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Sample records for features demonstrating defects

  1. Feature matching method in shaped light mode VFD defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xuanhong; Dai, Shuguang; Mu, Pingan

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Vacuum Fluorescent Display (VFD) module in the car audio panel has been widely used. However, due to process reasons, VFD display production process will produce defects, not only affect the appearance, but also affect the display correctly. So building a car VFD display panel defect detection system is of great significance. Machine vision technology is introduced into the automotive VFD display defect detection in order to achieve fast and accurate detection of defects. Shaped light mode is a typical flaw detection mode which is based on characteristics of vehicle VFD panel. According to the image features, learning of the gray matching and feature matching method, we integrated use of feature matching method and the gray level matching method to achieve defect detection.

  2. 3D fabric feature extraction and defect classification using low-cost USB camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Fikri; Akbar, Habibullah; Suryana, Nanna; Husni, Muhammad

    2011-10-01

    Defect detection on industrial product using vision system currently is considered as necessity. Quality control of product requires several key factors. Consistency of detection is one of the crucial factors in quality control. Previous method of defect detection requires human assistance. Vision system is the alternative solution for the inconsistent human-based detection. This article discusses defect detection, defect feature extraction and defect classification of fabric product. The solution proposed is by using statistical filter for defect recognition. Extracted features are GLCM-based features, and the proposed 3D defect feature. Defect classification is carried out using Neural Network. The result shows a promising result towards classifying defect product.

  3. Predicting internal red oak (Quercus rubra) log defect features using surface defect defect measurements

    Treesearch

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Determining the defects located within a log is crucial to understanding the tree/log resource for efficient processing. However, existing means of doing this non-destructively requires the use of expensive x-ray/CT (computerized tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), or microwave technology. These methods do not lend themselves to fast, efficient, and cost-...

  4. Successful demonstration of a comprehensive lithography defect monitoring strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ingrid B.; Breaux, Louis H.; Cross, Andrew; von den Hoff, Michael

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the validation of the methodology, the model and the impact of an optimized Lithography Defect Monitoring Strategy at two different semiconductor manufacturing factories. The lithography defect inspection optimization was implemented for the Gate Module at both factories running 0.13-0.15μm technologies on 200mm wafers, one running microprocessor and the other memory devices. As minimum dimensions and process windows decrease in the lithography area, new technologies and technological advances with resists and resist systems are being implemented to meet the demands. Along with these new technological advances in the lithography area comes potentially unforeseen defect issues. The latest lithography processes involve new resists in extremely thin, uniform films, exposing the films under conditions of highly optimized focus and illumination, and finally removing the resist completely and cleanly. The lithography cell is defined as the cluster of process equipment that accomplishes the coating process (surface prep, resist spin, edge-bead removal and soft bake), the alignment and exposure, and the developing process (post-exposure bake, develop, rinse) of the resist. Often the resist spinning process involves multiple materials such as BARC (bottom ARC) and / or TARC (top ARC) materials in addition to the resist itself. The introduction of these new materials with the multiple materials interfaces and the tightness of the process windows leads to an increased variety of defect mechanisms in the lithography area. Defect management in the lithography area has become critical to successful product introduction and yield ramp. The semiconductor process itself contributes the largest number and variety of defects, and a significant portion of the total defects originate within the lithography cell. From a defect management perspective, the lithography cell has some unique characteristics. First, defects in the lithography process module have the

  5. Laser scatter feature of surface defect on apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xiuqin; Ying, Yibin; Cen, YiKe; Huang, Haibo

    2006-10-01

    A machine vision system for real-time fruit quality inspection was developed. The system consists of a chamber, a laser projector, a TMS-7DSP CCD camera (PULNIX Inc.), and a computer. A Meteor-II/MC frame grabber (Matrox Graphics Inc.) was inserted into the slot of the computer to grab fruit images. The laser projector and the camera were mounted at the ceiling of the chamber. An apple was put in the chamber, the spot of the laser projector was projected on the surface of the fruit, and an image was grabbed. 2 breed of apples was test, Each apple was imaged twice, one was imaged for the normal surface, and the other for the defect. The red component of the images was used to get the feature of the defect and the sound surface of the fruits. The average value, STD value and comentropy Value of red component of the laser scatter image were analyzed. The Standard Deviation value of red component of normal is more suitable to separate the defect surface from sound surface for the ShuijinFuji apples, but for bintang apples, there is more work need to do to separate the different surface with laser scatter image.

  6. Software for Demonstration of Features of Chain Polymerization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnowski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Free software for the demonstration of the features of homo- and copolymerization processes (free radical, controlled radical, and living) is described. The software is based on the Monte Carlo algorithms and offers insight into the kinetics, molecular weight distribution, and microstructure of the macromolecules formed in those processes. It also…

  7. Software for Demonstration of Features of Chain Polymerization Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnowski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Free software for the demonstration of the features of homo- and copolymerization processes (free radical, controlled radical, and living) is described. The software is based on the Monte Carlo algorithms and offers insight into the kinetics, molecular weight distribution, and microstructure of the macromolecules formed in those processes. It also…

  8. Classification, clinical features, and genetics of neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) constitute a major health burden (0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide), and remain a preventable cause of still birth, neonatal, and infant death, or significant lifelong handicaps. The malformations result from failure of the neural folds to fuse in the midline, and form the neural tube between the third and the fourth week of embryonic development. This review article discusses their classification, clinical features, and genetics. Most NTDs are sporadic and both genetic, and non-genetic environmental factors are involved in its etiology. Consanguinity was suggested to contribute to the high incidence of NTDs in several countries, including Saudi Arabia. Syndromes, often associated with chromosomal anomalies, account for <10% of all NTDs; but a higher proportion (20%) has been documented in Saudi Arabia. Genetic predisposition constitutes the major underlying risk factor, with a strong implication of genes that regulate folate one-carbon metabolism and planar cell polarity. PMID:25551113

  9. Classification, clinical features, and genetics of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Salih, Mustafa A; Murshid, Waleed R; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z

    2014-12-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) constitute a major health burden (0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide), and remain a preventable cause of still birth, neonatal, and infant death, or significant lifelong handicaps. The malformations result from failure of the neural folds to fuse in the midline, and form the neural tube between the third and the fourth week of embryonic development. This review article discusses their classification, clinical features, and genetics. Most NTDs are sporadic and both genetic, and non-genetic environmental factors are involved in its etiology. Consanguinity was suggested to contribute to the high incidence of NTDs in several countries, including Saudi Arabia. Syndromes, often associated with chromosomal anomalies, account for <10% of all NTDs; but a higher proportion (20%) has been documented in Saudi Arabia. Genetic predisposition constitutes the major underlying risk factor, with a strong implication of genes that regulate folate one-carbon metabolism and planar cell polarity.

  10. Identification of biochemical features of defective Coffea arabica L. beans.

    PubMed

    Casas, María I; Vaughan, Michael J; Bonello, Pierluigi; McSpadden Gardener, Brian; Grotewold, Erich; Alonso, Ana P

    2017-05-01

    Coffee organoleptic properties are based in part on the quality and chemical composition of coffee beans. The presence of defective beans during processing and roasting contribute to off flavors and reduce overall cup quality. A multipronged approach was undertaken to identify specific biochemical markers for defective beans. To this end, beans were split into defective and non-defective fractions and biochemically profiled in both green and roasted states. A set of 17 compounds in green beans, including organic acids, amino acids and reducing sugars; and 35 compounds in roasted beans, dominated by volatile compounds, organic acids, sugars and sugar alcohols, were sufficient to separate the defective and non-defective fractions. Unsorted coffee was examined for the presence of the biochemical markers to test their utility in detecting defective beans. Although the green coffee marker compounds were found in all fractions, three of the roasted coffee marker compounds (1-methylpyrrole, 5-methyl- 2-furfurylfuran, and 2-methylfuran) were uniquely present in defective fractions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Modeling the relationships among internal defect features and external Appalachian hardwood log defect indicators

    Treesearch

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a hardwood tree grows and develops, surface defects such as branch stubs and wounds are overgrown. Evidence of these defects remain on the log surface for decades and in many instances for the life of the tree. As the tree grows the defect is encapsulated or grown over by new wood. During this process the appearance of the defect in the tree's bark changes. The...

  12. Predicting internal white oak (Quercus alba) log defect features using surface defect indicator measurements

    Treesearch

    Ralph E. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    As hardwood trees grow and develop, surface defects such as limb stubs and wounds are overgrown and encapsulated into the tree. Evidence of these defects can remain on the tree's surface for decades and in many instances for the life of the tree. The location and severity of internal defects dictate the quality and value of products that can be obtained from logs...

  13. Novel method of defect identification in bent structures through feature-guided wave detection using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Pabitro; Manogharan, Prabhakaran; Srinivasan, Balaji; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu

    2015-09-01

    Feature-guided waves (FGW) have emerged as a promising technique for structural health monitoring as they are well confined in local features such as bends and welds. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a novel method for identifying defects in 90° transverse bent structures through FGW detection using fiber Bragg gratings. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with results predicted using 3D-Finite Element (FE) simulations of the bent structure.

  14. Morphological features (defects) in fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Fowler, M. W.; Simon, L. C.; Grot, S.

    Reliability and durability issues in fuel cells are becoming more important as the technology and the industry matures. Although research in this area has increased, systematic failure analysis, such as a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), are very limited in the literature. This paper presents a categorization scheme of causes, modes, and effects related to fuel cell degradation and failure, with particular focus on the role of component quality, that can be used in FMEAs for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The work also identifies component defects imparted on catalyst-coated membranes (CCM) by manufacturing and proposes mechanisms by which they can influence overall degradation and reliability. Six major defects have been identified on fresh CCM materials, i.e., cracks, orientation, delamination, electrolyte clusters, platinum clusters, and thickness variations.

  15. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3–0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions. PMID:26417067

  16. Defective autophagy is a key feature of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Saverio; Corricelli, Mariangela; Trapani, Eliana; Bravi, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Delle Monache, Simona; Ferroni, Letizia; Patergnani, Simone; Missiroli, Sonia; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Rimessi, Alessandro; Giorgi, Carlotta; Zavan, Barbara; Cassoni, Paola; Dejana, Elisabetta; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is a major cerebrovascular disease affecting approximately 0.3-0.5% of the population and is characterized by enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhages. Cerebral cavernous malformation is a genetic disease that may arise sporadically or be inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Causative loss-of-function mutations have been identified in three genes, KRIT1 (CCM1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and PDCD10 (CCM3), which occur in both sporadic and familial forms. Autophagy is a bulk degradation process that maintains intracellular homeostasis and that plays essential quality control functions within the cell. Indeed, several studies have identified the association between dysregulated autophagy and different human diseases. Here, we show that the ablation of the KRIT1 gene strongly suppresses autophagy, leading to the aberrant accumulation of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, defective quality control systems, and increased intracellular stress. KRIT1 loss-of-function activates the mTOR-ULK1 pathway, which is a master regulator of autophagy, and treatment with mTOR inhibitors rescues some of the mole-cular and cellular phenotypes associated with CCM. Insufficient autophagy is also evident in CCM2-silenced human endothelial cells and in both cells and tissues from an endothelial-specific CCM3-knockout mouse model, as well as in human CCM lesions. Furthermore, defective autophagy is highly correlated to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial event that contributes to CCM progression. Taken together, our data point to a key role for defective autophagy in CCM disease pathogenesis, thus providing a novel framework for the development of new pharmacological strategies to prevent or reverse adverse clinical outcomes of CCM lesions.

  17. Evolution of pulmonary perfusion defects demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Howarth, N R; Beziat, C; Berthezène, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion defects can be demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a post-operative pulmonary embolus and was followed in the post-operative period with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion imaging. This technique allows rapid imaging of the first passage of contrast material through the lung after bolus injection in a peripheral vein. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of this MR technique in showing the evolution of peripheral pulmonary perfusion defects associated with pulmonary emboli.

  18. Demonstrating non-Abelian statistics of Majorana fermions using twist defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Dua, Arpit; Jiang, Liang

    We study the twist defects in the toric code model introduced by Bombin [Phys. Rev. Lett.105, 030403 (2010)]. Using a generalized 2D Jordan-Wigner transformation and a projective construction, we show explicitly the twist defects carry unpaired Majorana zero modes. In addition, we propose a quantum non-demolition measurement scheme of the parity of Majorana modes. Such a scheme provides an alternative avenue to demonstrate the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana fermions. The braiding operation is simulated by an efficient measurement-based approach that removes the uncertainty associated with the previous forced measurement scheme.

  19. Modeling of light scattering from features on and within films and light scatter from epitaxial silicon defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiping

    The detection of particles and defects on or within films deposited on wafers using light scattering is of great interest to the semiconductor industry. Numerical calculation of light scattering characteristics from these features is very useful to the development and calibration of wafer inspection tools. A model and associated code is developed by using a modification of the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method to compute the light scattering from a feature with arbitrary shape on or within a filmed surface. The reflection interaction matrix is modified with the Sommerfeld integrals for filmed surfaces. Three-dimensional fast Fourier transform technique is used for accelerating the computation of light scatter from features associated with layered surfaces using the DDA method. Far field scatter is calculated approximately based on the reaction theorem. Model predictions of scattering signatures are compared with experimental results and other numerical models. Comparisons show good agreement for the cases considered, which demonstrates the accuracy and validity of the model. An epitaxial silicon wafer defect sample was fabricated containing typical epitaxial wafer defects such as epitaxial stacking faults, spikes and mounds. Atomic force microscopy was used to determine their physical sizes and shapes. The optical scattering characteristics of these epitaxial silicon wafer defects were studied using the numerical model. A method to discriminate epitaxial crystalline defects and particles is proposed.

  20. Patient fibroblasts-derived induced neurons demonstrate autonomous neuronal defects in adult-onset Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Jun; Oh, Ki-Wook; Nahm, Minyeop; Xue, Yuanchao; Choi, Jae Hyeok; Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Young-Eun; Chung, Ki Wha; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by defective β-galactosylceramidase (GALC), a lysosomal enzyme responsible for cleavage of several key substrates including psychosine. Accumulation of psychosine to the cytotoxic levels in KD patients is thought to cause dysfunctions in myelinating glial cells based on a comprehensive study of demyelination in KD. However, recent evidence suggests myelin-independent neuronal death in the murine model of KD, thus indicating defective GALC in neurons as an autonomous mechanism for neuronal cell death in KD. These observations prompted us to generate induced neurons (iNeurons) from two adult-onset KD patients carrying compound heterozygous mutations (p.[K563*];[L634S]) and (p.[N228_S232delinsTP];[G286D]) to determine the direct contribution of autonomous neuronal toxicity to KD. Here we report that directly converted KD iNeurons showed not only diminished GALC activity and increased psychosine levels, as expected, but also neurite fragmentation and abnormal neuritic branching. The lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 (LAMP1) was expressed at higher levels than controls, LAMP1-positive vesicles were significantly enlarged and fragmented, and mitochondrial morphology and its function were altered in KD iNeurons. Strikingly, we demonstrated that psychosine was sufficient to induce neurite defects, mitochondrial fragmentation, and lysosomal alterations in iNeurons derived in healthy individuals, thus establishing the causal effect of the cytotoxic GALC substrate in KD and the autonomous neuronal toxicity in KD pathology. PMID:27780934

  1. Smoothing based model for images of buried EUV multilayer defects near absorber features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Chris H.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2008-10-01

    A modification has been made to the fast simulator RADICAL which allows it to simulate the reflected field from an EUV mask with a buried defect 15,000 times faster than the finite difference time domain method (FDTD). This new version uses an advanced single surface approximation (SSA) instead of ray tracing to model the defective multilayer stack. RADICAL with SSA can simulate a 32nm line space pattern with a buried defect in 4.0s. The accuracy of this method is verified with comparisons to FDTD simulations and good agreement is shown. The ability of this method to simulate large layouts with arbitrary defects is demonstrated. A 1.5μm x 1.5μm layout with an arbitrary buried defect and multilayer surface roughness is simulated in 75s. An alternative algebraic fast model for buried defects near absorber lines is also investigated based on the linear relationship between the surface height of isolated buried defects and the aerial image dip strength. However, the interaction is shown to be too complicated for accurate representation with the model proposed.

  2. Feature extraction for ultrasonic sensor based defect detection in ceramic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesharaju, Manasa; Nagarajah, Romesh

    2014-02-01

    High density silicon carbide materials are commonly used as the ceramic element of hard armour inserts used in traditional body armour systems to reduce their weight, while providing improved hardness, strength and elastic response to stress. Currently, armour ceramic tiles are inspected visually offline using an X-ray technique that is time consuming and very expensive. In addition, from X-rays multiple defects are also misinterpreted as single defects. Therefore, to address these problems the ultrasonic non-destructive approach is being investigated. Ultrasound based inspection would be far more cost effective and reliable as the methodology is applicable for on-line quality control including implementation of accept/reject criteria. This paper describes a recently developed methodology to detect, locate and classify various manufacturing defects in ceramic tiles using sub band coding of ultrasonic test signals. The wavelet transform is applied to the ultrasonic signal and wavelet coefficients in the different frequency bands are extracted and used as input features to an artificial neural network (ANN) for purposes of signal classification. Two different classifiers, using artificial neural networks (supervised) and clustering (un-supervised) are supplied with features selected using Principal Component Analysis(PCA) and their classification performance compared. This investigation establishes experimentally that Principal Component Analysis(PCA) can be effectively used as a feature selection method that provides superior results for classifying various defects in the context of ultrasonic inspection in comparison with the X-ray technique.

  3. Demonstrating non-Abelian braiding of surface code defects in a five qubit experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, James R.

    2017-03-01

    Currently, the mainstream approach to quantum computing is through surface codes. One way to store and manipulate quantum information with these to create defects in the codes which can be moved and used as if they were particles. Specifically, they simulate the behaviour of exotic particles known as Majoranas, which are a kind of non-Abelian anyon. By exchanging these particles, important gates for quantum computation can be implemented. Here we investigate the simplest possible exchange operation for two surface code Majoranas. This is found to act non-trivially on only five qubits. The system is then truncated to these five qubits, so that the exchange process can be run on the IBM 5Q processor. The results demonstrate the expected effect of the exchange. This paper has been written in a style that should hopefully be accessible to both professional and amateur scientists.

