10-01

    Liquid-liquid transitions under high pressure are found in many elemental materials, but the transitions are known to be associated with either sp-valent materials or f-valent rare-earth elements, in which the maximum or a negative slope in the melting line is readily suggestive of the transition. Here we find a liquid-liquid transition with a positive melting slope in transition metal Ti from structural, electronic, and thermodynamic studies using ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations, showing diffusion anomaly, but no density anomaly. The origin of the transition in liquid Ti is a pressure-induced increase of local structures containing very short bonds with directionality in electronic configurations. This behavior appears to be characteristic of the early transition metals. In contrast, the late transition metal liquid Ni does not show the L-L transition with pressure. This result suggests that the possibility of the L-L transition decreases from early to late transition metals as electronic structures of late transition metals barely have a Jahn-Teller effect and bond directionality. Our results generalize that a phase transition in disordered materials is found with any valence band regardless of the sign of the melting slope, but related to the symmetry of electronic structures of constituent elements.

  17. Magnetic properties of nanocrystalline transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aus, Martin J.

    1999-09-01

    In the past decade, considerable attention has been devoted to the nanoprocessing of magnetic materials to enhance specific magnetic properties. For nanocrystalline materials in which the grain size approaches the dimensions of the domain wall thickness of conventional materials, considerable changes in magnetic behaviour are expected. In the present work, various electrodeposited ferromagnetic nanocrystalline pure metals and alloys were characterized by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The systems investigated include pure Ni and Co as well as alloys of Ni-P, Ni-Fe and Co-Fe. These studies explored the effect of gram size on coercivity, indicating that the crystallographic texture is more significant than gram size. In addition, these studies reported, for the first time, that saturation magnetization of pore-free electroplated bulk nanocrystalline transition metals and their alloys is relatively little affected by grain size. In contrast, previously reported results for ultra-fine particles and nanomaterials produced from compacted powders showed a strong decrease in saturation magnetization with decreasing grain size. The difference in results for pore-free electrodeposits and ultrafine particles/compacted powders has been attributed to antiferromagnetic surface oxide layers, which is a direct result of large internal porosity in the latter group of materials. Further magnetic studies were completed on nanocrystalline electrodeposits produced by magnetoelectrohydrolysis. The effects of applied magnetic field strength and substrate orientation on saturation magnetization and coercivity of Ni-Fe and Co were explored. The results have shown that both nanoprocessing and electroplating in a magnetic field can improve soft magnetic properties by lowering the coercivity. Thermomagnetic studies examined saturation magnetization as a function of temperature, Curie temperature and coercivity changes during annealing. The Curie temperatures of electrodeposited

  18. Energetic characteristics of transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Wojewódka, Andrzej; Bełzowski, Janusz; Wilk, Zenon; Staś, Justyna

    2009-11-15

    Ten transition metal nitrate and perchlorate complexes of hydrazine and ethylenediamine were synthesized, namely [Cu(EN)(2)](ClO(4))(2), [Co(EN)(3)](ClO(4))(3), [Ni(EN)(3)](ClO(4))(2), [Hg(EN)(2)](ClO(4))(2), [Cr(N(2)H(4))(3)](ClO(4))(3), [Cd(N(2)H(4))(3)](ClO(4))(2), [Ni(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2), [Co(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(3), [Zn(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2), and [Cd(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2) based on the lines of the literature reported methods. All of them were tested with applying underwater detonation test and further compared to the typical blasting explosives: RDX, HMX, TNT and PETN. From the above presented complexes [Ni(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(2) (called NHN) and [Co(N(2)H(4))(3)](NO(3))(3) (called CoHN) are known as primary explosives and can be used as the standard explosives. Explosion parameters, such as shock wave overpressure, shock wave energy equivalent and bubble energy equivalent, were determined. Evaluated energetic characteristics of the tested compounds are comparable to those of the classic high explosives and are even enhanced in some cases.

  19. Impact Electrochemistry of Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Shan; Tan, Shu Min; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-08-25

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit paramount importance in the electrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction. It is crucial to determine the size of the electrocatalytic particles as well as to establish their electrocatalytic activity, which occurs at the edges of these particles. Here, we show that individual TMD (MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, or WSe2; in general MX2) nanoparticles impacting an electrode surface provide well-defined current "spikes" in both the cathodic and anodic regions. These spikes originate from direct oxidation of the nanoparticles (from M(4+) to M(6+)) at the anodic region and from the electrocatalytic currents generated upon hydrogen evolution in the cathodic region. The positive correlation between the frequency of the impacts and the concentration of TMD nanoparticles is also demonstrated here, enabling determination of the concentration of TMD nanoparticles in colloidal form. In addition, the size of individual TMD nanoparticles can be evaluated using the charge passed during every spike. The capability of detecting both the "indirect" catalytic effect of an impacting TMD nanoparticle as well as "direct" oxidation indicates that the frequency of impacts in both the "indirect" and "direct" scenarios are comparable. This suggests that all TMD nanoparticles, which are electrochemically oxidizable (thus capable of donating electrons to electrodes), are also capable of catalyzing the hydrogen reduction reaction.

  20. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  1. Transition metal-free olefin polymerization catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sen, Ayusman; Wojcinski, II, Louis M.; Liu, Shengsheng

    2001-01-01

    Ethylene and/or propylene are polymerized to form high molecular weight, linear polymers by contacting ethylene and/or propylene monomer, in the presence of an inert reaction medium, with a catalyst system which consists essentially of (1) an aluminum alkyl component, such as trimethylaluminum, triethylaluminum, triisobutylaluminum, tri-n-octylaluminum and diethylaluminum hydride and (2) a Lewis acid or Lewis acid derivative component, such as B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3, [(CH.sub.3).sub.2 N (H) (C.sub.6 H.sub.5)].sup.+ [B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5)4].sup.-, [(C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.3 NH].sup.+ [B C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ],.sup.-, [C(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3 ].sup.+ [B(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ].sup.-, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(OCH.sub.3), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenoxide), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5)Al(2,6 -di-t-butylphenoxide).sub.2, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butylphonoxide) , 2,6 -di-t-butylphenol.multidot.methylaluminoxane or an alkylaluminoxane, and which may be completely free any transition metal component(s).

  2. The Intriguing Properties of Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Michael J. R.

    2007-05-01

    Since the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates twenty years ago, there has been a resurgence of interest in the transition metal oxides. Work on these systems has been driven both by the fascinating properties that these materials exhibit and by potential applications in technology. A brief general review of the perovskites and their electronic structures is given. This is followed by a discussion of the properties of magnetic oxide systems ABO3 (A=La; B=Mn or Co), specifically focusing on the doped manganites (e.g. La1-x SrxMnO3) and cobaltites (e.g. La1-xSrxCoO3), in which mixed valence states and double exchange are important. Competing electron localizing and delocalizing effects result in rich phase diagrams and interesting transport properties with large magnetoresistance effects. Nanoscale phase separation has been found for a range of x values using a variety of techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering. These discoveries have provided an increased understanding of the role of the interacting magnetic, electronic and lattice structures in these systems.

  3. Properties of Transition Metal Doped Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykwest, Erik; Limmer, Krista; Brennan, Ray; Blair, Victoria; Ramprasad, Rampi

    Crystallographic texture can have profound effects on the properties of a material. One method of texturing is through the application of an external magnetic field during processing. While this method works with highly magnetic systems, doping is required to couple non-magnetic systems with the external field. Experiments have shown that low concentrations of rare earth (RE) dopants in alumina powders have enabled this kind of texturing. The magnetic properties of RE elements are directly related to their f orbital, which can have as many as 7 unpaired electrons. Since d-block elements can have as many as 5 unpaired electrons the effects of substitutional doping of 3d transition metals (TM) for Al in alpha (stable) and theta (metastable) alumina on the local structure and magnetic properties, in addition to the energetic cost, have been calculated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. This study has led to the development of general guidelines for the magnetic moment distribution at and around the dopant atom, and the dependence of this distribution on the dopant atom type and its coordination environment. It is anticipated that these findings can aid in the selection of suitable dopants help to guide parallel experimental efforts. This project was supported in part by an internship at the Army Research Laboratory, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, along with a grant of computer time from the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

  4. First-principles study on stability of transition metal solutes in aluminum by analyzing the underlying forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Yichun; Li, Xiangyan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Liang, Yunfeng; Wang, Zhiguang

    2015-05-01

    Although there have been some investigations on behaviors of solutes in metals under strain, the underlying mechanism of how strain changes the stability of a solute is still unknown. To gain such knowledge, first-principles calculations are performed on substitution energy of transition metal solutes in fcc Al host under rhombohedral strain (RS). Our results show that under RS, substitution energy decreases linearly with the increase of outermost d radius rd of the solute due to Pauli repulsion. The screened Coulomb interaction increases or decreases the substitution energy of a solute on condition that its Pauling electronegativity scale ϕ P is less or greater than that of Al under RS. This paper verifies a linear relation of substitution energy change versus rd and ϕ P under RS, which might be instructive for composition design of long life alloys serving in high stress condition.

  5. First-principles study on stability of transition metal solutes in aluminum by analyzing the underlying forces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Yichun; Li, Xiangyan; Wu, Xuebang Liu, C. S.; Liang, Yunfeng; Wang, Zhiguang

    2015-05-07

    Although there have been some investigations on behaviors of solutes in metals under strain, the underlying mechanism of how strain changes the stability of a solute is still unknown. To gain such knowledge, first-principles calculations are performed on substitution energy of transition metal solutes in fcc Al host under rhombohedral strain (RS). Our results show that under RS, substitution energy decreases linearly with the increase of outermost d radius r{sub d} of the solute due to Pauli repulsion. The screened Coulomb interaction increases or decreases the substitution energy of a solute on condition that its Pauling electronegativity scale ϕ{sub P} is less or greater than that of Al under RS. This paper verifies a linear relation of substitution energy change versus r{sub d} and ϕ{sub P} under RS, which might be instructive for composition design of long life alloys serving in high stress condition.

  6. Crystallographic phase transitions in actinide metals as a function of pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, O.; Soederlind, P.; Melsen, J.; Ahuja, R.; Johansson, B.; Wills, J.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    We present first-principles calculations of the equilibrium volumes and crystal structures of the light actinides (Th--Pu). The calculated equilibrium volumes for fcc Th, bct Pu, {alpha}-U, and {beta}-Np are found to agree reasonably well with the experimental data, and when comparing the total energies of the bcc, fcc, bct, {alpha}-U, and {beta}-Np structures we obtain the correct crystal structures for all studied systems. Equilibrium volumes for Th--Pu, using a hypothetical fcc structure, have been calculated; although spin-orbit coupling is included in these calculations, the calculated equilibrium volume of Pu is smaller than for Np, in disagreement with experiment. Moreover, the calculated tetragonal elastic constant, C{prime}, is shown to be negative for bcc U, bcc Np, bcc Pu, and fcc Pu. Thus, our zero temperature calculations suggest that the bcc structure is unstable for these elements and that fcc Pu is also unstable. This is in conflict with experiment and we are led to the conclusion that temperature effects must be of crucial importance for stabilizing cubic structures in U, Np, and Pu. Further, as a function of decreasing volume we predict a crystal structure sequence fcc {yields} bct {yields} fcc in Th, a sequence {alpha}-U {yields} bct {yields} bcc in U, and a sequence {beta}-Np {yields} bct {yields} bcc in Np. Also, a sequence of transitions in Sc as a function of decreasing volume have been calculated, namely hcp {yields} fcc {yields} {omega} {yields} {beta}-Np {yields} bcc.

  7. Solid–solid phase transitions via melting in metals

    PubMed Central

    Pogatscher, S.; Leutenegger, D.; Schawe, J. E. K.; Uggowitzer, P. J.; Löffler, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Observing solid–solid phase transitions in-situ with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution is a great challenge, and is often only possible via computer simulations or in model systems. Recently, a study of polymeric colloidal particles, where the particles mimic atoms, revealed an intermediate liquid state in the transition from one solid to another. While not yet observed there, this finding suggests that such phenomena may also occur in metals and alloys. Here we present experimental evidence for a solid–solid transition via the formation of a metastable liquid in a ‘real' atomic system. We observe this transition in a bulk glass-forming metallic system in-situ using fast differential scanning calorimetry. We investigate the corresponding transformation kinetics and discuss the underlying thermodynamics. The mechanism is likely to be a feature of many metallic glasses and metals in general, and may provide further insight into phase transition theory. PMID:27103085

  8. Transition Metal and Vacancy Defect Complexes in Phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mukul; Babar, Rohit

    Inducing magnetic moment in otherwise nonmagnetic two-dimensional semiconducting materials is the first step to design spintronic material. Here, we study the adsorption of transition-metals on pristine and defected phosphorene, within density functional theory. We predict that increased transition-meal diffusivity on the pristine phosphorene would hinder controlled magnetism. In contrast, point-defects anchor the transiton-metal to reduce metal diffusivity. The di-vacancy complex is more important in this context due to their increased thermodynamic stability over the mono-vacancy. For most cases, the defect-transition metal complexes retain the intrinsic semiconducting properties, and induce a local moment. We provide a simple microscopic model which describe the local moment of these transition metal and defect complexes.

  9. Ultrashort Beryllium-Beryllium Distances Rivalling Those of Metal-Metal Quintuple Bonds Between Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Caixia; Zhao, Xue-Feng; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2016-12-12

    Chemical bonding is at the heart of chemistry. Recent work on high bond orders between homonuclear transition metal atoms has led to ultrashort metal-metal (TM-TM) distances defined as dM-M <1.900 Å. The present work is a computational design and characterization of novel main group species containing ultrashort metal-metal distances (1.728-1.866 Å) between two beryllium atoms in different molecular environments, including a rhombic Be2 X2 (X=C, N) core, a vertical Be-Be axis in a 3D molecular star, and a horizontal Be-Be axis supported by N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands. The ultrashort Be-Be distances are achieved by affixing bridging atoms to attract the beryllium atoms electrostatically or covalently. Among these species are five global minima and one chemically viable diberyllium complex, which provide potential targets for experimental realization.

  10. Shear deformation, ideal strength, and stacking fault formation of fcc metals: A density-functional study of Al and Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnátek, Michal; Hafner, Jürgen; Krajčí, Marián

    2009-06-01

    Ab initio density-functional calculations have been used to study the response of two face-centered-cubic metals (Al and Cu) to shearing parallel to the close-packed (111) planes along two different directions, [112¯] and [1¯10] . Two different types of deformations—affine and alias—have been investigated. Under an affine shear deformation, all atoms are shifted parallel to the shearing direction by a distance proportional to their distance from the fixed basal plane. In the alias regime, only the top layer is displaced in the shearing direction. In both regimes, calculations have been performed with (pure shear) and without (simple shear) relaxation. For a pure alias shear, due to the interaction between the atoms, the displacement propagates through the sample; this is certainly the most realistic description of the shearing processes. In the pure alias regime, shear deformation, theoretical shear strength, and stacking fault formations may be described on a common footing. For small strains (in the elastic region), affine and alias shears lead to very similar results. Beyond the elastic limit, relaxation has a strong influence of the response on an applied shear strain. The elastic shear moduli are significantly larger for Cu than for Al, but a much higher shear strength is calculated for Al, although the shear strength is limited by the occurrence of a stacking fault instability before the stress maximum is reached. Under ⟨1¯10⟩ {111} shear the analysis of the atomistic deformation mechanism shows that in this case the formation of a stacking fault leads to a splitting of the (1)/(2)[1¯10] dislocation into two partial Shockley dislocations. Due to the repulsive interaction between the atoms in adjacent close-packed planes, the atoms in the top A layer move along (1)/(6)[2¯11] to a position directly above the B layer such that the stable intrinsic stacking fault configuration is the same for both slip systems. The analysis of the variation in the

  11. Transition-Metal Substitution Doping in Synthetic Atomically Thin Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Jian; Kim, Young Duck; Liang, Liangbo; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Chow, Phil; Tan, Jiawei; Li, Baichang; Li, Lu; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Lu, Toh-Ming; Meunier, Vincent; Hone, James; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2016-09-20

    Semiconductor impurity doping has enabled an entire generation of technology. The emergence of alternative semiconductor material systems, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), requires the development of scalable doping strategies. We report an unprecedented one-pot synthesis for transition-metal substitution in large-area, synthetic monolayer TMDCs. Electron microscopy, optical and electronic transport characterization and ab initio calculations indicate that our doping strategy preserves the attractive qualities of TMDC monolayers, including semiconducting transport and strong direct-gap luminescence. These results are expected to encourage exploration of transition-metal substitution in two-dimensional systems, potentially enabling next-generation optoelectronic technology in the atomically-thin regime.

  12. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  14. Chiral phase transition in lattice QCD as a metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Antonio M.; Osborn, James C.

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the lattice QCD Dirac operator with staggered fermions at temperatures around the chiral phase transition. We present evidence of a metal-insulator transition in the low lying modes of the Dirac operator around the same temperature as the chiral phase transition. This strongly suggests the phenomenon of Anderson localization drives the QCD vacuum to the chirally symmetric phase in a way similar to a metal-insulator transition in a disordered conductor. We also discuss how Anderson localization affects the usual phenomenological treatment of phase transitions a la Ginzburg-Landau.

  15. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; SEIBT,M.; SCHROTER,W.

    2000-03-23

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed from a mechanistic perspective. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are reviewed and illustrated. Needs for further research are discussed.

  16. Electrolytic separation of crystals of transition-metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnott, R. J.; Feretti, A.; Kunnamann, W.

    1969-01-01

    Versatile flux system grows large, well-formed, stoichiometric single crystals of mixed oxides of the transition-metal elements. These crystals have important uses in the microwave field, and applications as lasers and masers in communications.

  17. Atomic Natural Orbital Basis Sets for Transition Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    We show that atomic natural orbitals are an excellent way to contract transition-metal basis sets, even though the different low-lying electronic states may have very different basis set requirements.

  18. Phase transition from fcc to bcc structure of the Cu-clusters during nanocrystallization of Fe{sub 85.2}Si{sub 1}B{sub 9}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.8} soft magnetic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Nishijima, Masahiko; Matsuura, Makoto; Takenaka, Kana; Takeuchi, Akira; Makino, Akihiro; Ofuchi, Hironori

    2014-05-15

    A role of Cu on the nanocrystallization of an Fe{sub 85.2}Si{sub 1}B{sub 9}P{sub 4}Cu{sub 0.8} alloy was investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Cu K-edge XAFS results show that local structure around Cu is disordered for the as-quenched sample whereas it changes to fcc-like structure at 613 K. The fcc Cu-clusters are, however, thermodynamically unstable and begin to transform into bcc structure at 638 K. An explicit bcc structure is observed for the sample annealed at 693 K for 600 s in which TEM observation shows that precipitated bcc-Fe crystallites with ∼12 nm are homogeneously distributed. The bcc structure of the Cu-clusters transforms into the fcc-type again at 973 K, which can be explained by the TEM observations; Cu segregates at grain boundaries between bcc-Fe crystallites and Fe{sub 3}(B,P) compounds. Combining the XAFS results with the TEM observations, the structure transition of the Cu-clusters from fcc to bcc is highly correlated with the preliminary precipitation of the bcc-Fe which takes place prior to the onset of the first crystallization temperature, T{sub x1} = 707 K. Thermodynamic analysis suggests that an interfacial energy density γ between an fcc-Cu cluster and bcc-Fe matrix dominates at a certain case over the structural energy between fcc and bcc Cu, ΔG{sub fcc} {sub −} {sub bcc}, which causes phase transition of the Cu clusters from fcc to bcc structure.

  19. Transition-Metal-Free Biomolecule-Based Flexible Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun; Wang, Hua; Hao, Rui; Guo, Lin

    2016-09-01

    A transition-metal-free asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is successfully fabricated based on an earth-abundant biomass derived redox-active biomolecule, named lawsone. Such an ASC exhibits comparable or even higher energy densities than most of the recently reported transition-metal-based ASCs, and this green ASC generation from renewable resources is promising for addressing current issues of electronic hazard processing, high cost, and unsustainability.

  20. Early Transition Metal Alkyl and Tetrahydroborate Complexes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, James Allen

    1988-06-01

    An investigation of early transition metal alkyl and tetrahydroborate complexes as catalytic models and ceramic precursors has been initiated. The compounds MX _2 (dmpe)_2, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane, for M = Ti, V, Cr, and X = Br, I, BH_4, have been prepared. These complexes are paramagnetic and have been shown by X-ray crystallography to have trans-octahedral structures. The BH_4^{-} groups in Ti(BH_4)_2(dmpe) _2 bond to the metal in a bidentate manner. This structure is in marked contrast to the structure of the vanadium analogue, V(BH_4)_2 (dmpe)_2, which displays two unidentate BH_4^{-} groups. Alkylation of Ti(BH_4)_2 (dmpe)_2 with LiMe results in the complex TiMe_2(dmpe) _2 which is diamagnetic in both solution and solid state. Single crystal X-ray and neutron diffraction studies show that there may be strong Ti-C pi -bonding. A tetragonal compression along the C -Ti-C bond vector accounts for the observed diamegnetism. A series of complexes of the formula Ti(BH _4)_3(PR_3)_2 has been prepared where PR_3 = PMe_3, PEt_3, PMe_3Ph, and P(OMe)_3 . The X-ray crystal structure of Ti(BH _4)_3(PMe_3)_2 reveals a pseudo trigonal bipyramidal geometry in which two BH_4^{-} groups display an unusual "side-on" bonding mode. The "side-on" ligation mode has been attributed to a Jahn-Teller distortion of the orbitally degenerate d^1 ground state. In contrast, the non-Jahn-Teller susceptible vanadium analogue, V(BH_4)_3 (PMe_3)_2, possesses a nearly ideal D_{rm 3h} >=ometry with three bidentate tetrahydroborate groups. Addition of excess PMe_3 to V(BH_4)_3(PMe _3)_2<=ads to the vanadium(II) hydride -bridged dimer (V(H)(BH_4)(PMe _3)_2]_2, while addition of PMe_3 and water forms the vanadium(III) oxo dimer (V(BH_4)_2 (PMe_3)_2]_2 [mu-O) which has been structurally characterized. The compound Ti(CH_2CMe _3)_4 can be prepared by addition of Ti(OEt)_4 to LiCH_2 CMe_3. Sublimation of Ti(CH _2CMe_3)_4 over a substrate heated to 250^ circC results in the chemical vapor

  1. Electron Devices Based on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Mahmut

    Integrated circuits consists of building blocks called transistors. A transistor is a switch that enables logic operations to perform computing. Since the invention of the first integrated circuit, transistors have been scaled down in their dimensions to increase the density of transistors per unit area to enable more functionality. Transistor scaling is continued by introducing novel device structures and materials at each technology node. Due to the challenges such as short channel effects and the power consumption issues, novel materials are investigated as a candidate for next generation transistors. In this thesis, 2-dimensinal layered semiconductors, namely transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are studied to assess their electronic material properties as a candidate channel material for next generation electronic devices. Chapter one, introduces the challenges in the state of the art MOSFET devices. Then the motivation for the use of TMDCs in MOSFETs is explained. In chapter two, doping of the TMDCs is studied to be able to probe the intrinsic electronic properties of the devices fabricated using these materials. Contact resistance can be decreased by doping and TMDC MOSFETs with near-ideal performance metrics are demonstrated. In chapter three the CMOS integration of the devices using TMDCs are examined. Logic operations are conducted by fabricating WSe 2 n-FETs and p-FETs on the same flake. Then vertical 3-dimensional integration of n-FETs and p-FETs are demonstrated using the same gate. These transistors are connected as a CMOS inverter and logic operations are performed. Chapter four presents the band structure engineering study using TMDCs. Mono-multilayer MoS2 junctions are found to have a type-I heterojunction. Optoelectronic properties of this junction are investigated and the junction is shown to have a photoresponse that dominates the photoresponse coming from the contacts. In chapter five, the tunneling devices using TMDCs are studied. Dual

  2. Metal-metal multiple bonding in C3-symmetric bimetallic complexes of the first row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Krogman, Jeremy P; Thomas, Christine M

    2014-05-25

    Metal-metal multiple bonds have been an intense area of focus in inorganic chemistry for many decades as a result of their fundamentally interesting bonding properties, as well as their potential applications in multielectron transfer and small molecule activation processes. Much of what is known in this field revolves around 2nd and 3rd row transition metals, with fundamental knowledge lacking in the area of bonds between elements of the first transition series. The smaller size and tendency of first row ions to adopt high-spin electron configurations weaken metal-metal interactions and serve to complicate the interpretation of the electronic structure and bonding in bimetallic species containing first row transition metals. Furthermore, traditional tetragonal "paddlewheel" complexes dominate the metal-metal multiple bond literature, and only recently have researchers begun to take advantage of the weaker ligand field in three-fold symmetric bimetallic complexes to encourage more favourable metal-metal bonding interactions. In the past 5 years, several research groups have exploited three-fold symmetric frameworks to investigate new trends in metal-metal bonding involving the first row transition metals. This feature article serves to highlight recent achievements in this area and to use C3-symmetric systems as a model to better understand the fundamental aspects of multiple bonds featuring first row transition metals.

  3. Bi-phase transition diagrams of metallic thin multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.C.; Liu, W.; Jiang, Q. . E-mail: jiangq@jlu.edu.cn

    2005-02-01

    Phase transitions of metallic multilayers induced by differences in interface energy are considered thermodynamically, based on a thermodynamic model for interface energy and the Goldschmidt premise for lattice contraction. Bi-phase transition diagrams of Co/Cr, Zr/Nb, Ti/Nb and Ti/Al multilayers are constructed, which are in agreement with experimental results.

  4. [Non-empirical interatomic potentials for transition metals]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The report is divided into the following sections: potential-energy functions for d-band metals, potential-energy functions for aluminides and quasicrystals, electronic structure of complex structures and quasicrystals, potential-energy functions in transition-metal oxides, applications to defect structure and mechanical properties, and basic theory of interatomic potentials.

  5. [Non-empirical interatomic potentials for transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The report is divided into the following sections: potential-energy functions for d-band metals, potential-energy functions for aluminides and quasicrystals, electronic structure of complex structures and quasicrystals, potential-energy functions in transition-metal oxides, applications to defect structure and mechanical properties, and basic theory of interatomic potentials.

  6. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen.

    PubMed

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A; Ceperley, David M; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3) a0. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin's GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  7. Configuring bonds between first-row transition metals.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Reed J; Clouston, Laura J; Lu, Connie C

    2015-11-17

    Alfred Werner, who pioneered the field of coordination chemistry, envisioned coordination complexes as a single, transition metal atom at the epicenter of a vast ligand space. The idea that the locus of a coordination complex could be shared by multiple metals held together with covalent bonds would eventually lead to the discovery of the quadruple and quintuple bond, which have no analogues outside of the transition metal block. Metal-metal bonding can be classified into homometallic and heterometallic groups. Although the former is dominant, the latter is arguably more intriguing because of the inherently larger chemical space in which metal-metal bonding can be explored. In 2013, Lu and Thomas independently reported the isolation of heterometallic multiple bonds with exclusively first-row transition metals. Structural and theoretical data supported triply bonded Fe-Cr and Fe-V cores. This Account describes our continued efforts to configure bonds between first-row transition metals from titanium to copper. Double-decker ligands, or binucleating platforms that brace two transition metals in proximity, have enabled the modular synthesis of diverse metal-metal complexes. The resulting complexes are also ideal for investigating the effects of an "ancillary" metal on the properties and reactivities of an "active" metal center. A total of 38 bimetallic complexes have been compiled comprising 18 unique metal-metal pairings. Twenty-one of these bimetallics are strictly isostructural, allowing for a systematic comparison of metal-metal bonding. The nature of the chemical bond between first-row metals is remarkably variable and depends on two primary factors: the total d-electron count, and the metals' relative d-orbital energies. Showcasing the range of covalent bonding are a quintuply bonded (d-d)(10) Mn-Cr heterobimetallic and the singly bonded late-late pairings, e.g., Fe-Co, which adopt unusually high spin states. A long-term goal is to rationally tailor the

  8. Dielectric breakdown and avalanches at nonequilibrium metal-insulator transitions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2011-12-30

    Motivated by recent experiments on the finite temperature Mott transition in VO(2) films, we propose a classical coarse-grained dielectric breakdown model where each degree of freedom represents a nanograin which transitions from insulator to metal with increasing temperature and voltage at random thresholds due to quenched disorder. We describe the properties of the resulting nonequilibrium metal-insulator transition and explain the universal characteristics of the resistance jump distribution. We predict that by tuning voltage, another critical point is approached, which separates a phase of boltlike avalanches from percolationlike ones.

  9. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Xu, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqun; Tran, Kha; Scott, Marie E.; Overbeck, Vincent; Berghauser, Gunnar; Seifert, Edward J.; Pleskot, Dennis; Gabor, Nathaniel M.; Richter, Marten; Malic, Ermin

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  10. Trion formation dynamics in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Akashay; Moody, Galan; Schaibley, John R.; ...

