Science.gov

Sample records for fda required full

  1. FDA & digital mammography: why has FDA required full field digital mammography systems to be regulated as potentially dangerous devices for more than 10 years?

    PubMed

    Nields, Morgan W

    2010-05-01

    Digital mammography is routinely used in the US to screen asymptomatic women for breast cancer and currently over 50% of US screening centers employ the technology. In spite of FDAs knowledge that digital mammography requires less radiation than film mammography and that its equivalence has been proven in a prospective randomized trial, the agency has failed to allow the technology market access via the 510(k) pre market clearance pathway. As a result of the restrictive Pre Market Approval process, only four suppliers have received FDA approval. The resulting lack of a competitive market has kept costs high, restricted technological innovation, and impeded product improvements as a result of PMA requirements. Meanwhile, at least twelve companies are on the market in the EU and the resulting competitive market has lowered costs and provided increased technological choice. A cultural change with new leadership occurred in the early 90's at FDA. The historical culture at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of collaboration and education gave way to one characterized by a lack of reliance on outside scientific expertise, tolerance of decision making by unqualified reviewers, and an emphasis on enforcement and punishment. Digital mammography fell victim to this cultural change and as a result major innovations like breast CT and computer aided detection technologies are also withheld from the market. The medical device law, currently under review by the Institute of Medicine, should be amended by the Congress so that new technologies can be appropriately classified in accordance with the risk based assessment classification system detailed in Chapter V of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. A panel of scientific experts chartered by the NIH or IOM should determine the classification appropriate for new technologies that have no historical regulatory framework. This would be binding on FDA. Unless the law is changed we will likely again experience

  2. 78 FR 19715 - Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Provision Requiring FDA To Establish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... and Tracing of Food'' that appeared in the Federal Register of March 5, 2013 (78 FR 14309). In the... Register of March 5, 2013 (78 FR 14309), FDA published a ] notice with a 30-day comment period to...

  3. 78 FR 14309 - Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act Provision Requiring FDA To Establish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    .... Conduct two food product tracing pilot projects--one in coordination with the processed food sector and... points of service; 6. Demonstrate the tracking and tracing of: (a) A selected processed food and its key... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization...

  4. 10 CFR 35.7 - FDA, other Federal, and State requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FDA, other Federal, and State requirements. 35.7 Section 35.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL General Information § 35.7 FDA, other Federal, and State requirements. Nothing in this part relieves the licensee...

  5. Proton-pump inhibitors in patients requiring antiplatelet therapy: new FDA labeling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David A; Chilton, Robert; Liker, Harley R

    2014-05-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are recommended for patients who require antiplatelet therapy and have a history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Proton-pump inhibitors should also be considered for patients receiving antiplatelet therapy who have other risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding, including use of aspirin. Thus, evidence of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between PPIs and consequent impaired effectiveness of the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel has caused concern. Here, we discuss comparative studies suggesting that the extent to which a PPI reduces exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel and attenuates its antithrombotic effect differs among PPIs. Although a clinically meaningful effect of the interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel on cardiovascular outcomes has not been established, these studies provided the basis for recent changes in US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeling for several PPIs and clopidogrel. New labeling suggests that PPI use among patients taking clopidogrel be limited to pantoprazole, rabeprazole, lansoprazole, or dexlansoprazole. Because comparative studies indicate that omeprazole and esomeprazole have a greater effect on the CYP2C19-mediated conversion of clopidogrel to its active metabolite and, consequently, clopidogrel's effect on platelet reactivity, FDA labeling recommends avoiding omeprazole and esomeprazole in patients taking clopidogrel. Even a 12-hour separation of dosing does not appear to prevent drug interactions between omeprazole and clopidogrel. PMID:24918808

  6. Is It Really FDA Approved?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and implantable infusion pumps, require FDA approval before marketing. To receive FDA approval for these devices, the ... and many types of catheters) are cleared for marketing based on an FDA determination that they are ...

  7. Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessment in epilepsy: a review of epilepsy-specific PROs according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) data in clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), PRO results are not being routinely reported on European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product labels. This review aimed to evaluate epilepsy-specific PRO instruments against FDA regulatory standards for supporting label claims. Structured literature searches were conducted in Embase and Medline databases to identify epilepsy-specific PRO instruments. Only instruments that could potentially be impacted by pharmacological treatment, were completed by adults and had evidence of some validation work were selected for review. A total of 26 PROs were reviewed based on criteria developed from the FDA regulatory standards. The ability to meet these criteria was classified as either full, partial or no evidence, whereby partial reflected some evidence but not enough to comprehensively address the FDA regulatory standards. Most instruments provided partial evidence of content validity. Input from clinicians and literature was common although few involved patients in both item generation and cognitive debriefing. Construct validity was predominantly compromised by no evidence of a-priori hypotheses of expected relationships. Evidence for test-retest reliability and internal consistency was available for most PROs although few included complete results regarding all subscales and some failed to reach recommended thresholds. The ability to detect change and interpretation of change were not investigated in most instruments and no PROs had published evidence of a conceptual framework. The study concludes that none of the 26 have the full evidence required by the FDA to support a label claim, and all require further research to support their use as an endpoint. The Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy (SHE) and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) have the fewest gaps that would need to be addressed through

  8. Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessment in epilepsy: a review of epilepsy-specific PROs according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Annabel; Kerr, Cicely; Breheny, Katie; Wild, Diane

    2013-03-11

    Despite collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) data in clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), PRO results are not being routinely reported on European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product labels. This review aimed to evaluate epilepsy-specific PRO instruments against FDA regulatory standards for supporting label claims. Structured literature searches were conducted in Embase and Medline databases to identify epilepsy-specific PRO instruments. Only instruments that could potentially be impacted by pharmacological treatment, were completed by adults and had evidence of some validation work were selected for review. A total of 26 PROs were reviewed based on criteria developed from the FDA regulatory standards. The ability to meet these criteria was classified as either full, partial or no evidence, whereby partial reflected some evidence but not enough to comprehensively address the FDA regulatory standards. Most instruments provided partial evidence of content validity. Input from clinicians and literature was common although few involved patients in both item generation and cognitive debriefing. Construct validity was predominantly compromised by no evidence of a-priori hypotheses of expected relationships. Evidence for test-retest reliability and internal consistency was available for most PROs although few included complete results regarding all subscales and some failed to reach recommended thresholds. The ability to detect change and interpretation of change were not investigated in most instruments and no PROs had published evidence of a conceptual framework. The study concludes that none of the 26 have the full evidence required by the FDA to support a label claim, and all require further research to support their use as an endpoint. The Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy (SHE) and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) have the fewest gaps that would need to be addressed through

  9. BCS Biowaivers: Similarities and Differences Among EMA, FDA, and WHO Requirements.

    PubMed

    Davit, Barbara M; Kanfer, Isadore; Tsang, Yu Chung; Cardot, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), based on aqueous solubility and intestinal permeability, has enjoyed wide use since 1995 as a mechanism for waiving in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies. In 2000, the US-FDA was the first regulatory agency to publish guidance for industry describing how to meet criteria for requesting a waiver of in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for highly soluble, highly permeable (BCS Class I) drugs. Subsequently, the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) published guidelines recommending how to obtain BCS biowaivers for BCS Class III drugs (high solubility, low permeability), in addition to Class I drugs. In 2015, the US-FDA became better harmonized with the EMA and WHO following publication of two guidances for industry outlining criteria for obtaining BCS biowaivers for both Class I and Class III drugs. A detailed review and comparison of the BCS Class I and Class III criteria currently recommended by the US-FDA, EMA, and WHO revealed good convergence of the three agencies with respect to BCS biowaiver criteria. The comparison also suggested that, by applying the most conservative of the three jurisdictional approaches, it should be possible for a sponsor to design the same set of BCS biowaiver studies in preparing a submission for worldwide filing to satisfy US, European, and emerging market regulators. It is hoped that the availability of BCS Class I and Class III biowaivers in multiple jurisdictions will encourage more sponsors to request waivers of in vivo bioavailability/bioequivalence testing using the BCS approach.

  10. FDA 101: Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... professionals. As its resources permit, FDA also reviews product labels and other product information, such as package inserts, ... the address or phone number listed on the product's label. Dietary supplement firms are required to forward reports ...

  11. Consumers' Understanding of FDA Approval Requirements and Composite Scores in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Print Ads.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Sullivan, Helen W; Williams, Pamela A; Squire, Claudia; Betts, Kevin R; Fitts Willoughby, Jessica; Parvanta, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    In 2 studies, we investigated how laypersons perceive the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process, FDA authority, and the presentation of composite scores in direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug print ads. The 1st study consisted of 4 focus groups (N = 38) in 2 cities. Using a semi-structured guide, a moderator led participants through the viewing of 3 existing DTC print ads that differed in the presence or absence of composite score information, and participants discussed their views of the ads and their understanding of composite scores. The 2nd study surveyed a nationally representative sample of 1,629 individuals from the general population who saw a fictitious DTC print ad and answered closed-ended questions about the same topics. Results showed that knowledge of FDA approval and authority was mixed, with several misconceptions apparent. Many consumers were not familiar with the use of composite scores in a medical context or in advertising and, in the 1st study, expressed distrust of the product and the ad after learning about how composite scores are used. In the 2nd study, receiving composite score information changed the perceived clarity of the ad but not the perceived risk or benefits. Implications for the presentation of complex medical information are discussed. PMID:27414000

  12. Consumers' Understanding of FDA Approval Requirements and Composite Scores in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Print Ads.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Sullivan, Helen W; Williams, Pamela A; Squire, Claudia; Betts, Kevin R; Fitts Willoughby, Jessica; Parvanta, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    In 2 studies, we investigated how laypersons perceive the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process, FDA authority, and the presentation of composite scores in direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug print ads. The 1st study consisted of 4 focus groups (N = 38) in 2 cities. Using a semi-structured guide, a moderator led participants through the viewing of 3 existing DTC print ads that differed in the presence or absence of composite score information, and participants discussed their views of the ads and their understanding of composite scores. The 2nd study surveyed a nationally representative sample of 1,629 individuals from the general population who saw a fictitious DTC print ad and answered closed-ended questions about the same topics. Results showed that knowledge of FDA approval and authority was mixed, with several misconceptions apparent. Many consumers were not familiar with the use of composite scores in a medical context or in advertising and, in the 1st study, expressed distrust of the product and the ad after learning about how composite scores are used. In the 2nd study, receiving composite score information changed the perceived clarity of the ad but not the perceived risk or benefits. Implications for the presentation of complex medical information are discussed.

  13. Dietary supplement labeling and advertising claims: are clinical studies on the full product required?

    PubMed

    Villafranco, John E; Bond, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Whether labeling and advertising claims for multi-ingredient dietary supplements may be based on the testing of individual, key ingredients--rather than the actual product--has caused a good deal of confusion. This confusion stems from the dearth of case law and the open-endedness of Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on this issue. Nevertheless, the relevant regulatory guidance, case law and self-regulatory case law--when assessed together--indicate that the law allows and even protects "key ingredient claims" (i.e., claims based on efficacy testing of key ingredients in the absence of full product testing). This article provides an overview of the relevant substantiation requirements for dietary supplement claims and then reviews FTC's and FDA's guidance on key ingredient claims; relevant case law; use of key ingredient claims in the advertising of other consumer products; and the National Advertising Division of the Better Business Bureau, Inc.'s (NAD's) approach to evaluating key ingredient claims for dietary supplements. This article concludes that key ingredient claims--provided they are presented in a truthful and non-deceptive manner--are permissible, and should be upheld in litigation and cases subject to industry self-regulation. This article further concludes that the NAD's approach to key ingredient claims provides practical guidance for crafting and substantiating dietary supplement key ingredient claims. PMID:19998572

  14. Dietary supplement labeling and advertising claims: are clinical studies on the full product required?

    PubMed

    Villafranco, John E; Bond, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Whether labeling and advertising claims for multi-ingredient dietary supplements may be based on the testing of individual, key ingredients--rather than the actual product--has caused a good deal of confusion. This confusion stems from the dearth of case law and the open-endedness of Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on this issue. Nevertheless, the relevant regulatory guidance, case law and self-regulatory case law--when assessed together--indicate that the law allows and even protects "key ingredient claims" (i.e., claims based on efficacy testing of key ingredients in the absence of full product testing). This article provides an overview of the relevant substantiation requirements for dietary supplement claims and then reviews FTC's and FDA's guidance on key ingredient claims; relevant case law; use of key ingredient claims in the advertising of other consumer products; and the National Advertising Division of the Better Business Bureau, Inc.'s (NAD's) approach to evaluating key ingredient claims for dietary supplements. This article concludes that key ingredient claims--provided they are presented in a truthful and non-deceptive manner--are permissible, and should be upheld in litigation and cases subject to industry self-regulation. This article further concludes that the NAD's approach to key ingredient claims provides practical guidance for crafting and substantiating dietary supplement key ingredient claims.

  15. The requirements for a new full scale subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mckinney, M. O.; Luidens, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Justification and requirements are presented for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed.

  16. Full scale subsonic wind tunnel requirements and design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mort, K. W.; Hickey, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The justification and requirements are summarized for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full-scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL aircraft propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed. The design studies showed that the structural cost of this facility is the most important cost factor. For this reason (and other considerations such as requirements for engine exhaust gas purging) an open-return wind tunnel having two test sections was selected. The major technical problem in the design of an open-return wind tunnel is maintaining good test section flow quality in the presence of external winds. This problem has been studied extensively, and inlet and exhaust systems which provide satisfactory attenuation of the effects of external winds on test section flow quality were developed.

  17. Gaze Stabilization During Locomotion Requires Full Body Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Miller, C. A.; Houser, J.; Richards, J. T.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Maintaining gaze stabilization during locomotion places substantial demands on multiple sensorimotor subsystems for precise coordination. Gaze stabilization during locomotion requires eye-head-trunk coordination (Bloomberg, et al., 1997) as well as the regulation of energy flow or shock-wave transmission through the body at high impact phases with the support surface (McDonald, et al., 1997). Allowing these excessive transmissions of energy to reach the head may compromise gaze stability. Impairments in these mechanisms may lead to the oscillopsia and decreased dynamic visual acuity seen in crewmembers returning from short and long duration spaceflight, as well as in patients with vestibular disorders (Hillman, et al., 1999). Thus, we hypothesize that stabilized gaze during locomotion results from full-body coordination of the eye-head-trunk system combined with the lower limb apparatus. The goal of this study was to determine how multiple, interdependent full- body sensorimotor subsystems aiding gaze stabilization during locomotion are functionally coordinated, and how they adaptively respond to spaceffight.

  18. FDA's planning for radiological emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, C.

    1981-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident pointed out a number of shortcomings in federal and state governmental planning for radiological emergencies. One concerns the handling of radiation-contaminated food. Pennsylvania, for example, has no legal limits for the amount of radionuclides permitted in food. An examination of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) guidelines for the control of radiation-contaminated food which may be sold in interstate commerce concludes that only the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and one provision of the Atomic Energy Act are applicable; that the adulterated food section of the Act is not an effective means of barring the food from interstate commerce; and that the FDA has not established any regulations allowing it to condemn such food as required by the Act. 98 references.

  19. FDA Approval for Imiquimod

    Cancer.gov

    On July 15, 2004, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of a new indication for Aldara® (imiquimod) topical cream for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC), a type of skin cancer.

  20. [Hygienic requirements for work organization of full-day schools].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, M I; Sazaniuk, Z I; Voronova, B Z; Aleksandrova, I E; Berezina, N O; Laponova, E D; Lashneva, I P; Polenova, M A; Sedova, A S; Shumkova, T V

    2009-01-01

    Physiological and hygienic studies under the conditions of a natural hygienic experiment were conducted to examine different variants of the organization of work of new types of general educational establishments--full-day schools. Over 580 pupils from 5 full-day schools were followed up. Organization of teaching children at full-day schools was found to mainly correspond to the age-related capabilities of pupils from primary and secondary classes. Of vital importance for maintenance of mental performance, good emotional and psychosomatic states are the organization of the intraschool environment, including a school plot, as well as the conditions for realization of additional education, motor activity of children, and recess. Health keeping in pupils from full-day schools is favored by the reduction in the duration of lessons to 35 minutes and day sleep for first-form children, the decrease in the number of pupils in a class, outdoor physical exercises in the middle of a school day (a primary school) and strolls after lessons, three meals a day, balanced additional education, medicopsychological accompaniment, optimization of studies and rest in children during a school year. PMID:19514287

  1. Doctors, drugs, and the FDA.

    PubMed

    Shanklin, D R

    1972-11-01

    This communication is directed to obstetricians, to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and to those individuals who might want to impose possibly unnecessary external structures on the practice of medicine. It is considered a positive that the patients of today are well informed and are more actively participating in therapeutic design. There is more veto power on the part of the patient and more concern over the trained ability of the physician. In the past physicians frequently made judgements individually, applying isolated and at times random standards for their decisions. Such actions were inevitable in an era when neither pathogenesis nor treatment was well understood. Now there is no excuse for such actions. Communication is easy, journals are widely circulated, and there are numerous refresher seminars. Increased specialization of knowledge has meant more corporate or group decisions for therapy. Current trends will continue to offer both opportunities and responsibilities. The opportunities are for better diffusion of knowledge, and the responsibility is to be informed. There can be a high level national standard for medical practice. As a beginning, the medical practice laws could use some uniform decisions. The FDA needs to show more responsiveness to changing knowledge and increased willingness to reconsider indications and contraindications in the light of newer experience. There is sufficient information available now to support the revocation of the approval of the use of diuretics in the management of human pregnancy. Another role of the FDA is the approval of new substances or new uses of old substances. The prostaglandins appear in this category, and the December 1972 issue will include the recent Brook Lodge Symposium on prostaglandins. The individual physician requires journal articles, individual experience, and designed trials in order to make judgements on patients who may have some factors not accounted for by groupthink or regulations

  2. FDA pharmaceutical quality oversight.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lawrence X; Woodcock, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The launch of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) Office of Pharmaceutical Quality (OPQ) is a milestone in FDA's efforts to assure that quality medicines are available to the American public. As a new super-office within CDER, OPQ is strategically organized to streamline regulatory processes, advance regulatory standards, align areas of expertise, and originate surveillance of drug quality. Supporting these objectives will be an innovative and systematic approach to product quality knowledge management and informatics. Concerted strategies will bring parity to the oversight of innovator and generic drugs as well as domestic and international facilities. OPQ will promote and encourage the adoption of emerging pharmaceutical technology to enhance pharmaceutical quality and potentially reinvigorate the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector in the United States. With a motto of "One Quality Voice," OPQ embodies the closer integration of review, inspection, surveillance, policy, and research for the purpose of strengthening pharmaceutical quality on a global scale.

  3. 75 FR 43107 - Revocation of Requirements for Full-Size Baby Cribs and Non-Full-Size Baby Cribs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... proposing to revoke? CPSC first published the full-size crib regulation, 16 CFR part 1508, in 1973 (38 FR... CFR part 1509, in 1976 (41 FR 6240 (Feb. 12, 1976)) and amended it in 1982. Both standards currently contain requirements pertaining to dimensions, spacing of components, hardware, construction and...

  4. A Guide to the FDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Annetta K.

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) collects information in seven areas: foods, cosmetics, human drugs, animal drugs and feeds, medical devices, biologics, and electronic radiological products. By using procedures outlined in the Freedom of Information Act, the public may get specific information from such FDA files as inspection…

  5. Will the Requirement by the US FDA to Simultaneously Co-Develop Companion Diagnostics (CDx) Delay the Approval of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for RTK-Rearranged (ROS1-, RET-, AXL-, PDGFR-α-, NTRK1-) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Globally?

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Soo, Ross A; Kubo, Akihito; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2014-01-01

    the availability of crizotinib in most countries, a more cost-effective way is for crizotinib to gain compendium listing for ROS1-rearranged NSCLC in treatment guidelines. However, without a formal indication from the FDA, a drug cannot be marketed for off label use, it is unlikely that payers public or private will routinely pay for molecular testing for ROS1-rearrangement in NSCLC let alone reimburse off label use of crizotinib. Similarly, several marketed tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the US (sorafenib, sunitinib, vandetanib, cabozantinib, regorafenib) are potent RET inhibitors in vitro. It does not make sense for any one pharmaceutical company to shoulder the full cost of developing a particular CDx for RET-rearranged NSCLC where, once approved, it may be used by other pharmaceutical companies to gain addition labeling approval for their own RET inhibitors. Thus, the requirement by the US FDA that a specific CDx have to be co-developed and standardized for each of the molecular subtype of NSCLC as part of the drug approval process, while prudent, may have the un-intended consequence of deterring clinical development of these TKIs in these very rare molecular subsets of NSCLC. While we all march to the drumbeat of precision cancer medicine, the stringent requirement of co-development CDx for each molecular subtype of solid tumor may inadvertently make this goal substantially more difficult to achieve. PMID:24744988

  6. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... and acronyms) Brand Name FDA Approval Date Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV ... AZT, ZDV) Retrovir March 19, 1987 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and later alter reverse ...

  7. 16 CFR 1219.2 - Requirements for full-size baby cribs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, P.O. Box 0700, West... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for full-size baby cribs. 1219... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS (Eff. June 28, 2011) § 1219.2 Requirements for...

  8. Despite 2007 law requiring FDA hotline to be included in print drug ads, reporting of adverse events by consumers still low.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongyi; Goldsmith, John; Aikin, Kathryn J; Encinosa, William E; Nardinelli, Clark

    2012-05-01

    In 2007 the federal government began requiring drug makers to include in their print direct-to-consumer advertisements information for consumers on how to contact the Food and Drug Administration directly, either by phone or through the agency's website, to report any adverse events that they experienced after taking a prescription drug. Adverse events can range from minor skin problems like itching to serious injuries or illness that result in hospitalization, permanent disability, or even death. Even so, current rates of adverse event reporting are low. We studied adverse event reports about 123 drugs that came from patients before and after the enactment of the print advertising requirement and estimated that requirement's impact with model simulations. We found that if monthly spending on print direct-to-consumer advertising increased from zero to $7.7 million per drug, the presence of the Food and Drug Administration contact information tripled the increase in patient-reported adverse events, compared to what would have happened in the absence of the law. However, the absolute monthly increase was fewer than 0.24 reports per drug, suggesting that the public health impact of the increase was small and that the adverse event reporting rate would still be low. The study results suggest that additional measures, such as more publicity about the Adverse Event Reporting System or more consumer education, should be considered to promote patient reporting of adverse events.

  9. Avanti overcomes safety concerns raised by FDA.

    PubMed

    1995-02-01

    As an alternative to the latex condom, the Avanti polyurethane condom represents the first technological breakthrough in the condom industry in 70 years. The manufacturer, London International in Florida, claims to have spent $16 million developing this condom. Although the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determined that the condom is safe, it questioned test results showing that the polyurethane material did not biodegrade under relatively mild conditions. Therefore, the FDA required the company to perform additional animal toxicity studies, which showed that the product was safe for rabbits. This was necessary because certain polyurethanes when degrading in mild conditions release a known carcinogen and a potential toxin. Canadian officials are also reviewing Avanti for approval; Canada does not have standards for plastic condoms either. The co-inventor of the Avanti condom said in San Diego that the toxicity studies had been conducted to satisfy the FDA, and there were no indications that the polyurethane condom could cause cancer or other adverse reactions. However, one study was located in the literature linking asthma and contact dermatitis to substances released from polyurethane chemicals. Another issue was the silicone used as the lubricant for the condom. Long-term exposure to silicone is still debated, but moderate amounts are harmless, according a Canadian official. The manufacturers are also considering providing Avanti with the nonoxynol-9 spermicide, which would need FDA approval. The safety of the Avanti's retention ring was also questioned. It is a rubber-based elastomer used for nonallergenic gloves, safe for people with allergies. In addition, polyurethane is not susceptible to ozone and oxidation, and its shelf life is three years, although it remains stable up to five years, according to durability tests. PMID:12290715

  10. FDA's perspectives on cardiovascular devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eric A; Patel-Raman, Sonna M; O'Callaghan, Kathryn; Hillebrenner, Matthew G

    2009-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision process for approving or clearing medical devices is often determined by a review of robust clinical data and extensive preclinical testing of the device. The mission statement for the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) is to review the information provided by manufacturers so that it can promote and protect the health of the public by ensuring the safety and effectiveness of medical devices deemed appropriate for human use (Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act, Section 903(b)(1, 2(C)), December 31, 2004; accessed December 17, 2008 http://www.fda.gov/opacom/laws/fdcact/fdctoc.htm). For high-risk devices, such as ventricular assist devices (VADs), mechanical heart valves, stents, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices, pacemakers, and defibrillators, the determination is based on FDA's review of extensive preclinical bench and animal testing followed by use of the device in a clinical trial in humans. These clinical trials allow the manufacturer to evaluate a device in the intended use population. FDA reviews the data from the clinical trial to determine if the device performed as predicted and the clinical benefits outweigh the risks. This article reviews the regulatory framework for different marketing applications related to cardiovascular devices and describes the process of obtaining approval to study a cardiovascular device in a U.S. clinical trial.

  11. 78 FR 23137 - Implementation of Full-Service Intelligent Mail Requirements for Automation Prices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... Rulemaking in the Federal Register (77 FR 63771-63781) to require use of full-service Intelligent Mail to... prior to January 26, 2014. Mailer IDs (MIDs) and Customer Registration IDs (CRIDs) Comments...

  12. 16 CFR 1219.2 - Requirements for full-size baby cribs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for full-size baby cribs. 1219... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS (Eff. June 28, 2011) § 1219.2 Requirements for...

  13. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... blood-forming system. back to top Regulation of Stem Cells FDA regulates stem cells in the U.S. to ...

  14. FDA Approves New Weight-Loss Device

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159362.html FDA Approves New Weight-Loss Device Surgically implanted port allows obese patients to ... have been unable to lose weight and maintain weight loss using nonsurgical treatments. The FDA approval is for ...

  15. Philip Morris' FDA gambit: good for public health?

    PubMed

    Givel, Michael

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the 2004 USA Dewine-Kennedy Bill is congruent with Philip Morris' core policy principles for United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation of tobacco and what impact that would have on the public health. I compared the Dewine-Kennedy Bill with 1999 Philip Morris core policy principles for FDA regulation. Additional supporting data on FDA regulation from 1998 to the present were collected from previously secret tobacco industry documents, relevant newspaper reports from Nexis-Lexis, federal statutes, and federal regulations. The main outcome measure of the study is a comparison, summary, and analysis of the Dewine-Kennedy Bill with Philip Morris' core principles for FDA regulation, and the result is that the Dewine-Kennedy Bill is compatible with almost all of Philip Morris' core principles on FDA regulation. In conclusion, The Dewine-Kennedy Bill, at best, was mixed in terms of the enhancement of the public health. On the one hand, proponents of this legislation argued stronger FDA regulatory requirements would have some effect on reducing youth and adult tobacco consumption. On the other hand, tobacco products would have remained a politically and economically viable and legal product consumed by millions of Americans many of whom would have continued to suffer from tobacco-related illnesses and deaths.

  16. 75 FR 81788 - Revocation of Requirements for Full-Size Baby Cribs and Non-Full-Size Baby Cribs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... (38 FR 32129 (Nov. 21, 1973)) and amended it in 1982. The CPSC published the regulation for non-full-size cribs, 16 CFR part 1509, in 1976 (41 FR 6240 (Feb. 12, 1976)), and amended it in 1982. Both.... Comment on the Proposal In the Federal Register of July 23, 2010 (75 FR 43107), the Commission published...

  17. Internet Database Review: The FDA BBS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomaiuolo, Nicholas G.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the electronic bulletin board system (BBS) of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that is accessible through the Internet. Highlights include how to gain access; the menu-driven software; other electronic sources of FDA information; and adding value. Examples of the FDA BBS menu and the help screen are included. (LRW)

  18. 16 CFR 1220.2 - Requirements for non-full-size baby cribs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Safety Specification for Non-Full-Size Baby Cribs/Play Yards, approved October 15, 2010. The Director of... CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM International, 100 Bar Harbor Drive, PO Box 0700, West... 406-10a, comply with the following warning requirement: (i) Child can become entrapped and die...

  19. 16 CFR 1220.2 - Requirements for non-full-size baby cribs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Safety Specification for Non-Full-Size Baby Cribs/Play Yards, approved October 15, 2010. The Director of... CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from ASTM International, 100 Bar Harbor Drive, PO Box 0700, West... 406-10a, comply with the following warning requirement: (i) Child can become entrapped and die...

  20. US FDA oncology drug approvals in 2014.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Juliet E; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a close second to heart disease for cause of death in the USA, and could soon surpass heart disease as the population ages and the incidence of cancer continues to increase. While heart disease can be addressed through behavior modification and education (e.g., smoking cessation, dietary changes, exercises that promote cardiovascular fitness), pharmacology and improved surgical devices and methods, cancer ultimately requires improved and novel drug treatments to bring mortality rates down. In 2014, the US FDA approved 17 drugs and/or drug combinations in 12 disease sites for a total of 19 indications in melanoma, hematologic malignancies, gastrointestinal carcinoma, non-small-cell lung cancer, gynecologic malignancies and lymphoma/lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26039742

  1. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  2. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  3. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  4. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  5. 21 CFR 806.30 - FDA access to records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICES; REPORTS OF CORRECTIONS AND REMOVALS Reports and Records § 806.30 FDA access to records. Each device manufacturer or importer required under this part to maintain records and...

  6. 21 CFR 316.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ORPHAN DRUGS Orphan-drug Exclusive Approval § 316.34 FDA recognition of... written notice recognizing exclusive approval once the marketing application for a designated orphan-drug... orphan-drug exclusive approval for the full 7-year term of exclusive approval. (b) When a...

  7. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  8. 76 FR 38184 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; FDA Recall...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... regulated firms to conduct recalls. Variables in the type of products, the quantity and level of... Collection; Comment Request; FDA Recall Regulations AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... reporting requirements on FDA recalls. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on the...

  9. 21 CFR 1.279 - When must prior notice be submitted to FDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When must prior notice be submitted to FDA? 1.279... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Prior Notice of Imported Food Requirements to Submit Prior Notice of Imported Food § 1.279 When must prior notice be submitted to FDA? (a) Except as provided in paragraph...

  10. Access to F.D.A. Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinovic, Dianna

    Prior to the enactment of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), little of the data collected by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was made public or could be obtained from the agency. Although the FDA files are now open, information is considered exempt from public disclosure when it involves regulatory procedures, program guidelines, work…

  11. Current FDA directives for promoting public health

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.H. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The current directions of the FDA are outlined. The underlying philosophy of the FDA under the Reagan Administration is that both the private sector and the government must address the responsibilities to which they are best suited for the health-care system to work more efficiently. To facilitate this, FDA is conducting comprehensive reviews of FDA regulations and the drug-evaluation process. There are many dimensions to promoting public health, and the FDA alone cannot assure an adequate supply of safe and effective drugs. Innovative science and technology are needed to develop new drugs, followed by maximum potentiation (maximum good and least harm) after FDA approval. Hospital pharmacists have a role in maximizing the potential benefits of drugs through pharmacy and therapeutics committees. The current status of the pilot program for patient package inserts is described. The response at a recent hearing on the program indicates that the responsibility to protect the public health is shared by the government, health professions, industry, and the public. The FDA's campaign on sodium is based on that shared responsibility. By improving communication and building upon their common objections, both pharmacy and the FDA can do their jobs successfully.

  12. Performance of a full-scale ITER metal hydride storage bed in comparison with requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazov, S.; Glugla, M.; Fanghaenel, E.; Perevezentsev, A.; Wagner, R.

    2008-07-15

    The storage of hydrogen isotopes as metal hydride is the technique chosen for the ITER Tritium Plant Storage and Delivery System (SDS). A prototype storage bed of a full-scale has been designed, manufactured and intensively tested at the Tritium Laboratory, addressing main performance parameters specified for the ITER application. The main requirements for the hydrogen storage bed are a strict physical limitation of the tritium storage capacity (currently 70 g T{sub 2}), a high supply flow rate of hydrogen isotopes, in-situ calorimetry capabilities with an accuracy of 1 g and a fully tritium compatible design. The pressure composition isotherm of the ZrCo hydrogen system, as a reference material for ITER, is characterised by significant slope. As a result technical implementation of the ZrCo hydride bed in the SDS system requires further considerations. The paper presents the experience from the operation of ZrCo getter bed including loading/de-loading operation, calorimetric loop performance, and active gas cooling of the bed for fast absorption operation. The implications of hydride material characteristics on the SDS system configuration and design are discussed. (authors)

  13. CitB is required for full virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Masood; Taheri, Elaheh; Tarighi, Saeed

    2015-10-01

    To identify novel virulence associated genes in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), a Xoo isolate (XooIR42), obtained from north of Iran, was selected to generate a mini-Tn5 transposon mutation library. One mutant (XooM176) that indicated reduced virulence on rice plants, while grew similar to wild type was selected. This mutant had an insertion in a coding region with 96% amino acid identity to a response regulator of Xoo KACC10331, citB (Xoo_RS12710). Genome analysis of Xoo KACC10331 indicated several genes including a flagelin protein (FlgL) and a chemotaxis protein (Xoo_RS12720) which were identified as virulence genes 4297 and 1403 nucleotides from the citB, respectively. The swarming motility, resistance to hydrogen peroxide, induced a hypersensitive response, in planta growth and pathogenicity were reduced in XooM176 mutant compared to that of wild-type. A plasmid containing the full citB gene of Xoo KACC10331was sufficient to complement the XooM176 mutant for lesion formation and resistance to hydrogen peroxide. We therefore propose that Xoo requires CitB for full pathogenicity in rice plants and also for protection against oxidative stress.

  14. EXTENSIN18 is required for full male fertility as well as normal vegetative growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Pratibha; Saha, Prasenjit; Ray, Tui; Tang, Yuhong; Yang, David; Cannon, Maura C.

    2015-01-01

    EXTENSINS (EXTs) are a 65-member subfamily of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) of which 20 putatively form crosslinking networks in the cell wall. These 20 classical EXTs are involved at the start of new wall assembly as evidenced by a requirement for EXT3 during cytokinesis, and the ability of some EXTs to polymerize in vitro into dendritic patterns. EXT3 was previously shown to form pulcherosine (three Tyrosines) cross-links. Little direct data exists on the other 19 classical EXTs. Here, we describe the phenotypes of ext18 mutants and rescued progeny as well as associated expression profiles of all 20 classical EXT genes. We found that EXT18 is required for full male fertility, as well as for normal vegetative growth. EXT18 has potential to form crosslinking networks via di-iso-di-tyrosine (four Tyrosines) covalent bonds, and not via pulcherosine due to deficit of lone Tyrosines. This together with ext18 defective pollen grains and pollen tubes, and reduced plant size, suggests that EXT18-type EXTs are important contributors to wall integrity, in pollen and other rapidly extending walls. The data also show that a knockout of EXT18 had a pleiotropic affect on the expression of several EXTs, as did the reintroduction of the native EXT18 gene, thus supporting the thesis that transcription of groups of EXTs are co-regulated and work in different combinations to make distinctive inputs into wall assembly of different cell types. These insights contribute to basic knowledge of cell wall self-assembly in different cell types, and potentially enable biotechnological advances in biomass increase and plant fertility control. PMID:26257758

  15. The full-of-bacteria gene is required for phagosome maturation during immune defense in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Mohammed Ali; Tracy, Charles; Kahr, Walter H.A.

    2011-01-01

    Arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a fatal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the VPS33B or VPS16B genes. Both encode homologues of the Vps33p and Vps16p subunits of the HOPS complex necessary for fusions of vacuoles in yeast. Here, we describe a mutation in the full-of-bacteria (fob) gene, which encodes Drosophila Vps16B. Flies null for fob are homozygous viable and fertile. They exhibit, however, a defect in their immune defense that renders them hypersensitive to infections with nonpathogenic bacteria. fob hemocytes (fly macrophages) engulf bacteria but fail to digest them. Phagosomes undergo early steps of maturation and transition to a Rab7-positive stage, but do not mature to fully acidified phagolysosomes. This reflects a specific requirement of fob in the fusion of phagosomes with late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, cargo of autophagosomes as well as endosomes exhibit normal lysosomal delivery in fob cells. These findings suggest that defects in phagosome maturation may contribute to symptoms of ARC patients including recurring infections. PMID:21282466

  16. The tomato xylem sap protein XSP10 is required for full susceptibility to Fusarium wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Krasikov, Vladimir; Dekker, Henk L; Rep, Martijn; Takken, Frank L W

    2011-01-01

    XSP10 is an abundant 10 kDa protein found in the xylem sap of tomato. The protein displays structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are involved in various physiological processes, including disease resistance, and some are able to bind and transfer diverse lipid molecules. XSP10 abundance in xylem sap declines upon infection with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), implying involvement of XSP10 in the plant-pathogen interaction. Here, the biochemical characterization of XSP10 with respect to fatty acid-binding properties is reported; a weak but significant binding to saturated fatty acids was found. Furthermore, XSP10-silenced tomato plants were engineered and it was found that these plants exhibited reduced disease symptom development upon infection with a virulent strain of Fol. Interestingly, the reduced symptoms observed did not correlate with an altered expression profile for known reporter genes of plant defence (PR-1 and WIPI). This work demonstrates that XSP10 has lipid-binding properties and is required for full susceptibility of tomato to Fusarium wilt.

  17. Intracellular acidification is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by miraculin

    PubMed Central

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Nirasawa, Satoru; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    Acidification of the glycoprotein, miraculin (MCL), induces sweet taste in humans, but not in mice. The sweet taste induced by MCL is more intense when acidification occurs with weak acids as opposed to strong acids. MCL interacts with the human sweet receptor subunit hTAS1R2, but the mechanisms by which the acidification of MCL activates the sweet taste receptor remain largely unexplored. The work reported here speaks directly to this activation by utilizing a sweet receptor TAS1R2 + TAS1R3 assay. In accordance with previous data, MCL-applied cells displayed a pH dependence with citric acid (weak acid) being right shifted to that with hydrochloric acid (strong acid). When histidine residues in both the intracellular and extracellular region of hTAS1R2 were exchanged for alanine, taste-modifying effect of MCL was reduced or abolished. Stronger intracellular acidification of HEK293 cells was induced by citric acid than by HCl and taste-modifying effect of MCL was proportional to intracellular pH regardless of types of acids. These results suggest that intracellular acidity is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by MCL. PMID:26960429

  18. Identification of an Extracellular Endoglucanase That Is Required for Full Virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongling; Zhuo, Tao; Fan, Xiaojing; Zou, Huasong

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri causes citrus canker disease, which is characterized by the formation of water-soaked lesions, white or yellow spongy pustules and brown corky canker. In this work, we report the contribution of extracellular endoglucanase to canker development during infection. The ectopic expression of nine putative cellulases in Escherichia coli indicated that two endoglucanases, BglC3 and EngXCA, show carboxymethyl cellulase activity. Both bglC3 and engXCA genes were transcribed in X. citri subsp. citri, however, only BglC3 protein was detected outside the cell in western blot analysis. The deletion of bglC3 gene resulted in complete loss of extracellular carboxymethyl cellulase activity and delayed the onset of canker symptoms in both infiltration- and wound-inoculation assays. When growing in plant tissue, the cell density of bglC3 mutant was lower than that of the wild type. Our data demonstrated that BglC3 is an extracellular endoglucanase required for the full virulence of X. citri subsp. citri. PMID:26950296

  19. The RecA protein of Helicobacter pylori requires a posttranslational modification for full activity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2004-02-01

    The RecA protein is a central component of the homologous recombination machinery and of the SOS system in most bacteria. In performing these functions, it is involved in DNA repair processes and plays an important role in natural transformation competence. This may be especially important in Helicobacter pylori, where an unusually high degree of microdiversity among strains is generated by homologous recombination. We have suggested previously that the H. pylori RecA protein is subject to posttranslational modifications that result in a slight shift in its electrophoretic mobility. Here we show that at least two genes downstream of recA are involved in this modification and that this process is dependent on genes involved in glycosylation and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis of a putative glycosylation site results in production of an unmodified RecA protein. This posttranslational modification is not involved in membrane targeting or cell division functions but is necessary for the full function of RecA in DNA repair. Thus, it might be an adaptation to the specific requirements of H. pylori in its natural environment. PMID:14729704

  20. Intracellular acidification is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by miraculin.

    PubMed

    Sanematsu, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Nirasawa, Satoru; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-01-01

    Acidification of the glycoprotein, miraculin (MCL), induces sweet taste in humans, but not in mice. The sweet taste induced by MCL is more intense when acidification occurs with weak acids as opposed to strong acids. MCL interacts with the human sweet receptor subunit hTAS1R2, but the mechanisms by which the acidification of MCL activates the sweet taste receptor remain largely unexplored. The work reported here speaks directly to this activation by utilizing a sweet receptor TAS1R2 + TAS1R3 assay. In accordance with previous data, MCL-applied cells displayed a pH dependence with citric acid (weak acid) being right shifted to that with hydrochloric acid (strong acid). When histidine residues in both the intracellular and extracellular region of hTAS1R2 were exchanged for alanine, taste-modifying effect of MCL was reduced or abolished. Stronger intracellular acidification of HEK293 cells was induced by citric acid than by HCl and taste-modifying effect of MCL was proportional to intracellular pH regardless of types of acids. These results suggest that intracellular acidity is required for full activation of the sweet taste receptor by MCL. PMID:26960429

  1. The tomato xylem sap protein XSP10 is required for full susceptibility to Fusarium wilt disease

    PubMed Central

    Krasikov, Vladimir; Dekker, Henk L.; Rep, Martijn; Takken, Frank L.W.

    2011-01-01

    XSP10 is an abundant 10 kDa protein found in the xylem sap of tomato. The protein displays structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are involved in various physiological processes, including disease resistance, and some are able to bind and transfer diverse lipid molecules. XSP10 abundance in xylem sap declines upon infection with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), implying involvement of XSP10 in the plant–pathogen interaction. Here, the biochemical characterization of XSP10 with respect to fatty acid-binding properties is reported; a weak but significant binding to saturated fatty acids was found. Furthermore, XSP10-silenced tomato plants were engineered and it was found that these plants exhibited reduced disease symptom development upon infection with a virulent strain of Fol. Interestingly, the reduced symptoms observed did not correlate with an altered expression profile for known reporter genes of plant defence (PR-1 and WIPI). This work demonstrates that XSP10 has lipid-binding properties and is required for full susceptibility of tomato to Fusarium wilt. PMID:20974736

  2. The type VI secretion system gene cluster of Salmonella typhimurium: required for full virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Guo, Ji-Tao; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2013-07-01

    Type VI secretion system (T6SS) has increasingly been believed to participate in the infection process for many bacterial pathogens, but its role in the virulence of Salmonella typhimurium remains unclear. To look into this, we deleted the T6SS cluster from the genome of S. typhimurium 14028s and analyzed the phenotype of the resulting T6SS knockout mutant (T6SSKO mutant) in vitro and in vivo. We found that the T6SSKO mutant exhibited reduced capability in colonizing the spleen and liver in an in vivo colonization competition model in BALB/c mice infected by the oral route. Additionally, infection via intraperitoneal administration also showed that the T6SSKO mutant was less capable of colonizing the mouse spleen and liver than the wild-type strain. We did not detect significant differences between the T6SSKO and wild-type strains in epithelial cell invasion tests. However, in the macrophage RAW264.7 cell line, the T6SSKO mutant survived and proliferated significantly more poorly than the wild-type strain. These findings indicate that T6SS gene cluster is required for full virulence of S. typhimurium 14028s in BALB/c mice, possibly due to its roles in bacterial survival and proliferation in macrophages.