  4. Targeted ANP32E mutant mice do not demonstrate obvious movement defects.

    PubMed

    Wong, Peiyan; Leo, Vonny I; Low, Meijun; Mak, Tak W; Zhang, Xiaodong; Reilly, Patrick T

    2013-01-01

    The ANP32 family of proteins have been implicated in neuronal function through biochemical and cellular biology studies in neurons, as well as by recent behavioural studies of a gene-trapped loss-of-function mutation of Anp32e in mice, particularly with respect to fine motor function. A second targeted allele of the Anp32e, however, did not appear to demonstrate neurological phenotypes. Using a stringently controlled cohort of ten-generation backcrossed, co-caged, sex-matched, littermate pairs, we assayed for potential motor defects in the targeted ANP32E-deficient mice. We found no phenotypic difference in any assays. Since it is unlikely that the gene-trap is a more complete loss-of-function, our results suggest that ANP32E has no appreciable effect on motor functions and that genetic background differences most likely account for the gene-trap phenomena.

  5. Vision-based in-line fabric defect detection using yarn-specific shape features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Dorian; Aach, Til

    2012-01-01

    We develop a methodology for automatic in-line flaw detection in industrial woven fabrics. Where state of the art detection algorithms apply texture analysis methods to operate on low-resolved ({200 ppi) image data, we describe here a process flow to segment single yarns in high-resolved ({1000 ppi) textile images. Four yarn shape features are extracted, allowing a precise detection and measurement of defects. The degree of precision reached allows a classification of detected defects according to their nature, providing an innovation in the field of automatic fabric flaw detection. The design has been carried out to meet real time requirements and face adverse conditions caused by loom vibrations and dirt. The entire process flow is discussed followed by an evaluation using a database with real-life industrial fabric images. This work pertains to the construction of an on-loom defect detection system to be used in manufacturing practice.

  6. Fast three-dimensional simulation of buried EUV mask defect interaction with absorber features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Chris H.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2007-10-01

    To simulate the interaction of buried defects and absorber features in EUV masks, a full three-dimensional, fast, integrated, simulator based on ray tracing and a thin mask model is presented. This simulator allows rapid assessment of the effects of buried defects on EUV printing. This new simulator, RADICAL (Rapid Absorber Defect Interaction Computation for Advanced Lithography), gives a 450X speed increase compared to FDTD, and matches FDTD within 1.5nm for predicting CD change due to a buried defect. RADICAL consists of three sequential steps: the propagation of the mask illumination down through the absorber pattern, the reflection off the defective multilayer, and the propagation back up through the absorber. A propagated thin mask model is used to model the down/up propagation through the absorber pattern and a ray tracing simulator is used for the multilayer reflection. These simulators are linked together using a Fourier transform to convert the near field output of one simulator step into a set of plane wave inputs for the next.

  7. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients.more » The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.« less

  8. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients. The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.

  9. Specific features of defect and mass transport in concentrated fcc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetsky, Yuri N.; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-06-15

    We report that diffusion and mass transport are basic properties that control materials performance, such as phase stability, solute decomposition and radiation tolerance. While understanding diffusion in dilute alloys is a mature field, concentrated alloys are much less studied. Here, atomic-scale diffusion and mass transport via vacancies and interstitial atoms are compared in fcc Ni, Fe and equiatomic Ni-Fe alloy. High temperature properties were determined using conventional molecular dynamics on the microsecond timescale, whereas the kinetic activation-relaxation (k-ART) approach was applied at low temperatures. The k-ART was also used to calculate transition states in the alloy and defect transport coefficients. The calculations reveal several specific features. For example, vacancy and interstitial defects migrate via different alloy components, diffusion is more sluggish in the alloy and, notably, mass transport in the concentrated alloy cannot be predicted on the basis of diffusion in its pure metal counterparts. Lastly, the percolation threshold for the defect diffusion in the alloy is discussed and it is suggested that this phenomenon depends on the properties and diffusion mechanisms of specific defects.

  10. A new automated spectral feature extraction method and its application in spectral classification and defective spectra recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Guo, Ping; Luo, A.-Li

    2017-03-01

    Spectral feature extraction is a crucial procedure in automated spectral analysis. This procedure starts from the spectral data and produces informative and non-redundant features, facilitating the subsequent automated processing and analysis with machine-learning and data-mining techniques. In this paper, we present a new automated feature extraction method for astronomical spectra, with application in spectral classification and defective spectra recovery. The basic idea of our approach is to train a deep neural network to extract features of spectra with different levels of abstraction in different layers. The deep neural network is trained with a fast layer-wise learning algorithm in an analytical way without any iterative optimization procedure. We evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme on real-world spectral data. The results demonstrate that our method is superior regarding its comprehensive performance, and the computational cost is significantly lower than that for other methods. The proposed method can be regarded as a new valid alternative general-purpose feature extraction method for various tasks in spectral data analysis.

  11. Influence of Vacancy Defect on Surface Feature and Adsorption of Cs on GaN(0001) Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanjun; Du, Yujie; Wang, Meishan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Ga and N vacancy defect on the change in surface feature, work function, and characteristic of Cs adsorption on a (2 × 2) GaN(0001) surface have been investigated using density functional theory with a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential method based on first-principles calculations. The covalent bonds gain strength for Ga vacancy defect, whereas they grow weak for N vacancy defect. The lower work function is achieved for Ga and N vacancy defect surfaces than intact surface. The most stable position of Cs adatom on Ga vacancy defect surface is at T1 site, whereas it is at BGa site on N vacancy defect surface. The E ads of Cs on GaN(0001) vacancy defect surface increases compared with that of intact surface; this illustrates that the adsorption of Cs on intact surface is more stable. PMID:25126599

  12. Fast simulation of buried EUV mask defect interaction with absorber features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Chris H.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2007-03-01

    To simulate the interaction of buried defects and absorber features in EUV masks and their effects on projection printing, a prototype 2D, fast, integrated, simulator based on ray tracing and a thin mask model is presented. RADICAL (Rapid Absorber Defect Interaction Computation for Advanced Lithography), consists of three sequential steps: the propagation of the mask illumination down through the absorber pattern, the reflection off the defective multilayer, and the propagation back up through the absorber. A propagated thin mask model is used to model the down/up propagation through the absorber pattern and a ray tracing simulator is used for the multilayer reflection. These simulators are linked together using a Fourier transform to convert the near field output of one component into a set of plane wave inputs for the next. This new method gives a 100x-300x speed increase compared to FDTD, and agrees to a point to point average of less than 2% with FDTD for 22nm lines on the wafer for NA=0.5. The errors in RADICAL and FDTD are examined to determine the sources of error for each simulator.

  13. Defects in doped LaGaO3 anionic conductors: linking NMR spectral features, local environments, and defect thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Middlemiss, Derek S; Gan, Zhehong; Grey, Clare P

    2011-11-09

    Doped lanthanum gallate perovskites (LaGaO(3)) constitute some of the most promising electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells operating in the intermediate temperature regime. Here, an approach combining experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy with density functional theory total energy and GIPAW NMR calculations yields a comprehensive understanding of the structural and defect chemistries of Sr- and Mg-doped LaGaO(3) anionic conductors. The DFT energetics demonstrate that Ga-V(O)-Ga (V(O) = oxygen vacancy) environments are favored (vs Ga-V(O)-Mg, Mg-V(O)-Mg and Mg-O-Mg-V(O)-Ga) across a range y = 0.0625, 0.125, and 0.25 of fractional Mg contents in LaGa(1-y)Mg(y)O(3-y/2). The results are interpreted in terms of doping and mean phase formation energies (relative to binary oxides) and are compared with previous calculations and experimental calorimetry data. Experimental multinuclear NMR data reveal that while Mg sites remain six-fold coordinated across the range of phase stoichiometries, albeit with significant structural disorder, a stoichiometry-dependent minority of the Ga sites resonate at a shift consistent with Ga(V) coordination, demonstrating that O vacancies preferentially locate in the first anion coordination shell of Ga. The strong Mg-V(O) binding inferred by previous studies is not observed here. The (17)O NMR spectra reveal distinct resonances that can be assigned by using the GIPAW NMR calculations to anions occupying equatorial and axial positions with respect to the Ga(V)-V(O) axis. The disparate shifts displayed by these sites are due to the nature and extent of the structural distortions caused by the O vacancies.

  14. Experimental Demonstration of Feature Extraction and Dimensionality Reduction Using Memristor Networks.

    PubMed

    Choi, Shinhyun; Shin, Jong Hoon; Lee, Jihang; Sheridan, Patrick; Lu, Wei D

    2017-05-10

    Memristors have been considered as a leading candidate for a number of critical applications ranging from nonvolatile memory to non-Von Neumann computing systems. Feature extraction, which aims to transform input data from a high-dimensional space to a space with fewer dimensions, is an important technique widely used in machine learning and pattern recognition applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that memristor arrays can be used to perform principal component analysis, one of the most commonly used feature extraction techniques, through online, unsupervised learning. Using Sanger's rule, that is, the generalized Hebbian algorithm, the principal components were obtained as the memristor conductances in the network after training. The network was then used to analyze sensory data from a standard breast cancer screening database with high classification success rate (97.1%).

  15. Multifocal pattern electroretinogram does not demonstrate localised field defects in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Klistorner, A I; Graham, S L; Martins, A

    2000-01-01

    To determine if a multifocal PERG could be recorded in normals, and to examine changes in the multifocal PERG in glaucoma patients. To compare the ability of multifocal PERG and multifocal VEP responses in the same individuals to identify localised field defects in glaucoma. Using the VERIS Scientific system multifocal PERGs were recorded from 19 sites of the visual field according to pseudo-random binary m-sequence. Twenty normals and 15 glaucoma subjects were tested. Multifocal pattern VEPs were also recorded in the glaucoma cases using a cortically scaled stimulus. The second order kernel of the PERG shows a consistent signal. The overall PERG amplitude decreases with age in normals. In glaucoma the PERG amplitude was reduced across the field, but reductions did not correspond to the area of the scotoma. The VEP showed localised signal reductions in all 15 cases of glaucoma. A multifocal PERG can be recorded in normals. However it did not reflect localised ganglion cell losses, whereas the multifocal pattern VEP recorded to a very similar stimulus in the same individual did show losses in the scotoma area.

  16. A deep feature fusion methodology for breast cancer diagnosis demonstrated on three imaging modality datasets.

    PubMed

    Antropova, Natalia; Huynh, Benjamin Q; Giger, Maryellen L

    2017-07-06

    Deep learning methods for radiomics/computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) are often prohibited by small datasets, long computation time, and the need for extensive image preprocessing. We aim to develop a breast CADx methodology that addresses the aforementioned issues by exploiting the efficiency of pre-trained convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and using pre-existing handcrafted CADx features. We present a methodology that extracts and pools low- to mid-level features using a pretrained CNN and fuses them with handcrafted radiomic features computed using conventional CADx methods. Our methodology is tested on three different clinical imaging modalities (dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI [690 cases], full-field digital mammography [245 cases], and ultrasound [1125 cases]). From ROC analysis, our fusion-based method demonstrates, on all three imaging modalities, statistically significant improvements in terms of AUC as compared to previous breast cancer CADx methods in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. (DCE-MRI [AUC = 0.89 (se = 0.01)], FFDM [AUC = 0.86 (se = 0.01)], and ultrasound [AUC = 0.90 (se = 0.01)]). We proposed a novel breast CADx methodology that can be used to more effectively characterize breast lesions in comparison to existing methods. Furthermore, our proposed methodology is computationally efficient and circumvents the need for image preprocessing. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Arrhythmia and cardiac defects are a feature of spinal muscular atrophy model mice

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christopher R.; Satta, Rosalba; Lutz, Cathleen; DiDonato, Christine J.

    2010-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Traditionally, SMA has been described as a motor neuron disease; however, there is a growing body of evidence that arrhythmia and/or cardiomyopathy may present in SMA patients at an increased frequency. Here, we ask whether SMA model mice possess such phenotypes. We find SMA mice suffer from severe bradyarrhythmia characterized by progressive heart block and impaired ventricular depolarization. Echocardiography further confirms functional cardiac deficits in SMA mice. Additional investigations show evidence of both sympathetic innervation defects and dilated cardiomyopathy at late stages of disease. Based upon these data, we propose a model in which decreased sympathetic innervation causes autonomic imbalance. Such imbalance would be characterized by a relative increase in the level of vagal tone controlling heart rate, which is consistent with bradyarrhythmia and progressive heart block. Finally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, a drug known to benefit phenotypes of SMA model mice, produces prolonged maturation of the SMA heartbeat and an increase in cardiac size. Treated mice maintain measures of motor function throughout extended survival though they ultimately reach death endpoints in association with a progression of bradyarrhythmia. These data represent the novel identification of cardiac arrhythmia as an early and progressive feature of murine SMA while providing several new, quantitative indices of mouse health. Together with clinical cases that report similar symptoms, this reveals a new area of investigation that will be important to address as we move SMA therapeutics towards clinical success. PMID:20693262

  18. Glycine decarboxylase deficiency causes neural tube defects and features of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun Jin; Leung, Kit-Yi; Savery, Dawn; Hutchin, Tim; Prunty, Helen; Heales, Simon; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Brosnan, John T.; Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) acts in the glycine cleavage system to decarboxylate glycine and transfer a one-carbon unit into folate one-carbon metabolism. GLDC mutations cause a rare recessive disease non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH). Mutations have also been identified in patients with neural tube defects (NTDs); however, the relationship between NKH and NTDs is unclear. We show that reduced expression of Gldc in mice suppresses glycine cleavage system activity and causes two distinct disease phenotypes. Mutant embryos develop partially penetrant NTDs while surviving mice exhibit post-natal features of NKH including glycine accumulation, early lethality and hydrocephalus. In addition to elevated glycine, Gldc disruption also results in abnormal tissue folate profiles, with depletion of one-carbon-carrying folates, as well as growth retardation and reduced cellular proliferation. Formate treatment normalizes the folate profile, restores embryonic growth and prevents NTDs, suggesting that Gldc deficiency causes NTDs through limiting supply of one-carbon units from mitochondrial folate metabolism. PMID:25736695

  19. Arrhythmia and cardiac defects are a feature of spinal muscular atrophy model mice.

    PubMed

    Heier, Christopher R; Satta, Rosalba; Lutz, Cathleen; DiDonato, Christine J

    2010-10-15

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Traditionally, SMA has been described as a motor neuron disease; however, there is a growing body of evidence that arrhythmia and/or cardiomyopathy may present in SMA patients at an increased frequency. Here, we ask whether SMA model mice possess such phenotypes. We find SMA mice suffer from severe bradyarrhythmia characterized by progressive heart block and impaired ventricular depolarization. Echocardiography further confirms functional cardiac deficits in SMA mice. Additional investigations show evidence of both sympathetic innervation defects and dilated cardiomyopathy at late stages of disease. Based upon these data, we propose a model in which decreased sympathetic innervation causes autonomic imbalance. Such imbalance would be characterized by a relative increase in the level of vagal tone controlling heart rate, which is consistent with bradyarrhythmia and progressive heart block. Finally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, a drug known to benefit phenotypes of SMA model mice, produces prolonged maturation of the SMA heartbeat and an increase in cardiac size. Treated mice maintain measures of motor function throughout extended survival though they ultimately reach death endpoints in association with a progression of bradyarrhythmia. These data represent the novel identification of cardiac arrhythmia as an early and progressive feature of murine SMA while providing several new, quantitative indices of mouse health. Together with clinical cases that report similar symptoms, this reveals a new area of investigation that will be important to address as we move SMA therapeutics towards clinical success.

  20. Field Demonstration of Electro-Scan Defect Location Technology for Condition Assessment of Wastewater Collection Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the field demonstration program is to gather technically reliable cost and performance information on selected condition assessment technologies under defined field conditions. The selected technologies include zoom camera, electro-scan (FELL-41), and a multi-sens...

  1. Field Demonstration of Electro-Scan Defect Location Technology for Condition Assessment of Wastewater Collection Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the field demonstration program is to gather technically reliable cost and performance information on selected condition assessment technologies under defined field conditions. The selected technologies include zoom camera, electro-scan (FELL-41), and a multi-sens...

  2. Demonstration of defect free EUV mask for 22nm NAND flash contact layer using electron beam inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeya; Kawashima, Satoshi; Inazuki, Yuichi; Abe, Tsukasa; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Mohri, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Naoya; Wang, Fei; Ma, Long Eric; Zhao, Yan; Kuan, Chiyan; Xiao, Hong; Jau, Jack

    2011-04-01

    Fabrication of defect free EUV masks including their inspection is the most critical challenge for implementing EUV lithography into semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM) beyond 22nm half-pitch (HP) node. The contact to bit-line (CB) layers of NAND flash devices are the most likely the first lithography layers that EUV will be employed for manufacturing due to the aggressive scaling and the difficulty for making the pattern with the current ArF lithography. To assure the defect free EUV mask, we have evaluated electron beam inspection (EBI) system eXplore™ 5200 developed by Hermes Microvision, Inc. (HMI) [1]. As one knows, the main issue of EBI system is the low throughput. To solve this challenge, a function called Lightning Scan™ mode has been recently developed and installed in the system, which allows the system to only inspect the pattern areas while ignoring blanket areas, thus dramatically reduced the overhead time and enable us to inspect CB layers of NAND Flash device with much higher throughput. In this present work, we compared the Lightning scan mode with Normal scan mode on sensitivity and throughput. We found out the Lightning scan mode can improve throughput by a factor of 10 without any sacrifices of sensitivity. Furthermore, using the Lightning scan mode, we demonstrated the possibility to fabricate the defect free EUV masks with moderate inspection time.

  3. Experimental demonstration of cascaded AWG access network featuring bi-directional transmission and polarization multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Tsalamanis, Ioannis; Rochat, Etienne; Walker, Stuart; Parker, Michael; Holburn, D

    2004-03-08

    We present the first experimental demonstration of a bidirectional cascaded arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) access network combining one NxN AWG in the central office with multiple 1xN AWG's at the distribution points, such as to individually address N(2) users with only N wavelengths. Downstream and upstream data share the same optical path. BER curves were measured using 2.5Gb/s data stream in each direction, and error free transmission achieved for downstream and upstream, with only 0.3dB power penalty for simultaneous transmission. The addition of two orthogonal polarization-multiplexed channels per wavelength doubled the number of possible end users. Error free transmission was achieved with simultaneous upstream and downstream transmission of a composite signal featuring eight 2.5Gb/s channels (2 polarizations x 4 wavelengths).