    2016-01-05

    Here, we report charged exciton (trion) formation dynamics in doped monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, specifically molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), using resonant two-color pump-probe spectroscopy. When resonantly pumping the exciton transition, trions are generated on a picosecond time scale through exciton-electron interaction. As the pump energy is tuned from the high energy to low energy side of the inhomogeneously broadened exciton resonance, the trion formation time increases by ~50%. This feature can be explained by the existence of both localized and delocalized excitons in a disordered potential and suggests the existence of an exciton mobility edge in transition metal dichalcogenides.

  11. Binding of transition metals to S100 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gilston, Benjamin A.; Skaar, Eric P.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The S100 proteins are a unique class of EF-hand Ca2+ binding proteins distributed in a cell-specific, tissue-specific, and cell cycle-specific manner in humans and other vertebrates. These proteins are distinguished by their distinctive homodimeric structure, both intracellular and extracellular functions, and the ability to bind transition metals at the dimer interface. Here we summarize current knowledge of S100 protein binding of Zn2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+ ions, focusing on binding affinities, conformational changes that arise from metal binding, and the roles of transition metal binding in S100 protein function. PMID:27430886

  12. Thermodynamic behavior near a metal-insulator transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paalanen, M. A.; Graebner, J. E.; Bhatt, R. N.; Sachdev, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the low-temperature specific heat of phosphorus-doped silicon for densities near the metal-insulator transition show an enhancement over the conduction-band itinerant-electron value. The enhancement increases toward lower temperatures but is less than that found for the spin susceptibility. The data are compared with various theoretical models; the large ratio of the spin susceptibility to specific heat indicates the presence of localized spin excitations in the metallic phase as the metal-insulator transition is approached.

  13. Photoluminescence of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides integrated with VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; DeLello, Kursti; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Zhang, Kehao; Lin, Zhong; Terrones, Mauricio; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2016-12-01

    Integrating a phase transition material with two-dimensional semiconductors can provide a route towards tunable opto-electronic metamaterials. Here, we integrate monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides with vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films grown via molecular beam epitaxy to form a 2D/3D heterostructure. Vanadium dioxide undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition at 60-70 °C, which changes the band alignment between MoS2 and VO2 from a semiconductor-insulator junction to a semiconductor-metal junction. By switching VO2 between insulating and metallic phases, the modulation of photoluminescence emission in the 2D semiconductors was observed. This study demonstrates the feasibility to combine TMDs and functional oxides to create unconventional hybrid optoelectronic properties derived from 2D semiconductors that are linked to functional properties of oxides through proximity coupling.

  14. Temperature rise of installed FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Report discusses temperature profiles of installed FCC for wood and tile surfaces. Three-conductor FCC was tested at twice nominal current-carrying capacity over bare floor and under carpet, with result indicating that temperature rise is not a linear function of current with FCC at this level.

  15. The FCC in Fiscal 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    Fiscal 1971 saw major actions by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in all areas of its jurisdiction. In broadcasting, the FCC proposed new renewal rules and policies and issued a number of significant rulings on Fairness Doctrine matters. A policy statement outlining FCC cable television plans was submitted to the Congress. In the common…

  16. The FCC and Broadcasting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This report outlines the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) regulatory authority over the licensing and operation of commercial, educational, and public broadcasting in the United States. Also described are rules and regulations governing the program content and advertising, in relation to the fairness doctrine, free speech, and public…

  17. Electrical impedance of FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y. S.

    1972-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of FCC are investigated in the context of multiple transmission lines theory. Analytical expressions for the coefficients of capacitance of conductors in a single cable are obtained. Numerical values calculated with these expressions are in good agreement with experimental data. Crosstalk, attenuation constants and phase angles of the current and voltage in flat conductor cable are also calculated.

  18. Binding and catalytic reduction of NO by transition metal aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Hou, Shaolie.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to provide the scientific understanding of processes that actively and selectively reduce NO in dilute exhaust streams, as well as in concentrated streams, to N{sub 2}. Experimental studies of NO chemistry in transition metal-containing aluminosilicate catalysts are being carried out with the aim of determining the chemical rules for NO reduction on non-precious metals. The catalyst supports chosen for this investigation are A and Y zeolites, mordenite, and monoliths based on cordierite. The supported transition metal cations that were examined are principally the first row redox metals, e.g. Cr(2), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cu(I). The reactions of interest are the reductions of NO by H{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4}, as well as the disproportionation of NO. Rare earth cations that possess redox properties were placed in the more shielded sites, e.g. Site I in Y zeolite, prior to or simultaneously with the exchange procedure with the transition metal cations. Theoretical calculations of the electronic structure of the transition metal cations in zeolitic sites were carried out by ab initio methods. The aim of this part of the research is to find the best match between the metal-based antibonding orbitals and the antibonding orbitals of the NO molecule such that the N-O bond is weakened and is readily broken. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. [Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.

    1992-01-01

    Work on organotransition metal chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is summarized. Several cationic palladium(II) complexes with bulky phosphine or pyridine ligands were discovered that are highly selective catalysts for linear dimerization of vinyl monomers and linear polymerization of p-divinylbenzene, the reactions proceeding through a carbocationic mechanism. Our studies were continued on alternating olefin-carbon monoxide copolymers. The copolymerization reaction and reactivity of copolymers were examined. New catalytic systems for alternating copolymerization of [alpha]-olefins with CO were discovered. In the case of styrene derivatives, tactic copolymers were obtained. Poly(ethylenepyrrolediyl) derivatives were synthesized from alternating ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymer and become electronic conductors when doped with iodine. A catalytic system for direct synthesis of polyureas and polyoxamides from and diamines was also discovered. Pt metal catalyzed the oxidation of ethers, esters, and amines to carboxylic acids and the oxidation of olefins to 1,2-diols. Anaerobic and aerobic decomposition of molybdenum(VI)-oxoalkyl compounds were studied for heterogeneous oxidation of alkanes and olefins on Mo(VI)-oxide surfaces. Synthesis of polymer-trapped metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide nanoclusters (size <1--10 nm) was studied.

  20. Flexible metallic seal for transition duct in turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-22

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a flexible metallic seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  1. Catalysts comprising magnesium and a transition metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bujadoux, K.

    1984-10-09

    A catalyst comprising the product obtained by bringing into contact a compound of magnesium comprising at least one species selected from the group consisting of magnesium monohalides (MgX), halo-magnesium hydrides (HMgX) and magnesium hydride (MgH/sub 2/), X being a halogen and the said species MgX or HMgX being obtained by thermal decomposition of a powdery organo-magnesium halide R/sub 1/MgX wherein R/sub 1/ is an organic radical; and at least one halide of a transistion metal selected from the group consisting of titanium and vanadium, the valency of said metal in said halide being lower than or equal to 3, the quantities being such that the atomic ratio of magnesium to said transistion metal is between 1 and 25, and a catalyst system including the catalyst that is suitable for use in the polymerization of olefins and particularly ethylene.

  2. Flexible transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets for band-selective photodetection

    PubMed Central

    Velusamy, Dhinesh Babu; Kim, Richard Hahnkee; Cha, Soonyoung; Huh, June; Khazaeinezhad, Reza; Kassani, Sahar Hosseinzadeh; Song, Giyoung; Cho, Suk Man; Cho, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Ihn; Lee, Jinseong; Oh, Kyunghwan; Choi, Hyunyoug; Park, Cheolmin

    2015-01-01

    The photocurrent conversions of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets are unprecedentedly impressive, making them great candidates for visible range photodetectors. Here we demonstrate a method for fabricating micron-thick, flexible films consisting of a variety of highly separated transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets for excellent band-selective photodetection. Our method is based on the non-destructive modification of transition metal dichalcogenide sheets with amine-terminated polymers. The universal interaction between amine and transition metal resulted in scalable, stable and high concentration dispersions of a single to a few layers of numerous transition metal dichalcogenides. Our MoSe2 and MoS2 composites are highly photoconductive even at bending radii as low as 200 μm on illumination of near infrared and visible light, respectively. More interestingly, simple solution mixing of MoSe2 and MoS2 gives rise to blended composite films in which the photodetection properties were controllable. The MoS2/MoSe2 (5:5) film showed broad range photodetection suitable for both visible and near infrared spectra. PMID:26333531

  3. Electronic Transitions in f-electron Metals at High Pressures:

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C; Maddox, B; Lazicki, A; Iota, V; Klepeis, J P; McMahan, A

    2007-02-08

    This study was to investigate unusual phase transitions driven by electron correlation effects that occur in many f-band transition metals and are often accompanied by large volume changes: {approx}20% at the {delta}-{alpha} transition in Pu and 5-15% for analogous transitions in Ce, Pr, and Gd. The exact nature of these transitions has not been well understood, including the short-range correlation effects themselves, their relation to long-range crystalline order, the possible existence of remnants of the transitions in the liquid, the role of magnetic moments and order, the critical behavior, and dynamics of the transitions, among other issues. Many of these questions represent forefront physics challenges central to Stockpile materials and are also important in understanding the high-pressure behavior of other f- and d-band transition metal compounds including 3d-magnetic transition monoxide (TMO, TM=Mn, Fe, Co, Ni). The overarching goal of this study was, therefore, to understand the relationships between crystal structure and electronic structure of transition metals at high pressures, by using the nation's brightest third-generation synchrotron x-ray at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Significant progresses have been made, including new discoveries of the Mott transition in MnO at 105 GPa and Kondo-like 4f-electron dehybridization and new developments of high-pressure resonance inelastic x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray emission spectroscopy. These scientific discoveries and technology developments provide new insights and enabling tools to understand scientific challenges in stockpile materials. The project has broader impacts in training two SEGRF graduate students and developing an university collaboration (funded through SSAAP).

  4. The metal-insulator transition in magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, J. R.; Callen, E.

    1972-01-01

    We describe an electronic model for the low temperature transition in magnetite, in which the average number of electrons on a site is non-integral. The solution of the one-dimensional problem is reviewed, and the connection of the model with the Verwey ordering is discussed. Some of the implication of the three dimensional problem are discussed.

  5. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, Tomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  6. Metallization and charge-transfer gap closure of transition-metal iodides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. Li-Chung

    1993-05-01

    It is shown with resistivity and near-IR absorption measurements that NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2}, and FeI{sub 2} metallize under pressure by closure of the charge-transfer energy gap at pressures of 17, 10, and 23 GPa, respectively, which is close to the antiferromagnetic-diamagnetic transition in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}. Thus, the magnetic transitions probably are caused by the metallization; in NiI{sub 2} and CoI{sub 2}, the insulator-metal transitions are first order. Moessbauer and XRD data were also collected. Figs, 46 refs.

  7. In-situ transmission electron microscopy study of ion-irradiated copper : comparison of the temperature dependence of cascade collapse in FCC- and BCC- metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T. L.

    1998-10-23

    The kinetics which drive cascade formation and subsequent collapse into point-defect clusters is investigated by analyzing the microstructure produced in situ by low fluence 100 keV Kr ion irradiations of fcc-Cu over a wide temperature range (18-873 K). The yield of collapsed point-defect clusters is demonstrated unequivocally to be temperature dependent, remaining approximately constant up to lattice temperatures of 573 K and then abruptly decreasing with increasing temperature. This drop in yield is not caused by defect loss during or following ion irradiation. This temperature dependence can be explained by a thermal spike effect. These in-situ yield measurements are compared to previous ex-situ yield measurements in fcc-Ni and bcc-Mo.

  8. Surface energy and work function of fcc and bcc crystals: Density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Shao-Qing

    2014-12-01

    The surface energies and work functions for six close-packed surfaces of 19 common fcc and bcc metals in the periodic table have been systematically calculated by means of the density functional theory (DFT) method. The accuracy of the results is established in comparison with the experimental and other theoretical values. The variations of work functions with the surface crystallographic orientation display a good regularity. For alkali metals, the work functions follow the sequence Φ(110) > Φ(133) > Φ(311) > Φ(120) > Φ(100) > Φ(111). But for the same crystal structure of bcc transition metals (Nb, Mo, Ta, W), the order is Φ(110) > Φ(133) > Φ(120) > Φ(111) > Φ(311) > Φ(100). The work functions for 3d, 4d and 5d transition fcc metals also display an obvious regularity and ordered as Φ(111) > Φ(100) > Φ(211) > Φ(123) > Φ(310) > Φ(110). Particular attention is paid to the surface energies anisotropy with the same crystal structure metals and the variations present a good regularity, too. Especially, a roughly inverse proportional relationship between the surface energy and work function is found.

  9. Biocompatibility of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Tharajak, Jirasak; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C.; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2014-07-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, manganese, and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental compositions of the nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The particle size of the nanoparticles was investigated using particle size analyzer, and the zeta potentials were measured using zeta potential analyzer. The phase components of the synthesized transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were studied using Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the nanoparticles was assessed using osteoblast-like cells. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals strongly influences the physical, chemical properties, and biocompatibility of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  10. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  11. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    1998-12-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  12. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  13. Strong dependence of fluorescence quenching on the transition metal in layered transition metal dichalcogenide nanoflakes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Bonanni, Alessandra; Pumera, Martin

    2016-08-07

    In recent years, the application of transition metal dichalcogenides for the development of biosensors has been receiving widespread attention from researchers, as demonstrated by the surge in studies present in the field. While different transition metal dichalcogenide materials have been employed for the fabrication of fluorescent biosensors with superior performance, no research has been conducted to draw comparisons across materials containing different transition metals. Herein, the performance of MoS2 and WS2 nanoflakes for the fluorescence detection of nucleic acids is assessed. It is discovered that, at the optimal amount, MoS2 and WS2 nanoflakes exhibit a similar degree of fluorescence quenching, at 75% and 71% respectively. However, MoS2 nanoflakes have better performance in the areas of detection range and selectivity than WS2 nanoflakes. The detection range achieved with MoS2 nanoflakes is 9.60-366 nM while 13.3-143 nM with WS2 nanoflakes. In the context of selectivity, MoS2 nanoflakes display a signal difference of 97.8% between complementary and non-complementary DNA targets, whereas WS2 nanoflakes only exhibit 44.3%. Such research is highly beneficial as it delivers vital insights on how the performance of a fluorescent biosensor can be affected by the transition metal present. Furthermore, these insights can assist in the selection of suitable transition metal dichalcogenide materials for utilization in biosensor development.

  14. Anharmonic Vibrational Spectroscopy on Metal Transition Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latouche, Camille; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    Advances in hardware performance and the availability of efficient and reliable computational models have made possible the application of computational spectroscopy to ever larger molecular systems. The systematic interpretation of experimental data and the full characterization of complex molecules can then be facilitated. Focusing on vibrational spectroscopy, several approaches have been proposed to simulate spectra beyond the double harmonic approximation, so that more details become available. However, a routine use of such tools requires the preliminary definition of a valid protocol with the most appropriate combination of electronic structure and nuclear calculation models. Several benchmark of anharmonic calculations frequency have been realized on organic molecules. Nevertheless, benchmarks of organometallics or inorganic metal complexes at this level are strongly lacking despite the interest of these systems due to their strong emission and vibrational properties. Herein we report the benchmark study realized with anharmonic calculations on simple metal complexes, along with some pilot applications on systems of direct technological or biological interest.

  15. Role of phonons in the metal-insulator phase transition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review, for the transition series oxides, of the Mattis and Lander model, which is one of electrons interacting with lattice vibrations (electron and phonon interaction). The model displays superconducting, insulating, and metallic phases. Its basic properties evolve from a finite crystallographic distortion associated with a dominant phonon mode and the splitting of the Brillouin zone into two subzones, a property of simple cubic and body centered cubic lattices. The order of the metal-insulator phase transition is examined. The basic model has a second-order phase transition and the effects of additional mechanisms on the model are calculated. The way in which these mechanisms affect the magnetically ordered transition series oxides as described by the Hubbard model is discussed.

  16. Covalent functionalization of monolayered transition metal dichalcogenides by phase engineering.

    PubMed

    Voiry, Damien; Goswami, Anandarup; Kappera, Rajesh; e Silva, Cecilia de Carvalho Castro; Kaplan, Daniel; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Chemical functionalization of low-dimensional materials such as nanotubes, nanowires and graphene leads to profound changes in their properties and is essential for solubilizing them in common solvents. Covalent attachment of functional groups is generally achieved at defect sites, which facilitate electron transfer. Here, we describe a simple and general method for covalent functionalization of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets (MoS₂, WS₂ and MoSe₂), which does not rely on defect engineering. The functionalization reaction is instead facilitated by electron transfer between the electron-rich metallic 1T phase and an organohalide reactant, resulting in functional groups that are covalently attached to the chalcogen atoms of the transition metal dichalcogenide. The attachment of functional groups leads to dramatic changes in the optoelectronic properties of the material. For example, we show that it renders the metallic 1T phase semiconducting, and gives it strong and tunable photoluminescence and gate modulation in field-effect transistors.

  17. Control of magnetism across metal to insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Venta, J.; Wang, Siming; Ramirez, J. G.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic properties (coercivity and magnetization) of ferromagnetic films are strongly affected by the proximity to materials that undergo a metal to insulator transition. Here, we show that stress associated with structural changes across the metal-insulator phase transition in VO2 and V2O3 produces a magnetoelastic anisotropy in ferromagnetic films (Co and Ni) deposited on top of the oxides. The changes in coercivity are as large as 168% and occur in a very narrow temperature range. This effect can be controlled and inverted by the thickness and the deposition temperature of the ferromagnetic films, which is very flexible for important technological applications.

  18. Metal-insulator transition near a superconducting state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaveh, M.; Mott, N. F.

    1992-03-01

    We show that when the metal-insulation transition occurs near a superconducting state it results in a different critical behavior from that of amorphous metals or uncompensated doped semiconductors. This difference results from the enhancement of the effective electron-electron interaction caused by fluctuations to the superconducting state. This explains the recent experiments of Micklitz and co-workers on amorphous superconducting mixtures Ga-Ar and Bi-Kr.

  19. Transition Metal Complexes of Expanded Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Sessler, Jonathan L.; Tomat, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the rapid development of new synthetic routes for the preparation of expanded porphyrin macrocycles has allowed exploration of a new frontier consisting of “porphyrin-like” coordination chemistry. In this Account, we summarize our exploratory forays into the still relatively poorly explored area of oligopyrrolic macrocycle metalation chemistry. Specifically, we describe our successful formation of both mono- and binuclear complexes and in doing so highlight the diversity of coordination modes available to expanded porphyrin-type ligands. The nature of the inserted cation, the emerging role of tautomeric equilibria, and the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in regulating this chemistry are also discussed. PMID:17397134

  20. On the character of the optical transitions in closed-shell transition metal oxides doped with Bi(3).

    PubMed

    Amer, M; Boutinaud, P

    2017-01-18

    A criterion is introduced to achieve the assignment of the optical features observed in the excitation spectra of Bi(3+) ions incorporated in closed-shell transition metal oxides. The model is based on the calculation of the energy associated with the lowest (1)S0 → (3)P1 intra-ionic transition of Bi(3+) (A-like transition), the metal-to-metal charge transfer (D-like transition) and the Stokes shift of the corresponding emission.

  1. The elastic properties and stability of fcc-Fe and fcc-FeNi alloys at inner-core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorell, Benjamí; Brodholt, John; Wood, Ian G.; Vočadlo, Lidunka

    2015-07-01

    simulation box (108 atoms). At 360 GPa, in pure fcc-Fe, we find that the transition from fcc to the hcp-like structure occurs at 7000 K, whereas in the Ni bearing system, the transition occurs at higher temperature (7250 K). This reinforces previous work showing that fcc-Fe might transform to hcp-Fe just before melting, and that Ni tends to stabilize the fcc structure with respect to hcp.

  2. The Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Coated Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, David C.; Pederson, Mark R.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1998-03-01

    Clusters composed of fullerene molecules with an outer shell of transition metal atoms in the composition C_60M_62 (M being a transition metal) have been produced with laser vaporisation techniques(F. Tast, N. Malinowski, S. Frank, M. Heinebrodt, I.M.L. Billas, and T. P. Martin, Z. Phys D 40), 351 (1997).. We have studied several of these very large systems with a parallel version of the all-electron NRLMOL cluster code. Optimized geometries of the metal encased fullerenes C_60Ti_62 and C_60V_62 are presented along with their HOMO-LUMO gaps, electron affinities, ionization energies, and cohesive energies. We compare the stability of these clusters to relaxed met-car structures (e.g. Ti_8C_12) and to relaxed rocksalt metal-carbide fragments (TiC)n with n=8 and 32. In addition to metal-coated fullerenes we consider the possibility of a trilayered structure consisting of a small shell of metal atoms enclosed by a metal coated fullerene. The nature of bonding in these systems is analyzed by studying the electronic charge distributions.

  3. Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ranga P; Silvera, Isaac F

    2017-02-17

    Producing metallic hydrogen has been a great challenge in condensed matter physics. Metallic hydrogen may be a room-temperature superconductor and metastable when the pressure is released and could have an important impact on energy and rocketry. We have studied solid molecular hydrogen under pressure at low temperatures. At a pressure of 495 gigapascals, hydrogen becomes metallic, with reflectivity as high as 0.91. We fit the reflectance using a Drude free-electron model to determine the plasma frequency of 32.5 ± 2.1 electron volts at a temperature of 5.5 kelvin, with a corresponding electron carrier density of 7.7 ± 1.1 × 10(23) particles per cubic centimeter, which is consistent with theoretical estimates of the atomic density. The properties are those of an atomic metal. We have produced the Wigner-Huntington dissociative transition to atomic metallic hydrogen in the laboratory.

  4. Observation of the Wigner-Huntington transition to metallic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Ranga P.; Silvera, Isaac F.

    2017-02-01

    Producing metallic hydrogen has been a great challenge in condensed matter physics. Metallic hydrogen may be a room-temperature superconductor and metastable when the pressure is released and could have an important impact on energy and rocketry. We have studied solid molecular hydrogen under pressure at low temperatures. At a pressure of 495 gigapascals, hydrogen becomes metallic, with reflectivity as high as 0.91. We fit the reflectance using a Drude free-electron model to determine the plasma frequency of 32.5 ± 2.1 electron volts at a temperature of 5.5 kelvin, with a corresponding electron carrier density of 7.7 ± 1.1 × 1023 particles per cubic centimeter, which is consistent with theoretical estimates of the atomic density. The properties are those of an atomic metal. We have produced the Wigner-Huntington dissociative transition to atomic metallic hydrogen in the laboratory.

  5. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general.

  6. Transition-metal-free trifluoromethylthiolation of N-heteroarenes.

    PubMed

    Honeker, Roman; Ernst, Johannes B; Glorius, Frank

    2015-05-26

    A general and efficient methodology for the direct transition metal free trifluoromethylthiolation of a broad range of biologically relevant N-heteroarenes is reported employing abundant sodium chloride as the catalyst. This method is operationally simple, exhibits high functional group tolerance, and does not require protecting groups.

  7. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  8. Mechanisms of transition-metal gettering in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Seibt, M.; Schroeter, W.

    2000-10-01

    The atomic process, kinetics, and equilibrium thermodynamics underlying the gettering of transition-metal impurities in Si are reviewed. Methods for mathematical modeling of gettering are discussed and illustrated. Needs for further research are considered. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Biomass transition metal hydrogen-evolution electrocatalysts and electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wei-Fu; Iyer, Shweta; Iyer, Shilpa; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2017-02-28

    A catalytic composition from earth-abundant transition metal salts and biomass is disclosed. A calcined catalytic composition formed from soybean powder and ammonium molybdate is specifically exemplified herein. Methods for making the catalytic composition are disclosed as are electrodes for hydrogen evolution reactions comprising the catalytic composition.

  10. The Electrochemical Synthesis of Transition-Metal Acetylacetonates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, S. R.; Browning, S. R.; Lagowski, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of transition-metal acetylacetonates described here can form the basis of assisting in the transformation of an entry-level laboratory course into a research-like environment where all members of a class are working on the same problem, but where each member has a personal responsibility for the synthesis and…

  11. Microwave assisted synthesis of technologically important transition metal silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidhyanathan, B.; Rao, K.J.

    1997-12-01

    A novel, simple, clean and fast microwave assisted method of preparing important transition metal silicides (MoSi{sub 2}, WSi{sub 2}, CoSi{sub 2}, and TiSi{sub 2}) has been described. Amorphous carbon is used both as a microwave susceptor and as a preventer of oxidation. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  12. Well-defined transition metal hydrides in catalytic isomerizations.

    PubMed

    Larionov, Evgeny; Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2014-09-07

    This Feature Article intends to provide an overview of a variety of catalytic isomerization reactions that have been performed using well-defined transition metal hydride precatalysts. A particular emphasis is placed on the underlying mechanistic features of the transformations discussed. These have been categorized depending upon the nature of the substrate and in most cases discussed following a chronological order.

  13. Finding new ternary transition metal selenides and sulphides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Awadhesh; Bhutani, Ankita; Eckstein, James N.; Shoemaker, Daniel P.; Wagner, Lucas K.

    The transition metal oxides exhibit many interesting physical properties, and have been explored in detail over time. Recently, the transition metal chalchogenides including selenium and sulfur have been of interest because of their correlated electron properties, as seen in the iron based superconductors and the layered transition metal dichalchogenides. However, the chalchogenides are much less explored than the oxides, and there is an open question of whether there may be new materials heretofore undiscovered. We perform a systematic combined theoretical and experimental search over ternary phase diagrams that are empty in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database containing cations, transition metals, and one of selenium or sulfur. In these 27 ternary systems, we use a probabilistic model to reduce the likelihood of false negative predictions, which results in a list of 24 candidate materials. We then conduct a variety of synthesis experiments to check the candidate materials for stability. While the prediction method did obtain compositions that are stable, none of the candidate materials formed in our experiments. We come to the conclusion that these phase diagrams are either truly empty or have unusual structures or synthesis requirements. This work was supported by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, Department of Energy Frontier Research Center under Grant No. DEAC0298CH1088.

  14. Preparation of nanoporous metal foam from high nitrogen transition metal complexes

    DOEpatents

    Tappan, Bryce C.; Huynh, My Hang V.; Hiskey, Michael A.; Son, Steven F.; Oschwald, David M.; Chavez, David E.; Naud, Darren L.

    2006-11-28

    Nanoporous metal foams are prepared by ignition of high nitrogen transition metal complexes. The ammonium salts of iron(III) tris[bi(tetrazolato)-amine], cobalt(III) tris(bi(tetrazolato)amine), and high nitrogen compounds of copper and silver were prepared as loose powders, pressed into pellets and wafers, and ignited under an inert atmosphere to form nanoporous metal foam monoliths having very high surface area and very low density.

  15. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  16. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiHx, which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  17. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  18. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Sergey V; Khomskii, Daniel I

    2016-09-20

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect-an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal-metal bonds that leads to an "exclusion" of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d-5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin-orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior.

  19. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged

  20. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  1. Metal-insulator transition in films of doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Reich, K V; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Fu, Han; Kortshagen, Uwe R; Shklovskii, B I

    2016-03-01

    To fully deploy the potential of semiconductor nanocrystal films as low-cost electronic materials, a better understanding of the amount of dopants required to make their conductivity metallic is needed. In bulk semiconductors, the critical concentration of electrons at the metal-insulator transition is described by the Mott criterion. Here, we theoretically derive the critical concentration nc for films of heavily doped nanocrystals devoid of ligands at their surface and in direct contact with each other. In the accompanying experiments, we investigate the conduction mechanism in films of phosphorus-doped, ligand-free silicon nanocrystals. At the largest electron concentration achieved in our samples, which is half the predicted nc, we find that the localization length of hopping electrons is close to three times the nanocrystals diameter, indicating that the film approaches the metal-insulator transition.

  2. Transition Metal Nitrides for Electrocatalytic Energy Conversion: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Xie, Yi

    2016-03-07

    Electrocatalytic energy conversion has been considered as one of the most efficient and promising pathways for realizing energy storage and energy utilization in modern society. To improve electrocatalytic reactions, specific catalysts are needed to lower the overpotential. In the search for efficient alternatives to noble metal catalysts, transition metal nitrides have attracted considerable interest due to their high catalytic activity and unique electronic structure. Over the past few decades, numerous nitride-based catalysts have been explored with respect to their ability to drive various electrocatalytic reactions, such as the hydrogen evolution reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction to achieve water splitting and the oxygen reduction reaction coupled with the methanol oxidation reaction to construct fuel cells or rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. This Minireview provides a brief overview of recent progress on electrocatalysts based on transition metal nitrides, and outlines the current challenges and future opportunities.