  3. Detoxification of α-tomatine by Cladosporium fulvum is required for full virulence on tomato.

    PubMed

    Ökmen, Bilal; Etalo, Desalegn W; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Bouwmeester, Harro J; de Vos, Ric C H; Collemare, Jérôme; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2013-06-01

    · α-Tomatine is an antifungal glycoalkaloid that provides basal defense to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). However, tomato pathogens overcome this basal defense barrier by the secretion of tomatinases that degrade α-tomatine into the less fungitoxic compounds β-tomatine and tomatidine. Although pathogenic on tomato, it has been reported that the biotrophic fungus Cladosporium fulvum is unable to detoxify α-tomatine. · Here, we present a functional analysis of the glycosyl hydrolase (GH10), CfTom1, which is orthologous to fungal tomatinases. · We show that C. fulvum hydrolyzes α-tomatine into tomatidine in vitro and during the infection of tomato, which is fully attributed to the activity of CfTom1, as shown by the heterologous expression of this enzyme in tomato. Accordingly, ∆cftom1 mutants of C. fulvum are more sensitive to α-tomatine and are less virulent than the wild-type fungus on tomato. · Although α-tomatine is thought to be localized in the vacuole, we show that it is also present in the apoplast, where it is hydrolyzed by CfTom1 on infection. The accumulation of tomatidine during infection appears to be toxic to tomato cells and does not suppress defense responses, as suggested previously. Altogether, our results show that CfTom1 is responsible for the detoxification of α-tomatine by C. fulvum, and is required for full virulence of this fungus on tomato.

  4. Beyond biotechnology: FDA regulation of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Miller, John

    2003-01-01

    Nanotechnology, which involves investigating and manipulating matter at the atomic and molecular levels, may radically transform industry and society. Because nanotechnology could introduce whole new classes of materials and products, it could present an array of novel challenges to regulatory agencies. In this note, John Miller explores the regulatory challenges facing the Food and Drug Administration in regulating nanomedical products. First, the FDA will have trouble fitting the products into the agency's classification scheme. Second, it will be difficult for the FDA to maintain adequate scientific expertise in the field. He concludes that the FDA should consider implementing several reforms now to ensure that it is adequately prepared to regulate nanomedicine.

  5. Planning for effective interaction with FDA.

    PubMed

    Spurgin, Elizabeth A

    2004-12-01

    Manufacturers of diabetes devices can facilitate the formal regulatory approval process through early interaction with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Effective planning can help manage commonly perceived risks of interaction with the Agency, introduce new technologies to regulatory reviewers, and inform the manufacturer's product development strategy. This article reviews key aspects of the FDA evaluation process and suggests strategies that may facilitate effective communication with the Agency. Integrating early communication with FDA into broader product commercialization planning can streamline regulatory review and lead to early product launch into reimbursed markets.

  6. FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159648.html FDA Approves Eye Implant for Aging Boomers Tiny lens reshapes cornea to improve focus ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An implant that helps the aging eye focus on small print and nearby objects ...

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions Share Tweet Linkedin ... top What to Do if You Suspect Traumatic Brain Injury Anyone with signs of moderate or severe ...

  8. FDA Approves First Immunotherapy for Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved nivolumab (Opdivo®) for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma whose disease has relapsed or worsened after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  9. FDA Warns Ovarian Cancer Tests Not Reliable

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160880.html FDA Warns Ovarian Cancer Tests Not Reliable May delay preventive therapies for ... Sept. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Screening tests for ovarian cancer are not reliable and should not be used, ...

  10. FDA Bolsters Warnings about Class of Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160078.html FDA Bolsters Warnings About Class of Antibiotics Fluoroquinolones such as Cipro, Levaquin should be reserved ... it's strengthening label warnings on a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones because the drugs can lead to ...

  11. FDA Expands Advice on Statin Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... of liver damage. back to top Reports of Memory Loss FDA has been investigating reports of cognitive ... included assessments of cognitive function. The reports about memory loss, forgetfulness and confusion span all statin products ...

  12. 42 CFR 84.175 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods....175 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces shall be designed and constructed to fit persons...

  13. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces...

  14. 42 CFR 84.175 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods....175 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces shall be designed and constructed to fit persons...

  15. 42 CFR 84.135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces and full facepieces...

  16. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  17. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not...

  18. 42 CFR 84.75 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.75 Half-mask facepieces, full... which shall not reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the apparatus. (c) Apparatus...

  19. 42 CFR 84.75 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.75 Half-mask facepieces, full... which shall not reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the apparatus. (c) Apparatus...

  20. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not interfere... attached to the mouthpiece or gas mask and provide an airtight seal. (e) Facepieces shall be designed...

  1. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not interfere... attached to the mouthpiece or gas mask and provide an airtight seal. (e) Facepieces shall be designed...

  2. 42 CFR 84.118 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.118 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, and... reduce the respiratory protective qualities of the gas mask. (c) Half-mask facepieces shall not interfere... attached to the mouthpiece or gas mask and provide an airtight seal. (e) Facepieces shall be designed...

  3. 42 CFR 457.930 - Full investigation, resolution, and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND... and apparent instances of fraud and abuse. Once the State determines that a full investigation is... with and refer potential fraud and abuse cases to the State program integrity unit, if such a...

  4. 42 CFR 457.930 - Full investigation, resolution, and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND... and apparent instances of fraud and abuse. Once the State determines that a full investigation is... with and refer potential fraud and abuse cases to the State program integrity unit, if such a...

  5. 42 CFR 457.930 - Full investigation, resolution, and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND... and apparent instances of fraud and abuse. Once the State determines that a full investigation is... with and refer potential fraud and abuse cases to the State program integrity unit, if such a...

  6. 42 CFR 457.930 - Full investigation, resolution, and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND... and apparent instances of fraud and abuse. Once the State determines that a full investigation is... with and refer potential fraud and abuse cases to the State program integrity unit, if such a...

  7. 42 CFR 457.930 - Full investigation, resolution, and reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND... and apparent instances of fraud and abuse. Once the State determines that a full investigation is... with and refer potential fraud and abuse cases to the State program integrity unit, if such a...

  8. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  9. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  10. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  11. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  12. 16 CFR 1500.82 - Exemption from full labeling and other requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... from full labeling compliance otherwise applicable under the act because of the size of the package or... being classified as a “banned hazardous substance” as defined by section 2(q)(1)(A) of the act...

  13. FDA use of international standards in the premarket review process.

    PubMed

    Rechen, E; Barth, D J; Marlowe, D; Kroger, L

    1998-01-01

    "This is an exciting time," says Eric Rechen, policy analyst in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Device Evaluation (ODE). "We're entering an era in which standards will have a more prominent role in the review of medical devices than ever before." During the past 10 years, there has been significant growth in the importance of standards in regulatory processes, as Donald J. Barth, regulatory staff manager for the Medical Products Group at Hewlett Packard Company, notes in setting the stage for discussion of the latest developments. Donald Marlowe, director of the FDA's Office of Science and Technology, and Rechen explain the use of standards in the regulatory review process as part of FDA efforts to ensure public safety in a time of shrinking agency resources. Marlowe discusses provisions of the FDA Modernization Act of 1997 that allow manufacturers to submit a declaration of conformity to a standard to satisfy premarket review requirements. A guidance on the recognition and use of consensus standards, a list of recognized standards, and a list of frequently asked questions are available at the Web site of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) at www.fda.gov/cdrh and via the AAMI Web site at www.aami.org. The information is also available by telephone via CDRH Facts on Demand at 800-899-0381. Rechen provides details about the two new approaches for premarket notifications available under the new 510(k) paradigm. Manufacturers may demonstrate substantial equivalence through special and abbreviated 510(k)s in addition to traditional 510(k)s. A copy of the new 510(k) paradigm is available at the AAMI and CDRH Web sites and through Facts on Demand. As the FDA and many manufacturers enter the new world of abbreviated and special 510(k)s, Larry Kroger, GE Medical Systems, provides his comments based on the 4 years of experience manufacturers of diagnostic x-ray products have had with simplified 510(k)s. A comparison of the European

  14. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  15. Cytokinin Production by the Rice Blast Fungus Is a Pivotal Requirement for Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chanclud, Emilie; Kisiala, Anna; Emery, Neil R. J; Chalvon, Véronique; Ducasse, Aurélie; Romiti-Michel, Corinne; Gravot, Antoine; Kroj, Thomas; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce cytokinin (CK) hormones for controlling key developmental processes like source/sink distribution, cell division or programmed cell-death. Some plant pathogens have been shown to produce CKs but the function of this mimicry production by non-tumor inducing pathogens, has yet to be established. Here we identify a gene required for CK biosynthesis, CKS1, in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The fungal-secreted CKs are likely perceived by the plant during infection since the transcriptional regulation of rice CK-responsive genes is altered in plants infected by the mutants in which CKS1 gene was deleted. Although cks1 mutants showed normal in vitro growth and development, they were severely affected for in planta growth and virulence. Moreover, we showed that the cks1 mutant triggered enhanced induction of plant defenses as manifested by an elevated oxidative burst and expression of defense-related markers. In addition, the contents of sugars and key amino acids for fungal growth were altered in and around the infection site by the cks1 mutant in a different manner than by the control strain. These results suggest that fungal-derived CKs are key effectors required for dampening host defenses and affecting sugar and amino acid distribution in and around the infection site. PMID:26900703

  16. Cytokinin Production by the Rice Blast Fungus Is a Pivotal Requirement for Full Virulence.

    PubMed

    Chanclud, Emilie; Kisiala, Anna; Emery, Neil R J; Chalvon, Véronique; Ducasse, Aurélie; Romiti-Michel, Corinne; Gravot, Antoine; Kroj, Thomas; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-02-01

    Plants produce cytokinin (CK) hormones for controlling key developmental processes like source/sink distribution, cell division or programmed cell-death. Some plant pathogens have been shown to produce CKs but the function of this mimicry production by non-tumor inducing pathogens, has yet to be established. Here we identify a gene required for CK biosynthesis, CKS1, in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The fungal-secreted CKs are likely perceived by the plant during infection since the transcriptional regulation of rice CK-responsive genes is altered in plants infected by the mutants in which CKS1 gene was deleted. Although cks1 mutants showed normal in vitro growth and development, they were severely affected for in planta growth and virulence. Moreover, we showed that the cks1 mutant triggered enhanced induction of plant defenses as manifested by an elevated oxidative burst and expression of defense-related markers. In addition, the contents of sugars and key amino acids for fungal growth were altered in and around the infection site by the cks1 mutant in a different manner than by the control strain. These results suggest that fungal-derived CKs are key effectors required for dampening host defenses and affecting sugar and amino acid distribution in and around the infection site. PMID:26900703

  17. FDA approved drugs as potential Ebola treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Coffee, Megan

    2015-01-01

    In the search for treatments for the Ebola Virus, multiple screens of FDA drugs have led to the identification of several with promising in vitro activity. These compounds were not originally developed as antivirals and some have been further tested in mouse in vivo models. We put forward the opinion that some of these drugs could be evaluated further and move into the clinic as they are already FDA approved and in many cases readily available. This may be important if there is a further outbreak in future and no other therapeutic is available. PMID:25789163

  18. 42 CFR 84.1135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces,...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces,...

  20. 42 CFR 84.1135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask facepieces... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces,...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods... Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask...

  2. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.198 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1135 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods... Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1135 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, hoods, helmets, and mouthpieces; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask...

  4. 42 CFR 84.198 - Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.198 Half-mask facepieces, full facepieces, mouthpieces, hoods, and helmets; fit; minimum requirements. (a) Half-mask...

  5. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii produces an endoglucanase that is required for full virulence in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Burbank, Lindsey; Roper, M Caroline

    2012-04-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, a xylem-dwelling bacterium, is the causal agent of Stewart's wilt and blight of sweet corn. The goal of this study was to characterize the only gene in the P. stewartii subsp. stewartii genome predicted to encode an endoglucanase (EGase); this gene was designated engY. Culture supernatants from P. stewartii subsp. stewartii and Escherichia coli expressing recombinant EngY protein possessed both EGase and xylanase activities. Deletion of engY abolished EGase and xylanase activity, demonstrating that EngY appears to be the major EGase or xylanase produced by P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. Most importantly, our results show that EngY contributes to movement in the xylem and disease severity during the wilting phase of Stewart's wilt but is not required for water-soaked lesion formation. PMID:22122328

  6. SCAP/SREBP pathway is required for the full steroidogenic response to cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Van Yserloo, Brian; Golkowski, Martin G; Ong, Shao-En; Beavo, Joseph A; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-09-20

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) stimulates steroidogenesis largely through a surge in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Steroidogenic rates are also critically dependent on the availability of cholesterol at mitochondrial sites of synthesis. This cholesterol is provided by cellular uptake of lipoproteins, mobilization of intracellular lipid, and de novo synthesis. Whether and how these pathways are coordinated by cAMP are poorly understood. Recent phosphoproteomic analyses of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation sites in MA10 Leydig cells suggested that cAMP regulates multiple steps in these processes, including activation of the SCAP/SREBP pathway. SCAP [sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein] acts as a cholesterol sensor responsible for regulating intracellular cholesterol balance. Its role in cAMP-mediated control of steroidogenesis has not been explored. We used two CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9) knockout approaches to test the role of SCAP in steroidogenesis. Our results demonstrate that SCAP is required for progesterone production induced by concurrent inhibition of the cAMP phosphodiesterases PDE4 and PDE8. These inhibitors increased SCAP phosphorylation, SREBP2 activation, and subsequent expression of cholesterol biosynthetic genes, whereas SCAP deficiency largely prevented these effects. Reexpression of SCAP in SCAP-deficient cells restored SREBP2 protein expression and partially restored steroidogenic responses, confirming the requirement of SCAP-SREBP2 in steroidogenesis. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase and isoprenylation attenuated, whereas exogenously provided cholesterol augmented, PDE inhibitor-induced steroidogenesis, suggesting that the cholesterol substrate needed for steroidogenesis is provided by both de novo synthesis and isoprenylation-dependent mechanisms. Overall, these results demonstrate a novel role for LH/cAMP in SCAP

  7. β2-microglobulin is required for the full expression of xenobiotic-induced systemic autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth M; Hultman, Per; Toomey, Christopher B; Cauvi, David M; Kono, Dwight H; Konoc, Dwight H

    2011-01-01

    Mercury exposure in both humans and mice is associated with features of systemic autoimmunity. Murine HgCl₂-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA) requires MHC Class II, CD4⁺ T-cells, co-stimulatory molecules, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), similar to spontaneous models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). β₂-microglobulin (B2m) is required for functional MHC Class I molecules and the neonatal F(c) receptor (F(c)Rn). Deficiency of B2m in lupus-prone strains is consistently associated with reduced IgG levels, but with variable effects on other manifestations. Herein, we examined the role of B2m in mHgIA and show that in the absence of B2m, mercury-exposed mice failed to exhibit hypergammaglobulinemia, had reduced anti-nucleolar autoantibodies (ANoA), and had a lower incidence of immune complex deposits in splenic blood vessels, whereas IgG anti-chromatin autoantibodies and renal immune deposits were largely unaffected. Subclass analysis of the IgG anti-chromatin, however, revealed a significant reduction in the IgG₁ subtype. Examination of IFNγ, IL-4, and IL-2 in exposed skin, draining lymph nodes, and spleen following mercury exposure showed reduced IL-4 in the spleen and skin in B2m-deficient mice, consistent with the lower IgG₁ anti-chromatin levels, and reduced IFNγ expression in the skin. These findings demonstrate how a single genetic alteration can partially but significantly modify the clinical manifestations of systemic autoimmunity induced by exposure to xenobiotics.

  8. Reflections on the US FDA's Warning on Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing.

    PubMed

    Yim, Seon-Hee; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2014-12-01

    In November 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sent a warning letter to 23andMe, Inc. and ordered the company to discontinue marketing of the 23andMe Personal Genome Service (PGS) until it receives FDA marketing authorization for the device. The FDA considers the PGS as an unclassified medical device, which requires premarket approval or de novo classification. Opponents of the FDA's action expressed their concerns, saying that the FDA is overcautious and paternalistic, which violates consumers' rights and might stifle the consumer genomics field itself, and insisted that the agency should not restrict direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic testing without empirical evidence of harm. Proponents support the agency's action as protection of consumers from potentially invalid and almost useless information. This action was also significant, since it reflected the FDA's attitude towards medical application of next-generation sequencing techniques. In this review, we followed up on the FDA-23andMe incident and evaluated the problems and prospects for DTC genetic testing. PMID:25705152

  9. The FDA's Final Rule on Expedited Safety Reporting: Statistical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wittes, Janet; Crowe, Brenda; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Guettner, Achim; Hall, David; Jiang, Qi; Odenheimer, Daniel; Xia, H. Amy; Kramer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    In March 2011, a Final Rule for expedited reporting of serious adverse events took effect in the United States for studies conducted under an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. In December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) promulgated a final Guidance describing the operationalization of this Final Rule. The Rule and Guidance clarified that a clinical trial sponsor should have evidence suggesting causality before defining an unexpected serious adverse event as a suspected adverse reaction that would require expedited reporting to the FDA. The Rule's emphasis on the need for evidence suggestive of a causal relation should lead to fewer events being reported but, among those reported, a higher percentage actually being caused by the product being tested. This article reviews the practices that were common before the Final Rule was issued and the approach the New Rule specifies. It then discusses methods for operationalizing the Final Rule with particular focus on relevant statistical considerations. It concludes with a set of recommendations addressed to Sponsors and to the FDA in implementing the Final Rule. PMID:26550466

  10. FlhF Is Required for Swarming Motility and Full Pathogenicity of Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Mazzantini, Diletta; Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Gueye, Sokhna A.; Lupetti, Antonella; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Besides sporulation, Bacillus cereus can undergo a differentiation process in which short swimmer cells become elongated and hyperflagellated swarmer cells that favor migration of the bacterial community on a surface. The functionally enigmatic flagellar protein FlhF, which is the third paralog of the signal recognition particle (SRP) GTPases Ffh and FtsY, is required for swarming in many bacteria. Previous data showed that FlhF is involved in the control of the number and positioning of flagella in B. cereus. In this study, in silico analysis of B. cereus FlhF revealed that this protein presents conserved domains that are typical of SRPs in many organisms and a peculiar N-terminal basic domain. By proteomic analysis, a significant effect of FlhF depletion on the amount of secreted proteins was found with some proteins increased (e.g., B component of the non-hemolytic enterotoxin, cereolysin O, enolase) and others reduced (e.g., flagellin, L2 component of hemolysin BL, bacillolysin, sphingomyelinase, PC-PLC, PI-PLC, cytotoxin K) in the extracellular proteome of a ΔflhF mutant. Deprivation of FlhF also resulted in significant attenuation in the pathogenicity of this strain in an experimental model of infection in Galleria mellonella larvae. Our work highlights the multifunctional role of FlhF in B. cereus, being this protein involved in bacterial flagellation, swarming, protein secretion, and pathogenicity. PMID:27807433

  11. Requirement of full TCR repertoire for regulatory T cells to maintain intestinal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Junko; Baba, Minato; Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Negishi, Hideo; Yanai, Hideyuki; Habu, Sonoko; Hori, Shohei; Honda, Kenya; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of intestinal homeostasis by the immune system involves the dynamic interplay between gut commensal microbiota and resident immune cells. It is well known that a large and diverse lymphocyte antigen receptor repertoire enables the immune system to recognize and respond to a wide range of invading pathogens. There is also an emerging appreciation for a critical role the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire serves in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by regulatory T cells (Tregs). Nevertheless, how the diversity of the TCR repertoire in Tregs affects intestinal homeostasis remains unknown. To address this question, we studied mice whose T cells express a restricted TCR repertoire. We observed the development of spontaneous colitis, accompanied by the induction of T-helper type 17 cells in the colon that is driven by gut commensal microbiota. We provide further evidence that a restricted TCR repertoire causes a loss of tolerogenicity to microbiota, accompanied by a paucity of peripherally derived, Helios− Tregs and hyperactivation of migratory dendritic cells. These results thus reveal a new facet of the TCR repertoire in which Tregs require a diverse TCR repitoire for intestinal homeostasis, suggesting an additional driving force in the evolutional significance of the TCR repertoire. PMID:26420876

  12. FDA review panel gives thumbs up to Norplant.

    PubMed

    1989-05-01

    On April 27, the Fertility and Maternal Health Drugs Advisory Committee of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) unanimously recommended that Norplant, a long-acting contraceptive implant, be given final FDA approval for marketing in the US. This comes after almost 20 years of research conducted around the world. It was also announced that Wyeth-Ayerst would be manufacturing Norplant for distribution in the US as well as marketing it in countries overseas. FDA officials expect final approval of Norplant, along with its labeling, to be completed within the next several weeks. Norplant will be introduced to the US market, however, only after a full-scale training program has been instituted to ensure enough well-trained providers for both insertion and removal. Wyeth company representatives plan to immediately begin working with experts at the Population Council, and they expect Norplant to be ready for marketing within a year. The final cost of the new method remains in question and detailed post-marketing surveillance studies need to be ready for implementation.

  13. SWI/SNF complexes are required for full activation of the DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Smith-Roe, Stephanie L; Nakamura, Jun; Holley, Darcy; Chastain, Paul D; Rosson, Gary B; Simpson, Dennis A; Ridpath, John R; Kaufman, David G; Kaufmann, William K; Bultman, Scott J

    2015-01-20

    SWI/SNF complexes utilize BRG1 (also known as SMARCA4) or BRM (also known as SMARCA2) as alternative catalytic subunits with ATPase activity to remodel chromatin. These chromatin-remodeling complexes are required for mammalian development and are mutated in ~20% of all human primary tumors. Yet our knowledge of their tumor-suppressor mechanism is limited. To investigate the role of SWI/SNF complexes in the DNA-damage response (DDR), we used shRNAs to deplete BRG1 and BRM and then exposed these cells to a panel of 6 genotoxic agents. Compared to controls, the shRNA knockdown cells were hypersensitive to certain genotoxic agents that cause double-strand breaks (DSBs) associated with stalled/collapsed replication forks but not to ionizing radiation-induced DSBs that arise independently of DNA replication. These findings were supported by our analysis of DDR kinases, which demonstrated a more prominent role for SWI/SNF in the activation of the ATR-Chk1 pathway than the ATM-Chk2 pathway. Surprisingly, γH2AX induction was attenuated in shRNA knockdown cells exposed to a topoisomerase II inhibitor (etoposide) but not to other genotoxic agents including IR. However, this finding is compatible with recent studies linking SWI/SNF with TOP2A and TOP2BP1. Depletion of BRG1 and BRM did not result in genomic instability in a tumor-derived cell line but did result in nucleoplasmic bridges in normal human fibroblasts. Taken together, these results suggest that SWI/SNF tumor-suppressor activity involves a role in the DDR to attenuate replicative stress and genomic instability. These results may also help to inform the selection of chemotherapeutics for tumors deficient for SWI/SNF function.

  14. N-terminal serine dephosphorylation is required for KCC3 cotransporter full activation by cell swelling.

    PubMed

    Melo, Zesergio; de los Heros, Paola; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; Vázquez, Norma; Bobadilla, Norma A; Pasantes-Morales, Herminia; Alessi, Dario R; Mercado, Adriana; Gamba, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    The K(+):Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC) activity is modulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes. In isotonic conditions, KCCs are inactive and phosphorylated, whereas hypotonicity promotes their dephosphorylation and activation. Two phosphorylation sites (Thr-991 and Thr-1048) in KCC3 have been found to be critical for its regulation. However, here we show that the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A could be further activated by hypotonicity, suggesting that additional phosphorylation site(s) are involved. We observed that in vitro activated STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) complexed to its regulatory MO25 subunit phosphorylated KCC3 at Ser-96 and that in Xenopus laevis oocytes Ser-96 of human KCC3 is phosphorylated in isotonic conditions and becomes dephosphorylated during incubation in hypotonicity, leading to a dramatic increase in KCC3 function. Additionally, WNK3, which inhibits the activity of KCC3, promoted phosphorylation of Ser-96 as well as Thr-991 and Thr-1048. These observations were corroborated in HEK293 cells stably transfected with WNK3. Mutation of Ser-96 alone (KCC3-S96A) had no effect on the activity of the cotransporter when compared with wild type KCC3. However, when compared with the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A, the triple mutant KCC3-S96A/T991A/T1048A activity in isotonic conditions was significantly higher, and it was not further increased by hypotonicity or inhibited by WNK3. We conclude that serine residue 96 of human KCC3 is a third site that has to be dephosphorylated for full activation of the cotransporter during hypotonicity.

  15. N-terminal Serine Dephosphorylation Is Required for KCC3 Cotransporter Full Activation by Cell Swelling*

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Zesergio; de los Heros, Paola; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; Vázquez, Norma; Bobadilla, Norma A.; Pasantes-Morales, Herminia; Alessi, Dario R.; Mercado, Adriana; Gamba, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The K+:Cl− cotransporter (KCC) activity is modulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation processes. In isotonic conditions, KCCs are inactive and phosphorylated, whereas hypotonicity promotes their dephosphorylation and activation. Two phosphorylation sites (Thr-991 and Thr-1048) in KCC3 have been found to be critical for its regulation. However, here we show that the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A could be further activated by hypotonicity, suggesting that additional phosphorylation site(s) are involved. We observed that in vitro activated STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) complexed to its regulatory MO25 subunit phosphorylated KCC3 at Ser-96 and that in Xenopus laevis oocytes Ser-96 of human KCC3 is phosphorylated in isotonic conditions and becomes dephosphorylated during incubation in hypotonicity, leading to a dramatic increase in KCC3 function. Additionally, WNK3, which inhibits the activity of KCC3, promoted phosphorylation of Ser-96 as well as Thr-991 and Thr-1048. These observations were corroborated in HEK293 cells stably transfected with WNK3. Mutation of Ser-96 alone (KCC3-S96A) had no effect on the activity of the cotransporter when compared with wild type KCC3. However, when compared with the double mutant KCC3-T991A/T1048A, the triple mutant KCC3-S96A/T991A/T1048A activity in isotonic conditions was significantly higher, and it was not further increased by hypotonicity or inhibited by WNK3. We conclude that serine residue 96 of human KCC3 is a third site that has to be dephosphorylated for full activation of the cotransporter during hypotonicity. PMID:24043619

  16. FDA aprueba la primera inmunoterapia para linfoma

    Cancer.gov

    La FDA ha aprobado nivolumab (Opdivo®) para el tratamiento de pacientes con el linfoma clásico de Hodgkin que ha recaído o empeorado después de recibir un trasplante autólogo hematopoyético seguido de brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  17. Nods for Atezolizumab and Nivolumab from FDA.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The FDA has conditionally approved atezolizumab, the first PD-L1 inhibitor, for metastatic urothelial carcinoma, along with a companion diagnostic, the Ventana PD-L1 (SP142) assay. The agency has also expanded nivolumab's indications to include classical Hodgkin lymphoma, making this PD-1 inhibitor the first to be approved for a hematologic malignancy.

  18. FDA publishes conflict of interest rules for clinical trials. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1998-03-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published new rules defining conflict of interests between drug companies and medical researchers and clinicians. Certain financial arrangements will need to be disclosed, although the FDA estimates that only one to ten percent of pharmaceutical companies will need to submit disclosures for one or more of their investigators. The purpose of the new rule is to prevent bias in safety and efficacy studies of drugs and medical devices. The full rule is published in the Federal Register.

  19. FDA's misplaced priorities: premarket review under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Desmond; Lester, Joelle; Berman, Micah L

    2016-05-01

    Among other key objectives, the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act was designed to end an era of constant product manipulation by the tobacco industry that had led to more addictive and attractive products. The law requires new tobacco products to undergo premarket review by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before they can be sold. To assess FDA's implementation of its premarket review authorities, we reviewed FDA actions on new product applications, publicly available data on industry applications to market new products, and related FDA guidance documents and public statements. We conclude that FDA has not implemented the premarket review process in a manner that prioritises the protection of public health. In particular, FDA has (1) prioritised the review of premarket applications that allow for the introduction of new tobacco products over the review of potentially non-compliant products that are already on the market; (2) misallocated resources by accommodating the industry's repeated submissions of deficient premarket applications and (3) weakened the premarket review process by allowing the tobacco industry to market new and modified products that have not completed the required review process. PMID:27068243

  20. The new label for erythropoiesis stimulating agents: the FDA'S sentence.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, Steven; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2012-05-01

    On June 24, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) revised the prescribing instructions (the label) for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The new label, the second revision since publication of the TREAT Study, placed new restrictions on the use of these agents, and increased the strength of warnings. We believe that the new label language may deprive patients of the full benefits of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment and impair the opportunity to individualize treatment through shared decision making. Diminished discovery and innovation in the treatment of one of the most common and important complications of kidney disease may also be an unintended consequence of the label change. PMID:22515844

  1. Mining FDA drug labels for medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) has built the initial Natural Language Processing (NLP) component to extract medications with their corresponding medical conditions (Indications, Contraindications, Overdosage, and Adverse Reactions) as triples of medication-related information ([(1) drug name]-[(2) medical condition]-[(3) LOINC section header]) for an intelligent database system, in order to improve patient safety and the quality of health care. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) drug labels are used to demonstrate the feasibility of building the triples as an intelligent database system task. Methods This paper discusses a hybrid NLP system, called AutoMCExtractor, to collect medical conditions (including disease/disorder and sign/symptom) from drug labels published by the FDA. Altogether, 6,611 medical conditions in a manually-annotated gold standard were used for the system evaluation. The pre-processing step extracted the plain text from XML file and detected eight related LOINC sections (e.g. Adverse Reactions, Warnings and Precautions) for medical condition extraction. Conditional Random Fields (CRF) classifiers, trained on token, linguistic, and semantic features, were then used for medical condition extraction. Lastly, dictionary-based post-processing corrected boundary-detection errors of the CRF step. We evaluated the AutoMCExtractor on manually-annotated FDA drug labels and report the results on both token and span levels. Results Precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.90, 0.81, and 0.85, respectively, for the span level exact match; for the token-level evaluation, precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.92, 0.73, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrate that (1) medical conditions can be extracted from FDA drug labels with high performance; and (2) it is feasible to develop a framework for an intelligent database system. PMID:23617267

  2. FDA Recommends All Blood Donations Be Tested for Zika

    MedlinePlus

    ... FDA Recommends All Blood Donations Be Tested for Zika Updated guidance provides further protection for U.S. blood ... entire blood supply be routinely screened for the Zika virus. In February, the FDA recommended testing of ...

  3. An evaluation of the FDA's analysis of the costs and benefits of the graphic warning label regulation.

    PubMed

    Chaloupka, Frank J; Warner, Kenneth E; Acemoğlu, Daron; Gruber, Jonathan; Laux, Fritz; Max, Wendy; Newhouse, Joseph; Schelling, Thomas; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-03-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 gave the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority over cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products and authorised it to assert jurisdiction over other tobacco products. As with other Federal agencies, FDA is required to assess the costs and benefits of its significant regulatory actions. To date, FDA has issued economic impact analyses of one proposed and one final rule requiring graphic warning labels (GWLs) on cigarette packaging and, most recently, of a proposed rule that would assert FDA's authority over tobacco products other than cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. Given the controversy over the FDA's approach to assessing net economic benefits in its proposed and final rules on GWLs and the importance of having economic impact analyses prepared in accordance with sound economic analysis, a group of prominent economists met in early 2014 to review that approach and, where indicated, to offer suggestions for an improved analysis. We concluded that the analysis of the impact of GWLs on smoking substantially underestimated the benefits and overestimated the costs, leading the FDA to substantially underestimate the net benefits of the GWLs. We hope that the FDA will find our evaluation useful in subsequent analyses, not only of GWLs but also of other regulations regarding tobacco products. Most of what we discuss applies to all instances of evaluating the costs and benefits of tobacco product regulation and, we believe, should be considered in FDA's future analyses of proposed rules. PMID:25550419

  4. Reform at FDA: faster access to promising drugs? Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Baker, R

    1995-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the government agency responsible for ensuring that drugs, vaccines, and medical devices are safe and effective, is under hot debate by Congress, the Clinton administration, and the AIDS community. The Clinton/Gore proposal favors excluding drug and biologic manufacturers from requirements for more environmental assessments and only indirectly addresses drug development. Oregon Democratic Congressman Ron Wyden introduced an FDA reform bill which calls for the FDA to use expert panels, independent testing organizations, and institutional review boards (IRB) to help speed new drugs and devices through the approval process. The bill calls for the use of the IRB for the approval (or denial) of applications for Phase I review of new drugs. Not surprisingly, the AIDS community has differing views on the reform at the FDA. The Treatment Action Group (TAG), whose members hold key positions in well-known AIDS groups, supports the status quo at FDA and is lobbying AIDS organizations across the country to sign on to its FDA Reform Principles. Other AIDS treatment activists, such as members of ACT UP, favor local IRB jurisdiction over Phase I research.

  5. 21 CFR 312.86 - Focused FDA regulatory research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Focused FDA regulatory research. 312.86 Section... Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.86 Focused FDA regulatory research. At the discretion of the agency, FDA may undertake focused regulatory research on critical rate-limiting aspects of the...

  6. 21 CFR 312.86 - Focused FDA regulatory research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Focused FDA regulatory research. 312.86 Section... Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.86 Focused FDA regulatory research. At the discretion of the agency, FDA may undertake focused regulatory research on critical rate-limiting aspects of the...

  7. 21 CFR 312.86 - Focused FDA regulatory research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Focused FDA regulatory research. 312.86 Section... Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.86 Focused FDA regulatory research. At the discretion of the agency, FDA may undertake focused regulatory research on critical rate-limiting aspects of the...

  8. 21 CFR 314.102 - Communications between FDA and applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Communications between FDA and applicants. 314.102 Section 314.102 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG FDA Action on Applications and Abbreviated Applications §...

  9. 77 FR 14404 - Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee Members, and FDA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee Members, and FDA Staff: Public Availability of Advisory Committee Members' Financial Interest Information and Waivers; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  10. Under the law, FDA must grant different standards for new dietary ingredients and food additives.

    PubMed

    Mister, Steven; Hathcock, John

    2012-04-01

    The FDA's draft Guidance on notifications for new dietary ingredients attempts to narrow the scope of "old" dietary ingredients that do not require notification to FDA and repeats some mistakes from the past by going beyond what is required or permitted by the Food, Drug & Cosmetic Act, as amended by the Dietary Supplements Health and Education Act of 1994. The draft Guidance attempts to apply the notification requirement to new supplements, not just new ingredients, and it expands the working definition of "chemically altered" to include many changes that were not foreseen in the Congressional Record in 1994. Through these misinterpretations, FDA attempts to impose a food additives-like safety standard, and gain de facto premarket approval against the overt wishes of Congress.

  11. OpenVigil FDA – Inspection of U.S. American Adverse Drug Events Pharmacovigilance Data and Novel Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Ruwen; von Hehn, Leocadie; Herdegen, Thomas; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Bruhn, Oliver; Petri, Holger; Höcker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance contributes to health care. However, direct access to the underlying data for academic institutions and individual physicians or pharmacists is intricate, and easily employable analysis modes for everyday clinical situations are missing. This underlines the need for a tool to bring pharmacovigilance to the clinics. To address these issues, we have developed OpenVigil FDA, a novel web-based pharmacovigilance analysis tool which uses the openFDA online interface of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to access U.S. American and international pharmacovigilance data from the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). OpenVigil FDA provides disproportionality analyses to (i) identify the drug most likely evoking a new adverse event, (ii) compare two drugs concerning their safety profile, (iii) check arbitrary combinations of two drugs for unknown drug-drug interactions and (iv) enhance the relevance of results by identifying confounding factors and eliminating them using background correction. We present examples for these applications and discuss the promises and limits of pharmacovigilance, openFDA and OpenVigil FDA. OpenVigil FDA is the first public available tool to apply pharmacovigilance findings directly to real-life clinical problems. OpenVigil FDA does not require special licenses or statistical programs. PMID:27326858

  12. OpenVigil FDA - Inspection of U.S. American Adverse Drug Events Pharmacovigilance Data and Novel Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Ruwen; von Hehn, Leocadie; Herdegen, Thomas; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Bruhn, Oliver; Petri, Holger; Höcker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance contributes to health care. However, direct access to the underlying data for academic institutions and individual physicians or pharmacists is intricate, and easily employable analysis modes for everyday clinical situations are missing. This underlines the need for a tool to bring pharmacovigilance to the clinics. To address these issues, we have developed OpenVigil FDA, a novel web-based pharmacovigilance analysis tool which uses the openFDA online interface of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to access U.S. American and international pharmacovigilance data from the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). OpenVigil FDA provides disproportionality analyses to (i) identify the drug most likely evoking a new adverse event, (ii) compare two drugs concerning their safety profile, (iii) check arbitrary combinations of two drugs for unknown drug-drug interactions and (iv) enhance the relevance of results by identifying confounding factors and eliminating them using background correction. We present examples for these applications and discuss the promises and limits of pharmacovigilance, openFDA and OpenVigil FDA. OpenVigil FDA is the first public available tool to apply pharmacovigilance findings directly to real-life clinical problems. OpenVigil FDA does not require special licenses or statistical programs. PMID:27326858

  13. Evaluation of genotoxicity testing of FDA approved large molecule therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Satin G; Fielden, Mark R; Black, Kurt A

    2014-10-01

    Large molecule therapeutics (MW>1000daltons) are not expected to enter the cell and thus have reduced potential to interact directly with DNA or related physiological processes. Genotoxicity studies are therefore not relevant and typically not required for large molecule therapeutic candidates. Regulatory guidance supports this approach; however there are examples of marketed large molecule therapeutics where sponsors have conducted genotoxicity studies. A retrospective analysis was performed on genotoxicity studies of United States FDA approved large molecule therapeutics since 1998 identified through the Drugs@FDA website. This information was used to provide a data-driven rationale for genotoxicity evaluations of large molecule therapeutics. Fifty-three of the 99 therapeutics identified were tested for genotoxic potential. None of the therapeutics tested showed a positive outcome in any study except the peptide glucagon (GlucaGen®) showing equivocal in vitro results, as stated in the product labeling. Scientific rationale and data from this review indicate that testing of a majority of large molecule modalities do not add value to risk assessment and support current regulatory guidance. Similarly, the data do not support testing of peptides containing only natural amino acids. Peptides containing non-natural amino acids and small molecules in conjugated products may need to be tested.

  14. FDA Approval Summary: Ramucirumab for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Casak, Sandra J; Fashoyin-Aje, Ibilola; Lemery, Steven J; Zhang, Lillian; Jin, Runyan; Li, Hongshan; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Huanyu; He, Kun; Dougherty, Michele; Novak, Rachel; Kennett, Sarah; Khasar, Sachia; Helms, Whitney; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The FDA approved ramucirumab (CYRAMZA; Eli Lilly and Company) for previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma initially as monotherapy (April 21, 2014) and subsequently as combination therapy with paclitaxel (November 5, 2014). In the monotherapy trial, 355 patients in the indicated population were randomly allocated (2:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks. In the combination trial, 665 patients were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive ramucirumab or placebo, 8 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks, in combination with paclitaxel, 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of 28-day cycles. Overall survival (OS) was increased in patients who received ramucirumab in both the monotherapy [HR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60-0.998; log rank P = 0.047] and combination trials (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.96; P = 0.017). The most common adverse reactions were hypertension and diarrhea in the monotherapy trial and fatigue, neutropenia, diarrhea, and epistaxis in the combination trial. Because of concerns about the robustness of the monotherapy trial results, FDA approved the original application after receiving the results of the combination trial confirming the OS effect. Based on exploratory exposure-response analyses, there is residual uncertainty regarding the optimal dose of ramucirumab.

  15. An evaluation of the FDA's analysis of the costs and benefits of the graphic warning label regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chaloupka, Frank J; Warner, Kenneth E; Acemoğlu, Daron; Gruber, Jonathan; Laux, Fritz; Max, Wendy; Newhouse, Joseph; Schelling, Thomas; Sindelar, Jody

    2015-01-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 gave the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority over cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products and authorised it to assert jurisdiction over other tobacco products. As with other Federal agencies, FDA is required to assess the costs and benefits of its significant regulatory actions. To date, FDA has issued economic impact analyses of one proposed and one final rule requiring graphic warning labels (GWLs) on cigarette packaging and, most recently, of a proposed rule that would assert FDA’s authority over tobacco products other than cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. Given the controversy over the FDA's approach to assessing net economic benefits in its proposed and final rules on GWLs and the importance of having economic impact analyses prepared in accordance with sound economic analysis, a group of prominent economists met in early 2014 to review that approach and, where indicated, to offer suggestions for an improved analysis. We concluded that the analysis of the impact of GWLs on smoking substantially underestimated the benefits and overestimated the costs, leading the FDA to substantially underestimate the net benefits of the GWLs. We hope that the FDA will find our evaluation useful in subsequent analyses, not only of GWLs but also of other regulations regarding tobacco products. Most of what we discuss applies to all instances of evaluating the costs and benefits of tobacco product regulation and, we believe, should be considered in FDA's future analyses of proposed rules. PMID:25550419

  16. The new NIH and FDA medical research policies: targeting gender, promoting justice.

    PubMed

    Baird, K L

    1999-06-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have both recently revised their policies regarding the inclusion of women in clinical trials. Pressured by women's health activists and members of Congress, the NIH has vastly improved its policies; it now requires that women and minorities the included in clinical trials and that an analysis of gender and racial differences be performed. The FDA policy states that women and men should be included in clinical trials if both would receive the drug when marketed and that it expects a gender analysis to be performed. The FDA also lifted its 1977 ban on including women of childbearing potential in the early phases of drug studies. Analyzing these NIH and FDA policies according to a gender justice framework, I find that the NIH has moved significantly toward the institution of gender justice as it applies to medical research policies and that the FDA has taken only small steps toward this goal and lags behind the NIH.

  17. Biotechnology: the view from the FDA.

    PubMed

    Young, F E

    1986-01-01

    What is biotechnology? This is not a naive question. The Office of Technology Assessment has found differing definitions of biotechnology emanating from eight foreign countries and three international organizations. FDA's working definition of biotechnology is the application of biological systems and organisms to technical and industrial processes. This definition is necessarily broad. It takes in both the "old" and "new" science: the age-old techniques for making beer or yogurt as well as the most advanced uses of recombinant DNA technology. It takes in many applications, from production of enzymes for laundry detergents, to selective breeding of plants and animals, to genetic engineering of bacteria to clean up oil spills. As with any new technology, ethical issues are raised. But in the case of genetic engineering and cloning, many of the primordial fears of man concerning the power of science are awakened.