  4. Functional MRI demonstrates pain perception in hand osteoarthritis has features of central pain processing

    PubMed Central

    Sofat, Nidhi; Smee, Cori; Hermansson, Monika; Howard, Matthew; Baker, Emma H; Howe, Franklyn A; Barrick, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Background Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is typified by pain and reduced function. We hypothesised that people with HOA have enhanced sensitivity and activation of peripheral nociceptors in the hand, thereby potentiating chronic pain. In our study we aimed to assess if central sensitisation mediates pain perception in osteoarthritis of the hand. Methods Participants with proximal and distal interphalangeal joint (PIP/DIP) HOA and non-OA controls were recruited. Clinical pain scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded before and after performing a painful hand task. Central pain processing was evaluated with functional brain neuroimaging (fMRI) using a finger flexion-extension (FFE) task performed over 3 minutes. Data was analysed with FMRIB software (www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl). Group mean activation of functional MRI signal between hand osteoarthritis and control non-arthritic participants was compared. Results Our group of hand OA participants reported high pain levels compared with non-arthritic controls as demonstrated by the mean VAS in hand OA participants of 59.31± 8.19 mm compared to 4.00 ± 1.89 mm in controls (p < 0.0001), despite all participants reporting analgesic use. Functional MRI analysis showed increased activation in the thalamus, cingulate, frontal and somatosensory cortex in the hand OA group but not in controls (thresholded at p < 0.05). Regions of activation were mapped to Brodmann areas 3, 4, 6, 9, 13, 22, 24 and 44. Activated regions found in our study are recognised higher brain pain processing centres implicated in central sensitisation. Conclusions People with hand osteoarthritis demonstrated features of central sensitisation that was evident after a finger flexion-extension task using functional MRI. Functional MRI is a useful biomarker in detecting pain in hand osteoarthritis and could be used in future hand osteoarthritis pain studies to evaluate pain modulation strategies. PMID:24294351

  5. Functional MRI demonstrates pain perception in hand osteoarthritis has features of central pain processing.

    PubMed

    Sofat, Nidhi; Smee, Cori; Hermansson, Monika; Howard, Matthew; Baker, Emma H; Howe, Franklyn A; Barrick, Thomas R

    2013-11-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is typified by pain and reduced function. We hypothesised that people with HOA have enhanced sensitivity and activation of peripheral nociceptors in the hand, thereby potentiating chronic pain. In our study we aimed to assess if central sensitisation mediates pain perception in osteoarthritis of the hand. Participants with proximal and distal interphalangeal joint (PIP/DIP) HOA and non-OA controls were recruited. Clinical pain scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded before and after performing a painful hand task. Central pain processing was evaluated with functional brain neuroimaging (fMRI) using a finger flexion-extension (FFE) task performed over 3 minutes. Data was analysed with FMRIB software (www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl). Group mean activation of functional MRI signal between hand osteoarthritis and control non-arthritic participants was compared. Our group of hand OA participants reported high pain levels compared with non-arthritic controls as demonstrated by the mean VAS in hand OA participants of 59.31± 8.19 mm compared to 4.00 ± 1.89 mm in controls (p < 0.0001), despite all participants reporting analgesic use. Functional MRI analysis showed increased activation in the thalamus, cingulate, frontal and somatosensory cortex in the hand OA group but not in controls (thresholded at p < 0.05). Regions of activation were mapped to Brodmann areas 3, 4, 6, 9, 13, 22, 24 and 44. Activated regions found in our study are recognised higher brain pain processing centres implicated in central sensitisation. People with hand osteoarthritis demonstrated features of central sensitisation that was evident after a finger flexion-extension task using functional MRI. Functional MRI is a useful biomarker in detecting pain in hand osteoarthritis and could be used in future hand osteoarthritis pain studies to evaluate pain modulation strategies.

  6. Enhancing the optoelectronic properties of amorphous zinc tin oxide by subgap defect passivation: A theoretical and experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucavado, Esteban; Jeangros, Quentin; Urban, Daniel F.; Holovský, Jakub; Remes, Zdenek; Duchamp, Martial; Landucci, Federica; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Körner, Wolfgang; Elsässer, Christian; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Morales-Masis, Monica; Ballif, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    The link between sub-bandgap states and optoelectronic properties is investigated for amorphous zinc tin oxide (a-ZTO) thin films deposited by RF sputtering. a-ZTO samples were annealed up to 500 °C in oxidizing, neutral, and reducing atmospheres before characterizing their structural and optoelectronic properties by photothermal deflection spectroscopy, near-infrared-visible UV spectrophotometry, Hall effect, Rutherford backscattering, hydrogen forward scattering and transmission electron microscopy. By combining the experimental results with density functional theory calculations, oxygen deficiencies and resulting metal atoms clusters are identified as the source of subgap states, some of which act as electron donors but also as free electron scattering centers. The role of hydrogen on the optoelectronic properties is also discussed. Based on this detailed understanding of the different point defects present in a-ZTO, their impact on optoelectronic properties, and how they can be suppressed by postdeposition annealing treatments, an amorphous indium-free transparent conductive oxide, with a high thermal stability and an electron mobility up to 35 c m2V-1s-1 , is demonstrated by defect passivation.

  7. Histopathological features of bone regeneration in a canine segmental ulnar defect model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Today, finding an ideal biomaterial to treat the large bone defects, delayed unions and non-unions remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeions and researchers. Several studies have been carried out on the subject of bone regeneration, each having its own advantages. The present study has been designed in vivo to evaluate the effects of cellular auto-transplantation of tail vertebrae on healing of experimental critical bone defect in a dog model. Methods Six indigenous breeds of dog with 32 ± 3.6 kg average weight from both sexes (5 males and 1 female) received bilateral critical-sized ulnar segmental defects. After determining the health condition, divided to 2 groups: The Group I were kept as control I (n = 1) while in Group II (experimental group; n = 5) bioactive bone implants were inserted. The defects were implanted with either autogeneic coccygeal bone grafts in dogs with 3-4 cm diaphyseal defects in the ulna. Defects were stabilized with internal plate fixation, and the control defects were not stabilized. Animals were euthanized at 16 weeks and analyzed by histopathology. Results Histological evaluation of this new bone at sixteen weeks postoperatively revealed primarily lamellar bone, with the formation of new cortices and normal-appearing marrow elements. And also reformation cortical compartment and reconstitution of marrow space were observed at the graft-host interface together with graft resorption and necrosis responses. Finally, our data were consistent with the osteoconducting function of the tail autograft. Conclusions Our results suggested that the tail vertebrae autograft seemed to be a new source of autogenous cortical bone in order to supporting segmental long bone defects in dogs. Furthermore, cellular autotransplantation was found to be a successful replacement for the tail vertebrae allograft bone at 3-4 cm segmental defects in the canine mid- ulna. Clinical application using graft expanders or bone

  8. Do Linguistic Features of Science Test Items Prevent English Language Learners from Demonstrating Their Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Tracy; Kachchaf, Rachel; Rosebery, Ann; Warren, Beth; O'Connor, Mary Catherine; Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Little research has examined individual linguistic features that influence English language learners (ELLs) test performance. Furthermore, research has yet to explore the relationship between the science strand of test items and the types of linguistic features the items include. Utilizing Differential Item Functioning, this study examines ELL…

  9. Feature extraction in MFL signals of machined defects in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perazzo, R.; Pignotti, A.; Reich, S.; Stickar, P.

    2001-04-01

    Thirty defects of various shapes were machined on the external and internal wall surfaces of a 177 mm diameter ferromagnetic steel pipe. MFL signals were digitized and recorded at a frequency of 4 Khz. Various magnetizing currents and relative tube-probe velocities of the order of 2m/s were used. The identification of the location of the defect by a principal component/neural network analysis of the signal is shown to be more effective than the standard procedure of classification based on the average signal frequency.

  10. The role of nanoscale defect features in enhancing the thermoelectric performance of p-type nanostructured SiGe alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathula, Sivaiah; Jayasimhadri, M.; Gahtori, Bhasker; Singh, Niraj Kumar; Tyagi, Kriti; Srivastava, A. K.; Dhar, Ajay

    2015-07-01

    Despite SiGe being one of the most widely studied thermoelectric materials owing to its application in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG), the thermoelectric figure-of merit (ZT) of p-type SiGe is still quite low, resulting in poor device efficiencies. In the present study, we report a substantial enhancement in ZT ~ 1.2 at 900 °C for p-type nanostructured Si80Ge20 alloys by creating several types of defect features within the Si80Ge20 nanostructured matrix in a spectrum of nano to meso-scale dimensions during its nanostructuring, by employing mechanical alloying followed by spark plasma sintering. This enhancement in ZT, which is ~25% over the existing state-of-the-art value for a p-type nanostructured Si80Ge20 alloy, is primarily due to its ultralow thermal conductivity of ~2.04 W m-1 K-1 at 900 °C, resulting from the scattering of low-to-high wavelength heat-carrying phonons by different types of defect features in a range of nano to meso-scale dimensions in the Si80Ge20 nanostructured matrix. These include point defects, dislocations, isolated amorphous regions, nano-scale grain boundaries and more importantly, the nano to meso-scale residual porosity distributed throughout the Si80Ge20 matrix. These nanoscale multi-dimensional defect features have been characterized by employing scanning and transmission electron microscopy and correlated with the electrical and thermal transport properties, based on which the enhancement of ZT has been discussed.Despite SiGe being one of the most widely studied thermoelectric materials owing to its application in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG), the thermoelectric figure-of merit (ZT) of p-type SiGe is still quite low, resulting in poor device efficiencies. In the present study, we report a substantial enhancement in ZT ~ 1.2 at 900 °C for p-type nanostructured Si80Ge20 alloys by creating several types of defect features within the Si80Ge20 nanostructured matrix in a spectrum of nano to meso

  11. The role of nanoscale defect features in enhancing the thermoelectric performance of p-type nanostructured SiGe alloys.

    PubMed

    Bathula, Sivaiah; Jayasimhadri, M; Gahtori, Bhasker; Singh, Niraj Kumar; Tyagi, Kriti; Srivastava, A K; Dhar, Ajay

    2015-08-07

    Despite SiGe being one of the most widely studied thermoelectric materials owing to its application in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG), the thermoelectric figure-of merit (ZT) of p-type SiGe is still quite low, resulting in poor device efficiencies. In the present study, we report a substantial enhancement in ZT∼ 1.2 at 900 °C for p-type nanostructured Si80Ge20 alloys by creating several types of defect features within the Si80Ge20 nanostructured matrix in a spectrum of nano to meso-scale dimensions during its nanostructuring, by employing mechanical alloying followed by spark plasma sintering. This enhancement in ZT, which is ∼25% over the existing state-of-the-art value for a p-type nanostructured Si80Ge20 alloy, is primarily due to its ultralow thermal conductivity of ∼2.04 W m(-1) K(-1) at 900 °C, resulting from the scattering of low-to-high wavelength heat-carrying phonons by different types of defect features in a range of nano to meso-scale dimensions in the Si80Ge20 nanostructured matrix. These include point defects, dislocations, isolated amorphous regions, nano-scale grain boundaries and more importantly, the nano to meso-scale residual porosity distributed throughout the Si80Ge20 matrix. These nanoscale multi-dimensional defect features have been characterized by employing scanning and transmission electron microscopy and correlated with the electrical and thermal transport properties, based on which the enhancement of ZT has been discussed.

  12. Predicting internal yellow-poplar log defect features using surface indicators

    Treesearch

    R. Edward Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Determining the defects that are located within the log is crucial to understanding the tree/log resource for efficient processing. However, existing means of doing this non-destructively requires the use of expensive X-ray/CT, MRI, or microwave technology. These methods do not lend themselves to fast, efficient, and cost-effective analysis of logs and tree stems in...

  13. Bilateral epithelial defects after laser in situ keratomileusis. Clinical features, management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Rao, Srinivas K; Shome, Debraj; Iyer, Geetha K; Fogla, Rajesh; Padmanabhan, Prema

    2005-03-01

    To describe the preoperative characteristics, intraoperative details, management, and postoperative in patients with bilateral epithelial defects after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). Retrospective non-comparative case series. Six patients with bilateral epithelial defects after LASIK were part of a cohort of 605 patients undergoing bilateral LASIK at our center from December 2001 to April 2003. The mean age of the patients (5M:1F) was 28.5 +/- 7.9 years, and the average pretreatment myopic spherical equivalent (SE) refraction was 7.3 +/- 0.7 D (-4, -12.25D). An epithelial flap was present in 6 eyes and an epithelial defect with a mean diameter of 3 mm (2mm, 6mm) was seen in 6 eyes. In four patients the epithelial disturbance was bilaterally similar. All defects occurred in the inferior cornea and the epithelial flaps had the hinge positioned superiorly. None of the patients had ocular or systemic risk factors that could have resulted in this complication. A bandage contact lens was used in 6 eyes. At last follow-up of 5.5 +/- 9.5 months (0.25, 21 months), unaided visual acuity was 6/9 or better in 10 eyes. Best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) was maintained in 8 eyes, while 4 eyes lost one line of BSCVA. Recurrent corneal erosions were not reported in the follow-up period. These patients represent a hitherto unrecognised group of individuals who appear to have a subclinical weakness of adhesion of the corneal epithelium to the underlying structures, which is not evident on clinical examination. This results in bilateral epithelial disturbances after LASIK. Appropriate management results in satisfactory clinical outcomes. Other options for treatment of the fellow eye of such patients include the use of a different microkeratome, release of suction during the reverse pass of the Hansatome microkeratome, and photorefractive keratectomy if the refractive error is low.

  14. Defective autophagy leads to the suppression of stem-like features of CD271(+) osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Qing; Sun, Hao; Yin, Lijuan; Wu, Jiajun; Xu, Jun; He, Tianxiang; Yang, Chunlei; Liang, Chengwei

    2016-11-18

    As an important stress-response mechanism, autophagy plays crucial role in the tumor formation and drug resistance of cancer cells including osteosarcoma (OS). OS cancer stem cells (CSCs) also are considered a key factor of tumorigenesis, drug resistance and tumor recurrence. However, the relationship between autophagy and OS CSCs still remains unclear. CD271+ OS CSCs and CD271- OS cells were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting. The autophagy level was evaluated by the mRNA expression of autophagy genes, the protein level of LC3II and p62, and the mean number of GFP-LC3 dot per cell. Lentivirus-delivered specific shRNA was utilized to inhibit the corresponding gene expression. The cell viability was examined with CCK8 assay. The cell proliferation level was detected with BrdU staining assay. Cell death was determined by Annexin V/PI double staining of fluorescence activated cell sorting, lactate dehydrogenase release and caspase-3 activity. Tumorigenicity ability was evaluated by colony and sphere formation assay, the protein expression of stemness markers and tumor formation in nude mice. Our data indicated that CD271+ OS CSCs had a similar basic autophagy level with CD271- OS cells. Autophagy deficiency had no observable effects on the levels of cell proliferation and death both in CD271+ and CD271- OS cells under normal condition. However, CD271+ OS cells showed a higher autophagy activity than CD271- OS cells under hypoxia and low nutrient (LH) condition. Moreover, autophagy-deficient CD271+ OS cells lost the advantage of tolerance to LH condition compared to CD271- OS cells. Meanwhile, autophagy deficiency enhanced the sensitivity to chemotherapeutics in the CD271+ cells to the comparable level in the CD271- cells. More importantly, deficient-autophagy decreased the protein expression of stemness markers and caused the disappearance of the superiority in tumorigenicity in vitro and vivo in CD271+ OS cells. The results above demonstrated that autophagy

  15. A Drosophila Model of Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease Demonstrates Lysosomal-Autophagic Defects and Altered mTOR Signalling and Is Functionally Rescued by Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Grönke, Sebastian; Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván; Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Li, Li; Sirka, Ernestas; Gegg, Matthew; Mills, Kevin; Hardy, John; Bjedov, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) mutations are associated with Gaucher disease (GD), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by functional deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GBA), a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes glucosylceramide to ceramide and glucose. Neuronopathic forms of GD can be associated with rapid neurological decline (Type II) or manifest as a chronic form (Type III) with a wide spectrum of neurological signs. Furthermore, there is now a well-established link between GBA1 mutations and Parkinson's disease (PD), with heterozygote mutations in GBA1 considered the commonest genetic defect in PD. Here we describe a novel Drosophila model of GD that lacks the two fly GBA1 orthologs. This knock-out model recapitulates the main features of GD at the cellular level with severe lysosomal defects and accumulation of glucosylceramide in the fly brain. We also demonstrate a block in autophagy flux in association with reduced lifespan, age-dependent locomotor deficits and accumulation of autophagy substrates in dGBA-deficient fly brains. Furthermore, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is downregulated in dGBA knock-out flies, with a concomitant upregulation of Mitf gene expression, the fly ortholog of mammalian TFEB, likely as a compensatory response to the autophagy block. Moreover, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin is able to partially ameliorate the lifespan, locomotor, and oxidative stress phenotypes. Together, our results demonstrate that this dGBA1-deficient fly model is a useful platform for the further study of the role of lysosomal-autophagic impairment and the potential therapeutic benefits of rapamycin in neuronopathic GD. These results also have important implications for the role of autophagy and mTOR signaling in GBA1-associated PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We developed a Drosophila model of neuronopathic GD by knocking-out the fly orthologs of the GBA1 gene, demonstrating abnormal lysosomal pathology in the fly brain. Functioning lysosomes are

  16. Feasibility demonstration of a massively parallelizable optical near-field sensor for sub-wavelength defect detection and imaging.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat; Diaz, Rodolfo E

    2016-05-17

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. Full physics simulations of the photonic antenna detector element that enables this instrument, show that using conventional red laser light (in the 600 nm range) the detector magnifies the signal from an 8 nm particle by up to 1.5 orders of magnitude. The antenna is a shaped slot element in a 60 nm silver film. The ability of this detector element to resolve λ/78 objects is confirmed experimentally at radio frequencies by fabricating an artificial material structure that mimics the optical permittivity of silver scaled to 2 GHz, and "cutting" into it the slot antenna. The experimental set-up is also used to demonstrate the imaging of a patterned surface in which the critical dimensions of the pattern are λ/22 in size.