  3. Disorder-Driven Metal-Insulator Transitions in Deformable Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sante, Domenico; Fratini, Simone; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Ciuchi, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    We show that, in the presence of a deformable lattice potential, the nature of the disorder-driven metal-insulator transition is fundamentally changed with respect to the noninteracting (Anderson) scenario. For strong disorder, even a modest electron-phonon interaction is found to dramatically renormalize the random potential, opening a mobility gap at the Fermi energy. This process, which reflects disorder-enhanced polaron formation, is here given a microscopic basis by treating the lattice deformations and Anderson localization effects on the same footing. We identify an intermediate "bad insulator" transport regime which displays resistivity values exceeding the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit and with a negative temperature coefficient, as often observed in strongly disordered metals. Our calculations reveal that this behavior originates from significant temperature-induced rearrangements of electronic states due to enhanced interaction effects close to the disorder-driven metal-insulator transition.

  4. Phase field theory of interfaces and crystal nucleation in a eutectic system of fcc structure: I. Transitions in the one-phase liquid region.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Gránásy, László

    2007-08-21

    The phase field theory (PFT) has been applied to predict equilibrium interfacial properties and nucleation barrier in the binary eutectic system Ag-Cu using double well and interpolation functions deduced from a Ginzburg-Landau expansion that considers fcc (face centered cubic) crystal symmetries. The temperature and composition dependent free energies of the liquid and solid phases are taken from CALculation of PHAse Diagrams-type calculations. The model parameters of PFT are fixed so as to recover an interface thickness of approximately 1 nm from molecular dynamics simulations and the interfacial free energies from the experimental dihedral angles available for the pure components. A nontrivial temperature and composition dependence for the equilibrium interfacial free energy is observed. Mapping the possible nucleation pathways, we find that the Ag and Cu rich critical fluctuations compete against each other in the neighborhood of the eutectic composition. The Tolman length is positive and shows a maximum as a function of undercooling. The PFT predictions for the critical undercooling are found to be consistent with experimental results. These results support the view that heterogeneous nucleation took place in the undercooling experiments available at present. We also present calculations using the classical droplet model [classical nucleation theory (CNT)] and a phenomenological diffuse interface theory (DIT). While the predictions of the CNT with a purely entropic interfacial free energy underestimate the critical undercooling, the DIT results appear to be in a reasonable agreement with the PFT predictions.

  5. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-21

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work, we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic body centered cubic atomic hydrogen in its ground state. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of r{sub s} = 2.27(3) a{sub 0}. We compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin’s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  6. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transition order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.

  7. Thermal conductivity switch: Optimal semiconductor/metal melting transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangnam; Kaviany, Massoud

    2016-10-01

    Scrutinizing distinct solid/liquid (s /l ) and solid/solid (s /s ) phase transitions (passive transitions) for large change in bulk (and homogenous) thermal conductivity, we find the s /l semiconductor/metal (S/M) transition produces the largest dimensionless thermal conductivity switch (TCS) figure of merit ZTCS (change in thermal conductivity divided by smaller conductivity). At melting temperature, the solid phonon and liquid molecular thermal conductivities are comparable and generally small, so the TCS requires localized electron solid and delocalized electron liquid states. For cyclic phase reversibility, the congruent phase transition (no change in composition) is as important as the thermal transport. We identify X Sb and X As (X =Al , Cd, Ga, In, Zn) and describe atomic-structural metrics for large ZTCS, then show the superiority of S/M phonon- to electron-dominated transport melting transition. We use existing experimental results and theoretical and ab initio calculations of the related properties for both phases (including the Kubo-Greenwood and Bridgman formulations of liquid conductivities). The 5 p orbital of Sb contributes to the semiconductor behavior in the solid-phase band gap and upon disorder and bond-length changes in the liquid phase this changes to metallic, creating the large contrast in thermal conductivity. The charge density distribution, electronic localization function, and electron density of states are used to mark this S/M transition. For optimal TCS, we examine the elemental selection from the transition, basic, and semimetals and semiconductor groups. For CdSb, addition of residual Ag suppresses the bipolar conductivity and its ZTCS is over 7, and for Zn3Sb2 it is expected to be over 14, based on the structure and transport properties of the better-known β -Zn4Sb3 . This is the highest ZTCS identified. In addition to the metallic melting, the high ZTCS is due to the electron-poor nature of II-V semiconductors, leading to the

  8. Transition Metal d-Orbital Splitting Diagrams: An Updated Educational Resource for Square Planar Transition Metal Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bo¨rgel, Jonas; Campbell, Michael G.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of d-orbital splitting diagrams for square planar transition metal complexes in textbooks and educational materials is often inconsistent and therefore confusing for students. Here we provide a concise summary of the key features of orbital splitting diagrams for square planar complexes, which we propose may be used as an updated…

  9. Self-assembly of noble metal monolayers on transition metal carbide nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sean T; Milina, Maria; Alba-Rubio, Ana C; Hendon, Christopher H; Dumesic, James A; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrated the self-assembly of transition metal carbide nanoparticles coated with atomically thin noble metal monolayers by carburizing mixtures of noble metal salts and transition metal oxides encapsulated in removable silica templates. This approach allows for control of the final core-shell architecture, including particle size, monolayer coverage, and heterometallic composition. Carbon-supported Ti(0.1)W(0.9)C nanoparticles coated with Pt or bimetallic PtRu monolayers exhibited enhanced resistance to sintering and CO poisoning, achieving an order of magnitude increase in specific activity over commercial catalysts for methanol electrooxidation after 10,000 cycles. These core-shell materials provide a new direction to reduce the loading, enhance the activity, and increase the stability of noble metal catalysts.

  10. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo studies of transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-02-22

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high-quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major plane-wave electronic structure codes. We have generated a set of neon-core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of density functional theory. The pseudopotentials have been directly tested for accuracy within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (M) atoms and the binding curve of each M-O dimer. We find the ionization potentials to be accurate to 0.16(1) eV, on average, relative to experiment. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 0.5(1)% of experimental values, on average, and the binding energies are also typically accurate to 0.18(3) eV. The level of accuracy we find for atoms and dimers is comparable to what has recently been observed for bulk metals and oxides using the same pseudopotentials. Our QMC pseudopotential results compare well with the findings of previous QMC studies and benchmark quantum chemical calculations.

  11. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds

    PubMed Central

    Streltsov, Sergey V.; Khomskii, Daniel I.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect—an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal–metal bonds that leads to an “exclusion” of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d–5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin–orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior. PMID:27601669

  12. Pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo studies of transition metal oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-02-22

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of transition metal oxides are partially limited by the availability of high-quality pseudopotentials that are both accurate in QMC and compatible with major plane-wave electronic structure codes. We have generated a set of neon-core pseudopotentials with small cutoff radii for the early transition metal elements Sc to Zn within the local density approximation of density functional theory. The pseudopotentials have been directly tested for accuracy within QMC by calculating the first through fourth ionization potentials of the isolated transition metal (M) atoms and the binding curve of each M-O dimer. We find the ionization potentialsmore » to be accurate to 0.16(1) eV, on average, relative to experiment. The equilibrium bond lengths of the dimers are within 0.5(1)% of experimental values, on average, and the binding energies are also typically accurate to 0.18(3) eV. The level of accuracy we find for atoms and dimers is comparable to what has recently been observed for bulk metals and oxides using the same pseudopotentials. Our QMC pseudopotential results compare well with the findings of previous QMC studies and benchmark quantum chemical calculations.« less

  13. Vibrational energy transfer dynamics in ruthenium polypyridine transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Fedoseeva, Marina; Delor, Milan; Parker, Simon C; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-01-21

    Understanding the dynamics of the initial stages of vibrational energy transfer in transition metal complexes is a challenging fundamental question which is also of crucial importance for many applications, such as improving the performance of solar devices or photocatalysis. The present study investigates vibrational energy transport in the ground and the electronic excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2, a close relative of the efficient "N3" dye used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Using the emerging technique of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we show that, similarly to other transition-metal complexes, the central Ru heavy atom acts as a "bottleneck" making the energy transfer from small ligands with high energy vibrational stretching frequencies less favorable and thereby affecting the efficiency of vibrational energy flow in the complex. Comparison of the vibrational relaxation times in the electronic ground and excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2 shows that it is dramatically faster in the latter. We propose to explain this observation by the intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the thiocyanate group and partially oxidised Ru metal center, which increase the degree of vibrational coupling between CN and Ru-N modes in the excited state thus reducing structural and thermodynamic barriers that slow down vibrational relaxation and energy transport in the electronic ground state. As a very similar behavior was earlier observed in another transition-metal complex, Re(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2'-bpy)(CO)3Cl, we suggest that this effect in vibrational energy dynamics might be common for transition-metal complexes with heavy central atoms.

  14. The transition to the metallic state in low density hydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    McMinis, Jeremy; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; ...

    2015-11-18

    Solid atomic hydrogen is one of the simplest systems to undergo a metal-insulator transition. Near the transition, the electronic degrees of freedom become strongly correlated and their description provides a difficult challenge for theoretical methods. As a result, the order and density of the phase transition are still subject to debate. In this work we use diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to benchmark the transition between the paramagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic phases of ground state body centered cubic atomic hydrogen. We locate the density of the transition by computing the equation of state for these two phases and identify the phase transitionmore » order by computing the band gap near the phase transition. These benchmark results show that the phase transition is continuous and occurs at a Wigner-Seitz radius of rs = 2.27(3)a0. As a result, we compare our results to previously reported density functional theory, Hedin s GW approximation, and dynamical mean field theory results.« less

  15. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, Nenad M.; Chen, Jian

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme.

  16. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    DOEpatents

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  17. An Alternative Approach to the Teaching of Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Brian

    1979-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to teaching Systematic Transition Metal Chemistry with the transition metal chemistry skeleton features of interest. The "skeleton" is intended as a guide to predicting the chemistry of a selected compound. (Author/SA)

  18. Commercial FCC License Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swearer, Harvey F.

    Jobs in radio arts, from serviceman to station engineer, are easier to get if one has a recommendation of the U.S. Government in the form of a license from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). This study guide for FCC radiotelephone licenses is designed to thoroughly prepare the applicant for any radiotelephone exam and to serve as a…

  19. The FCC: A Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Paul

    The numerous forms filed with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) provide information about a variety of topics. Basic licensing information that is available concerns engineering, ownership, and equal employment opportunity. The FCC's broadcast bureau collects information about programing, the ascertainment of community needs, public…

  20. A superconductor to superfluid phase transition in liquid metallic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Babaev, Egor; Sudbø, Asle; Ashcroft, N W

    2004-10-07

    Although hydrogen is the simplest of atoms, it does not form the simplest of solids or liquids. Quantum effects in these phases are considerable (a consequence of the light proton mass) and they have a demonstrable and often puzzling influence on many physical properties, including spatial order. To date, the structure of dense hydrogen remains experimentally elusive. Recent studies of the melting curve of hydrogen indicate that at high (but experimentally accessible) pressures, compressed hydrogen will adopt a liquid state, even at low temperatures. In reaching this phase, hydrogen is also projected to pass through an insulator-to-metal transition. This raises the possibility of new state of matter: a near ground-state liquid metal, and its ordered states in the quantum domain. Ordered quantum fluids are traditionally categorized as superconductors or superfluids; these respective systems feature dissipationless electrical currents or mass flow. Here we report a topological analysis of the projected phase of liquid metallic hydrogen, finding that it may represent a new type of ordered quantum fluid. Specifically, we show that liquid metallic hydrogen cannot be categorized exclusively as a superconductor or superfluid. We predict that, in the presence of a magnetic field, liquid metallic hydrogen will exhibit several phase transitions to ordered states, ranging from superconductors to superfluids.

  1. Polytypic phase transitions in metal intercalated Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengjing; Koski, Kristie J.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature and concentration dependent phase diagrams of zero-valent copper, cobalt, and iron intercalated bismuth selenide are investigated using in situ transmission electron microscopy. Polytypic phase transitions associated with superlattice formation along with order-disorder transitions of the guest intercalant are determined. Dual-element intercalants of CuCo, CuFe, and CoFe-Bi2Se3 are also investigated. Hexagonal and striped domain formation consistent with two-dimensional ordering of the intercalant and Pokrovksy-Talapov theory is identified as a function of concentration. These studies provide a complete picture of the structural behavior of zero-valent metal intercalated Bi2Se3.

  2. Positronium formation in solid transition metal losartanates complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Fulgêncio, F.; da Silva, J. G.; Windmöller, D.; Marques-Netto, A.; Machado, J. C.; Magalhães, W. F.

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) measurements were performed in transition metal losartanates complexes, MT(Los)2, and in potassium losartanate, KLos, in order to built up insights about the positronium formation mechanism in molecular environment. A correlation was obtained between formation probability, I3, and the covalence of complexes, evaluated by molar electrical conductivity in dimethylformamide (DMF). Furthermore, some metallic ion properties, such as reduction potential and pauling electronegativity, were also correlated with I3. These results were analyzed in terms of the spur model and of the recently proposed mechanism, named cybotatic correlated system kinetic mechanism (CCSKM), which involves molecular excited states in positronium formation.

  3. Transition metal doped arsenene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minglei; Wang, Sake; Du, Yanhui; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2016-12-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atoms substitutional doping of an arsenene monolayer. Based on the binding energy, the TM-substituted arsenene systems were found to be robust. Magnetic states were obtained for Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Fe doping. More importantly, a half-metallic state resulted from Ti and Mn doping, while the spin-polarized semiconducting state occurred with V, Cr and Fe doping. Our studies demonstrated the potential applications of TM-substituted arsenene for spintronics and magnetic storage devices.

  4. Highly Efficient Transition Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlong; Ciganda, Roberto; Salmon, Lionel; Gregurec, Danijela; Irigoyen, Joseba; Moya, Sergio; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2016-02-24

    A ligand design is proposed for transition metal nanoparticle (TMNP) catalysts in aqueous solution. Thus, a tris(triazolyl)-polyethylene glycol (tris-trz-PEG) amphiphilic ligand, 2, is used for the synthesis of very small TMNPs with Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au. These TMNP-2 catalysts were evaluated and compared for the model 4-nitrophenol reduction, and proved to be extremely efficient. High catalytic efficiencies involving the use of only a few ppm metal of PdNPs, RuNPs, and CuNPs were also exemplified in Suzuki-Miyaura, transfer hydrogenation, and click reactions, respectively.

  5. Interaction-Driven Metal-Insulator Transition in Strained Graphene.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ho-Kin; Laksono, E; Rodrigues, J N B; Sengupta, P; Assaad, F F; Adam, S

    2015-10-30

    The question of whether electron-electron interactions can drive a metal to insulator transition in graphene under realistic experimental conditions is addressed. Using three representative methods to calculate the effective long-range Coulomb interaction between π electrons in graphene and solving for the ground state using quantum Monte Carlo methods, we argue that, without strain, graphene remains metallic and changing the substrate from SiO_{2} to suspended samples hardly makes any difference. In contrast, applying a rather large-but experimentally realistic-uniform and isotropic strain of about 15% seems to be a promising route to making graphene an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator.

  6. Resonant Ultrasound Studies of Complex Transition Metal Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Henry Bass; Dr. J. R. Gladden

    2008-08-18

    Department of Energy EPSCoR The University of Mississippi Award: DE-FG02-04ER46121 Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Studies of Complex Transition Metal Oxides The central thrust of this DOE funded research program has been to apply resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS), an elegant and efficient method for determining the elastic stiffness constants of a crystal, to the complex and poorly understood class of materials known as transition metal oxides (TMOs). Perhaps the most interesting and challenging feature of TMOs is their strongly correlated behavior in which spin, lattice, and charge degrees of freedom are strongly coupled. Elastic constants are a measure of the interatomic potentials in a crystal and are thus sensitive probes into the atomic environment. This sensitivity makes RUS an ideal tool to study the coupling of phase transition order parameters to lattice strains. The most significant result of the project has been the construction of a high temperature RUS apparatus capable of making elastic constant measurements at temperatures as high as 1000 degrees Celsius. We have designed and built novel acoustic transducers which can operate as high as 600 degrees Celsius based on lithium niobate piezoelectric elements. For measurement between 600 to 1000 C, a buffer rod system is used in which the samples under test and transducers are separated by a rod with low acoustic attenuation. The high temperature RUS system has been used to study the charge order (CO) transition in transition metal oxides for which we have discovered a new transition occurring about 35 C below the CO transition. While the CO transition exhibits a linear coupling between the strain and order parameter, this new precursor transition shows a different coupling indicating a fundamentally different mechanism. We have also begun a study, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to study novel thermoelectric materials at elevated temperatures. These materials include silicon

  7. Spin Transport in Single Layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael; Aji, Vivek

    Inversion symmetry breaking and strong spin orbit coupling in two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides leads to interesting new phenomena such as the valley hall and spin hall effects. The nontrivial Berry curvature of the bands yields transverse spin currents in applied field. In this talk we characterize the spin transport in hole-doped systems. Due to the large spin-splitting, time-reversal invariance, and the large separation of hole pockets in momentum space, spin flip scattering involves inter-valley processes with large momentum. As such, one expects large spin life times and a large spin hall angle. We analyze the robustness of the phenomena to various scattering processes and explore the viability of transition metal dichalcogenides for spintronic applications. We acknowledge the support of the NSF via Grant NSF DMR-1506707.

  8. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  9. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  10. Metal-Insulator Transition and Topological Properties of Pyrochlore Iridates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Haule, Kristjan; Vanderbilt, David

    2017-01-01

    Combining density functional theory (DFT) and embedded dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) methods, we study the metal-insulator transition in R2Ir2 O7 (R =Y , Eu, Sm, Nd, Pr, and Bi) and the topological nature of the insulating compounds. Accurate free energies evaluated using the charge self-consistent DFT +DMFT method reveal that the metal-insulator transition occurs for an A -cation radius between that of Nd and Pr, in agreement with experiments. The all-in-all-out magnetic phase, which is stable in the Nd compound but not the Pr one, gives rise to a small Ir4 + magnetic moment of ≈0.4 μB and opens a sizable correlated gap. We demonstrate that within this state-of-the-art theoretical method, the insulating bulk pyrochlore iridates are topologically trivial.

  11. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupé, B.; Bihlmayer, G.; Böttcher, M.; Blügel, S.; Heinze, S.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations.

  12. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics.

    PubMed

    Dupé, B; Bihlmayer, G; Böttcher, M; Blügel, S; Heinze, S

    2016-06-03

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations.

  13. Recent Advances in Transition Metal-Catalyzed Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    McKay, Matthew J; Nguyen, Hien M

    2012-08-03

    Having access to mild and operationally simple techniques for attaining carbohydrate targets will be necessary to facilitate advancement in biological, medicinal, and pharmacological research. Even with the abundance of elegant reports for generating glycosidic linkages, stereoselective construction of α- and β-oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates is by no means trivial. In an era where expanded awareness of the impact we are having on the environment drives the state-of-the-art, synthetic chemists are tasked with developing cleaner and more efficient reactions for achieving their transformations. This movement imparts the value that prevention of waste is always superior to its treatment or cleanup. This review will highlight recent advancement in this regard by examining strategies that employ transition metal catalysis in the synthesis of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. These methods are mild and effective for constructing glycosidic bonds with reduced levels of waste through utilization of sub-stoichiometric amounts of transition metals to promote the glycosylation.

  14. Transition metal catalysis in the generation of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    1995-12-31

    The view that natural gas is thermolytic, coming from decomposing organic debris, has remained almost unchallenged for nearly half a century. Disturbing contradictions exist, however: Oil is found at great depth, at temperatures where only gas should exist and oil and gas deposits show no evidence of the thermolytic debris indicative of oil decomposing to gas. Moreover, laboratory attempts to duplicate the composition of natural gas, which is typically between 60 and 95+ wt% methane in C{sub 1}-C{sub 4}, have produced insufficient amounts of methane (10 to 60%). It has been suggested that natural gas may be generated catalytically, promoted by the transition metals in carbonaceous sedimentary rocks. This talk will discuss experimental results that support this hypothesis. Various transition metals, as pure compounds and in source rocks, will be shown to generate a catalytic gas that is identical to natural gas. Kinetic results suggest robust catalytic activity under moderate catagenetic conditions.

  15. Recent Advances in Transition Metal-Catalyzed Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Matthew J.; Nguyen, Hien M.

    2012-01-01

    Having access to mild and operationally simple techniques for attaining carbohydrate targets will be necessary to facilitate advancement in biological, medicinal, and pharmacological research. Even with the abundance of elegant reports for generating glycosidic linkages, stereoselective construction of α- and β-oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates is by no means trivial. In an era where expanded awareness of the impact we are having on the environment drives the state-of-the-art, synthetic chemists are tasked with developing cleaner and more efficient reactions for achieving their transformations. This movement imparts the value that prevention of waste is always superior to its treatment or cleanup. This review will highlight recent advancement in this regard by examining strategies that employ transition metal catalysis in the synthesis of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. These methods are mild and effective for constructing glycosidic bonds with reduced levels of waste through utilization of sub-stoichiometric amounts of transition metals to promote the glycosylation. PMID:22924154

  16. Engineering skyrmions in transition-metal multilayers for spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, B.; Bihlmayer, G.; Böttcher, M.; Blügel, S.; Heinze, S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized, topologically protected spin structures that have been proposed for storing or processing information due to their intriguing dynamical and transport properties. Important in terms of applications is the recent discovery of interface stabilized skyrmions as evidenced in ultra-thin transition-metal films. However, so far only skyrmions at interfaces with a single atomic layer of a magnetic material were reported, which greatly limits their potential for application in devices. Here we predict the emergence of skyrmions in [4d/Fe2/5d]n multilayers, that is, structures composed of Fe biatomic layers sandwiched between 4d and 5d transition-metal layers. In these composite structures, the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions that control skyrmion formation can be tuned separately by the two interfaces. This allows engineering skyrmions as shown based on density functional theory and spin dynamics simulations. PMID:27257020

  17. Separation observation of metal-insulator transition and structural phase transition in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tak; Kim, Bong-Jun; Lee, Yong Wook; Chae, Byung Gyu; Yun, Sun Jin; Oh, Soo-Young; Lim, Yong-Sik

    2007-03-01

    An intermediate monoclinic metal phase between the metal-insulator transition (MIT) and the structural phase transition (SPT) is observed with VO2-based two-terminal devices and can be explained in terms of the Mott MIT. The conductivity of this phase linearly increases with increasing temperature up to TSPT 68^oC and becomes maximum at TSPT. The SPT is confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Optical microscopic observation reveals the absence of a local current path in the metal phase. The current uniformly flows throughout the surface of the VO2 film when the MIT occurs. This device can be used as a programmable critical temperature sensor. (References: New J. Phys. 6 (1994) 52 (http://www.njp.org); Appl. Phys. Lett. 86 (2005) 24210); Physica B 369 (2005) 76; cond-mat/0607577; cond-mat/0608085; cond-mat/0609033).

  18. Metal-insulator and charge ordering transitions in oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujay Kumar

    Strongly correlated oxides are a class of materials wherein interplay of various degrees of freedom results in novel electronic and magnetic phenomena. Vanadium oxides are widely studied correlated materials that exhibit metal-insulator transitions (MIT) in a wide temperature range from 70 K to 380 K. In this Thesis, results from electrical transport measurements on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium oxide bronze (MxV 2O5) (where M: alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal cations) are presented and discussed. Although the MIT in VO2 has been studied for more than 50 years, the microscopic origin of the transition is still debated since a slew of external parameters such as light, voltage, and strain are found to significantly alter the transition. Furthermore, recent works on electrically driven switching in VO2 have shown that the role of Joule heating to be a major cause as opposed to electric field. We explore the mechanisms behind the electrically driven switching in single crystalline nanobeams of VO2 through DC and AC transport measurements. The harmonic analysis of the AC measurement data shows that non-uniform Joule heating causes electronic inhomogeneities to develop within the nanobeam and is responsible for driving the transition in VO2. Surprisingly, field assisted emission mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel effect is found to be absent and the role of percolation is also identified in the electrically driven transition. This Thesis also provides a new insight into the mechanisms behind the electrolyte gating induced resistance modulation and the suppression of MIT in VO2. We show that the metallic phase of VO2 induced by electrolyte gating is due to an electrochemical process and can be both reversible and irreversible under different conditions. The kinetics of the redox processes increase with temperature; a complete suppression of the transition and the stabilization of the metallic phase are achievable by gating in the rutile metallic phase

  19. Cointercalation of titanium dichalcogenides with transition metals and copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, A. A.; Titov, A. N.; Titova, S. G.; Pryanichnikov, S. V.; Chezganov, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    Cointercalated materials are studied, obtained by introducing copper into a TiSe2 lattice preintercalated with transition metals M = Mn, Fe, Co, or Ni. The analysis of the state of cointercalated systems at 950°C shows that copper reduces manganese and iron, but it is incapable of reducing cobalt or nickel. To explain the results, the values of the binding energy of hybrid states M3d/Ti3 d are compared.

  20. Zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal initiators supported by olefin ligands

    DOEpatents

    Bazan, Guillermo C.; Chen, Yaofeng

    2011-10-25

    A zwitterionic Group VIII transition metal complex containing the simple and relatively small 3-(arylimino)-but-1-en-2-olato ligand that catalyzes the formation of polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene. A novel feature of this catalyst is that the active species is stabilized by a chelated olefin adduct. The present invention also provides methods of polymerizing olefin monomers using zwitterionic catalysts, particularly polypropylene and high molecular weight polyethylene.

  1. The chemistry and physics of transition metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, E.K.; Jellinek, J.; Knickelbein, M.B.; Riley, S.J.

    1994-06-01

    In this program the authors study the fundamental properties of isolated clusters of transition metal atoms. Experimental studies of cluster chemistry include determination of cluster structure, reactivity, and the nature of cluster-adsorbate interactions. Studies of physical properties include measurements of cluster ionization potentials and photoabsorption cross sections. Theoretical studies focus on the structure and dynamics of clusters, including isomers, phases and phase changes, interactions with molecules, and fragmentation process.

  2. The energetics of ordered intermetallic alloys (of the transition metals)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W.; Fernando, G.W.; Bennett, L.H.

    1992-10-01

    The atomically ordered phases in ordered transition metal alloys are discussed. This chapter is divided into: physical parameters controlling phase stability (Hume-Rothery, structural maps, Miedema Hamiltonian), wave functions & band theory, comment on entropy terms, cohesive energies (electron promotion energies, Hund`s rule on orbital effects), structural energies/stabilities of elemental solids, total energies and atomic positions, charge transfer (Au alloys, charge tailing), heats of formation of ordered compounds.

  3. The energetics of ordered intermetallic alloys (of the transition metals)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Weinert, M.; Davenport, J.W. ); Fernando, G.W. . Dept. of Physics); Bennett, L.H. . Metallurgy Div.)

    1992-01-01

    The atomically ordered phases in ordered transition metal alloys are discussed. This chapter is divided into: physical parameters controlling phase stability (Hume-Rothery, structural maps, Miedema Hamiltonian), wave functions band theory, comment on entropy terms, cohesive energies (electron promotion energies, Hund's rule on orbital effects), structural energies/stabilities of elemental solids, total energies and atomic positions, charge transfer (Au alloys, charge tailing), heats of formation of ordered compounds.

  4. Novel Transition Metal Compounds with Promising Thermoelectric Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.; Fleurial, J. -P.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in the search for new high temperature thermoelectric materials at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is reviewed. Novel transition metal compounds were selected as potential new high performance thermoelectric materials and criteria of selection are presented and discussed. Samples of these new compounds were prepared at JPL by a variety of techniques. Encouraging experimental results obtained on several of these compounds are reported and show that they have the potential to be the next generation of thermoelectric materials.

  5. Preparation of nanocomposites containing nanoclusters of transition metals

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, S.B.; Lukehart, C.M., Wittig, J.E.

    1996-10-01

    New nanocomposites containing nanoclusters of transition metals have been prepared and characterized by TEM, XRD, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Organometallic or other coordination compounds functionalized with trialkoxysilyl groups have been synthesized and covalently incorporated into silica xerogels using standard sol-gel techniques. Thermal oxidative treatment of these xerogels in air followed by reduction in hydrogen yielded the desired nanocomposite phases. Using these methods, Mo, Re, Fe, Ru, Os, Pd, Pt, Cu. and Ag nanocomposites have been prepared.

  6. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  7. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  8. The development of a biological interface for transition metal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Kim R.