  18. Imaging as a tumor biomarker in oncology drug trials for lung cancer: the FDA perspective.

    PubMed

    Petrick, N; Brown, D G; Suleiman, O; Myers, K J

    2008-10-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is committed to working with the oncology community to expedite the drug evaluation process in view of the many promising new oncology drugs under laboratory development and the time and expense required for such new drugs to reach the patient population. One significant advance would be to enable quantitative imaging as a tumor biomarker. The FDA is working with the pharmaceutical industry, academia, and sister stakeholders in the government, primarily through collaborative educational and research efforts, to identify how imaging can serve this function. PMID:18716616

  19. 21 CFR 60.34 - FDA action on petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false FDA action on petitions. 60.34 Section 60.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT TERM RESTORATION Due Diligence Petitions § 60.34 FDA action on petitions. (a) Within 90 days after FDA receives a petition filed under § 60.30(a),...

  20. The longest mitochondrial RNA editing PPR protein MEF12 in Arabidopsis thaliana requires the full-length E domain.

    PubMed

    Härtel, Barbara; Zehrmann, Anja; Verbitskiy, Daniil; Takenaka, Mizuki

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial RNA editing factor 12 (MEF12) was identified in a screen for editing defects of a chemically mutated plant population in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MEF12 editing protein is required for the C to U change of nucleotide nad5-374. The MEF12 polypeptide is characterized by an exceptionally long stretch of 25 pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR) and a C-terminal extension domain. Editing is lost in mutant plants with a stop codon in the extending element. A T-DNA insertion substituting the 10 C-terminal amino acids of the extension domain reduces RNA editing to about 20% at the target site in a mutant plant. These results support the importance of the full-length extension module for functional RNA editing in plant mitochondria.

  1. Medical devices; medical device distributor reporting; opportunity for comments--FDA. Final rule; opportunity for comments.

    PubMed

    1993-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an opportunity for public comments on the final rule on medical device distributor reporting, which is published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register. The medical device distributor reporting tentative final rule became final on May 28, 1992, by operation of the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (the SMDA), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1992 (the 1992 amendments). Although not required to do so, FDA realizes that there may be issues not previously considered, such as technical issues on specific provisions, and therefore is providing this additional time for comment. If changes are warranted by comments, FDA will make further changes in the rules.

  2. 21 CFR 516.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights. 516.34 Section 516.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... for maintaining MUMS-designated drug exclusive marketing rights for the full 7-year term. This...

  3. A SIX1 Homolog in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans Is Required for Full Virulence on Cabbage.

    PubMed

    Li, Erfeng; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Jiling; Ling, Jian; Yang, Yuhong; Xie, Bingyan

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a soil-born fungus that induces wilt and root rot on a variety of plants. F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans (Foc) can cause wilt disease on cabbage. This study showed that a homolog of SIX1 protein in the Arabidopsis infecting isolate Fo5176 (Fo5176-SIX1) had four isoforms in the conidia of Foc by proteomic analysis. Thus, we analyzed the roles of protein Foc-SIX1. Gene expression analysis showed that, compared to the expression in mycelia, dramatically altered expression of Foc-SIX1 could be detected after infecting cabbages, and Foc-SIX1 was highly expressed in conidia under axenic culture condition. Furthermore, we knocked out the Foc-SIX1 gene and found that Foc-ΔSIX1 mutants had significantly reduced virulence compared with wild type isolate, and full virulence was restored by complementation of Foc-ΔSIX1 mutants with Foc-SIX1. Thus, we concluded that SIX1 in Foc was required for full virulence on cabbage. We also complemented Foc-ΔSIX1 with SIX1 gene in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and found Foc-ΔSIX1::Fol-SIX1 mutants did not affect the virulence of Foc-ΔSIX1. The results confirmed that Fol-SIX1 was not capable of replacing the role of Foc-SIX1 in Foc on the disease symptom development of cabbage. The roles of Fol-SIX1 on virulence might rely on host specificity. PMID:27010418

  4. A SIX1 Homolog in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans Is Required for Full Virulence on Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Jian; Yang, Yuhong; Xie, Bingyan

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a soil-born fungus that induces wilt and root rot on a variety of plants. F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans (Foc) can cause wilt disease on cabbage. This study showed that a homolog of SIX1 protein in the Arabidopsis infecting isolate Fo5176 (Fo5176-SIX1) had four isoforms in the conidia of Foc by proteomic analysis. Thus, we analyzed the roles of protein Foc-SIX1. Gene expression analysis showed that, compared to the expression in mycelia, dramatically altered expression of Foc-SIX1 could be detected after infecting cabbages, and Foc-SIX1 was highly expressed in conidia under axenic culture condition. Furthermore, we knocked out the Foc-SIX1 gene and found that Foc-ΔSIX1 mutants had significantly reduced virulence compared with wild type isolate, and full virulence was restored by complementation of Foc-ΔSIX1 mutants with Foc-SIX1. Thus, we concluded that SIX1 in Foc was required for full virulence on cabbage. We also complemented Foc-ΔSIX1 with SIX1 gene in F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and found Foc-ΔSIX1::Fol-SIX1 mutants did not affect the virulence of Foc-ΔSIX1. The results confirmed that Fol-SIX1 was not capable of replacing the role of Foc-SIX1 in Foc on the disease symptom development of cabbage. The roles of Fol-SIX1 on virulence might rely on host specificity. PMID:27010418

  5. FgIlv5 is required for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis and full virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Jian; Xu, Jianhong; Shi, Jianrong

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we characterized FgIlv5, a homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae keto-acid reductoisomerase (KARI) from the important wheat head scab fungus Fusarium graminearum. KARI is a key enzyme in the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA, including leucine, isoleucine and valine) biosynthetic pathway that exists in a variety of organisms from bacteria to fungi and higher plants, but not in mammals. The FgILV5 deletion mutant ΔFgIlv5-4 failed to grow when the culture medium was nutritionally limited for BCAAs. When grown on potato-dextrose agar plates, ΔFgIlv5-4 exhibited a significant decrease in aerial hyphae formation and red pigmentation. Conidia formation was also blocked in ΔFgIlv5-4. Exogenous addition of 1 mM isoleucine and valine was able to rescue the defects of mycelial growth and conidial morphogenesis. Cellular stress assays showed that ΔFgIlv5-4 was more sensitive to osmotic and oxidative stresses than the wild-type strain. In addition, virulence of ΔFgIlv5-4 was dramatically reduced on wheat heads, and a low level of deoxynivalenol production was detected in ΔFgIlv5-4 in wheat kernels. The results of this study indicate that FgIlv5 is involved in valine and isoleucine biosynthesis and is required for full virulence in F. graminearum.

  6. 42 CFR 405.203 - FDA categorization of investigational devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FDA categorization of investigational devices. 405.203 Section 405.203 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Coverage Decisions That Relate to Health Care Technology § 405.203 FDA categorization of...

  7. 21 CFR 5.1110 - FDA public information offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FDA public information offices. 5.1110 Section 5... ORGANIZATION Organization § 5.1110 FDA public information offices. (a) Division of Dockets Management. The Division of Dockets Management public room is located in rm. 1061, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD...

  8. 21 CFR 812.30 - FDA action on applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FDA action on applications. 812.30 Section 812.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... modifications, or disapprove it. An investigation may not begin until: (1) Thirty days after FDA receives...

  9. 21 CFR 812.30 - FDA action on applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FDA action on applications. 812.30 Section 812.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... modifications, or disapprove it. An investigation may not begin until: (1) Thirty days after FDA receives...

  10. 21 CFR 812.30 - FDA action on applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FDA action on applications. 812.30 Section 812.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... modifications, or disapprove it. An investigation may not begin until: (1) Thirty days after FDA receives...

  11. The Adh1 gene of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae is expressed during insect colonization and required for full virulence.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Negrete, Olga Alicia; Torres-Guzmán, Juan Carlos; Padilla-Guerrero, Israel Enrique; Esquivel-Naranjo, Ulises; Padilla-Ballesteros, Maria Fernanda; García-Tapia, Adriana; Schrank, Augusto; Salazar-Solís, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Corona, Félix; González-Hernández, Gloria Angélica

    2015-03-01

    Zymography of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae grown under various conditions revealed that micro-aerobic growth was associated with increased ADH activity. The major ADH protein, AdhIp, was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography and has an estimated molecular weight of 41kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.4. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis allowed the identification and cloning of the gene that encodes this protein, Adh1, as annotated in the M. anisopliae genome database. AdhIp is related to the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR)/zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase-like family and contains conserved ADH sequence motifs, such as the zinc-containing ADH signature, the FAD/NAD binding domain and amino acid residues that are conserved in most microbial ADHs. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Adh1 gene expression occurs at low levels during early Plutella xylostella infection and that the Adh1 gene was primarily expressed at larval death and as mycelia emerge from the insect cuticle before conidiation. Antisense-RNA experiments indicated that NAD(+)-dependent ADH activity was diminished by 20-75% in the transformants, and the transformants that had lower ADH activity showed allyl alcohol resistance, which indicates that reduction in ADH activity also occurs in vivo. Bioassays performed using antisense adh1 transformants, which have lower ADH activity, showed that LC50 values were two to five times higher than the wild-type, indicating that AdhIp is required for full capability of the fungus to penetrate and/or colonize the insect.

  12. Full activation of mouse platelets requires ADP secretion regulated by SERCA3 ATPase-dependent calcium stores.

    PubMed

    Elaïb, Ziane; Adam, Frédéric; Berrou, Eliane; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Prévost, Nicolas; Bobe, Régis; Bryckaert, Marijke; Rosa, Jean-Philippe

    2016-08-25

    The role of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) 3 (SERCA3) in platelet physiology remains poorly understood. Here, we show that SERCA3 knockout (SERCA3(-/-)) mice exhibit prolonged tail bleeding time and rebleeding. Thrombus formation was delayed both in arteries and venules in an in vivo ferric chloride-induced thrombosis model. Defective platelet adhesion and thrombus growth over collagen was confirmed in vitro. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) removal by apyrase diminished adhesion and thrombus growth of control platelets to the level of SERCA3(-/-) platelets. Aggregation, dense granule secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization of SERCA3(-/-) platelets induced by low collagen or low thrombin concentration were weaker than controls. Accordingly, SERCA3(-/-) platelets exhibited a partial defect in total stored Ca(2+) and in Ca(2+) store reuptake following thrombin stimulation. Importantly ADP, but not serotonin, rescued aggregation, secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization in SERCA3(-/-) platelets, suggesting specificity. Dense granules appeared normal upon electron microscopy, mepacrine staining, and total serotonin content, ruling out a dense granule defect. ADP induced normal platelet aggregation, excluding a defect in ADP activation pathways. The SERCA3-specific inhibitor 2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone diminished both Ca(2+) mobilization and secretion of control platelets, as opposed to the SERCA2b inhibitor thapsigargin. This confirmed the specific role of catalytically active SERCA3 in ADP secretion. Accordingly, SERCA3-dependent Ca(2+) stores appeared depleted in SERCA3(-/-) platelets. Finally, αIIbβ3 integrin blockade did not affect SERCA3-dependent secretion, therefore proving independent of αIIbβ3 engagement. Altogether, these results show that SERCA3-dependent Ca(2+) stores control a specific ADP secretion pathway required for full platelet secretion induced by agonists at low concentration and independent

  13. The FDA role in contact lens development and safety.

    PubMed

    Lippman, R E

    1990-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) exercises a multifaceted role in fulfilling its mission of enforcing the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (Act), functioning not only as industry regulator and consumer protector, but also as scientific advisor and consumer educator regarding medical devices, drugs, foods, cosmetics, and veterinary medicine. Medical devices are regulated within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Contact lenses are regulated under the authority of the medical device amendments. The Center is responsible for promulgating regulations, publishing guidelines, and developing written guidance in enforcing the Act, and also for guiding manufacturers of medical devices in safe and effective product development. Other components deal with the compliance of manufacturers with the marketing of medical devices within the meaning of the Act, and through labeling requirements of the Act and consumer education and informational activities. As for contact lenses, the process of updating product development regulations and guidelines is an ongoing activity. The most recent version of the Contact Lens Guideline Document, issued in April 1988, contains two major revisions involving preclinical and clinical testing. The first redefines plastics into one materials category, thus reducing testing requirements with respect to animal toxicology studies and other preclinical areas. The second revision restricts clinical testing requirements to allow confirmatory trials in applications for new daily wear lenses. The intention was to maintain the ability of studies to detect major material or design flaws in lenses, thus boosting confidence in their performance while eliminating unnecessary trials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2189684

  14. A Comparative Review of Waivers Granted in Pediatric Drug Development by FDA and EMA from 2007-2013

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Gunter F.; Wharton, Gerold T.; Malli, Suzanne; Temeck, Jean; Murphy, M. Dianne; Tomasi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background The European Union and the United States have different legal frameworks in place for pediatric drug development, which can potentially lead to different pediatric research requirements for the pharmaceutical industry. This manuscript compares pediatric clinical trial waivers granted by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods This is a retrospective review comparing EMA’s Paediatric Committee (PDCO) decisions with FDA’s Pediatric Review Committee (PeRC) recommendations for all product-specific pediatric full waiver applications submitted to EMA from January 2007 through December 2013. Using baseline data from EMA, we matched product-specific waivers with their FDA equivalents during the study period. Results For single active substance products, PDCO and PeRC adopted similar opinions in 42 of 49 indications (86%). For fixed-dose combinations, PDCO and PeRC adopted similar opinions in 24 of 31 indications (77%). Conclusion Despite the different legal frameworks, criteria, and processes of determination, the waiver decisions of the 2 agencies were similar in the majority of cases. PMID:27274951

  15. Multiple full-length NS3 molecules are required for optimal unwinding of oligonucleotide DNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Alan J; Chen, Yingfeng; Cameron, Craig E; Raney, Kevin D

    2005-03-18

    NS3 (nonstructural protein 3) from the hepatitis C virus is a 3' --> 5' helicase classified in helicase superfamily 2. The optimally active form of this helicase remains uncertain. We have used unwinding assays in the presence of a protein trap to investigate the first cycle of unwinding by full-length NS3. When the enzyme was in excess of the substrate, NS3 (500 nM) unwound >80% of a DNA substrate containing a 15-nucleotide overhang and a 30-bp duplex (45:30-mer; 1 nM). This result indicated that the active form of NS3 that was bound to the DNA prior to initiation of the reaction was capable of processive DNA unwinding. Unwinding with varying ratios of NS3 to 45:30-mer allowed us to investigate the active form of NS3 during the first unwinding cycle. When the substrate concentration slightly exceeded that of the enzyme, little or no unwinding was observed, indicating that if a monomeric form of the protein is active, then it exhibits very low processivity. Binding of NS3 to the 45:30-mer was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, resulting in K(D) = 2.7 +/- 0.4 nM. Binding to individual regions of the substrate was investigated by measuring the K(D) for a 15-mer oligonucleotide as well as a 30-mer duplex. NS3 bound tightly to the 15-mer (K(D) = 1.3 +/- 0.2 nM) and, surprisingly, fairly tightly to the double-stranded 30-mer (K(D) = 11.3 +/- 1.3 nM). However, NS3 was not able to rapidly unwind a blunt-end duplex. Thus, under conditions of optimal unwinding, the 45:30-mer is initially saturated with the enzyme, including the duplex region. The unwinding data are discussed in terms of a model whereby multiple molecules of NS3 bound to the single-stranded DNA portion of the substrate are required for optimal unwinding.

  16. Point-Counterpoint: The FDA Has a Role in Regulation of Laboratory-Developed Tests.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Angela M; Hanson, Kimberly E

    2016-04-01

    Since the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released its draft guidance on the regulation of laboratory-developed tests (LDTs) in October 2014, there has been a flurry of responses from commercial and hospital-based laboratory directors, clinicians, professional organizations, and diagnostic companies. The FDA defines an LDT as an "in vitrodiagnostic device that is intended for clinical use and is designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory." The draft guidance outlines a risk-based approach, with oversight of high-risk and moderate-risk tests being phased in over 9 years. High-risk tests would be regulated first and require premarket approval. Subsequently, moderate-risk tests would require a 510(k) premarket submission to the FDA and low-risk tests would need only to be registered. Oversight discretion would be exercised for LDTs focused on rare diseases (defined as fewer than 4,000 tests, not cases, per year nationally) and unmet clinical needs (defined as those tests for which there is no alternative FDA-cleared or -approved test). There was an open comment period followed by a public hearing in early January of 2015, and we are currently awaiting the final decision regarding the regulation of LDTs. Given that LDTs have been developed by many laboratories and are essential for the diagnosis and monitoring of an array of infectious diseases, changes in their regulation will have far-reaching implications for clinical microbiology laboratories. In this Point-Counterpoint, Angela Caliendo discusses the potential benefits of the FDA guidance for LDTs whereas Kim Hanson discusses the concerns associated with implementing the guidance and why these regulations may not improve clinical care. PMID:26791369

  17. Nanoparticle-Based Medicines: A Review of FDA-Approved Materials and Clinical Trials to Date.

    PubMed

    Bobo, Daniel; Robinson, Kye J; Islam, Jiaul; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Corrie, Simon R

    2016-10-01

    In this review we provide an up to date snapshot of nanomedicines either currently approved by the US FDA, or in the FDA clinical trials process. We define nanomedicines as therapeutic or imaging agents which comprise a nanoparticle in order to control the biodistribution, enhance the efficacy, or otherwise reduce toxicity of a drug or biologic. We identified 51 FDA-approved nanomedicines that met this definition and 77 products in clinical trials, with ~40% of trials listed in clinicaltrials.gov started in 2014 or 2015. While FDA approved materials are heavily weighted to polymeric, liposomal, and nanocrystal formulations, there is a trend towards the development of more complex materials comprising micelles, protein-based NPs, and also the emergence of a variety of inorganic and metallic particles in clinical trials. We then provide an overview of the different material categories represented in our search, highlighting nanomedicines that have either been recently approved, or are already in clinical trials. We conclude with some comments on future perspectives for nanomedicines, which we expect to include more actively-targeted materials, multi-functional materials ("theranostics") and more complicated materials that blur the boundaries of traditional material categories. A key challenge for researchers, industry, and regulators is how to classify new materials and what additional testing (e.g. safety and toxicity) is required before products become available. PMID:27299311

  18. The Facts on the FDA's New Tobacco Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... agency authority to regulate the manufacturing, distribution, and marketing of tobacco products. Today, the rule does several ... law. And those manufacturers will have to receive marketing authorization from the FDA. The new rule also ...

  19. FDA: Cutting-Edge Technology Sheds Light on Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... FDA is using cutting-edge technology called whole genome sequencing (WGS). A genome is an organism’s complete set of genes. In the 20 years since the first bacterial genome was completely sequenced, the science has advanced dramatically. ...

  20. FDA Renews Call to Reduce Salt in Processed Foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... consume more salt than recommended, the FDA pointed out. The problem is widespread in children and teens, too. Foods that are often high in sodium include pizza, sandwiches, deli meats, pasta dishes, snacks, salad dressings, soups and cheese. The ...

  1. FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual. Section VI. Radiological health

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing written program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration field operations for project implementation.

  2. What FDA Learned About Dark Chocolate and Milk Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updates What FDA Learned About Dark Chocolate and Milk Allergies Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... to top No Message Doesn’t Mean No Milk You shouldn’t assume that dark chocolate contains ...

  3. FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Exondys 51 seems to fill unmet need for ... the first drug for a rare form of muscular dystrophy. Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) was granted accelerated approval to ...

  4. FDA Facilitates Research on Earlier Stages of Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updates FDA Facilitates Research on Earlier Stages of Alzheimer's Disease Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... disease.” back to top New Paths for New Alzheimer’s Drugs FDA’s draft guidance aims to encourage research ...

  5. Starting Monday, FDA Banning E-Cigarette Sales to Minors

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160310.html Starting Monday, FDA Banning E-Cigarette Sales to Minors Agency also details other ... Aug. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The sale of e-cigarettes to minors will be banned starting Monday, ...

  6. FDA OKs Non-Prescription Use of Acne Drug

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159779.html FDA OKs Non-Prescription Use of Acne Drug Differin Gel 0.1% is first retinoid ... July 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Good news for acne sufferers: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ...

  7. Think Twice Before You Get That Tattoo: FDA

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159272.html Think Twice Before You Get That Tattoo: FDA Though popular, they carry infection risks and ... 8, 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Tattoos are increasingly popular in the United States, but ...

  8. NCI Director Also to Be Interim FDA Commissioner

    Cancer.gov

    Andrew von Eschenbach, M.D., director of the NCI, was asked by President Bush on Friday, September 23, 2005, to assume the additional role of interim Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  9. PREFACE: Fractional Differentiation and its Applications (FDA08) Fractional Differentiation and its Applications (FDA08)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2009-10-01

    The international workshop, Fractional Differentiation and its Applications (FDA08), held at Cankaya University, Ankara, Turkey on 5-7 November 2008, was the third in an ongoing series of conferences dedicated to exploring applications of fractional calculus in science, engineering, economics and finance. Fractional calculus, which deals with derivatives and integrals of any order, is now recognized as playing an important role in modeling multi-scale problems that span a wide range of time or length scales. Fractional calculus provides a natural link to the intermediate-order dynamics that often reflects the complexity of micro- and nanostructures through fractional-order differential equations. Unlike the more established techniques of mathematical physics, the methods of fractional differentiation are still under development; while it is true that the ideas of fractional calculus are as old as the classical integer-order differential operators, modern work is proceeding by both expanding the capabilities of this mathematical tool and by widening its range of applications. Hence, the interested reader will find papers here that focus on the underlying mathematics of fractional calculus, that extend fractional-order operators into new domains, and that apply well established methods to experimental and theoretical problems. The organizing committee invited presentations from experts representing the international community of scholars in fractional calculus and welcomed contributions from the growing number of researchers who are applying fractional differentiation to complex technical problems. The selection of papers in this topical issue of Physica Scripta reflects the success of the FDA08 workshop, with the emergence of a variety of novel areas of application. With these ideas in mind, the guest editors would like to honor the many distinguished scientists that have promoted the development of fractional calculus and, in particular, Professor George M

  10. Effect of the FDA on health care investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, David J.

    1994-12-01

    The cost of securing FDA approval has long been an important consideration in funding projects involving new medical technologies, but the more stringent regulatory behavior of the FDA in the past few years has led to a discernable decrease in the funding of start-up medical device companies. An abundance of anecdotal evidence, supported with surveys of venture capital firms, investment groups and medical device corporations, indicates a serious shortage of funds available for the development of certain medical technologies.

  11. 78 FR 78720 - Deferral of Compliance Date: Full-Service Intelligent Mail Barcode Requirement To Qualify for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... automation prices, previously published on April 18, 2013, in a final rule in the Federal Register (78 FR... compliance date of the relevant portions of the final rule published April 18, 2013 (78 FR 23137) is delayed..., 78 FR 23146-23148. All other requirements that were published in the Federal Register (78 FR...

  12. 77 FR 23643 - Advance Notice of Implementation of Full-Service Intelligent Mail Required for Automation Prices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... 2014. Full-Service Intelligent Mail combines use of unique scan codes with the provision of electronic... verification process based on comparing electronic documentation with scans of Intelligent Mail barcodes... mail is ] co-palletized, combined or comingled (in-house or at a different plant). The...

  13. Agonist Met antibodies define the signalling threshold required for a full mitogenic and invasive program of Kaposi's Sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bardelli, Claudio; Sala, Marilena; Cavallazzi, Umberto; Prat, Maria . E-mail: mprat@med.unipmn.it

    2005-09-09

    We previously showed that the Kaposi Sarcoma line KS-IMM express a functional Met tyrosine kinase receptor, which, upon HGF stimulation, activates motogenic, proliferative, and invasive responses. In this study, we investigated the signalling pathways activated by HGF, as well as by Met monoclonal antibodies (Mabs), acting as full or partial agonists. The full agonist Mab mimics HGF in all biological and biochemical aspects. It elicits the whole spectrum of responses, while the partial agonist Mab induces only wound healing. These differences correlated with a more prolonged and sustained tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and MAPK evoked by HGF and by the full agonist Mab, relative to the partial agonist Mab. Since Gab1, JNK and PI 3-kinase are activated with same intensity and kinetics by HGF and by the two agonist antibodies, it is concluded that level and duration of MAPK activation by Met receptor are crucial for the induction of a full HGF-dependent mitogenic and invasive program in KS cells.

  14. Pharmacotherapeutics of Intranasal Scopolamine: FDA Regulations and Procedures for Clinical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Daniels, V. R.; Vaksman, Z.; Boyd, J. L.; Buckey, J. C.; Locke, J. P.; Putcha, L.

    2007-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is commonly experienced by astronauts and often requires treatment with medications during the early flight days of a space mission. Bioavailability of oral (PO) SMS medications is often low and highly variable; additionally, physiological changes in a microgravity environment exacerbate variability and decrease bioavailability. These factors prompted NASA to develop an intranasal dosage form of scopolamine (INSCOP) suitable for the treatment of SMS. However, to assure safety and efficacy of treatment in space, NASA physicians prescribe commercially available pharmaceutical products only. Development of a pharmaceutical preparation for clinical use must follow distinct clinical phases of testing, phase I through IV to be exact, before it can be approved by the FDA for approval for clinical use. After a physician sponsored Investigative New Drug (IND) application was approved by the FDA, a phase I clinical trial of INSCOP formulation was completed in normal human subjects and results published. The current project includes three phase II clinical protocols for the assessment of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD), efficacy, and safety of INSCOP. Three clinical protocols that were submitted to FDA to accomplish the project objectives: 1) 002-A, a FDA Phase II dose ranging study with four dose levels between 0.1 and 0.4 mg in 12 subjects to assess PK/PD, 2) 002-B, a phase II clinical efficacy study in eighteen healthy subjects to compare efficacy of 0.2 (low dose) and 0.4 mg (high dose) INSCOP for prophylactic treatment of motion-induces (off-axis vertical rotation) symptoms, and (3) 002-C, a phase II clinical study with twelve subjects to determine bioavailability and pharmacodynamics of two doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP in simulated microgravity, antiorthostatic bedrest. All regulatory procedures were competed that include certification for Good laboratory Procedures by Theradex , clinical documentation, personnel training

  15. The US FDA pregnancy lactation and labeling rule - Implications for maternal immunization.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Marion F

    2015-11-25

    The FDA has responsibility for ensuring that prescription drug and biological products including vaccines are accompanied by labeling that summarizes scientific information concerning their safe and effective use. As part of a broader effort to improve the content and format of prescription drug labeling FDA published a final rule, the Content and Format of Labeling for Human Prescription Drug and Biological Products; Requirements for Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling, referred to as the "Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule (PLLR)." The most significant change to be implemented by this Rule is the removal of the letter risk categories A, B, C, D and X from all labeling, replacing them with a narrative summary of the risks of using a drug or biological product including vaccines during pregnancy. The PLLR requires an evaluation of available information about a product's use in pregnancy and provides an opportunity to update labeling when new information about use of a vaccine in pregnancy becomes available. Implementation of the provisions articulated in the PLLR, as they apply to vaccine product labeling, will require close collaboration between FDA and the vaccine manufacturer for both currently licensed vaccines and those in development.

  16. FDA Approves Two HPV Vaccines: Cervarix for Girls, Gardasil for Boys | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved a second vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and cervical precancers, the vaccine’s manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), announced last week. The approval is based on data from a large clinical trial showing that the vaccine, Cervarix, prevented precancerous lesions in 93 percent of those who received the full vaccine sequence of three injections over 6 months. |

  17. The evaporative requirement for heat balance determines whole-body sweat rate during exercise under conditions permitting full evaporation.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Daniel; Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-06-01

    Although the requirements for heat dissipation during exercise are determined by the necessity for heat balance, few studies have considered them when examining sweat production and its potential modulators. Rather, the majority of studies have used an experimental protocol based on a fixed percentage of maximum oxygen uptake (% ). Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the independent contribution of the evaporative requirement for heat balance (Ereq) and % to whole-body sweat rate (WBSR) during exercise. We hypothesised that WBSR would be determined by Ereq and not by % . A total of 23 males performed two separate experiments during which they exercised for 90 min at different rates of metabolic heat production (200, 350, 500 W) at a fixed air temperature (30°C, n = 8), or at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (290 W) at different air temperatures (30, 35, 40°C, n = 15 and 45°C, n = 7). Whole-body evaporative heat loss was measured by direct calorimetry and used to calculate absolute WBSR in grams per minute. The conditions employed resulted in a wide range of Ereq (131-487 W) and % (15-55%). The individual variation in non-steady-state (0-30 min) and steady-state (30-90 min) WBSR correlated significantly with Ereq (P < 0.001). In contrast, % correlated negatively with the residual variation in WBSR not explained by Ereq, and marginally increased (∼2%) the amount of total variability in WBSR described by Ereq alone (non-steady state: R(2) = 0.885; steady state: R(2) = 0.930). These data provide clear evidence that absolute WBSR during exercise is determined by Ereq, not by % . Future studies should therefore use an experimental protocol which ensures a fixed Ereq when examining absolute WBSR between individuals, irrespective of potential differences in relative exercise intensity. PMID:23459754

  18. The evaporative requirement for heat balance determines whole-body sweat rate during exercise under conditions permitting full evaporation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-01-01

    Although the requirements for heat dissipation during exercise are determined by the necessity for heat balance, few studies have considered them when examining sweat production and its potential modulators. Rather, the majority of studies have used an experimental protocol based on a fixed percentage of maximum oxygen uptake (%). Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the independent contribution of the evaporative requirement for heat balance (Ereq) and % to whole-body sweat rate (WBSR) during exercise. We hypothesised that WBSR would be determined by Ereq and not by %. A total of 23 males performed two separate experiments during which they exercised for 90 min at different rates of metabolic heat production (200, 350, 500 W) at a fixed air temperature (30°C, n= 8), or at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (290 W) at different air temperatures (30, 35, 40°C, n= 15 and 45°C, n= 7). Whole-body evaporative heat loss was measured by direct calorimetry and used to calculate absolute WBSR in grams per minute. The conditions employed resulted in a wide range of Ereq (131–487 W) and % (15–55%). The individual variation in non-steady-state (0–30 min) and steady-state (30–90 min) WBSR correlated significantly with Ereq (P < 0.001). In contrast, % correlated negatively with the residual variation in WBSR not explained by Ereq, and marginally increased (∼2%) the amount of total variability in WBSR described by Ereq alone (non-steady state: R2= 0.885; steady state: R2= 0.930). These data provide clear evidence that absolute WBSR during exercise is determined by Ereq, not by %. Future studies should therefore use an experimental protocol which ensures a fixed Ereq when examining absolute WBSR between individuals, irrespective of potential differences in relative exercise intensity. PMID:23459754

  19. The histone acetyltransferase PsGcn5 mediates oxidative stress responses and is required for full virulence of Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Tao; Liu, Shusen; Chen, Qingqing; Qi, Rende

    2015-10-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, histone acetyltransferase complexes are coactivators that are important for transcriptional activation by modifying chromatin. In this study, a gene (PsGcn5) from Phytophthora sojae encoding a histone acetyltransferase was identified as a homolog of one component of the histone acetyltransferase complex from yeasts to mammals. PsGcn5 was constitutively expressed in each stage tested, but had a slightly higher expression in sporulating hyphae and 3 h after infection. PsGcn5-silenced mutants were generated using polyethylene glycol-mediated protoplast stable transformation. These mutants had normal development, but compared to wild type strains they had higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and significantly reduced virulence in soybean. Diaminobenzidine staining revealed an accumulation of H2O2 around the infection sites of PsGcn5-silenced mutants but not for wild type strains. Inhibition of the plant NADPH oxidase by diphenyleneiodonium prevented host-derived H2O2 accumulation in soybean cells and restored infectious hyphal growth of the mutants. Thus, we concluded that PsGcn5 is important for growth under conditions of oxidative stress and contributes to the full virulence of P. sojae by suppressing the host-derived reactive oxygen species.

  20. TNFR2 expression by CD4 effector T cells is required to induce full-fledged experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Nie, Yingjie; Xiao, Haitao; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Scarzello, Anthony J.; Song, Na-Young; Anna, Trivett L.; Yang, De; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that TNFR2 is constitutively expressed on CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and TNF-TNFR2 interaction is critical for the activation, expansion and functional stability of Tregs. However, we showed that the expression of TNFR2 was also up-regulated on CD4+ Foxp3− effector T cells (Teffs) upon TCR stimulation. In order to define the role of TNFR2 in the pathogenic CD4 T cells, we compared the effect of transferred naïve CD4 cells from WT mice and TNFR2−/− mice into Rag 1−/− recipients. Transfer of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells failed to induce full-fledged colitis, unlike WT Teffs. This was due to defective proliferative expansion of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells in the lymphopenic mice, as well as their reduced capacity to express proinflammatory Th1 cytokine on a per cell basis. In vitro, the proliferative response of TNFR2 deficient naïve CD4 cells to anti-CD3 stimulation was markedly decreased as compared with that of WT naïve CD4 cells. The hypoproliferative response of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells to TCR stimulation was associated with an increased ratio of p100/p52, providing a mechanistic basis for our findings. Therefore, this study clearly indicates that TNFR2 is important for the proliferative expansion of pathogenic Teff cells. PMID:27601345

  1. VdCrz1 is involved in microsclerotia formation and required for full virulence in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dianguang; Wang, Yonglin; Tang, Chen; Fang, Yulin; Zou, Jingyi; Tian, Chengming

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling plays crucial roles in ion stress tolerance, sporulation and pathogenicity in fungi. Although the signaling pathway mediated by calcineurin and the calcineurin-responsive zinc finger transcription factor Crz1 is well characterized in other fungi, this pathway is not well characterized in the phytopathogenic fungus, Verticillium dahliae. To better understand the role of this calcineurin-dependent transcription factor in V. dahliae, an ortholog of CRZ1, VdCrz1, was identified and characterized functionally. Transcriptional analysis of VdCrz1 and GFP expression driven by the VdCrz1 promoter indicated that VdCrz1 was involved in microsclerotia development. After targeted deletion of VdCrz1, microsclerotia formation and melanin accumulation were impaired. Furthermore, the ΔVdCrz1 mutants were hypersensitive to high concentrations of Ca(2+) and cell wall-perturbing agents, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. The addition of Mg(2+) to the medium restores the microsclerotia formation in ΔVdCrz1 mutants. The ΔVdCrz1 mutants exhibited delayed Verticillium wilt symptoms on smoke tree. These results suggest that VdCrz1 plays important roles in Ca(2+) signaling, cell wall integrity, microsclerotia development and full virulence in V. dahliae.

  2. TNFR2 expression by CD4 effector T cells is required to induce full-fledged experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Nie, Yingjie; Xiao, Haitao; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Scarzello, Anthony J; Song, Na-Young; Anna, Trivett L; Yang, De; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2016-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that TNFR2 is constitutively expressed on CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and TNF-TNFR2 interaction is critical for the activation, expansion and functional stability of Tregs. However, we showed that the expression of TNFR2 was also up-regulated on CD4(+) Foxp3(-) effector T cells (Teffs) upon TCR stimulation. In order to define the role of TNFR2 in the pathogenic CD4 T cells, we compared the effect of transferred naïve CD4 cells from WT mice and TNFR2(-/-) mice into Rag 1(-/-) recipients. Transfer of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells failed to induce full-fledged colitis, unlike WT Teffs. This was due to defective proliferative expansion of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells in the lymphopenic mice, as well as their reduced capacity to express proinflammatory Th1 cytokine on a per cell basis. In vitro, the proliferative response of TNFR2 deficient naïve CD4 cells to anti-CD3 stimulation was markedly decreased as compared with that of WT naïve CD4 cells. The hypoproliferative response of TNFR2-deficient Teff cells to TCR stimulation was associated with an increased ratio of p100/p52, providing a mechanistic basis for our findings. Therefore, this study clearly indicates that TNFR2 is important for the proliferative expansion of pathogenic Teff cells. PMID:27601345

  3. Requirement of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa CbrA Sensor Kinase for Full Virulence in a Murine Acute Lung Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Amy T. Y.; Janot, Laure; Pena, Olga M.; Neidig, Anke; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Hilchie, Ashley; Levesque, Roger C.; Overhage, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is a major cause of respiratory tract and other nosocomial infections. The sensor kinase CbrA is a central regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in vitro also regulates virulence-related processes in P. aeruginosa. Here, we investigated the role of CbrA in two murine models of infection. In both peritoneal infections in leukopenic mice and lung infection models, the cbrA mutant was less virulent since substantially larger numbers of cbrA mutant bacteria were required to cause the same level of infection as wild-type or complemented bacteria. In contrast, in the chronic rat lung model the cbrA mutant grew and persisted as well as the wild type, indicating that the decrease of in vivo virulence of the cbrA mutant did not result from growth deficiencies on particular carbon substrates observed in vitro. In addition, a mutant in the cognate response regulator CbrB showed no defect in virulence in the peritoneal infection model, ruling out the involvement of certain alterations of virulence properties in the cbrA mutant including defective swarming motility, increased biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity, since these alterations are controlled through CbrB. Further investigations indicated that the mutant was more susceptible to uptake by phagocytes in vitro, resulting in greater overall bacterial killing. Consistent with the virulence defect, it took a smaller number of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to kill the cbrA mutant than to kill the wild type. Transcriptional analysis of the cbrA mutant during D. discoideum infection led to the conclusion that CbrA played an important role in the iron metabolism, protection of P. aeruginosa against oxidative stress, and the regulation of certain virulence factors. PMID:24379284

  4. Requirement of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa CbrA sensor kinase for full virulence in a murine acute lung infection model.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Amy T Y; Janot, Laure; Pena, Olga M; Neidig, Anke; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Hilchie, Ashley; Levesque, Roger C; Overhage, Joerg; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is a major cause of respiratory tract and other nosocomial infections. The sensor kinase CbrA is a central regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in vitro also regulates virulence-related processes in P. aeruginosa. Here, we investigated the role of CbrA in two murine models of infection. In both peritoneal infections in leukopenic mice and lung infection models, the cbrA mutant was less virulent since substantially larger numbers of cbrA mutant bacteria were required to cause the same level of infection as wild-type or complemented bacteria. In contrast, in the chronic rat lung model the cbrA mutant grew and persisted as well as the wild type, indicating that the decrease of in vivo virulence of the cbrA mutant did not result from growth deficiencies on particular carbon substrates observed in vitro. In addition, a mutant in the cognate response regulator CbrB showed no defect in virulence in the peritoneal infection model, ruling out the involvement of certain alterations of virulence properties in the cbrA mutant including defective swarming motility, increased biofilm formation, and cytotoxicity, since these alterations are controlled through CbrB. Further investigations indicated that the mutant was more susceptible to uptake by phagocytes in vitro, resulting in greater overall bacterial killing. Consistent with the virulence defect, it took a smaller number of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae to kill the cbrA mutant than to kill the wild type. Transcriptional analysis of the cbrA mutant during D. discoideum infection led to the conclusion that CbrA played an important role in the iron metabolism, protection of P. aeruginosa against oxidative stress, and the regulation of certain virulence factors.

  5. FDA reform floated in DC. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Hodel, D

    1995-06-01

    Legislative proposals to reform the mandate of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are underway in Washington. An ad hoc coalition has been formed by many leading AIDS groups to participate in the debate. The group is drafting principles for evaluating FDA reform proposals from the standpoint of people with life-threatening disease. Items under discussion for the reform include shifting more efficacy studies to a post-marketing setting. This would enable drugs to reach the market much faster; however, the risks are greater because more people will be taking the drugs with less data about hazards. Another measure would utilize local Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) to review proposals for the early human testing (phase I clinical trials) on drugs. In addition, a measure was proposed that would privatize certain drug safety reviews, by relegating them to independent testing or accrediting institutions. Another measure would permit the promotion of FDA-approved drugs for off-label uses. A measure to impose statutory time limits on FDA review is also under discussion. Finally, the possible removal of export barriers for non-FDA-approved drugs is under review.

  6. Healthy public relations: the FDA's 1930s legislative campaign.

    PubMed

    Kay, G

    2001-01-01

    In this article, I argue that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is an oft-overlooked government agency that acts to preserve and secure the public's health. From its early years as an agency charged with enforcement of the 1906 Pure Food and Drugs Act, the FDA not only protected the public's health but also made the public aware of its mission, using methods as diverse as displays at county fairs and at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair, radio programming, and active correspondence. The agency encouraged the public to protect itself, particularly in those arenas in which the FDA had no regulatory authority. In addition, it may have overstepped its boundaries when it actively solicited public support for a bill submitted to Congress in the early 1930s. In the dark days of the Great Depression, the FDA contended not only with limited resources and its own feelings of inadequacy in terms of what could and could not be done to protect the populace, but also with "guinea pig" books that horrified and angered many readers. By 1938, when the agency prevailed and the revisions to the 1906 Act passed Congress and were signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the FDA had done all that a responsible public health agency should do, and more. PMID:11568487

  7. The F plasmid centromere, sopC, is required for full repression of the sopAB operon.

    PubMed

    Yates, P; Lane, D; Biek, D P

    1999-07-16

    The SopB protein of the F plasmid has a dual role in the partition of F plasmid copies to daughter cells prior to division. It binds to the sopC centromere site to form the partition complex needed for stabilizing the plasmid, and it interacts with SopA to repress transcription of the sopAB operon, thus preventing the destabilization that results from excess SopB. We have isolated sop mutants by screening for unstable inheritance of mutagenized mini-F DNA. Four of the mutants resulted from different missense mutations in sopB. All four were deficient, to varying degrees, in autoregulation of Sop protein synthesis. The mutant proteins showed diminished capacity for reducing the linking number of mini-F and for destabilizing a plasmid carrying sopC, indicating that reduced ability to form a normal complex with sopC might underlie the autoregulation defect. Repression of the transcription of a sop promoter- lacZ fusion by SopA and SopB was strongly enhanced in the presence of sopC, in cis or in trans, and the enhancement was reduced or nullified when wild-type sopB was replaced by the mutant sopB alleles. A single 43 bp unit of sopC was almost as effective as sopC itself in enhancing repression. The results show that sopC is necessary for full repression of the sop promoter. They thus indicate a previously unsuspected role for this centromere site, and suggest that autoregulation and partition might normally be coordinated processes.