  17. Feasibility demonstration of a massively parallelizable optical near-field sensor for sub-wavelength defect detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat; Diaz, Rodolfo E.

    2016-05-01

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. Full physics simulations of the photonic antenna detector element that enables this instrument, show that using conventional red laser light (in the 600 nm range) the detector magnifies the signal from an 8 nm particle by up to 1.5 orders of magnitude. The antenna is a shaped slot element in a 60 nm silver film. The ability of this detector element to resolve λ/78 objects is confirmed experimentally at radio frequencies by fabricating an artificial material structure that mimics the optical permittivity of silver scaled to 2 GHz, and “cutting” into it the slot antenna. The experimental set-up is also used to demonstrate the imaging of a patterned surface in which the critical dimensions of the pattern are λ/22 in size.

  18. Feasibility demonstration of a massively parallelizable optical near-field sensor for sub-wavelength defect detection and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat; Diaz, Rodolfo E.

    2016-01-01

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. Full physics simulations of the photonic antenna detector element that enables this instrument, show that using conventional red laser light (in the 600 nm range) the detector magnifies the signal from an 8 nm particle by up to 1.5 orders of magnitude. The antenna is a shaped slot element in a 60 nm silver film. The ability of this detector element to resolve λ/78 objects is confirmed experimentally at radio frequencies by fabricating an artificial material structure that mimics the optical permittivity of silver scaled to 2 GHz, and “cutting” into it the slot antenna. The experimental set-up is also used to demonstrate the imaging of a patterned surface in which the critical dimensions of the pattern are λ/22 in size. PMID:27185385

  19. Myocardial perfusion defect in patients with coronary artery disease demonstrated by 64-multidetector computed tomography at rest.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kohichiro; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2011-07-01

    The first-pass imaging of 64-multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) using pharmacological stress has been used to assess myocardial perfusion. However, detection of myocardial ischemia at rest using MDCT has yet to be elucidated. We studied the incidence of myocardial perfusion defect (MPD) by 64-MDCT at rest and the effect of coronary revascularization therapy on MPD in patients with coronary artery disease. MPD by 64-MDCT at rest indicates myocardial ischemia. We studied 76 patients with coronary artery disease who underwent 64-MDCT before and after revascularization therapy and 55 patients who did not undergo revascularization therapy. According to percent diameter stenosis, we defined group A, B, C, and D to have stenosis between 70% and 90%, 50% and 69%, 30% and 49%, and 10% and 29%, respectively. We evaluated regional myocardial contrast enhancement by long and short axis planes. MPD was defined as hypoenhancement area of some extent with CT value <50 HU during diastole. MPD was found in 60.0% and 32.4% of group A and B patients, respectively (P = 0.0176). The incidence was 4.8% and 0% in group C and D patients, respectively (P<0.0001 compared with group A and B). All patients in group A and B and 2 patients with MPD in group C underwent coronary revascularization therapy. MPD disappeared after revascularization therapy in all but 3 group A patients. No patients showed new MPD after revascularization therapy. Our results demonstrate that a significant percentage of patients with significant coronary artery stenosis show MPD by 64-MDCT at rest, and these MPDs may represent myocardial ischemia. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A novel tunable filter featuring defect mode of the TE wave from one-dimensional photonic crystals doped by magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Xiangkun; Liu Shaobin; Li Chunzao; Zhang Haifeng

    2010-10-15

    A novel tunable filter featuring the defect mode of the TE wave from one-dimensional photonic crystals doped by magnetized plasma is presented. The photonic crystals are composed by SiO{sub 2} and air with one defect layer made by magnetized plasma. By the transfer matrix method and Bloch's theorem, we find out that the frequency of the defect mode can be modulated by plasma density or external magnetic field. Without changing the structure of the photonic crystal, the defect mode can be modulated in a larger frequency range, especially when the left-hand polarized electromagnetic wave is utilized.

  1. Erythroid precursors from patients with low-risk myelodysplasia demonstrate ultrastructural features of enhanced autophagy of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Houwerzijl, E J; Pol, H-W D; Blom, N R; van der Want, J J L; de Wolf, J Th M; Vellenga, E

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies in erythroid cells have shown that autophagy is an important process for the physiological clearance of mitochondria during terminal differentiation. However, autophagy also plays an important role in removing damaged and dysfunctional mitochondria. Defective mitochondria and impaired erythroid maturation are important characteristics of low-risk myelodysplasia. In this study we therefore questioned whether the autophagic clearance of mitochondria might be altered in erythroblasts from patients with refractory anemia (RA, n=3) and RA with ringed sideroblasts (RARS, n=6). Ultrastructurally, abnormal and iron-laden mitochondria were abundant, especially in RARS patients. A large proportion (52+/-16%) of immature and mature myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) erythroblasts contained cytoplasmic vacuoles, partly double membraned and positive for lysosomal marker LAMP-2 and mitochondrial markers, findings compatible with autophagic removal of dysfunctional mitochondria. In healthy controls only mature erythroblasts comprised these vacuoles (12+/-3%). These findings were confirmed morphometrically showing an increased vacuolar surface in MDS erythroblasts compared to controls (P<0.0001). In summary, these data indicate that MDS erythroblasts show features of enhanced autophagy at an earlier stage of erythroid differentiation than in normal controls. The enhanced autophagy might be a cell protective mechanism to remove defective iron-laden mitochondria.

  2. Specific features of the circular dichroism of a chiral photonic crystal with a defect layer inside in the presence of a gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The specific features of the circular dichroism (CD) spectra of a cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) layer with a defect layer inside in the presence of gain have been investigated. The features of the dependence of CD on the parameter characterizing the gain on the defect mode are analyzed for two cases: (i) gain is present in the defect layer and is absent in the CLC sublayers and (ii) gain is absent in the defect layer but is present in the CLC sublayers. It is shown that these dependences significantly differ in the two aforementioned cases. The dependences of the reflection, transmission, and absorption on the defect mode on the gain parameter have been investigated for incident light with both circular polarizations.

  3. Software defined networking (SDN) over space division multiplexing (SDM) optical networks: features, benefits and experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Amaya, N; Yan, S; Channegowda, M; Rofoee, B R; Shu, Y; Rashidi, M; Ou, Y; Hugues-Salas, E; Zervas, G; Nejabati, R; Simeonidou, D; Puttnam, B J; Klaus, W; Sakaguchi, J; Miyazawa, T; Awaji, Y; Harai, H; Wada, N

    2014-02-10

    We present results from the first demonstration of a fully integrated SDN-controlled bandwidth-flexible and programmable SDM optical network utilizing sliceable self-homodyne spatial superchannels to support dynamic bandwidth and QoT provisioning, infrastructure slicing and isolation. Results show that SDN is a suitable control plane solution for the high-capacity flexible SDM network. It is able to provision end-to-end bandwidth and QoT requests according to user requirements, considering the unique characteristics of the underlying SDM infrastructure.

  4. Tears of the fascia cruris demonstrate characteristic sonographic features: a case series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Webborn, Nick; Pritchard, Melanie; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background fascia cruris (FC) tears have recently been recognised in the literature, although little is known about their characteristic ultrasound findings. The aim was to describe the echo-graphic features of FC tears in order to improve recognition and diagnosis. Methods the ultrasound reports and images of >600 patients attending a specialist musculoskeletal clinic for Achilles tendon ultrasound scans between October 2010–May 2014 were reviewed. Any patient diagnosed with a FC tear had a structured data set extracted. All ultrasound images were performed by one consultant radiologist. Bilateral Achilles images were available for analysis. Results sixteen patients from >600 subjects were diagnosed with a FC tear. Fourteen subjects were male and two female (mean age 37.8; range 23–61), with seven elite level sports men. Nine tears were right sided and seven left, with eight situated laterally and seven medially. Seven of the tears were situated in the musculotendinous junction. Symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy co-existed in ten of sixteen subjects (average transverse diameter of Achilles tendon = 7.1±2.0 mm). Conclusion FC tears should be considered in the differential diagnoses for Achillodynia, diagnosed using their characteristic ultrasound findings, with a hypoechoic area at the medial or lateral attachment to the Achilles tendon in the transverse plane. PMID:26958540

  5. Quantitative Sensory Testing in Painful Hand Osteoarthritis Demonstrates Features of Peripheral Sensitisation

    PubMed Central

    Wajed, Julekha; Ejindu, Vivian; Heron, Christine; Hermansson, Monika; Kiely, Patrick; Sofat, Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is a prevalent condition for which treatments are based on analgesia and physical therapies. Our primary objective was to evaluate pain perception in participants with HOA by assessing the characteristics of nodal involvement, pain threshold in each hand joint, and radiological severity. We hypothesised that inflammation in hand osteoarthritis joints enhances sensitivity and firing of peripheral nociceptors, thereby causing chronic pain. Participants with proximal and distal interphalangeal (PIP and DIP) joint HOA and non-OA controls were recruited. Clinical parameters of joint involvement were measured including clinical nodes, VAS (visual analogue score) for pain (0–100 mm scale), HAQ (health assessment questionnaire), and Kellgren-Lawrence scores for radiological severity and pain threshold measurement were performed. The mean VAS in HOA participants was 59.3 mm ± 8.19 compared with 4.0 mm ± 1.89 in the control group (P < 0.0001). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) demonstrated lower pain thresholds in DIP/PIP joints and other subgroups in the OA group including the thumb, metacarpophalangeal (MCPs), joints, and wrists (P < 0.008) but not in controls (P = 0.348). Our data demonstrate that HOA subjects are sensitised to pain due to increased firing of peripheral nociceptors. Future work to evaluate mechanisms of peripheral sensitisation warrants further investigation. PMID:23209475

  6. Oxygenated fixation demonstrates novel and improved ultrastructural features of the human endolymphatic sac.

    PubMed

    Møller, Martin Nue; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe in detail the ultrastructure of the human endolymphatic sac using a new and improved method of fixation as well as a refined surgical approach in obtaining specimens. Transmission electron microscopy of the human endolymphatic sac, employing an oxygenated fixative. Eighteen tissue samples of the human endolymphatic sac were obtained during surgery for vestibular schwannoma using the translabyrinthine approach. The specimens were fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde in an oxygenated fluorocarbon blood substitute vehicle before preparation by routine methods for transmission electron microscopy. We focused on the epithelial cell layer, subepithelial tissue, intraluminal content, and vascular tissue in both the intra- and extraosseous part of the endolymphatic sac. We observed well-defined endolymphatic sac epithelial cell lining in all 18 specimens. In general, we found very well-preserved specimens with well-defined intracellular structures. In contrast to the results in former studies, a minimum of fixation artifacts was observed in the present study. Three different cell types were observed in the intraosseous part of the sac: mitochondria-rich cells, ribosome-rich cells, and nonclassifiable cells. A fourth cell type was found in the extraosseous part. Novel ultrastructural features of the epithelial lining and the subepithelial layer are described and discussed. The results in the present study indicate an improvement in obtaining human tissue with optimal fixation for ultrastructural analysis and provide several novel morphologic observations. The potential functions of the endolymphatic sac are discussed with reference to former studies. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Innovative Structural Design Features for a 10 m Solar Sail Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, G.; Moore, J.; Clayton, W.

    2004-01-01

    The successful development of sail architectures will require careful attention to a number of key issues including but not limited to material strength issues, stress conditions for the membrane, load interactions between membrane and structure, and membrane material planarity. Along with the inherent challenges of fabricating and handling very large membrane structures these issues will pose real challenges for the near-term development of practical sail technologies. SRS has developed innovative technologies that deal directly with the challenges of developing very large sail membranes. Some of these technologies include edge reinforcements and innovative reinforcement attachment techniques, production of flight durable sail materials of less than 2.5 micron thicknesses and large scale fabrication techniques. SRS has employed these technologies in several large 10 m demonstrators that have been delivered to LaRC for solar vacuum testing. Details of the design of this system will be discussed.

  8. Innovative Structural Design Features for a 10 m Solar Sail Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, G.; Moore, J.; Clayton, W.

    2004-01-01

    The successful development of sail architectures will require careful attention to a number of key issues including but not limited to material strength issues, stress conditions for the membrane, load interactions between membrane and structure, and membrane material planarity. Along with the inherent challenges of fabricating and handling very large membrane structures these issues will pose real challenges for the near-term development of practical sail technologies. SRS has developed innovative technologies that deal directly with the challenges of developing very large sail membranes. Some of these technologies include edge reinforcements and innovative reinforcement attachment techniques, production of flight durable sail materials of less than 2.5 micron thicknesses and large scale fabrication techniques. SRS has employed these technologies in several large 10 m demonstrators that have been delivered to LaRC for solar vacuum testing. Details of the design of this system will be discussed.

  9. Special features of annealing of radiation defects in irradiated p-Si crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pagava, T. A.

    2007-06-15

    p-Si single crystals grown by the Czochralski method were studied; the hole concentration in these crystals was p = 6 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. The samples were irradiated with 8-MeV electrons at 300 K and were then annealed isochronously in the temperature range T{sub ann} = 100-500 deg. C. The studies were carried out using the Hall method in the temperature range of 77-300 K. It is shown that annealing of divacancies occurs via their transformation into the B{sub s}V{sub 2} complexes. This complex introduces the energy level located at E{sub v} + 0.22 eV into the band gap and is annealed out in the temperature range of 360-440 deg. C. It is assumed that defects with the level E{sub v} + 0.2 eV that anneal out in the temperature range T{sub ann} = 340-450 deg. C are multicomponent complexes and contain the atoms of the doping and background impurities.

  10. Feasibility Demonstration of a Massively Parallelizable Near-Field Sensor for Sub-Wavelength Defect Detection and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, consisting of a remotely interrogating array of dipoles, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. In the present work a remotely interrogating slot antenna inside a 60nm silver slab is designed which increases the signal to noise ratio of the original system. The antenna is tuned to resonance at 600nm range by taking advantage of the plasmon resonance properties of the metal's negative permittivity and judicious shaping of the slot element. Full-physics simulations show the capability of detecting an 8nm particle using red light illumination. The sensitivity to the lambda/78 particle is attained by detecting the change induced on the antenna's far field signature by the proximate particle, a change that is 15dB greater than the scattering signature of the particle by itself. To verify the capabilities of this technology in a readily accessible experimental environment, a radiofrequency scale model is designed using a meta-material to mimic the optical properties of silver in the 2GHz to 5GHz range. Various approaches to the replication of the metal's behavior are explored in a trade-off between fidelity to the metal's natural plasmon response, desired bandwidth of the demonstration, and ii manufacturability of the meta-material. The simulation and experimental results successfully verify the capability of the proposed near-field sensor in sub-wavelength detection and imaging not only as a proof of concept for optical frequencies but also as a

  11. Graphene-augmented nanofiber scaffolds demonstrate new features in cells behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Roman; Gasik, Michael; Neuman, Toomas; Hussainova, Irina

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) customized scaffolds capable to mimic a native extracellular matrix open new frontiers in cells manipulation and advanced therapy. The major challenge is in a proper substrate for in vitro models on engineered scaffolds, capable to modulate cells differentiation. Here for the first time we demonstrate novel design and functionality of the 3D porous scaffolds of aligned, self-assembled ceramic nanofibers of ultra-high anisotropy ratio (~107), augmented into graphene shells. This unique hybrid nano-network allows an exceptional combination of selective guidance stimuli of stem cells differentiation, immune reactions variations, and local immobilization of cancer cells, which was not available before. The scaffolds were shown to be able to direct human mesenchymal stem cells (important for stimulation of neuronal and muscle cells) preferential orientation, to suppress major inflammatory factors, and to localize cancer cells; all without additions of specific culture media. The selective downregulation of specific cytokines is anticipated as a new tool for understanding of human immune system and ways of treatment of associated diseases. The effects observed are self-regulated by cells only, without side effects, usually arising from use of external factors. New scaffolds may open new horizons for stem cells fate control such as towards axons and neurites regeneration (Alzheimer’s disease) as well as cancer therapy development.

  12. Graphene-augmented nanofiber scaffolds demonstrate new features in cells behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Roman; Gasik, Michael; Neuman, Toomas; Hussainova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) customized scaffolds capable to mimic a native extracellular matrix open new frontiers in cells manipulation and advanced therapy. The major challenge is in a proper substrate for in vitro models on engineered scaffolds, capable to modulate cells differentiation. Here for the first time we demonstrate novel design and functionality of the 3D porous scaffolds of aligned, self-assembled ceramic nanofibers of ultra-high anisotropy ratio (~107), augmented into graphene shells. This unique hybrid nano-network allows an exceptional combination of selective guidance stimuli of stem cells differentiation, immune reactions variations, and local immobilization of cancer cells, which was not available before. The scaffolds were shown to be able to direct human mesenchymal stem cells (important for stimulation of neuronal and muscle cells) preferential orientation, to suppress major inflammatory factors, and to localize cancer cells; all without additions of specific culture media. The selective downregulation of specific cytokines is anticipated as a new tool for understanding of human immune system and ways of treatment of associated diseases. The effects observed are self-regulated by cells only, without side effects, usually arising from use of external factors. New scaffolds may open new horizons for stem cells fate control such as towards axons and neurites regeneration (Alzheimer’s disease) as well as cancer therapy development. PMID:27443974

  13. Virtual reconstruction of very large skull defects featuring partly and completely missing midsagittal planes.

    PubMed

    Senck, Sascha; Coquerelle, Michael; Weber, Gerhard W; Benazzi, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    Despite the development of computer-based methods, cranial reconstruction of very large skull defects remains a challenge particularly if the damage affects the midsagittal region hampering the usage of mirror imaging techniques. This pilot study aims to deliver a new method that goes beyond mirror imaging, giving the possibility to reconstruct crania characterized by large missing areas, which might be useful in the fields of paleoanthropology, bioarcheology, and forensics. We test the accuracy of digital reconstructions in cases where two-thirds or more of a human cranium were missing. A three-dimensional (3D) virtual model of a human cranium was virtually damaged twice to compare two destruction-reconstruction scenarios. In the first case, a small fraction of the midsagittal region was still preserved, allowing the application of mirror imaging techniques. In the second case, the damage affected the complete midsagittal region, which demands a new approach to estimate the position of the midsagittal plane. Reconstructions were carried out using CT scans from a sample of modern humans (12 males and 13 females), to which 3D digital modeling techniques and geometric morphometric methods were applied. As expected, the second simulation showed a larger variability than the first one, which underlines the fact that the individual midsagittal plane is of course preferable in order to minimize the reconstruction error. However, in both simulations the Procrustes mean shape was an effective reference for the reconstruction of the entire cranium, producing models that showed a remarkably low error of about 3 mm, given the extent of missing data.