    The specific goal of this research was to develop an in vitro model for a root-form endosseous dental implant that contains a periodontal ligament and that is biologically integratable into alveolar bone. This objective was based on the following two hypotheses. (1) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the number of fibroblast cells attached to the surface of the metal. (2) The chemical attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to the surface of transition metals increases the strength of the fibroblast cell attachment to the surface of the metal. The model needed to have a well-controlled surface that was reproducible. Thus, a layer of Au was deposited over a Ti base, and dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) (DSP) a chemical containing disulfide groups was adsorbed to the Au. Next, extracellular matrix proteins which are periodontal ligament components were attached to the free end group of the chemical that was adsorbed to the Au. This surface served as an attachment substrate on which additional periodontal ligament components such as fibroblast cells could grow. From this model a new implant interface may be developed. This model was tested using the following polypeptides; collagen type I, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and poly-D-lysine. L929 cells were grown on Ti, Ti + Au, Ti + Au + polypeptide, and Ti + Au + DSP + polypeptide. After 72 hours, the live cells were stained with neutral red. The substrates were then subjected to increasing centrifugal forces. The viable stained cells were fixed onto the substrates and cells were counted. The hypotheses were proven for three polypeptides: fibronectin, collagen type I, and poly-D-lysine. The strongest attachment was found with collagen type I. Collagen type IV did not provide any advantage for attachment over uncoated transition metals.

  9. Theory of the pairbreaking superconductor-metal transition in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    2009-03-01

    We present a detailed description of a zero temperature phase transition between superconducting and diffusive metallic states in very thin wires due to a Cooper pair breaking mechanism. The dissipative critical theory contains current reducing fluctuations in the guise of both quantum and thermally activated phase slips. A full cross-over phase diagram is computed via an expansion in the inverse number of complex components of the superconducting order parameter (one in the physical case). The fluctuation corrections to the electrical (σ) and thermal (κ) conductivities are determined, and we find that σ has a non-monotonic temperature dependence in the metallic phase which may be consistent with recent experimental results on ultra-narrow wires. In the quantum critical regime, the ratio of the thermal to electrical conductivity displays a linear temperature dependence and thus the Wiedemann-Franz law is obeyed, with a new universal experimentally verifiable Lorenz number. We also examined the influence of quenched disorder on the superconductor-metal transition. The self-consistent pairing eigenmodes of a quasi-one dimensional wire were determined numerically. Our results support the proposal by Hoyos et al./ (Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 230601 (2007)) that the transition is described by the same strong disorder fixed point describing the onset of ferromagnetism in the quantum Ising model in a transverse field.

  10. The role of transition metal ions chemistry on multiphase chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Leriche, M.; Monod, A.; Chaumerliac, N.

    2003-04-01

    A modelling study of the role of transition metal ions chemistry on cloud chemistry is presented. First, new developments of the Model of Multiphase Cloud Chemistry (M2C2) are described: the transition metal ions reactivity and variable photolysis in the aqueous phase. Secondly, three summertime scenarios describing urban, remote and marine conditions are simulated. First, comparisons between results from M2C2 and from CAPRAM2.3 models for the same scenarios (Herrmann et al., 2000) show a good agreement between the two models with respect to their different chemical mechanisms. Secondly, chemical regimes in cloud are analysed to understand the role of transition metal ions chemistry on cloud chemistry. This study focuses on HOx chemistry, which afterwards influences the sulphur and the VOCs chemistry in droplets. The ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III) exhibits a diurnal variation with values in agreement with the few measurements of Fe speciation available. In the polluted case, sensitivity tests with and without TMI chemistry, show an enhancement of OH concentration in the aqueous phase when TMI chemistry is considered. This implies a more important oxidation of VOCs in droplets, which produces the HO2 radical, the hydrogen peroxide precursor. In fact, the HO2 radical is mainly converted into hydrogen peroxide by reactions between HO2/O2- radicals with Fe(II). This production of hydrogen peroxide leads to a rapid conversion of S(IV) into S(VI) at the beginning of the simulation.

  11. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2NO(PH 3) 2 and a small proton donor H 2O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H⋯H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  12. Optical properties of transition metal oxide quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chungwei; Posadas, Agham; Choi, Miri; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-21

    Fabrication of a quantum well, a structure that confines the electron motion along one or more spatial directions, is a powerful method of controlling the electronic structure and corresponding optical response of a material. For example, semiconductor quantum wells are used to enhance optical properties of laser diodes. The ability to control the growth of transition metal oxide films to atomic precision opens an exciting opportunity of engineering quantum wells in these materials. The wide range of transition metal oxide band gaps offers unprecedented control of confinement while the strong correlation of d-electrons allows for various cooperative phenomena to come into play. Here, we combine density functional theory and tight-binding model Hamiltonian analysis to provide a simple physical picture of transition metal oxide quantum well states using a SrO/SrTiO{sub 3}/SrO heterostructure as an example. The optical properties of the well are investigated by computing the frequency-dependent dielectric functions. The effect of an external electric field, which is essential for electro-optical devices, is also considered.

  13. Optical properties of transition metal oxide quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chungwei; Posadas, Agham; Choi, Miri; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of a quantum well, a structure that confines the electron motion along one or more spatial directions, is a powerful method of controlling the electronic structure and corresponding optical response of a material. For example, semiconductor quantum wells are used to enhance optical properties of laser diodes. The ability to control the growth of transition metal oxide films to atomic precision opens an exciting opportunity of engineering quantum wells in these materials. The wide range of transition metal oxide band gaps offers unprecedented control of confinement while the strong correlation of d-electrons allows for various cooperative phenomena to come into play. Here, we combine density functional theory and tight-binding model Hamiltonian analysis to provide a simple physical picture of transition metal oxide quantum well states using a SrO/SrTiO3/SrO heterostructure as an example. The optical properties of the well are investigated by computing the frequency-dependent dielectric functions. The effect of an external electric field, which is essential for electro-optical devices, is also considered.

  14. Control of Exciton Valley Coherence in Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Marie, X.; Liu, B. L.; Amand, T.; Robert, C.; Cadiz, F.; Renucci, P.; Urbaszek, B.

    2016-10-01

    The direct gap interband transitions in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are governed by chiral optical selection rules. Determined by laser helicity, optical transitions in either the K+ or K- valley in momentum space are induced. Linearly polarized laser excitation prepares a coherent superposition of valley states. Here, we demonstrate the control of the exciton valley coherence in monolayer WSe2 by tuning the applied magnetic field perpendicular to the monolayer plane. We show rotation of this coherent superposition of valley states by angles as large as 30° in applied fields up to 9 T. This exciton valley coherence control on the ps time scale could be an important step towards complete control of qubits based on the valley degree of freedom.

  15. Transition-metal-nitride films for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribbing, Carl-Gustaf; Roos, Arne

    1997-10-01

    The three transition metal nitrides TiN, ZrN and HfN have remarkably high stability due to their bonding: a mixture of covalent and ionic contributions. The optical properties of these nitride compounds are free-electron like to a surprisingly large extent, in particular in comparison with the corresponding carbides. It is argued that the interband optical excitations of the d-electrons are restricted by selection rules, resulting in a Drude like behavior of these d-electron compounds. Hitherto, one of the main optical applications has been as opaque, wear-resistant replacements for gold-coatings. This review includes the efforts to study, understand and enhance the optical selectivity of group IVB transition metal nitrides as the selective surface in high temperature thermal solar absorbers, as the metal layer in LE-coatings on energy-efficient or solar control windows and as a Langmuir probe coating. The reflectance edge is not in the optimum position for absorber applications and attempts to shift it with alloying were unsuccessful. Recent development of inhomogeneous, cermet- type nitrides hold some promise. The LE-coatings will not reach as high selectivity as the current noble metal based multilayers, but many find use in aggressive environments because of their excellent stability.

  16. Peierls potential for crowdions in the bcc transition metals.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, S P; Nguyen-Manh, D

    2008-09-12

    We present the first derivation of the analytic expression for the Peierls-Nabarro potential for crowdion migration using the double sine-Gordon model. The analysis is guided by the group-specific trend in the shapes of the periodic lattice potentials calculated for the body-centered-cubic transition metals in groups 5B and 6B of the periodic table. We combine density-functional calculations of the crowdion's profile and environment with an extended version of the analytical Frenkel-Kontorova model, and determine the effective potential experienced by the defect's center of mass. This reveals important underlying differences between the metals in these groups, which are inaccessible to either the numerical or analytical approaches alone, and accounts for the previously unexplained significantly higher crowdion migration temperatures observed in the metals of group 6B relative to those of group 5B.

  17. Transition-metal prion protein attachment: Competition with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2012-02-01

    Prion protein, PrP, is a protein capable of binding copper ions in multiple modes depending on their concentration. Misfolded PrP is implicated in a group of neurodegenerative diseases, which include ``mad cow disease'' and its human form, variant Creutzfeld-Jacob disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that attachment of non-copper metal ions to PrP triggers transformations to abnormal forms similar to those observed in prion diseases. In this work, we use hybrid Kohn-Sham/orbital-free density functional theory simulations to investigate copper replacement by other transition metals that bind to PrP, including zinc, iron and manganese. We consider all known copper binding modes in the N-terminal domain of PrP. Our calculations identify modes most susceptible to copper replacement and reveal metals that can successfully compete with copper for attachment to PrP.

  18. Capacitive network near the metal insulator transition in Vanadium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J. G.; Patino, E. J.; Schmidt, R.; Sharoni, A.; Gomez, M. E.; Schuller, I. K.

    2011-03-01

    Recent infrared spectroscopy and transport measurements in nano-scaled junction of VO2 have revealed the existence of phase separation into metallic and insulating phases. Here we present Impedance spectroscopy measurements performed in high quality Vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films for the first time. This technique allows distinguishing between the resistive and capacitive response of the VO2 films and provides the dielectric properties across the metal-insulator transition (MIT). The film capacitance exhibits an unusual increase close to the MIT which implies the formation of a capacitor network produced by the nanoscale phase separation of metallic and insulating phases. This work has been supported by AFOSR, COLCIENCIAS, CENM and Ramon y Cajal Fellowship.

  19. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  20. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  1. Thermophysical Property Measurements of Silicon-Transition Metal Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Erwin, William R.; Sansoucie, Michael P.; Lee, Jonghyun; Gave, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Metals and metallic alloys often have high melting temperatures and highly reactive liquids. Processing reactive liquids in containers can result in significant contamination and limited undercooling. This is particularly true for molten silicon and it alloys. Silicon is commonly termed "the universal solvent". The viscosity, surface tension, and density of several silicon-transition metal alloys were determined using the Electrostatic Levitator system at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The temperature dependence of the viscosity followed an Arrhenius dependence, and the surface tension followed a linear temperature dependence. The density of the melts, including the undercooled region, showed a linear behavior as well. Viscosity and surface tension values were obtain for several of the alloys in the undercooled region.

  2. Open volume defects and magnetic phase transition in Fe60Al40 transition metal aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedke, M. O.; Anwand, W.; Bali, R.; Cornelius, S.; Butterling, M.; Trinh, T. T.; Wagner, A.; Salamon, S.; Walecki, D.; Smekhova, A.; Wende, H.; Potzger, K.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic phase transition in the Fe60Al40 transition metal aluminide from the ferromagnetic disordered A2-phase to the paramagnetic ordered B2-phase as a function of annealing up to 1000 °C has been investigated by means of magneto-optical and spectroscopy techniques, i.e., Kerr effect, positron annihilation, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The positron annihilation spectroscopy has been performed in-situ sequentially after each annealing step at the Apparatus for In-situ Defect Analysis that is a unique tool combining positron annihilation spectroscopy with temperature treatment, material evaporation, ion irradiation, and sheet resistance measurement techniques. The overall goal was to investigate the importance of the open volume defects onto the magnetic phase transition. No evidence of variation in the vacancy concentration in matching the magnetic phase transition temperature range (400-600 °C) has been found, whereas higher temperatures showed an increase in the vacancy concentration.

  3. A Transition to Metallic Hydrogen: Evidence of the Plasma Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    The insulator-metal transition in hydrogen is one of the most outstanding problems in condensed matter physics. The high-pressure metallic phase is now predicted to be liquid atomic from T =0 K to very high temperatures. We have conducted measurements of optical properties of hot dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K in a diamond anvil cell using pulsed laser heating of the sample. We present evidence in two forms: a plateau in the heating curves (average laser power vs temperature) characteristic of a first-order phase transition with latent heat, and changes in transmittance and reflectance characteristic of a metal for temperatures above the plateau temperature. For thick films the reflectance saturates at ~0.5. The phase line of this transition has a negative slope in agreement with theories of the so-called plasma phase transition. The NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H supported this research.

  4. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  5. Control of Magnetic Properties Across Metal to Insulator Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Venta, Jose

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic (FM) thin films without magnetic fields is an on-going challenge in condensed matter physics with multiple technological implications. External stimuli and proximity effects are the most used methods to control the magnetic properties. An interesting possibility arises when ferromagnets are in proximity to materials that undergo a metal-insulator (MIT) and structural phase transition (SPT). The stress associated with the structural changes produces a magnetoelastic anisotropy in proximity coupled ferromagnetic films that allows controlling the magnetic properties without magnetic fields. Canonical examples of materials that undergo MIT and SPT are the vanadium oxides (VO2 and V2O3) . VO2 undergoes a metal/rutile to an insulator/monoclinic phase transition at 340 K. In V2O3 the transition at 160 K is from a metallic/rhombohedral to an insulating/ monoclinic phase. We have investigated the magnetic properties of different combinations of ferromagnetic (Ni, Co and Fe) and vanadium oxide thin films. The (0.32%) volume expansion in VO2 or the (1.4%) volume decrease in V2O3 across the MIT produces an interfacial stress in the FM overlayer. We show that the coercivities and magnetizations of the ferromagnetic films grown on vanadium oxides are strongly affected by the phase transition. The changes in coercivity can be as large as 168% and occur in a very narrow temperature interval. These effects can be controlled by the thickness and deposition conditions of the different ferromagnetic films. For VO2/Ni bilayers the large change in the coercivity occurring above room temperature opens the possibilities for technological applications. Work done in collaboration with Siming Wang, J. G. Ramirez, and Ivan K. Schuller. Funded by the US DoE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award FG03-87ER-45332 and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research No. FA9550-12-1-0381.

  6. Disorder and metal-insulator transitions in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hua; Chen, Chui-Zhen; Song, Juntao; Sun, Qing-Feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.

    The Weyl semimetal (WSM) is a newly proposed quantum state of matter. It has Weyl nodes in bulk excitations and Fermi arcs surface states. We study the effects of disorder and localization in WSMs and find three novel phase transitions.(I) Two Weyl nodes near the Brillouin zone boundary can be annihilated pairwise by disorder scattering, resulting in the opening of a topologically nontrivial gap and a transition from a WSM to a three-dimensional (3D) quantum anomalous Hall state. (II) When the two Weyl nodes are well separated in momentum space, the emergent bulk extended states can give rise to a direct transition from a WSM to a 3D diffusive anomalous Hall metal. (III) Two Weyl nodes can emerge near the zone center when an insulating gap closes with increasing disorder, enabling a direct transition from a normal band insulator to a WSM. We determine the phase diagram by numerically computing the localization length and the Hall conductivity, and propose that the novel phase transitions can be realized on a photonic lattice.

  7. Disorder and Metal-Insulator Transitions in Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chui-Zhen; Song, Juntao; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-feng; Wang, Ziqiang; Xie, X. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Weyl semimetal (WSM) is a newly proposed quantum state of matter. It has Weyl nodes in bulk excitations and Fermi arc surface states. We study the effects of disorder and localization in WSMs and find three novel phase transitions. (i) Two Weyl nodes near the Brillouin zone boundary can be annihilated pairwise by disorder scattering, resulting in the opening of a topologically nontrivial gap and a transition from a WSM to a three-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall state. (ii) When the two Weyl nodes are well separated in momentum space, the emergent bulk extended states can give rise to a direct transition from a WSM to a 3D diffusive anomalous Hall metal. (iii) Two Weyl nodes can emerge near the zone center when an insulating gap closes with increasing disorder, enabling a direct transition from a normal band insulator to a WSM. We determine the phase diagram by numerically computing the localization length and the Hall conductivity, and propose that the novel phase transitions can be realized on a photonic lattice.

  8. Transition metal complexes of isonicotinic acid (2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Melha, Khlood S.

    2008-06-01

    A new series of transition metal complexes of Schiff base isonicotinic acid (2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazide, HL, have been synthesized. The Schiff base reacted with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Fe(III) and UO 2(II) ions as monobasic tridentate ligand to yield mononuclear complexes of 1:2 (metal:ligand) except that of Cu(II) which form complex of 1:1 (metal:ligand). The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, mass and 1H NMR spectra, as well as magnetic moment, conductance measurements, and thermal analyses. All complexes have octahedral configurations except Cu(II) complex which has an extra square planar geometry distorted towards tetrahedral. While, the UO 2(II) complex has its favour hepta-coordination. The ligand and its metal complexes were tested against one strain Gram +ve bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus), Gram -ve bacteria (Escherichia coli) , and Fungi ( Candida albicans). The tested compounds exhibited higher antibacterial activities.

  9. Transition metal complexes of isonicotinic acid (2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Abou-Melha, Khlood S

    2008-06-01

    A new series of transition metal complexes of Schiff base isonicotinic acid (2-hydroxybenzylidene)hydrazide, HL, have been synthesized. The Schiff base reacted with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Fe(III) and UO2(II) ions as monobasic tridentate ligand to yield mononuclear complexes of 1:2 (metal:ligand) except that of Cu(II) which form complex of 1:1 (metal:ligand). The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, mass and 1H NMR spectra, as well as magnetic moment, conductance measurements, and thermal analyses. All complexes have octahedral configurations except Cu(II) complex which has an extra square planar geometry distorted towards tetrahedral. While, the UO2(II) complex has its favour hepta-coordination. The ligand and its metal complexes were tested against one strain Gram +ve bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram -ve bacteria (Escherichia coli), and Fungi (Candida albicans). The tested compounds exhibited higher antibacterial activities.

  10. Enhancing conductivity of metallic carbon nanotube networks by transition metal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ketolainen, T. Havu, V.; Puska, M. J.

    2015-02-07

    The conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films is mainly determined by carbon nanotube junctions, the resistance of which can be reduced by several different methods. We investigate electronic transport through carbon nanotube junctions in a four-terminal configuration, where two metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes are linked by a group 6 transition metal atom. The transport calculations are based on the Green’s function method combined with the density-functional theory. The transition metal atom is found to enhance the transport through the junction near the Fermi level. However, the size of the nanotube affects the improvement in the conductivity. The enhancement is related to the hybridization of chromium and carbon atom orbitals, which is clearly reflected in the character of eigenstates near the Fermi level. The effects of chromium atoms and precursor molecules remaining adsorbed on the nanotubes outside the junctions are also examined.

  11. Atomic force imaging of the surface of a FCC after thermal and hydrothermal treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Occelli, M.L.; Gould, S.A.G.; Baldiraghi, F.; Leoncini, S.

    1996-10-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in a contact mode was used to observe surface variations in FCC resulting from aging. AFM images of a commercial FCC sample before and after steam-aging have been compared with those of the same FCC after use in a major refinery. Large scale (5 {mu}m x 5 {mu}m) images reveal that the FCC surface is formed by platelets and platelet aggregates and that the catalyst microporosity result mainly from elongated and narrow spacings between these plates. Steam-aging does not seem to greatly change the FCC surface architecture. However, in the corresponding equilibrium catalyst (containing several metals impurities) the FCC surface roughness decreases. Atomic scale images were obtained for all the samples examined. The hexagonal symmetry observed in these images is consistent with the structure of the silicate layer in Kaolin, a major component of these types of catalysts.

  12. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  13. Status and availability of FCC hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romriell, G. K.

    1973-01-01

    The source availability of FCC and/or FCC connectors was surveyed. The results for the following areas are presented: (1) cost of FCC versus standard round cable, (2) qualification status, (3) size of wire available in FCC, (4) availability of hermetic connectors for FCC, (5) conversion from flat cable to round cable and visa versa, (6) availability of shielded flat cable for RF usage, (7) termination techniques, and (8) repair techniques.

  14. Transition metal complexes of an isatinic quinolyl hydrazone

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The importance of the isatinic quinolyl hydrazones arises from incorporating the quinoline ring with the indole ring in the same compound. Quinoline ring has therapeutic and biological activities. On the other hand, isatin (1H-indole-2,3-dione) and its derivatives exhibit a wide range of biological activities. Also, the indole ring occurs in Jasmine flowers and Orange blossoms. Recently, the physiological and biological activities of quinolyl hydrazones arise from their tendency to form metal chelates with transition metal ions. In this context, we have reported to isolate, characterize and study the biological activity of some transition metal complexes of an isatinic quinolyl hydrazone; 3-[2-(4-methyl quinolin-2-yl)hydrazono] indolin-2-one. Results Mono- and binuclear as well as dimeric chelates were obtained from the reaction of a new isatinic quinolyl hydrazone with Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), VO(II) and Pd(II) ions. The ligand showed a variety of modes of bonding viz. (NNO)2-, (NO)- and (NO) per each metal ion supporting its ambidentate and flexidentate characters. The mode of bonding and basicity of the ligand depend mainly on the type of the metal cation and its counter anion. All the obtained Pd(II)- complexes have the preferable square planar geometry (D4h- symmetry) and depend mainly on the mole ratio (M:L). Conclusion The effect of the type of the metal ion for the same anion (Cl-) is obvious from either structural diversity of the isolated complexes (Oh, Td and D4h) or the various modes of bonding. The isatinic hydrazone uses its lactim form in all complexes (Cl-) except complex 5 (SO42-) in which it uses its lactam form. The obtained Pd(II)- complexes (dimeric, mono- and binuclear) are affected by the mole ratio (M:L) and have the square planar (D4h) geometry. Also, the antimicrobial activity is highly influenced by the nature of the metal ion and the order for S. aureus bacteria is as follows: Nickel(II) > Vanadyl(II) > Cobalt

  15. Low temperature synthesis of transition metal oxides containing surfactant ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janauer, Gerald Gilbert

    1998-11-01

    Recently there has been much interest in reacting vanadium oxides hydrothermally with cationic surfactants to form novel layered compounds. A series of new transition metal oxides, however, has also been formed at or near room temperature in open containers. Synthesis, characterization, and proposed mechanisms of formation are the focus of this work. Low temperature reactions of vanadium pentoxide and ammonium transition metallates with long chain amine surfactants, such as dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide yielded interesting new products many of which are layered phases. DTAsb4\\ Hsb2Vsb{10}Osb{28}. 8Hsb2O, a layered highly crystalline phase, is the first such phase for which a single crystal X-ray structure has been determined. The unit cell for this material was found to be triclinic with space group P1-, cell parameters a=9.8945(3)A, b=11.5962(1)A, c=21.9238(2)A, alpha=95.153(2)sp°,\\ beta=93.778(1)sp°, and gamma=101.360(1)sp°. Additionally, a novel tungsten, a molybdenum and a dichromate phase will be discussed. Both the tungsten and the dichromate materials were indexed from their powder diffraction patterns yielding monoclinic unit cells. The tungsten material was found to have a=50.56(4)A, b=54.41(4)A, c=13.12(1)A, and beta=99.21sp°. The dichromate compound was determined to have a=26.757(5)A, b=10.458(2)A, c=14.829(3)A and beta=98.01(1)sp°. Interlayer spacings for the lamellar dichromate and molybdenum phases were d001 = 28.7 A, and d001 = 22.9 A. The synthesis, characterization, composition, and structure of these transition metal oxide-surfactant materials will be discussed.

  16. He-He and He-metal interactions in transition metals from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengbo; Zou, Tingting; Zhao, Jijun

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the atomistic mechanism of He-He and He-metal interactions in bcc transition metals (V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Fe) using first-principles methods. We calculated formation energy and binding energy of He-He pair as function of distance within the host lattices. The strengths of He-He attraction in Cr, Mo, W, and Fe (0.37-1.11 eV) are significantly stronger than those in V, Nb, and Ta (0.06-0.17 eV). Such strong attractions mean that He atoms would spontaneously aggregate inside perfect Cr, Mo, W, and Fe host lattices in absence of defects like vacancies. The most stable configuration of He-He pair is <100> dumbbell in groups VB metals, whereas it adopts close <110> configuration in Cr, Mo, and Fe, and close <111> configuration in W. Overall speaking, the He-He equilibrium distances of 1.51-1.55 Å in the group VIB metals are shorter than 1.65-1.70 Å in the group VB metals. Moreover, the presence of interstitial He significantly facilitates vacancy formation and this effect is more pronounced in the group VIB metals. The present calculations help understand the He-metal/He-He interaction mechanism and make a prediction that He is easier to form He cluster and bubbles in the groups VIB metals and Fe.

  17. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  18. Holographic metal-insulator transition in higher derivative gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yi; Liu, Peng; Wu, Jian-Pin; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a Weyl term into the Einstein-Maxwell-Axion theory in four dimensional spacetime. Up to the first order of the Weyl coupling parameter γ, we construct charged black brane solutions without translational invariance in a perturbative manner. Among all the holographic frameworks involving higher derivative gravity, we are the first to obtain metal-insulator transitions (MIT) when varying the system parameters at zero temperature. Furthermore, we study the holographic entanglement entropy (HEE) of strip geometry in this model and find that the second order derivative of HEE with respect to the axion parameter exhibits maximization behavior near quantum critical points (QCPs) of MIT. It testifies the conjecture in [1,2] that HEE itself or its derivatives can be used to diagnose quantum phase transition (QPT).

  19. Theory of the pairbreaking superconductor-metal transition in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Maestro, Adrian; Rosenow, Bernd; Sachdev, Subir

    2009-03-01

    We present a detailed description of a zero temperature phase transition between superconducting and diffusive metallic states in very thin wires due to a Cooper pair breaking mechanism. The dissipative critical theory contains current reducing fluctuations in the guise of both quantum and thermally activated phase slips. A full cross-over phase diagram is computed via an expansion in the inverse number of complex components of the superconducting order parameter (one in the physical case). The fluctuation corrections to the electrical ( σ) and thermal ( κ) conductivities are determined, and we find that σ has a non-monotonic temperature dependence in the metallic phase which may be consistent with recent experimental results on ultra-narrow wires. In the quantum critical regime, the ratio of the thermal to electrical conductivity displays a linear temperature dependence and thus the Wiedemann-Franz law is obeyed, with a new universal experimentally verifiable Lorenz number.

  20. Topological Phase Transition in Metallic Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Rin; Izumida, Wataru; Eto, Mikio

    2017-01-01

    The topological phase transition is theoretically studied in a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) by applying a magnetic field B parallel to the tube. The Z topological invariant, winding number, is changed discontinuously when a small band gap is closed at a critical value of B, which can be observed as a change in the number of edge states owing to the bulk-edge correspondence. This is confirmed by numerical calculations for finite SWNTs of ˜1 µm length, using a one-dimensional lattice model to effectively describe the mixing between σ and π orbitals and spin-orbit interaction, which are relevant to the formation of the band gap in metallic SWNTs.

  1. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    DOE PAGES

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; ...

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. In conclusion, these unique features open up promising novel applications in activemore » nanophotonics.« less

  2. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; Gamage, Sampath; Javani, Mohammad H.; Stockman, Mark I.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. In conclusion, these unique features open up promising novel applications in active nanophotonics.

  3. Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

  4. The photochemistry of transition metal complexes using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Garino, Claudio; Salassa, Luca

    2013-07-28

    The use of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) to study the photochemistry of metal complexes is becoming increasingly important among chemists. Computational methods provide unique information on the electronic nature of excited states and their atomic structure, integrating spectroscopy observations on transient species and excited-state dynamics. In this contribution, we present an overview on photochemically active transition metal complexes investigated by DFT. In particular, we discuss a representative range of systems studied up to now, which include CO- and NO-releasing inorganic and organometallic complexes, haem and haem-like complexes dissociating small diatomic molecules, photoactive anti-cancer Pt and Ru complexes, Ru polypyridyls and diphosphino Pt derivatives.

  5. Dinuclear transition metal complexes in carbon nanostructured materials synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, J. I.; Hernández, E.; Delgado, E.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) were prepared with two similar techniques using organometallic complexes as catalysts precursors. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and pyrolysis with chlorine gas approaches were employed in order to explore the effect of dinuclear transition metal compounds [Fe2(CO)6(μ-S2C6H2X2), (X=OH, Cl)] in synthesis of CNMs. Our to-date results have shown these complexes generate different carbonaceous materials when they are used in bulk, it was also observed that their performances in synthesis differ even though these compounds are analogous. With X=OH complex used in CVD process, metal nanoparticles of ca. 20-50 nm in size and embedded in carbon matrix were obtained. X=C1 complex has been used in pyrolysis experiments and showed an entire volatilisation or no reaction, depending on selected temperature. Furthermore, obtaining of a new tetranuclear iron cluster is presented in this work.