  8. The FDA's Experience with Emerging Genomics Technologies-Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joshua; Thakkar, Shraddha; Gong, Binsheng; Tong, Weida

    2016-07-01

    The rapid advancement of emerging genomics technologies and their application for assessing safety and efficacy of FDA-regulated products require a high standard of reliability and robustness supporting regulatory decision-making in the FDA. To facilitate the regulatory application, the FDA implemented a novel data submission program, Voluntary Genomics Data Submission (VGDS), and also to engage the stakeholders. As part of the endeavor, for the past 10 years, the FDA has led an international consortium of regulatory agencies, academia, pharmaceutical companies, and genomics platform providers, which was named MicroArray Quality Control Consortium (MAQC), to address issues such as reproducibility, precision, specificity/sensitivity, and data interpretation. Three projects have been completed so far assessing these genomics technologies: gene expression microarrays, whole genome genotyping arrays, and whole transcriptome sequencing (i.e., RNA-seq). The resultant studies provide the basic parameters for fit-for-purpose application of these new data streams in regulatory environments, and the solutions have been made available to the public through peer-reviewed publications. The latest MAQC project is also called the SEquencing Quality Control (SEQC) project focused on next-generation sequencing. Using reference samples with built-in controls, SEQC studies have demonstrated that relative gene expression can be measured accurately and reliably across laboratories and RNA-seq platforms. Besides prediction performance comparable to microarrays in clinical settings and safety assessments, RNA-seq is shown to have better sensitivity for low expression and reveal novel transcriptomic features. Future effort of MAQC will be focused on quality control of whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing. PMID:27116022

  9. FDA regulations regarding iodine addition to foods and labeling of foods containing added iodine.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Paula R

    2016-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the addition of iodine to infant formulas, the iodization of salt, and the addition of salt and iodine to foods. The required amount of iodine in infant formulas is based on caloric content, and the label must provide the iodine content per 100 kcal. Cuprous iodide and potassium iodide may be added to table salt as a source of dietary iodine at a maximum amount of 0.01%; if added, the label must indicate that the salt is iodized. Table salt to which iodine has not been added must bear the statement, "This salt does not supply iodide, a necessary nutrient." If a nutrient is to be appropriately added to a food for the purpose of correcting a dietary insufficiency, there should be sufficient scientific information available to demonstrate a nutritional deficiency and/or identify a public health problem. Furthermore, the population groups that would benefit from the proposed fortification should be identified. If iodine is added to a food, the percent Daily Value of iodine must be listed. There are no FDA regulations governing ingredient standards for dietary supplements. As a result, some dietary supplements include iodine and others do not. If a supplement contains iodine, the Supplement Facts label must list iodine as a nutrient ingredient. If iodine is not listed on the Supplement Facts label, then it has not been added. There are similarities between the FDA, which establishes US food regulations and policies, and the Codex Alimentarius (Codex), which develops international food standards and guidelines under the aegis of the FAO and the WHO. Both the FDA and Codex call for the labeling of table salt to indicate fortification with iodine, voluntary labeling of iodine on foods, and a Daily Value (called a Nutrient Reference Value by Codex) of 150 μg for iodine. PMID:27534626

  10. The FDA's Experience with Emerging Genomics Technologies-Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joshua; Thakkar, Shraddha; Gong, Binsheng; Tong, Weida

    2016-07-01

    The rapid advancement of emerging genomics technologies and their application for assessing safety and efficacy of FDA-regulated products require a high standard of reliability and robustness supporting regulatory decision-making in the FDA. To facilitate the regulatory application, the FDA implemented a novel data submission program, Voluntary Genomics Data Submission (VGDS), and also to engage the stakeholders. As part of the endeavor, for the past 10 years, the FDA has led an international consortium of regulatory agencies, academia, pharmaceutical companies, and genomics platform providers, which was named MicroArray Quality Control Consortium (MAQC), to address issues such as reproducibility, precision, specificity/sensitivity, and data interpretation. Three projects have been completed so far assessing these genomics technologies: gene expression microarrays, whole genome genotyping arrays, and whole transcriptome sequencing (i.e., RNA-seq). The resultant studies provide the basic parameters for fit-for-purpose application of these new data streams in regulatory environments, and the solutions have been made available to the public through peer-reviewed publications. The latest MAQC project is also called the SEquencing Quality Control (SEQC) project focused on next-generation sequencing. Using reference samples with built-in controls, SEQC studies have demonstrated that relative gene expression can be measured accurately and reliably across laboratories and RNA-seq platforms. Besides prediction performance comparable to microarrays in clinical settings and safety assessments, RNA-seq is shown to have better sensitivity for low expression and reveal novel transcriptomic features. Future effort of MAQC will be focused on quality control of whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing.

  11. FDA Approvals of Brand-Name Prescription Drugs in 2015

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The drugs included in this review were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 and are grouped into the following categories: New Pharmaceuticals: New Molecular Entities and New Biologic License ApplicationsNew Combinations and New IndicationsNew Dosage Forms and New FormulationsNew Biosimilars, Vaccines, Viral Therapies, and Blood Products

  12. 21 CFR 60.34 - FDA action on petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FDA action on petitions. 60.34 Section 60.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT TERM... not exercise due diligence such that, even if the petition were granted, the petition would not...

  13. 21 CFR 60.34 - FDA action on petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false FDA action on petitions. 60.34 Section 60.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT TERM... not exercise due diligence such that, even if the petition were granted, the petition would not...

  14. 21 CFR 60.34 - FDA action on petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FDA action on petitions. 60.34 Section 60.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT TERM... not exercise due diligence such that, even if the petition were granted, the petition would not...

  15. 21 CFR 60.34 - FDA action on petitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FDA action on petitions. 60.34 Section 60.34 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT TERM... not exercise due diligence such that, even if the petition were granted, the petition would not...

  16. 21 CFR 60.10 - FDA assistance on eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FDA assistance on eligibility. 60.10 Section 60.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT... use; (2) For human drug products, food additives, color additives, and medical devices,...

  17. 21 CFR 60.10 - FDA assistance on eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FDA assistance on eligibility. 60.10 Section 60.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PATENT... use; (2) For human drug products, food additives, color additives, and medical devices,...

  18. 42 CFR 405.203 - FDA categorization of investigational devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FDA categorization of investigational devices. 405.203 Section 405.203 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Medical Services Coverage Decisions That Relate to Health...

  19. 36 CFR 13.980 - Other FDA closures and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Other FDA closures and restrictions. 13.980 Section 13.980 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  20. 36 CFR 13.980 - Other FDA closures and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Other FDA closures and restrictions. 13.980 Section 13.980 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  1. 36 CFR 13.980 - Other FDA closures and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Other FDA closures and restrictions. 13.980 Section 13.980 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  2. 36 CFR 13.980 - Other FDA closures and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Other FDA closures and restrictions. 13.980 Section 13.980 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  3. 21 CFR 312.86 - Focused FDA regulatory research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Focused FDA regulatory research. 312.86 Section 312.86 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUG APPLICATION Drugs Intended to Treat Life-threatening...

  4. 21 CFR 5.1110 - FDA public information offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false FDA public information offices. 5.1110 Section 5.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: 301-827-6242; and at 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy.,...

  5. 21 CFR 5.1110 - FDA public information offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false FDA public information offices. 5.1110 Section 5.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: 301-827-6242; and at 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy.,...

  6. 21 CFR 5.1110 - FDA public information offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false FDA public information offices. 5.1110 Section 5.1110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: 301-827-6242; and at 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy.,...

  7. FDA Approvals of Brand-Name Prescription Drugs in 2015

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The drugs included in this review were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 and are grouped into the following categories: New Pharmaceuticals: New Molecular Entities and New Biologic License ApplicationsNew Combinations and New IndicationsNew Dosage Forms and New FormulationsNew Biosimilars, Vaccines, Viral Therapies, and Blood Products PMID:27668042

  8. Network analysis of FDA approved drugs and their targets.

    PubMed

    Ma'ayan, Avi; Jenkins, Sherry L; Goldfarb, Joseph; Iyengar, Ravi

    2007-04-01

    The global relationship between drugs that are approved for therapeutic use and the human genome is not known. We employed graph-theory methods to analyze the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs and their known molecular targets. We used the FDA Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations 26(th) Edition Electronic Orange Book (EOB) to identify all FDA approved drugs and their active ingredients. We then connected the list of active ingredients extracted from the EOB to those known human protein targets included in the DrugBank database and constructed a bipartite network. We computed network statistics and conducted Gene Ontology analysis on the drug targets and drug categories. We find that drug to drug-target relationship in the bipartite network is scale-free. Several classes of proteins in the human genome appear to be better targets for drugs since they appear to be selectively enriched as drug targets for the currently FDA approved drugs. These initial observations allow for development of an integrated research methodology to identify general principles of the drug discovery process. PMID:17516560

  9. 36 CFR 13.980 - Other FDA closures and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other FDA closures and restrictions. 13.980 Section 13.980 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  10. FDA Approvals of Brand-Name Prescription Drugs in 2015.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The drugs included in this review were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 and are grouped into the following categories: New Pharmaceuticals: New Molecular Entities and New Biologic License ApplicationsNew Combinations and New IndicationsNew Dosage Forms and New FormulationsNew Biosimilars, Vaccines, Viral Therapies, and Blood Products. PMID:27668042

  11. Cigarette Graphic Warning Labels and Smoking Prevalence in Canada: A Critical Examination and Reformulation of the FDA Regulatory Impact Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jidong; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The estimated effect of cigarette graphic warning labels (GWLs) on smoking rates is a key input to FDA's regulatory impact analysis (RIA), required by law as part of its rulemaking process. However, evidence on the impact of GWLs on smoking prevalence is scarce. Objective The goal of this paper is to critically analyze FDA's approach to estimating the impact of GWLs on smoking rates in its RIA, and to suggest a path forward to estimating the impact of the adoption of GWLs in Canada on Canadian national adult smoking prevalence. Methods A quasi-experimental methodology was employed to examine the impact of adoption of GWLs in Canada in 2000, using the U.S. as a control. Findings We found a statistically significant reduction in smoking rates after the adoption of GWLs in Canada in comparison to the U.S. Our analyses show that implementation of GWLs in Canada reduced smoking rates by 2.87 to 4.68 percentage points, a relative reduction of 12.1 to 19.6% — 33 to 53 times larger than FDA's estimates of a 0.088 percentage point reduction. We also demonstrated that FDA's estimate of the impact was flawed because it is highly sensitive to the changes in variable selection, model specification, and the time period analyzed. Conclusions Adopting GWLs on cigarette packages reduces smoking prevalence. Applying our analysis of the Canadian GWLs, we estimate that if the U.S. had adopted GWLs in 2012, the number of adult smokers in the U.S. would have decreased by 5.3 to 8.6 million in 2013. Our analysis demonstrates that FDA's approach to estimating the impact of GWLs on smoking rates is flawed. Rectifying these problems before this approach becomes the norm is critical for FDA's effective regulation of tobacco products. PMID:24218057

  12. Revisiting Financial Conflicts of Interest in FDA Advisory Committees

    PubMed Central

    Pham-Kanter, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Context The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Safety and Innovation Act has recently relaxed conflict-of-interest rules for FDA advisory committee members, but concerns remain about the influence of members’ financial relationships on the FDA's drug approval process. Using a large newly available data set, this study carefully examined the relationship between the financial interests of FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) advisory committee members and whether members voted in a way favorable to these interests. Methods The study used a data set of voting behavior and reported financial interests of 1,379 FDA advisory committee members who voted in CDER committee meetings that were convened during the 15-year period of 1997–2011. Data on 1,168 questions and 15,739 question-votes from 379 meetings were used in the analyses. Multivariable logit models were used to estimate the relationship between committee members’ financial interests and their voting behavior. Findings Individuals with financial interests solely in the sponsoring firm were more likely to vote in favor of the sponsor than members with no financial ties (OR = 1.49, p = 0.03). Members with interests in both the sponsoring firm and its competitors were no more likely to vote in favor of the sponsor than those with no financial ties to any potentially affected firm (OR = 1.16, p = 0.48). Members who served on advisory boards solely for the sponsor were significantly more likely to vote in favor of the sponsor (OR = 4.97, p = 0.005). Conclusions There appears to be a pro-sponsor voting bias among advisory committee members who have exclusive financial relationships with the sponsoring firm but not among members who have nonexclusive financial relationships (ie, those with ties to both the sponsor and its competitors). These findings point to important heterogeneities in financial ties and suggest that policymakers will need to be nuanced in their management of financial

  13. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Neuroscience remains a great challenge and opportunity in terms of new drug discovery and development. An assessment of FDA-approved new molecular entities (NMEs) reveals a low steady rate of new FDA approvals, which is interrupted by two bursts in activity, first in the 1950s and then in the 1990s. These trends are reflected in the approvals for NMEs targeting multiple indications in this field, including seizure, Parkinson's disease and neuromuscular disorders. The majority of drugs target ion channels or G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but the mechanistic basis for many NMEs remains unclear or controversial. These trends could suggest future opportunities for success in a crucial field with considerable unmet needs.

  14. FDA seeks temporary blood donor changes. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    1997-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has requested that blood collection agencies exclude donors at risk of Group O HIV, following two cases identified in 1996. Group O is very rare in the United States. Blood donors would be excluded if they were born or lived in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Niger or Nigeria since 1977, or had sexual conduct with anyone traveling to those areas. The number of excluded donors would be minute.

  15. QSAR Models at the US FDA/NCTR.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Chen, Minjun; Ng, Hui Wen; Tong, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) has been used in the scientific research community for many decades and applied to drug discovery and development in the industry. QSAR technologies are advancing fast and attracting possible applications in regulatory science. To facilitate the development of reliable QSAR models, the FDA had invested a lot of efforts in constructing chemical databases with a variety of efficacy and safety endpoint data, as well as in the development of computational algorithms. In this chapter, we briefly describe some of the often used databases developed at the FDA such as EDKB (Endocrine Disruptor Knowledge Base), EADB (Estrogenic Activity Database), LTKB (Liver Toxicity Knowledge Base), and CERES (Chemical Evaluation and Risk Estimation System) and the technologies adopted by the agency such as Mold(2) program for calculation of a large and diverse set of molecular descriptors and decision forest algorithm for QSAR model development. We also summarize some QSAR models that have been developed for safety evaluation of the FDA-regulated products. PMID:27311476

  16. FDA Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Facility Incident

    MedlinePlus

    ... ia/importalert_621.html FDA may adjust this strategy based on additional information received from monitoring results in Japan. FDA may also further evaluate this strategy if the Government of Japan makes changes to ...

  17. FDA Regulates Tobacco Maps and Data of Model-Based Small Area Estimates - Small Area Estimates

    Cancer.gov

    FDA Regulates Tobacco is defined as a person 18 years of age or older who must have reported that he/she believes that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates tobacco products in the U.S.

  18. Regulatory perspectives and research activities at the FDA on the use of phantoms with in vivo diagnostic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Anant; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Weininger, Sandy; Chakrabarti, Kish; Pfefer, Joshua

    2008-02-01

    For a number of years, phantoms have been used to optimize device parameters and validate performance in the primary medical imaging modalities (CT, MRI, PET/SPECT, ultrasound). Furthermore, the FDA under the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) requires image quality evaluation of mammography systems using FDA-approved phantoms. The oldest quantitative optical diagnostic technology, pulse oximetry, also benefits from the use of active phantoms known as patient simulators to validate certain performance characteristics under different clinically-relevant conditions. As such, guidance provided by the FDA to its staff and to industry on the contents of pre-market notification and approval submissions includes suggestions on how to incorporate the appropriate phantoms in establishing device effectiveness. Research at the FDA supports regulatory statements on the use of phantoms by investigating how phantoms can be designed, characterized, and utilized to determine critical device performance characteristics. These examples provide a model for how novel techniques in the rapidly growing field of optical diagnostics can use phantoms during pre- and post-market regulatory testing.

  19. No sisyphean task: how the FDA can regulate electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Paradise, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    The adverse effects of smoking have fostered a natural market for smoking cessation and smoking reduction products. Smokers attempting to quit or reduce consumption have tried everything: "low" or "light" cigarettes; nicotine-infused chewing gum, lozenges, and lollipops; dermal patches; and even hypnosis. The latest craze in the quest to find a safer source of nicotine is the electronic cigarette. Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have swept the market, reaching a rapidly expanding international consumer base. Boasting nicotine delivery and the tactile feel of a traditional cigarette without the dozens of other chemical constituents that contribute to carcinogenicity, e-cigarettes are often portrayed as less risky, as a smoking reduction or even a complete smoking cessation product, and perhaps most troubling for its appeal to youth, as a flavorful, trendy, and convenient accessory. The sensationalism associated with e-cigarettes has spurred outcry from health and medical professional groups, as well as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), because of the unknown effects on public health. Inhabiting a realm of products deemed "tobacco products" under recent 2009 legislation, e-cigarettes pose new challenges to FDA regulation because of their novel method of nicotine delivery, various mechanical and electrical parts, and nearly nonexistent safety data. Consumer use, marketing and promotional claims, and technological characteristics of e-cigarettes have also raised decades old questions of when the FDA can assert authority over products as drugs or medical devices. Recent case law restricting FDA enforcement efforts against e-cigarettes further confounds the distinction among drugs and medical devices, emerging e-cigarette products, and traditional tobacco products such as cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco. This Article investigates the e-cigarette phenomenon in the wake of the recently enacted Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009

  20. No sisyphean task: how the FDA can regulate electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Paradise, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    The adverse effects of smoking have fostered a natural market for smoking cessation and smoking reduction products. Smokers attempting to quit or reduce consumption have tried everything: "low" or "light" cigarettes; nicotine-infused chewing gum, lozenges, and lollipops; dermal patches; and even hypnosis. The latest craze in the quest to find a safer source of nicotine is the electronic cigarette. Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have swept the market, reaching a rapidly expanding international consumer base. Boasting nicotine delivery and the tactile feel of a traditional cigarette without the dozens of other chemical constituents that contribute to carcinogenicity, e-cigarettes are often portrayed as less risky, as a smoking reduction or even a complete smoking cessation product, and perhaps most troubling for its appeal to youth, as a flavorful, trendy, and convenient accessory. The sensationalism associated with e-cigarettes has spurred outcry from health and medical professional groups, as well as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), because of the unknown effects on public health. Inhabiting a realm of products deemed "tobacco products" under recent 2009 legislation, e-cigarettes pose new challenges to FDA regulation because of their novel method of nicotine delivery, various mechanical and electrical parts, and nearly nonexistent safety data. Consumer use, marketing and promotional claims, and technological characteristics of e-cigarettes have also raised decades old questions of when the FDA can assert authority over products as drugs or medical devices. Recent case law restricting FDA enforcement efforts against e-cigarettes further confounds the distinction among drugs and medical devices, emerging e-cigarette products, and traditional tobacco products such as cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco. This Article investigates the e-cigarette phenomenon in the wake of the recently enacted Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009

  1. 21 CFR 1.379 - How long may FDA detain an article of food?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How long may FDA detain an article of food? 1.379... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption General Provisions § 1.379 How long may FDA detain an article of food? (a) FDA may detain an article of food for...

  2. 21 CFR 1.393 - What information must FDA include in the detention order?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What information must FDA include in the detention... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption How Does Fda Order A Detention? § 1.393 What information must FDA include in the detention...

  3. 21 CFR 1.379 - How long may FDA detain an article of food?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How long may FDA detain an article of food? 1.379... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption General Provisions § 1.379 How long may FDA detain an article of food? (a) FDA may detain an article of food for...

  4. 21 CFR 1.379 - How long may FDA detain an article of food?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How long may FDA detain an article of food? 1.379... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption General Provisions § 1.379 How long may FDA detain an article of food? (a) FDA may detain an article of food for...

  5. 21 CFR 1.393 - What information must FDA include in the detention order?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information must FDA include in the detention... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption How Does Fda Order A Detention? § 1.393 What information must FDA include in the detention...

  6. Medical devices; performance standards for dental and mammographic X-ray devices; amendment--FDA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1998-10-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to exempt panoramic dental x-ray units from the requirement that they be manufactured with exposure timers which automatically reset to zero upon premature termination of an exposure. Removing the automatic timer reset requirement will not compromise the quality of the radiographic image and will protect patients from being subjected to unnecessary radiation due to repeat radiographs. FDA also proposes five changes to align the performance standard with the equipment requirements issued under the Mammography Quality Standards Act of 1992 (MQSA). First, the agency proposes to remove any reference to the use of equipment not specifically designed for mammography from the performance requirements for mammography equipment. Second, FDA proposes that the mammographic field alignment requirements restrict the irradiation beam to less than 2 percent of the source-image receptor distance (SID) beyond the image receptor edges. Third, it is proposed that the definition of an image receptor support device be amended to specify that it must provide a primary protective barrier for any orientation of the x-ray tube and image receptor support device assembly. Fourth, it is proposed that the useful beam must be confined to the dimensions of the primary barrier provided by the image receptor support device (except on the chest wall side). Fifth, it is proposed that exposures not be permitted without the primary barrier in place.

  7. Identification of novel virulence genes and metabolic pathways required for full fitness of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in olive (Olea europaea) knots.

    PubMed

    Matas, Isabel M; Lambertsen, Lotte; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Ramos, Cayo

    2012-12-01

    Comparative genomics and functional analysis of Pseudomonas syringae and related pathogens have mainly focused on diseases of herbaceous plants; however, there is a general lack of knowledge about the virulence and pathogenicity determinants required for infection of woody plants. Here, we applied signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) to Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi during colonization of olive (Olea europaea) knots, with the goal of identifying the range of genes linked to growth and symptom production in its plant host. A total of 58 different genes were identified, and most mutations resulted in hypovirulence in woody olive plants. Sequence analysis of STM mutations allowed us to identify metabolic pathways required for full fitness of P. savastanoi in olive and revealed novel mechanisms involved in the virulence of this pathogen, some of which are essential for full colonization of olive knots by the pathogen and for the lysis of host cells. This first application of STM to a P. syringae-like pathogen provides confirmation of functional capabilities long believed to play a role in the survival and virulence of this group of pathogens but not adequately tested before, and unravels novel factors not correlated previously with the virulence of other plant or animal bacterial pathogens.

  8. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Christian M.; Kinsella, Rachel L.; Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion. PMID:26764912

  9. 2015 in review: FDA approval of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    The myriad new molecular entities (NMEs) approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 reflected both the opportunities and risks associated with the development of new medicines. On the one hand, the approval of 45 NMEs was among the highest ever recorded. Likewise, the diversity underlying the mechanistic basis of new medicines suggests continued broadening relative to the predominate trends of the past few decades. On the other hand, closer inspection indicates that business model decisions surrounding orphan indications and consolidation could be placing the industry in an ever-more precarious position, with severe implications for the sustainability of the entire enterprise. PMID:27109618

  10. FDA's Laser Notice 50: a step toward global harmonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Suzie L. B.; Dennis, Jerome E.; Zaharek, Gary L.; Eng, Francis J.

    2003-06-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration, Center of Devices and Radiological Health issued Laser Notice 50 in July 2001. This Notice is a preliminary step that FDA has taken to harmonize US regulations for laser products (21 Code of Federal Regulations) with the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) standards for Safety of Laser Products. The paper discusses rationale for the changes and describes some of the implementation issues, including comparisons between the current standards. The impact on the regulated industry and the user community is that the same laser hazard classification scheme is used and that engineered safety features are consistentin the world markets.

  11. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for oncology.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death globally. The number of new medicines targeting cancer has grown impressively since the 1990s. On average, ten new drugs are introduced each year. Such growth has partly been achieved by emphasizing biologics and orphan indications, which account for one-quarter and one-half of new oncology drugs, respectively. The biotechnology industry likewise has become the primary driver of cancer drug development in terms of patents, preclinical and clinical research, although pharmaceutical companies are granted more FDA approvals. Many targeting strategies have been successful but recent trends suggest that kinase targets, although tractable, might be overemphasized.

  12. Awareness of the role of science in the FDA regulatory submission process: a survey of the TERMIS-Americas membership.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Peter C; Bertram, Tim A; Carty, Neal R; Hellman, Kiki B; Tawil, Bill J; Van Dyke, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The Industry Committee of the Tissue Engineering Regenerative Medicine International Society, Americas Chapter (TERMIS-AM) administered a survey to its membership in 2013 to assess the awareness of science requirements in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory process. One hundred forty-four members responded to the survey. Their occupational and geographical representation was representative of the TERMIS-AM membership as a whole. The survey elicited basic demographic information, the degree to which members were involved in tissue engineering technology development, and their plans for future involvement in such development. The survey then assessed the awareness of general FDA scientific practices as well as specific science requirements for regulatory submissions to the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), and the Office of Combination Projects (OCP). The FDA-specific questions in the survey were culled from guidance documents posted on the FDA web site ( www.fda.gov ). One of the answer options was an opt-out clause that enabled survey respondents to claim a lack of sufficient awareness of the topic to answer the question. This enabled the stratification of respondents on the basis of confidence in the topic. Results indicate that across all occupational groups (academic, business, and government) that are represented in the TERMIS-AM membership, the awareness of FDA science requirements varies markedly. Those who performed best were for-profit company employees, consultants, and government employees; while students, professors, and respondents from outside the USA performed least well. Confidence in question topics was associated with increased correctness in responses across all groups, though the association between confidence and the ability to answer correctly was poorest among students and professors. Though 80% of

  13. Awareness of the role of science in the FDA regulatory submission process: a survey of the TERMIS-Americas membership.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Peter C; Bertram, Tim A; Carty, Neal R; Hellman, Kiki B; Tawil, Bill J; Van Dyke, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The Industry Committee of the Tissue Engineering Regenerative Medicine International Society, Americas Chapter (TERMIS-AM) administered a survey to its membership in 2013 to assess the awareness of science requirements in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory process. One hundred forty-four members responded to the survey. Their occupational and geographical representation was representative of the TERMIS-AM membership as a whole. The survey elicited basic demographic information, the degree to which members were involved in tissue engineering technology development, and their plans for future involvement in such development. The survey then assessed the awareness of general FDA scientific practices as well as specific science requirements for regulatory submissions to the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), and the Office of Combination Projects (OCP). The FDA-specific questions in the survey were culled from guidance documents posted on the FDA web site ( www.fda.gov ). One of the answer options was an opt-out clause that enabled survey respondents to claim a lack of sufficient awareness of the topic to answer the question. This enabled the stratification of respondents on the basis of confidence in the topic. Results indicate that across all occupational groups (academic, business, and government) that are represented in the TERMIS-AM membership, the awareness of FDA science requirements varies markedly. Those who performed best were for-profit company employees, consultants, and government employees; while students, professors, and respondents from outside the USA performed least well. Confidence in question topics was associated with increased correctness in responses across all groups, though the association between confidence and the ability to answer correctly was poorest among students and professors. Though 80% of

  14. 76 FR 17138 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  15. 77 FR 8886 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  16. 76 FR 78933 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  17. 76 FR 51040 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  18. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  19. 75 FR 51824 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  20. Full activation of RNaseL in animal cells requires binding of 2-5A within ankyrin repeats 6 to 9 of this interferon-inducible enzyme.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Guerra, M; Rivas, C; Esteban, M

    1999-02-01

    To define protein domains important for activation of the interferon (IFN)-induced enzyme 2-5A-dependent RNaseL, we have generated vaccinia virus (VV) recombinants able to express in cultured cells truncated forms of this protein and compared their biologic activities with those producing the wild-type enzyme, with and without coexpression of 2-5A synthetase. Our results show that full activation of RNaseL requires binding of 2-5A oligonucleotides within amino acid positions 212-339, corresponding to ankyrin repeats 6 to 9. The protein kinase and ribonuclease domains of RNaseL, amino acids 340-741, are sufficient for a constitutively active enzyme that is unresponsive to excess 2-5A. These results demonstrate in vivo the importance of the ankyrin domains in the biologic function of RNaseL. We suggest that ankyrin repeats act as key modulators of RNaseL activity.

  1. PsAAT3, an oomycete-specific aspartate aminotransferase, is required for full pathogenicity of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongbo; Zhang, Meixiang; Liu, Hong; Xu, Jing; Yu, Jia; He, Feng; Zhang, Xiong; Dong, Suomeng; Dou, Daolong

    2016-04-01

    Pathogen nutrient acquisition and metabolism are critical for successful infection and colonization. However, the nutrient requirements and metabolic pathways related to pathogenesis in oomycete pathogens are unknown. In this study, we bioinformatically identified Phytophthora sojae aspartate aminotransferases (AATs), which are key enzymes that coordinate carbon and nitrogen metabolism. We demonstrated that P. sojae encodes more AATs than the analysed fungi. Some of the AATs contained additional prephenate dehydratase and/or prephenate dehydrogenase domains in their N-termini, which are unique to oomycetes. Silencing of PsAAT3, an infection-inducible expression gene, reduced P. sojae pathogenicity on soybean plants and affected the growth under N-starving condition, suggesting that PsAAT3 is involved in pathogen pathogenicity and nitrogen utilisation during infection. Our results suggest that P. sojae and other oomycete pathogens may have distinct amino acid metabolism pathways and that PsAAT3 is important for its full pathogenicity. PMID:27020161

  2. Smokers’ and Nonsmokers’ Beliefs About Harmful Tobacco Constituents: Implications for FDA Communication Efforts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Legislation requires the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to release information to the public about harmful constituents in tobacco and tobacco smoke. To inform these efforts, we sought to better understand how smokers and nonsmokers think about tobacco constituents. Methods: In October 2012, 300U.S. adults aged 18–66 years completed a cross-sectional Internet survey. The questions focused on 20 harmful tobacco constituents that the FDA has prioritized for communicating with the public. Results: Most participants had heard of 7 tobacco constituents (ammonia, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and nicotine), but few participants had heard of the others (e.g., acrolein). Few participants correctly understood that many constituents were naturally present in tobacco. Substances that companies add to cigarette tobacco discouraged people from wanting to smoke more than substances that naturally occur in cigarette smoke (p < .001). Ammonia, arsenic, carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde being in cigarettes elicited the most discouragement from smoking. Constituents elicited greater discouragement from wanting to smoke if respondents were nonsmokers (β = −.34, p < .05), had negative images of smokers (i.e., negative smoker prototypes; β = .19, p < .05), believed constituents are added to tobacco (β = .14, p < .05), or were older (β = .16, p < .05). Conclusions: Our study found low awareness of most tobacco constituents, with greater concern elicited by additives. Efforts to communicate health risks of tobacco constituents should consider focusing on ones that elicited the most discouragement from smoking. PMID:24151139

  3. NIEHS/FDA CLARITY-BPA research program update.

    PubMed

    Heindel, Jerrold J; Newbold, Retha R; Bucher, John R; Camacho, Luísa; Delclos, K Barry; Lewis, Sherry M; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Churchwell, Mona I; Twaddle, Nathan C; McLellen, Michelle; Chidambaram, Mani; Bryant, Matthew; Woodling, Kellie; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Ferguson, Sherry A; Flaws, Jodi; Howard, Paul C; Walker, Nigel J; Zoeller, R Thomas; Fostel, Jennifer; Favaro, Carolyn; Schug, Thaddeus T

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical used in the production of numerous consumer products resulting in potential daily human exposure to this chemical. The FDA previously evaluated the body of BPA toxicology data and determined that BPA is safe at current exposure levels. Although consistent with the assessment of some other regulatory agencies around the world, this determination of BPA safety continues to be debated in scientific and popular publications, resulting in conflicting messages to the public. Thus, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) developed a consortium-based research program to link more effectively a variety of hypothesis-based research investigations and guideline-compliant safety testing with BPA. This collaboration is known as the Consortium Linking Academic and Regulatory Insights on BPA Toxicity (CLARITY-BPA). This paper provides a detailed description of the conduct of the study and a midterm update on progress of the CLARITY-BPA research program.

  4. NIEHS/FDA CLARITY-BPA research program update.

    PubMed

    Heindel, Jerrold J; Newbold, Retha R; Bucher, John R; Camacho, Luísa; Delclos, K Barry; Lewis, Sherry M; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Churchwell, Mona I; Twaddle, Nathan C; McLellen, Michelle; Chidambaram, Mani; Bryant, Matthew; Woodling, Kellie; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Ferguson, Sherry A; Flaws, Jodi; Howard, Paul C; Walker, Nigel J; Zoeller, R Thomas; Fostel, Jennifer; Favaro, Carolyn; Schug, Thaddeus T

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical used in the production of numerous consumer products resulting in potential daily human exposure to this chemical. The FDA previously evaluated the body of BPA toxicology data and determined that BPA is safe at current exposure levels. Although consistent with the assessment of some other regulatory agencies around the world, this determination of BPA safety continues to be debated in scientific and popular publications, resulting in conflicting messages to the public. Thus, the National Toxicology Program (NTP), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) developed a consortium-based research program to link more effectively a variety of hypothesis-based research investigations and guideline-compliant safety testing with BPA. This collaboration is known as the Consortium Linking Academic and Regulatory Insights on BPA Toxicity (CLARITY-BPA). This paper provides a detailed description of the conduct of the study and a midterm update on progress of the CLARITY-BPA research program. PMID:26232693

  5. FDA Escherichia coli Identification (FDA-ECID) Microarray: a Pangenome Molecular Toolbox for Serotyping, Virulence Profiling, Molecular Epidemiology, and Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Isha R.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Lacher, David W.; Mammel, Mark K.; Jackson, Scott A.; Lampel, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most Escherichia coli strains are nonpathogenic. However, for clinical diagnosis and food safety analysis, current identification methods for pathogenic E. coli either are time-consuming and/or provide limited information. Here, we utilized a custom DNA microarray with informative genetic features extracted from 368 sequence sets for rapid and high-throughput pathogen identification. The FDA Escherichia coli Identification (FDA-ECID) platform contains three sets of molecularly informative features that together stratify strain identification and relatedness. First, 53 known flagellin alleles, 103 alleles of wzx and wzy, and 5 alleles of wzm provide molecular serotyping utility. Second, 41,932 probe sets representing the pan-genome of E. coli provide strain-level gene content information. Third, approximately 125,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of available whole-genome sequences (WGS) were distilled to 9,984 SNPs capable of recapitulating the E. coli phylogeny. We analyzed 103 diverse E. coli strains with available WGS data, including those associated with past foodborne illnesses, to determine robustness and accuracy. The array was able to accurately identify the molecular O and H serotypes, potentially correcting serological failures and providing better resolution for H-nontypeable/nonmotile phenotypes. In addition, molecular risk assessment was possible with key virulence marker identifications. Epidemiologically, each strain had a unique comparative genomic fingerprint that was extended to an additional 507 food and clinical isolates. Finally, a 99.7% phylogenetic concordance was established between microarray analysis and WGS using SNP-level data for advanced genome typing. Our study demonstrates FDA-ECID as a powerful tool for epidemiology and molecular risk assessment with the capacity to profile the global landscape and diversity of E. coli. IMPORTANCE This study describes a robust, state-of-the-art platform developed from available

  6. Full reconstitution of the immune deficiency in scid mice with normal stem cells requires low-dose irradiation of the recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Fulop, G.M.; Phillips, R.A.

    1986-06-15

    Mice homozygous for an autosomal recessive mutation for the scid gene exhibit a defect that specifically impairs lymphoid differentiation but not myelopoiesis. Such mice can be cured of their lymphoid deficiency by grafts with normal bone marrow, although full reconstitution of lymphoid function is seldom obtained. Long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) are devoid of all mature B and pre-B cells but contain lymphoid stem cells. We therefore reconstituted scid mice with LTBMC cells to study the kinetics of B lymphocyte reconstitution in normal and irradiated (4 Gy) scid recipients and in irradiated (9.5 Gy) co-isogenic C.B-17 mice. Detectable colony-forming B cells rapidly increased in the spleen and bone marrow of irradiated C.B-17 and irradiated scid recipients, reaching normal levels between 4 and 6 wk post-grafting. Unirradiated scid recipients showed limited reconstitution in spleen and very poor reconstitution in bone marrow. Unirradiated scid recipients also had relatively few surface Ig+ cells in spleen or bone marrow, whereas both groups of irradiated recipients had normal numbers between 4 and 6 wk post-reconstitution. Normal levels of cytotoxic T cell activity by 8 wk after reconstitution were observed only in the irradiated C.B-17 and irradiated scid recipients. Analysis of mice reconstituted with cells from LTBMC indicates that these cultures contain lymphoid stem cells with significant proliferative and self-renewal potential, and that full reconstitution of lymphoid function requires prior irradiation of the scid recipient.

  7. Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel S1P1 agonist that does not require S1P-like head-group interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of S1P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A S1P1 mutants neither bind S1P nor transduce S1P function. Because S1P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective S1P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating S1P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in S1P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for S1P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of S1P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of S1P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific S1P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for S1P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates S1P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of S1P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635

  8. Perspective on Advancing FDA Regulatory Monitoring for Mycotoxins in Foods using Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wong, Jon W; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Trucksess, Mary W

    2016-07-01

    The presence of mycotoxins (such as aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, fumonisins, and patulin) is routinely monitored by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure that their concentrations in food are below the levels requiring regulatory action or advisories. To improve the efficiency of mycotoxin analysis, the researchers at the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition have been evaluating modern LC-MS technologies. Consequently, a variety of LC-tandem MS and LC-high-resolution MS methods have been developed, which simultaneously identify and quantitate multiple mycotoxins in foods and feeds. Although matrix effects (matrix-induced ion suppression or enhancement) associated with LC-MS-based mycotoxin analysis remain, this review discusses methods for managing these effects and proposes practical solutions for the future implementation of LC-MS-based multimycotoxin analysis. PMID:27330044

  9. 45 CFR 73a.735-201 - Control activity employees formerly associated with organizations subject to FDA regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with organizations subject to FDA regulation. 73a.735-201 Section 73a.735-201 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT... with organizations subject to FDA regulation. (a) For a period of 1 year after FDA appointment, or... employed in a regulated organization within 1 year before FDA employment shall not participate in...

  10. 45 CFR 73a.735-201 - Control activity employees formerly associated with organizations subject to FDA regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with organizations subject to FDA regulation. 73a.735-201 Section 73a.735-201 Public Welfare Department... with organizations subject to FDA regulation. (a) For a period of 1 year after FDA appointment, or... employed in a regulated organization within 1 year before FDA employment shall not participate in...

  11. 45 CFR 73a.735-201 - Control activity employees formerly associated with organizations subject to FDA regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... with organizations subject to FDA regulation. 73a.735-201 Section 73a.735-201 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT... with organizations subject to FDA regulation. (a) For a period of 1 year after FDA appointment, or... employed in a regulated organization within 1 year before FDA employment shall not participate in...

  12. Electrosurgical injuries during robot assisted surgery: insights from the FDA MAUDE database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Andrew; Vilos, George A.; Pautler, Stephen E.

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: The da Vinci surgical system requires the use of electrosurgical instruments. The re-use of such instruments creates the potential for stray electrical currents from capacitive coupling and/or insulation failure with subsequent injury. The morbidity of such injuries may negate many of the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. We sought to evaluate the rate and nature of electrosurgical injury (ESI) associated with this device. Methods: The Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is administered by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and reports adverse events related to medical devices in the United States. We analyzed all incidents in the context of robotic surgery between January 2001 and June 2011 to identify those related to the use of electrosurgery. Results: In the past decade, a total of 605 reports have been submitted to the FDA with regard to adverse events related to the da Vinci robotic surgical platform. Of these, 24 (3.9%) were related to potential or actual ESI. Nine out of the 24 cases (37.5%) resulted in additional surgical intervention for repair. There were 6 bowel injuries of which only one was recognized and managed intra-operatively. The remainder required laparotomy between 5 and 8 days after the initial robotic procedure. Additionally, there were 3 skin burns. The remaining cases required conservative management or resulted in no harm. Conclusion: ESI in the context of robotic surgery is uncommon but remains under-recognized and under-reported. Surgeons performing robot assisted surgery should be aware that ESI can occur with robotic instruments and vigilance for intra- and post-operative complications is paramount.

  13. FDA-approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Nielsen, Thomas E; Clausen, Mads H

    2015-07-01

    Kinases have emerged as one of the most intensively pursued targets in current pharmacological research, especially for cancer, due to their critical roles in cellular signaling. To date, the US FDA has approved 28 small-molecule kinase inhibitors, half of which were approved in the past 3 years. While the clinical data of these approved molecules are widely presented and structure-activity relationship (SAR) has been reported for individual molecules, an updated review that analyzes all approved molecules and summarizes current achievements and trends in the field has yet to be found. Here we present all approved small-molecule kinase inhibitors with an emphasis on binding mechanism and structural features, summarize current challenges, and discuss future directions in this field.

  14. Analysis of a Spontaneous Non-Motile and Avirulent Mutant Shows That FliM Is Required for Full Endoflagella Assembly in Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Célia; Lambert, Ambroise; Benaroudj, Nadia; Gasparini, David; Gorgette, Olivier; Cachet, Nathalie; Bomchil, Natalia; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira strains are responsible for leptospirosis, a worldwide emerging zoonotic disease. These spirochetes are unique amongst bacteria because of their corkscrew-like cell morphology and their periplasmic flagella. Motility is reported as an important virulence determinant, probably favoring entry and dissemination of pathogenic Leptospira in the host. However, proteins constituting the periplasmic flagella and their role in cell shape, motility and virulence remain poorly described. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous L. interrogans mutant strain lacking motility, correlated with the loss of the characteristic hook-shaped ends, and virulence in the animal model. Whole genome sequencing allowed the identification of one nucleotide deletion in the fliM gene resulting in a premature stop codon, thereby preventing the production of flagellar motor switch protein FliM. Genetic complementation restored cell morphology, motility and virulence comparable to those of wild type cells. Analyses of purified periplasmic flagella revealed a defect in flagella assembly, resulting in shortened flagella compared to the wild type strain. This also correlated with a lower amount of major filament proteins FlaA and FlaB. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that FliM is required for full and correct assembly of the flagella which is essential for motility and virulence. PMID:27044038

  15. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Acquisition Influences Motility and Is Required for Full Virulence of the Xylem-Dwelling Bacterial Phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    PubMed Central

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen. PMID:25326304

  16. The Pmt2p-Mediated Protein O-Mannosylation Is Required for Morphogenesis, Adhesive Properties, Cell Wall Integrity and Full Virulence of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Tan, Leyong; Nie, Xiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Pan, Yuemin; Gao, Zhimou

    2016-01-01

    Protein O-mannosylation is a type of O-glycosylation that is characterized by the addition of mannose residues to target proteins, and is initially catalyzed by evolutionarily conserved protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs). In this study, three members of PMT were identified in Magnaporthe oryzae, and the pathogenic roles of MoPmt2, a member of PMT2 subfamily, were analyzed. We found that MoPmt2 is a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pmt2 and could complement yeast Pmt2 function in resistance to CFW. Quantitative RT–PCR revealed that MoPmt2 is highly expressed during conidiation, and targeted disruption of MoPmt2 resulted in defects in conidiation and conidia morphology. The MoPmt2 mutants also showed a distinct reduction in fungal growth, which was associated with severe alterations in hyphal polarity. In addition, we found that the MoPmt2 mutants severely reduced virulence on both rice plants and barley leaves. The subsequent examination revealed that the fungal adhesion, conidial germination, CWI and invasive hyphae growth in host cells are responsible for defects on appressorium mediated penetration, and thus attenuated the pathogenicity of MoPmt2 mutants. Taken together, our results suggest that protein O-mannosyltransferase MoPmt2 plays essential roles in fungal growth and development, and is required for the full pathogenicity of M. oryzae. PMID:27199956

  17. Analysis of a Spontaneous Non-Motile and Avirulent Mutant Shows That FliM Is Required for Full Endoflagella Assembly in Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Célia; Lambert, Ambroise; Benaroudj, Nadia; Gasparini, David; Gorgette, Olivier; Cachet, Nathalie; Bomchil, Natalia; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira strains are responsible for leptospirosis, a worldwide emerging zoonotic disease. These spirochetes are unique amongst bacteria because of their corkscrew-like cell morphology and their periplasmic flagella. Motility is reported as an important virulence determinant, probably favoring entry and dissemination of pathogenic Leptospira in the host. However, proteins constituting the periplasmic flagella and their role in cell shape, motility and virulence remain poorly described. In this study, we characterized a spontaneous L. interrogans mutant strain lacking motility, correlated with the loss of the characteristic hook-shaped ends, and virulence in the animal model. Whole genome sequencing allowed the identification of one nucleotide deletion in the fliM gene resulting in a premature stop codon, thereby preventing the production of flagellar motor switch protein FliM. Genetic complementation restored cell morphology, motility and virulence comparable to those of wild type cells. Analyses of purified periplasmic flagella revealed a defect in flagella assembly, resulting in shortened flagella compared to the wild type strain. This also correlated with a lower amount of major filament proteins FlaA and FlaB. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that FliM is required for full and correct assembly of the flagella which is essential for motility and virulence. PMID:27044038

  18. Disparities in Discontinuing Rosiglitazone Following the 2007 FDA Safety Alert

    PubMed Central

    Qato, Danya M.; Trivedi, Amal N.; Mor, Vincent; Dore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Responsiveness to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rosiglitazone safety alert, issued on May 21, 2007, has not been examined among vulnerable subpopulations of the elderly. Objective To compare time to discontinuation of rosiglitazone after the safety alert between black and white elderly persons, and across sociodemographic and economic subgroups. Research Design A cohort study. Subjects Medicare fee-for-service enrollees in 2007 who were established users of rosiglitazone identified from a 20% national sample of pharmacy claims. Measures Outcome of interest was time to discontinuation of rosiglitazone after the May alert. We modeled the number of days following the warning to the end of the days’ supply for the last rosiglitazone claim during the study period (May 21, 2007–December 31, 2007) using multivariable proportional hazards models. Results More than 67% of enrollees discontinued rosiglitazone within six months of the advisory. In adjusted analysis, white enrollees (hazard ratio = 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.86–0.94) discontinued rosiglitazone later than the comparison group of black enrollees. Enrollees with a history of low personal income also discontinued later than their comparison group (hazard ratio = 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.81–0.87). There were no observed differences across quintiles of area-level socioeconomic status. Conclusions White race and a history of low personal income modestly predicted later discontinuation of rosiglitazone after the FDA’s safety advisory in 2007. The impact of FDA advisories can vary among sociodemographic groups. Policymakers should continue to monitor whether risk management policies reach their intended populations. PMID:26978569

  19. FDA toxicity databases and real-time data entry

    SciTech Connect

    Arvidson, Kirk B.