  14. Discriminant Analysis of Defective and Non-Defective Field Pea (Pisum sativum L.) into Broad Market Grades Based on Digital Image Features.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Linda S; Panozzo, Joseph F; Salisbury, Phillip A; Ford, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Field peas (Pisum sativum L.) are generally traded based on seed appearance, which subjectively defines broad market-grades. In this study, we developed an objective Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) model to classify market grades of field peas based on seed colour, shape and size traits extracted from digital images. Seeds were imaged in a high-throughput system consisting of a camera and laser positioned over a conveyor belt. Six colour intensity digital images were captured (under 405, 470, 530, 590, 660 and 850nm light) for each seed, and surface height was measured at each pixel by laser. Colour, shape and size traits were compiled across all seed in each sample to determine the median trait values. Defective and non-defective seed samples were used to calibrate and validate the model. Colour components were sufficient to correctly classify all non-defective seed samples into correct market grades. Defective samples required a combination of colour, shape and size traits to achieve 87% and 77% accuracy in market grade classification of calibration and validation sample-sets respectively. Following these results, we used the same colour, shape and size traits to develop an LDA model which correctly classified over 97% of all validation samples as defective or non-defective.

  15. Echocardiographic features defining right dominant unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect: a multi-institutional Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Meryl S; Jegatheeswaran, Anusha; Baffa, Jeanne M; Gremmels, David B; Overman, David M; Caldarone, Christopher A; McCrindle, Brian W; Mertens, Luc

    2013-07-01

    Definition and management of right dominant unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) remains challenging because unbalance entails a spectrum of left heart hypoplasia. Previous work has highlighted atrioventricular valve (AVV) index as a reasonable defining echocardiographic measure. We sought to assess which additional echocardiographic features might provide further characterization. From a multi-institutional cohort of complete AVSD, 52 preoperative echocardiograms of patients with presumed right dominant unbalanced AVSD (based on AVV index) and 60 randomly selected preoperative echocardiograms from patients with presumed balanced AVSD were reviewed. Cluster analysis of echocardiographic variables was used to group patients with similar features. Discriminant function analysis was used to explore which variables differentiated these groups. Three groups were identified from the cluster analysis. Echocardiographic variables that differentiated these groups were right ventricle:left ventricle inflow angle, LV width/LV length, left AVV color diameter at smallest inflow, left AVV color diameter at annulus, right AVV overriding left atrium, and LV width. Based on procedures and outcomes, 1 group likely represented balanced patients, whereas 2 groups with similar outcomes likely represented unbalanced patients. The dominant differentiating echocardiographic variable between the 3 cluster groups was the right ventricle:LV inflow angle (partial R²=0.86), defined as the angle between the base of the right ventricle and LV free wall, using the crest of the ventricular septum as apex of the angle. The angle of right ventricle/LV inflow and other surrogates of inflow may be important defining echocardiographic measures of right dominant unbalanced AVSD, although confirmation is needed.

  16. Demonstration of pattern transfer into sub-100 nm polysilicon line/space features patterned with extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G. F.; Henderson, C. C.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Mangat, P. J. S.; Cobb, J.; Hector, S. D.

    1999-11-01

    In two separate experiments, we have successfully demonstrated the transfer of dense- and loose-pitch line/space (L/S) photoresist features, patterned with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, into an underlying hard mask material. In both experiments, a deep-UV photoresist ({approx}90 nm thick) was spin cast in bilayer format onto a hard mask (50-90 nm thick) and was subsequently exposed to EUV radiation using a 10x reduction EUV exposure system. The EUV reticle was fabricated at Motorola (Tempe, AZ) using a subtractive process with Ta-based absorbers on Mo/Si multilayer mask blanks. In the first set of experiments, following the EUV exposures, the L/S patterns were transferred first into a SiO{sub 2} hard mask (60 nm thick) using a reactive ion etch (RIE), and then into polysilicon (350 nm thick) using a triode-coupled plasma RIE etcher at the University of California, Berkeley, microfabrication facilities. The latter etch process, which produced steep (>85 degree sign ) sidewalls, employed a HBr/Cl chemistry with a large (>10:1) etch selectivity of polysilicon to silicon dioxide. In the second set of experiments, hard mask films of SiON (50 nm thick) and SiO{sub 2} (87 nm thick) were used. A RIE was performed at Motorola using a halogen gas chemistry that resulted in a hard mask-to-photoresist etch selectivity >3:1 and sidewall profile angles {>=}85 degree sign . Line edge roughness (LER) and linewidth critical dimension (CD) measurements were performed using Sandia's GORA(c) CD digital image analysis software. Low LER values (6-9 nm, 3{sigma}, one side) and good CD linearity (better than 10%) were demonstrated for the final pattern-transferred dense polysilicon L/S features from 80 to 175 nm. In addition, pattern transfer (into polysilicon) of loose-pitch (1:2) L/S features with CDs{>=}60 nm was demonstrated. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  17. Non-Invasive Imaging Demonstrates Clinical Features of Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Rat Adjuvant Model: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, J.; Kolbinger, F.; Kramer, I.; Beckmann, N.

    2016-01-01

    Main features of ankylosing spondylitis like inflammatory erosive osteopenia and bony overgrowth are recapitulated in rats challenged with complete Freund’s adjuvant. In vivo changes induced in the rat spine were followed longitudinally by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and assessed terminally by micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) and histology. Signals reflecting inflammation were detected by MRI at levels L5-L6 throughout the experiment, peaking at day 27 after adjuvant. Bone erosion and formation occurred from this time point onward, as confirmed by micro-CT. Histology confirmed the inflammation and bone remodeling. The present study demonstrates the potential of imaging for longitudinal assessments of spinal changes in this animal model and the excellent correlation between in vivo images and histology underlines its fundamental role in the validation of non-invasive imaging. PMID:28076929

  18. Field Demonstration of Electro-Scan Defect Location Technology for Condition Assessment of Wastewater Collection Systems - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    A USEPA-sponsored field demonstration program was conducted to gather technically reliable cost and performance information on the electro-scan (FELL -41) pipeline condition assessment technology. Electro-scan technology can be used to estimate the magnitude and location of pote...

  19. Field Demonstration of Electro-Scan Defect Location Technology for Condition Assessment of Wastewater Collection Systems - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    A USEPA-sponsored field demonstration program was conducted to gather technically reliable cost and performance information on the electro-scan (FELL -41) pipeline condition assessment technology. Electro-scan technology can be used to estimate the magnitude and location of pote...

  20. Demonstration of defective C3-receptor-mediated clearance by the reticuloendothelial system in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B S; Bohnsack, J F; Sourlis, S H; Frank, M M; Quinn, T C

    1987-01-01

    The function of macrophage C3 receptors was assessed in vivo by measuring the clearance of C3-sensitized autologous erythrocytes in seven acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, eight healthy homosexual men, eight healthy heterosexual men, and four infected controls. Healthy heterosexual men had an initial clearance of 50.1 +/- 2.0% of the inoculum, with a release of a small portion of these cells (10.9 +/- 1.3%) into the circulation. Healthy homosexual men had a greater initial clearance of 66.0 +/- 4.2% (P less than 0.01) followed by a similar release (14.0 +/- 3.3%). AIDS patients had an initial clearance of 60.6 +/- 7.5% but had a relatively large release of cells (25.6 +/- 3.2%) (P less than 0.005 vs. heterosexuals; P less than 0.05 vs. homosexuals), suggesting a failure of macrophage phagocytosis. Infected controls had an initial clearance of 59.4 +/- 4.9%, with a release of 19.6 +/- 3.8% (P = NS vs. AIDS). These data, in addition to Fc-receptor dysfunction, demonstrate a global reticuloendothelial system dysfunction in AIDS patients. This may contribute to their frequent infections with opportunistic pathogens and inappropriate immune responses against these microorganisms. Images PMID:3546375

  1. Defect Detection in Arc-Welding Processes by Means of the Line-to-Continuum Method and Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Allende, P. Beatriz; Mirapeix, Jesus; Conde, Olga M.; Cobo, Adolfo; Lopez-Higuera, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma optical spectroscopy is widely employed in on-line welding diagnostics. The determination of the plasma electron temperature, which is typically selected as the output monitoring parameter, implies the identification of the atomic emission lines. As a consequence, additional processing stages are required with a direct impact on the real time performance of the technique. The line-to-continuum method is a feasible alternative spectroscopic approach and it is particularly interesting in terms of its computational efficiency. However, the monitoring signal highly depends on the chosen emission line. In this paper, a feature selection methodology is proposed to solve the uncertainty regarding the selection of the optimum spectral band, which allows the employment of the line-to-continuum method for on-line welding diagnostics. Field test results have been conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the solution. PMID:22408478

  2. Placental C4d deposition is a feature of defective placentation: observations in cases of preeclampsia and miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Na; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Lee, Joong Yeup; Hwang, Doyeong; Kim, Ki Chul; Lee, JoonHo; Shim, Jae-Yoon; Kim, Chong Jai

    2015-06-01

    Placental C4d deposition is frequent in preeclampsia, and shallow placentation is a characteristic of both preeclampsia and miscarriage. This study was conducted to determine the relationship among placental C4d, maternal human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, and placental pathology in preeclampsia and miscarriage cases. The patient population (N = 104) included those with (1) preterm preeclampsia with fetal growth restriction (PE-FGR; n = 21), (2) preterm preeclampsia (PE; n = 20), (3) spontaneous preterm delivery (sPTD; n = 39), and (4) miscarriage (n = 24). C4d immunohistochemistry was performed, and the presence of maternal plasma HLA antibodies was examined. C4d staining of the syncytiotrophoblast was more frequent in PE-FGR patients (76.2 %) than in PE (10.0 %; p < 0.001) and sPTD (2.6 %; p < 0.001) patients. Maternal HLA antibody-positive rate was not different among the study groups. There was a significant correlation between C4d immunoreactivity and placental pathology consistent with maternal vascular underperfusion (p < 0.001) but not with maternal HLA antibody status. In miscarriages, the positive rates of C4d, HLA class I, and HLA class II antibodies were 58.3, 25.0, and 12.5 %, respectively. There was no correlation between the presence of maternal HLA class I or II antibodies and placental C4d immunoreactivity. This study confirms frequent placental C4d deposition in preeclampsia with fetal growth restriction and miscarriage. The association between placental C4d deposition and pathological findings of maternal vascular underperfusion suggests that C4d staining of the syncytiotrophoblast is a consequence of defective placentation rather than of a specific maternal immune response against fetal HLA. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of C4d as a biomarker of placentas at risk.

  3. A human imprinting centre demonstrates conserved acquisition but diverged maintenance of imprinting in a mouse model for Angelman syndrome imprinting defects.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Karen A; DuBose, Amanda J; Futtner, Christopher R; Elmore, Michael D; Brannan, Camilynn I; Resnick, James L

    2006-02-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are caused by the loss of imprinted gene expression from chromosome 15q11-q13. Imprinted gene expression in the region is regulated by a bipartite imprinting centre (IC), comprising the PWS-IC and the AS-IC. The PWS-IC is a positive regulatory element required for bidirectional activation of a number of paternally expressed genes. The function of the AS-IC appears to be to suppress PWS-IC function on the maternal chromosome through a methylation imprint acquired during female gametogenesis. Here we have placed the entire mouse locus under the control of a human PWS-IC by targeted replacement of the mouse PWS-IC with the equivalent human region. Paternal inheritance of the human PWS-IC demonstrates for the first time that a positive regulatory element in the PWS-IC has diverged. These mice show postnatal lethality and growth deficiency, phenotypes not previously attributed directly to the affected genes. Following maternal inheritance, the human PWS-IC is able to acquire a methylation imprint in mouse oocytes, suggesting that acquisition of the methylation imprint is conserved. However, the imprint is lost in somatic cells, showing that maintenance has diverged. This maternal imprinting defect results in expression of maternal Ube3a-as and repression of Ube3a in cis, providing evidence that Ube3a is regulated by its antisense and creating the first reported mouse model for AS imprinting defects.

  4. Demonstration of thermal control, microstructure control, defect mitigation and process parameter database generation for Ti-6Al-4V Direct Digital Manufacturing - Understanding defect mitigation and process parameter database generation for direct digital manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Sridharan, Niyanth; Dinwiddie, Ralph; Robson, Alan; Jordan, Brian; Chaudhary, Anil; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Researchers from Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with Applied Optimization (AO) to understand and evaluate the propensity for defect formation in builds manufactured using DM3D-POM laser direct metal deposition. The main aim of this collaboration was to understand the character of powder jet behavior as a function of the nozzle parameters such as cover gas, carrier gas, and shaping gas. In order to evaluate the sensitivities of the parameters used in model, various experiments were performed with in-situ monitoring of the powder stream characteristics using a high speed camera. A wide variety of conditions while keeping the hopper motor rpm constant, including laser power and travel speed were explored. The cross sections of the deposits were characterized using optical microscopy.

  5. Demonstration Erosion Control Project Monitoring Program. Volume 6. Appendix E. Expeditious Design and Review of Pipe-Drop Drainage Features

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Monitoring Program Fiscal Year 1992 Report Volume VI: Appendix E Expeditious Design and Review of Pipe-Drop Drainage Features by Chester C. Watson...Design and Review of Pipe-Drop Drainage Features by Chester C. Watson, Steven R. AM CH Engineering Department Engineering Research Cener Coldo State...Expeditious design and review of pipe-drop drainage fa tetures. V. byieter VC. Seris:n Techncal repot prprdfrU.S. Army EngineerWaewy trasExperiment Station m

  6. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-07-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces.

  7. Omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus and spinal defect (OEIS Complex) with overlapping features of body stalk anomaly (limb body wall complex).

    PubMed

    Mandrekar, Suresh R S; Amoncar, Sangeeta; Banaulikar, Siddhartha; Sawant, Vishal; Pinto, R G W

    2014-04-01

    OEIS is an extremely rare constellation of malformations, which includes omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus, and spinal defect. We report here autopsy findings in a case of OEIS complex, which apart from the major anomalies of the complex had bilateral club foot that is, congenital talipes equinovarus, right hydroureter, and body stalk anomaly. The umbilical cord was absent, and the umbilical vessels were embedded in an amniotic sheet, which connected the skin margin of the anterior body wall defect to the placenta, this feature being the hallmark of limb body wall complex (LBWC). This case further supports the view that OEIS and LBWC represent a continuous spectrum of abnormalities rather than separate conditions and may share a common etiology and pathogenetic mechanism as proposed by some authors.

  8. Omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus and spinal defect (OEIS Complex) with overlapping features of body stalk anomaly (limb body wall complex)

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar, Suresh R. S.; Amoncar, Sangeeta; Banaulikar, Siddhartha; Sawant, Vishal; Pinto, R. G. W.

    2014-01-01

    OEIS is an extremely rare constellation of malformations, which includes omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus, and spinal defect. We report here autopsy findings in a case of OEIS complex, which apart from the major anomalies of the complex had bilateral club foot that is, congenital talipes equinovarus, right hydroureter, and body stalk anomaly. The umbilical cord was absent, and the umbilical vessels were embedded in an amniotic sheet, which connected the skin margin of the anterior body wall defect to the placenta, this feature being the hallmark of limb body wall complex (LBWC). This case further supports the view that OEIS and LBWC represent a continuous spectrum of abnormalities rather than separate conditions and may share a common etiology and pathogenetic mechanism as proposed by some authors. PMID:25400352

  9. Orbicularis oris muscle defects as an expanded phenotypic feature in nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Neiswanger, Katherine; Weinberg, Seth M; Rogers, Carolyn R; Brandon, Carla A; Cooper, Margaret E; Bardi, Kathleen M; Deleyiannis, Frederic W B; Resick, Judith M; Bowen, A'Delbert; Mooney, Mark P; de Salamanca, Javier Enríquez; González, Beatriz; Maher, Brion S; Martin, Rick A; Marazita, Mary L

    2007-06-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip+/-cleft palate is a complex disease with a wide phenotypic spectrum; occult defects of the superior orbicularis oris muscle may represent the mildest subclinical form of the lip portion of the phenotype. This study used high-resolution ultrasonography to compare the frequency of discontinuities in the OO muscle in 525 unaffected relatives of individuals with nonsyndromic cleft lip+/-cleft palate versus 257 unaffected controls. OO muscle discontinuities were observed in 54 (10.3%) of the non-cleft relatives, compared to 15 (5.8%) of the controls-a statistically significant increase (P=0.04). Male relatives had a significantly higher rate of discontinuities than male controls (12.0% vs. 3.2%; P=0.01); female relatives also had a higher rate of discontinuities than female controls, but the increase was not statistically significant (8.9% vs. 7.4%; P=0.56). These data confirm the hypothesis that subepithelial OO muscle defects are a mild manifestation of the cleft lip phenotype. Identification of subepithelial OO muscle defects may be important in a clinical setting, as a means of providing more accurate recurrence risk estimates to relatives in cleft families. Furthermore, the expansion of the cleft lip+/-cleft palate phenotypic spectrum should improve the power of genetic studies. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Knots as an incongruent product feature: a demonstration of the potential for character-marked hardwood furniture

    Treesearch

    M.S. Bumgardner; R.J. Bush; C.D. West; C.D. West

    2001-01-01

    Increased use of character-marks, or naturally occurring features of wood such as knots, in wood household furniture has received attention recently as a means for U.S. furniture manufacturers to make more efficient use of forest resources. However, little information exists concerning furniture retailers' perceptions of character-marked wood. Propositions that...

  11. Shaping solitons by lattice defects

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Liangwei; Ye Fangwei

    2010-11-15

    We demonstrate the existence of shape-preserving self-localized nonlinear modes in a two-dimensional photonic lattice with a flat-topped defect that covers several lattice sites. The balance of diffraction, defocusing nonlinearity, and optical potential induced by lattices with various forms of defects results in novel families of solitons featuring salient properties. We show that the soliton shape can be controlled by varying the shape of lattice defects. The existence domains of fundamental and vortex solitons in the semi-infinite gap expand with the defect amplitude. Vortex solitons in the semi-infinite gap with rectangular intensity distributions will break into dipole solitons when the propagation constant exceeds a critical value. In the semi-infinite and first-finite gaps, we find that lattices with rectangular defects can support stable vortex solitons which exhibit noncanonical phase structure.