  6. Control of plasmonic nanoantennas by reversible metal-insulator transition

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Yohannes; Marvel, Robert E.; Ziegler, Jed I.; Gamage, Sampath; Javani, Mohammad H.; Stockman, Mark I.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate dynamic reversible switching of VO2 insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) locally on the scale of 15 nm or less and control of nanoantennas, observed for the first time in the near-field. Using polarization-selective near-field imaging techniques, we simultaneously monitor the IMT in VO2 and the change of plasmons on gold infrared nanoantennas. Structured nanodomains of the metallic VO2 locally and reversibly transform infrared plasmonic dipole nanoantennas to monopole nanoantennas. Fundamentally, the IMT in VO2 can be triggered on femtosecond timescale to allow ultrafast nanoscale control of optical phenomena. These unique features open up promising novel applications in active nanophotonics. PMID:26358623

  7. Dirac cones in transition metal doped boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Min; Cao, Xuewei; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu

    2015-05-07

    The transition metal (TM) doped zinc blende boron nitride (c-BN) is studied by using the first principle calculation. TM atoms fill in the interstitials in c-BN and form two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. The generalized gradient approximation and projector augmented wave method are used. The calculated density of states and band structures show that d electrons of TM atoms form impurity bands in the gap of c-BN. When the TM-BN system is in ferromagnetic or non-magnetic state, Dirac cones emerge at the K point in Brillouin zone. When TM is Ti and Co, the Dirac cones are spin polarized and very close to the Fermi level, which makes them promising candidates of Dirac half-metal [H. Ishizuka and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012)]. While TM is Ni and Cu, the system is non-magnetic and Dirac cones located above the Fermi level.

  8. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  9. Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosh, R. C.; Das, Ramprosad; Sen, Sumon C.; Bhuiyan, G. M.

    2015-07-01

    Surface entropy of liquid transition and noble metals has been investigated using an expression obtained from the hard-sphere (HS) theory of liquid. The expression is developed from the Mayer's extended surface tension formula [Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 380 (2013) 42-47]. For interionic interaction in metals, Brettonet-Silbert (BS) pseudopotentials and embedded atom method (EAM) potentials have been used. The liquid structure is described by the variational modified hypernetted chain (VMHNC) theory. The essential ingredient of the expression is the temperature dependent effective HS diameter (or packing fraction), which is calculated from the aforementioned potentials together with the VMHNC theory. The obtained results for the surface entropy using the effective HS diameter are found to be good in agreement with the available experimental as well as other theoretical values.

  10. Augmenting Molecular Junctions with Different Transition Metal Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rupan Preet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    2013-11-01

    In this research paper, the effect of the material of electrodes at the nanometer scale was elucidated towards measuring the electron transport properties of a single molecular junction comprising of anthracenedithiol molecule (ADT) stringed to two semi-infinite metallic electrodes using Extended Huckle Theory (EHT)-based semi-empirical modelling approach. The electron transport parameters i.e., I-V curves, Conductance-Voltage curves and transmission spectrum were investigated through ADT molecule by buffering it between different electrodes composed of rhodium, palladium, nickel and copper, all from transition metals series, under finite bias voltages within Keldysh's non equilibrium green function formulism (NEGF). The simulated results revealed that the copper electrodes showed maximum conduction whereas palladium showed least. The maximum conductance of 0.82 G0 and 43 μA current was exhibited by copper and thus affirmed to be the most effective electrode at nanometre scale when compared with other electrodes viz. nickel, rhodium and palladium.

  11. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  12. Trion and Biexciton in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya; Tsiklauri, Shalva M.

    2017-01-01

    We study the trion and biexciton in transition metal dichalcogenides monolayers within the framework of a nonrelativistic potential model using the method of hyperspherical harmonics (HH). We solve the three- and four-body Schrödinger equations with the Keldysh potential by expanding the wave functions of a trion and biexciton in terms of the antisymmetrized HH. Results of the calculations for the ground state energies are in good agreement with similar calculations for the Keldysh potential and in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements of trion and biexciton binding energies.

  13. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  14. First-principles study of transition metal carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connétable, Damien

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the physical properties of transition metal carbides compounds associated with the Nb-C, Ti-C, Mo-C and W-C alloys systems using first-principles calculations. The ground-state properties (lattice parameters, cohesive energies and magnetism) were analyzed and compared to the experimental and theoretical literature. The simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental findings concerning atomic positions and structures. Elastic properties, computed using a finite-differences approach, are then discussed in detail. To complete the work, their lattice dynamics properties (phonon spectra) were investigated. These results serve to establish that some structures, which are mechanically stable, are dynamically unstable.

  15. Flexible Transition Metal Oxide Electronics and Imprint Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Warren B.

    The previous chapters have discussed inorganic low-deposition temperature materials suitable for flexible applications, such as amorphous and nano-crystalline-silicon (Si) and organic conductors. This chapter presents the results of a recently developed inorganic low-temperature materials system, transition metal oxides (TMOs), that appears to be a very promising, new high-performance flexible electronic materials system. An equally, if not more, important part of this chapter, is the presentation of self-aligned imprint lithography (SAIL) a new fabrication method for flexible substrates that solves the layer-to-layer alignment problem.

  16. Optical Control of Spin Polarization in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yan, Tengfei; Zhu, Bairen; Yang, Siyuan; Cui, Xiaodong

    2017-02-28

    Optical excitation could generate electrons' spin polarization in some semiconductors with the control of the field polarization. In this article, we report a series of spin-resolved photocurrent experiments on monolayer tungsten disulfide. The experiments demonstrate that the optical excitations with the same helicity could generate opposite spin polarization around the Fermi level by tuning the excitation energy. The mechanism lies in the valley-dependent optical selection rules, the giant spin-orbit coupling, and spin-valley locking in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). These exotic features make monolayer TMDs promising candidates for conceptual semiconductor-based spintronics.

  17. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  18. A simple, general route to 2-pyridylidene transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Roselló-Merino, Marta; Díez, Josefina; Conejero, Salvador

    2010-12-28

    Pyridinium 2-carboxylates decompose thermally in the presence of a variety of late transition metal precursors to yield the corresponding 2-pyridylidene-like complexes. The mild reaction conditions and structural diversity that can be generated in the heterocyclic ring make this method an attractive alternative for the synthesis of 2-pyridylidene complexes. IR spectra of the Ir(i) carbonyl compounds [IrCl(NHC)(CO)(2)] indicate that these N-heterocyclic carbene ligands are among the strongest σ-electron donors.

  19. The nature of the bonding in the transition metal trimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic structure of the transition metal (TM) trimers was studied by comparing the bonding in the Ca3, Sc3, and Cu3 molecules. The complete active space SCF/externally contracted configuration interaction (CI) ratio for the low-lying states of Sc3 and Sc3(+) and the SCF/CI ratio for Ca3 and Cu3 trimers, all for near equilateral triangle geometries, were calculated. In addition, vertical excitation energies for Cu3 were computed, leading to a new assignment of the upper state in the resonant two-photon ionization spectrum. Based on these studies, bonding in other TM trimers was discussed.

  20. Synthesis, structure and physical properties of selected transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Joanna Elizabeth Leah

    Monoclinic Nb12O29 has been synthesised by topotactic reduction of H-Nb2O5. It has a complex crystallographic shear structure made up of 3x4 blocks of corner shared NbO6 octahedra. Nb12O29 is mixed d0/d1 compound which, can be written as Nb4+2NB5+10O29. It has been found, using Rietveld refinement of powder neutron diffraction data, to undergo a charge ordering transition at around 12K resulting in a lowering of symmetry from A2/m to Am. Below this transition, one Nb4+ ion is localised on a crystallographically distinct site in the centre of the 3x4 blocks. This charge ordering transition has an associated transition to an incommensurate one dimensional antiferromagnetic state. The nature of the magnetic order has been investigated using susceptibility and SR measurements. Susceptibility measurements reveal that only 48% of the Nb4+ in the system is localised, and its temperature dependence is well fitted to a Bonner-Fisher model for S=1/2 one dimensional antiferromagnets. It is found that the remaining valence electrons in NB12O29 itinerant and contribute to its metallic conductivity. Further evidence for the unique properties of monoclinic Nb12O29 has been obtained by doping the structure with small amounts of diamagnetic Ti4+, which rapidly causes a destruction of the long range magnetic order at only 3% doping, but leaves the metallic conductivity unaffected, as is expected for a one dimensional chain.

  1. Transition Metal Intercalators as Anticancer Agents—Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Krishant M.; Pages, Benjamin J.; Ang, Dale L.; Gordon, Christopher P.; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R.

    2016-01-01

    The diverse anticancer utility of cisplatin has stimulated significant interest in the development of additional platinum-based therapies, resulting in several analogues receiving clinical approval worldwide. However, due to structural and mechanistic similarities, the effectiveness of platinum-based therapies is countered by severe side-effects, narrow spectrum of activity and the development of resistance. Nonetheless, metal complexes offer unique characteristics and exceptional versatility, with the ability to alter their pharmacology through facile modifications of geometry and coordination number. This has prompted the search for metal-based complexes with distinctly different structural motifs and non-covalent modes of binding with a primary aim of circumventing current clinical limitations. This review discusses recent advances in platinum and other transition metal-based complexes with mechanisms of action involving intercalation. This mode of DNA binding is distinct from cisplatin and its derivatives. The metals focused on in this review include Pt, Ru and Cu along with examples of Au, Ni, Zn and Fe complexes; these complexes are capable of DNA intercalation and are highly biologically active. PMID:27809241

  2. Origin of Transitions between Metallic and Insulating States in Simple Metals

    DOE PAGES

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-04-17

    Unifying principles that underlie recently discovered transitions between metallic and insulating states in elemental solids under pressure are developed. Using group theory arguments and first principles calculations, we show that the electronic properties of the phases involved in these transitions are controlled by symmetry principles not previously recognized. The valence bands in these systems are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms, and which are not necessarily all symmetrical. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bondingmore » in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of novel behavior such as phases having three-dimensional Dirac-like points. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca).« less

  3. Origin of Transitions between Metallic and Insulating States in Simple Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-04-17

    Unifying principles that underlie recently discovered transitions between metallic and insulating states in elemental solids under pressure are developed. Using group theory arguments and first principles calculations, we show that the electronic properties of the phases involved in these transitions are controlled by symmetry principles not previously recognized. The valence bands in these systems are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms, and which are not necessarily all symmetrical. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multi-center chemical bonding in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as re-entrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of novel behavior such as phases having three-dimensional Dirac-like points. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been identified or reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca).

  4. Origin of Transitions between Metallic and Insulating States in Simple Metals.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2015-04-17

    Unifying principles that underlie recently discovered transitions between metallic and insulating states in elemental solids under pressure are developed. Using group theory arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the electronic properties of the phases involved in these transitions are controlled by symmetry principles. The valence bands in these systems are described by simple and composite band representations constructed from localized Wannier functions centered on points unoccupied by atoms, and which are not necessarily all symmetrical. The character of the Wannier functions is closely related to the degree of s-p(-d) hybridization and reflects multicenter chemical bonding in these insulating states. The conditions under which an insulating state is allowed for structures having an integer number of atoms per primitive unit cell as well as reentrant (i.e., metal-insulator-metal) transition sequences are detailed, resulting in predictions of behavior such as phases having band-contact lines. The general principles developed are tested and applied to the alkali and alkaline earth metals, including elements where high-pressure insulating phases have been reported (e.g., Li, Na, and Ca).

  5. Microcalorimetry of oxygen adsorption on fcc Co{110}.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kristine; Fiorin, Vittorio; Jenkins, Stephen J; King, David A

    2012-05-28

    The coverage dependent heats of adsorption and sticking probabilities for oxygen on fcc Co{110} have been measured at 300 K using single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC). Initial adsorption is consistent with dissociative chemisorption at low coverage followed by oxide formation above 0.6 ML coverage. The initial heat of adsorption of 633 kJ mol(-1) is similar to heat values calorimetrically measured on other ferromagnetic metal surfaces, such as nickel and iron. As the coverage increases, the heat of adsorption and sticking probability drop very rapidly up to the onset of oxidation. As already observed for other oxygen-metal surface systems, strong lateral adatom repulsions are responsible for the transition from the chemisorption regime to oxide film formation at higher coverage. The heat of oxide formation at the onset is 475 kJ mol(-1), which is consistent with the formation of CoO crystallites. The oxide film formation is discussed in terms of nucleation and island growth, and the Mott-Cabrera mechanisms, the latter being evidenced by the relatively constant heat of adsorption and sticking probability in contrast to the nickel and iron oxidation cases.

  6. Selective transformations of cyclopentadienyl ligands of transition-metal and rare-earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruiting; Zhou, Xigeng

    2013-04-21

    Cyclopentadienyl and substituted cyclopentadienyl ligands are observed in a wide range of organometallic complexes. In addition to serving as ancillary ligands, these ligands have come into their own as intermediates in organometallic reactions, and shown many unique reaction modes involving ring C-H, C-C and C=C bond cleavages. This feature article summarizes the progressive development of cyclopentadienyl-based reactions of metallocene complexes of transition metals and rare-earth metals, with the aim of further developing the fundamental modes of reactivity of such systems together with their synthetic applications.

  7. Magnetism In 3d Transition Metals at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, V

    2006-02-09

    This research project examined the changes in electronic and magnetic properties of transition metals and oxides under applied pressures, focusing on complex relationship between magnetism and phase stability in these correlated electron systems. As part of this LDRD project, we developed new measurement techniques and adapted synchrotron-based electronic and magnetic measurements for use in the diamond anvil cell. We have performed state-of-the-art X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the dedicated high-pressure beamline HP-CAT (Sector 16 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory), maintained in collaboration with of University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Geophysical Laboratory of The Carnegie Institution of Washington. Using these advanced measurements, we determined the evolution of the magnetic order in the ferromagnetic 3d transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni) under pressure, and found that at high densities, 3d band broadening results in diminished long range magnetic coupling. Our experiments have allowed us to paint a unified picture of the effects of pressure on the evolution of magnetic spin in 3d electron systems. The technical and scientific advances made during this LDRD project have been reported at a number of scientific meetings and conferences, and have been submitted for publication in technical journals. Both the technical advances and the physical understanding of correlated systems derived from this LDRD are being applied to research on the 4f and 5f electron systems under pressure.

  8. Defects and ferromagnetism in transition metal doped zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapa, Sunil

    Transition metal doped zinc oxide has been studied recently due to its potential application in spintronic devices. The magnetic semiconductor, often called Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS), has the ability to incorporate both charge and spin into a single formalism. Despite a large number of studies on ferromagnetism in ZnO based DMS and the realization of its room temperature ferromagnetism, there is still a debate about the origin of the ferromagnetism. In this work, the synthesis and characterization of transition metal doped zinc oxide have been carried out. The sol-gel method was used to synthesize thin films, and they were subsequently annealed in air. Characterization of doped zinc oxide films was carried out using the UV-visible range spectrometer, scanning electron microscopy, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), x-ray diffraction(XRD) and positron annihilation spectroscopy. Hysteresis loops were obtained for copper and manganese doped zinc oxide, but a reversed hysteresis loop was observed for 2% Al 3% Co doped zinc oxide. The reversed hysteresis loop has been explained using a two-layer model.

  9. Nanostructured transition metal oxides for energy storage and conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    Lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors and photovoltaic devices have been widely considered as the three major promising alternatives of fossil fuels facing upcoming depletion to power the 21th century. The conventional film configuration of electrochemical electrodes hardly fulfills the high energy and efficiency requirements because heavy electroactive material deposition restricts ion diffusion path, and lowers power density and fault tolerance. In this thesis, I demonstrate that novel nanoarchitectured transition metal oxides (TMOs), e.g. MnO2, V2O 5, and ZnO, and their relevant nanocomposites were designed, fabricated and assembled into devices to deliver superior electrochemical performances such as high energy and power densities, and rate capacity. These improvements could be attributed to the significant enhancement of surface area, shortened ion diffusion distances and facile penetration of electrolyte solution into open structures of networks as well as to the pseudocapacitance domination. The utilization of ForcespinningRTM, a newly developed nanofiber processing technology, for large-scale energy storage and conversion applications is emphasized. This process simplifies the tedious multi-step hybridization synthesis and facilitates the contradiction between the micro-batch production and the ease of large-scale manufacturing. Key Words: Transition metal oxides, energy storage and conversion, ForcespinningRTM, pseudocapacitance domination, high rate capacity

  10. Effects of interband transitions on Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wysin, G M; Chikan, Viktor; Young, Nathan; Dani, Raj Kumar

    2013-08-14

    The Faraday rotation in metallic nanoparticles is considered based on a quantum model for the dielectric function ϵ(ω) in the presence of a DC magnetic field B. We focus on effects in ϵ(ω) due to interband transitions (IBTs), which are important in the blue and ultraviolet for noble metals used in plasmonics. The dielectric function is found using the perturbation of the electron density matrix due to the optical field of the incident electromagnetic radiation. The calculation is applied to transitions between two bands (d and p, for example) separated by a gap, as one finds in gold at the L-point of the Fermi surface. The result of the DC magnetic field is a shift in the effective optical frequency causing IBTs by ±μBB/ħ, where opposite signs are associated with left/right circular polarizations. The Faraday rotation for a dilute solution of 17 nm diameter gold nanoparticles is measured and compared with both the IBT theory and a simpler Drude model for the bound electron response. Effects of the plasmon resonance mode on Faraday rotation in nanoparticles are also discussed.

  11. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  12. Wannier function analysis of charge states in transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pickett, Warren

    2015-03-01

    The charge (or oxidation) state of a cation has been a crucial concept in analyzing the electronic and magnetic properties of oxides as well as interpreting ``charge ordering'' metal-insulator transitions. In recent years a few methods have been proposed for the objective identification of charge states, beyond the conventional (and occasionally subjective) use of projected densities of states, weighted band structures (fatbands), and Born effective charges. In the past two decades Wannier functions (WFs) and particularly maximally localized WFs (MLWFs), have become an indispensable tool for several different purposes in electronic structure studies. These developments have motivated us to explore the charge state picture from the perspective of MLWFs. We will illustrate with a few transition metal oxide examples such as AgO and YNiO3 that the shape, extent, and location of the charge centers of the MLWFs provide insights into how cation-oxygen hybridization determines chemical bonding, charge distribution, and ``charge ordering.'' DOE DE-FG02-04ER46111.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lucas

    2006-03-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo is a powerful computational tool to study correlated systems, allowing us to explicitly treat many-body interactions with favorable scaling in the number of particles. It has been regarded as a benchmark tool for first and second row condensed matter systems, although its accuracy has not been thoroughly investigated in strongly correlated transition metal oxides. QMC has also historically suffered from the mixed estimator error in operators that do not commute with the Hamiltonian and from stochastic uncertainty, which make small energy differences unattainable. Using the Reptation Monte Carlo algorithm of Moroni and Baroni(along with contributions from others), we have developed a QMC framework that makes these previously unavailable quantities computationally feasible for systems of hundreds of electrons in a controlled and consistent way, and apply this framework to transition metal oxides. We compare these results with traditional mean-field results like the LDA and with experiment where available, focusing in particular on the polarization and lattice constants in a few interesting ferroelectric materials. This work was performed in collaboration with Lubos Mitas and Jeffrey Grossman.

  14. Electron-phonon coupling and structural phase transitions in early transition metal oxides and chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Katie Elizabeth

    Pronounced nonlinear variation of electrical transport characteristics as a function of applied voltage, temperature, magnetic field, strain, or photo-excitation is usually underpinned by electronic instabilities that originate from the complex interplay of spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom. This dissertation focuses on two canonical materials that show pronounced discontinuities in their temperature-dependent resistivity as a result of electron---phonon and electron---electron correlations: orthorhombic TaS3 and monoclinic VO2. Strong electron-phonon interactions in transition metal oxides and chalcogenides results in interesting structural and electronic phase transitions. The properties of the material can be changed drastically in response to external stimuli such as temperature, voltage, or light. Understanding the influence these interactions have on the electronic structure and ultimately transport characteristics is of utmost importance in order to take these materials from a fundamental aspect to prospective applications such as low-energy interconnects, steep-slope transistors, and synaptic neural networks. This dissertation describes synthetic routes to nanoscale TaS3 and VO2, develops mechanistic understanding of their electronic instabilities, and in the case of the latter system explores modulation of the electronic and structural phase transition via the incorporation of substitutional dopant atoms. We start in chapter 2 with a detailed study of the synthesis and electronic transport properties of TaS3, which undergoes a Peierls' distortion to form a charge density wave. Scaling this material down to the nanometer-sized regime allows for interrogation of single or discrete phase coherent domains. Using electrical transport and broad band noise measurements, the dynamics of pinning/depinning of the charge density wave is investigated. Chapter 3 provides a novel synthetic approach to produce high-edge-density MoS2 nanorods. MoS2 is a

  15. Plasma-enhanced deposition and processing of transition metals and transition metal silicides for VLSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, D. W.

    1986-05-01

    Radiofrequency (rf) discharges have been used to deposit films of tungsten, molybdenum and titanium silicide. As-deposited tungsten films, from tungsten hexafluoride and hydrogen source gases, were metastable (beta W), with significant (>1 atomic percent) fluorine incorporation. Film resistivities were 40-55 micro ohm - cm due to the beta W, but dropped to about 8 micro ohm cm after a short heat treatment at 700 C which resulted in a phase transition to alpha W (bcc form). The high resistivity (>10,000 micro ohm) associated with molybdenum films deposited from molybdenum hexafluoride and hydrogen appeared to be a result of the formation of molybdenum trifluoride in the deposited material. Titanium silicide films formed from a discharge of titanium tetrachloride, silane, and hydrogen, displayed resistivities of about 150 micro ohm cm, due to small amounts of oxygen and chlorine incorporated during deposition. Plasma etching studies of tungsten films with fluorine containing gases suggest that the etchant species for tungsten in these discharges are fluorine atoms.

  16. Materials with intermediate valence ; a comparison with transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, N. F.

    A discussion of metallic intermediate valence materials is given, particularly of hybridisation between the 4f and the conduction band δ. If n, 1 - n are the numbers of ions in each of two charge states, the variation of n with temperature is described. Resistivity is ascribed to scattering of the conduction electrons into the 4f band. The mechanism is compared with that in transition metals and their alloys, particularly Pd1-xAg x. The resistivity can be very large, of order of the Ioffe-Regel value 1/3 e2/ħa. It is argued that both here and in metallic alloys, this can only occur with a two-band model. At high temperatures there is some evidence that s-f scattering does not occur. On discute des matériaux métalliques à valence intermédiaire, en particulier de l'hybridation entre la bande 4f et la bande de conduction. Notant n et 1 - n les nombres d'ions dans chacun des deux états de charge, on décrit la variation de n avec la température. Le mécanisme est comparé avec celui des métaux de transition et de leurs alliages, particulièrement Pd1-xAg x. La résistivité peut être très grande, de l'ordre de la valeur de Ioffe-Regel 1/3 e2/ħa. On donne des arguments tendant à prouver que ceci ne peut se produire que dans le cadre d'un modèle à 2 bandes. Il y a des évidences qu'à haute température la diffusion s-f n'a pas lieu.

  17. Polynuclear transition metal complexes with thiocarbohydrazide and dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, K. S.; Khan, Sadaf; Nami, Shahab A. A.; El-ajaily, M. M.

    2007-07-01

    Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 was prepared from the precursor Sn(tch) 2 and MCl 2. It was subsequently allowed to react with diethyldithiocarbamate which yielded the trinuclear complexes of the type Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4}, where tch = thiocarbohydrazide, M = Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and dtc = diethyldithiocarbamate. They were characterized on the basis of microanalytical, thermal (TGA/DSC), spectral (IR, UV-vis, EPR, 1H NMR) studies, conductivity measurement and magnetic moment data. On the basis of spectral data a tetrahedral geometry has been proposed for the halide complexes, Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 except for Cu(II) which exhibits a square planar coordination although the transition metal ion in Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4} achieves an octahedral geometry where the dithiocarbamato moiety acts as a symmetrical bidentate ligand. The bidentate nature has been established by the appearance of a sharp single ν(C-S) around 1000 cm -1. A downfield shift observed in NH a and NH b protons on moving from Sn(tch) 2 to Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 is due to the drift of electrons toward metal atoms. A two-step pyrolysis has been observed in the Sn(tch) 2{MCl 2} 2 complexes while their dithiocarbamato derivatives exhibit a three-stage degradation pattern. Finally, the in vitro antibacterial activity of Sn(tch) 2{M 2(dtc) 4} and the mononuclear Sn(tch) 2 has been carried out on bacterial strains Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. The compounds were found to be active against the test organisms. The activity of the complexes is enhanced with increasing concentration. The maximum activity in both the strains was achieved by cobalt(II) dithiocarbamate complex. Minimum activity was found for Sn(tch) 2 which generally increases with the introduction of transition metal ion in the complex.

  18. Quantum phase transitions in ultrathin films of metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Anthony Michael

    1997-11-01

    Conductance measurements of ultrathin films of amorphous bismuth are presented. The measurements were performed at temperatures down to 0.15K as a function of temperature and film thickness. Such films are known to become superconducting when the conductance reaches ˜4esp2/h. Careful analysis of the insulating state reveals a crossover near esp2/h, with hopping conduction below and weak localization above. A corresponding change in behavior is also evident in plots of G vs. d at esp2/h. A crossover conductance, Gsbcr ˜ (30 ± 1kOmega)sp{-1}, was extracted by examining the derivative of the G vs. d curves. A scaling analysis is performed yielding an excellent collapse of the data with critical exponents nu z = 6.9 ± 0.7. Ultrathin films of Pd (which is not superconducting) also show a crossover, but at Gsbcr ˜ (56 ± 6kOmega)sp{-1}. The Bi and Pd data sets are collapsed together onto the same curve yielding nu z = 7.2 ± 1.0 for Pd. The success of the scaling analysis supports the view that the crossover is the finite temperature signature of a quantum phase transition occurring at T = 0. The transition is between phases identified as (weakly localized) metal and insulator, which may make this the first observation of a metal-insulator transition in a two-dimensional system. The scaling analysis developed for the crossover at esp2/h was applied to the superconductor-insulator transition as well. While the collapse of the data is poor, the analysis yields a single value of the critical exponent nu z = 1.99 ± 0.09. A previous analysis yielded two separate (and inconsistent) values of nu z on the insulating and superconducting sides. The analysis was also applied to the case of the field-driven superconductor-insulator transition. The resulting collapse is excellent yielding a critical exponent nu z = 0.637 ± 0.010. The scaling parameter deviates from a power law in T above 0.7K. Since the data presented only extends down to 0.5K, the critical region accessed is

  19. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  20. Supported transition metal nanomaterials: Nanocomposites synthesized by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, D. M.; Castano, C. E.; Rojas, J. V.

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructures decorated with transition metal nanoparticles using ionizing radiation as a synthesis method in aqueous solutions represents a clean alternative to existing physical, chemical and physicochemical methods. Gamma irradiation of aqueous solutions generates free radicals, both oxidizing and reducing species, all distributed homogeneously. The presence of oxidant scavengers in situ during irradiation generates a highly reductive environment favoring the reduction of the metal precursors promoting seed formation and nanoparticle growth. Particle growth is controlled by addition of surfactants, polymers or various substrates, otherwise referred to as supports, which enhance the formation of well dispersed nanoparticles. Furthermore, the combination of nanoparticles with supports can offer desirable synergisms not solely presented by the substrate or nanoparticles. Thus, supported nanoparticles offer a huge diversity of applications. Among the ionizing radiation methods to synthesize nanomaterials and modify their characteristics, gamma irradiation is of growing interest and it has shown tremendous potential in morphological control and distribution of particle size by judiciously varying parameters including absorbed dose, dose rate, concentration of metal precursor, and stabilizing agents. In this work, major advances on the synthesis of supported nanoparticles through gamma irradiation are reviewed as well as the opportunities to develop and exploit new composites using gamma-rays and other accessible ionizing radiation sources such as X-rays.

  1. Metal-insulator transition in a switchable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arunabha Shasanka

    2001-11-01

    Rare earth hydride films can be converted reversibly from metallic mirrors to insulating windows simply by changing the surrounding hydrogen gas pressure at room temperature. At low temperatures, in situ doping is not possible in this way as hydrogen cannot diffuse. However, our finding of persistent photoconductivity under ultraviolet illumination enables us to tune yttrium hydride through the T = 0 metal-insulator transition. Conductivity and Hall measurements are used to determine the critical exponents in this system: mu = 1.0 +/- 0.1 and zv = 6.0 +/- 0.5. The simultaneous validity of finite-size scaling in the metal and its failure in the insulator motivates a study of the insulating phase of YHx in greater detail. A new transport regime is discovered which is consistent with our earlier determined values for the critical exponents but entails a new scaling dependence of the conductivity on the carrier density n and temperature T. The unusually large value for the product of the static and dynamic critical exponents appears to signify the important role played by electron-electron interactions in this system. Finally, possible schemes for the mechanism underlying the unusual photoconductivity are discussed.