    2008-11-15

    Structure-searchable electronic databases are valuable new tools that are assisting the FDA in its mission to promptly and efficiently review incoming submissions for regulatory approval of new food additives and food contact substances. The Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Office of Food Additive Safety (CFSAN/OFAS), in collaboration with Leadscope, Inc., is consolidating genetic toxicity data submitted in food additive petitions from the 1960s to the present day. The Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of Pharmaceutical Science's Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff (CDER/OPS/ICSAS) is separately gathering similar information from their submissions. Presently, these data are distributed in various locations such as paper files, microfiche, and non-standardized toxicology memoranda. The organization of the data into a consistent, searchable format will reduce paperwork, expedite the toxicology review process, and provide valuable information to industry that is currently available only to the FDA. Furthermore, by combining chemical structures with genetic toxicity information, biologically active moieties can be identified and used to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and testing guidelines. Additionally, chemicals devoid of toxicity data can be compared to known structures, allowing for improved safety review through the identification and analysis of structural analogs. Four database frameworks have been created: bacterial mutagenesis, in vitro chromosome aberration, in vitro mammalian mutagenesis, and in vivo micronucleus. Controlled vocabularies for these databases have been established. The four separate genetic toxicity databases are compiled into a single, structurally-searchable database for easy accessibility of the toxicity information. Beyond the genetic toxicity databases described here, additional databases for subchronic, chronic, and teratogenicity studies have been prepared.

  20. FDA toxicity databases and real-time data entry.

    PubMed

    Arvidson, Kirk B

    2008-11-15

    Structure-searchable electronic databases are valuable new tools that are assisting the FDA in its mission to promptly and efficiently review incoming submissions for regulatory approval of new food additives and food contact substances. The Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Office of Food Additive Safety (CFSAN/OFAS), in collaboration with Leadscope, Inc., is consolidating genetic toxicity data submitted in food additive petitions from the 1960s to the present day. The Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of Pharmaceutical Science's Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff (CDER/OPS/ICSAS) is separately gathering similar information from their submissions. Presently, these data are distributed in various locations such as paper files, microfiche, and non-standardized toxicology memoranda. The organization of the data into a consistent, searchable format will reduce paperwork, expedite the toxicology review process, and provide valuable information to industry that is currently available only to the FDA. Furthermore, by combining chemical structures with genetic toxicity information, biologically active moieties can be identified and used to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and testing guidelines. Additionally, chemicals devoid of toxicity data can be compared to known structures, allowing for improved safety review through the identification and analysis of structural analogs. Four database frameworks have been created: bacterial mutagenesis, in vitro chromosome aberration, in vitro mammalian mutagenesis, and in vivo micronucleus. Controlled vocabularies for these databases have been established. The four separate genetic toxicity databases are compiled into a single, structurally-searchable database for easy accessibility of the toxicity information. Beyond the genetic toxicity databases described here, additional databases for subchronic, chronic, and teratogenicity studies have been prepared.

  1. Novel algorithms for improved pattern recognition using the US FDA Adverse Event Network Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Botsis, Taxiarchis; Scott, John; Goud, Ravi; Toman, Pamela; Sutherland, Andrea; Ball, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The medical review of adverse event reports for medical products requires the processing of "big data" stored in spontaneous reporting systems, such as the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS data are not well suited to traditional statistical analyses so we developed the FDA Adverse Event Network Analyzer (AENA) and three novel network analysis approaches to extract information from these data. Our new approaches include a weighting scheme based on co-occurring triplets in reports, a visualization layout inspired by the islands algorithm, and a network growth methodology for the detection of outliers. We explored and verified these approaches by analysing the historical signal of Intussusception (IS) after the administration of RotaShield vaccine (RV) in 1999. We believe that our study supports the use of AENA for pattern recognition in medical product safety and other clinical data. PMID:25160375

  2. The FDA Perspective on Pre-Clinical Testing for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Gerald R.

    2006-05-01

    In the U. S., the pre-market review of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices is carried out under the authority of the 1976 Medical Device Amendments to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Different regulatory mechanisms may apply depending on the complexity of the HIFU device and the indications for use, but in all cases pre-clinical testing is required. This testing typically includes ultrasound field characterization, thermal modeling and measurement, and may include demonstrating the accuracy of targeting and monitoring, if applicable. Because there are no guidance documents or standards for these tests at present, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) welcomes working with interested parties to develop acceptable procedures that can be incorporated into the regulatory review process.

  3. Novel algorithms for improved pattern recognition using the US FDA Adverse Event Network Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Botsis, Taxiarchis; Scott, John; Goud, Ravi; Toman, Pamela; Sutherland, Andrea; Ball, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The medical review of adverse event reports for medical products requires the processing of "big data" stored in spontaneous reporting systems, such as the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS data are not well suited to traditional statistical analyses so we developed the FDA Adverse Event Network Analyzer (AENA) and three novel network analysis approaches to extract information from these data. Our new approaches include a weighting scheme based on co-occurring triplets in reports, a visualization layout inspired by the islands algorithm, and a network growth methodology for the detection of outliers. We explored and verified these approaches by analysing the historical signal of Intussusception (IS) after the administration of RotaShield vaccine (RV) in 1999. We believe that our study supports the use of AENA for pattern recognition in medical product safety and other clinical data.

  4. A Critical Review of Methods to Evaluate the Impact of FDA Regulatory Actions

    PubMed Central

    Briesacher, Becky A.; Soumerai, Stephen B.; Zhang, Fang; Toh, Sengwee; Andrade, Susan E.; Wagner, Joann L.; Shoaibi, Azadeh; Gurwitz, Jerry H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a synthesis of the literature on methods to evaluate the impacts of FDA regulatory actions, and identify best practices for future evaluations. Methods We searched MEDLINE for manuscripts published between January 1948 and August 2011 that included terms related to FDA, regulatory actions, and empirical evaluation; the review additionally included FDA-identified literature. We used a modified Delphi method to identify preferred methodologies. We included studies with explicit methods to address threats to validity, and identified designs and analytic methods with strong internal validity that have been applied to other policy evaluations. Results We included 18 studies out of 243 abstracts and papers screened. Overall, analytic rigor in prior evaluations of FDA regulatory actions varied considerably; less than a quarter of studies (22%) included control groups. Only 56% assessed changes in the use of substitute products/services, and 11% examined patient health outcomes. Among studies meeting minimal criteria of rigor, 50% found no impact or weak/modest impacts of FDA actions and 33% detected unintended consequences. Among those studies finding significant intended effects of FDA actions, all cited the importance of intensive communication efforts. There are preferred methods with strong internal validity that have yet to be applied to evaluations of FDA regulatory actions. Conclusions Rigorous evaluations of the impact of FDA regulatory actions have been limited and infrequent. Several methods with strong internal validity are available to improve trustworthiness of future evaluations of FDA policies. PMID:23847020

  5. BtaE, an Adhesin That Belongs to the Trimeric Autotransporter Family, Is Required for Full Virulence and Defines a Specific Adhesive Pole of Brucella suis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ranwez, Verónica; Posadas, Diana M.; Van der Henst, Charles; Estein, Silvia M.; Arocena, Gastón M.; Abdian, Patricia L.; Martín, Fernando A.; Sieira, Rodrigo; De Bolle, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Brucella is responsible for brucellosis, one of the most common zoonoses worldwide that causes important economic losses in several countries. Increasing evidence indicates that adhesion of Brucella spp. to host cells is an important step to establish infection. We have previously shown that the BmaC unipolar monomeric autotransporter mediates the binding of Brucella suis to host cells through cell-associated fibronectin. Our genome analysis shows that the B. suis genome encodes several additional potential adhesins. In this work, we characterized a predicted trimeric autotransporter that we named BtaE. By expressing btaE in a nonadherent Escherichia coli strain and by phenotypic characterization of a B. suis ΔbtaE mutant, we showed that BtaE is involved in the binding of B. suis to hyaluronic acid. The B. suis ΔbtaE mutant exhibited a reduction in the adhesion to HeLa and A549 epithelial cells compared with the wild-type strain, and it was outcompeted by the wild-type strain in the binding to HeLa cells. The knockout btaE mutant showed an attenuated phenotype in the mouse model, indicating that BtaE is required for full virulence. BtaE was immunodetected on the bacterial surface at one cell pole. Using old and new pole markers, we observed that both the BmaC and BtaE adhesins are consistently associated with the new cell pole, suggesting that, in Brucella, the new pole is functionally differentiated for adhesion. This is consistent with the inherent polarization of this bacterium, and its role in the invasion process. PMID:23319562

  6. Heparin requirements for full anticoagulation are higher for patients on dabigatran than for those on warfarin – a model-based study

    PubMed Central

    Edrich, Thomas; Frendl, Gyorgy; Michaud, Gregory; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dabigatran (D) is increasingly used for chronic anticoagulation in place of warfarin (W). These patients may present for catheter-based procedures requiring full anticoagulation with heparin. This study compares the heparin sensitivity of patients previously on dabigatran, on warfarin, or on no chronic anticoagulant during ablation of atrial fibrillation. Patients and methods In a retrospective study of patients treated with D, W, or neither drug (N) undergoing atrial ablation, the timing of heparin doses and resulting activated clotting times were collected. First, the initial activated clotting time response to the first heparin bolus was compared. Then, a non-linear mixed effects modelling (NONMEM) analysis was performed, fitting a pharmacokinetic and -dynamic model to the entire anticoagulation course of each patient. Resulting model coefficients were used to compare the different patient groups. Results Data for 66 patients on dabigatran, 95 patients on warfarin, and 27 patients on no anticoagulation were retrieved. The last dose of dabigatran or warfarin had occurred 27 hours and 15 hours before the procedure. Groups D and N both responded significantly less (P<0.05) to the initial heparin bolus than Group W (approximately 50%). Likewise, the model coefficients resulting from the fit to each group reflected a significantly lower heparin sensitivity in groups D and N compared to W. Clearances of the heparin effect in the model did not differ significantly among groups. Conclusion Patients on warfarin with an average INR of 1.5 or higher are more sensitive to heparin than patients not previously anticoagulated or patients who discontinued dabigatran 27 hours earlier (approximately two half-lives) warfarin. PMID:25709508

  7. 21 CFR 25.20 - Actions requiring preparation of an environmental assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...). (g) Issuance, amendment, and enforcement of FDA regulations, or an exemption or variance from FDA... request, unless categorically excluded in §§ 25.30(d) or 25.32(h). (d) Disposition of FDA laboratory waste....30 (e) or (f). (f) Establishment by regulation of labeling requirements, a standard, or a...

  8. Mining FDA drug labels using an unsupervised learning technique - topic modeling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug labels contain a broad array of information, ranging from adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to drug efficacy, risk-benefit consideration, and more. However, the labeling language used to describe these information is free text often containing ambiguous semantic descriptions, which poses a great challenge in retrieving useful information from the labeling text in a consistent and accurate fashion for comparative analysis across drugs. Consequently, this task has largely relied on the manual reading of the full text by experts, which is time consuming and labor intensive. Method In this study, a novel text mining method with unsupervised learning in nature, called topic modeling, was applied to the drug labeling with a goal of discovering “topics” that group drugs with similar safety concerns and/or therapeutic uses together. A total of 794 FDA-approved drug labels were used in this study. First, the three labeling sections (i.e., Boxed Warning, Warnings and Precautions, Adverse Reactions) of each drug label were processed by the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) to convert the free text of each label to the standard ADR terms. Next, the topic modeling approach with latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) was applied to generate 100 topics, each associated with a set of drugs grouped together based on the probability analysis. Lastly, the efficacy of the topic modeling was evaluated based on known information about the therapeutic uses and safety data of drugs. Results The results demonstrate that drugs grouped by topics are associated with the same safety concerns and/or therapeutic uses with statistical significance (P<0.05). The identified topics have distinct context that can be directly linked to specific adverse events (e.g., liver injury or kidney injury) or therapeutic application (e.g., antiinfectives for systemic use). We were also able to identify potential adverse events that

  9. Cooperative Functions of ZnT1, Metallothionein and ZnT4 in the Cytoplasm Are Required for Full Activation of TNAP in the Early Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Tokuji; Anan, Yasumi; Tsuji, Natsuko; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Kimura, Tomoki; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Kambe, Taiho

    2013-01-01

    The activation process of secretory or membrane-bound zinc enzymes is thought to be a highly coordinated process involving zinc transport, trafficking, transfer and coordination. We have previously shown that secretory and membrane-bound zinc enzymes are activated in the early secretory pathway (ESP) via zinc-loading by the zinc transporter 5 (ZnT5)-ZnT6 hetero-complex and ZnT7 homo-complex (zinc transport complexes). However, how other proteins conducting zinc metabolism affect the activation of these enzymes remains unknown. Here, we investigated this issue by disruption and re-expression of genes known to be involved in cytoplasmic zinc metabolism, using a zinc enzyme, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), as a reporter. We found that TNAP activity was significantly reduced in cells deficient in ZnT1, Metallothionein (MT) and ZnT4 genes (ZnT1−/−MT−/−ZnT4−/− cells), in spite of increased cytosolic zinc levels. The reduced TNAP activity in ZnT1−/−MT−/−ZnT4−/− cells was not restored when cytosolic zinc levels were normalized to levels comparable with those of wild-type cells, but was reversely restored by extreme zinc supplementation via zinc-loading by the zinc transport complexes. Moreover, the reduced TNAP activity was adequately restored by re-expression of mammalian counterparts of ZnT1, MT and ZnT4, but not by zinc transport-incompetent mutants of ZnT1 and ZnT4. In ZnT1−/−MT−/−ZnT4−/− cells, the secretory pathway normally operates. These findings suggest that cooperative zinc handling of ZnT1, MT and ZnT4 in the cytoplasm is required for full activation of TNAP in the ESP, and present clear evidence that the activation process of zinc enzymes is elaborately controlled. PMID:24204829

  10. The gpsX gene encoding a glycosyltransferase is important for polysaccharide production and required for full virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    , our data confirm that the gpsX gene is involved in EPS and LPS synthesis and biofilm formation in Xac and suggest that the gpsX gene contributes to the adaptation of Xac to the host microenvironments at early stage of infection and thus is required for full virulence on host plants. PMID:22404966

  11. FDA regulation of invasive neural recording electrodes: a daunting task for medical innovators.

    PubMed

    Welle, Cristin; Krauthamer, Victor

    2012-03-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is charged with assuring the safety and effectiveness of medical devices. Before any medical device can be brought to market, it must comply with all federal regulations regarding FDA processes for clearance or approval. Navigating the FDA regulatory process may seem like a daunting task to the innovator of a novel medical device who has little experience with the FDA regulatory process or device commercialization. This review introduces the basics of the FDA regulatory premarket process, with a focus on issues relating to chronically implanted recording devices in the central or peripheral nervous system. Topics of device classification and regulatory pathways, the use of standards and guidance documents, and optimal time lines for interaction with the FDA are discussed. Additionally, this article summarizes the regulatory research on neural implant safety and reliability conducted by the FDA's Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories (OSEL) in collaboration with Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Reliable Neural Technology (RE-NET) Program. For a more detailed explanation of the medical device regulatory process, please refer to several excellent reviews of the FDA's regulatory pathways for medical devices [1]-[4].

  12. 76 FR 34715 - Draft Guidance for Industry; Considering Whether an FDA-Regulated Product Involves the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ...-Regulated Product Involves the Application of Nanotechnology; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Application of Nanotechnology''. This guidance is intended to provide industry with FDA's current... nanotechnology. The points to consider are intended to be broadly applicable to all FDA-regulated products,...

  13. 21 CFR 516.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights. 516... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.34 FDA recognition of...

  14. FDA Researchers Advance Science for Vaccines to Prevent Mumps and Whooping Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Researchers Advance Science for Vaccines to Prevent Mumps and Whooping Cough ... that FDA studies will continue. “We enjoy the science,” says Merkel. “But what’s driving our research is ...

  15. 21 CFR 4.2 - How does FDA define key terms and phrases in this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does FDA define key terms and phrases in this... Combination Products § 4.2 How does FDA define key terms and phrases in this subpart? The terms listed in this... device as these terms are defined under this section. Combination product has the meaning set forth...

  16. 21 CFR 1.378 - What criteria does FDA use to order a detention?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? 1... GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption General Provisions § 1.378 What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? An officer or...

  17. 21 CFR 1.378 - What criteria does FDA use to order a detention?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? 1... GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption General Provisions § 1.378 What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? An officer or...

  18. 21 CFR 1.378 - What criteria does FDA use to order a detention?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? 1... GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption General Provisions § 1.378 What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? An officer or...

  19. FDA Procedures for Standardization and Certification of Retail Food Inspection/Training Officers, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This document provides information, standards, and behavioral objectives for standardization and certification of retail food inspection personnel in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The procedures described in the document are based on the FDA Food Code, updated to reflect current Food Code provisions and to include a more refined focus on…

  20. 21 CFR 1.405 - When does FDA have to issue a decision on an appeal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When does FDA have to issue a decision on an... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption What Is the Appeal Process for A Detention Order? § 1.405 When does FDA have to issue a...

  1. 21 CFR 1.378 - What criteria does FDA use to order a detention?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? 1... GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption General Provisions § 1.378 What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? An officer or...

  2. 21 CFR 1.405 - When does FDA have to issue a decision on an appeal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When does FDA have to issue a decision on an... SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption What Is the Appeal Process for A Detention Order? § 1.405 When does FDA have to issue a...

  3. 76 FR 61709 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; FDA Form 3728...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Collection; Comment Request; FDA Form 3728, Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act Cover Sheet AGENCY: Food and... Generic Drug User Fee Act of 2008 (AGDUFA). DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on the... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. FDA Form 3728, Animal Generic Drug User Fee Act...

  4. 76 FR 38666 - Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Nutrition (CFSAN) and the Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL). The goal... Marine Environmental Science Consortium-Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL) will greatly contribute to FDA's... Objectives FDA Gulf Coast Seafood Laboratory (GCSL) and the Marine Environmental Science Consortium of...

  5. 77 FR 14401 - Draft Guidance on Drug Safety Information-FDA's Communication to the Public; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Communication to the Public; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... ``Drug Safety Information-- FDA's Communication to the Public.'' This draft guidance updates and revises the March 2007 guidance entitled ``Drug Safety Information-- FDA's Communication to the Public.''...

  6. 21 CFR 516.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights. 516... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.34 FDA recognition of...

  7. 21 CFR 516.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights. 516... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.34 FDA recognition of...

  8. The US FDA and animal cloning: risk and regulatory approach.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, Larisa; Matheson, John C

    2007-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Veterinary Medicine issued a voluntary request to producers of livestock clones not to introduce food from clones or their progeny into commerce until the agency had assessed whether production of cattle, swine, sheep, or goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) posed any unique risks to the animal(s) involved in the process, humans, or other animals by consuming food from those animals, compared with any other assisted reproductive technology (ART) currently in use. Following a comprehensive review, no anomalies were observed in animals produced by cloning that have not also been observed in animals produced by other ARTs and natural mating. Further systematic review on the health of, and composition of meat and milk from, cattle, swine, and goat clones and the progeny of cattle and sheep did not result in the identification of any food-consumption hazards. The agency therefore concluded that food from cattle, swine, and goat clones was as safe to eat as food from animals of those species derived by conventional means. The agency also concluded that food from the progeny of the clone of any species normally consumed for food is as safe to eat as those animals. The article also describes the methodology used by the agency to analyze data and draw these conclusions, the plans the agency has proposed to manage any identified risks, and the risk communication approaches the agency has used.

  9. FDA-Approved Natural Polymers for Fast Dissolving Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md Tausif; Parvez, Nayyar; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Oral route is the most preferred route for administration of different drugs because it is regarded as safest, most convenient, and economical route. Fast disintegrating tablets are very popular nowadays as they get dissolved or facilely disintegrated in mouth within few seconds of administration without the need of water. The disadvantages of conventional dosage form, especially dysphagia (arduousness in swallowing), in pediatric and geriatric patients have been overcome by fast dissolving tablets. Natural materials have advantages over synthetic ones since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. Natural polymers like locust bean gum, banana powder, mango peel pectin, Mangifera indica gum, and Hibiscus rosa-sinenses mucilage ameliorate the properties of tablet and utilized as binder, diluent, and superdisintegrants increase the solubility of poorly water soluble drug, decrease the disintegration time, and provide nutritional supplement. Natural polymers are obtained from the natural origin and they are cost efficacious, nontoxic, biodegradable, eco-friendly, devoid of any side effect, renewable, and provide nutritional supplement. It is proved from the studies that natural polymers are more safe and efficacious than the synthetic polymers. The aim of the present article is to study the FDA-approved natural polymers utilized in fast dissolving tablets. PMID:26556207

  10. The FDA and genetic testing: improper tools for a difficult problem

    PubMed Central

    Willmarth, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently issued draft guidance on how it intends to regulate laboratory-developed tests, including genetic tests. This article argues that genetic tests differ from traditional targets of FDA regulation in both product as well as industry landscape, and that the FDA's traditional tools are ill-suited for regulating this space. While existing regulatory gaps do create risks in genetic testing, the regulatory burden of the FDA's proposal introduces new risks for both test providers and patients that may offset the benefits. Incremental expansion of current oversight outside of the FDA can mitigate many of the risks necessitating increased oversight while avoiding the creation of new ones that could undermine this industry.

  11. Translation of proteomic biomarkers into FDA approved cancer diagnostics: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Füzéry, Anna K; Levin, Joshua; Chan, Maria M; Chan, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made over the past few decades to discover novel cancer biomarkers for use in clinical practice. However, a striking discrepancy exists between the effort directed toward biomarker discovery and the number of markers that make it into clinical practice. One of the confounding issues in translating a novel discovery into clinical practice is that quite often the scientists working on biomarker discovery have limited knowledge of the analytical, diagnostic, and regulatory requirements for a clinical assay. This review provides an introduction to such considerations with the aim of generating more extensive discussion for study design, assay performance, and regulatory approval in the process of translating new proteomic biomarkers from discovery into cancer diagnostics. We first describe the analytical requirements for a robust clinical biomarker assay, including concepts of precision, trueness, specificity and analytical interference, and carryover. We next introduce the clinical considerations of diagnostic accuracy, receiver operating characteristic analysis, positive and negative predictive values, and clinical utility. We finish the review by describing components of the FDA approval process for protein-based biomarkers, including classification of biomarker assays as medical devices, analytical and clinical performance requirements, and the approval process workflow. While we recognize that the road from biomarker discovery, validation, and regulatory approval to the translation into the clinical setting could be long and difficult, the reward for patients, clinicians and scientists could be rather significant. PMID:24088261

  12. Translation of proteomic biomarkers into FDA approved cancer diagnostics: issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made over the past few decades to discover novel cancer biomarkers for use in clinical practice. However, a striking discrepancy exists between the effort directed toward biomarker discovery and the number of markers that make it into clinical practice. One of the confounding issues in translating a novel discovery into clinical practice is that quite often the scientists working on biomarker discovery have limited knowledge of the analytical, diagnostic, and regulatory requirements for a clinical assay. This review provides an introduction to such considerations with the aim of generating more extensive discussion for study design, assay performance, and regulatory approval in the process of translating new proteomic biomarkers from discovery into cancer diagnostics. We first describe the analytical requirements for a robust clinical biomarker assay, including concepts of precision, trueness, specificity and analytical interference, and carryover. We next introduce the clinical considerations of diagnostic accuracy, receiver operating characteristic analysis, positive and negative predictive values, and clinical utility. We finish the review by describing components of the FDA approval process for protein-based biomarkers, including classification of biomarker assays as medical devices, analytical and clinical performance requirements, and the approval process workflow. While we recognize that the road from biomarker discovery, validation, and regulatory approval to the translation into the clinical setting could be long and difficult, the reward for patients, clinicians and scientists could be rather significant. PMID:24088261

  13. Buckman extended: federal preemption of state fraud-on-the-FDA statutes.

    PubMed

    Gaddis, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    A number of states have enacted statutes that provide protection to drug manufacturers in product liability actions. Additionally, several of these states have enacted "fraud-on-the-FDA" statutory provisions, which remove statutory protection afforded to drug manufacturers in product liability actions if plaintiffs can provide evidence that the drug manufacturer made misrepresentations to the FDA during the process of obtaining marketing approval for the drug. Currently, the federal circuits are in disagreement over whether these state "fraud-on-the-FDA" statutes should be federally preempted. This issue warrants resolution for drug manufacturers, private citizens, and state legislatures. This Comment will discuss the history and role of the FDA's authority in drug and medical device regulation; federal preemption generally and the Supreme Court's decisions that considered whether state law failure to warn claims are federally preempted in the context of drugs and medical devices; the Supreme Court's decision in Buckman v. Plaintiffs' Legal Committee, where the Court held that claims that a medical device manufacturer made fraudulent representations to the FDA were federally preempted because such claims interfered with the relationship between the FDA and the entities it regulated, state fraud-on-the-FDA statutory provisions, and the existing circuit split regarding whether those statutes should be federally preempted; the potential resolutions to the circuit split; and will conclude and advocate that the Supreme Court's Buckman holding be applied to federally preempt state fraud-on-the-FDA statutes because such statutes involve the relationship between a federal agency and the entity it regulates and thus undermine the FDA's authority.

  14. Did FDA Decisionmaking Affect Anti-Psychotic Drug Prescribing in Children?: A Time-Trend Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M.; Eddings, Wesley; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, many drugs are prescribed for non-FDA-approved (“off-label”) uses. If substantial evidence supports the efficacy and safety of off-label indications, manufacturers can pursue formal FDA approval through supplemental new drug applications (sNDAs). We evaluated the effect of FDA determinations on pediatric sNDAs for antipsychotic drugs on prescribing of these products in children. Methods Retrospective, segmented time-series analysis using new prescription claims during 2003–2012 for three atypical antipsychotics (olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone). FDA approved the sNDAs for pediatric use of olanzapine and quetiapine in December 2009, but did not approve the sNDA for pediatric use of ziprasidone. Results During the months before FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA, new prescriptions of olanzapine decreased for both children and adults. After FDA approval, the increase in prescribing trends was similar for both age groups (P = 0.47 for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; P = 0.37 for other indications). Comparable decreases in use of quetiapine were observed between pediatrics and adults following FDA approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.88; P = 0.63). Prescribing of ziprasidone decreased similarly for pediatric and adult patients after FDA non-approval of its pediatric sNDA (P = 0.61; P = 0.79). Conclusions The FDA’s sNDA determinations relating to use of antipsychotics in children did not result in changes in use that favored the approved sNDAs and disfavored the unapproved sNDA. Improved communication may help translate the agency’s expert judgments to clinical practice. PMID:27032095

  15. Ensuring that consumers receive appropriate information from drug ads: what is the FDA's role?

    PubMed

    Waxman, Henry A

    2004-01-01

    The promise of direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertisements lies in their potential to educate consumers about medical conditions and the possibility of treatment. But this promise can only be fulfilled if consumers are given clear and accurate information. The responsibility for ensuring that this occurs falls on the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Recent congressional investigations have indicated that the agency is failing at this task, as FDA enforcement actions against false and misleading ads have declined precipitously in recent years. Other FDA efforts, such as its recently released guidelines on prescription drugs, do not appear to be helpful, potentially confusing consumers more than helping them. PMID:15452002

  16. An analysis of FDA passive surveillance reports of seizures associated with consumption of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, L; Barnard, R J

    1992-05-01

    Aspartame, the methyl ester of the dipeptide formed from combining phenylalanine and aspartic acid, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1981. FDA monitors complaints from consumers and health professionals through the Adverse Reaction Monitoring System, a passive surveillance program FDA has received 251 reports of seizures that have been linked to ingestion of aspartame by consumers. In most cases, information obtained from the complainants' medical records as well as data on consumption patterns, temporal relationships, and challenge tests did not support the claim that the occurrences of the seizures were linked to consumption of aspartame.

  17. Science, law, and politics in FDA's genetically engineered foods policy: scientific concerns and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, David L

    2005-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) 1992 policy statement granted genetically engineered foods presumptive GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status. Since then, divergent views have been expressed concerning the scientific support for this policy. This paper examines four sources to better understand the basis for these claims: 1) internal FDA correspondence; 2) reports from the National Academy of Sciences; 3) research funded by US Department of Agriculture from 1981 to 2002; and 4) FDA's proposed rules issued in 2001. These sources reveal that little research has been conducted on unintended compositional changes from genetic engineering. Profiling techniques now make this feasible, but the new debate centers on the functional meaning of compositional changes.

  18. Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Supply Chain and Its Implications for FDA Policy Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Zawack, Kelson; Li, Min; Booth, James G; Love, Will; Lanzas, Cristina; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2016-09-01

    In response to concerning increases in antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has decided to increase veterinary oversight requirements for antimicrobials and restrict their use in growth promotion. Given the high stakes of this policy for the food supply, economy, and human and veterinary health, it is important to rigorously assess the effects of this policy. We have undertaken a detailed analysis of data provided by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS). We examined the trends in both AMR proportion and MIC between 2004 and 2012 at slaughter and retail stages. We investigated the makeup of variation in these data and estimated the sample and effect size requirements necessary to distinguish an effect of the policy change. Finally, we applied our approach to take a detailed look at the 2005 withdrawal of approval for the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin in poultry water. Slaughter and retail showed similar trends. Both AMR proportion and MIC were valuable in assessing AMR, capturing different information. Most variation was within years, not between years, and accounting for geographic location explained little additional variation. At current rates of data collection, a 1-fold change in MIC should be detectable in 5 years and a 6% decrease in percent resistance could be detected in 6 years following establishment of a new resistance rate. Analysis of the enrofloxacin policy change showed the complexities of the AMR policy with no statistically significant change in resistance of both Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to ciprofloxacin, another second-generation fluoroquinolone.

  19. Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance in the Food Supply Chain and Its Implications for FDA Policy Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Zawack, Kelson; Li, Min; Booth, James G; Love, Will; Lanzas, Cristina; Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2016-09-01

    In response to concerning increases in antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has decided to increase veterinary oversight requirements for antimicrobials and restrict their use in growth promotion. Given the high stakes of this policy for the food supply, economy, and human and veterinary health, it is important to rigorously assess the effects of this policy. We have undertaken a detailed analysis of data provided by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS). We examined the trends in both AMR proportion and MIC between 2004 and 2012 at slaughter and retail stages. We investigated the makeup of variation in these data and estimated the sample and effect size requirements necessary to distinguish an effect of the policy change. Finally, we applied our approach to take a detailed look at the 2005 withdrawal of approval for the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin in poultry water. Slaughter and retail showed similar trends. Both AMR proportion and MIC were valuable in assessing AMR, capturing different information. Most variation was within years, not between years, and accounting for geographic location explained little additional variation. At current rates of data collection, a 1-fold change in MIC should be detectable in 5 years and a 6% decrease in percent resistance could be detected in 6 years following establishment of a new resistance rate. Analysis of the enrofloxacin policy change showed the complexities of the AMR policy with no statistically significant change in resistance of both Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to ciprofloxacin, another second-generation fluoroquinolone. PMID:27324772

  20. 21 CFR 1.383 - What expedited procedures apply when FDA initiates a seizure action against a detained perishable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What expedited procedures apply when FDA initiates... DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... procedures apply when FDA initiates a seizure action against a detained perishable food? If FDA initiates...

  1. 21 CFR 1.383 - What expedited procedures apply when FDA initiates a seizure action against a detained perishable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What expedited procedures apply when FDA initiates... DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... procedures apply when FDA initiates a seizure action against a detained perishable food? If FDA initiates...

  2. 21 CFR 1.383 - What expedited procedures apply when FDA initiates a seizure action against a detained perishable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What expedited procedures apply when FDA initiates... DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS... procedures apply when FDA initiates a seizure action against a detained perishable food? If FDA initiates...

  3. Public voices in pharmaceutical deliberations: negotiating "clinical benefit" in the FDA's Avastin Hearing.

    PubMed

    Teston, Christa B; Graham, S Scott; Baldwinson, Raquel; Li, Andria; Swift, Jessamyn

    2014-06-01

    This article offers a hybrid rhetorical-qualitative discourse analysis of the FDA's 2011 Avastin Hearing, which considered the revocation of the breast cancer indication for the popular cancer drug Avastin. We explore the multiplicity of stakeholders, the questions that motivated deliberations, and the kinds of evidence presented during the hearing. Pairing our findings with contemporary scholarship in rhetorical stasis theory, Mol's (2002) construct of multiple ontologies, and Callon, Lascoumes, and Barthe's (2011) "hybrid forums," we demonstrate that the FDA's deliberative procedures elides various sources of evidence and the potential multiplicity of definitions for "clinical benefit." Our findings suggest that while the FDA invited multiple stakeholders to offer testimony, there are ways that the FDA might have more meaningfully incorporated public voices in the deliberative process. We conclude with suggestions for how a true hybrid forum might be deployed. PMID:24682644

  4. Quality assessment of digital annotated ECG data from clinical trials by the FDA ECG Warehouse.

    PubMed

    Sarapa, Nenad

    2007-09-01

    The FDA mandates that digital electrocardiograms (ECGs) from 'thorough' QTc trials be submitted into the ECG Warehouse in Health Level 7 extended markup language format with annotated onset and offset points of waveforms. The FDA did not disclose the exact Warehouse metrics and minimal acceptable quality standards. The author describes the Warehouse scoring algorithms and metrics used by FDA, points out ways to improve FDA review and suggests Warehouse benefits for pharmaceutical sponsors. The Warehouse ranks individual ECGs according to their score for each quality metric and produces histogram distributions with Warehouse-specific thresholds that identify ECGs of questionable quality. Automatic Warehouse algorithms assess the quality of QT annotation and duration of manual QT measurement by the central ECG laboratory.

  5. Use of Cancer-Linked Fibroid Device Declines After FDA Warning

    MedlinePlus

    ... FDA Warning Rate of uterus removals done with power morcellators dropped significantly, study finds To use the ... Aug. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The use of power morcellators -- cutting tools used in minimally invasive gynecological ...

  6. FDA: Anti-Aging, Skin-Lightening Products May Contain Mercury

    MedlinePlus

    ... FDA: Anti-Aging, Skin-Lightening Products May Contain Mercury How you can eliminate the health risk to ... 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some skin products contain mercury and pose a threat to your health, the ...

  7. US FDA patient-reported outcome guidance: great expectations and unintended consequences.

    PubMed

    Fehnel, Sheri; DeMuro, Carla; McLeod, Lori; Coon, Cheryl; Gnanasakthy, Ari

    2013-08-01

    Release of the US FDA patient-reported outcome (PRO) guidance raised expectations within the pharmaceutical industry for the use of PRO measures in support of labeling claims. The FDA developed the guidance with admirable intent, and the recommendations within this document are based on sound scientific principles. However, implementation of the guidance has been somewhat inconsistent within the Study Endpoints and Label Development (SEALD) and across the various FDA-reviewing divisions. Industry and regulatory bodies need to work toward gaining common ground to best support registration of treatments that could extend patients' lives, reduce symptoms, and/or improve health-related quality of life. PROs are valuable tools in communicating these messages, and realistic implementation of the FDA PRO Guidance may truly facilitate this process.

  8. FDA compliance program guidance manual (FY 83). section VI. radiological health

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing written program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration field operations for project implementation.

  9. Indoor Tanning Raises Risk of Melanoma: FDA Strengthens Warnings for Sunlamp Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... the FDA make sure indoor tanning facilities are giving truthful and easy-to-read information to consumers. ... a Safer Spring Break More in Consumer Updates Animal & Veterinary Children's Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food ...

  10. 21 CFR 516.34 - FDA recognition of exclusive marketing rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Designation of a Minor Use or Minor Species New Animal Drug § 516.34 FDA recognition of...

  11. Public voices in pharmaceutical deliberations: negotiating "clinical benefit" in the FDA's Avastin Hearing.

    PubMed

    Teston, Christa B; Graham, S Scott; Baldwinson, Raquel; Li, Andria; Swift, Jessamyn

    2014-06-01

    This article offers a hybrid rhetorical-qualitative discourse analysis of the FDA's 2011 Avastin Hearing, which considered the revocation of the breast cancer indication for the popular cancer drug Avastin. We explore the multiplicity of stakeholders, the questions that motivated deliberations, and the kinds of evidence presented during the hearing. Pairing our findings with contemporary scholarship in rhetorical stasis theory, Mol's (2002) construct of multiple ontologies, and Callon, Lascoumes, and Barthe's (2011) "hybrid forums," we demonstrate that the FDA's deliberative procedures elides various sources of evidence and the potential multiplicity of definitions for "clinical benefit." Our findings suggest that while the FDA invited multiple stakeholders to offer testimony, there are ways that the FDA might have more meaningfully incorporated public voices in the deliberative process. We conclude with suggestions for how a true hybrid forum might be deployed.

  12. 21 CFR 801.57 - Discontinuation of legacy FDA identification numbers assigned to devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... request for continued use of an assigned labeler code must be submitted by email to: udi@fda.hhs.gov, or... address, email address, and phone number of the labeler who is currently using the labeler code; (2)...

  13. Effectively implementing FDA medication alerts utilizing patient centered medical home clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Barbara J; Diez, Heidi L; Bostwick, Jolene R; Kales, Helen C; Zivin, Kara; Dalack, Gregory W; Fluent, Tom E; Standiford, Connie J; Stano, Claire; Mi Choe, Hae

    2016-03-01

    FDA medication alerts can be successfully implemented within patient centered medical home (PCMH) clinics utilizing clinical pharmacists. Targeted selection of high-risk patients from an electronic database allows PCMH pharmacists to prioritize assessments. Trusting relationships between PCMH clinical pharmacists and primary care providers facilitates high response rates to pharmacist recommendations. This health system approach led by PCMH pharmacists provides a framework for proactive responses to FDA safety alerts and medication related quality measure improvement. PMID:27001101

  14. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases 3 and 6 Are Required for Full Priming of Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Gerold J.M.; Jaskiewicz, Michal; Liu, Yidong; Underwood, William R.; He, Sheng Yang; Zhang, Shuqun; Conrath, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In plants and animals, induced resistance (IR) to biotic and abiotic stress is associated with priming of cells for faster and stronger activation of defense responses. It has been hypothesized that cell priming involves accumulation of latent signaling components that are not used until challenge exposure to stress. However, the identity of such signaling components has remained elusive. Here, we show that during development of chemically induced resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana, priming is associated with accumulation of mRNA and inactive proteins of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MPKs), MPK3 and MPK6. Upon challenge exposure to biotic or abiotic stress, these two enzymes were more strongly activated in primed plants than in nonprimed plants. This elevated activation was linked to enhanced defense gene expression and development of IR. Strong elicitation of stress-induced MPK3 and MPK6 activity is also seen in the constitutive priming mutant edr1, while activity was attenuated in the priming-deficient npr1 mutant. Moreover, priming of defense gene expression and IR were lost or reduced in mpk3 or mpk6 mutants. Our findings argue that prestress deposition of the signaling components MPK3 and MPK6 is a critical step in priming plants for full induction of defense responses during IR. PMID:19318610

  15. The Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis specific mptD gene is required for maintenance of the metabolic homeostasis necessary for full virulence in mouse infections.

    PubMed

    Meißner, Thorsten; Eckelt, Elke; Basler, Tina; Meens, Jochen; Heinzmann, Julia; Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Oelemann, Walter M R; Trenkamp, Sandra; Holst, Otto; Weiss, Siegfried; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Goethe, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. Furthermore, infections of humans with MAP have been reported and a possible association with Crohn's disease and diabetes type I is currently discussed. MAP owns large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs) that were exclusively found in this mycobacteria species. The relevance of these LSPs in the pathobiology of MAP is still unclear. The mptD gene (MAP3733c) of MAP belongs to a small group of functionally uncharacterized genes, which are not present in any other sequenced mycobacteria species. mptD is part of a predicted operon (mptABCDEF), encoding a putative ATP binding cassette-transporter, located on the MAP-specific LSP14. In the present study, we generated an mptD knockout strain (MAPΔmptD) by specialized transduction. In order to investigate the potential role of mptD in the host, we performed infection experiments with macrophages. By this, we observed a significantly reduced cell number of MAPΔmptD early after infection, indicating that the mutant was hampered with respect to adaptation to the early macrophage environment. This important role of mptD was supported in mouse infection experiments where MAPΔmptD was significantly attenuated after peritoneal challenge. Metabolic profiling was performed to determine the cause for the reduced virulence and identified profound metabolic disorders especially in the lipid metabolism of MAPΔmptD. Overall our data revealed the mptD gene to be an important factor for the metabolic adaptation of MAP required for persistence in the host.

  16. Reported infections after human tissue transplantation before and after new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, United States, 2001 through June, 2010.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Tarun K; Mosquera, Alexis; Zinderman, Craig E; St Martin, Laura; Wise, Robert P

    2012-06-01

    Processors distributed about 1.5 million human tissue allografts in the U.S. in 2007. The potential for transmitting infections through allografts concerns clinicians and patients. In 2005, FDA implemented Current Good Tissue Practice (CGTP) rules requiring tissue establishments to report to FDA certain serious infections after allograft transplantations. We describe infection reports following tissue transplants received by FDA from 2005 through June, 2010, and compare reporting before and after implementation of CGTP rules. We identified reports received by FDA from January 2001 through June, 2010, for infections in human tissue recipients, examining the reports by tissue type, organism, time to onset, severity, and reporter characteristics. Among 562 reports, 83 (20.8/year) were received from 2001-2004, before the CGTP rules, 43 in the 2005 transition year, and 436 (96.9/year) from 2006 through June, 2010, after the rules. Tissue processors accounted for 84.2% of reports submitted after the rules, compared to 26.5% previously. Bacterial infections were the most commonly reported organisms before (64.6%) and after (62.2%) the new rules. Afterward, 2.5% (11) of reports described deaths, and 33.7% (147) involved hospitalizations. Before the rules, 13% (11) described deaths, and another 72% involved hospitalizations. Reports received by the FDA quadrupled since 2005, suggesting that CGTP regulations have contributed to increased reporting and improved tissue safety surveillance. However, these data do not confirm that the reported infections were caused by suspect tissues; most reports may represent routine post-surgical infections not actually due to allografts.