  12. Specific features of the spectral properties of a photonic crystal with a nanocomposite defect with allowance for the size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, S. Ya.; Pankin, P. S.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) with a structure defect (a layer of isotropic nanocomposite inserted between two multilayer dielectric mirrors) have been investigated. The nanocomposite consists of spherical gold nanoparticles dispersed in a transparent matrix; it is characterized by effective resonant permittivity. The dependence of the transmission and absorption spectra on the size and concentration of nanoparticles is analyzed. It is shown that the transmission spectrum contains, along with the band gap caused by Bragg diffraction of light, an additional nontransmission band due to the nanocomposite absorption near the resonant frequency.

  13. Strip-Pattern-Spheres Self-Assembled from Polypeptide-Based Polymer Mixtures: Structure and Defect Features

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xingyu; Guan, Zhou; Lin, Jiaping; Cai, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    We found that poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PBLG-b-PEG) rod-coil block copolymers and polystyrene (PS) homopolymers can cooperatively self-assemble into nano-spheres with striped patterns on their surfaces (strip-pattern-spheres) in aqueous solution. With assistance of dissipative particle dynamics simulation, it is discovered that the PS homopolymers form a spherical template core and the PBLG-b-PEG block copolymers assemble into striped patterns on the spherical surface. The hydrophobic PBLG rods are packed orderly in the strips, while the hydrophilic PEG blocks stabilize the strip-pattern-spheres in solution. Defects such as dislocations and disclinations can be observed in the striped patterns. Self-assembling temperature and sphere radius are found to affect defect densities in the striped patterns. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate how PBLG-b-PEG and PS cooperatively self-assemble into hierarchical spheres with striped patterns on surfaces. PMID:27418116

  14. A study of the preparation of epitaxy-ready polished surfaces of (100) Gallium Antimonide substrates demonstrating ultra-low surface defects for MBE growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Rebecca; Tybjerg, Marius; Flint, Patrick; Fastenau, Joel; Lubyshev, Dmitri; Liu, Amy W. K.; Furlong, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) is an important Group III-V compound semiconductor which is suitable for use in the manufacture of a wide variety of optoelectronic devices such as infra-red (IR) focal plane detectors. A significant issue for the commercialisation of these products is the production of epitaxy ready GaSb, which remains a challenge for the substrate manufacturer, as the stringent demands of the MBE process, requires a high quality starting wafer. In this work large diameter GaSb crystals were grown by the Czochralski (Cz) method and wafers prepared for chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP). Innovative epi-ready treatments and novel post polish cleaning methodologies were applied. The effect of these modified finishing chemistries on substrate surface quality and the performance of epitaxially grown MBE GaSb IR detector structures were investigated. Improvements in the lowering of surface defectivity, maintaining of the surface roughness and optimisation of all flatness parameters is confirmed both pre and post MBE growth. In this paper we also discuss the influence of bulk GaSb quality on substrate surface performance through the characterisation of epitaxial structures grown on near zero etch pit density (EPD) crystals. In summary progression and development of current substrate polishing techniques has been demonstrated to deliver a consistent improved surface on GaSb wafers with a readily desorbed oxide for epitaxial growth.

  15. Pituitary and ovarian abnormalities demonstrated by CT and ultrasound in children with features of the McCune-Albright syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Rieth, K.G.; Comite, F.; Shawker, T.H.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    In a random series of 97 children referred to the National Institutes of Health with a presumptive diagnosis of precocious puberty, eight girls were found to have features of the McCune-Albright syndrome, including fibrous dysplasia of bone and/or skin lesions resembling cafe au lait spots. Radiographic evaluation of these patients included computed tomography of the head and pelvic ultrasound. The pituitary glands were suspicious for abnormality in five of the eight girls. Seven girls underwent pelvic ultrasound, and in all of them the ovaries were considered to be abnormal for their chronological age; in addition, two had functional ovarian cysts. The role of diagnostic radiological studies in the diagnosis of this syndrome is discussed.

  16. Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered.

  17. Novel features of radiation-induced bystander signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated using root micro-grafting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Li, Fanghua; Xu, Wei; Bian, Po; Wu, Yuejin; Wu, Lijun

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been well demonstrated in whole organisms, as well as in single-cell culture models in vitro and multi-cellular tissues models in vitro, however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, including the temporal and spatial course of bystander signaling. The RIBE in vivo has been shown to exist in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana). Importantly, the unique plant grafting provides a delicate approach for studying the temporal and spatial course of bystander signaling in the context of whole plants. In our previous study, the time course of bystander signaling in plants has been well demonstrated using the root micro-grafting technique. In this study, we further investigated the temporal cooperation pattern of multiple bystander signals, the directionality of bystander signaling, and the effect of bystander tissues on the bystander signaling. The results showed that the bystander response could also be induced efficiently when the asynchronously generated bystander signals reached the bystander tissues in the same period, but not when they entered into the bystander tissues in an inversed sequence. The absence of bystander response in root-inversed grafting indicated that the bystander signaling along roots might be of directionality. The bystander signaling was shown to be independent of the bystander tissues. PMID:23072991

  18. Demonstration of motionless Knudsen pump based micro-gas chromatography featuring micro-fabricated columns and on-column detectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Gupta, Naveen K; Wise, Kensall D; Gianchandani, Yogesh B; Fan, Xudong

    2011-10-21

    This paper reports the investigation of a micro-gas chromatography (μGC) system that utilizes an array of miniaturized motionless Knudsen pumps (KPs) as well as microfabricated separation columns and optical detectors. A prototype system was built to achieve a flow rate of 1 mL min(-1) and 0.26 mL min(-1) for helium and dry air, respectively, when they were used as carrier gas. This system was then employed to evaluate GC performance compromises and demonstrate the ability to separate and detect gas mixtures containing analytes of different volatilities and polarities. Furthermore, the use of pressure programming of the KP array was demonstrated to significantly shorten the analysis time while maintaining a high detection resolution. Using this method, we obtained a high resolution detection of 5 alkanes of different volatilities within 5 min. Finally, we successfully detected gas mixtures of various polarities using a tandem-column μGC configuration by installing two on-column optical detectors to obtain complementary chromatograms.

  19. Interstitial deletion of 14q24.3-q32.2 in a male patient with plagiocephaly, BPES features, developmental delay, and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Cingöz, Sultan; Bache, Iben; Bjerglund, Lise; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Tommerup, Niels; Jensen, Hanne; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Tümer, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    Distal interstitial deletions of chromosome 14 involving the 14q24-q23.2 region are rare, and only been reported so far in 20 patients. Ten of these patients were analyzed both clinically and genetically. Here we present a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 14q24.3-q32.2 in a male patient with developmental delay, language impairment, plagiocephaly, BPES features (blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus), and congenital heart defect. The deletion breakpoints were fine mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and the size of the deletion is estimated to be approximately 23 Mb. Based on genotype-phenotype comparisons of the 10 previously published patients and the present case, we suggest that the shortest regions for deletion overlap may include candidate genes for speech impairment, mental retardation, and hypotonia.

  20. Rational defect introduction in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Shin, Naechul; Chi, Miaofang; Howe, Jane Y; Filler, Michael A

    2013-05-08

    The controlled introduction of planar defects, particularly twin boundaries and stacking faults, in group IV nanowires remains challenging despite the prevalence of these structural features in other nanowire systems (e.g., II-VI and III-V). Here we demonstrate how user-programmable changes to precursor pressure and growth temperature can rationally generate both transverse twin boundaries and angled stacking faults during the growth of <111> oriented Si nanowires. We leverage this new capability to demonstrate prototype defect superstructures. These findings yield important insight into the mechanism of defect generation in semiconductor nanowires and suggest new routes to engineer the properties of this ubiquitous semiconductor.

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1982-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a sunset effect using a gooseneck lamp and 20 sheets of paper and (2) the preparation and determination of structural features of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by infrared spectroscopy. (SK)

  3. Replacement of amino acid sequence features of a- and c-subunits of ATP synthases of Alkaliphilic Bacillus with the Bacillus consensus sequence results in defective oxidative phosphorylation and non-fermentative growth at pH 10.5.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZhenXiong; Hicks, David B; Guffanti, Arthur A; Baldwin, Katisha; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2004-06-18

    Mitchell's (Mitchell, P. (1961) Nature 191, 144-148) chemiosmotic model of energy coupling posits a bulk electrochemical proton gradient (Deltap) as the sole driving force for proton-coupled ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and for other bioenergetic work. Two properties of proton-coupled OXPHOS by alkaliphilic Bacillus species pose a challenge to this tenet: robust ATP synthesis at pH 10.5 that does not correlate with the magnitude of the Deltap and the failure of artificially imposed potentials to substitute for respiration-generated potentials in energizing ATP synthesis at high pH (Krulwich, T. (1995) Mol. Microbiol. 15, 403-410). Here we show that these properties, in alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, depend upon alkaliphile-specific features in the proton pathway through the a- and c-subunits of ATP synthase. Site-directed changes were made in six such features to the corresponding sequence in Bacillus megaterium, which reflects the consensus sequence for non-alkaliphilic Bacillus. Five of the six single mutants assembled an active ATPase/ATP synthase, and four of these mutants exhibited a specific defect in non-fermentative growth at high pH. Most of these mutants lost the ability to generate the high phosphorylation potentials at low bulk Deltap that are characteristic of alkaliphiles. The aLys(180) and aGly(212) residues that are predicted to be in the proton uptake pathway of the a-subunit were specifically implicated in pH-dependent restriction of proton flux through the ATP synthase to and from the bulk phase. The evidence included greatly enhanced ATP synthesis in response to an artificially imposed potential at high pH. The findings demonstrate that the ATP synthase of extreme alkaliphiles has special features that are required for non-fermentative growth and OXPHOS at high pH.

  4. Altered expression of several genes in IIIManL-defective mutants of Streptococcus salivarius demonstrated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, R; Frenette, M; Vadeboncoeur, C

    1993-05-01

    Mannose, glucose and fructose are transported in Streptococcus salivarius by a phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system (PTS) which consists of a membrane-bound Enzyme II (EII) and two forms of IIIMan having molecular weights of 38,900 (IIIManH) and 35,200 (IIIManL), respectively. We have previously reported the isolation of spontaneous mutants lacking IIIManL and showed that they exhibit higher beta-galactosidase activity than the parental strain after growth on glucose, and that some of them constitutively express a fructose PTS which is induced by fructose in the parental strain. In an attempt to determine whether the expression of other genes is affected by the mutation and what the physiological link is between them, we examined three S. salivarius IIIManL-defective mutants (strains A37, B31 and G29) and the parental strain using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after growth of the cells on a variety of sugars. After growth on glucose, five new proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of the three mutants. Two of these proteins were induced in the parental strain by galactose or oligosaccharides containing galactose, and one was specifically induced by melibiose. The other two proteins were not detected in the parental strain under any of the growth conditions tested. Two other proteins were only detected in glucose-grown cells of mutant A37, and a protein associated with the metabolism of fructose was constitutively expressed in mutants B31 and G29. Moreover, we have found that under identical growth conditions the amounts of several other proteins which were detected in the parental strain were either increased or decreased in the mutants. Globally, our results have indicated that (1) the expression of several genes was affected in the spontaneous IIIManL-defective mutants; (2) some of the proteins abnormally produced in the mutants were specifically induced in the parental strain by sugars; (3) the phenotypic modifications observed in the

  5. Experimental demonstration of single electron transistors featuring SiO{sub 2} plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition in Ni-SiO{sub 2}-Ni tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Karbasian, Golnaz McConnell, Michael S.; Orlov, Alexei O.; Rouvimov, Sergei; Snider, Gregory L.

    2016-01-15

    The authors report the use of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to fabricate single-electron transistors (SETs) featuring ultrathin (≈1 nm) tunnel-transparent SiO{sub 2} in Ni-SiO{sub 2}-Ni tunnel junctions. They show that, as a result of the O{sub 2} plasma steps in PEALD of SiO{sub 2}, the top surface of the underlying Ni electrode is oxidized. Additionally, the bottom surface of the upper Ni layer is also oxidized where it is in contact with the deposited SiO{sub 2}, most likely as a result of oxygen-containing species on the surface of the SiO{sub 2}. Due to the presence of these surface parasitic layers of NiO, which exhibit features typical of thermally activated transport, the resistance of Ni-SiO{sub 2}-Ni tunnel junctions is drastically increased. Moreover, the transport mechanism is changed from quantum tunneling through the dielectric barrier to one consistent with thermally activated resistors in series with tunnel junctions. The reduction of NiO to Ni is therefore required to restore the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure of the junctions. Rapid thermal annealing in a forming gas ambient at elevated temperatures is presented as a technique to reduce both parasitic oxide layers. This method is of great interest for devices that rely on MIM tunnel junctions with ultrathin barriers. Using this technique, the authors successfully fabricated MIM SETs with minimal trace of parasitic NiO component. They demonstrate that the properties of the tunnel barrier in nanoscale tunnel junctions (with <10{sup −15} m{sup 2} in area) can be evaluated by electrical characterization of SETs.

  6. Motor Neuron Rescue in Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Demonstrates That Sensory-Motor Defects Are a Consequence, Not a Cause, of Motor Neuron Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gogliotti, Rocky G.; Quinlan, Katharina A.; Barlow, Courtenay B.; Heier, Christopher R.; Heckman, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of motor neurons (MNs) is a hallmark of the neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA); however, it is unclear whether this phenotype autonomously originates within the MN. To address this question, we developed an inducible mouse model of severe SMA that has perinatal lethality, decreased motor function, motor unit pathology, and hyperexcitable MNs. Using an Hb9-Cre allele, we increased Smn levels autonomously within MNs and demonstrate that MN rescue significantly improves all phenotypes and pathologies commonly described in SMA mice. MN rescue also corrects hyperexcitability in SMA motor neurons and prevents sensory-motor synaptic stripping. Survival in MN-rescued SMA mice is extended by only 5 d, due in part to failed autonomic innervation of the heart. Collectively, this work demonstrates that the SMA phenotype autonomously originates in MNs and that sensory-motor synapse loss is a consequence, not a cause, of MN dysfunction. PMID:22423102

  7. Expression of Dominant-Negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor Alpha1 in Leydig and Sertoli Cells Demonstrates No Additional Defect Compared with Expression in Sertoli Cells Only

    PubMed Central

    Fumel, Betty; Froment, Pascal; Holzenberger, Martin; Livera, Gabriel; Monget, Philippe; Fouchécourt, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Background In the testis, thyroid hormone (T3) regulates the number of gametes produced through its action on Sertoli cell proliferation. However, the role of T3 in the regulation of steroidogenesis is still controversial. Methods The TRαAMI knock-in allele allows the generation of transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative TRα1 (thyroid receptor α1) isoform restricted to specific target cells after Cre-loxP recombination. Here, we introduced this mutant allele in both Sertoli and Leydig cells using a novel aromatase-iCre (ARO-iCre) line that expresses Cre recombinase under control of the human Cyp19(IIa)/aromatase promoter. Findings We showed that loxP recombination induced by this ARO-iCre is restricted to male and female gonads, and is effective in Sertoli and Leydig cells, but not in germ cells. We compared this model with the previous introduction of TRαAMI specifically in Sertoli cells in order to investigate T3 regulation of steroidogenesis. We demonstrated that TRαAMI-ARO males exhibited increased testis weight, increased sperm reserve in adulthood correlated to an increased proliferative index at P3 in vivo, and a loss of T3-response in vitro. Nevertheless, TRαAMI-ARO males showed normal fertility. This phenotype is similar to TRαAMI-SC males. Importantly, plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels, as well as mRNA levels of steroidogenesis enzymes StAR, Cyp11a1 and Cyp17a1 were not affected in TRαAMI-ARO. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that the presence of a mutant TRαAMI allele in both Leydig and Sertoli cells does not accentuate the phenotype in comparison with its presence in Sertoli cells only. This suggests that direct T3 regulation of steroidogenesis through TRα1 is moderate in Leydig cells, and that Sertoli cells are the main target of T3 action in the testis. PMID:25793522

  8. Cell surface delivery and structural re-organization by pharmacological chaperones of an oligomerization-defective α1b-adrenoceptor mutant demonstrates membrane targeting of GPCR oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Meritxell; Lopez-Gimenez, Juan F.; Milligan, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Many G-protein-coupled receptors, including the α1b-adrenoceptor, form homo-dimers or oligomers. Mutation of hydrophobic residues in transmembrane domains I and IV alters the organization of the α1b-adrenoceptor oligomer, with transmembrane domain IV playing a critical role. These mutations also result in endoplasmic reticulum trapping of the receptor. Following stable expression of this α1b-adrenoceptor mutant, cell surface delivery, receptor function and structural organization were recovered by treatment with a range of α1b-adrenoceptor antagonists that acted at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum. This was accompanied by maturation of the mutant receptor to a terminally N-glycosylated form, and only this mature form was trafficked to the cell surface. Co-expression of the mutant receptor with an otherwise wild-type form of the α1b-adrenoceptor that is unable to bind ligands resulted in this wild-type variant also being retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Ligand-induced cell surface delivery of the mutant α1b-adrenoceptor now allowed co-recovery to the plasma membrane of the ligand-binding-deficient mutant. These results demonstrate that interactions between α1b-adrenoceptor monomers occur at an early stage in protein synthesis, that ligands of the α1b-adrenoceptor can act as pharmacological chaperones to allow a structurally compromised form of the receptor to pass cellular quality control, that the mutated receptor is not inherently deficient in function and that an oligomeric assembly of ligand-binding-competent and -incompetent forms of the α1b-adrenoceptor can be trafficked to the cell surface by binding of a ligand to only one component of the receptor oligomer. PMID:18764782

  9. Molecular Delineation of Partial Trisomy 14q and Partial Trisomy 12p in a Patient with Dysmorphic Features, Heart Defect and Developmental Delay.