  2. Discovery of elusive structures of multifunctional transition-metal borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yongcheng; Wu, Zhaobing; Yuan, Xun; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Peihong

    2015-12-01

    A definitive determination of crystal structures is an important prerequisite for designing and exploiting new functional materials. Even though tungsten and molybdenum borides (TMBx) are the prototype for transition-metal light-element compounds with multiple functionalities, their elusive crystal structures have puzzled scientists for decades. Here, we discover that the long-assumed TMB2 phases with the simple hP3 structure (hP3-TMB2) are in fact a family of complex TMB3 polytypes with a nanoscale ordering along the axial direction. Compared with the energetically unfavorable and dynamically unstable hP3-TMB2 phase, the energetically more favorable and dynamically stable TMB3 polytypes explain the experimental structural parameters, mechanical properties, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns better. We demonstrate that such a structural and compositional modification from the hP3-TMB2 phases to the TMB3 polytypes originates from the relief of the strong antibonding interaction between d electrons by removing one third of metal atoms systematically. These results resolve the longstanding structural mystery of this class of metal borides and uncover a hidden family of polytypic structures. Moreover, these polytypic structures provide an additional hardening mechanism by forming nanoscale interlocks that may strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movements, which promises to open a new avenue towards designing novel superhard nanocomposite materials by exploiting the coexistence of various polytypes.

  3. Density functional calculation of transition metal adatom adsorption on graphene.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuliang; Yuan, Jianmei; Zhong, Jianxin

    2008-03-19

    The functionalization of graphene (a single graphite layer) by the addition of transition metal atoms of Mn, Fe and Co to its surface has been investigated computationally using density functional theory. In the calculation, the graphene surface supercell was constructed from a single layer of graphite (0001) surface separated by vertical vacuum layers 2 nm thick. We found that the center of the hexagonal ring formed by carbon from graphene is the most stable site for Mn, Fe, Co to stay after optimization. The calculated spin-polarized band structures of the graphene encapsulating the Mn adatom indicate that the conduction bands are modified and move down due to the coupling between the Mn atom and graphene. For Fe adsorbed on the graphene surface, it is semi-half-metallic, and the spin polarization P is found to be 100%. The system of Co adatom on graphene exhibits metallic electronic structure due to the density of states (DOS) peak at the band center with both majority and minority spins. Local density of states analyses indicate a larger promotion of 4s electrons into the 3d state in Fe and Co, resulting in lower local moments compared to an Mn adatom on the graphite surface.

  4. K-CO on transition metals: A local ionic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Charles H.; Schultz, Peter A.; Messmer, Richard P.

    1987-05-01

    The nature of the K-CO interaction on a transition metal surface is addressed when the K:CO stoichiometry is approx. 1. The interaction proposed is transfer of the K 4s electron to CO. A BORN-Haber cycle for this process on a surface has been calculated. The reference state is K plus CO, bound separately to the surface (a). A key point in the cycle is that removal of the electron from K bound to a metal surface (b) is less costly in energy (approx. metal/K surface, i.e., approx. +2.0 eV) than from K in the gas phase (IP = +4.3 eV). This means that the complex is significantly stabilized on the surface. The removed K electron is then transported to the isolated adsorbed CO (c) at a cost of the electron affinity of CO (approx. = 1.5 eV). When the isolated ions are brought together (d) the net stabilization at the equilibrium geometry is approx. - 1.8 eV.

  5. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  6. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid.

  7. Catalytic mechanism of transition-metal compounds on Mg hydrogen sorption reaction.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Gagik; Klassen, Thomas; Bormann, Rüdiger

    2006-06-08

    The catalytic mechanisms of transition-metal compounds during the hydrogen sorption reaction of magnesium-based hydrides were investigated through relevant experiments. Catalytic activity was found to be influenced by four distinct physico-thermodynamic properties of the transition-metal compound: a high number of structural defects, a low stability of the compound, which however has to be high enough to avoid complete reduction of the transition metal under operating conditions, a high valence state of the transition-metal ion within the compound, and a high affinity of the transition-metal ion to hydrogen. On the basis of these results, further optimization of the selection of catalysts for improving sorption properties of magnesium-based hydrides is possible. In addition, utilization of transition-metal compounds as catalysts for other hydrogen storage materials is considered.

  8. Metal-insulator-metal transition in NdNiO3 films capped by CoFe2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, M. S.; Song, C.; Peng, J. J.; Cui, B.; Li, F.; Gu, Y. D.; Pan, F.

    2017-02-01

    Metal-insulator transition features as a transformation from a highly charge conductive state to another state where the charge conductivity is greatly suppressed when decreasing the temperature. Here, we demonstrate two consecutive transitions in NdNiO3 films with CoFe2O4 capping, in which the metal-insulator transition occurs at ˜85 K, followed by an unprecedented insulator-metal transition below 40 K. The emerging insulator-metal transition associated with a weak antiferromagnetic behavior is observed in 20 unit cell-thick NdNiO3 with more than 5 unit cell CoFe2O4 capping. Differently, the NdNiO3 films with thinner CoFe2O4 capping only exhibit metal-insulator transition at ˜85 K, accompanied by a strong antiferromagnetic state below 40 K. Charge transfer from Co to Ni, instead of from Fe to Ni, formulates the ferromagnetic interaction between Ni-Ni and Ni-Co atoms, thus suppressing the antiferromagnetic feature and producing a metallic conductive behavior. Furthermore, a phase diagram for the metal-insulator-metal transition in this system is drawn.

  9. Electronic, magnetic and topological properties of transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi

    Transition metal oxides have been the ideal platform for designing materials with exotic properties due to the complex interplay between spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom which can be fine-tuned by varying pressure, temperature, and external magnetic field to give rise to novel phases. Transition metal oxides are also a challenge from the theoretical point of view. The (semi)local density approximation for the exchange correlation functional that is often used in density functional calculations fails to adequately describe the many-body effects of 3d and 4f electrons thereby leading to underestimated band gaps. Several techniques, such as hybrid functionals, dynamical mean field theory, and DFT+U, have been developed over the past few decades to account for the many-body effects of 3d and 4f electrons. The DFT+U method, which will be used extensively throughout this thesis, has proved to be very successful in modeling gap opening, structure optimization and predicting transport properties. Rare earth nickelates have attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to their complex phase diagram that arises from the competition between spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom. Of particular interest is the metal-insulator transition that occurs upon cooling for RNiO3 (R=rare earth, except for La) which was found to be accompanied by symmetry lowering, later theorized as the evidence for charge ordering. By using first principles calculations, we found that the charge difference between Ni ions in the "charge-ordered" phase is negligibly small, while various aspects such as core energy levels, spectral weight immediately above and below the Fermi level, and magnetic moments do differ. Using Wannier function analysis, the charge states of Ni ions in the lower symmetry structure are systematically studied and found to correlated to the number of Wannier charge centers at the Ni site. The same approach was applied to study the charge states of Ag I and Ag

  10. Investigations of Transition Metal Oxide with the Perovskite Structure as Potential Multiferroics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Investigation of Transition Metal Oxides with the Perovskite Structure as Potential Multiferroics by Virginia Lea Miller and Steven C. Tidrow...Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-4621 October 2008 Investigation of Transition Metal Oxides with the Perovskite Structure as Potential...5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation of Transition Metal Oxides with the Perovskite Structure as Potential Multiferroics 5c

  11. Charge-transfer gap closure in transition-metal halides under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.L.; Yu, P.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Insulator-to-metal transition induced by pressure has been studied in three transition metal iodides: NiI{sub 2}, CoI{sub 2} and FeI{sub 2} using optical absorption and resistivity measurements at room temperature. Comparisons between the results obtained by these two techniques suggested that the closure of the charge-transfer gap is the principal mechanism responsible for the insulator-to-metal transition in these materials.

  12. Electronic Relaxation Processes of Transition Metal Atoms in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautsch, Andreas; Lindebner, Friedrich; Koch, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopy of doped superfluid helium nanodroplets (He_N) gives information about the influence of this cold, chemically inert, and least interacting matrix environment on the excitation and relaxation dynamics of dopant atoms and molecules. We present the results from laser induced fluorescence (LIF), photoionization (PI), and mass spectroscopy of Cr and Cu doped He_N. From these results, we can draw a comprehensive picture of the complex behavior of such transition metal atoms in He_N upon photo-excitation. The strong Cr and Cu ground state transitions show an excitation blueshift and broadening with respect to the bare atom transitions which can be taken as indication for the solvation inside the droplet. From the originally excited states the atoms relax to energetically lower states and are ejected from the He_N. The relaxation processes include bare atom spin-forbidden transitions, which clearly bears the signature of the He_N influence. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2CR2PI) also shows the formation of bare atoms and small Cr-He_n and Cu-He_n clusters in their ground and metastable states ^c. Currently, Cr dimer excitation studies are in progress and a brief outlook on the available results will be given. C. Callegari and W. E. Ernst, Helium Droplets as Nanocryostats for Molecular Spectroscopy - from the Vacuum Ultraviolet to the Microwave Regime, in Handbook of High-Resolution Spectroscopy, eds. M. Quack and F. Merkt, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 2011. A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, J. Phys. Chem. A, 117 (2013) 9621-9625, DOI: 10.1021/jp312336m F. Lindebner, A. Kautsch, M. Koch, and W. E. Ernst, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. (2014) in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.ijms.2013.12.022 M. Koch, A. Kautsch, F. Lackner, and W. E. Ernst, submitted to J. Phys. Chem. A

  13. First-Principles Momentum Dependent Local Ansatz Approach to the Momentum Distribution Function in Iron-Group Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2017-03-01

    The momentum distribution function (MDF) bands of iron-group transition metals from Sc to Cu have been investigated on the basis of the first-principles momentum dependent local ansatz wavefunction method. It is found that the MDF for d electrons show a strong momentum dependence and a large deviation from the Fermi-Dirac distribution function along high-symmetry lines of the first Brillouin zone, while the sp electrons behave as independent electrons. In particular, the deviation in bcc Fe (fcc Ni) is shown to be enhanced by the narrow eg (t2g) bands with flat dispersion in the vicinity of the Fermi level. Mass enhancement factors (MEF) calculated from the jump on the Fermi surface are also shown to be momentum dependent. Large mass enhancements of Mn and Fe are found to be caused by spin fluctuations due to d electrons, while that for Ni is mainly caused by charge fluctuations. Calculated MEF are consistent with electronic specific heat data as well as recent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy data.

  14. Peruvian perovskite Between Transition-metal to PGM/PlatinumGroupMetal Catalytic Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Strongly correlated electronic materials made of simple building blocks, such as a transition-metal ion in an octahedral oxygen cage forming a perovskite structure- Dagotto & Tokura for examples are the high-temperature superconductivity & the CMR/Colossal Magnetoresistance . Helium-4 denotes from LC Case,ScD: "Catalytic Fusion of Deuterium into Helium-4"- 1998 dealt with gaseous D2- "contacted with a supported metallic catalyst at superatmospheric pressure". The catalyst is a platinum-group metal, at about 0.5% - 1% by weight, on activated C. Accompanies Stephen J Geier, 2010 quotes "transition metal complexes", the Energy thus produced is enormous, and because the deuterium is very cheap in the form of heavy water (less than US 1/g), the fuel cost is very low (<<1 %/KwH). "The oceans contain enough deuterium to satisfy the Earth's energy needs for many millions of year" to keep "maria"/Latin name of seas &Deuteronomy to be eternally preserves. Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. HANDOJO.

  15. Transition metal chalcogenides: ultrathin inorganic materials with tunable electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Heine, Thomas

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: After the discovery of graphene and the development of powerful exfoliation techniques, experimental preparation of two-dimensional (2D) crystals can be expected for any layered material that is known to chemistry. Besides graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), transition metal chalcogenides (TMC) are among the most studied ultrathin materials. In particular, single-layer MoS2, a direct band gap semiconductor with ∼1.9 eV energy gap, is popular in physics and nanoelectronics, because it nicely complements semimetallic graphene and insulating h-BN monolayer as a construction component for flexible 2D electronics and because it was already successfully applied in the laboratory as basis material for transistors and other electronic and optoelectronic devices. Two-dimensional crystals are subject to significant quantum confinement: compared with their parent layered 3D material, they show different structural, electronic, and optical properties, such as spontaneous rippling as free-standing monolayer, significant changes of the electronic band structure, giant spin-orbit splitting, and enhanced photoluminescence. Most of those properties are intrinsic for the monolayer and already absent for two-layer stacks of the same 2D crystal. For example, single-layer MoS2 is a direct band gap semiconductor with spin-orbit splitting of 150 meV in the valence band, while the bilayer of the same material is an indirect band gap semiconductor without observable spin-orbit splitting. All these properties have been observed experimentally and are in excellent agreement with calculations based on density-functional theory. This Account reports theoretical studies of a subgroup of transition metal dichalcogenides with the composition MX2, with M = Mo, or W and X = Se or S, also referred to as "MoWSeS materials". Results on the electronic structure, quantum confinement, spin-orbit coupling, spontaneous monolayer rippling, and change of electronic properties in the

  16. Martensitic fcc-to-hcp transformation observed in xenon at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Cynn, H; Yoo, C S; Baer, B; Iota-Herbei, V; McMahan, A K; Nicol, M; Carlson, S

    2001-05-14

    Angle-resolved x-ray diffraction patterns of Xe to 127 GPa indicate that the fcc-to-hcp transition occurs martensitically between 3 and 70 GPa in diamond-anvil cells without an intermediate phase. These data also reveal that the transition occurs by the introduction of stacking disorder in the fcc lattice at low pressure, which grows into hcp domains with increasing pressure. The small energy difference between the hcp and the fcc structures may allow the two phases to coexist over a wide pressure range. Evidence of similar stacking disorder and incipient growth of an hcp phase are also observed in solid Kr.

  17. Change of universality class of metal-insulator transition due to magnetic ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, N. A.; Tovar Costa, M. V.; Troper, A.; Japiassú, Gloria M.; Continentino, M. A.

    1999-04-01

    Using a two-band model we report a theory to describe the metal-insulator (MI) transition as a function of an external applied magnetic field in Kondo insulators. To deal with electronic correlations we use a functional integral approach in the static approximation. We show the existence of a critical value of the Coulomb correlation Uc, such that for Utransition is continuous and occurs from a paramagnetic insulator to a paramagnetic metal. In this case this transition is in the universality class of density-driven transitions. For U>Uc, the transition is to a ferromagnetic metal and it is described by different critical exponents.

  18. FCC-ee: Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Koratzinos, M.; Blondel, A.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Zimmermann, F.

    2015-06-02

    The FCC-ee aims to improve on electroweak precision measurements, with goals of 100 ke V on the Z mass and width, and a fraction of MeV on the W mass. Compared to LEP, this implies a much improved knowledge of the center-of-mass energy when operating at the Z peak and WW threshold. This can be achieved by making systematic use of resonant depolarization. A number of issues have been identified, due in particular to the long polarization times. However the smaller emittance and energy spread of FCC-ee with respect to LEP should help achieve a much improved performance.

  19. Excitonic linewidth and coherence lifetime in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Selig, Malte; Berghäuser, Gunnar; Raja, Archana; ...

    2016-11-07

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides are direct-gap semiconductors with strong light–matter and Coulomb interactions. The latter accounts for tightly bound excitons, which dominate their optical properties. Besides the optically accessible bright excitons, these systems exhibit a variety of dark excitonic states. They are not visible in the optical spectra, but can strongly influence the coherence lifetime and the linewidth of the emission from bright exciton states. We investigate the microscopic origin of the excitonic coherence lifetime in two representative materials (WS2 and MoSe2) through a study combining microscopic theory with spectroscopic measurements. We also show that the excitonic coherence lifetimemore » is determined by phonon-induced intravalley scattering and intervalley scattering into dark excitonic states. Particularly, we identify exciton relaxation processes involving phonon emission into lower-lying dark states that are operative at all temperatures, in WS2.« less

  20. Excitonic linewidth and coherence lifetime in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, Malte; Berghäuser, Gunnar; Raja, Archana; Nagler, Philipp; Schüller, Christian; Heinz, Tony F.; Korn, Tobias; Chernikov, Alexey; Malic, Ermin; Knorr, Andreas

    2016-11-07

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides are direct-gap semiconductors with strong light–matter and Coulomb interactions. The latter accounts for tightly bound excitons, which dominate their optical properties. Besides the optically accessible bright excitons, these systems exhibit a variety of dark excitonic states. They are not visible in the optical spectra, but can strongly influence the coherence lifetime and the linewidth of the emission from bright exciton states. We investigate the microscopic origin of the excitonic coherence lifetime in two representative materials (WS2 and MoSe2) through a study combining microscopic theory with spectroscopic measurements. We also show that the excitonic coherence lifetime is determined by phonon-induced intravalley scattering and intervalley scattering into dark excitonic states. Particularly, we identify exciton relaxation processes involving phonon emission into lower-lying dark states that are operative at all temperatures, in WS2.

  1. Mechanism of Transition-Metal Nanoparticle Catalytic Graphene Cutting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Jinlan; Yip, Joanne; Ding, Feng

    2014-04-03

    Catalytic cutting by transition-metal (TM) particles is a promising method for the synthesizing of high-quality graphene quantum dots and nanoribbons with smooth edges. Experimentally, it is observed that the cutting always results in channels with zigzag (ZZ) or armchair (AC) edges. However, the driving force that is responsible for such a cutting behavior remains a puzzle. Here, by calculating the interfacial formation energies of the TM-graphene edges with ab initio method, we show that the surface of a catalyst particle tends to be aligned along either AC or ZZ direction of the graphene lattice, and thus the cutting of graphene is guided as such. The different cutting behaviors of various catalysts are well-explained based on the competition between TM-passivated graphene edges and the etching-agent-terminated ones. Furthermore, the kinetics of graphene catalytic cutting along ZZ and AC directions, respectively, are explored at the atomic level.

  2. Topologically insulating states in ternary transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xianqing; Ni, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The topological and electronic properties of monolayered monoclinic transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) alloys (1T '-M1-xNxX2 with M, N = Cr, Mo, W and X = S, Se) have been studied through calculations based on the projected Wannier functions obtained from first-principles calculations. We predict that the ternary compounds 1T '-Mo1-xCrxS2 with x up to 7/12 and all 1T '-Mo1-xWxSe2 host topologically insulating states with band gaps comparable to the pure systems. For Cr contained alloys, the mechanism of sign changing of Berry curvature is proposed to explain the trivial band topology of some configurations. The predicted topologically insulating ternary TMDs may be promising candidates for future realization of topological devices.

  3. Chiral topological excitons in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Gong, Z R; Luo, W Z; Jiang, Z F; Fu, H C

    2017-02-10

    We theoretically investigate the chiral topological excitons emerging in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, where a bulk energy gap of valley excitons is opened up by a position dependent external magnetic field. We find two emerging chiral topological nontrivial excitons states, which exactly connects to the bulk topological properties, i.e., Chern number = 2. The dependence of the spectrum of the chiral topological excitons on the width of the magnetic field domain wall as well as the magnetic filed strength is numerically revealed. The chiral topological valley excitons are not only important to the excitonic transport due to prevention of the backscattering, but also give rise to the quantum coherent control in the optoelectronic applications.

  4. Excitonic linewidth and coherence lifetime in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Selig, Malte; Berghäuser, Gunnar; Raja, Archana; Nagler, Philipp; Schüller, Christian; Heinz, Tony F.; Korn, Tobias; Chernikov, Alexey; Malic, Ermin; Knorr, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides are direct-gap semiconductors with strong light–matter and Coulomb interactions. The latter accounts for tightly bound excitons, which dominate their optical properties. Besides the optically accessible bright excitons, these systems exhibit a variety of dark excitonic states. They are not visible in the optical spectra, but can strongly influence the coherence lifetime and the linewidth of the emission from bright exciton states. Here, we investigate the microscopic origin of the excitonic coherence lifetime in two representative materials (WS2 and MoSe2) through a study combining microscopic theory with spectroscopic measurements. We show that the excitonic coherence lifetime is determined by phonon-induced intravalley scattering and intervalley scattering into dark excitonic states. In particular, in WS2, we identify exciton relaxation processes involving phonon emission into lower-lying dark states that are operative at all temperatures. PMID:27819288

  5. Chiral topological excitons in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Z. R.; Luo, W. Z.; Jiang, Z. F.; Fu, H. C.

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the chiral topological excitons emerging in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, where a bulk energy gap of valley excitons is opened up by a position dependent external magnetic field. We find two emerging chiral topological nontrivial excitons states, which exactly connects to the bulk topological properties, i.e., Chern number = 2. The dependence of the spectrum of the chiral topological excitons on the width of the magnetic field domain wall as well as the magnetic filed strength is numerically revealed. The chiral topological valley excitons are not only important to the excitonic transport due to prevention of the backscattering, but also give rise to the quantum coherent control in the optoelectronic applications.

  6. On holographic disorder-driven metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2017-01-01

    We give a minimal holographic model of a disorder-driven metal-insulator transition. It consists in a CFT with a charge sector and a translation-breaking sector that interact in the most generic way allowed by the symmetries and by dynamical consistency. In the gravity dual, it reduces to a Massive Gravity-Maxwell model with a new direct coupling between the gauge field and the metric that is allowed when gravity is massive. We show that the effect of this coupling is to decrease the DC electrical conductivity generically. This gives a nontrivial check that holographic massive gravity can be consistently interpreted as disorder from the CFT perspective. The suppression of the conductivity happens to such an extent that it does not obey any lower bound and it can be very small in the insulating phase. In some cases, the large disorder limit produces gradient instabilities that hint at the formation of modulated phases.

  7. Chiral topological excitons in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Z. R.; Luo, W. Z.; Jiang, Z. F.; Fu, H. C.

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the chiral topological excitons emerging in the monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, where a bulk energy gap of valley excitons is opened up by a position dependent external magnetic field. We find two emerging chiral topological nontrivial excitons states, which exactly connects to the bulk topological properties, i.e., Chern number = 2. The dependence of the spectrum of the chiral topological excitons on the width of the magnetic field domain wall as well as the magnetic filed strength is numerically revealed. The chiral topological valley excitons are not only important to the excitonic transport due to prevention of the backscattering, but also give rise to the quantum coherent control in the optoelectronic applications. PMID:28186154

  8. Surfactant-Modified Diffusion on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.; KELLOGG,GARY LEE

    1999-12-01

    Wanting to convert surface impurities from a nuisance to a systematically applicable nano-fabrication tool, we have sought to understand how such impurities affect self-diffusion on transition-metal surfaces. Our field-ion microscope experiments reveal that in the presence of surface hydrogen, self-diffusion on Rh(100) is promoted, while on Pt(100), not only is it inhibited, but its mechanism changes. First-principles calculations aimed at learning how oxygen fosters perfect layerwise growth on a growing Pt(111) crystal contradict the idea in the literature that it does so by directly promoting transport over Pt island boundaries. The discovery that its real effect is to burn off adventitious adsorbed carbon monoxide demonstrates the predictive value of state-of-the-art calculation methods.

  9. Sonochemical synthesis of mesoporous transition metal and rare earth oxides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqin; Yin, Lunxiang; Gedanken, Arahon

    2002-11-01

    Straight-extended layered mesostructures based on transItion metal (Fe, Cr) and rare earth (Y, Ce, La, Sm, Er) oxides are synthesized by sonication for 3 h. After a longer period of sonication (6 h), hexagonal mesostructures based on Y- and Er-oxides are obtained. The surface areas of the Y-based hexagonal mesophases before and after extraction are 46.5, 256 m2/g, respectively. For Er-based hexagonal mesophases, the surface areas before and after extraction are 157 and 225 m2/g. The pore sizes after extraction are 5.0 and 2.2 nm for Y- and Er-based mesophases, respectively. Hexagonal mesostructures are also obtained for Zr-based material after sonication for 3 h and the hexagonal structure is still maintained after calcinations at 400 degrees C for 4 h, although the surface area is only 35 m2/g.

  10. Transition-metal-catalyzed synthesis of phenols and aryl thiols

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shasha

    2017-01-01

    Phenols and aryl thiols are fundamental building blocks in organic synthesis and final products with interesting biological activities. Over the past decades, substantial progress has been made in transition-metal-catalyzed coupling reactions, which resulted in the emergence of new methods for the synthesis of phenols and aryl thiols. Aryl halides have been extensively studied as substrates for the synthesis of phenols and aryl thiols. In very recent years, C–H activation represents a powerful strategy for the construction of functionalized phenols directly from various arenes. However, the synthesis of aryl thiols through C–H activation has not been reported. In this review, a brief overview is given of the recent advances in synthetic strategies for both phenols and aryl thiols.

  11. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  12. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction. PMID:26235646

  13. Transition metal dichalcogenides based saturable absorbers for pulsed laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanraj, J.; Velmurugan, V.; Sivabalan, S.

    2016-10-01

    Ultrashort pulsed laser is an indispensable tool for the evolution of photonic technology in the present and future. This laser has been progressing tremendously with new pulse regimes and incorporating novel devices inside its cavity. Recently, a nanomaterial based saturable absorber (SA) was used in ultrafast laser that has improved the lasing performance and caused a reduction in the physical dimension when compared to conventional SAs. To date, the nanomaterials that are exploited for the development of SA devices are carbon nanotubes, graphene, topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and black phosphorous. These materials have unique advantages such as high nonlinear optical response, fiber compatibility and ease of fabrication. In these, TMDs are prominent and an emerging two-dimensional nanomaterial for photonics and optoelectronics applications. Therefore, we review the reports of Q-switched and mode-locked pulsed lasers using TMDs (specifically MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2) based SAs.

  14. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides in Energy Storage and Conversion.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Shi, Fan; Zhan, Jiye; Tu, Jiangping; Fan, Hong Jin

    2016-05-01

    High-performance electrode materials are the key to advances in the areas of energy conversion and storage (e.g., fuel cells and batteries). In this Review, recent progress in the synthesis and electrochemical application of transition metal carbides (TMCs) and nitrides (TMNs) for energy storage and conversion is summarized. Their electrochemical properties in Li-ion and Na-ion batteries as well as in supercapacitors, and electrocatalytic reactions (oxygen evolution and reduction reactions, and hydrogen evolution reaction) are discussed in association with their crystal structure/morphology/composition. Advantages and benefits of nanostructuring (e.g., 2D MXenes) are highlighted. Prospects of future research trends in rational design of high-performance TMCs and TMNs electrodes are provided at the end.

  15. Quantum dot photosensitizers. Interactions with transition metal centers.

    PubMed

    Burks, Peter T; Ford, Peter C

    2012-11-14

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive for potential use as photosensitizers for a variety of applications. These nanomaterials have very high absorption cross-sections and often display strong photoluminescence (PL). Furthermore, QD absorption and emission spectra can be tuned simply by varying their size, and QD surfaces can be modified to access multiple sites for attaching potential acceptors as well as other functionalities. Here we provide an overview of recent studies concerned with the photosensitization of transition metal centers and other acceptors. Particular focus is directed towards potential therapeutic applications and to our own interest in the delivery of small molecule bioregulators to physiological targets. Studies that have addressed factors that control likely energy and charge transfer processes between QD donors and acceptor molecules are also discussed. Understanding the mechanisms of these photosensitization processes can provide design guidelines for successful applications.

  16. Observation of Interlayer Phonons in Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui; Ye, Zhipeng; Ji, Chao; Means-Shively, Casie; Anderson, Heidi; Kidd, Tim; Chiu, Kuan-Chang; Chou, Cheng-Tse; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Andersen, Trond; Lui, Chun Hung

    Interlayer phonon modes in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterostructures are observed for the first time. We measured the low-frequency Raman response of MoS2/WSe2 and MoSe2/MoS2 heterobilayers. We discovered a distinct Raman mode (30 - 35 cm-1) that cannot be found in any individual monolayers. By comparing with Raman spectra of Bernal bilayer (2L) MoS2, 2L MoSe2 and 2L WSe2, we identified the new Raman mode as the layer breathing vibration arising from the vertical displacement of the two TMD layers. The layer breathing mode (LBM) only emerges in bilayer regions with atomically close layer-layer proximity and clean interface. In addition, the LBM frequency exhibits noticeable dependence on the rotational angle between the two TMD layers, which implies a change of interlayer separation and interlayer coupling strength with the layer stacking.