  17. The debate on FDA reform: a view from the U.S. Senate. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Baker, R

    1995-09-01

    The recently released concept paper on Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reform from Republican Senator, Nancy Kassebaum, is reviewed. Senator Kassebaum chairs the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources that will influence the Senate's action on FDA reform. The paper outlines the Senator's priorities for Congressional legislation on FDA reform in the following areas: the FDA mission and its accountability; creation of a Performance Review Panel and Industry Advisory Council; approval and access of products for seriously ill patients; the FDA's responsibility for good manufacturing practices; establishment of an Ombudsman Office for resolving disputes; dissemination of information on unapproved uses of approved products; and approval standards for new drugs.

  18. Assessment of foetal risk associated with 93 non-US-FDA approved medications during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Al-jedai, Ahmed H.; Balhareth, Sakra S.; Algain, Roaa A.

    2012-01-01

    Health care practitioners utilize the United States-Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA) pregnancy categorization (A, B, C, D, X) for making decision on the appropriateness of certain medications during pregnancy. Many non US-FDA approved medications are registered and marketed in Saudi Arabia. However, these medications do not have an assigned pregnancy risk categorization like those approved in the US. The objective of this review is to evaluate, report, and categorize the foetal risk associated with non-US-FDA approved medications registered by the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (S-FDA) according to the US-FDA pregnancy risk categorization system. We identified 109 non-US-FDA approved medications in the Saudi National Formulary (SNF) as of October 2007. We searched for data on functional or anatomical birth defects or embryocidal-associated risk using different databases and references. An algorithm for risk assessment was used to determine a pregnancy risk category for each medication. Out of 93 eligible medications, 73% were assigned category risk C, 10 medications (11%) were assigned category risk D, and 12 medications (13%) were assigned category risk B. Only three medications were judged to be safe during pregnancy based on the available evidence and were assigned category risk A. Inconsistencies in defining and reporting the foetal risk category among different drug regulatory authorities could create confusion and affect prescribing. We believe that standardization and inclusion of this information in the medication package insert is extremely important to all health care practitioners. PMID:23960803

  19. Towards a Computational Analysis of Status and Leadership Styles on FDA Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broniatowski, David A.; Magee, Christopher L.

    Decisions by committees of technical experts are increasingly impacting society. These decision-makers are typically embedded within a web of social relations. Taken as a whole, these relations define an implicit social structure which can influence the decision outcome. Aspects of this structure are founded on interpersonal affinity between parties to the negotiation, on assigned roles, and on the recognition of status characteristics, such as relevant domain expertise. This paper build upon a methodology aimed at extracting an explicit representation of such social structures using meeting transcripts as a data source. Whereas earlier results demonstrated that the method presented here can identify groups of decision-makers with a contextual affinity (i.e., membership in a given medical specialty or voting clique), we now can extract meaningful status hierarchies, and can identify differing facilitation styles among committee chairs. Use of this method is demonstrated on the transcripts of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel meeting transcripts; nevertheless, the approach presented here is extensible to other domains and requires only a meeting transcript as input.

  20. Tamoxifen: an FDA approved drug with neuroprotective effects for spinal cord injury recovery.

    PubMed

    Colón, Jennifer M; Miranda, Jorge D

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition without a cure, affecting sensory and/or motor functions. The physical trauma to the spinal cord initiates a cascade of molecular and cellular events that generates a non-permissive environment for cell survival and axonal regeneration. Among these complex set of events are damage of the blood-brain barrier, edema formation, inflammation, oxidative stress, demyelination, reactive gliosis and apoptosis. The multiple events activated after SCI require a multi-active drug that could target most of these events and produce a permissive environment for cell survival, regeneration, vascular reorganization and synaptic formation. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is an FDA approved drug with several neuroprotective properties that should be considered for the treatment of this devastating condition. Various investigators using different animal models and injury parameters have demonstrated the beneficial effects of this drug to improve functional locomotor recovery after SCI. Results suggest that the mechanism of action of Tamoxifen administration is to modulate anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-gliotic responses. A gap of knowledge exists regarding the sex differences in response to Tamoxifen and the therapeutic window available to administer this treatment. In addition, the effects of Tamoxifen in axonal outgrowth or synapse formation needs to be investigated. This review will address some of the mechanisms activated by Tamoxifen after SCI and the results recently published by investigators in the field. PMID:27651756

  1. Bringing smart pills to market: FDA regulation of ingestible drug/device combination products.

    PubMed

    Avery, Matthew; Liu, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a pill that, after you swallow it, can track its position in your body. Or imagine a pill that can transmit a message to a doctor to tell him that you have taken your bitter medicine. Pills like this already exist. These so-called smart pills are an emerging type of medical therapy. However, this nascent technology has yet to reach the market and developers of these novel therapies face significant regulatory challenges. This article predicts how the Food and Drug Administration will regulate smart pills and shows how the current regulatory regime is inadequate. The article then proposes modifying the current regulatory regime to encourage development of smart pills and other innovative combination products by: (1) regulating combination products based on their "novel mode of action" rather than their "primary mode of action," (2) creating a marketing approval pathway specifically for combination products, and (3) eliminating regulations that require sponsors to get marketing approval from multiple centers within FDA and providing regulatory guidance specifically for ingestible drug/device combination products.

  2. Tamoxifen: an FDA approved drug with neuroprotective effects for spinal cord injury recovery

    PubMed Central

    Colón, Jennifer M.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition without a cure, affecting sensory and/or motor functions. The physical trauma to the spinal cord initiates a cascade of molecular and cellular events that generates a non-permissive environment for cell survival and axonal regeneration. Among these complex set of events are damage of the blood-brain barrier, edema formation, inflammation, oxidative stress, demyelination, reactive gliosis and apoptosis. The multiple events activated after SCI require a multi-active drug that could target most of these events and produce a permissive environment for cell survival, regeneration, vascular reorganization and synaptic formation. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is an FDA approved drug with several neuroprotective properties that should be considered for the treatment of this devastating condition. Various investigators using different animal models and injury parameters have demonstrated the beneficial effects of this drug to improve functional locomotor recovery after SCI. Results suggest that the mechanism of action of Tamoxifen administration is to modulate anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-gliotic responses. A gap of knowledge exists regarding the sex differences in response to Tamoxifen and the therapeutic window available to administer this treatment. In addition, the effects of Tamoxifen in axonal outgrowth or synapse formation needs to be investigated. This review will address some of the mechanisms activated by Tamoxifen after SCI and the results recently published by investigators in the field. PMID:27651756

  3. Tamoxifen: an FDA approved drug with neuroprotective effects for spinal cord injury recovery

    PubMed Central

    Colón, Jennifer M.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a condition without a cure, affecting sensory and/or motor functions. The physical trauma to the spinal cord initiates a cascade of molecular and cellular events that generates a non-permissive environment for cell survival and axonal regeneration. Among these complex set of events are damage of the blood-brain barrier, edema formation, inflammation, oxidative stress, demyelination, reactive gliosis and apoptosis. The multiple events activated after SCI require a multi-active drug that could target most of these events and produce a permissive environment for cell survival, regeneration, vascular reorganization and synaptic formation. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is an FDA approved drug with several neuroprotective properties that should be considered for the treatment of this devastating condition. Various investigators using different animal models and injury parameters have demonstrated the beneficial effects of this drug to improve functional locomotor recovery after SCI. Results suggest that the mechanism of action of Tamoxifen administration is to modulate anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-gliotic responses. A gap of knowledge exists regarding the sex differences in response to Tamoxifen and the therapeutic window available to administer this treatment. In addition, the effects of Tamoxifen in axonal outgrowth or synapse formation needs to be investigated. This review will address some of the mechanisms activated by Tamoxifen after SCI and the results recently published by investigators in the field.

  4. 21 CFR 822.31 - What records am I required to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... applicable FDA regulations, and any conditions of approval for your plan, such as reporting requirements; (c...? You must keep copies of: (a) All correspondence with your investigators or FDA, including required... plan; and (e) Any other records that we require to be maintained by regulation or by order, such...

  5. 21 CFR 822.31 - What records am I required to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... applicable FDA regulations, and any conditions of approval for your plan, such as reporting requirements; (c...? You must keep copies of: (a) All correspondence with your investigators or FDA, including required... plan; and (e) Any other records that we require to be maintained by regulation or by order, such...

  6. 21 CFR 822.31 - What records am I required to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... applicable FDA regulations, and any conditions of approval for your plan, such as reporting requirements; (c...? You must keep copies of: (a) All correspondence with your investigators or FDA, including required... plan; and (e) Any other records that we require to be maintained by regulation or by order, such...

  7. 21 CFR 822.31 - What records am I required to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... applicable FDA regulations, and any conditions of approval for your plan, such as reporting requirements; (c...? You must keep copies of: (a) All correspondence with your investigators or FDA, including required... plan; and (e) Any other records that we require to be maintained by regulation or by order, such...

  8. 21 CFR 822.31 - What records am I required to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... applicable FDA regulations, and any conditions of approval for your plan, such as reporting requirements; (c...? You must keep copies of: (a) All correspondence with your investigators or FDA, including required... plan; and (e) Any other records that we require to be maintained by regulation or by order, such...

  9. Ensuring the safe and effective FDA regulation of fecal microbiota transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Rachel E.; Edelstein, Carolyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Scientists, policymakers, and medical professionals alike have become increasingly worried about the rise of antibiotic resistance, and the growing number of infections due to bacteria like Clostridium difficile, which cause a significant number of deaths and are imposing increasing costs on our health care system. However, in the last few years, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), the transplantation of stool from a healthy donor into the bowel of a patient, has emerged as a startlingly effective means to treat recurrent C. difficile infections. At present, the FDA is proposing to regulate FMT as a biologic drug. However, this proposed classification is both underregulatory and overregulatory. The FDA's primary goal is to ensure that patients have access to safe, effective treatments—and as such they should regulate some aspects of FMT more stringently than they propose to, and others less so. This essay will examine the nature of the regulatory challenges the FDA will face in deciding to regulate FMT as a biologic drug, and will then evaluate available policy alternatives for the FDA to pursue, ultimately concluding that the FDA ought to consider adopting a hybrid regulatory model as it has done in the case of cord blood. PMID:27774199

  10. Focus on Food Labeling. An FDA Consumer Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This special issue is designed for those who want to know all they can about the new federal requirements for nutrition information on food labels. Nine articles are included. "Good Reading for Good Eating" (Paula Kurtzweil) addresses mandatory nutrition labeling, the nutrition panel, nutrient content and health claims, and ingredient labeling.…

  11. The Role of Adverse Event Reporting in the FDA Response to a Multistate Outbreak of Liver Disease Associated with a Dietary Supplement

    PubMed Central

    DeBeck, Heidi J.; LeBlanc, Pamela; Mogen, Kathryn M.; Wolpert, Beverly J.; Sabo, Jonathan L.; Salter, Monique; Seelman, Sharon L.; Lance, Susan E.; Monahan, Caitlin; Steigman, David S.; Gensheimer, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Liver disease is a potential complication from using dietary supplements. This study investigated an outbreak of non-viral liver disease associated with the use of OxyELITE ProTM, a dietary supplement used for weight loss and/or muscle building. Methods Illness details were ascertained from MedWatch reports submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) describing consumers who ingested OxyELITE Pro alone or in combination with other dietary supplements. FDA's Forensic Chemistry Center analyzed samples of OxyELITE Pro. Results From February 2012 to February 2014, FDA received 114 reports of adverse events of all kinds involving consumers who ingested OxyELITE Pro. The onset of illness for the first report was December 2010 and for the last report was January 2014. Thirty-three states, two foreign nations, and Puerto Rico submitted reports. Fifty-five of the reports (48%) described liver disease in the absence of viral infection, gallbladder disease, autoimmune disease, or other known causes of liver damage. A total of 33 (60%) of these patients were hospitalized, and three underwent liver transplantation. In early 2013, OxyELITE Pro products entered the market with a formulation distinct from products sold previously. The new formulation replaced 1,3-dimethylamylamine with aegeline. However, the manufacturer failed to submit to FDA a required “new dietary ingredient” notice for the use of aegeline in OxyELITE Pro products. Laboratory analysis identified no drugs, poisons, pharmaceuticals, toxic metals, usnic acid, N-Nitroso-fenfluramine, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, aristocholic acid, or phenethylamines in the products. Conclusions Vigilant surveillance is required for adverse events linked to the use of dietary supplements. PMID:26327730

  12. FDA approval of comparative claims for prescription drugs--the Moxam case.

    PubMed

    Marcus, D

    1983-01-01

    FDA allowance of comparative claims as part of the approved labeling for new prescription drugs creates special problems. Claims contained in prescription drug labeling are viewed by physicians as embodying not just the normal puffery of the manufacturer, but the considered views of government agency charged with protecting public health. Thus, labeling claims for prescription drugs have an impact and significance that promotional claims for other products do not. In the Moxam case--a dispute between Upjohn and Lilly over the FDA's approval of a comparative claim for a new Lilly antibiotic--the agency recognized this fundamental reality. Faced with the prospect of having to provide a procedure to permit competitors to challenge approval of comparative claims, the FDA has moved toward a policy of not permitting such claims in labeling, while allowing them in advertising.

  13. Summaries of Safety Labeling Changes Approved by the FDA: Boxed Warnings Highlights.

    PubMed

    Rose, Brenda

    2016-06-01

    As part of the US Food and Drug Administration's MedWatch program, safety labeling changes are reviewed and compiled monthly for drugs and therapeutic biologics where important changes have been made to the safety information. Boxed warnings (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm075096.pdf) are ordinarily used to highlight either adverse reactions so serious in proportion to the potential benefit from the drug that it is essential that it be considered in assessing the risks and benefits of using the drugs or serious adverse reactions that can be prevented/reduced in frequency or severity by appropriate use of the drug; or FDA approved the drug with restrictions to ensure safe use because FDA concluded that the drug can be safely used only if distribution or use is restricted. There were 4 revised boxed warning from January through March 2016.

  14. The FDA's role in medical device clinical studies of human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviola, James

    2005-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of the United States Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) role as a regulatory agency in medical device clinical studies involving human subjects. The FDA's regulations and responsibilities are explained and the device application process discussed. The specific medical device regulatory authorities are described as they apply to the development and clinical study of retinal visual prosthetic devices. The FDA medical device regulations regarding clinical studies of human subjects are intended to safeguard the rights and safety of subjects. The data gathered in pre-approval clinical studies provide a basis of valid scientific evidence in order to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of a medical device. The importance of a working understanding of applicable medical device regulations from the beginning of the device development project is emphasized particularly for novel, complex products such as implantable visual prosthetic devices.

  15. The FDA Review Process for Cardiac Medical Devices in Children: A Review for the Clinician.

    PubMed

    Almond, Christopher S

    2012-05-01

    Pediatric medical devices play a vital role in the treatment of children with cardiovascular disease. Most cardiac medical devices used in children today are used off-label where the risk-benefit of devices has not been well characterized. Pediatric medical devices face a variety of challenges to FDA approval related in large part to the small target population, heterogeneity of the patient population and ethical considerations of device testing in children. While relatively few cardiac devices have received FDA approval in children, the number of devices navigating the approval process successfully is growing. Most pediatric device approvals are being granted through the humanitarian device exemption (HDE) pathway, which is designed for rare diseases making it suitable for devices treating congenital heart disease. This review summarizes the FDA review process for pediatric medical devices as it continues to evolve in response to the unique challenges of understanding device performance in the pediatric population. PMID:22661882

  16. Summaries of Safety Labeling Changes Approved by the FDA: Boxed Warnings Highlights.

    PubMed

    Rose, Brenda

    2016-06-01

    As part of the US Food and Drug Administration's MedWatch program, safety labeling changes are reviewed and compiled monthly for drugs and therapeutic biologics where important changes have been made to the safety information. Boxed warnings (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm075096.pdf) are ordinarily used to highlight either adverse reactions so serious in proportion to the potential benefit from the drug that it is essential that it be considered in assessing the risks and benefits of using the drugs or serious adverse reactions that can be prevented/reduced in frequency or severity by appropriate use of the drug; or FDA approved the drug with restrictions to ensure safe use because FDA concluded that the drug can be safely used only if distribution or use is restricted. There were 4 revised boxed warning from January through March 2016. PMID:27354752

  17. Prescribing of FDA-approved and compounded hormone therapy differs by specialty

    PubMed Central

    Constantine, Ginger D.; Archer, David F.; Graham, Shelli; Bernick, Brian A.; Mirkin, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of general practitioners (GPs), obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), and wellness physicians (WPs) of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) for both compounded (CHT) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved products, using a survey of US physicians. Methods: Nine thousand one US physicians were invited to participate in a survey to report on their HT-prescribing patterns. Physicians were eligible if they prescribed HT for at least six patients per month. Results: The survey was completed by 440 eligible physicians (893 responded of 9,001 invited) including 171 GPs, 170 OB/GYNs, and 84 WPs. Physicians prescribed HT for 15% to 30% of their female patients, with WPs numerically most likely to prescribe HT. Menopausal symptoms were the leading reason for HT prescriptions among all specialties. WPs seemed more likely to prescribe HT for general/cardiovascular health (28%), and for shorter durations, than other specialties. WPs prescribed proportionally more compounded (vs FDA-approved) estrogens/progestogens than GPs or OB/GYNs, but OB/GYNs seemed to prescribe more compounded dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone (prescribed alone) than did others. OB/GYNs seemed least likely to consider CHT being more safe or effective than FDA-approved HT. Symptom relief was the main determinant of efficacy for all specialties; WPs also used blood (61%) or saliva testing (25%) for dose adjustment. Conclusions: Although all physician specialties surveyed prescribed HT, differences in prescribing CHT versus FDA-approved formulations by medical specialty/practice seemed to exist. Of those surveyed, OB/GYNs and GPs prescribed proportionally more FDA-approved HT, whereas WPs, similarly, prescribed more CHT. More discussion is needed concerning physicians’ decisions to prescribe CHT versus FDA-approved formulations. PMID:27648594

  18. Medical device reporting: manufacturer reporting, importer reporting, user facility reporting, distributor reporting--FDA. Direct final rule; withdrawal.

    PubMed

    1998-08-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published in the Federal Register of May 12, 1998, a proposed rule (63 FR 26129) and a direct final rule (63 FR 26069) to implement amendments to the medical device reporting provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as amended by the FDA Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). The comment period closed July 27, 1998. FDA is withdrawing the direct final rule because the agency received significant adverse comment.

  19. FDA publishes checklist of Y2K high-risk devices.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    Key points. The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed a list of types of medical devices that have the potential for the most serious consequences for patients should they fail because of Y2K-related problems. This list of computer-controlled potentially high-risk devices can provide a guide to health care facilities regarding the types of devices that should receive priority in their assessment and remediation of medical devices. The list may change as the FDA receives comments on the types of devices included in the list.

  20. Nanotechnology Laboratory Continues Partnership with FDA and National Institute of Standards and Technology | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI-funded Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL)—a leader in evaluating promising nanomedicines to fight cancer—recently renewed its collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to continue its groundbreaking work on characterizing nanomedicines and moving them toward the clinic. In partnership with NIST and the FDA, NCL has laid a solid, scientific foundation for using the power of nanotechnology to increase the potency and target the delivery

  1. Security market reaction to FDA fast track designations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher W; Zhang, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Pharmaceutical firms can apply for the Food and Drug Administration to 'fast track' research and de velopment on new drugs, accelerating clinical trials and expediting regulatory review required prior to marketing to consumers. We investigate security market reaction to more than 100 fast track designations from 1998 to 2004. Fast track designation appears to enhance investor recognition of firm value. Specifically, fast track designation coincides with abnormal trading volume and excess daily stock returns for sponsoring firms. Institutional ownership and analyst attention also increase. Market response is more pronounced for firms that are smaller, do not yet market products, and have low institutional ownership. PMID:21294437

  2. The Dangers of Dental Devices as reported in the FDA MAUDE Database

    PubMed Central

    Hebballi, Nutan B; Ramoni, Rachel; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Delattre, Veronique F.; Stewart, Denice C.L.; Kent, Karla; White, Joel M; Vaderhobli, Ram; Walji, Muhammad F

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the frequency and type of adverse events (AEs) associated with dental devices reported to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. Methods We downloaded and thoroughly reviewed the dental device-related AEs reported to MAUDE from January 01, 1996 – December 31, 2011. Results MAUDE received a total of 1,978,056 reports between January 01, 1996 and December 31, 2011. Among these reports, 28,046 (1.4 percent) AEs reports were associated with dental devices. Within the dental AE reports that had event type information, 17,261 reported injuries, 7,777 reported device malfunctions, and 66 reported deaths. Among the 66 entries classified as death reports, 52 actually reported a death in the description; the remaining were either misclassified or lacked sufficient information in the report to determine whether a death had occurred. 53.5 percent of the dental device associated AEs pertained to endosseous implants. Conclusion There is a plethora of devices used in dental care, and to achieve Element 1 of AHRQ’s Patient Safety Initiative, we must be able to monitor the safety of dental devices. While MAUDE is essentially the single source of this valuable information, our investigations led us to conclude that it currently has major limitations that prevent it from being the broad-based patient safety sentinel the profession requires. Practical Implications As potential contributors to MAUDE, dental care teams play a key role in improving the profession’s access to information about the safety of dental devices. PMID:25637208

  3. Recommendations from the iSBTc-SITC/FDA/NCI Workshop on Immunotherapy Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Lisa H.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Britten, Cedrik M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Håkansson, Leif; Janetzki, Sylvia; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kleen, Thomas-Oliver; Lee, Peter P.; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T.; Maino, Vernon C.; Maio, Michele; Malyguine, Anatoli; Masucci, Giuseppe; Pawelec, Graham; Potter, Douglas M.; Rivoltini, Licia; Salazar, Lupe G.; Schendel, Dolores J.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Song, Wenru; Stroncek, David F.; Tahara, Hideaki; Thurin, Magdalena; Trinchieri, Giorgio; van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wigginton, Jon M.; Marincola, Francesco; Khleif, Samir; Fox, Bernard A.; Disis, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate development of innovative immunotherapy approaches, especially for treatment concepts exploiting the potential benefits of personalized therapy, there is a need to develop and validate tools to identify patients who can benefit from immunotherapy. Despite substantial effort, we do not yet know which parameters of anti-tumor immunity to measure and which assays are optimal for those measurements. Experimental Design The iSBTc-SITC, FDA and NCI partnered to address these issues for immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we review the major challenges, give examples of approaches and solutions and present our recommendations. Results and Conclusions While specific immune parameters and assays are not yet validated, we recommend following standardized (accurate, precise and reproducible) protocols and use of functional assays for the primary immunologic readouts of a trial; consideration of central laboratories for immune monitoring of large, multi-institutional trials; and standardized testing of several phenotypic and functional potential potency assays specific to any cellular product. When reporting results, the full QA/QC performed, selected examples of truly representative raw data and assay performance characteristics should be included. Lastly, to promote broader analysis of multiple aspects of immunity, and gather data on variability, we recommend that in addition to cells and serum, that RNA and DNA samples be banked (under standardized conditions) for later testing. We also recommend that sufficient blood be drawn to allow for planned testing of the primary hypothesis being addressed in the trial, and that additional baseline and post-treatment blood is banked for testing novel hypotheses (or generating new hypotheses) that arise in the field. PMID:21558394

  4. A two one-sided parametric tolerance interval test for control of delivered dose uniformity. Part 1--characterization of FDA proposed test.

    PubMed

    Novick, Steven; Christopher, David; Dey, Monisha; Lyapustina, Svetlana; Golden, Michael; Leiner, Stefan; Wyka, Bruce; Delzeit, Hans-Joachim; Novak, Chris; Larner, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    The FDA proposed a parametric tolerance interval (PTI) test at the October 2005 Advisory Committee meeting as a replacement of the attribute (counting) test for delivered dose uniformity (DDU), published in the 1998 draft guidance for metered dose inhalers (MDIs) and dry powder inhalers (DPIs) and the 2002 final guidance for inhalation sprays and intranasal products. This article (first in a series of three) focuses on the test named by the FDA "87.5% coverage." Unlike a typical two-sided PTI test, which controls the proportion of the DDU distribution within a target interval (coverage), this test is comprised of two one-sided tests (TOST) designed to control the maximum amount of DDU values in either tail of the distribution above and below the target interval. Through simulations, this article characterizes the properties and performance of the proposed PTI-TOST under different scenarios. The results show that coverages of 99% or greater are needed for a batch to have acceptance probability 98% or greater with the test named by the FDA "87.5% coverage" (95% confidence level), while batches with 87.5% coverage have less than 1% probability of being accepted. The results also illustrate that with this PTI-TOST, the coverage requirement for a given acceptance probability increases as the batch mean deviates from target. The accompanying articles study the effects of changing test parameters and the test robustness to deviations from normality.

  5. Current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, processing, packing, or holding of drugs; revision of certain labeling controls--FDA. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1993-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for human and veterinary drug products to revise certain labeling control provisions. Specifically, the final rule defines the term "gang-printed labeling," specifies conditions for the use of gang-printed or cut labeling, exempts manufacturers that employ automated 100-percent labeling inspection systems from CGMP labeling reconciliation requirements, and requires manufacturers to identify filled drug product containers that are set aside and held in an unlabeled condition for future labeling operations. These changes are intended to reduce the frequency of drug product mislabeling and associated drug product recalls.

  6. Language and Nutrition (Mis)Information: Food Labels, FDA Policies and Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Christy Marie

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, I address the ways in which food manufacturers can exploit the often vague and ambiguous nature of FDA policies concerning language and images used on food labels. Employing qualitative analysis methods (Strauss, 1987; Denzin and Lincoln, 2003; Mackey and Gass, 2005) that drew upon critical discourse analysis (Fairclough,…

  7. 78 FR 36194 - Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Investigational New Drug Applications for Minimally...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... Affecting the Hematopoietic System.'' That draft guidance, when finalized, is intended to supersede the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Investigational... Hematopoietic System; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  8. Impact of FDA Actions, DTCA, and Public Information on the Market for Pain Medication.

    PubMed

    Bradford, W David; Kleit, Andrew N

    2015-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most important classes of prescription drugs used by primary care physicians to manage pain. The NSAID class of products has a somewhat controversial history, around which a complex regulatory and informational environment has developed. This history includes a boxed warning mandated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for all NSAIDs in 2005. We investigate the impact that various information shocks have had on the use of prescription medications for pain in primary care in the USA. We accomplish this by extracting data on nearly 600,000 patients from a unique nationwide electronic medical record database and estimate the probability of any active prescription for the four types of pain medications as a function of FDA actions, advertising, media coverage, and patient characteristics. We find that even after accounting for multiple sources of information, the FDA label changes and boxed warnings had a significant effect on pain medication prescribing. The boxed warning did not have the same impact on the use of all NSAID inhibitors. We find that the boxed warning reduced the use of NSAID COX-2 inhibitor use, which was the focus of much of the press attention. In contrast, however, the warning actually increased the use of non-COX-2 NSAID inhibitors. Thus, the efficacy of the FDA's black box warning is clearly mixed. PMID:25059655

  9. 21 CFR 14.171 - Utilization of an advisory committee on the initiative of FDA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Human Prescription Drugs § 14.171 Utilization of an advisory committee on the initiative of FDA. (a) Any matter involving a human prescription drug under review within the agency may, in the discretion of the... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Utilization of an advisory committee on...

  10. 21 CFR 111.610 - What records must be made available to FDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What records must be made available to FDA? 111.610 Section 111.610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN...

  11. 21 CFR 111.610 - What records must be made available to FDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What records must be made available to FDA? 111.610 Section 111.610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN...

  12. 21 CFR 111.610 - What records must be made available to FDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What records must be made available to FDA? 111.610 Section 111.610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN...

  13. 21 CFR 111.610 - What records must be made available to FDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What records must be made available to FDA? 111.610 Section 111.610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN...

  14. 21 CFR 111.610 - What records must be made available to FDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What records must be made available to FDA? 111.610 Section 111.610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN...

  15. 21 CFR 1271.3 - How does FDA define important terms in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CFR 121.2, that are intended for use in organ transplantation and labeled “For use in organ... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS General Provisions § 1271.3 How does FDA... use means the implantation, transplantation, infusion, or transfer of human cells or tissue back...

  16. 21 CFR 1271.3 - How does FDA define important terms in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR 121.2, that are intended for use in organ transplantation and labeled “For use in organ... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS General Provisions § 1271.3 How does FDA... use means the implantation, transplantation, infusion, or transfer of human cells or tissue back...

  17. 21 CFR 1271.27 - Will FDA assign me a registration number?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Will FDA assign me a registration number? 1271.27 Section 1271.27 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN...

  18. 21 CFR Appendix A to Part 201 - Examples of Graphic Enhancements Used by FDA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examples of Graphic Enhancements Used by FDA A... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Pt. 201, App. A Appendix A to Part 201—Examples of Graphic Enhancements... dosage directions. 10. A graphic appears at the bottom of the first panel leading the reader to the...

  19. 21 CFR Appendix A to Part 201 - Examples of Graphic Enhancements Used by FDA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Examples of Graphic Enhancements Used by FDA A... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Pt. 201, App. A Appendix A to Part 201—Examples of Graphic Enhancements... dosage directions. 10. A graphic appears at the bottom of the first panel leading the reader to the...

  20. 21 CFR 803.3 - How does FDA define the terms used in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING General Provisions § 803.3 How does FDA define the terms used in this part? Some of the terms we use in this part are specific to medical device... services or any other facility) or operated by another medical entity (e.g., under the common...

  1. 76 FR 32367 - Draft Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA... notice that appeared in the Federal Register of May 24, 2011 (76 FR 30175). The document announced...

  2. Current perspectives on the US FDA regulatory framework for intelligent drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Sapsford, Kim E; Lauritsen, Kristina; Tyner, Katherine M

    2012-12-01

    The US FDA is the US agency responsible for regulating intelligent drug-delivery systems (IDDS). IDDS can be classified as a device, drug, biologic or combination product. In this perspective, the current regulatory framework for IDDS and future perspectives on how the field is expected to evolve from a regulatory standpoint is discussed.

  3. 21 CFR 803.3 - How does FDA define the terms used in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING General Provisions § 803.3 How does FDA... reporting and reflect the language used in the statute (law). Other terms are more general and reflect our... recognized accreditation organization. If an adverse event meets the criteria for reporting, the ASF...

  4. 21 CFR 1271.27 - Will FDA assign me a registration number?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Will FDA assign me a registration number? 1271.27 Section 1271.27 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN...

  5. Formation of a 6FDA-based ring polyimide with nanoscale cavity evaluated by DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Takao, Yoshimi; Tamai, Yoshinori

    2005-04-01

    The computer-aided molecular design of a rigid ring molecule has been performed. As a candidate molecule, the polyimide derived from 2,2-bis(3,4-carboxylphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) with m-phenylenediamine (MDA) has been used. The optimized structures of the 6FDA-MDA model compounds including a precursor type amic acid model were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. Using the optimized structures of the model compounds, the probable combinations to form a flat ring polyimide are considered by taking the spatial angles between the respective aromatic groups into consideration. We selected several combinations with different conformations and the number of monomer units. We showed that the dimer, trimer and tetramer of not only the 6FDA-based ring imide but also the corresponding ring amic acid can have a stable geometry. Each of them contains a cavity of sub-nanometer size and characteristic shape. Among them, the interaction energy with some guest molecules are evaluated for the smallest ring imide constructed from two units of 6FDA-MDA using the DFT calculations.

  6. 21 CFR 1.406 - How will FDA handle classified information in an informal hearing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How will FDA handle classified information in an informal hearing? 1.406 Section 1.406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human...

  7. 21 CFR 1.406 - How will FDA handle classified information in an informal hearing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How will FDA handle classified information in an informal hearing? 1.406 Section 1.406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human...

  8. 21 CFR 1.406 - How will FDA handle classified information in an informal hearing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How will FDA handle classified information in an informal hearing? 1.406 Section 1.406 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human...

  9. NCL Partnerships - U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)- Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory

    Cancer.gov

    The activities within the NCL represent a formal scientific interaction of three Federal agencies: National Cancer Institute and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the Department of Health and Human Services, and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the Department of Commerce.

  10. 21 CFR 1.393 - What information must FDA include in the detention order?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What information must FDA include in the detention order? 1.393 Section 1.393 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or...

  11. 21 CFR Appendix B to Part 101 - Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA B Appendix B to Part 101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Pt. 101, App. B Appendix B to Part...

  12. 21 CFR Appendix B to Part 101 - Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA B Appendix B to Part 101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Pt. 101, App. B Appendix B to Part...

  13. 21 CFR Appendix B to Part 101 - Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA B Appendix B to Part 101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Pt. 101, App. B Appendix B to Part...

  14. 21 CFR Appendix B to Part 101 - Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA B Appendix B to Part 101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Pt. 101, App. B Appendix B to Part...

  15. 21 CFR Appendix B to Part 101 - Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Graphic Enhancements Used by the FDA B Appendix B to Part 101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Pt. 101, App. B Appendix B to Part...

  16. DMSO, Hobby Shops and the FDA: The Diffusion of a Health Policy Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstock, Edward; Davis, Phillip

    1985-01-01

    Despite being banned by the FDA, DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) usage has spread rapidly among arthritic victims and weekend athletes. This study looked at current and past users to learn how they discovered DMSO, their reactions to buying an illegal drug, and possible implications for public health policy. (MT)

  17. 21 CFR 1271.27 - Will FDA assign me a registration number?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Will FDA assign me a registration number? 1271.27... (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Procedures for Registration and Listing § 1271.27 Will...

  18. 21 CFR 1271.27 - Will FDA assign me a registration number?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Will FDA assign me a registration number? 1271.27... (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Procedures for Registration and Listing § 1271.27 Will...

  19. 21 CFR 1271.27 - Will FDA assign me a registration number?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Will FDA assign me a registration number? 1271.27... (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Procedures for Registration and Listing § 1271.27 Will...

  20. FDA regulation of adult stem cell therapies as used in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Chirba, Mary Ann; Sweetapple, Berkley; Hannon, Charles P; Anderson, John A

    2015-02-01

    In sports medicine, adult stem cells are the subject of great interest. Several uses of stem cells are under investigation including cartilage repair, meniscal regeneration, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and tendinopathy. Extensive clinical and basic science research is warranted as stem cell therapies become increasingly common in clinical practice. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for regulating the use of stem cells through its "Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products" regulations. This report provides a brief overview of FDA regulation of adult stem cells. Several common clinical case scenarios are then presented that highlight how stem cells are currently being used in sports medicine and how current FDA regulations are likely to affect the physicians who use them. In the process, it explains how a variety of factors in sourcing and handling these cells, particularly the extent of cell manipulation, will affect what a physician can and cannot do without first obtaining the FDA's express approval.

  1. Quantitative analysis on the characteristics of targets with FDA approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sakharkar, Meena K.; Li, Peng; Zhong, Zhaowei; Sakharkar, Kishore R.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulated knowledge of genomic information, systems biology, and disease mechanisms provide an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate the genetic basis of diseases, and to discover new and novel therapeutic targets from the wealth of genomic data. With hundreds to a few thousand potential targets available in the human genome alone, target selection and validation has become a critical component of drug discovery process. The explorations on quantitative characteristics of the currently explored targets (those without any marketed drug) and successful targets (targeted by at least one marketed drug) could help discern simple rules for selecting a putative successful target. Here we use integrative in silico (computational) approaches to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of 133 targets with FDA approved drugs and 3120 human disease genes (therapeutic targets) not targeted by FDA approved drugs. This is the first attempt to comparatively analyze targets with FDA approved drugs and targets with no FDA approved drug or no drugs available for them. Our results show that proteins with 5 or fewer number of homologs outside their own family, proteins with single-exon gene architecture and proteins interacting with more than 3 partners are more likely to be targetable. These quantitative characteristics could serve as criteria to search for promising targetable disease genes. PMID:18167532

  2. ADVERSE PRE- AND POSTNATAL EVENTS REPORTED TO FDA IN ASSOCIATION WITH MATERNAL ATENOLOL TREATMENT IN PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atenolol is a beta-adrenoreceptor blocker used for treatment of hypertension in pregnancy. This study evaluates the reporting frequency of adverse pre- and postnatal outcomes in a series of 70 cases of maternal exposure during gestation, derived from 140 reports to FDA with Ateno...

  3. 75 FR 28622 - FDA Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment Regarding Disclosure Policies of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration FDA Transparency Initiative: Draft Proposals for Public Comment Regarding Disclosure Policies of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: As...

  4. 21 CFR 1.393 - What information must FDA include in the detention order?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...; (7) The address and location where the article of food is to be detained and the appropriate storage... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What information must FDA include in the detention order? 1.393 Section 1.393 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  5. 21 CFR 1.393 - What information must FDA include in the detention order?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...; (7) The address and location where the article of food is to be detained and the appropriate storage... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What information must FDA include in the detention order? 1.393 Section 1.393 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  6. 75 FR 14448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... announcing a public workshop entitled ``FDA Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among the FDA and clinical trial staff,...

  7. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the... FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards (IRBs). Individual...

  8. Synthetic Biology in the FDA Realm: Toward Productive Oversight Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Leili; Hall, Ralph F

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is expected to create tremendous opportunities in a wide range of areas, including in foods, therapeutics, and diagnostics subject to regulatory oversight by the United States Food and Drug Administration. At the same time, there is substantial basis for concern about the uncertainties of accurately assessing the human health and environmental risks of such SB products. As such, SB is the latest in a string of emerging technologies that is the subject of calls for new approaches to regulation and oversight that involve "thinking ahead" to anticipate governance challenges upstream of technological development and adopting oversight mechanisms that are both adaptive to new information about risks and reflexive to performance data and feedback on policy outcomes over time. These new approaches constitute a marked departure from the status quo, and their development and implementation will require considerable time, resources, and reallocation of responsibilities. Furthermore, in order to develop an appropriate oversight response, adaptive or otherwise, there is first a need to identify the specific types and natures of applications, uncertainties, and regulatory issues that are likely to pose oversight challenges. This article presents our vision for a Productive Oversight Assessment (POA) approach in which the abilities and deficits of an oversight system are evaluated with the aim of enabling productive decisions (i.e., timely, feasible, effective for achieving desired policy outcomes) about oversight while also building capacity to facilitate broader governance efforts. The value ofPOA is two-fold. First, it will advance the development of a generalizable approach for making productive planning and decision-making about the oversight of any given new technology that presents challenges and uncertainties for any given oversight system whose policy goals are implicated by that technology. Second, this effort can enhance the very processes

  9. Clinical trial registration, reporting, publication and FDAAA compliance: a cross-sectional analysis and ranking of new drugs approved by the FDA in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer E; Korn, David; Ross, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical trial registration, reporting and publication rates for new drugs by: (1) legal requirements and (2) the ethical standard that all human subjects research should be publicly accessible to contribute to generalisable knowledge. Design Cross-sectional analysis of all clinical trials submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for drugs approved in 2012, sponsored by large biopharmaceutical companies. Data sources Information from Drugs@FDA, ClinicalTrials.gov, MEDLINE-indexed journals and drug company communications. Main outcome measures Clinical trial registration and results reporting in ClinicalTrials.gov, publication in the medical literature, and compliance with the 2007 FDA Amendments Acts (FDAAA), analysed on the drug level. Results The FDA approved 15 drugs sponsored by 10 large companies in 2012. We identified 318 relevant trials involving 99 599 research participants. Per drug, a median of 57% (IQR 32–83%) of trials were registered, 20% (IQR 12–28%) reported results in ClinicalTrials.gov, 56% (IQR 41–83%) were published, and 65% (IQR 41–83%) were either published or reported results. Almost half of all reviewed drugs had at least one undisclosed phase II or III trial. Per drug, a median of 17% (IQR 8–20%) of trials supporting FDA approvals were subject to FDAAA mandated public disclosure; of these, a median of 67% (IQR 0–100%) were FDAAA-compliant. 68% of research participants (67 629 of 99 599) participated in FDAAA-subject trials, with 51% (33 405 of 67 629) enrolled in non-compliant trials. Transparency varied widely among companies. Conclusions Trial disclosures for new drugs remain below legal and ethics standards, with wide variation in practices among drugs and their sponsors. Best practices are emerging. 2 of our 10 reviewed companies disclosed all trials and complied with legal disclosure requirements for their 2012 approved drugs. Ranking new drugs on transparency criteria may improve

  10. Exceptions or alternatives to labeling requirements for products held by the Strategic National Stockpile. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is adopting as a final rule, without change, the interim final rule that issued regulations permitting FDA Center Directors to grant exceptions or alternatives to certain regulatory labeling requirements applicable to human drugs, biological products, or medical devices that are or will be included in the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS). FDA is taking this action to complete the rulemaking initiated with the interim final rule.

  11. From bench to FDA to bedside: US regulatory trends for new stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Knoepfler, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    The phrase "bench-to-bedside" is commonly used to describe the translation of basic discoveries such as those on stem cells to the clinic for therapeutic use in human patients. However, there is a key intermediate step in between the bench and the bedside involving governmental regulatory oversight such as by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States (US). Thus, it might be more accurate in most cases to describe the stem cell biological drug development process in this way: from bench to FDA to bedside. The intermediate development and regulatory stage for stem cell-based biological drugs is a multifactorial, continually evolving part of the process of developing a biological drug such as a stem cell-based regenerative medicine product. In some situations, stem cell-related products may not be classified as biological drugs in which case the FDA plays a relatively minor role. However, this middle stage is generally a major element of the process and is often colloquially referred to in an ominous way as "The Valley of Death". This moniker seems appropriate because it is at this point, and in particular in the work that ensues after Phase 1, clinical trials that most drug product development is terminated, often due to lack of funding, diseases being refractory to treatment, or regulatory issues. Not surprisingly, workarounds to deal with or entirely avoid this difficult stage of the process are evolving both inside and outside the domains of official regulatory authorities. In some cases these efforts involve the FDA invoking new mechanisms of accelerating the bench to beside process, but in other cases these new pathways bypass the FDA in part or entirely. Together these rapidly changing stem cell product development and regulatory pathways raise many scientific, ethical, and medical questions. These emerging trends and their potential consequences are reviewed here.