    PubMed

    Bose, Divya; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Venkatesh, K S; Aiyaz, Mohamed; Shetty, Mitesh; Rao, Sudha N; Kutty, A V M

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a molecular analysis of partial trisomy 14q and partial trisomy 12p in a 5-year-old male child presenting with dysmorphic features, congenital heart disease and global developmental delay. Chromosomal analysis of the patient with GTG bands revealed a 47,XY,+der(14)t(12;14)(p13;q22)mat karyotype; the mother's karyotype was 46,XX,t(12;14)(p13;q22). Further, oligonucleotide array- CGH studies revealed an amplification of 32.3 Mb in the 14q11.1q22.1 region, substantiating partial trisomy 14q and additionally displaying an amplification of ∼1 Mb in the 12p13.3pter region for partial trisomy 12p. This is the first study to demonstrate a novel association of partial trisomies of 14q and 12p due to a 3:1 segregation of a maternal balanced translocation involving chromosomes 12 and 14. Gene ontology studies indicated 5 potential candidate genes in the amplified regions for the observed congenital anomalies.

  10. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  11. Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-28

    ... Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction This routine demonstrates extraction of the feature type information stored in a ... Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction routine  (5 KB) Interactive Data Language (IDL) is available from  ...

  12. Polydispersity-driven topological defects as order-restoring excitations.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2014-04-08

    The engineering of defects in crystalline matter has been extensively exploited to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of many materials. Recent experiments on manipulating extended defects in graphene, for example, show that defects direct the flow of electric charges. The fascinating possibilities offered by defects in two dimensions, known as topological defects, to control material properties provide great motivation to perform fundamental investigations to uncover their role in various systems. Previous studies mostly focus on topological defects in 2D crystals on curved surfaces. On flat geometries, topological defects can be introduced via density inhomogeneities. We investigate here topological defects due to size polydispersity on flat surfaces. Size polydispersity is usually an inevitable feature of a large variety of systems. In this work, simulations show well-organized induced topological defects around an impurity particle of a wrong size. These patterns are not found in systems of identical particles. Our work demonstrates that in polydispersed systems topological defects play the role of restoring order. The simulations show a perfect hexagonal lattice beyond a small defective region around the impurity particle. Elasticity theory has demonstrated an analogy between the elementary topological defects named disclinations to electric charges by associating a charge to a disclination, whose sign depends on the number of its nearest neighbors. Size polydispersity is shown numerically here to be an essential ingredient to understand short-range attractions between like-charge disclinations. Our study suggests that size polydispersity has a promising potential to engineer defects in various systems including nanoparticles and colloidal crystals.

  13. A physics-based defects model and inspection algorithm for automatic visual inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yu; Ye, Yutang; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Li; Liu, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The representation of physical characteristics is the most essential feature of mathematical models used for the detection of defects in automatic inspection systems. However, the feature of defects and formation of the defect image are not considered enough in traditional algorithms. This paper presents a mathematical model for defect inspection, denoted as the localized defects image model (LDIM), is different because it modeling the features of manual inspection, using a local defect merit function to quantify the cost that a pixel is defective. This function comprises two components: color deviation and color fluctuation. Parameters related to statistical data of the background region of images are also taken into consideration. Test results demonstrate that the model matches the definition of defects, as defined by international industrial standards IPC-A-610D and IPC-A-600G. Furthermore, the proposed approach enhances small defects to improve detection rates. Evaluation using a defects images database returned a 100% defect inspection rate with 0% false detection. Proving that this method could be practically applied in manufacture to quantify inspection standards and minimize false alarms resulting from human error.

  14. TU-A-12A-04: Quantitative Texture Features Calculated in Lung Tissue From CT Scans Demonstrate Consistency Between Two Databases From Different Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, A; Armato, S; Castillo, R; Pham, N; Guerrero, T; Al-Hallaq, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the consistency of computed tomography (CT) scan texture features, previously identified as stable in a healthy patient cohort, in esophageal cancer patient CT scans. Methods: 116 patients receiving radiation therapy (median dose: 50.4Gy) for esophageal cancer were retrospectively identified. For each patient, diagnostic-quality pre-therapy (0-183 days) and post-therapy (5-120 days) scans (mean voxel size: 0.8mm×0.8mm×2.5mm) and a treatment planning scan and associated dose map were collected. An average of 501 32x32-pixel ROIs were placed randomly in the lungs of each pre-therapy scan. ROI centers were mapped to corresponding locations in post-therapy and planning scans using the displacement vector field output by demons deformable registration. Only ROIs with mean dose <5Gy were analyzed, as these were expected to contain minimal post-treatment damage. 140 texture features were calculated in pre-therapy and post-therapy scan ROIs and compared using Bland-Altman analysis. For each feature, the mean feature value change and the distance spanned by the 95% limits of agreement were normalized to the mean feature value, yielding normalized range of agreement (nRoA) and normalized bias (nBias). Using Wilcoxon signed rank tests, nRoA and nBias were compared with values computed previously in 27 healthy patient scans (mean voxel size: 0.67mm×0.67mm×1mm) acquired at a different institution. Results: nRoA was significantly (p<0.001) larger in cancer patients than healthy patients. Differences in nBias were not significant (p=0.23). The 20 features identified previously as having nRoA<20% for healthy patients had the lowest nRoA values in the current database, with an average increase of 5.6%. Conclusion: Despite differences in CT scanner type, scan resolution, and patient health status, the same 20 features remained stable (i.e., low variability and bias) in the absence of disease changes for databases from two institutions. Identification of

  15. In vitro characterization of 6S RNA release-defective mutants uncovers features of pRNA-dependent release from RNA polymerase in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Oviedo Ovando, Mariana; Shephard, Lindsay; Unrau, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    6S RNA is a noncoding RNA that inhibits bacterial transcription by sequestering RNA polymerase holoenzyme (Eσ70) in low-nutrient conditions. This transcriptional block can be relieved by the synthesis of a short product RNA (pRNA) using the 6S RNA as a template. Here, we selected a range of 6S RNA release-defective mutants from a high diversity in vitro pool. Studying the release-defective variant R9-33 uncovered complex interactions between three regions of the 6S RNA. As expected, mutating the transcriptional start site (TSS) slowed and partially inhibited release. Surprisingly, additional mutations near the TSS were found that rescued this effect. Likewise, three mutations in the top strand of the large open bubble (LOB) could considerably slow release but were rescued by the addition of upstream mutations found between a highly conserved “-35” motif and the LOB. Combining the three top strand LOB mutations with mutations near the TSS, however, was particularly effective at preventing release, and this effect could be further enhanced by inclusion of the upstream mutations. Overexpressing R9-33 and a series of milder release-defective mutants in Escherichia coli resulted in a delayed entry into exponential phase together with a decrease in cell survival that correlated well with the severity of the in vitro phenotypes. The complex crosstalk observed between distinct regions of the 6S RNA supports a scrunching type model of 6S RNA release, where at least three regions of the 6S RNA must interact with Eσ70 in a cooperative manner so as to ensure effective pRNA-dependent release. PMID:24681966

  16. Nonlinear beam deflection in photonic lattices with negative defects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiandong; Ye Zhuoyi; Lou Cibo; Miller, Alexandra; Zhang Peng; Hu Yi; Chen Zhigang; Yang Jianke

    2011-03-15

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that a nonlinear beam can be reflected by a negative defect in a photonic lattice if the incident angle is below a threshold value. Above this threshold angle, the beam simply passes through the defect. This phenomenon occurs in both one- and two-dimensional photonic lattices, and it provides a way to use the incident angle to control beam propagation in a lattice network. If the defect is absent or positive, no evident transition from reflection to transmission occurs. These nonlinear phenomena are also compared with linear nondiffracting-beam propagation in a photonic lattice with a defect, and both similarities and differences are observed. In addition, some important features in linear and nonlinear beam propagations are explained analytically by using a linear model with a delta-function defect.

  17. Interrelated emission and spin-spin relaxation feature mediated by VO+ defects in Gd2O3 nanorods subjected to swift ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Samiran; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2016-04-01

    We report on the manifestation and interconnected photoluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance responses in gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanorods subjected to 80 MeV carbon ion irradiation. On increasing the irradiation fluence between 1 × 1011 and 3 × 1012 ions/cm2, the emission associated with neutral oxygen vacancies (VOx), positioned at ~350 nm, undergoes a steady increase compared to that associated with singly charged vacancies (VO+), located at ~414 nm. The enhancement of spin-spin relaxation time (τss) is ascribed to a substantial changeover from VO+ to VOx defects with irradiation, the former being recognized as the major contributor to paramagnetic centres. Interconnected luminescence and spin-spin relaxation could provide insight for making advanced nanophosphors and spin valve elements.

  18. Structural defect generation and band-structure features in the HfNi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Sn semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Romaka, V. A.; Rogl, P.; Romaka, V. V.; Stadnyk, Yu. V.; Krayovskyy, V. Ya.; Kaczorowski, D.; Nakonechnyy, I. N.; Goryn, A. M.

    2015-08-15

    The crystal and electronic structure and magnetic, energy, and kinetic properties of the n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with the Co acceptor impurity (HfNi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Sn) are investigated in the temperature and Co concentration ranges T = 80–400 K and N{sub A}{sup Co} ≈ 9.5 × 10{sup 19}-5.7 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} (x = 0.005–0.30), respectively, and under magnetic field H ≤ 10 kOe. It is established that the degree of compensation of the semiconductor changes due to transformation of the crystal structure upon doping, which leads to the generation of acceptor and donor structural defects. The calculated electronic structure is consistent with the experiment; the HfNi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Sn semiconductor is shown to be a promising thermoelectric material. The results obtained are discussed within the Shklovsky-Efros model for a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

  19. Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Del Genio, Charo I.; Bassler, Kevin E.; Korzhenevskii, Alexander L.; Barabash, Rozaliya; Trenkler, PhD Johann; Reiter, George; Moss, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Structural defects in a crystal are responsible for the ''two-length-scale'' behavior in which a sharp central peak is superimposed over a broad peak in critical diffuse x-ray scattering. We have previously measured the scaling behavior of the central peak by scattering from a near-surface region of a V{sub 2}H crystal, which has a first-order transition in the bulk. As the temperature is lowered toward the critical temperature, a crossover in critical behavior is seen, with the temperature range nearest to the critical point being characterized by mean-field exponents. Near the transition, a small two-phase coexistence region is observed. The values of transition and crossover temperatures decay with depth. An explanation of these experimental results is here proposed by means of a theory in which edge dislocations in the near-surface region occur in walls oriented in the two directions normal to the surface. The strain caused by the dislocation lines causes the ordering in the crystal to occur as growth of roughly cylindrically shaped regions. After the regions have reached a certain size, the crossover in the critical behavior occurs, and mean-field behavior prevails. At a still lower temperature, the rest of the material between the cylindrical regions orders via a weak first-order transition.

  20. A case of familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome due to a compound heterozygous mutation in GALNT3 demonstrating new phenotypic features

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Claudia E.; Kelly, Marilyn H.; Khosravi, Azarmindokht; Hart, Thomas C.; Brahim, Jaime; White, Kenneth E.; Farrow, Emily G.; Nathan, Muriel H.; Murphey, Mark D.; Collins, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Familial tumoral calcinosis (FTC) and hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome (HHS) are caused by mutations in FGF23, GALNT3, or KLOTHO. They are characterized by hyperphosphatemia, increased phosphate reabsorption, and elevated or inappropriately normal serum 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D); FTC is associated with calcific masses, and HHS with diaphyseal hyperostosis. Methods A 36-year-old woman presented with abnormal dental x-rays at age 12, and was hyperphosphatemic at 22. She underwent radiographic, biochemical and genetic testing, and medical treatment. Results Serum phosphorus was 7.3 mg/dl (2.5-4.8), TmP/GFR 6.99 mg/100 ml (2.97-4.45), 1,25-D3 35 pg/ml (22-67). Radiographs revealed tooth anomalies, thyroid cartilage calcification, calcific masses in vertebral spaces, calcification of the interstitial septae of the soft tissue in the lower extremities, and cortical thickening of the long bones. Her total hip Z-Score was 1.9. C-terminus serum FGF23 was 1210 RU/ml (20-108), but intact FGF23 was 7.4 pg/ml (10-50). DNA sequencing determined she was a compound heterozygote for mutations in GALNT3. Treatment with niacinamide and acetazolamide decreased TmP/GFR and serum phosphate, which was paralleled by a decrease in serum C-terminus FGF23. Conclusions This case broadens the spectrum of phenotypic and genotypic features of FTC/HHS, and suggests treatments to decrease renal phosphate reabsorption in the setting of a low intact FGF23. PMID:18982401

  1. Demonstration of skin friction measurements featuring in situ estimation of conduction loss using constant voltage anemometers and surface hot-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Garimella R.; Moes, Timothy R.

    2005-05-01

    The top of the 12.2m long NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's ground research vehicle (GRV) was used as a flat plate test bed for demonstrating an approach to measure skin friction. Using an array of surface hot-films operated by constant voltage anemometers (CVAs), the approach was demonstrated with in situ estimation of conduction heat loss from the hot-films to the substrate. An algebraic relationship, using the channel calibration constants a and b (determined a priori) with CVA output voltages Vs and Vw from that channel, is used for the estimation of the required quantities and lead resistance (rL) of the hot-film measured on site. Estimates of the power dissipated in the hot-film alone (Phf) (excluding the lead resistances), in situ resistance (Rw) of the hot-film due to applied overheat and flow, and the cold resistance (Ra) of the same hot-film at the ambient temperature are so obtained. Different approaches to estimate the in situ cold resistance (which is the resistance without any self-heating) of the hot-film are presented addressing the suitability of the procedure for flight applications as well. Tests were performed at several speeds of the GRV on the tarmac of a runway at the flight test center. The measured values are fitted to the classical (1/3) law equation with the computational dimensional skin friction (τ) obtained using the empirical local skin friction law for the long flat plate. There was an excellent (1/3) law fit in all the hot-films, demonstrating that the measured values fit classical theory. Using this measured fit with the theoretical values, calibration coefficients (A and B) for dimensional skin friction (τ) were obtained. Using these calibration coefficients, measured values were then converted to nondimensional local skin friction coefficients cf for all the hot-films at all speeds. Measured cf values agree well with the associated flat plate theory. Since the in situ measurement of heat loss to the substrate should ideally

  2. Defect criticality index (DCI): a new methodology to significantly improve DOI sampling rate in a 45nm production environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Kaga, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Yuuichiro; Aoki, Masami; Tsui, David; Young, Chris; Chang, Ellis

    2008-03-01

    Increasing inspection sensitivity may be necessary for capturing the smaller defects of interest (DOI) dictated by reduced minimum design features. Unfortunately, higher inspection sensitivity can result in a greater percentage of non-DOI or nuisance defect types during inline monitoring in a mass production environment. Due to the time and effort required, review sampling is usually limited to 50 to 100 defects per wafer. Determining how to select and identify critical defect types under very low sampling rate conditions, so that more yield-relevant defect Paretos can be created after SEM review, has become very important. By associating GDS clip (design layout) information with every defect, and including defect attributes such as size and brightness, a new methodology called Defect Criticality Index (DCI) has demonstrated improved DOI sampling rates.

  3. [Features of the immune proteasome expression in ascite Zajdela hepatoma after implantation into Brattleboro rats with the hereditary defect of arginine-vasopressin synthesis].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikova, V I; Khegaĭ, I I; Popova, N A; Lifantseva, N V; Ivanova, L N; Zaharova, L A

    2014-01-01

    The expression of the total proteasome pool, immune proteasome subunits LMP2 and LMP7, TAP1 and TAP2 transporters, as well as RT1A molecule of MHC class I was investigated in the ascite Zajdela hepatoma at the 10th day after implantation into Brattleboro rats with the hereditary defect of hypothalamic arginine-vasopressin synthesis (AVP) and into WAG rats with normal AVP expression. In Zajdela hepatoma cells implanted into Brattleboro rats the 3-fold increase of the total proteasome pool and LMP2 level and 8-fold increase of the LMP7 level was detected by Western blotting as compared to those in WAG rats. Differences in the LMP2 and LMP7 expression suggest variations in their functions, namely the important role of LMP7 in anti-tumor immunity. The growth of Zajdela hepatoma in WAG rats was accompanied by the decreased level of total proteasome pool as well as immune proteasome expression as compared to those in Brattleboro rats during the regression of tumor. The analysis of TAP1 and TAP2 revealed the pronounced expression of these peptide transporters in Zajdela hepatoma cells implanted into Brattleboro and WAG rats. The expression level of RT1A molecule of MHC class I was increased 3 times in Zajdela hepatoma cells implanted into Brattleboro rats as compared to WAG rats. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis of CD4- and CD8-lymphocytes number in the spleen of Brattleboro and WAG rats was performed at the 10th day after implantation of Zajdela hepatoma. The increased number of CD4- and CD8-lymphocytes was observed in the spleen of Brattleboro as compared to WAG. The increased subpopulations of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and T-helpers might promote the tumor regression in Brattleboro rats. The reduced populations of CD4- and CD8-lymphocytes in the spleen of WAG rats were accompanied by the splenomegaly and tumor progression. The data obtained suggest that AVP deficiency in Brattleboro rats leads to the increase of the immune proteasome and MHC class I expression in

  4. An interstitial deletion of 7.1Mb in chromosome band 6p22.3 associated with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including heart defects, short neck, and eye abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Anna; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Giacobini, Maibritt

    2009-01-01

    Seven cases with an interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 6 involving the 6p22 region have previously been reported. The clinical phenotype of these cases includes developmental delay, brain-, heart-, and kidney defects, eye abnormalities, short neck, craniofacial malformations, hypotonia, as well as clinodactyly or syndactyly. Here, we report a patient with a 7.1Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome band 6p22.3, detected by genome-wide screening array CGH. The patient is a 4-year-old girl with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including eye abnormalities, short neck, and a ventricular septum defect. The deleted region at 6p22.3 in our patient overlaps with six out of the seven previously reported cases with a 6p22-24 interstitial deletion. This enabled us to further narrow down the critical region for the 6p22 deletion phenotype to 2.2Mb. Twelve genes are mapped to the overlapping deleted region, among them the gene encoding the ataxin-1 protein, the ATXN1 gene. Mice with homozygous deletions in ATXN1 are phenotypically normal but show cognitive delay. Haploinsufficiency of ATXN1 may therefore contribute to the learning difficulties observed in the patients harboring a 6p22 deletion.