  17. Transition Metals Catalyzed Element-Cyano Bonds Activations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Falck, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Cyano group as a versatile functionalized intermediate has been explored for several decades, as it readily transfers to many useful functionalization groups such as amine, amide, acid, etc., which make it possess high popularization and use value in organic synthesis. Reactions involved with element-cyano bond cleavage can provide not only a new cyano group but also a freshly functionalized skeleton in one-pot, consequently making it of high importance. The highlights reviewed herein include H-CN, Si-CN, C-CN, B-CN, Sn-CN, Ge-CN, S-CN, Halo-CN, N-CN, and O-CN bonds cleavages and will summarize progress in such an important research area. This review article will focus on transition metal catalyzed reactions involving element-cyano bond activation. PMID:25558119

  18. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    DOE PAGES

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a highmore » crystallinity and very low defect concentration.« less

  19. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides in Energy Storage and Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Shi, Fan; Zhan, Jiye; Tu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    High‐performance electrode materials are the key to advances in the areas of energy conversion and storage (e.g., fuel cells and batteries). In this Review, recent progress in the synthesis and electrochemical application of transition metal carbides (TMCs) and nitrides (TMNs) for energy storage and conversion is summarized. Their electrochemical properties in Li‐ion and Na‐ion batteries as well as in supercapacitors, and electrocatalytic reactions (oxygen evolution and reduction reactions, and hydrogen evolution reaction) are discussed in association with their crystal structure/morphology/composition. Advantages and benefits of nanostructuring (e.g., 2D MXenes) are highlighted. Prospects of future research trends in rational design of high‐performance TMCs and TMNs electrodes are provided at the end. PMID:27812464

  20. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-01-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  1. Superconductor to Quantum Metal Transitions in Ultra Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Goldman, Allen M.

    2009-03-01

    Homogeneous films of amorphous bismuth have been continuously tuned from the superconducting state by increasing a perpendicular magnetic field. Electrical transport and Hall measurements show that the non-superconducting states of the films are quantum-corrected metals. In the vicinity of transition field, the resistance can be fit by an Arrhenius type of conduction at high temperatures but this form fails at lower temperatures where the resistance is a non-monotonic function of temperature. This suggests that a two-phase regime develops near criticality. Theories suggest that this is in the form of superconducting puddles embedded in a normal matrix^1,2. ^1B. Spivak, P. Oreto, and S. A. Kivelson, Phys. Rev. B 77, 214523 (2008) ^2Y. Dubi, Y. Meir, and Y. Avishai, Nature 449, 876-880 (2007)

  2. Electric field tuning of band offsets in transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dennis; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-12-01

    We use first-principles calculations to investigate the band structure evolution of W X2 /Mo X2 (X = S, Se) heterobilayers under a perpendicular electric field. We characterize the extent to which the type II band alignment in these compounds can be tuned or inverted electrostatically. Our results demonstrate two effects of the stacking configuration. First, different stackings produce different net dipole moments, resulting in band offset variations that are larger than 0.1 eV. Second, based on symmetry constraints that depend on stacking, a perpendicular electric field may hybridize W X2 and Mo X2 bands that cross at the Brillouin zone corner K . Our results suggest that external electric fields can be used to tune the physics of intralayer and interlayer excitons in heterobilayers of transition metal dichalcogenides.

  3. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  4. Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Growth via Close Proximity Precursor Supply

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Maria; McEvoy, Niall; Hallam, Toby; Kim, Hye-Young; Berner, Nina C.; Hanlon, Damien; Lee, Kangho; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is currently a highly pressing research field, as numerous potential applications rely on the production of high quality films on a macroscopic scale. Here, we show the use of liquid phase exfoliated nanosheets and patterned sputter deposited layers as solid precursors for chemical vapour deposition. TMD monolayers were realized using a close proximity precursor supply in a CVD microreactor setup. A model describing the growth mechanism, which is capable of producing TMD monolayers on arbitrary substrates, is presented. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electrical transport measurements reveal the high quality of the TMD samples produced. Furthermore, through patterning of the precursor supply, we achieve patterned growth of monolayer TMDs in defined locations, which could be adapted for the facile production of electronic device components. PMID:25487822

  5. Extraction of exchange parameters in transition-metal perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Furrer, A.; Podlesnyak, A.; Krämer, K. W.

    2015-09-15

    When extracting exchange parameters from measured spin-wave dispersion relations there are severe limitations particularly for magnetic compounds such as the transition-metal perovskites, where the nearest-neighbor exchange parameter usually dominates the couplings between the further-distant-neighbor spins. Very precise exchange parameters beyond the nearest-neighbor spins can be obtained by neutron spectroscopic investigations of the magnetic excitation spectra of isolated multimers in magnetically diluted compounds. Moreover, this is exemplified for manganese trimers in the mixed three-and two-dimensional perovskite compounds KMnxZn1-xF3 and K2MnxZn1-xF4, respectively. We show that the small exchange couplings between the second-nearest-neighbor and the third-nearest-neighbor spins can be determined unambiguously and withmore » equal precision as the dominating nearest-neighbor exchange coupling.« less

  6. Electronics and optoelectronics of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing Hua; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Kis, Andras; Coleman, Jonathan N; Strano, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene have renewed interest in inorganic, two-dimensional materials with unique electronic and optical attributes. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into two-dimensional layers of single unit cell thickness. Although TMDCs have been studied for decades, recent advances in nanoscale materials characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities for two-dimensional layers of thin TMDCs in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. TMDCs such as MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2) and WSe(2) have sizable bandgaps that change from indirect to direct in single layers, allowing applications such as transistors, photodetectors and electroluminescent devices. We review the historical development of TMDCs, methods for preparing atomically thin layers, their electronic and optical properties, and prospects for future advances in electronics and optoelectronics.

  7. Theory of strain in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Habib; Roldán, Rafael; Cappelluti, Emmanuele; Asgari, Reza; Guinea, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Strain engineering has emerged as a powerful tool to modify the optical and electronic properties of two-dimensional crystals. Here we perform a systematic study of strained semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides. The effect of strain is considered within a full Slater-Koster tight-binding model, which provides us with the band structure in the whole Brillouin zone (BZ). From this, we derive an effective low-energy model valid around the K point of the BZ, which includes terms up to second order in momentum and strain. For a generic profile of strain, we show that the solutions for this model can be expressed in terms of the harmonic oscillator and double quantum well models, for the valence and conduction bands respectively. We further study the shift of the position of the electron and hole band edges due to uniform strain. Finally, we discuss the importance of spin-strain coupling in these 2D semiconducting materials.

  8. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-08-17

    Here, the research community has been steadily expanding the family of few-atom-thick crystals beyond graphene, discovering new materials or producing known materials in a 2D state and demonstrating their unique properties1, 2. Recently, nanometre-thin 2D transition metal carbides have also joined this family3. Writing in Nature Materials, Chuan Xu and colleagues now report a significant advance in the field, showing the synthesis of large-area, high-quality, nanometre-thin crystals of molybdenum carbide that demonstrate low-temperature 2D superconductivity4. Moreover, they also show that other ultrathin carbide crystals, such as tungsten and tantalum carbides, can be grown by chemical vapour deposition with a high crystallinity and very low defect concentration.

  9. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  10. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  11. Elastic properties of C40 transition metal disilicides

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, F.; Maloy, S.A.; Petrovic, J.J.; Mitchell, T.E.; Lei, M.

    1996-08-01

    Room-temperature and low temperature elastic properties of hexagonal C40 transition metal disilicides, NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2}, have been studied using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). All five independent elastic stiffness constants c{sub ij} for NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} single crystals have been obtained. The temperature dependence of the c{sub ij} is normal but not large. The orientation dependence of the Young`s and shear moduli was examined in comparison with other transition metal disilicides. The room temperature shear moduli in the {l_brace}0001{r_brace} plane, with values of 145.3 and 143.7 GPa for NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} respectively, are low relative to those in the equivalent pseudo hexagonal {l_brace}220{r_brace} close-packed plane for tetragonal C11{sub b} MoSi{sub 2} and WSi{sub 2}. The isotropic elastic constants for polycrystalline materials were also calculated. The results show that the various moduli are all much higher than those of the constituent elements. The room temperature Poisson`s ratios of NbSi{sub 2} and TaSi{sub 2} are 0.18 and 0.19, respectively, which are smaller than those of the constituent elements and smaller than most materials. The Debye temperatures, {theta}{sub D}, were estimated to be 688 K for NbSi{sub 2} and 552 K for TaSi{sub 2}. The elastic properties of C40 VSi{sub 2}, NbSi{sub 2}, TaSi{sub 2}, and CrSi{sub 2} and C11{sub b} MoSi{sub 2} and WSi{sub 2} are compared and the possible influence on mechanical behavior discussed.

  12. Metal-Metal Quintuple and Sextuple Bonding in Bent Dimetallocenes of the Third Row Transition Metals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Li, Qian-Shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2010-03-09

    Theoretical studies on the dimetallocenes Cp2M2 (M = Os, Re, W, Ta) predict bent structures with short metal-metal distances suggesting high-order metal-metal multiple bonds. Analysis of the frontier bonding molecular orbitals indicates a formal Os-Os quintuple bond (σ + 2π + 2δ) in singlet Cp2Os2 and a formal Re-Re sextuple bond (2σ + 2π + 2δ) in singlet Cp2Re2, thereby giving the metals in both molecules the favored 18-electron metal configurations. Predicted low-energy triplet structures for Cp2M2 (M = Os, Re) have formal quintuple bonds but with only two δ one-electron "half" bonds (M = Os) or a single δ two-electron bond (M = Re) and a second σ component derived from overlap of the d(z(2)) orbitals. A quintuple bond similar to that found in triplet Cp2Re2 is found in singlet Cp2W2, giving both tungsten atoms a 16-electron configuration. The formal Ta-Ta quadruple bond in the lowest energy singlet Cp2Ta2 structure is different from that in the original Re2Cl8(2-) in that it is a 2σ + 2π bond with no δ components but only σ and π components.

  13. Probing Magnetism in 2D Molecular Networks after in Situ Metalation by Transition Metal Atoms.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, K; Ivanova, Ts; Li, Z; Iancu, V; Janssens, E; Van Haesendonck, C

    2015-03-19

    Metalated molecules are the ideal building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of, e.g., two-dimensional arrays of magnetic particles for spintronics applications. Compared to chemical synthesis, metalation after network formation by an atom beam can yield a higher degree of control and flexibility and allows for mixing of different types of magnetic atoms. We report on successful metalation of tetrapyridyl-porphyrins (TPyP) by Co and Cr atoms, as demonstrated by scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. For the metalation, large periodic networks formed by the TPyP molecules on a Ag(111) substrate are exposed in situ to an atom beam. Voltage-induced dehydrogenation experiments support the conclusion that the porphyrin macrocycle of the TPyP molecule incorporates one transition metal atom. The newly synthesized Co-TPyP and Cr-TPyP complexes exhibit striking differences in their electronic behavior, leading to a magnetic character for Cr-TPyP only as evidenced by Kondo resonance measurements.

  14. Preparation and magnetic properties of phthalocyanine-based carbon materials containing transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Z.; Sato, S.; Hagiwara, M.; Kida, T.; Sakai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Kamata, N.

    2016-07-01

    A simple method for the preparation of bulk quantities of magnetic carbon materials, which contain uniformly dispersed transition metals (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) as the magnetic components, is presented. By using highly chlorinated metal phthalocyanine as the building block and potassium as the coupling reagent, phthalocyanine-based carbon materials (PBCMs) containing transition metals were obtained. Our experiments demonstrate the structure of these PBCMs consists of transition metals embedded in graphitic carbon that includes a square planar MN4 magnetic core and the Fe and Co-PBCM possess spontaneous magnetization at room temperature. In addition, carbon-coated transition metal particles were obtained by the Wurtz-type reaction with excess amount of potassium coupling agent. The large transition metal surface area and magnetization of these M-PBCMs are useful for spintronic and catalytic applications.

  15. Thin film reaction of transition metals with germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudet, S.; Detavernier, C.; Kellock, A.J.; Desjardins, P.; Lavoie, C.

    2006-05-15

    A systematic study of the thermally induced reaction of 20 transition metals (Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, Mn, Re, Fe, Ru, Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Cu) with Ge substrates was carried out in order to identify appropriate contact materials in Ge-based microelectronic circuits. Thin metal films, nominally 30 nm thick, were sputter deposited on both amorphous Ge and crystalline Ge(001). Metal-Ge reactions were monitored in situ during ramp anneals at 3 deg. C s{sup -1} in an atmosphere of purified He using time-resolved x-ray diffraction, diffuse light scattering, and resistance measurements. These analyses allowed the determination of the phase formation sequence for each metal-Ge system and the identification of the most promising candidates--in terms of sheet resistance and surface roughness--for their use as first level interconnections in microelectronic circuits. A first group of metals (Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, and Ta) reacted with Ge only at temperatures well above 450 deg. C and was prone to oxidation. Another set (Cr, Mo, Mn, Re, Rh, Ru, and Ir) did not form low resistivity phases (<130 {mu}{omega} cm) whereas no reaction was observed in the case of W even after annealing at up to 1000 deg. C. We found that Fe, Co, Ni, Pd, Pt, and Cu were the most interesting candidates for microelectronic applications as they reacted at relatively low temperatures (150-360 deg. C) to form low resistivity phases (22-129 {mu}{omega} cm). Among those, two monogermanides, NiGe and PdGe, exhibited the lowest resistivity values (22-30 {mu}{omega} cm) and were stable over the widest temperature window during ramp anneals. In passing, we note that Cu, Ni, and Pd were the most effective in lowering the crystallization temperature of amorphous Ge, by up to 290 deg. C for our typical ramp anneals at 3 deg. C s{sup -1}.

  16. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  17. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  18. Orbital reconstruction in nonpolar tetravalent transition-metal oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Nikolay A.; Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Romhányi, Judit; Yushankhai, Viktor; Kataev, Vladislav; Büchner, Bernd; van den Brink, Jeroen; Hozoi, Liviu

    2015-06-01

    A promising route to tailoring the electronic properties of quantum materials and devices rests on the idea of orbital engineering in multilayered oxide heterostructures. Here we show that the interplay of interlayer charge imbalance and ligand distortions provides a knob for tuning the sequence of electronic levels even in intrinsically stacked oxides. We resolve in this regard the d-level structure of layered Sr2IrO4 by electron spin resonance. While canonical ligand-field theory predicts g||-factors less than 2 for positive tetragonal distortions as present in Sr2IrO4, the experiment indicates g|| is greater than 2. This implies that the iridium d levels are inverted with respect to their normal ordering. State-of-the-art electronic-structure calculations confirm the level switching in Sr2IrO4, whereas we find them in Ba2IrO4 to be instead normally ordered. Given the nonpolar character of the metal-oxygen layers, our findings highlight the tetravalent transition-metal 214 oxides as ideal platforms to explore d-orbital reconstruction in the context of oxide electronics.

  19. Dynamic Phase Engineering of Bendable Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joel; Zhou, Songsong; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J; Haataja, Mikko P

    2017-03-14

    Current interest in two-dimensional (2D) materials is driven in part by the ability to dramatically alter their optoelectronic properties through strain and phase engineering. A combination of these approaches can be applied in quasi-2D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers to induce displacive structural transformations between semiconducting (H) and metallic/semimetallic (T') phases. We classify such transformations in Group VI TMDs, and formulate a multiscale, first-principles-informed modeling framework to describe evolution of microstructural domain morphologies in elastically bendable 2D monolayers. We demonstrate that morphology and mechanical response can be controlled via application of strain either uniformly or through local probes to generate functionally patterned conductive T' domains. Such systems form dynamically programmable electromechanical 2D materials, capable of rapid local switching between domains with qualitatively different transport properties. This enables dynamic "drawing" of localized conducting regions in an otherwise semiconducting TMD monolayer, opening several interesting device-relevant functionalities such as the ability to dynamically "rewire" a device in real time.

  20. Magnesium nanoparticles with transition metal decoration for hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, Luca; Callini, Elsa; Brighi, Matteo; Boscherini, Federico; Montone, Amelia; Jensen, Torben R.; Maurizio, Chiara; Vittori Antisari, Marco; Bonetti, Ennio

    2011-11-01

    We report on the hydrogen storage behaviour of Mg nanoparticles (NPs) (size range 100 nm-1 μm) with metal-oxide core-shell morphology synthesized by inert gas condensation and decorated by transition metal (TM) (Pd or Ti) clusters via in situ vacuum deposition. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared and hydrogenated NPs is studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction including in situ experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, in order to investigate the relationships with the hydrogen storage kinetics measured by the volumetric Sieverts method. With both Pd and Ti, the decoration deeply improves the hydrogen sorption properties: previously inert NPs exhibit complete hydrogenation with fast transformation kinetics, good stability and reversible gravimetric capacity that can attain 6 wt%. In the case of Pd-decoration, the occurrence of Mg-Pd alloying is observed at high temperatures and in dependence of the hydrogen pressure conditions. These structural transformations modify both the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydride formation, while Ti-decoration has an effect only on the kinetics. The experimental results are discussed in relation with key issues such as the amount of decoration, the heat of mixing between TM and Mg and the binding energy between TM and hydrogen.

  1. Reactivity of small transition-metal clusters with CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mats T.; Gronbeck, H.; Holmgren, L.; Rosen, Arne

    1995-09-01

    The size-dependent reactivity of several transition-metal clusters: Con, Nbn, Rhn, and Wn with CO has been investigated in a cluster beam experiment. The reactions occur at single-collision-like conditions and the results are evaluated in terms of the reaction probability (S) in a collision. For all the four metals, clusters with more than 10 - 15 atoms show a high reaction probability, S >= 0.4, rather independent of size. For smaller Nbn and Wn, the reaction probability is lower, and for Nbn, large variations in the CO reactivity are observed in the n equals 8 - 13 range with a distinct minimum at Nb10. Using an LCAO approach within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the adsorption of molecular CO on Nbn has also been investigated theoretically. The geometries of the bare clusters were optimized and two different sites for CO were investigated. The discussion is based on a detailed analysis of Nb4. The calculations show that compact structures with high coordination numbers are the most stable ones for the bare Nb clusters and hollow sites, also maximizing the coordination, are preferred for CO adsorption. The calculations indicate that a high CO-Nbn bond strength is obtained for clusters with a high density of states close to the Fermi level and for which the HOMO level has a symmetry that allows for an efficient back-donation of electrons to the 2(pi) *-orbital of CO. A particularly low chemisorption energy was calculated for the Nb10 cluster.

  2. Generic trend of work functions in transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitake, Michiko

    2014-11-15

    Transition-metal carbides and nitrides (TMCs and TMNs) are promising electrode materials for various electronic devices such as metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and metal-insulator-metal capacitors. In this paper, the work functions of TMCs and TMNs are discussed systematically. Based upon the origin of the work function, the effect upon transition metal species by different periodic table groups is explained, carbides are compared with nitrides for the same transition metal, and the effect of carbon or nitrogen vacancies is discussed. In addition, a method to estimate the generic trend of the work function is proposed for TMC{sub x}, TMN{sub x}, TMC{sub 1−y}N{sub y} (transition metal carbonitrides), and TM{sub 1−z}TM′{sub z}C (alloy carbides)

  3. (S)TEM analysis of functional transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Miaofang

    Perovskite vanadates (AVO3) form an ideal family to study the structure-property relationships in transition metal oxides because their physical properties can easily be tailored by varying the A-site cations. (S)TEM is an ideal tool for this type of study due to its capacity for simultaneous imaging and chemical analysis. Determination of the oxidation state of vanadium in complex oxides have been carried out by electron energy loss spectroscopy. SrVO3/LaAlO3 is then studied both experimentally and theoretically as a prototype system. Extra electrons have been detected on the interface layer, and further proven to originate mainly from a change in the local bonding configuration of V at the La-O terminated substrate surface. Cr-containing stainless steel deposited with a LaCrO3 thin-film layer is a promising interconnect material of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). Our investigation on its microstructural evolution reveals that the LaCrO 3 thin film plays a role in inhibiting the growth of an oxide layer on the metal surface and thus protects the surface of the stainless steel. Ca-doped LaCoO3 is a promising SOFC cathode material. The domain structures and the oxidation state of Co in Ca-doped LaCoO3, which are directly related to its mechanical properties and electronic conductivity, are investigated by in-situ TEM and EELS. The formation of microcracks is observed during thermal cycles. Ca-doping in LaCoO3 is shown to not only improve the electronic conductivity of the material, but is also likely to strengthen the grain boundaries. The realization of its application in SOFCs depends on depressing the ferroelastisity to reduce strain formation during thermal cycles. The application of the (S)TEM techniques used for studying the perovskite systems are further extended to other compounds containing transition metal elements. The refractory minerals from Comet 81 P/Wild-2 are studied to investigate the formation of the early solar system. A relatively high Ti3+/Ti 4

  4. Strong electron correlations in biomimetic transition metal molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labute, Montiago Xavier

    The first-row transition metals (Fe, Co, V,...) are key players in the active sites of proteins and enzymes responsible for diverse biological processes such as NO regulation and photosynthesis. Many small transition metal complexes possess chemical coordination environments in the vicinity of the metal atom that are reminiscent of these active sites. We have studied the electronic structure of these molecules and discussed the relevance for their biological analogues. The specific question on which we wish to focus is: Do strong correlations (resulting from the localized character of the TM 3d-orbitals) contribute significantly to the reaction energetics of these molecules and, if so, can these effects be observed by experiment? To accomplish these ends we focus on the cobalt valence tautomer molecules and the phenomenon of electron transfer in aqueous hexaammine cobalt ions. We utilize theoretical methods in order to study the cobalt valence tautomer molecules which undergo an interconversion with temperature that is reminiscent of the changes in structure and spin that the heme group experiences as the result of Fe-ligand interactions. We perform fully ab initio calculations using the GGA implementation of density functional theory with the computer code SIESTA. In addition, a simple Anderson Impurity Model has been employed that more properly accounts for the Coulomb interaction among the 3d electrons on the cobalt atom. The calculated Co K x-ray absorption near-edge spectra XANES agrees well with experimental data and a prediction for the Co L-edge XAS that could be tested in future experiments is also presented. We believe that there are structures in both spectra that may only be explained by a strong admixture of configurations. It is conjectured that strong electron correlations help explain the non-Arrhenius rate behavior observed in the high-spin to low-spin relaxation rate at low temperatures. Work on electron-transfer in CoNH32 +/3+6aq using these

  5. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, Guy

    2012-06-29

    The efficient and selective preparation of organic molecules is critical for mankind. For the future, it is of paramount importance to find catalysts able to transform abundant and cheap feedstocks into useful compounds. Acyclic and heterocyclic nitrogen-containing derivatives are common components of naturally occurring compounds, agrochemicals, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals; they are also useful intermediates in a number of industrial processes. One of the most widely used synthetic strategies, allowing the formation of an N-C bond, is the addition of an N-H bond across a carbon-carbon multiple bond, the so-called hydroamination reaction. This chemical transformation fulfills the principle of “green chemistry” since it ideally occurs with 100% atom economy. Various catalysts have been found to promote this reaction, although many limitations remain; one of the most prominent is the lack of methods that permit the use of NH3 and NH2NH2 as the amine partners. In fact, ammonia and hydrazine have rarely succumbed to homogeneous catalytic transformations. Considering the low cost and abundance of ammonia (136 million metric tons produced in 2011) and hydrazine, catalysts able to improve the reactivity and selectivity of the NH3- and NH2NH2-hydroamination reaction, and more broadly speaking the functionalization of these chemicals, are highly desirable. In the last funded period, we discovered the first homogeneous catalysts able to promote the hydroamination of alkynes and allenes with ammonia and the parent hydrazine. The key feature of our catalytic systems is that the formation of catalytically inactive Werner complexes is reversible, in marked contrast to most of the known ammonia and hydrazine transition metal complexes. This is due to the peculiar electronic properties of our neutral ancillary ligands, especially their strong donating capabilities. However, our catalysts currently require

  6. FCC, CATV, ETV, and ITFS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Woods, Robert A.

    Actions taken in 1970 by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) are reviewed and discussed in this paper. These actions include amendment of educational broadcast rules for the first time in 17 years, decisions in the area of educational programing, a decision regarding the ultra high frequency (UHF)-land mobile dilemma, and a promise to…

  7. FCC and the Sunshine Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Kenneth

    The Sunshine Act, designed to encourage open meetings to increase public understanding of the governmental decision-making process, went into effect in March 1977. A total of 50 agencies, including the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), are subject to the provisions of the Sunshine Act. The act lists 10 exemptions, any of which can result in…

  8. Rapid solidification of polymorphic transition metals induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitta, Satish

    1991-01-01

    An Nd-YAG laser giving 5 ns, 266 nm pulses was used to melt and subsequently quench thin, pure metallic films on a liquid Al/Al2O3 substrate at 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th K/s. Transmission electron microscopy together with electron diffraction was used to study the competitive nucleation and growth behavior of the crystals from the undercooled melt. In the case of Fe and Co, the high-temperature bcc and fcc structures were retained after laser quenching. Ti and Zr in spite of the structural similarities exhibit different preferences for nucleation from the undercooled melt. In all the metals the solid-state transformations were completely suppressed and the crystal growth was found to be limited by the collisional frequency of the atoms onto the growing interface.

  9. Solubility Behavior and Phase Stability of Transition Metal Oxides in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak

    2000-05-18

    The solubility behavior of transition metal oxides in high temperature water is interpreted by recognizing three types of chemical reaction equilibria: metal oxide hydration/dehydration, metal oxide dissolution and metal ion hydroxocomplex formation. The equilibria are quantified using thermodynamic concepts and the thermochemical properties of the metal oxides/ions representative of the most common constituents of construction metal alloys, i.e., element shaving atomic numbers between Z = 22 (Ti) and Z = 30 (Zn), are summarized on the basis of metal oxide solubility studies conducted in the laboratory. Particular attention is devoted to the uncharged metal ion hydrocomplex, M{sup Z}(OH){sub Z}(aq), since its thermochemical properties define minimum solubilities of the metal oxide at a given temperature. Experimentally-extracted values of standard partial molal entropy (S{sup 0}) for the transition metal ion neutral hydroxocomplex are shown to be influenced by ligand field stabilization energies and complex symmetry.

  10. Ternary Amides Containing Transition Metals for Hydrogen Storage: A Case Study with Alkali Metal Amidozincates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hujun; Richter, Theresia M M; Pistidda, Claudio; Chaudhary, Anna-Lisa; Santoru, Antonio; Gizer, Gökhan; Niewa, Rainer; Chen, Ping; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The alkali metal amidozincates Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2 and K2[Zn(NH2)4] were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time as hydrogen storage media. Compared with the LiNH2-2 LiH system, both Li4 [Zn(NH2)4](NH2)2-12 LiH and K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH systems showed improved rehydrogenation performance, especially K2[Zn(NH2)4]-8 LiH, which can be fully hydrogenated within 30 s at approximately 230 °C. The absorption properties are stable upon cycling. This work shows that ternary amides containing transition metals have great potential as hydrogen storage materials.

  11. Mott metal-insulator transition in a metallic liquid - Gutzwiller molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Kipton; Chern, Gia-Wei; Batista, Cristian D.; Kress, Joel D.; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are crucial to modern computational physics, chemistry, and materials science, especially when combined with potentials derived from density-functional theory. However, even in state of the art MD codes, the on-site Coulomb repulsion is only treated at the self-consistent Hartree-Fock level. This standard approximation may miss important effects due to electron correlations. The Gutzwiller variational method captures essential correlated-electron physics yet is much faster than, e.g., the dynamical-mean field theory approach. We present our efficient Gutzwiller-MD implementation. With it, we investigate the Mott metal-insulator transition in a metallic fluid and uncover several surprising static and dynamic properties of this system.

  12. Late transition metal m-or chemistry and D6 metal complex photoeliminations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Paul

    2015-07-31

    With the goal of understanding and controlling photoreductive elimination reactions from d6 transition metal complexes as part of a solar energy storage cycle we have investigated the photochemistry of Pt(IV) bromo, chloro, hydroxo, and hydroperoxo complexes. Photoreductive elimination reactions occur for all of these complexes and appear to involve initial Pt-Br, Pt-Cl, or Pt-O bond fission. In the case of Pt-OH bond fission, the subsequent chemistry can be controlled through hydrogen bonding to the hydroxo group.

  13. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  14. Thermal induced phase transitions and structural relaxation in apoferritin encapsulated copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ceolín, Marcelo; Gálvez, Natividad; Domínguez-Vera, José M

    2008-08-07

    Nanocrystalline metals display interesting basic and technological properties related to their chemical and structural properties. Among other properties, they display a richer phase diagram due to the additional degree of freedom introduced by the nanoparticles surface. Metal nanoparticles encapsulated within biological macromolecules have the additional advantage of biocompatibility. In this paper we investigate the thermal evolution of the structure and dynamics of apoferritin encapsulated nanocrystalline copper. We determined the occurrence of a yet unexpected phase transition from a low temperature FCC to a complex high temperature phase including a (putative) amorphous precursor. The occurrence of a FCC-icosahedral transition is also discussed as a possible explanation to our results. The lattice dynamics of the FCC phase (monitored by its Debye temperature) differs from the behaviour expected for nanosized structures.