  12. From Bench to FDA to Bedside: US Regulatory Trends for New Stem Cell Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Knoepfler, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    The phrase “bench to bedside” is commonly used to describe the translation of basic discoveries such as those on stem cells to the clinic for therapeutic use in human patients. However, there is a key intermediate step in between the bench and the bedside involving governmental regulatory oversight such as by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States (US). Thus, it might be more accurate in most cases to describe the stem cell biological drug development process in this way: from bench to FDA to bedside. The intermediate development and regulatory stage for stem cell-based biological drugs is a multifactorial, continually evolving part of the process of developing a biological drug such as a stem cell-based regenerative medicine product. In some situations, stem cell-related products may not be classified as biological drugs in which case the FDA plays a relatively minor role. However, this middle stage is generally a major element of the process and is often colloquially referred to in an ominous way as “The Valley of Death”. This moniker seems appropriate because it is at this point and in particular in the work that ensues after Phase 1 clinical trials that most drug product development is terminated, often due to lack of funding, diseases being refractory to treatment, or regulatory issues. Not surprisingly, workarounds to deal with or entirely avoid this difficult stage of the process are evolving both inside and outside the domains of official regulatory authorities. In some cases these efforts involve the FDA invoking new mechanisms of accelerating the bench to beside process, but in other cases these new pathways bypass the FDA in part or entirely. Together these rapidly changing stem cell product development and regulatory pathways raise many scientific, ethical, and medical questions. These emerging trends and their potential consequences are reviewed here. PMID:25489841

  13. Use of surrogate outcomes in US FDA drug approvals, 2003–2012: a survey

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tsung; Hsu, Yea-Jen; Fain, Kevin M; Boyd, Cynthia M; Holbrook, Janet T; Puhan, Milo A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate, across a spectrum of diseases, how often surrogate outcomes are used as a basis for drug approvals by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and whether and how the rationale for using treatment effects on surrogates as predictors of treatment effects on patient-centred outcomes is discussed. Study design and setting We used the Drugs@FDA website to identify drug approvals produced from 2003 to 2012 by the FDA. We focused on four diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type 1 or 2 diabetes, glaucoma and osteoporosis) for which surrogates are commonly used in trials. We reviewed the drug labels and medical reviews to provide empirical evidence on how surrogate outcomes are handled by the FDA. Results Of 1043 approvals screened, 58 (6%) were for the four diseases of interest. Most drugs for COPD (7/9, 78%), diabetes (26/26, 100%) and glaucoma (9/9, 100%) were approved based on surrogates while for osteoporosis, most drugs (10/14, 71%) were also approved for patient-centred outcomes (fractures). The rationale for using surrogates was discussed in 11 of the 43 (26%) drug approvals based on surrogates. In these drug approvals, we found drug approvals for diabetes are more likely than the other examined conditions to contain a discussion of trial evidence demonstrating that treatment effects on surrogate outcomes predict treatment effects on patient-centred outcomes. Conclusions Our results suggest that the FDA did not use a consistent approach to address surrogates in assessing the benefits and harms of drugs for COPD, type 1 or 2 diabetes, glaucoma and osteoporosis. For evaluating new drugs, patient-centred outcomes should be chosen whenever possible. If the use of surrogate outcomes is necessary, then a consistent approach is important to review the evidence for surrogacy and consider surrogate's usage in the treatment and population under study. PMID:26614616

  14. 76 FR 62073 - Guidance for Industry on Implementation of the Fee Provisions of the FDA Food Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Implementation of the Fee... guidance for industry entitled ``Implementation of the Fee Provisions of Section 107 of the FDA Food Safety... guidance for industry entitled ``Implementation of the Fee Provisions of Section 107 of the FDA Food...

  15. 77 FR 70955 - FDA Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Smoking-Cessation Products; Report to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 15 FDA Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement... public on FDA consideration of applicable approval mechanisms and additional indications for nicotine..., including nicotine-containing gums, patches, and lozenges, are already marketed for smoking cessation....

  16. 21 CFR 170.105 - The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Premarket Notifications § 170.105 The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food contact substance (FCN) is no longer effective....

  17. Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyosun

    2015-01-01

    Background: For the purpose of understanding the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) concerns regarding online promotion of prescription drugs advertised directly to consumers, this study examines notices of violations (NOVs) and warning letters issued by the FDA to pharmaceutical manufacturers. Methods: The FDA’s warning letters and NOVs, which were issued to pharmaceutical companies over a 10-year period (2005 to 2014) regarding online promotional activities, were content-analyzed. Results: Six violation categories were identified: risk information, efficacy information, indication information, product labeling, material information issues, and approval issues. The results reveal that approximately 95% of the alleged violations were found on branded drug websites, in online paid advertisements, and in online videos. Of the total 179 violations, the majority of the alleged violations were concerned with the lack of risk information and/or misrepresentation of efficacy information, suggesting that achieving a fair balance of benefit versus risk information is a major problem with regard to the direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs. In addition, the character space limitations of online platforms, eg, sponsored links on search engines, pose challenges for pharmaceutical marketers with regard to adequately communicating important drug information, such as indication information, risk information, and product labeling. Conclusion: Presenting drug information in a fair and balanced manner remains a major problem. Industry guidance should consider addressing visibility and accessibility of information in the web environment to help pharmaceutical marketers meet the requirements for direct-to-consumer promotion and to protect consumers from misleading drug information. Promotion via social media warrants further attention, as pharmaceutical manufacturers have already begun actively establishing a social media presence, and the FDA has thus

  18. 21 CFR 814.82 - Postapproval requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements. (a) FDA may impose postapproval requirements in a PMA approval order or by regulation at the time of approval of the PMA or by regulation subsequent to approval. Postapproval requirements may include... periodic reporting on the safety, effectiveness, and reliability of the device for its intended use....

  19. 21 CFR 814.82 - Postapproval requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements. (a) FDA may impose postapproval requirements in a PMA approval order or by regulation at the time of approval of the PMA or by regulation subsequent to approval. Postapproval requirements may include... periodic reporting on the safety, effectiveness, and reliability of the device for its intended use....

  20. ArrayTrack: a free FDA bioinformatics tool to support emerging biomedical research--an update.

    PubMed

    Xu, Joshua; Kelly, Reagan; Fang, Hong; Tong, Weida

    2010-08-01

    ArrayTrack is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) bioinformatics tool that has been widely adopted by the research community for genomics studies. It provides an integrated environment for microarray data management, analysis and interpretation. Most of its functionality for statistical, pathway and gene ontology analysis can also be applied independently to data generated by other molecular technologies. ArrayTrack has been undergoing active development and enhancement since its inception in 2001. This review summarises its key functionalities, with emphasis on the most recent extensions in support of the evolving needs of FDA's research programmes. ArrayTrack has added capability to manage, analyse and interpret proteomics and metabolomics data after quantification of peptides and metabolites abundance, respectively. Annotation information about single nucleotide polymorphisms and quantitative trait loci has been integrated to support genetics-related studies. Other extensions have been added to manage and analyse genomics data related to bacterial food-borne pathogens.

  1. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs as therapeutics to treat Rift Valley fever virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Ashwini; Bansal, Neha; Senina, Svetlana; Hooper, Idris; Lundberg, Lindsay; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Narayanan, Aarthi; Gutting, Bradford; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no FDA-approved therapeutics available to treat Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. In an effort to repurpose drugs for RVFV treatment, a library of FDA-approved drugs was screened to determine their ability to inhibit RVFV. Several drugs from varying compound classes, including inhibitors of growth factor receptors, microtubule assembly/disassembly, and DNA synthesis, were found to reduce RVFV replication. The hepatocellular and renal cell carcinoma drug, sorafenib, was the most effective inhibitor, being non-toxic and demonstrating inhibition of RVFV in a cell-type and virus strain independent manner. Mechanism of action studies indicated that sorafenib targets at least two stages in the virus infectious cycle, RNA synthesis and viral egress. Computational modeling studies also support this conclusion. siRNA knockdown of Raf proteins indicated that non-classical targets of sorafenib are likely important for the replication of RVFV. PMID:26217313

  2. Screening of FDA-Approved Drugs for Treatment of Emerging Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sisk, Jeanne M; Frieman, Matthew B

    2015-09-11

    The current outbreaks of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Ebolavirus (EboV) have revealed a gap in the development and availability of drugs to treat these infections. To date, there are no approved treatments for patients infected with MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a virus that continues to infect new patients and that has now spread from the Middle East to Asia. Despite a downward trend in the number of new EboV cases in West Africa, new infections are still occurring, and many patients continue to suffer from this illness. People infected with MERS and Ebola viruses receive only supportive care in hopes of recovery. Investigation into repurposing drugs approved by the FDA is gaining interest. To identify better treatment strategies, several groups have used drug screens to repurpose FDA-approved drugs as inhibitors of MERS-CoV and EboV. PMID:27617922

  3. The complications of controlling agency time discretion: FDA review deadlines and postmarket drug safety.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Jacqueline; Moffitt, Susan; Nall, Clayton

    2012-01-01

    Public agencies have discretion on the time domain, and politicians deploy numerous policy instruments to constrain it. Yet little is known about how administrative procedures that affect timing also affect the quality of agency decisions. We examine whether administrative deadlines shape decision timing and the observed quality of decisions. Using a unique and rich dataset of FDA drug approvals that allows us to examine decision timing and quality, we find that this administrative tool induces a piling of decisions before deadlines, and that these “just-before-deadline” approvals are linked with higher rates of postmarket safety problems (market withdrawals, severe safety warnings, safety alerts). Examination of data from FDA advisory committees suggests that the deadlines may impede quality by impairing late-stage deliberation and agency risk communication. Our results both support and challenge reigning theories about administrative procedures, suggesting they embody expected control-expertise trade-offs, but may also create unanticipated constituency losses. PMID:22400144

  4. FDA direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs: what are consumer preferences and response tendencies?

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Nile; Loudon, David; Sircar-Ramsewak, Feroza

    2007-01-01

    The effect of direct-to-consumer (DTC) television advertising of prescription medications is a growing concern of the United States (U.S.) Congress, state legislatures, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This research study was conducted in order to examine consumers' perceived preferences of DTC television advertisement in relation to "reminder" "help-seeking," and "product-claim" FDA-approved advertisement categories. An additional objective was to examine the influence of DTC television advertising of prescription drugs on consumers' tendency to seek more information about the medication and/or the medical condition. The research indicates that DTC television drug ads appear to be insufficient for consumers to make informed decisions. Their mixed perception and acceptance of the advertisements seem to influence them to seek more information from a variety of medical sources. PMID:19042521

  5. Killing with kindness: why the FDA need not certify drugs used for execution safe and effective.

    PubMed

    Annas, G J

    1985-09-01

    In 1977, Texas and Oklahoma became the first states to legalize administration of the death penalty by lethal injection; by late 1985, 14 other states had followed suit. Opponents of the death penalty petitioned the Food and Drug Administration in 1980 to declare drugs specified for use in executions as "not approved," and to prevent their use for that purpose. When the FDA denied their request, the petitioners took legal action against the agency, eventually arguing their case before the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled against them in Heckler v. Chaney (1985). Annas discusses the Court's action, which dealt only with the judicial reviewability under federal statute of the FDA's decision not to exercise its authority over the use of drugs in interstate commerce. He notes that, by dealing only with procedural issues, the Court avoided ruling on the death penalty itself.

  6. Bodies of evidence: activists, patients, and the FDA regulation of Depo-Provera.

    PubMed

    Kline, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    In January 1983, the FDA held one of only two scientific "Public Boards of Inquiry" in the history of the administration to determine whether to approve Depo-Provera for use as a contraceptive in the United States. At the hearing, ideas about gender and power played a central role in negotiations between scientists, doctors, patients, and women's health activists. The nature of the Depo-Provera Public Board of Inquiry lends itself to analysis of the interaction between and among these groups, each of which had a vested interest in the outcome of the FDA decision. The stories and strategies emerging from the actors involved in the Public Board of Inquiry reveal the enormous complexity of regulating reproduction in the late twentieth century.

  7. [Consideration about data management and biostatistics analysis from a FDA's botanical drug approval case].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian-yuan; Huang, Fang-hua; Zhu, Fei-peng

    2009-11-01

    FDA approved the first botanical drug of non-simplex ingredient on 31st Oct 2006. The new drug's trade name is Veregen 15% Ointment. Veregen succeeded in coming into the market in U.S, which attracts other countries and regions' attention where traditional herbs have been always used. From the viewpoints of data management and biostatistics method, the authors will think and discuss this case well, and hope to promote domestic new drug investigation.

  8. FDA (food and drug administration) compliance program guidance manual (fy 84). Section 6. Radiological health

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing written program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section VI provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the area of radiological health. Some of the areas of coverage include laser standards; compliance testing of x-ray equipment, ultrasonic therapy devices, mercury vapor lamps, television receivers, and microwave ovens; radiation policy; and imported electronic products.

  9. FDA Approves Test to Aid Post-PSA Biopsy Decisions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a test to help men with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test scores decide whether to have a biopsy to test for prostate cancer. The Access Hybritech p2PSA test is approved for use in men aged 50 or older who have a PSA test score between 4 and 10 ng/ml but who show no signs of cancer during a digital rectal exam. |

  10. Heparin crisis 2008: a tipping point for increased FDA enforcement in the pharma sector?

    PubMed

    Rosania, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Against a backdrop of steady deregulation, the pharmaceutical industry is increasingly outsourcing manufacturing, resulting in decentralized control of the global supply chain. Established products such as heparin have been held to outdated analytical standards. Ten million Americans receive heparin every year; Baxter International accounts for half of this market. In 2008, contamination of Baxter's heparin--sourced in China--resulted in about 350 adverse events and 150 deaths in the United States. In future, increasingly stringent FDA inspections and enforcement are expected for imported drugs and ingredients. More regional FDA offices will be set up overseas. FDA funding will likely be supplemented in future by user fees charged to importers. For newer products, companies will face pressure to adopt Quality by Design, with solid control of the global supply chain and a proactive focus on GMP. Older products will be held to modern standards. Long-term, imports of drugs and ingredients from developing markets will continue. This makes sense to companies from an economic standpoint, but protections will be essential to ensure that it is also justifiable from a public health perspective. PMID:24479237

  11. Database identifies FDA-approved drugs with potential to be repurposed for treatment of orphan diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Coté, Timothy R

    2011-07-01

    Facing substantial obstacles to developing new therapies for rare diseases, some sponsors are looking to 'repurpose' drugs already approved for other conditions and use those therapies to treat rare diseases. In an effort to facilitate such repurposing and speed the delivery of new therapies to people who need them, we have established a new resource, the Rare Disease Repurposing Database (RDRD). The advantages of repurposed compounds include their demonstrated efficacy (in some clinical contexts), their observed toxicity profiles and their clearly described manufacturing controls. To create the RDRD, we matched the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) orphan designation database to FDA drug and biological product approval lists. The RDRD lists 236 products that have received orphan status designation--that is, were found to be 'promising' for the treatment of a rare disease--and though not yet approved for marketing for that rare disease, they are already approved for marketing to treat some other disease or condition. The RDRD contains three tables: Orphan-designated products with at least one marketing approval for a common disease indication (N = 109); orphan-designated products with at least one marketing approval for a rare disease indication (N = 76); and orphan-designated products with marketing approvals for both common and rare disease indications (N = 51). While the data included in the database is a re-configuration/cross-indexing of information already released by the FDA, it offers sponsors a new tool for finding special opportunities to develop niche therapies for rare disease patients.

  12. The role of data audits in detecting scientific misconduct. Results of the FDA program.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M F; Charrow, R P

    1989-05-01

    To evaluate the extent of the problem of scientific misconduct in investigational drug trials, we reviewed data from 1955 routine audits conducted by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from June 1977 to April 1988. Serious deficiencies were detected in 12% of audits prior to October 1985, but in only 7% since that date. At the same time, there was no evidence of a decline over time in the rate of detection of many categories of deficiencies, and some investigators were able to continue to participate in drug trials after flagrant violations of recognized norms of research. The data auditing program should be continued, but additional measures are needed to regulate misconduct. These must be tailored to the variety of causes of misconduct, ranging from negligence to fraud. Possible additional approaches could include certifying the competence of potential investigators; peer-reviewed, competitive application for the opportunity to conduct FDA-authorized clinical trials; limiting an investigator's level of participation in clinical trials; penalizing manufacturers who fail to detect their investigators' misconduct; and permitting the FDA to suspend investigators prior to a hearing. Measures taken should maximize public utility at the least economic cost to society and should be evaluated thoroughly.

  13. Editorial Perspective: How should child psychologists and psychiatrists interpret FDA device approval? Caveat emptor.

    PubMed

    Arns, Martijn; Loo, Sandra K; Sterman, M Barry; Heinrich, Hartmut; Kuntsi, Jonna; Asherson, Philip; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Recently several new tests have received US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) marketing approval as aids in the diagnostic process for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), including the Neuropsychiatric electroencephalogram (EEG)-Based ADHD Assessment Aid (NEBA) Health test. The NEBA test relies upon an EEG-based measure, called the theta to beta ratio (TBR). Although this measure has yielded large differences between ADHD and non-ADHD groups in studies prior to 2009, recent studies and a meta-analysis could not replicate these findings. In this article, we have used the NEBA device as an exemplar for a discussion that distinguishes between FDA de novo marketing approval for a device and any claims that that device is empirically supported, scientifically validated with replicated findings. It is understood that the aims of each differ; however, for many, including the lay public as well as some mental health professionals, these terms may be confused and treated as though they are synonymous. With regard to the TBR measure, there is no reliable association or replication for its clinical usage in the ADHD diagnostic process. The recommendation for potential consumers of the NEBA Health test (as well as perhaps for other existing FDA-approved diagnostic tests) is caveat emptor (let the buyer beware!). PMID:27090383

  14. Heparin crisis 2008: a tipping point for increased FDA enforcement in the pharma sector?

    PubMed

    Rosania, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Against a backdrop of steady deregulation, the pharmaceutical industry is increasingly outsourcing manufacturing, resulting in decentralized control of the global supply chain. Established products such as heparin have been held to outdated analytical standards. Ten million Americans receive heparin every year; Baxter International accounts for half of this market. In 2008, contamination of Baxter's heparin--sourced in China--resulted in about 350 adverse events and 150 deaths in the United States. In future, increasingly stringent FDA inspections and enforcement are expected for imported drugs and ingredients. More regional FDA offices will be set up overseas. FDA funding will likely be supplemented in future by user fees charged to importers. For newer products, companies will face pressure to adopt Quality by Design, with solid control of the global supply chain and a proactive focus on GMP. Older products will be held to modern standards. Long-term, imports of drugs and ingredients from developing markets will continue. This makes sense to companies from an economic standpoint, but protections will be essential to ensure that it is also justifiable from a public health perspective.

  15. Effects of FDA Advisories on the Pharmacologic Treatment of ADHD, 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Rachel; Watson, Sydeaka; Higashi, Ashley S.; Conti, Rena M.; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Garfield, Craig F.; Dorsey, E. Ray; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Alexander, G. Caleb

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the effect of public health advisories issued between 2005 and 2007 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on treatments of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and physician prescribing practices. Methods Data obtained from the IMS Health National Disease and Therapeutic Index, a nationally representative audit of ambulatory physicians, were used to examine trends in office visits by children and adolescents (under age 18) during which ADHD was treated with Adderall, other psychostimulants, or atomoxetine. Segmented time series regressions were conducted to determine changes in use associated with three advisories issued between 2005 and 2007. Results In 2004, before the first FDA advisory, Adderall accounted for 36% of ADHD pharmacotherapy treatment visits. Other stimulants accounted for 46%, and atomoxetine accounted for 19%. Overall pharmacotherapy treatment rates were stable over the study period, but by 2008 the treatment visits accounted for by Adderall (that is, market share) declined to 24%, and the market share for atomoxetine declined to 8%. The market share for substitute therapies—clonidine, guanfacine, and bupropion—was stable over this period, ranging from 5% to 7%. Despite the declines in the use of Adderall and atomoxetine over the study period, results from the regression models suggest that the advisories did not have a statistically significant effect on ADHD medication prescribing. Conclusions FDA advisories regarding potential cardiovascular and other risks of ADHD medications had little discernible incremental effect on the use of these medicines in this nationally representative ambulatory audit. PMID:23318985

  16. Science, law, and politics in the Food and Drug Administration's genetically engineered foods policy: FDA's 1992 policy statement.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, David L

    2005-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) 1992 policy statement was developed in the context of critical gaps in scientific knowledge concerning the compositional effects of genetic transformation and severe limitations in methods for safety testing. FDA acknowledged that pleiotropy and insertional mutagenesis may cause unintended changes, but it was unknown whether this happens to a greater extent in genetic engineering compared with traditional breeding. Moreover, the agency was not able to identify methods by which producers could screen for unintended allergens and toxicants. Despite these uncertainties, FDA granted genetically engineered foods the presumption of GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) and recommended that producers use voluntary consultations before marketing them.

  17. Petitioning the FDA to Improve Pharmaceutical, Device and Public Health Safety by Ordinary Citizens: A Descriptive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y. Tony; Cheng, Xi; Bian, John; Bennett, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The United States Constitution protects the right of citizens to petition the government for “a redress of grievances.” This right has important implications for citizens desiring to advance the public health by petitioning administrative agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration, to take safety actions. We examined a total of 1,915 petitions filed between 2001 and 2013 to investigate the outcomes of citizen petitions that address public health concerns. We found that most petitions were filed by manufacturers against other manufacturers. Only 346 (18%) of all petitions were submitted by individuals and non-profit organizations, and 178 (87.3%) of these petitions with a final response were denied. On average, these petitions required 2.85 years for a final agency decision, and many decisions remain pending 10–13 years after their initial submission. The great majority of the approved requests included some form of risk communication, such as labeling changes, boxed warnings or placement of a drug into a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy. As a policy instrument to improve the safety of medical and food products, the citizen petition process requires sophisticated legal and scientific expertise, and may not represent a viable route for ordinary citizens to petition the FDA to “redress grievances.” PMID:27171162

  18. 21 CFR 884.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section 515 of the act FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such... regulation classifying the device unless the manufacturer has an approval under section 515 of the act... of the act consists of FDA's issuance of an order approving an application for premarket...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... approving a PMA or declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  20. 21 CFR 886.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... approving a PMA or declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... approving a PMA or declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  2. 21 CFR 870.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section 515(b) of the act... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  3. 21 CFR 882.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section 515(b) of the act... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... approving a PMA or declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  5. 21 CFR 880.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section 515 of the act FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such... regulation classifying the device unless the manufacturer has an approval under section 515 of the act... of the act consists of FDA's issuance of an order approving an application for premarket...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... approving a PMA or declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  7. 21 CFR 892.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section 515(b) of the act... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  8. 21 CFR 886.3 - Effective dates of requirement for premarket approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FDA must promulgate a regulation under section 515(b) of the act requiring such approval, except as... approving a PMA or declaring completed a PDP for the device. If FDA promulgates a regulation under section... (premarket approval) shall not be commercially distributed after the date shown in the regulation...

  9. Full Scale Tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

  10. United States FDA's emergency use authorization of Ebola virus diagnostics: current impact and lessons for the future.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Chris A; Bavari, Sina; Perkins, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola outbreak that took hold in West Africa in 2014 outran the epidemic response capacity of many organizations. Five months after the epidemic was first declared, there were still only two laboratories in West Africa with the capacity to confirm Ebola virus infection. In the summer of 2014, before the first case of imported Ebola occurred in the USA, the US FDA announced it would issue Emergency Use Authorizations for Ebola virus in vitro diagnostics to speed their availability. Between October 2014 and March 2015, the FDA issued Emergency Use Authorizations for nine diagnostic products. The actions of the FDA not only allowed nationwide deployment of Ebola virus testing capacity in the USA but also established an attractive regulatory goalpost for companies developing assays for use in West Africa. Here, we comment on the diagnostic assays for which the FDA has issued emergency authorizations and their fitness for purpose. PMID:26394699

  11. Medical device reporting: manufacturer reporting, importer reporting, user facility reporting, and distributor reporting--FDA. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    1998-05-12

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing reporting by manufacturers, importers, distributors, and health care (user) facilities of adverse events related to medical devices. Amendments are being made to implement revisions to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). FDA is publishing these amendments in accordance with its direct final rule procedures. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a companion proposed rule under FDA's usual procedures for notice and comment to provide a procedural framework to finalize the rule in the event the agency receives a significant adverse comment and withdraws this direct final rule.

  12. Radiological health; evaluation of radiation exposure in diagnostic radiology examinations; availability of draft recommendations--FDA. Notice.

    PubMed

    1983-07-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announces the availability for public review and comment of draft recommendations on evaluation of radiation exposure in diagnostic radiology examinations, prepared by FDA's National Center for Devices and Radiological Health (NCDRH). In addition to the draft recommendations, FDA is making available background information, rationale, and NCDRH's response to comments that were received on a notice of inquiry regarding the need for and content of such recommendations. FDA is also encouraging private groups and individuals to join in the research efforts needed to develop further technique/exposure guidance and suggests a number of principles to be followed in these efforts so all interested parties may achieve consistent and useful results. Final recommendations, when developed, will be published as a technical report in NCDRH's radiation recommendation series. PMID:10261489

  13. "Bringing a Butter Knife to a Gun Fight"? Salience, Disclosure, and FDA's Differing Approaches to the Tobacco Use and Obesity Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Weimholt, Josef

    2015-01-01

    One might expect--given the vastly different look, feel, and function of the ubiquitous (and innocuous) Nutrition Facts panel and the "inflammatory" graphic warning labels for cigarettes--that the statutes establishing such disclosure requirements would exhibit similar disparities. In fact, the relevant provisions of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 and the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 are. quite analogous. Like other mandated disclosures, the nutrition label and the cigarette. graphic warnings seek to simultaneously inform and influence consumer decisions. Both statutes grant FDA considerable discretion in.the implementation of the labeling requirements, generally allowing the agency to alter the format and content of the labels as necessary to promote the statutory goals. Thus, the differences in the nutrition and cigarette warning labels are not the product of the statutory schemes alone; rather, they reflect important differences in FDA's interpretation and prioritization of the dual regulatory goals, and in the agency's implicit or explicit assumptions about human behavior.

  14. "Bringing a Butter Knife to a Gun Fight"? Salience, Disclosure, and FDA's Differing Approaches to the Tobacco Use and Obesity Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Weimholt, Josef

    2015-01-01

    One might expect--given the vastly different look, feel, and function of the ubiquitous (and innocuous) Nutrition Facts panel and the "inflammatory" graphic warning labels for cigarettes--that the statutes establishing such disclosure requirements would exhibit similar disparities. In fact, the relevant provisions of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 and the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 are. quite analogous. Like other mandated disclosures, the nutrition label and the cigarette. graphic warnings seek to simultaneously inform and influence consumer decisions. Both statutes grant FDA considerable discretion in.the implementation of the labeling requirements, generally allowing the agency to alter the format and content of the labels as necessary to promote the statutory goals. Thus, the differences in the nutrition and cigarette warning labels are not the product of the statutory schemes alone; rather, they reflect important differences in FDA's interpretation and prioritization of the dual regulatory goals, and in the agency's implicit or explicit assumptions about human behavior. PMID:26827390

  15. Why (not) go east? Comparison of findings from FDA Investigational New Drug study site inspections performed in Central and Eastern Europe with results from the USA, Western Europe, and other parts of the world.

    PubMed

    Caldron, Paul H; Gavrilova, Svetlana I; Kropf, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, investigational sites in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) have been increasingly utilized by pharmaceutical companies because of their high productivity in terms of patient enrolment into clinical trials. Based on the FDA's publicly accessible Clinical Investigator Inspection List, we present an analysis of findings and outcome classifications from FDA inspections during Investigational New Drug (IND) studies and compare the results for the CEE region to those from Western European countries and the USA. Data from all 5531 FDA clinical trials inspections that occurred between 1994 (when the FDA first performed inspections in CEE) and the end of 2010 were entered into the database for comparative analysis. Of these, 4865 routine data audit (DA) inspections were analyzed: 401 from clinical trials performed in Western Europe, 230 in CEE, 3858 in the USA, and 376 in other countries. The average number of deficiencies per inspection ranged between 0.99 for CEE and 1.97 in Western Europe. No deficiencies were noted during 16.6%, 39.0%, and 21.5% of the inspections in Western Europe, CEE and USA, respectively. The percentages of inspections after which no follow-up action was indicated were 36.9% for Western Europe, 55.7% for CEE, and 44.3% for US sites. CEE was also the region with the lowest percentage of inspections that required official or voluntary action. On the basis of FDA inspection data, the high productivity of CEE sites appears to be accompanied by regulatory compliance as well as by data quality standards that are not inferior to those in Western regions. PMID:22563236

  16. US FDA perspective on the regulations of medical-grade polymers: cyanoacrylate polymer medical device tissue adhesives.

    PubMed

    Mattamal, George J

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief description of the uses and clinical applications of medical-grade polymers, in particular synthetic cyanoacrylate adhesive/glue devices that have been cleared and/or approved as medical devices by the US FDA since the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 were enacted. This includes Class I cyanoacrylate devices (e.g., liquid bandages), Class II cyanoacrylate devices (e.g., dental cements), and Class III (premarket approval) cyanoacrylate devices such as Dermabond, Indermil Tissue Adhesive, Histoacryl and Histoacryl Blue Topical Skin Adhesive, and Trufill n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate Embolic Agent. By citing an example of FDA approved Class III devices in the cyanoacrylate technology, the article provides a brief discussion of the FDA approval process of medical devices. It includes the FDA issues regarding the published guidance document for 'Cyanoacrylate Topical Tissue Adhesives' that will provide guidance to regulatory personnel and manufacturers in the preparation of investigational device exception applications and in the development of valid scientific evidence to support premarket approval applications for cyanocrylate tissue adhesives intended for topical approximation of skin and others. The article provides a short regulatory description of the US FDA; under what laws its operates, how the FDA evaluates new devices for marketing, and how the device regulatory system works, for example, Class I, Class II, and Class III cyanoacrylate medical devices.

  17. Similarities and differences in the oncology drug approval process between FDA and European Union with emphasis on in vitro companion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Senderowicz, Adrian M; Pfaff, Otmar

    2014-03-15

    Drug approval [U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or market authorization for the European Union's European Medicines Agency (EMA)] is the most significant regulatory milestone for any drug, as drugs can only be marketed after marketing approval by a health authority. This article focuses on the main regulatory aspects of the drug approval process in the European Union (EU) and the United States. Although the procedures, requirements, and timelines for drug approvals are different between the EU and the United States, several global harmonization efforts have been developed during the past few years to have more consistent regulatory procedures/outcomes in different parts of the world. One of the most different procedures/requirements among these regions is co-development, also known as in vitro companion diagnostic. In the United States, it is expected that for a drug that requires an in vitro diagnostic test to select the population to be treated, the companion diagnostic should be already/concomitantly approved by the FDA. In the EU, these requirements are not as stringent as in the United States. However, it is anticipated that in the very near future, legislation changes in the EU will lead to similar requirements for the companion diagnostics for EMA. In summary, although the principles, procedures, and requirements for drug approvals may differ between the United States and EMA, novel efforts to harmonize them are being considered and implemented, thereby leading to simpler global drug development. It is of outmost importance that drug developers understand and appreciate differences in regional regulations. Otherwise, lack of understanding may lead to rejection or delays in drug approvals for useful anticancer agents. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "The Precision Medicine Conundrum: Approaches to Companion Diagnostic Co-development."

  18. Similarities and differences in the oncology drug approval process between FDA and European Union with emphasis on in vitro companion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Senderowicz, Adrian M; Pfaff, Otmar

    2014-03-15

    Drug approval [U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), or market authorization for the European Union's European Medicines Agency (EMA)] is the most significant regulatory milestone for any drug, as drugs can only be marketed after marketing approval by a health authority. This article focuses on the main regulatory aspects of the drug approval process in the European Union (EU) and the United States. Although the procedures, requirements, and timelines for drug approvals are different between the EU and the United States, several global harmonization efforts have been developed during the past few years to have more consistent regulatory procedures/outcomes in different parts of the world. One of the most different procedures/requirements among these regions is co-development, also known as in vitro companion diagnostic. In the United States, it is expected that for a drug that requires an in vitro diagnostic test to select the population to be treated, the companion diagnostic should be already/concomitantly approved by the FDA. In the EU, these requirements are not as stringent as in the United States. However, it is anticipated that in the very near future, legislation changes in the EU will lead to similar requirements for the companion diagnostics for EMA. In summary, although the principles, procedures, and requirements for drug approvals may differ between the United States and EMA, novel efforts to harmonize them are being considered and implemented, thereby leading to simpler global drug development. It is of outmost importance that drug developers understand and appreciate differences in regional regulations. Otherwise, lack of understanding may lead to rejection or delays in drug approvals for useful anticancer agents. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "The Precision Medicine Conundrum: Approaches to Companion Diagnostic Co-development." PMID:24634467

  19. New Role for FDA-Approved Drugs in Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jourdan A; Fitts, Eric C; Kirtley, Michelle L; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Peniche, Alex G; Dann, Sara M; Motin, Vladimir L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Rosenzweig, Jason A; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance in medically relevant bacterial pathogens, coupled with a paucity of novel antimicrobial discoveries, represents a pressing global crisis. Traditional drug discovery is an inefficient and costly process; however, systematic screening of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapeutics for other indications in humans offers a rapid alternative approach. In this study, we screened a library of 780 FDA-approved drugs to identify molecules that rendered RAW 264.7 murine macrophages resistant to cytotoxicity induced by the highly virulent Yersinia pestis CO92 strain. Of these compounds, we identified 94 not classified as antibiotics as being effective at preventing Y. pestis-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 17 prioritized drugs, based on efficacy in in vitro screens, were chosen for further evaluation in a murine model of pneumonic plague to delineate if in vitro efficacy could be translated in vivo Three drugs, doxapram (DXP), amoxapine (AXPN), and trifluoperazine (TFP), increased animal survivability despite not exhibiting any direct bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect on Y. pestis and having no modulating effect on crucial Y. pestis virulence factors. These findings suggested that DXP, AXPN, and TFP may modulate host cell pathways necessary for disease pathogenesis. Finally, to further assess the broad applicability of drugs identified from in vitro screens, the therapeutic potential of TFP, the most efficacious drug in vivo, was evaluated in murine models of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Clostridium difficile infections. In both models, TFP treatment resulted in increased survivability of infected animals. Taken together, these results demonstrate the broad applicability and potential use of nonantibiotic FDA-approved drugs to combat respiratory and gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. PMID:27067323

  20. Analysis of Transitional and Turbulent Flow Through the FDA Benchmark Nozzle Model Using Laser Doppler Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joshua O; Good, Bryan C; Paterno, Anthony V; Hariharan, Prasanna; Deutsch, Steven; Malinauskas, Richard A; Manning, Keefe B

    2016-09-01

    Transitional and turbulent flow through a simplified medical device model is analyzed as part of the FDA's Critical Path Initiative, designed to improve the process of bringing medical products to market. Computational predictions are often used in the development of devices and reliable in vitro data is needed to validate computational results, particularly estimations of the Reynolds stresses that could play a role in damaging blood elements. The high spatial resolution of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is used to collect two component velocity data within the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Two flow conditions are used to produce flow encompassing laminar, transitional, and turbulent regimes, and viscous stresses, principal Reynolds stresses, and turbulence intensities are calculated from the measured LDV velocities. Axial velocities and viscous stresses are compared to data from a prior inter-laboratory study conducted with particle image velocimetry. Large velocity gradients are observed near the wall in the nozzle throat and in the jet shear layer located in the expansion downstream of the throat, with axial velocity changing as much as 4.5 m/s over 200 μm. Additionally, maximum Reynolds shear stresses of 1000-2000 Pa are calculated in the high shear regions, which are an order of magnitude higher than the peak viscous shear stresses (<100 Pa). It is important to consider the effects of both viscous and turbulent stresses when simulating flow through medical devices. Reynolds stresses above commonly accepted hemolysis thresholds are measured in the nozzle model, indicating that hemolysis may occur under certain flow conditions. As such, the presented turbulence quantities from LDV, which are also available for download at https://fdacfd.nci.nih.gov/ , provide an ideal validation test for computational simulations that seek to characterize the flow field and to predict hemolysis within the FDA nozzle geometry. PMID:27350137

  1. Has the tobacco industry evaded the FDA's ban on ‘Light’ cigarette descriptors?

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Gregory N; Alpert, Hillel R

    2014-01-01

    Background Under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned the use of “Lights” descriptors or similar terms on tobacco products that convey messages of reduced risk. Manufacturers eliminated terms explicitly stated and substituted colour name descriptors corresponding to the banned terms. This paper examines whether the tobacco industry complied with or circumvented the law and potential FDA regulatory actions. Methods Philip Morris retailer manuals, manufacturers' annual reports filed with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, a national public opinion survey, and market-wide cigarette sales data were examined. Results Manufacturers substituted “Gold” for “Light” and “Silver” for “Ultra-light” in the names of Marlboro sub-brands, and “Blue”, “Gold”, and “Silver” for banned descriptors in sub-brand names. Percent filter ventilation levels, used to generate the smoke yield ranges associated with “Lights” categories, appear to have been reassigned to the new colour brand name descriptors. Following the ban, 92% of smokers reported they could easily identify their usual brands, and 68% correctly named the package colour associated with their usual brand, while sales for “Lights” cigarettes remained unchanged. Conclusions Tobacco manufacturers appear to have evaded a critical element of the FSPTCA, the ban on misleading descriptors that convey reduced health risk messages. The FPSTCA provides regulatory mechanisms, including banning these products as adulterated (Section 902). Manufacturers could then apply for pre-market approval as new products and produce evidence for FDA evaluation and determination whether or not sales of these products are in the public health interest. PMID:23485704

  2. Analysis of Transitional and Turbulent Flow Through the FDA Benchmark Nozzle Model Using Laser Doppler Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joshua O; Good, Bryan C; Paterno, Anthony V; Hariharan, Prasanna; Deutsch, Steven; Malinauskas, Richard A; Manning, Keefe B

    2016-09-01

    Transitional and turbulent flow through a simplified medical device model is analyzed as part of the FDA's Critical Path Initiative, designed to improve the process of bringing medical products to market. Computational predictions are often used in the development of devices and reliable in vitro data is needed to validate computational results, particularly estimations of the Reynolds stresses that could play a role in damaging blood elements. The high spatial resolution of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is used to collect two component velocity data within the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Two flow conditions are used to produce flow encompassing laminar, transitional, and turbulent regimes, and viscous stresses, principal Reynolds stresses, and turbulence intensities are calculated from the measured LDV velocities. Axial velocities and viscous stresses are compared to data from a prior inter-laboratory study conducted with particle image velocimetry. Large velocity gradients are observed near the wall in the nozzle throat and in the jet shear layer located in the expansion downstream of the throat, with axial velocity changing as much as 4.5 m/s over 200 μm. Additionally, maximum Reynolds shear stresses of 1000-2000 Pa are calculated in the high shear regions, which are an order of magnitude higher than the peak viscous shear stresses (<100 Pa). It is important to consider the effects of both viscous and turbulent stresses when simulating flow through medical devices. Reynolds stresses above commonly accepted hemolysis thresholds are measured in the nozzle model, indicating that hemolysis may occur under certain flow conditions. As such, the presented turbulence quantities from LDV, which are also available for download at https://fdacfd.nci.nih.gov/ , provide an ideal validation test for computational simulations that seek to characterize the flow field and to predict hemolysis within the FDA nozzle geometry.

  3. FDA Approves Immunotherapy for a Cancer that Affects Infants and Children | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved dinutuximab (ch14.18) as an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that offers poor prognosis for about half of the children who are affected. The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Biopharmaceutical Development Program (BDP) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research produced ch14.18 for the NCI-sponsored clinical trials that proved the drug’s effectiveness against the disease.

  4. Assessing the Impact of HL7/FDA Structured Product Label (SPL) Content for Medication Knowledge Management

    PubMed Central

    Schadow, Gunther

    2007-01-01

    The amount and quality of the SPL drug knowledge which has been released so far is assessed. All published labels were loaded into a relational database and classified to create vendor-independent descriptions. While SPL labels cover only 23% of RxNorm clinical drugs, they still describe 78% of actual community pharmacy dispenses records. SPL descriptions agree well with RxNorm. SPL can be used as the primary source of drug information for e-prescribing systems once the upcoming FDA listing rule takes effect. In the interim, existing gaps can be temporarily closed with RxNorm or other sources. PMID:18693916

  5. Statistical innovations in the medical device world sparked by the FDA.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gregory; Yue, Lilly Q

    2016-01-01

    The world of medical devices while highly diverse is extremely innovative, and this facilitates the adoption of innovative statistical techniques. Statisticians in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have provided leadership in implementing statistical innovations. The innovations discussed include: the incorporation of Bayesian methods in clinical trials, adaptive designs, the use and development of propensity score methodology in the design and analysis of non-randomized observational studies, the use of tipping-point analysis for missing data, techniques for diagnostic test evaluation, bridging studies for companion diagnostic tests, quantitative benefit-risk decisions, and patient preference studies. PMID:26372890

  6. Quality assurance in nuclear medicine facilities; availability of final recommendations--FDA. Notice.

    PubMed

    1985-05-13

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of final recommendations prepared by its Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) on quality assurance programs in nuclear medicine facilities. The final recommendations include the agency's rationale for the recommendations as well as references that can be used as well as references that can be used as guides in conducting quality control monitoring. These final recommendations are available as a technical report in CDRH's radiation recommendations series. They are intended to encourage and promote the development of voluntary quality assurance programs in nuclear medicine facilities. PMID:10271280

  7. Postmarketing safety reports for human drug and biological products; electronic submission requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending its postmarketing safety reporting regulations for human drug and biological products to require that persons subject to mandatory reporting requirements submit safety reports in an electronic format that FDA can process, review, and archive. FDA is taking this action to improve the Agency's systems for collecting and analyzing postmarketing safety reports. The change will help the Agency to more rapidly review postmarketing safety reports, identify emerging safety problems, and disseminate safety information in support of FDA's public health mission. In addition, the amendments will be a key element in harmonizing FDA's postmarketing safety reporting regulations with international standards for the electronic submission of safety information.

  8. Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Shiga-like toxin 1 is required for full pathogenicity and activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chou, T-C; Chiu, H-C; Kuo, C-J; Wu, C-M; Syu, W-J; Chiu, W-T; Chen, C-S

    2013-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) causes life-threatening infections in humans as a consequence of the production of Shiga-like toxins. Lack of a good animal model system currently hinders in vivo study of EHEC virulence by systematic genetic methods. Here we applied the genetically tractable animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, as a surrogate host to study the virulence of EHEC as well as the host immunity to this human pathogen. Our results show that E. coli O157:H7, a serotype of EHEC, infects and kills C. elegans. Bacterial colonization and induction of the characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions in the intact intestinal epithelium of C. elegans by E. coli O157:H7 were concomitantly demonstrated in vivo. Genetic analysis indicated that the Shiga-like toxin 1 (Stx1) of E. coli O157:H7 is a virulence factor in C. elegans and is required for full toxicity. Moreover, the C. elegans p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, an evolutionarily conserved innate immune and stress response signalling pathway, is activated in the regulation of host susceptibility to EHEC infection in a Stx1-dependent manner. Our results validate the EHEC-C. elegans interaction as suitable for future comprehensive genetic screens for both novel bacterial and host factors involved in the pathogenesis of EHEC infection.