  15. The highly synergistic, broad spectrum, antibacterial activity of organic acids and transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Zhitnitsky, Daniel; Rose, Jessica; Lewinson, Oded

    2017-01-01

    For millennia, transition metals have been exploited to inhibit bacterial growth. We report here the potentiation of the anti-bacterial activity of transition metals by organic acids. Strong synergy between low, non-toxic concentrations of transition metals and organic acids was observed with up to ~1000-fold higher inhibitory effect on bacterial growth. We show that organic acids shuttle transition metals through the permeability barrier of the bacterial membrane, leading to increased influx of transition metals into bacterial cells. We demonstrate that this synergy can be effectively used to inhibit the growth of a broad range of plant and human bacterial pathogens, and suggest that a revision of food preservation and crop protection strategies may be in order. These findings bear significant biomedical, agricultural, financial and environmental opportunities. PMID:28294164

  16. Electronic bonding analyses and mechanical strengths of incompressible tetragonal transition metal dinitrides TMN2 (TM = Ti, Zr, and Hf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meiguang; Cheng, Ke; Yan, Haiyan; Wei, Qun; Zheng, Baobing

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by recent successful synthesis of transition metal dinitride TiN2, the electronic structure and mechanical properties of the discovered TiN2 and other two family members (ZrN2 and HfN2) have been thus fully investigated by using first-principles calculations to explore the possibilities and provide guidance for future experimental efforts. The incompressible nature of these tetragonal TMN2 (TM = Ti, Zr, and Hf) compounds has been demonstrated by the calculated elastic moduli, originating from the strong N-N covalent bonds that connect the TMN8 units. However, as compared with traditional fcc transition metal mononitride (TMN), the TMN2 possess a larger elastic anisotropy may impose certain limitations on possible applications. Further mechanical strength calculations show that tetragonal TMN2 exhibits a strong resistance against (100)[010] shear deformation prevents the indenter from making a deep imprint, whereas the peak stress values (below 12 GPa) of TMN2 along shear directions are much lower than those of TMN, showing their lower shear resistances than these known hard wear-resistant materials. The shear deformation of TMN2 at the atomic level during shear deformation can be attributed to the collapse of TMN8 units with breaking of TM-N bonds through the bonding evolution and electronic localization analyses.

  17. Electronic bonding analyses and mechanical strengths of incompressible tetragonal transition metal dinitrides TMN2 (TM = Ti, Zr, and Hf)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meiguang; Cheng, Ke; Yan, Haiyan; Wei, Qun; Zheng, Baobing

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent successful synthesis of transition metal dinitride TiN2, the electronic structure and mechanical properties of the discovered TiN2 and other two family members (ZrN2 and HfN2) have been thus fully investigated by using first-principles calculations to explore the possibilities and provide guidance for future experimental efforts. The incompressible nature of these tetragonal TMN2 (TM = Ti, Zr, and Hf) compounds has been demonstrated by the calculated elastic moduli, originating from the strong N-N covalent bonds that connect the TMN8 units. However, as compared with traditional fcc transition metal mononitride (TMN), the TMN2 possess a larger elastic anisotropy may impose certain limitations on possible applications. Further mechanical strength calculations show that tetragonal TMN2 exhibits a strong resistance against (100)[010] shear deformation prevents the indenter from making a deep imprint, whereas the peak stress values (below 12 GPa) of TMN2 along shear directions are much lower than those of TMN, showing their lower shear resistances than these known hard wear-resistant materials. The shear deformation of TMN2 at the atomic level during shear deformation can be attributed to the collapse of TMN8 units with breaking of TM-N bonds through the bonding evolution and electronic localization analyses. PMID:27830728

  18. Explicitly correlated composite thermochemistry of transition metal species.

    PubMed

    Bross, David H; Hill, J Grant; Werner, H-J; Peterson, Kirk A

    2013-09-07

    Atomization energies were calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods with correlation consistent basis sets for a series of 19 small molecules containing 3d transition metal atoms. The atomization energies were calculated using a modified Feller-Peterson-Dixon approach in which CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limits were obtained using extrapolations of aVTZ∕aVQZ CCSD(T)-F12b correlation energies, and then a series of additive contributions for relativity, core correlation, higher order correlation, and zero-point vibrations were included. The frozen-core CBS limits calculated with F12 methods closely matched the more computational expensive conventional awCVQZ∕awCV5Z CBS extrapolations, with a mean unsigned deviation of just 0.1 kcal∕mol. In particular, the CCSD(T∗)-F12b∕aVDZ and aVTZ atomization energies were more accurate on average than the conventional CCSD(T)∕aVQZ and aV5Z results, respectively. In several cases the effects of higher order correlation beyond CCSD(T), as judged by CCSDT and CCSDT(Q)Λ calculations, were greater than 1 kcal∕mol, reaching 4.5 kcal∕mol for CrO3. For the 16 molecules of this study with experimental uncertainties of ∼3.5 kcal∕mol or less, the final composite heats of formation have a mean unsigned deviation (MUD) from experiment of just 1.3 kcal∕mol, which is slightly smaller than the average of the experimental uncertainties, 1.8 kcal∕mol. The root mean square deviation (RMS) is only slightly larger at 1.7 kcal∕mol. Without the contributions due to higher order correlation effects, the MUD and RMS rise to 2.1 and 2.8 kcal∕mol, respectively. To facilitate the F12 calculations, new (aug-)cc-pVnZ∕MP2Fit (n = Q, 5) and (aug-)cc-pwCVTZ∕MP2Fit auxiliary basis sets were also developed for the transition metal atoms.

  19. Transition-Metal Oxides in Warm Circumstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mirosław R.; Kaminski, Tomasz; Tylenda, Romuald

    2013-06-01

    We report on detections and simulations of electronic bands of transition-metal oxides, i.e. ScO, TiO, VO, CrO, YO, and of AlO, in spectra of two red novae V838 Mon and V4332 Sgr. These objects experienced a stellar merger event in 2002 and 1994, respectively, and have very rich circumstellar environments abundant in dust and molecules. We analyzed optical spectra of V838 Mon which show a presence of outflowing material. In this object, electronic systems of oxides are observed in absorption against a photospheric spectrum which resembles that of a late-type supergiant. We present simulations of the absorption bands which allowed us to derive the excitation temperatures of 300-500 K and constrain column densities, which turned out to be very high. Among many interesting features discovered, we identified forbidden transitions of TiO in the b^1Π-X^3Δ and c^{1}Φ-X^{3}Δ systems, which are seen owing to the high column densities and the relatively low temperatures. In the case of the older red nova V4332 Sgr, the main object is surrounded by a circumstellar disc which is seen almost edge-on and obscures the central star. The molecular spectra are seen in emission in this object, what is very unusual in astrophysical sources observed at optical wavelengths. We show that these emission bands arise owing to the special geometry of the star-disk system and that radiative pumping is responsible for excitation of the molecules. From the shapes of the rotational contours, we derive temperatures of about 120 K in this object. Remarkably, the spectra of V4332 Sgr contain features of CrO, which is the first identified signature of this molecule in an astrophysical object. In addition to the excitation and radiative-transfer analysis of the molecular spectra, we discuss chemical pathways that could lead to the observed variety of metal oxides seen in these enigmatic sources. T. Kaminski, M. Schmidt, R. Tylenda, M. Konacki, and M. Gromadzki ApJSuppl., {182} (33), 2009. T

  20. Synthesis and characterization of two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are an emerging class of atomically thin semiconductors that show potential in next-generation electronics, optoelectronics, and energy storage batteries. The successful synthesis and doping of TMDs is the key to their applications. I have synthesized monolayer MoS2, WS2, and multilayer ReS2 flakes by CVD, and studied an unprecedented one-pot synthesis for transition-metal substitution doping in large-area, synthetic monolayer TMDs. Electron microscopy, optical and electronic transport characterization and ab initio calculations indicate that our doping strategy preserves the attractive qualities of TMD monolayers, including semiconducting transport and strong direct-gap luminescence. The Re doping of MoS2 greatly improve the contact quality (one of the biggest issue in TMDs) and the FET shows Ohmic contact even at low temperature (4K). These results potentially enables next-generation optoelectronic technology in the atomically-thin regime. Besides, TMDs are generally considered to be 'air-stable', however, we have found that they exhibit poor long-term stability in air in morphology, chemical states, photo-emission, and demonstrated a potential solution to this problem by encapsulation of the monolayer sheet with transparent parylene C. Synthetic TMDs tend to grow parallel to the growth substrate, however, high performance energy conversion and storage devices prefer flakes with high exposed surface area. Therefore by choosing the right precursors and appropriate tuning of the CVD growth conditions, we have grown vertical ReS2 nanosheets on various growth substrates. We show that these structural features of the vertically grown ReS2 sheets can be exploited to significantly improve their performance as electrochemical catalysts in Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) batteries and in hydrogen evolution reactions (HER). After 300 cycles, the specific capacity of the Li-S battery with vertical-ReS2 catalyst is retained above

  1. Explicitly correlated composite thermochemistry of transition metal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, David H.; Hill, J. Grant; Werner, H.-J.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2013-09-01

    Atomization energies were calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods with correlation consistent basis sets for a series of 19 small molecules containing 3d transition metal atoms. The atomization energies were calculated using a modified Feller-Peterson-Dixon approach in which CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limits were obtained using extrapolations of aVTZ/aVQZ CCSD(T)-F12b correlation energies, and then a series of additive contributions for relativity, core correlation, higher order correlation, and zero-point vibrations were included. The frozen-core CBS limits calculated with F12 methods closely matched the more computational expensive conventional awCVQZ/awCV5Z CBS extrapolations, with a mean unsigned deviation of just 0.1 kcal/mol. In particular, the CCSD(T*)-F12b/aVDZ and aVTZ atomization energies were more accurate on average than the conventional CCSD(T)/aVQZ and aV5Z results, respectively. In several cases the effects of higher order correlation beyond CCSD(T), as judged by CCSDT and CCSDT(Q)Λ calculations, were greater than 1 kcal/mol, reaching 4.5 kcal/mol for CrO3. For the 16 molecules of this study with experimental uncertainties of ˜3.5 kcal/mol or less, the final composite heats of formation have a mean unsigned deviation (MUD) from experiment of just 1.3 kcal/mol, which is slightly smaller than the average of the experimental uncertainties, 1.8 kcal/mol. The root mean square deviation (RMS) is only slightly larger at 1.7 kcal/mol. Without the contributions due to higher order correlation effects, the MUD and RMS rise to 2.1 and 2.8 kcal/mol, respectively. To facilitate the F12 calculations, new (aug-)cc-pVnZ/MP2Fit (n = Q, 5) and (aug-)cc-pwCVTZ/MP2Fit auxiliary basis sets were also developed for the transition metal atoms.

  2. Fingerprints of spin-orbital entanglement in transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Oleś, Andrzej M

    2012-08-08

    The concept of spin-orbital entanglement on superexchange bonds in transition metal oxides is introduced and explained on several examples. It is shown that spin-orbital entanglement in superexchange models destabilizes the long-range (spin and orbital) order and may lead either to a disordered spin-liquid state or to novel phases at low temperature which arise from strongly frustrated interactions. Such novel ground states cannot be described within the conventionally used mean field theory which separates spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Even in cases where the ground states are disentangled, spin-orbital entanglement occurs in excited states and may become crucial for a correct description of physical properties at finite temperature. As an important example of this behaviour we present spin-orbital entanglement in the RV O(3) perovskites, with R = La,Pr,…,Y b,Lu, where the finite temperature properties of these compounds can be understood only using entangled states: (i) the thermal evolution of the optical spectral weights, (ii) the dependence of the transition temperatures for the onset of orbital and magnetic order on the ionic radius in the phase diagram of the RV O(3) perovskites, and (iii) the dimerization observed in the magnon spectra for the C-type antiferromagnetic phase of Y V O(3). Finally, it is shown that joint spin-orbital excitations in an ordered phase with coexisting antiferromagnetic and alternating orbital order introduce topological constraints for the hole propagation and will thus radically modify the transport properties in doped Mott insulators where hole motion implies simultaneous spin and orbital excitations.

  3. Transition-metal embedded carbon nitride monolayers: high-temperature ferromagnetism and half-metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Indrani; Kumar, Sourabh; Mahata, Arup; Rawat, Kuber Singh; Pathak, Biswarup

    2016-07-01

    High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ~450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices.High-temperature ferromagnetic materials with planar surfaces are promising candidates for spintronics applications. Using state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations, transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn, and Fe) incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (TM@gt-C3N4) systems are investigated as possible spintronics devices. Interestingly, ferromagnetism and half-metallicity were observed in all of the TM@gt-C3N4 systems. We find that Cr@gt-C3N4 is a nearly half-metallic ferromagnetic material with a Curie temperature of ~450 K. The calculated Curie temperature is noticeably higher than other planar 2D materials studied to date. Furthermore, it has a steel-like mechanical stability and also possesses remarkable dynamic and thermal (500 K) stability. The calculated magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in Cr@gt-C3N4 is as high as 137.26 μeV per Cr. Thereby, such material with a high Curie temperature can be operated at high temperatures for spintronics devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  4. Voltage controlled magnetism in 3d transitional metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weigang

    2015-03-01

    Despite having attracted much attention in multiferroic materials and diluted magnetic semiconductors, the impact of an electric field on the magnetic properties remains largely unknown in 3d transitional ferromagnets (FMs) until recent years. A great deal of effort has been focused on the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect where the modulation of anisotropy field is understood by the change of electron density among different d orbitals of FMs in the presence of an electric field. Here we demonstrate another approach to alter the magnetism by electrically controlling the oxidation state of the 3d FM at the FM/oxide interface. The thin FM film sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and a gate oxide can be reversibly changed from an optimally-oxidized state with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy to a metallic state with an in-plane magnetic anisotropy, or to a fully-oxidized state with nearly zero magnetization, depending on the polarity and time duration of the applied electric fields. This is a voltage controlled magnetism (VCM) effect, where both the saturation magnetization and anisotropy field of the 3d FM layer can be simultaneously controlled by voltage in a non-volatile fashion. We will also discuss the impact of this VCM effect on magnetic tunnel junctions and spin Hall switching experiments. This work, in collaboration with C. Bi, Y.H. Liu, T. Newhouse-Illige, M. Xu, M. Rosales, J.W. Freeland, O. Mryasov, S. Zhang, and S.G.E. te Velthuis, was supported in part by NSF (ECCS-1310338) and by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  5. Metamagnetism of η-carbide-type transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waki, T.; Terazawa, S.; Umemoto, Y.; Tabata, Y.; Sato, K.; Kondo, A.; Kindo, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2011-09-01

    η-carbide-type transition-metal compounds include the frustrated stella quadran-gula lattice. Due to characteristics of the lattice, we expect subtle transitions between frustrated and non-frustrated states. Here, we report metamagnetic transitions newly found in η-carbide-type compounds Fe3W3C, Fe6W6C and Co6W6C.

  6. Transition metal activation and functionalization of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.

    1992-06-01

    We are investigating the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic factors that influence carbon-hydrogen bond activation at homogeneous transition metal centers and the conversion of hydrocarbons into functionalized products of potential use to the chemical industry. Advances have been made in both understanding the interactions of hydrocarbons with metals and in the functionalization of hydrocarbons. We have found that RhCl(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(CNR) complexes can catalyze the insertion of isonitriles into the C-H bonds or arenes upon photolysis. The mechanism of these reactions was found to proceed by way of initial phosphine dissociation, followed by C-H activation and isonitrile insertion. We have also examined reactions of a series of arenes with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})PhH and begun to map out the kinetic and thermodynamic preferences for arene coordination. The effects of resonance, specifically the differences in the Hueckel energies of the bound vs free ligand, are now believed to fully control the C-H activation/{eta}{sup 2}-coordination equilibria. We have begun to examine the reactions of rhodium isonitrile pyrazolylborates for alkane and arene C-H bond activation. A new, labile, carbodiimide precursor has been developed for these studies. We have completed studies of the reactions of (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})H{sub 2} with D{sub 2} and PMe{sub 3} that indicate that both {eta}{sup 5} {yields} {eta}{sup 3} ring slippage and metal to ring hydride migration occur more facilely than thermal reductive elimination of H{sub 2}. We have examined the reactions of heterocycles with (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})PhH and found that pyrrole and furan undergo C-H or N-H activation. Thiophene, however, undergoes C-S bond oxidative addition, and the mechanism of activation has been shown to proceed through sulfur coordination prior to C-S insertion.

  7. Magnetic and Orbital Structures in Transition Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomskii, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    The interplay of different degrees of freedom (charge, spin, orbital, lattice) determine all the rich properties of transition metal oxides. In particular, spin and orbital orderings appear to be especially strongly coupled. At least this is the case in perovskite-like systems with (almost) 180-degree metal-oxygen-metal bonds. The coupled spins and orbitals in this case can be described by the effective Hamiltonian of the type H = A(S*S)+B(T*T)+C(S*S)(T*T), where S and T are the spin and pseudospin of an ion ( describing an orbital occupation). In conventional cases, e.g. in perovskites, the constants A, B, C are of the same order, which determines strong coupling between spins and orbitals. However this electronic mechanism is not the only one leading to orbital ordering. The conventional Jahn-Teller interaction can also contribute to the latter, and it is not always clear which mechanism dominates. In this talk I will consider two questions. The first is the possibility to describe different orbital (and charge) superstructures in oxides, in particular in manganites, using the electron-lattice (elastic) interaction [1]. One can show that due to specific features of these interactions, one can naturally get in this mechanism different superstructures, including stripes. The second question concerns the form which these mechanisms take in systems with more complicated crystal structures - notably in oxides with 90-degree bonds. To these systems belong in particular some systems with geometric frustrations, e.g. some spinels, or LiNiO2, NaNiO2. We show that the exchange interaction in case of orbital degeneracy has for these systems the form much different from the perovskites: spin and orbital degrees of freedom are essentially decoupled, orbital exchange being much stronger even in the absence of electron-lattice interaction. We obtain corresponding exchange Hamiltonian, and consider the orbital and spin structure in systems like LiNiO2 [2], in which, due to a

  8. Sequential slip transfer of mixed-character dislocations across Σ3 coherent twin boundary in FCC metals: a concurrent atomistic-continuum study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuozhi; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; McDowell, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Sequential slip transfer across grain boundaries (GB) has an important role in size-dependent propagation of plastic deformation in polycrystalline metals. For example, the Hall-Petch effect, which states that a smaller average grain size results in a higher yield stress, can be rationalised in terms of dislocation pile-ups against GBs. In spite of extensive studies in modelling individual phases and grains using atomistic simulations, well-accepted criteria of slip transfer across GBs are still lacking, as well as models of predicting irreversible GB structure evolution. Slip transfer is inherently multiscale since both the atomic structure of the boundary and the long-range fields of the dislocation pile-up come into play. In this work, concurrent atomistic-continuum simulations are performed to study sequential slip transfer of a series of curved dislocations from a given pile-up on Σ3 coherent twin boundary (CTB) in Cu and Al, with dominant leading screw character at the site of interaction. A Frank-Read source is employed to nucleate dislocations continuously. It is found that subject to a shear stress of 1.2 GPa, screw dislocations transfer into the twinned grain in Cu, but glide on the twin boundary plane in Al. Moreover, four dislocation/CTB interaction modes are identified in Al, which are affected by (1) applied shear stress, (2) dislocation line length, and (3) dislocation line curvature. Our results elucidate the discrepancies between atomistic simulations and experimental observations of dislocation-GB reactions and highlight the importance of directly modeling sequential dislocation slip transfer reactions using fully 3D models.

  9. Metal-insulator transition in NaxWO3: Photoemission spectromicroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Sanhita; Ghosh, Anirudha; Raj, Satyabrata

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated the validity of percolation model, which is quite often invoked to explain the metal-insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxWO3 by photoelectron spectromicroscopy. The spatially resolved direct spectromicroscopic probing on both the insulating and metallic phases of high quality single crystals of NaxWO3 reveals the absence of any microscopic inhomogeneities embedded in the system within the experimental limit. Neither any metallic domains in the insulating host nor any insulating domains in the metallic host have been found to support the validity of percolation model to explain the metal-insulator transition in NaxWO3.

  10. Recognition- and Reactivity-Based Fluorescent Probes for Studying Transition Metal Signaling in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed “recognition” and “reactivity”. Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give

  11. Recognition- and reactivity-based fluorescent probes for studying transition metal signaling in living systems.

    PubMed

    Aron, Allegra T; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed "recognition" and "reactivity". Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give three recent

  12. Strain-induced topological phase transition at zigzag edges of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Linhu; Castro, Eduardo V.; Sacramento, Pedro D.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of strain in zigzag ribbons of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides with induced superconductivity is studied using a minimal three-band tight-binding model. The unstrained system shows a topological phase with Majorana zero modes localized at the boundaries of the one-dimensional (1D) zigzag edges. By direct inspection of the spectrum and wave functions we examine the evolution of the topological phase as an in-plane, uniaxial deformation is imposed. It is found that strain shifts the energy of 1D edge states, thus causing a topological phase transition which eliminates the Majorana modes. For realistic parameter values, we show that the effect of strain can be changed from completely destructive—in which case a small built-in strain is enough to destroy the topological phase—to a situation where strain becomes an effective tuning parameter which can be used to manipulate Majorana zero modes. These two regimes are accessible by increasing the value of the applied Zeeman field within realistic values. We also study how strain effects are affected by the chemical potential, showing, in particular, how unwanted effects can be minimized. Finally, as a cross-check of the obtained results, we reveal the connection between 1D Majorana zero modes in the zigzag edge and the multiband Berry phase, which serves as a topological invariant of this system.

  13. Defect engineering of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhong; Carvalho, Bruno R.; Kahn, Ethan; Lv, Ruitao; Rao, Rahul; Terrones, Humberto; Pimenta, Marcos A.; Terrones, Mauricio

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), an emerging family of layered materials, have provided researchers a fertile ground for harvesting fundamental science and emergent applications. TMDs can contain a number of different structural defects in their crystal lattices which significantly alter their physico-chemical properties. Having structural defects can be either detrimental or beneficial, depending on the targeted application. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of structural defects is required. Here we review different defects in semiconducting TMDs by summarizing: (i) the dimensionalities and atomic structures of defects; (ii) the pathways to generating structural defects during and after synthesis and, (iii) the effects of having defects on the physico-chemical properties and applications of TMDs. Thus far, significant progress has been made, although we are probably still witnessing the tip of the iceberg. A better understanding and control of defects is important in order to move forward the field of Defect Engineering in TMDs. Finally, we also provide our perspective on the challenges and opportunities in this emerging field.

  14. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  15. Synthesis of millimeter-scale transition metal dichalcogenides single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Gong, Yongji; Ye, Gonglan; Lei, Sidong; ...

    2016-02-10

    The emergence of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) atomic layers has opened up unprecedented opportunities in atomically thin electronics. Yet the scalable growth of TMD layers with large grain sizes and uniformity has remained very challenging. Here is reported a simple, scalable chemical vapor deposition approach for the growth of MoSe2 layers is reported, in which the nucleation density can be reduced from 105 to 25 nuclei cm-2, leading to millimeter-scale MoSe2 single crystals as well as continuous macrocrystalline films with millimeter size grains. The selective growth of monolayers and multilayered MoSe2 films with well-defined stacking orientation can also bemore » controlled via tuning the growth temperature. In addition, periodic defects, such as nanoscale triangular holes, can be engineered into these layers by controlling the growth conditions. The low density of grain boundaries in the films results in high average mobilities, around ≈42 cm2 V-1 s-1, for back-gated MoSe2 transistors. This generic synthesis approach is also demonstrated for other TMD layers such as millimeter-scale WSe2 single crystals.« less

  16. Synthesis of millimeter-scale transition metal dichalcogenides single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yongji; Ye, Gonglan; Lei, Sidong; Shi, Gang; Vajtai, Robert; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Li, Bo; Ajayan, Pullikel M.

    2016-02-10

    The emergence of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) atomic layers has opened up unprecedented opportunities in atomically thin electronics. Yet the scalable growth of TMD layers with large grain sizes and uniformity has remained very challenging. Here is reported a simple, scalable chemical vapor deposition approach for the growth of MoSe2 layers is reported, in which the nucleation density can be reduced from 105 to 25 nuclei cm-2, leading to millimeter-scale MoSe2 single crystals as well as continuous macrocrystalline films with millimeter size grains. The selective growth of monolayers and multilayered MoSe2 films with well-defined stacking orientation can also be controlled via tuning the growth temperature. In addition, periodic defects, such as nanoscale triangular holes, can be engineered into these layers by controlling the growth conditions. The low density of grain boundaries in the films results in high average mobilities, around ≈42 cm2 V-1 s-1, for back-gated MoSe2 transistors. This generic synthesis approach is also demonstrated for other TMD layers such as millimeter-scale WSe2 single crystals.

  17. Exciton radiative lifetime in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, C.; Lagarde, D.; Cadiz, F.; Wang, G.; Lassagne, B.; Amand, T.; Balocchi, A.; Renucci, P.; Tongay, S.; Urbaszek, B.; Marie, X.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the exciton dynamics in transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers using time-resolved photoluminescence experiments performed with optimized time resolution. For MoS e2 monolayer, we measure τrad0=1.8 ±0.2 ps at T =7 K that we interpret as the intrinsic radiative recombination time. Similar values are found for WS e2 monolayers. Our detailed analysis suggests the following scenario: at low temperature (T ≲50 K ), the exciton oscillator strength is so large that the entire light can be emitted before the time required for the establishment of a thermalized exciton distribution. For higher lattice temperatures, the photoluminescence dynamics is characterized by two regimes with very different characteristic times. First the photoluminescence intensity drops drastically with a decay time in the range of the picosecond driven by the escape of excitons from the radiative window due to exciton-phonon interactions. Following this first nonthermal regime, a thermalized exciton population is established gradually yielding longer photoluminescence decay times in the nanosecond range. Both the exciton effective radiative recombination and nonradiative recombination channels including exciton-exciton annihilation control the latter. Finally the temperature dependence of the measured exciton and trion dynamics indicates that the two populations are not in thermodynamical equilibrium.

  18. Superconductivity Series in Transition Metal Dichalcogenides by Ionic Gating.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wu; Ye, Jianting; Zhang, Yijin; Suzuki, Ryuji; Yoshida, Masaro; Miyazaki, Jun; Inoue, Naoko; Saito, Yu; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-03

    Functionalities of two-dimensional (2D) crystals based on semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have now stemmed from simple field effect transistors (FETs) to a variety of electronic and opto-valleytronic devices, and even to superconductivity. Among them, superconductivity is the least studied property in TMDs due to methodological difficulty accessing it in different TMD species. Here, we report the systematic study of superconductivity in MoSe2, MoTe2 and WS2 by ionic gating in different regimes. Electrostatic gating using ionic liquid was able to induce superconductivity in MoSe2 but not in MoTe2 because of inefficient electron accumulation limited by electronic band alignment. Alternative gating using KClO4/polyethylene glycol enabled a crossover from surface doping to bulk doping, which induced superconductivities in MoTe2 and WS2 electrochemically. These new varieties greatly enriched the TMD superconductor families and unveiled critical methodology to expand the capability of ionic gating to other materials.

  19. Thermoelectricity in transition metal compounds: the role of spin disorder.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Prashun; Toberer, Eric S; Stevanović, Vladan

    2016-11-23

    At room temperature and above, most magnetic materials adopt a spin-disordered (paramagnetic) state whose electronic properties can differ significantly from their low-temperature, spin-ordered counterparts. Yet computational searches for new functional materials usually assume some type of magnetic order. In the present work, we demonstrate a methodology to incorporate spin disorder in computational searches and predict the electronic properties of the paramagnetic phase. We implement this method in a high-throughput framework to assess the potential for thermoelectric performance of 1350 transition-metal sulfides and find that all magnetic systems we identify as promising in the spin-ordered ground state cease to be promising in the paramagnetic phase due to disorder-induced deterioration of the charge carrier transport properties. We also identify promising non-magnetic candidates that do not suffer from these spin disorder effects. In addition to identifying promising materials, our results offer insights into the apparent scarcity of magnetic systems among known thermoelectrics and highlight the importance of including spin disorder in computational searches.

  20. Proton extraction by laser ablation of transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Krása, J.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-07-01

    A study on the proton beams extraction from a plasma generated by pulsed laser ablation by targets containing transition metals is presented. The targets used were pure disks of titanium and tantalum and disks of TiH2, obtained by compression of TiH2 powder. The plasma was produced by means of a nanosecond excimer KrF laser operating at low irradiance (109-1010 W/cm2). The proton and ions emission was analyzed by the time-of-flight technique using a Faraday cup as ion collector. Studies on the produced protons and ions at different laser irradiances from 2 to 15 GW/cm2 were performed. The characterization showed that it is possible to obtain good proton fluxes from these targets, up to 1011 proton/pulse. The results obtained are very interesting if compared with those available in literature where proton fluxes per pulse ranging from 108 to 109 by hydride targets were obtained, at the same laser irradiances.