  9. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  10. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  11. Larval zebrafish model for FDA-approved drug repositioning for tobacco dependence treatment.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Margot A; Ebbert, Jon O; Wiinamaki, Amanda R; Urban, Mark D; Argue, David P; Ekker, Stephen C; Klee, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking remains the most preventable cause of death and excess health care costs in the United States, and is a leading cause of death among alcoholics. Long-term tobacco abstinence rates are low, and pharmacotherapeutic options are limited. Repositioning medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may efficiently provide clinicians with new treatment options. We developed a drug-repositioning paradigm using larval zebrafish locomotion and established predictive clinical validity using FDA-approved smoking cessation therapeutics. We evaluated 39 physician-vetted medications for nicotine-induced locomotor activation blockade. We further evaluated candidate medications for altered ethanol response, as well as in combination with varenicline for nicotine-response attenuation. Six medications specifically inhibited the nicotine response. Among this set, apomorphine and topiramate blocked both nicotine and ethanol responses. Both positively interact with varenicline in the Bliss Independence test, indicating potential synergistic interactions suggesting these are candidates for translation into Phase II clinical trials for smoking cessation.

  12. Large eddy simulation of the FDA benchmark nozzle for a Reynolds number of 6500.

    PubMed

    Janiga, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    This work investigates the flow in a benchmark nozzle model of an idealized medical device proposed by the FDA using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It was in particular shown that a proper modeling of the transitional flow features is particularly challenging, leading to large discrepancies and inaccurate predictions from the different research groups using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling. In spite of the relatively simple, axisymmetric computational geometry, the resulting turbulent flow is fairly complex and non-axisymmetric, in particular due to the sudden expansion. The resulting flow cannot be well predicted with simple modeling approaches. Due to the varying diameters and flow velocities encountered in the nozzle, different typical flow regions and regimes can be distinguished, from laminar to transitional and to weakly turbulent. The purpose of the present work is to re-examine the FDA-CFD benchmark nozzle model at a Reynolds number of 6500 using large eddy simulation (LES). The LES results are compared with published experimental data obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and an excellent agreement can be observed considering the temporally averaged flow velocities. Different flow regimes are characterized by computing the temporal energy spectra at different locations along the main axis.

  13. FDA cigarette warning labels lower craving and elicit frontoinsular activation in adolescent smokers

    PubMed Central

    Do, Kathy T.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is an economically and epidemiologically expensive public health concern. Most adult smokers become addicted during adolescence, rendering it a crucial period for prevention and intervention. Although litigation claims have delayed implementation, graphic warning labels proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may be a promising way to achieve this goal. We aimed to determine the efficacy of the labels in reducing in-scanner craving and to characterize the neurobiological responses in adolescent and adult smokers and non-smokers. While undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging, thirty-nine 13- to 18-year-old adolescent and forty-one 25- to 30-year-old adult smokers and non-smokers rated their desire to smoke when presented with emotionally graphic warning labels and comparison non-graphic labels. Compared with adult smokers, adolescent smokers exhibited greater craving reduction in response to the warning labels. Although smokers evinced overall blunted recruitment of insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) relative to non-smokers, an effect that was stronger in adolescent smokers, parametrically increasing activation of these regions was associated with greater craving reduction. Functional connectivity analyses suggest that greater DLPFC regulation of limbic regions predicted cigarette craving. These data underscore a prominent role of frontoinsular circuitry in predicting the efficacy of FDA graphic warning labels in craving reduction in adult and adolescent smokers. PMID:25887154

  14. Benefit-risk paradigm for clinical trial design of obesity devices: FDA proposal.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Herbert; Whang, Joyce; Nipper, Rebecca

    2013-03-01

    Diet and exercise, except in controlled circumstances, have not been shown to provide effective and prolonged weight loss for the majority of those who are obese. Several older drugs intended to reduce weight have been withdrawn from the market, and the new drugs show only modest weight loss. Surgical intervention, specifically procedures that alter the normal gastrointestinal anatomy, does provide prolonged periods of sustained weight loss, with rebound weight gain over time. A variety of medical devices to assist in weight reduction have been studied, but only two are legally marketed devices for obesity. The authors propose a new paradigm for devices intended to treat obesity, based on a benefit-risk determination, with the hope to provide sponsors an a priori tool for systematic assessment of the risks associated with the devices intended for treatment of obesity and to suggest appropriate levels of benefit for devices with different risk levels. The paradigm is not intended to determine the class of a device from a regulatory perspective. This approach was conceived at a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) co-sponsored workshop in October, 2011 and formally presented to an FDA advisory panel for discussion in May 2012.

  15. FDA cigarette warning labels lower craving and elicit frontoinsular activation in adolescent smokers.

    PubMed

    Do, Kathy T; Galván, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    Cigarette smoking is an economically and epidemiologically expensive public health concern. Most adult smokers become addicted during adolescence, rendering it a crucial period for prevention and intervention. Although litigation claims have delayed implementation, graphic warning labels proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may be a promising way to achieve this goal. We aimed to determine the efficacy of the labels in reducing in-scanner craving and to characterize the neurobiological responses in adolescent and adult smokers and non-smokers. While undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging, thirty-nine 13- to 18-year-old adolescent and forty-one 25- to 30-year-old adult smokers and non-smokers rated their desire to smoke when presented with emotionally graphic warning labels and comparison non-graphic labels. Compared with adult smokers, adolescent smokers exhibited greater craving reduction in response to the warning labels. Although smokers evinced overall blunted recruitment of insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) relative to non-smokers, an effect that was stronger in adolescent smokers, parametrically increasing activation of these regions was associated with greater craving reduction. Functional connectivity analyses suggest that greater DLPFC regulation of limbic regions predicted cigarette craving. These data underscore a prominent role of frontoinsular circuitry in predicting the efficacy of FDA graphic warning labels in craving reduction in adult and adolescent smokers.

  16. FDA cigarette warning labels lower craving and elicit frontoinsular activation in adolescent smokers.

    PubMed

    Do, Kathy T; Galván, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    Cigarette smoking is an economically and epidemiologically expensive public health concern. Most adult smokers become addicted during adolescence, rendering it a crucial period for prevention and intervention. Although litigation claims have delayed implementation, graphic warning labels proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may be a promising way to achieve this goal. We aimed to determine the efficacy of the labels in reducing in-scanner craving and to characterize the neurobiological responses in adolescent and adult smokers and non-smokers. While undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging, thirty-nine 13- to 18-year-old adolescent and forty-one 25- to 30-year-old adult smokers and non-smokers rated their desire to smoke when presented with emotionally graphic warning labels and comparison non-graphic labels. Compared with adult smokers, adolescent smokers exhibited greater craving reduction in response to the warning labels. Although smokers evinced overall blunted recruitment of insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) relative to non-smokers, an effect that was stronger in adolescent smokers, parametrically increasing activation of these regions was associated with greater craving reduction. Functional connectivity analyses suggest that greater DLPFC regulation of limbic regions predicted cigarette craving. These data underscore a prominent role of frontoinsular circuitry in predicting the efficacy of FDA graphic warning labels in craving reduction in adult and adolescent smokers. PMID:25887154

  17. Recent drug approvals from the US FDA and EMEA: what the future holds.

    PubMed

    Pevarello, Paolo

    2009-04-01

    The decreased productivity of the pharmaceutical industry in terms of new medical entities approved by the US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) on a yearly basis has long been debated. This review will analyze overall new drug applications (NDAs) approved by both the FDA and EMEA in 2007, with the aim of finding trends (also looking at the past) that can be used to predict what the future may be. After a general introduction to the regulatory terminology, NDA approvals in 2007 are divided into categories (new applications of old medicines, metabolites, enantiomers and prodrugs, biological products, natural products and small organic molecule new molecular entities) and discussed. General aspects of the NDA approvals, such as historical trends, the length of the drug-discovery process, geography, differences among therapeutic areas, and the relative role of biotech and pharma industries are also outlined. From this analysis, a perspective is gained on some aspects that will probably influence future drug approvals. The conclusion is that 2007 may represent an inflexion point, in terms of quality if not quantity of new approvals, and that the future may be brighter than previously forecast.

  18. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Pickar, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. Methods: US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Results: Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. Conclusions: The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk. PMID:26418479

  19. Cytoplasmic anchoring of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) is required for meiotic arrest of porcine full-grown and growing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takanori; Fujii, Wataru; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian growing oocytes (GOs) lack the ability to resume meiosis, although the molecular mechanism of this limitation is not fully understood. We previously hypothesized that the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs was attributed to complex spatial-temporal regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs), but found that AKAP1 is not involved in the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs. In the present study, we cloned porcine cDNAs of AKAP5 and AKAP7alpha, and found that inhibiting the expression of these AKAPs induced PKA translocation into the nucleus and promoted meiotic resumption of porcine GOs without affecting the total PKA activity of GOs, whereas overexpressing these AKAPs had no effect. Because AKAPs regulate PKA localization through binding with regulatory subunits of PKA (PKA-Rs), PKA-R binding with AKAPs was inhibited by AKAP-binding inhibition peptides or PKA-R expression inhibition by antisense RNAs. We found that the expression inhibition and binding inhibition of PRKAR1A, an isoform of mammalian PKA-R, promoted meiotic resumption of porcine GOs, whereas these inhibitions of PRKAR2A, another PKA-R isoform, had no effect. In contrast, the expression inhibition and binding inhibition of PRKAR2A had higher effects than those of PRKAR1A on meiotic resumption of porcine full-grown oocytes. These results suggest that cytoplasmic anchoring of PKA by AKAPs is required for meiotic arrest of oocytes and that the PKA-R isoform working for the maintenance of meiotic arrest changed from PRKAR1A to PRKAR2A during the acquisition of meiotic competence. PMID:24501172

  20. A novel sterol regulatory element-binding protein gene (sreA) identified in penicillium digitatum is required for prochloraz resistance, full virulence and erg11 (cyp51) regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Yongze; Wu, Zhi; Li, Na; Chen, Yuanlei; Qin, Tingting; Geng, Hui; Xiong, Li; Liu, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved domain of unknown function (DUF2014) at its carboxyl terminus and a helix-loop-helix (HLH) leucine zipper DNA binding domain at its amino terminus, domains that are functionally associated with SREBP transcription factors. The deletion of sreA (ΔsreA) in a prochloraz-resistant strain (PdHS-F6) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation led to increased susceptibility to prochloraz and a significantly lower EC50 value compared with the HS-F6 wild-type or complementation strain (COsreA). A virulence assay showed that the ΔsreA strain was defective in virulence towards citrus fruits, while the complementation of sreA could restore the virulence to a large extent. Further analysis by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that prochloraz-induced expression of cyp51A and cyp51B in PdHS-F6 was completely abolished in the ΔsreA strain. These results demonstrate that sreA is a critical transcription factor gene required for prochloraz resistance and full virulence in P. digitatum and is involved in the regulation of cyp51 expression.

  1. America, you are digging your grave with your spoon--should the FDA tell you that on food labels?

    PubMed

    Card, Melissa M

    2013-01-01

    R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. v. Food & Drug Admin. discussed whether the FDA's promulgation of graphic images violated tobacco companies' First Amendment rights. While the tobacco companies contested the graphic images, the tobacco companies did not contest the promulgation of nine textual statements about the adverse effects of cigarettes. This uncontested mandate opens a door for the FDA to further expand its regulatory scheme. If the FDA can mandate textual statements about the adverse effects of cigarettes, can the FDA mandate textual statements about the adverse effects of sugar to combat the obesity crisis? This Article presents three textual statements about the adverse effects of sugar, to define the line between acceptable and unacceptable forms of compelled commercial speech under Central Hudson. Establishing this line ensures that the commercial speech doctrine does not deny the FDA from its authority to provide consumers with accurate information. While three textual statements are presented, this Article advocates that one of the textual statements is likely to serve as the best solution to the obesity crisis. The chosen textual statement serves as an effective solution because it presents meaningful information to the consumers enabling consumers to make healthful decisions about their food and encourages manufacturers to modify their products. PMID:24640612

  2. Trends in utilization of FDA expedited drug development and approval programs, 1987-2014: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Franklin, Jessica M; Darrow, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of special expedited development and review pathways at the US Food and Drug Administration over the past two decades. Design Cohort study. Setting FDA approved novel therapeutics between 1987 and 2014. Population Publicly available sources provided each drug’s year of approval, their innovativeness (first in class versus not first in class), World Health Organization Anatomic Therapeutic Classification, and which (if any) of the FDA’s four primary expedited development and review programs or designations were associated with each drug: orphan drug, fast track, accelerated approval, and priority review. Main outcome measures Logistic regression models evaluated trends in the proportion of drugs associated with each of the four expedited development and review programs. To evaluate the number of programs associated with each approved drug over time, Poisson models were employed, with the number of programs as the dependent variable and a linear term for year of approval. The difference in trends was compared between drugs that were first in class and those that were not. Results The FDA approved 774 drugs during the study period, with one third representing first in class agents. Priority review (43%) was the most prevalent of the four programs, with accelerated approval (9%) the least common. There was a significant increase of 2.6% per year in the number of expedited review and approval programs granted to each newly approved agent (incidence rate ratio 1.026, 95% confidence interval 1.017 to 1.035, P<0.001), and a 2.4% increase in the proportion of drugs associated with at least one such program (odds ratio 1.024, 95% confidence interval 1.006 to 1.043, P=0.009). Driving this trend was an increase in the proportion of approved, non-first in class drugs associated with at least one program for drugs (P=0.03 for interaction). Conclusions In the past two decades, drugs newly approved by the FDA have been associated with an

  3. Can the FDA improve oversight of foreign clinical trials?: Closing the information gap and moving towards a globalized regulatory scheme.

    PubMed

    Ourso, André

    2012-01-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical companies' utilization of foreign clinical trial data is a ubiquitous and indispensable aspect of gaining approval to market drugs in the United States. Cost benefits, a larger pool of ready volunteer subjects, and greater efficiency in clinical testing are some of the reasons for conducting clinical trials overseas. Despite these advantages, lack of proper oversight may have serious public health implications regarding the integrity of clinical research, ethical treatment of human subjects, and drug safety. Due to the expansive global nature of foreign clinical trials, there are concerns with the FDA's ability to monitor and regulate these trials. This article examines the FDA's oversight of foreign clinical trials and the agency's limitations regulating these trials. In addition to looking at steps the FDA is taking to address these limitations, the article examines other potential regulatory and cooperative actions that can be taken to effectively monitor foreign clinical trials and to ensure data integrity and patient safety. PMID:22606923

  4. Can the FDA improve oversight of foreign clinical trials?: Closing the information gap and moving towards a globalized regulatory scheme.

    PubMed

    Ourso, André

    2012-01-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical companies' utilization of foreign clinical trial data is a ubiquitous and indispensable aspect of gaining approval to market drugs in the United States. Cost benefits, a larger pool of ready volunteer subjects, and greater efficiency in clinical testing are some of the reasons for conducting clinical trials overseas. Despite these advantages, lack of proper oversight may have serious public health implications regarding the integrity of clinical research, ethical treatment of human subjects, and drug safety. Due to the expansive global nature of foreign clinical trials, there are concerns with the FDA's ability to monitor and regulate these trials. This article examines the FDA's oversight of foreign clinical trials and the agency's limitations regulating these trials. In addition to looking at steps the FDA is taking to address these limitations, the article examines other potential regulatory and cooperative actions that can be taken to effectively monitor foreign clinical trials and to ensure data integrity and patient safety.

  5. FDA approval of expanded age indication for a tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine.

    PubMed

    2011-09-23

    On July 8, 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved an expanded age indication for the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) Boostrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium). Originally, Boostrix was licensed in 2005 for persons aged 10 through 18 years, but in 2008, FDA approved an expanded age indication for Boostrix to include persons aged 19 through 64 years. FDA has now expanded the age indication to include persons aged 65 years and older. Boostrix is now licensed for use in persons aged 10 years and older as a single-dose booster vaccination. This notice summarizes the indications for use of Boostrix. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for Tdap vaccines have been published previously. Publication of revised Tdap recommendations within the next year is anticipated.

  6. An overview of FDA-approved new molecular entities: 1827-2013.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Haynesworth, Austin; Kinch, Sarah L; Hoyer, Denton

    2014-08-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is undergoing fundamental change and its future is unclear. We performed a meta-analysis by cataloging FDA-approved legacy drugs and new molecular entities (NMEs). Objective information regarding scientific, medical and commercial activities was captured and provides insight into processes governing drug development. In this report, we review the rates of NME introduction through to the end of 2013. Recent trends show the emergence of a handful of companies that controls two-thirds of NMEs. We also report growth in the number of NMEs controlled by marketing organizations that have little or no internal drug discovery or development activities. This trend has increased dramatically since 2000 and could raise important questions about the future landscape and viability of drug discovery and development. PMID:24680947

  7. A Screen of FDA-Approved Drugs for Inhibitors of Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Nicholas J; Campos, Rafael K; Powell, Steven T; Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Schott-Lerner, Geraldine; Soto-Acosta, Ruben; Galarza-Muñoz, Gaddiel; McGrath, Erica L; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Gao, Junling; Wu, Ping; Menon, Ramkumar; Saade, George; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Rossi, Shannan L; Vasilakis, Nikos; Routh, Andrew; Bradrick, Shelton S; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2016-08-10

    Currently there are no approved vaccines or specific therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. We interrogated a library of FDA-approved drugs for their ability to block infection of human HuH-7 cells by a newly isolated ZIKV strain (ZIKV MEX_I_7). More than 20 out of 774 tested compounds decreased ZIKV infection in our in vitro screening assay. Selected compounds were further validated for inhibition of ZIKV infection in human cervical, placental, and neural stem cell lines, as well as primary human amnion cells. Established anti-flaviviral drugs (e.g., bortezomib and mycophenolic acid) and others that had no previously known antiviral activity (e.g., daptomycin) were identified as inhibitors of ZIKV infection. Several drugs reduced ZIKV infection across multiple cell types. This study identifies drugs that could be tested in clinical studies of ZIKV infection and provides a resource of small molecules to study ZIKV pathogenesis.

  8. Real-time imaging of electrical signals with an infrared FDA-approved dye.

    PubMed

    Treger, Jeremy S; Priest, Michael F; Iezzi, Raymond; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2014-09-16

    Clinical methods used to assess the electrical activity of excitable cells are often limited by their poor spatial resolution or their invasiveness. One promising solution to this problem is to optically measure membrane potential using a voltage-sensitive dye, but thus far, none of these dyes have been available for human use. Here we report that indocyanine green (ICG), an infrared fluorescent dye with FDA approval as an intravenously administered contrast agent, is voltage-sensitive. The fluorescence of ICG can follow action potentials in artificial neurons and cultured rat neurons and cardiomyocytes. ICG also visualized electrical activity induced in living explants of rat brain. In humans, ICG labels excitable cells and is routinely visualized transdermally with high spatial resolution. As an infrared voltage-sensitive dye with a low toxicity profile that can be readily imaged in deep tissues, ICG may have significant utility for clinical and basic research applications previously intractable for potentiometric dyes. PMID:25229155

  9. Catalyzing the Critical Path Initiative: FDA's progress in drug development activities.

    PubMed

    Parekh, A; Buckman-Garner, S; McCune, S; ONeill, R; Geanacopoulos, M; Amur, S; Clingman, C; Barratt, R; Rocca, M; Hills, I; Woodcock, J

    2015-03-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has directed considerable effort towards modernizing its regulatory processes over the past decade to address the challenges in the drug development sector. Through partnerships and input from stakeholders, multiple initiatives are under way, many projects have been launched, several have resulted in tangible results, and many are ongoing and under discussion. We are learning that collaborative efforts can better inform and leverage existing knowledge, that the challenges of data sharing and intellectual property can be overcome, and that there is wide interest in partnering to address key public health regulatory science issues. It is crucial that we continue to build on these initial efforts to facilitate drug development.

  10. Alirocumab for hyperlipidemia: ODYSSEY Phase III clinical trial results and US FDA approval indications.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eli M

    2016-03-01

    A new class of lipid-lowering drugs, inhibitors of PCSK9 has been generating impressive clinical trial data over the last several years, and alirocumab (Praluent) has become the first to be approved by the US FDA. Alirocumab has been shown to lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 45-62% with a safety profile generally comparable to placebo. Alirocumab is a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9 administered subcutaneously and has been evaluated in 16 Phase III clinical trials, the majority of which have been enrolled or completed. This article will be a review of the available Phase III safety and efficacy data of the ODYSSEY studies including a brief description of each of the 16 studies. PMID:26785741

  11. Catalyzing the Critical Path Initiative: FDA's progress in drug development activities.

    PubMed

    Parekh, A; Buckman-Garner, S; McCune, S; ONeill, R; Geanacopoulos, M; Amur, S; Clingman, C; Barratt, R; Rocca, M; Hills, I; Woodcock, J

    2015-03-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has directed considerable effort towards modernizing its regulatory processes over the past decade to address the challenges in the drug development sector. Through partnerships and input from stakeholders, multiple initiatives are under way, many projects have been launched, several have resulted in tangible results, and many are ongoing and under discussion. We are learning that collaborative efforts can better inform and leverage existing knowledge, that the challenges of data sharing and intellectual property can be overcome, and that there is wide interest in partnering to address key public health regulatory science issues. It is crucial that we continue to build on these initial efforts to facilitate drug development. PMID:25670629

  12. FDA preemption of drug and device labeling: who should decide what goes on a drug label?

    PubMed

    Valoir, Tamsen; Ghosh, Shubha

    2011-01-01

    The Supreme Court decided an issue that is critical to consumer health and safety last year. In April 2009, the Supreme Court held that extensive FDA regulation of drugs did not preempt a state law claim that an additional warning on the label was necessary to make the drug reasonably safe for use. Thus, states--and even courts and juries--are now free to cast their vote on what a drug label should say. This is in direct contrast to medical devices, where the federal statute regulating medical devices expressly provides that state regulations are preempted. This Article discusses basic preemption principles and drugs, and explores the policy ramifications of pro- and anti-preemption policy in the healthcare industry.

  13. Real-Time Imaging of Electrical Signals with an Infrared FDA-Approved Dye

    PubMed Central

    Treger, Jeremy S.; Priest, Michael F.; Iezzi, Raymond; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Clinical methods used to assess the electrical activity of excitable cells are often limited by their poor spatial resolution or their invasiveness. One promising solution to this problem is to optically measure membrane potential using a voltage-sensitive dye, but thus far, none of these dyes have been available for human use. Here we report that indocyanine green (ICG), an infrared fluorescent dye with FDA approval as an intravenously administered contrast agent, is voltage-sensitive. The fluorescence of ICG can follow action potentials in artificial neurons and cultured rat neurons and cardiomyocytes. ICG also visualized electrical activity induced in living explants of rat brain. In humans, ICG labels excitable cells and is routinely visualized transdermally with high spatial resolution. As an infrared voltage-sensitive dye with a low toxicity profile that can be readily imaged in deep tissues, ICG may have significant utility for clinical and basic research applications previously intractable for potentiometric dyes. PMID:25229155

  14. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for infectious disease: antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Patridge, Eric; Plummer, Mark; Hoyer, Denton

    2014-09-01

    Drugs targeting infectious diseases have greatly improved public health. A study to evaluate all US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved new molecular entities (NMEs) reveals that the number of new agents targeting infectious disease peaked during the 1990s and declined rapidly thereafter. Molecules targeting bacterial pathogens represent the most common component of anti-infectives followed by antivirals and antifungals. Focusing on antibacterial agents, an increase in new NMEs predominated from the 1960s through to the 1990s, dropping sharply thereafter. Obsolescence and resistance has eliminated one-third of these drugs. Consequently, the arsenal of antibiotics peaked in 2000 and is declining. Likewise, the number of organizations awarded at least one NME for a bacterial indication has declined to a level not seen in more than a half century. PMID:25043770

  15. FDA's nozzle numerical simulation challenge: non-Newtonian fluid effects and blood damage.

    PubMed

    Trias, Miquel; Arbona, Antonio; Massó, Joan; Miñano, Borja; Bona, Carles

    2014-01-01

    Data from FDA's nozzle challenge-a study to assess the suitability of simulating fluid flow in an idealized medical device-is used to validate the simulations obtained from a numerical, finite-differences code. Various physiological indicators are computed and compared with experimental data from three different laboratories, getting a very good agreement. Special care is taken with the derivation of blood damage (hemolysis). The paper is focused on the laminar regime, in order to investigate non-Newtonian effects (non-constant fluid viscosity). The code can deal with these effects with just a small extra computational cost, improving Newtonian estimations up to a ten percent. The relevance of non-Newtonian effects for hemolysis parameters is discussed. PMID:24667931

  16. A Screen of FDA-Approved Drugs for Inhibitors of Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Nicholas J; Campos, Rafael K; Powell, Steven T; Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Schott-Lerner, Geraldine; Soto-Acosta, Ruben; Galarza-Muñoz, Gaddiel; McGrath, Erica L; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Gao, Junling; Wu, Ping; Menon, Ramkumar; Saade, George; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Rossi, Shannan L; Vasilakis, Nikos; Routh, Andrew; Bradrick, Shelton S; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2016-08-10

    Currently there are no approved vaccines or specific therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. We interrogated a library of FDA-approved drugs for their ability to block infection of human HuH-7 cells by a newly isolated ZIKV strain (ZIKV MEX_I_7). More than 20 out of 774 tested compounds decreased ZIKV infection in our in vitro screening assay. Selected compounds were further validated for inhibition of ZIKV infection in human cervical, placental, and neural stem cell lines, as well as primary human amnion cells. Established anti-flaviviral drugs (e.g., bortezomib and mycophenolic acid) and others that had no previously known antiviral activity (e.g., daptomycin) were identified as inhibitors of ZIKV infection. Several drugs reduced ZIKV infection across multiple cell types. This study identifies drugs that could be tested in clinical studies of ZIKV infection and provides a resource of small molecules to study ZIKV pathogenesis. PMID:27476412

  17. An analysis of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: protection for consumers and boon for business.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Debra M

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes components of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act, which was prompted by incidents of food contamination, exploring the history of its passage and explaining its significance, as well as its limitations. As the first time in 70 years that food law has been changed substantially, this new law represents only an initial but significant step in the direction of improving food safety. With bipartisan support from both Congress and the President, this legislation embodies a mandate that food safety is at this moment becoming a priority. As a result, the time is ripe for a reassessment of other areas of food laws--particularly genetically modified foods and the use of milk and meat from cloned animals and their progeny--which are allowed under current U.S. law with no labeling, preapprovals, or post-market monitoring. These areas warrant special regulation consistent with the new proactive policy towards securing the safety of the food supply.

  18. Paraxial Full-Field Cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joseph; Howell, John

    2015-05-01

    Broadband, omnidirectional invisibility cloaking has been a goal of scientists since coordinate transformations were suggested for cloaking. The requirements for realizing such a cloak can be simplified by considering only the paraxial (`small-angle') regime. We recap the experimental demonstration of paraxial ray optics cloaking and theoretically complete its formalism, by extending it to the full-field of light. We then show how to build a full-field paraxial cloaking system.

  19. The FDA guidance for industry on PROs: the point of view of a pharmaceutical company.

    PubMed

    Arpinelli, Fabio; Bamfi, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    The importance of the patients point of view on their health status is widely recognised. Patient-reported outcomes is a broad term encompassing a large variety of different health data reported by patients, as symptoms, functional status, Quality of Life and Health-Related Quality of Life. Measurements of Health-Related Quality of Life have been developed during many years of researches, and a lot of validated questionnaires exist. However, few attempts have been made to standardise the evaluation of instruments characteristics, no recommendations are made about interpretation on Health-Related Quality of Life results, especially regarding the clinical significance of a change leading a therapeutic approach. Moreover, the true value of Health-Related Quality of Life evaluations in clinical trials has not yet been completely defined. An important step towards a more structured and frequent use of Patient-Reported Outcomes in drug development is represented by the FDA Guidance, issued on February 2006. In our paper we aim to report some considerations on this Guidance. Our comments focus especially on the characteristics of instruments to use, the Minimal Important Difference, and the methods to calculate it. Furthermore, we present the advantages and opportunities of using the Patient-Reported Outcomes in drug development, as seen by a pharmaceutical company. The Patient-Reported Outcomes can provide additional data to make a drug more competitive than others of the same pharmacological class, and a well demonstrated positive impact on the patient' health status and daily life might allow a higher price and/or the inclusion in a reimbursement list. Applying extensively the FDA Guidance in the next trials could lead to a wider culture of subjective measurement, and to a greater consideration for the patient's opinions on his/her care. Moreover, prescribing doctors and payers could benefit from subjective information to better define the value of drugs. PMID:17076891

  20. AAPS and US FDA Crystal City VI workshop on bioanalytical method validation for biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lowes, Steve; Ackermann, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Crystal City VI Workshop on Bioanalytical Method Validation of Biomarkers, Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel, Baltimore, MD, USA, 28-29 September 2015 The Crystal City VI workshop was organized by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists in association with the US FDA to continue discussion on the bioanalysis of biomarkers. An outcome of the Crystal City V workshop, convened following release of the draft FDA Guidance for Industry on Bioanalytical Methods Validation in 2013 was the need to have further discussion on biomarker methods. Biomarkers ultimately became the sole focal point for Crystal City VI, a meeting attended by approximately 200 people and composed of industry scientists and regulators from around the world. The meeting format included several panel discussions to maximize the opportunity for dialogue among participants. Following an initial session on the general topic of biomarker assays and intended use, more focused sessions were held on chromatographic (LC-MS) and ligand-binding assays. In addition to participation by the drug development community, significant representation was present from clinical testing laboratories. The experience of this latter group, collectively identified as practitioners of CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments), helped shape the discussion and takeaways from the meeting. While the need to operate within the framework of the current BMV guidance was clearly acknowledged, a general understanding that biomarker methods validation cannot be adequately depicted by current PK-centric guidelines emerged as a consensus from the meeting. This report is not intended to constitute the official proceedings from Crystal City VI, which is expected to be published in early 2016. PMID:26795584

  1. Synergy Testing of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Potent Drug Combinations against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Don, Robert; Buckner, Frederick S.

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 8 million persons, mainly in Latin America, are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas disease have significant toxicities and suboptimal effectiveness, hence new therapeutic strategies need to be devised to address this neglected tropical disease. Due to the high research and development costs of bringing new chemical entities to the clinic, we and others have investigated the strategy of repurposing existing drugs for Chagas disease. Screens of FDA-approved drugs (described in this paper) have revealed a variety of chemical classes that have growth inhibitory activity against mammalian stage Trypanosoma cruzi parasites. Aside from azole antifungal drugs that have low or sub-nanomolar activity, most of the active compounds revealed in these screens have effective concentrations causing 50% inhibition (EC50's) in the low micromolar or high nanomolar range. For example, we have identified an antihistamine (clemastine, EC50 of 0.4 µM), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, EC50 of 4.4 µM), and an antifolate drug (pyrimethamine, EC50 of 3.8 µM) and others. When tested alone in the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, most compounds had insufficient efficacy to lower parasitemia thus we investigated using combinations of compounds for additive or synergistic activity. Twenty-four active compounds were screened in vitro in all possible combinations. Follow up isobologram studies showed at least 8 drug pairs to have synergistic activity on T. cruzi growth. The combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, plus the antifungal drug, posaconazole, was found to be more effective at lowering parasitemia in mice than either drug alone, as was the combination of clemastine and posaconazole. Using combinations of FDA-approved drugs is a promising strategy for developing new treatments for Chagas disease. PMID:25033456

  2. Regulatory Requirements for Devices for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigi, John, Ed.; Rivera, Richard J., Ed.

    This booklet explains in question/answer form the basic regulatory requirements established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the federal government concerning the manufacture, marketing and distribution of medical devices (including implantable devices and devices previously regulated as drugs) for persons with disabilities. Topics…

  3. The FDA's risk/benefit calculus in the approvals of Qsymia and Belviq: treating an obesity epidemic while avoiding another fen-phen.

    PubMed

    Azebu, Lauren M

    2014-01-01

    As obesity rates continue to rise in the United States, both physicians and patients have demanded more safe and effective drug treatment options. However, following the fen-phen/Redux and sibutramine failures, the FDA has been hesitant to approve any anti-obesity drugs, despite the magnitude of the epidemic. Some have argued that these public embarrassments have led the FDA to overestimate the risks and underestimate the benefits when deciding whether to approve new anti-obesity drugs. On June 27, 2012, the FDA approved Belviq for chronic weight management, making it the first anti-obesity drug approved by the FDA in thirteen years. Less than one month later, the FDA approved Qsymia for the treatment of obesity. Both drugs had been denied FDA approval less than two years earlier. In this paper, I will first review the obesity crisis and discuss the high-profile market withdrawals of fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine, and sibutramine. Second, I will explain the FDA's drug approval process with a focus on the FDA's risk/benefit calculus. Third, I will compare the FDA's risk/benefit analysis for Qsymia and Belviq in 2010 with the agency's risk/benefit analysis in 2012 to determine what caused the agency to grant approval in 2012 while denying it in 2010. Finally, I will analyze what these drug approvals may mean for the future of other anti-obesity drugs. PMID:24772687

  4. 76 FR 53912 - FDA's Public Database of Products With Orphan-Drug Designation: Replacing Non-Informative Code...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration FDA's Public Database of Products With Orphan-Drug... its public database of products that have received orphan-drug designation. The Orphan Drug Act... received orphan designation were published on our public database with non-informative code names....

  5. The FDA, contraceptive marketing approval and products liability litigation: Depo-Provera and the risk of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Green, William

    2013-01-01

    The FDA approved Depo-Provera, an injectable contraceptive, in 1992 on the condition that its manufacturer conduct a post-approval study on the risk ofosteoporosis. Then in 2004, the agency revised the drug's labeling to include a boxed (i.e. Black Box) Warning on the risk ofosteoporosis. This article will analyze the FDA's Depo-Provera approval and label revision process: the agency's acceptance of Upjohn's New Drug Application, its Fertility and Maternal Health Advisory Committee's review of the human clinical studies and approval recommendation, its marketing approval of Depo-Provera, and its 2004 drug labeling revision. Then the article will analyze the post-2004 products liability litigation by women who claimed to have been injured by their use of the drug. None of the cases have survived the manufacturer's summary judgment motions, because the women have been unable to establish by expert and physician evidence that the FDA-approved labeling was inadequate to inform their physicians of the risk of osteoporosis, that the inadequate warnings caused their osteoporosis or osteopenia, and that these are compensable injuries. As a result, the manufacturer has been able to use the FDA labeling, state products liability law, and the learned intermediary doctrine to avoid liability. The conclusion will consider the lessons of these products liability cases for other women who have received Depo-Provera and suffered bone mineral density loss. PMID:24640465

  6. FDA Draft Guidances Compound the Compounding Uncertainty: A New List of 503B Outsourcing Facilities Offers No Guarantee of Anything.

    PubMed

    Barlas, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Compounders who prepare nonpatient-specific prescriptions have been slow to sign up for a new FDA program meant to serve as a de facto "Good Housekeeping" seal of approval. Meanwhile, inspectors are turning up problems wherever they go. PMID:25050055

  7. Independent components analysis to increase efficiency of discriminant analysis methods (FDA and LDA): Application to NMR fingerprinting of wine.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Godelmann, Rolf; Kuballa, Thomas; Mushtakova, Svetlana P; Rutledge, Douglas N

    2015-08-15

    Discriminant analysis (DA) methods, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or factorial discriminant analysis (FDA), are well-known chemometric approaches for solving classification problems in chemistry. In most applications, principle components analysis (PCA) is used as the first step to generate orthogonal eigenvectors and the corresponding sample scores are utilized to generate discriminant features for the discrimination. Independent components analysis (ICA) based on the minimization of mutual information can be used as an alternative to PCA as a preprocessing tool for LDA and FDA classification. To illustrate the performance of this ICA/DA methodology, four representative nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data sets of wine samples were used. The classification was performed regarding grape variety, year of vintage and geographical origin. The average increase for ICA/DA in comparison with PCA/DA in the percentage of correct classification varied between 6±1% and 8±2%. The maximum increase in classification efficiency of 11±2% was observed for discrimination of the year of vintage (ICA/FDA) and geographical origin (ICA/LDA). The procedure to determine the number of extracted features (PCs, ICs) for the optimum DA models was discussed. The use of independent components (ICs) instead of principle components (PCs) resulted in improved classification performance of DA methods. The ICA/LDA method is preferable to ICA/FDA for recognition tasks based on NMR spectroscopic measurements.

  8. Seafood Contamination after the BP Gulf Oil Spill and Risks to Vulnerable Populations: A Critique of the FDA Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Karen K.; Solomon, Gina M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The BP oil spill of 2010 resulted in contamination of one of the most productive fisheries in the United States by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs, which can accumulate in seafood, are known carcinogens and developmental toxicants. In response to the oil spill, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) developed risk criteria and established thresholds for allowable levels [levels of concern (LOCs)] of PAH contaminants in Gulf Coast seafood. Objectives: We evaluated the degree to which the FDA’s risk criteria adequately protect vulnerable Gulf Coast populations from cancer risk associated with PAHs in seafood. Discussion: The FDA LOCs significantly underestimate risk from seafood contaminants among sensitive Gulf Coast populations by failing to a) account for the increased vulnerability of the developing fetus and child; b) use appropriate seafood consumption rates; c) include all relevant health end points; and d) incorporate health-protective estimates of exposure duration and acceptable risk. For benzo[a]pyrene and naphthalene, revised LOCs are between two and four orders of magnitude below the level set by the FDA. Comparison of measured levels of PAHs in Gulf seafood with the revised LOCs revealed that up to 53% of Gulf shrimp samples were above LOCs for pregnant women who are high-end seafood consumers. Conclusions: FDA risk assessment methods should be updated to better reflect current risk assessment practices and to protect vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children. PMID:21990339

  9. 76 FR 24494 - Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    .../ Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling; Availability AGENCY... Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling... ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health...

  10. The FDA's decision-making process: isn't it time to temper the principle of protective paternalism?

    PubMed

    Brandt, Lawrence J

    2008-05-01

    The authors conducted a well-designed, multinational, large study of women younger than 65 yr of age with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with a mixed pattern of diarrhea and constipation (IBS-M) or constipation (IBS-C) and showed that a statistically greater percentage of patients in each group responded to tegaserod compared with patients treated with placebo. Practicality looms large, however, in that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) disallowed the continued marketing of tegaserod because of cardiovascular safety concerns, and it now is only available under a restricted access program. The wisdom of this decision aside, it is disturbing that the FDA revealed a zero-tolerance for any significant risk of disease when a drug (e.g., tegaserod) was used for a nonlife-threatening condition; the FDA chose to neglect any potential benefit of significant improvement in quality of life, while at the same time allowing the continued availability of sildenifil for erectile dysfunction and other medications (e.g., rosiglitazone and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), each with a far greater risk of cardiovascular complications. Whether tegaserod will be re-released and, if so, under what conditions, is yet to be determined, as is the question of whether the FDA will decide to allow a more transparent decision-making process with input from all interested parties affected by their decision. PMID:18477347

  11. 78 FR 29141 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health Appeals Processes; Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... for Industry and FDA,'' dated July 2001. In the Federal Register of December 28, 2011 (76 FR 81511... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health Appeals Processes... ``Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Appeals Processes.'' This document describes...

  12. 76 FR 13643 - FDA Food Safety Modernization Act: Title III-A New Paradigm for Importers; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... purpose of the public meeting is to provide interested persons an opportunity to discuss implementation of... imported foods and animal feed and lessons learned through equivalence determinations. The public hearing... statute directs FDA to issue implementing regulations, including provisions on conflicts of...

  13. 21 CFR 170.105 - The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Premarket Notifications § 170.105 The Food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food contact substance (FCN) is no longer effective....

  14. 21 CFR 170.105 - The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Premarket Notifications § 170.105 The Food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food contact substance (FCN) is no longer effective....

  15. 21 CFR 170.105 - The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Premarket Notifications § 170.105 The Food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food contact substance (FCN) is no longer effective....

  16. 21 CFR 170.105 - The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Premarket Notifications § 170.105 The Food... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) determination that a premarket notification for a food contact substance (FCN) is no longer effective....

  17. 76 FR 41506 - Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff on In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff on In Vitro... entitled ``In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices.'' This guidance is intended to assist sponsors planning to develop a therapeutic product that depends on the use of an in vitro companion diagnostic...

  18. The FDA, contraceptive marketing approval and products liability litigation: Depo-Provera and the risk of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Green, William

    2013-01-01

    The FDA approved Depo-Provera, an injectable contraceptive, in 1992 on the condition that its manufacturer conduct a post-approval study on the risk ofosteoporosis. Then in 2004, the agency revised the drug's labeling to include a boxed (i.e. Black Box) Warning on the risk ofosteoporosis. This article will analyze the FDA's Depo-Provera approval and label revision process: the agency's acceptance of Upjohn's New Drug Application, its Fertility and Maternal Health Advisory Committee's review of the human clinical studies and approval recommendation, its marketing approval of Depo-Provera, and its 2004 drug labeling revision. Then the article will analyze the post-2004 products liability litigation by women who claimed to have been injured by their use of the drug. None of the cases have survived the manufacturer's summary judgment motions, because the women have been unable to establish by expert and physician evidence that the FDA-approved labeling was inadequate to inform their physicians of the risk of osteoporosis, that the inadequate warnings caused their osteoporosis or osteopenia, and that these are compensable injuries. As a result, the manufacturer has been able to use the FDA labeling, state products liability law, and the learned intermediary doctrine to avoid liability. The conclusion will consider the lessons of these products liability cases for other women who have received Depo-Provera and suffered bone mineral density loss.

  19. Diet - full liquid

    MedlinePlus

    ... O Milkshakes Pudding Popsicles You can NOT eat solid foods when you are on a full liquid ... bouillon, consommé, and strained cream soups, but NO solids) Sodas, such as ginger ale and Sprite Gelatin ( ...

  20. The 2014 FDA assessment of commercial fish: practical considerations for improved dietary guidance.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jennifer; Kaplan, Jason; Lapolla, John; Kleiner, Rima

    2016-07-13

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently released its report: A Quantitative Assessment of the Net Effects on Fetal Neurodevelopment from Eating Commercial Fish (As Measured by IQ and also by Early Age Verbal Development in Children). By evaluating the benefits and potential concerns of eating fish during pregnancy and breastfeeding, the analysis suggests that pregnant women consuming two seafood meals (8-12 oz) per week could provide their child with an additional 3.3 IQ points by age 9. Recent insights from behavioral economics research indicate that other factors, such as concerns about price and methylmercury (MeHg) exposure, appear to reduce fish consumption in many individuals.To assess the net effects of eating commercial fish during pregnancy, we compared the consumption of select fish species necessary to achieve IQ benefits with the amount necessary to have adverse developmental effects due to MeHg exposure. For the species or market types evaluated, the number of servings necessary to reach MeHg exposure to observe an adverse effect was at least twice that the amount estimated to achieve peak developmental benefit. We then reported average costs of fresh and canned or pouched fish, and calculated the cost per week for pregnant women to achieve maximum IQ benefits for their gestating child. Canned light tuna was the least expensive option at $1.83 per week to achieve maximum IQ benefit.Due to their relatively low cost, canned and pouched fish products eaten with enough regularity are likely to provide peak cognitive benefits. Because of its popularity, canned and pouched tuna could provide some of the largest cognitive benefits from fish consumption in the U.S. Future FDA consumer advice and related educational initiatives could benefit from a broader perspective that highlights the importance of affordable and accessible fish choices. These observations underscore the importance of clear public health messaging that address both health