  5. H9c2 and HL-1 cells demonstrate distinct features of energy metabolism, mitochondrial function and sensitivity to hypoxia-reoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Javadov, Sabzali; Sickinger, Stephan; Frotschnig, Sandra; Grimm, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of cardiac energy metabolism plays a critical role in many cardiac diseases, including heart failure, myocardial infarction and ischemia–reperfusion injury and organ transplantation. The characteristics of these diseases can be elucidated in vivo, though animal-free in vitro experiments, with primary adult or neonatal cardiomyocytes, the rat ventricular H9c2 cell line or the mouse atrial HL-1 cells, providing intriguing experimental alternatives. Currently, it is not clear how H9c2 and HL-1 cells mimic the responses of primary cardiomyocytes to hypoxia and oxidative stress. In the present study, we show that H9c2 cells are more similar to primary cardiomyocytes than HL-1 cells with regard to energy metabolism patterns, such as cellular ATP levels, bioenergetics, metabolism, function and morphology of mitochondria. In contrast to HL-1, H9c2 cells possess beta-tubulin II, a mitochondrial isoform of tubulin that plays an important role in mitochondrial function and regulation. We demonstrate that H9c2 cells are significantly more sensitive to hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in terms of loss of cell viability and mitochondrial respiration, whereas HL-1 cells were more resistant to hypoxia as evidenced by their relative stability. In comparison to HL-1 cells, H9c2 cells exhibit a higher phosphorylation (activation) state of AMP-activated protein kinase, but lower peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha levels, suggesting that each cell type is characterized by distinct regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results provide evidence that H9c2 cardiomyoblasts are more energetically similar to primary cardiomyocytes than are atrial HL-1 cells. H9c2 cells can be successfully used as an in vitro model to simulate cardiac ischemia–reperfusion injury. PMID:25450968

  6. H9c2 and HL-1 cells demonstrate distinct features of energy metabolism, mitochondrial function and sensitivity to hypoxia-reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Javadov, Sabzali; Sickinger, Stephan; Frotschnig, Sandra; Grimm, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Dysfunction of cardiac energy metabolism plays a critical role in many cardiac diseases, including heart failure, myocardial infarction and ischemia-reperfusion injury and organ transplantation. The characteristics of these diseases can be elucidated in vivo, though animal-free in vitro experiments, with primary adult or neonatal cardiomyocytes, the rat ventricular H9c2 cell line or the mouse atrial HL-1 cells, providing intriguing experimental alternatives. Currently, it is not clear how H9c2 and HL-1 cells mimic the responses of primary cardiomyocytes to hypoxia and oxidative stress. In the present study, we show that H9c2 cells are more similar to primary cardiomyocytes than HL-1 cells with regard to energy metabolism patterns, such as cellular ATP levels, bioenergetics, metabolism, function and morphology of mitochondria. In contrast to HL-1, H9c2 cells possess beta-tubulin II, a mitochondrial isoform of tubulin that plays an important role in mitochondrial function and regulation. We demonstrate that H9c2 cells are significantly more sensitive to hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in terms of loss of cell viability and mitochondrial respiration, whereas HL-1 cells were more resistant to hypoxia as evidenced by their relative stability. In comparison to HL-1 cells, H9c2 cells exhibit a higher phosphorylation (activation) state of AMP-activated protein kinase, but lower peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha levels, suggesting that each cell type is characterized by distinct regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results provide evidence that H9c2 cardiomyoblasts are more energetically similar to primary cardiomyocytes than are atrial HL-1 cells. H9c2 cells can be successfully used as an in vitro model to simulate cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fuzzy Logic Connectivity in Semiconductor Defect Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Kamowski, T.P.; Tobin, K.W.

    1999-01-24

    In joining defects on semiconductor wafer maps into clusters, it is common for defects caused by different sources to overlap. Simple morphological image processing tends to either join too many unrelated defects together or not enough together. Expert semiconductor fabrication engineers have demonstrated that they can easily group clusters of defects from a common manufacturing problem source into a single signature. Capturing this thought process is ideally suited for fuzzy logic. A system of rules was developed to join disconnected clusters based on properties such as elongation, orientation, and distance. The clusters are evaluated on a pair-wise basis using the fuzzy rules and are joined or not joined based on a defuzzification and threshold. The system continuously re-evaluates the clusters under consideration as their fuzzy memberships change with each joining action. The fuzzy membership functions for each pair-wise feature, the techniques used to measure the features, and methods for improving the speed of the system are all developed. Examples of the process are shown using real-world semiconductor wafer maps obtained from chip manufacturers. The algorithm is utilized in the Spatial Signature Analyzer (SSA) software, a joint development project between Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) and SEMATECH.

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the following chemistry lecture demonstrations and experiments: (1) a versatile kinetic demonstration; (2) the Bakelite Demonstration; (3) applying Beer's law; and (4) entropy calculations. (HM)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are presented. The first is a demonstration of chemiluminescence. The second is a demonstration using a secondary battery constructed from common household articles. (JN)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations which are intended for chemistry college students. These demonstrations are: (1) enhancement of concentration quenching by micelles; and (2) the thermite lecture demonstration. (HM)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details three demonstrations for use in chemistry classrooms. Includes: "A Demonstration of Corrosion by Differential Aeration"; "A Simple Demonstration of the Activation Energy Concept"; and "A Boiling Demonstration at Room Temperature." Each description includes equipment, materials, and methods. (CW)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two chemistry demonstrations including a demonstration of chemical inhibition and "The Rayleigh Fountain" which demonstrates the polarity of the water molecule. Provides instructions and explanations for each demonstration. (CW)

  15. Defective autologous mixed lymphocyte reactivity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, R L

    1986-01-01

    T cells from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and normal controls were assessed for their ability to respond in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). Cells from stable MS patients demonstrated a significant defect in their proliferative response to non-T cells in comparison to normal controls. Despite the defective AMLR response, T cells from MS patients reacted as well as T cells from normal controls to allogeneic stimuli. Furthermore, MS non-T-cells were fully capable of stimulating allogeneic MLR responses by normal and MS T cells. Since the T4+ cell is the major subpopulation which proliferates in the AMLR, these studies suggest a functional defect in a subpopulation of T4+ cells in MS patients. Since the AMLR may represent an important mechanism by which immune responses are regulated, a defect in the ability of MS T cells to respond to autologous cells could account for several of the autoimmune features of the disease. PMID:2942317

  16. Impurity-defect complexes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.H. ); Fong, C.Y. . Dept. of Physics); Nichols, C.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    The two most outstanding features observed for dopants in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) -- a shift in the Fermi level accompanied by an increase in the defect density and an absence of degenerate doping -- have previously been postulated to stem from the formation of substitutional dopant-dangling bond complexes. Using first-principles self-consistent pseudopotential calculation in conjunction with a supercell model for the amorphous network and the ability of network relaxation from the first-principles results, we have studied the electronic and structural properties of substitutional fourfold-coordinated phosphorus and boron at the second neighbor position to a dangling bond defect. We demonstrate that such impurity-defect complexes can account for the general features observed experimentally in doped a-Si:H. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  19. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides procedures for demonstrations: (1) the ferrioxalate actinometer, which demonstrates a photochemical reaction; and (2) the silver mirror, which demonstrates the reduction of a metal salt to the metal and/or the reducing power of sugars. (CS)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations for chemical education. The activities include: (1) demonstration of vapor pressure; (2) a multicolored luminol-based chemiluminescence demonstration; and (3) a Charles's Law/Vapor pressure apparatus. (RH)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) partition coefficients; (2) Rutherford simulation experiment; and (3) demonstration of the powerful oxidizing property of dimanganeseheptoxide. Background information, materials needed, and procedures are provided for each demonstration. (JN)

  3. Reflectance Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Presents a demonstration in which a mirror "disappears" upon rotation. The author has used the demonstration with students from fourth grade up through college. Suggestions are given for making the demonstration into a permanent hallway display. (MVL)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article details two demonstrations involving color changes. Included are "Manganese Color Reactions" and "Flame Colors Demonstration." Include a list of materials needed, procedures, cautions, and results. (CW)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (including chemical reactions) and procedures used are provided for (1) three buffer demonstrations and (2) a demonstration of phase transfer catalysis and carbanion formation. (JN)

  8. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  9. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Three demonstrations are described: paramagnetic properties of Fe(11) and Fe(111), the preparation of polyurethane foam: a lecture demonstration and the electrolysis of water-fuel cell reactions. A small discussion of the concepts demonstrated is included in each demonstration's description. (MR)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student…

  11. Prevention of medical accidents caused by defective surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Komatsu, Takami; Obayashi, Toshihiko; Saito, Yuhei; Uetera, Yushi

    2012-02-01

    The malfunctioning of surgical instruments may lead to serious medical accidents. Limited information is available on the risk of defective instruments. The purpose of these study is to demonstrate the features of defective surgical instruments, to establish a strategy to reduce the risk of medical accidents. We studied 19,474 consecutive operations during 2007 to 2009 at our hospital. The data on defective instruments were collected based on the orders for repair of broken instruments and reports of near-miss incidents. Adverse events caused by defective instruments were also identified from reports of near-miss incidents. A total of 1,775 nonfunctioning instruments were identified during the study period. Of these, 112 were found during operation. More than half of the defective instruments were tissue-grasping instruments, bone-boring/gnawing instruments, and instruments for endoscopic surgery. Wearing out and inappropriate use of instruments were 2 major causes of defects. The rest of the causes consisted of inadequate inspection and factory defects. Two near-miss incidents (incidence 10 per 100,000 operations) in endoscopic surgery were potentially critical, but the postoperative course was uneventful in each patient. The incidence of defects adjusted by the number of operations demonstrated that bone-boring/gnawing instruments and instruments for endoscopic surgery tend to be broken during surgery. Without inspection by the manufacturer, the incidence would be much higher for endoscopic instruments. Our data suggest that the appropriate use and adequate inspection of particular types of instruments are key for reducing the risk of medical accidents caused by defective surgical instruments. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogen induced optically-active defects in silicon photonic nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Boninelli, S; Franzò, G; Cardile, P; Priolo, F; Lo Savio, R; Galli, M; Shakoor, A; O'Faolain, L; Krauss, T F; Vines, L; Svensson, B G

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate intense room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from optically active hydrogen- related defects incorporated into crystalline silicon. Hydrogen was incorporated into the device layer of a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer by two methods: hydrogen plasma treatment and ion implantation. The room temperature PL spectra show two broad PL bands centered at 1300 and 1500 nm wavelengths: the first one relates to implanted defects while the other band mainly relates to the plasma treatment. Structural characterization reveals the presence of nanometric platelets and bubbles and we attribute different features of the emission spectrum to the presence of these different kind of defects. The emission is further enhanced by introducing defects into photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that the isotropicity of plasma treatment causes the formation of a higher defects density around the whole cavity compared to the ion implantation technique, while ion implantation creates a lower density of defects embedded in the Si layer, resulting in a higher PL enhancement. These results further increase the understanding of the nature of optically active hydrogen defects and their relation with the observed photoluminescence, which will ultimately lead to the development of intense and tunable crystalline silicon light sources at room temperature.

  13. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth defects & other health conditions > Neural tube defects Neural tube defects E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Neural tube defects (NTDs) are birth defects of the ...

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Presents: (1) a simple demonstration which illustrates the driving force of entropy using the familiar effects of the negative thermal expansion coefficient of rubber; and (2) a demonstration of tetrahedral bonding using soap films. (CS)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described which are suitable for introductory chemistry classes. The first involves the precipitation of silver, and the second is a demonstration of the relationship between rate constants and equilibrium constants using water and beakers. (BB)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations including a variation of the iodine clock reaction, and a simple demonstration of refractive index. The materials, procedures, and a discussion of probable results are given for each. (CW)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are two demonstrations; "Heat of Solution and Colligative Properties: An Illustration of Enthalpy and Entropy," and "A Vapor Pressure Demonstration." Included are lists of materials and experimental procedures. Apparatus needed are illustrated. (CW)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) red cabbage and electrolysis of water to bring together acid/base and electrochemical concepts; and (2) a model to demonstrate acid/base conjugate pairs utilizing magnets. (SK)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations; one on Boyle's Law, to illustrate the gas law and serve as a challenging problem for the students; the other is a modified Color Blind Traffic Light demonstration in which the oscillating reactions were speeded up. (GA)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides instructions on conducting four demonstrations for the chemistry classroom. Outlines procedures for demonstrations dealing with coupled oscillations, the evaporation of liquids, thioxanthone sulfone radical anion, and the control of variables and conservation of matter. (TW)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  9. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for two demonstrations are provided. The solubility of ammonia gas in water is demonstrated by introducing water into a closed can filled with the gas, collapsing the can. The second demonstration relates scale of standard reduction potentials to observed behavior of metals in reactions with hydrogen to produce hydrogen gas. (Author/JN)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two classroom chemistry demonstrations which focus on the descriptive chemistry of bromine and iodine. Outlines the chemicals and equipment needed, experimental procedures, and discussion of one demonstration of the oxidation states of bromine and iodine, and another demonstration of the oxidation states of iodine. (TW)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    List of materials needed, procedures used, and results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first is an inexpensive and quick method for demonstrating column chromatography of plant pigments of spinach extract. The second is a demonstration of cathodic protection by impressed current. (JN)

  14. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a demonstration involving the controlled combustion of a mixture of metals with black and smokeless powder in a small Erlenmeyer flask. Also describes demonstrations using a device that precludes breathing of hazardous vapors during class demonstrations; the device is easy to transport and use in rooms without sinks. (JN)

  16. Molecular and cellular analysis of the DNA repair defect in a patient in Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D who has the clinical features of Xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Broughton, B.C.; Thompson, A.F.; Harcourt, S.A.; Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F.; Lehmann, A.R.; Vermeulen, W.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Botta, E.; Stefanini, M.

    1995-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are quite distinct genetic disorders that are associated with defects in excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage. A few patients have been described previously with the clinical features of both disorders. In this paper we describe an individual in this category who has unusual cellular responses to UV light. We show that his cultured fibroblasts and lymphocytes are extremely sensitive to irradiation with UV-C, despite a level of nucleotide excision repair that is 30%-40% that of normal cells. The deficiency is assigned to the XP-D complementation group, and we have identified two causative mutations in the XPD gene: a gly{yields}arg change at amino acid 675 in the allele inherited from the patient`s mother and a -1 frameshift at amino acid 669 in the allele inherited from his father. These mutations are in the C-terminal 20% of the 760-amino-acid XPD protein, in a region where we have recently identified several mutations in patients with trichothiodystrophy. 44 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  18. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  19. Light Localization by Defects in Optically Induced Photonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianke; Wang, Xiaosheng; Wang, Jiandong; Chen, Zhigang

    In the past ten years, there has blossomed an interest in the study of collective behavior of wave propagation in periodic waveguide arrays and photonic lattices [1-3]. The unique bandgap structures of these periodic media, coupled with nonlinear effects, give rise to many types of novel soliton structures [1- 26]. On the other hand, it is well known that one of the unique and most interesting features of photonic band-gap structures is a fundamentally different way of waveguiding by defects in otherwise uniformly periodic structures. Such waveguiding has been demonstrated with an "air-hole" in photonic crystal fibers (PCF) for optical waves [27, 28], in an isolated defect in two-dimensional arrays of dielectric cylinders for microwaves [29-31], and recently in all-solid PCF with a lower-index core [32, 33]. In addition, laser emission based on photonic defect modes has been realized in a number of experiments [34-38]. In one-dimensional (1D) fabricated semiconductor waveguide arrays, previous experiments have investigated nonlinearity-induced escape from a defect state [39] and interactions of discrete solitons with structural defects [40] (see also [41]). Despite the above efforts, theoretical understanding on defect guiding was still limited, and experimental demonstrations of defect guiding was still scarce. In addition, when nonlinear effects are significant, how defect guiding is affected by nonlinearity is largely an open issue. Recently, in a series of theoretical and experimental studies, we optically induced 1D, 2D and ringlike photonic lattices with single-site negative defects in photorefractive crystals, and investigated their linear and nonlinear light guiding properties [42-48]. This work will be reviewed in this Chapter. In addition, we present the first experimental demonstration of nonlinear defect modes which undergoes nonlinear propagation through the defects. Our work not only has a direct link to technologically important systems of periodic

  20. Subclinical features in non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P): review of the evidence that subepithelial orbicularis oris muscle defects are part of an expanded phenotype for CL/P.

    PubMed

    Marazita, Mary L

    2007-05-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a common, complex birth defect with a wide phenotypic spectrum. This review summarizes the evidence that subepithelial (occult) defects of the superior orbicularis oris (OO) muscle represent the mildest form of the lip portion of CL/P. The rate of OO defects was assessed via ultrasound in non-CL/P relatives of individuals with CL/P and compared with controls. Descriptive histology of OO muscles from cadavers was carried out. BMP4 was sequenced in non-CL/P individuals with OO defects vs. controls. 1) Non-CL/P relatives of individuals with overt CL/P have a significantly increased frequency of OO defects compared with controls with no family history of CL/P; 2) Preliminary histological studies of cadaver OO muscles show a pattern of disorganized muscle fibers in an individual with OO discontinuities as seen on ultrasound compared with another individual with no OO defect. That is, the defects seen on ultrasound appear to have an anatomical basis; 3) Sequencing BMP4 found a significant increase in potentially damaging mutations in individuals with OO defects vs. controls. Taken together, these data provide significant support for the hypothesis that subepithelial OO muscle defects are a mild manifestation of the lip portion of the CL/P phenotype. Given that subepithelial OO muscle defects are relatively straightforward to identify via ultrasound, such defects show great promise for providing more accurate recurrence risk estimates to relatives in cleft families. Furthermore, inclusion of OO defects in the CL/P phenotypic spectrum should improve the power of genetic studies.

  1. Assessing EUV mask defectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Tchikoulaeva, Anna; Ackmann, Paul; Wood, Obert; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bubke, Karsten; Holfeld, Christian; Peters, Jan Hendrik; Kini, Sumanth; Watson, Sterling; Lee, Isaac; Mu, Bo; Lim, Phillip; Raghunathan, Sudhar; Boye, Carol

    2010-04-01

    This paper assesses the readiness of EUV masks for pilot line production. The printability of well characterized reticle defects, with particular emphasis on those reticle defects that cause electrical errors on wafer test chips, is investigated. The reticles are equipped with test marks that are inspected in a die-to-die mode (using DUV inspection tool) and reviewed (using a SEM tool), and which also comprise electrically testable patterns. The reticles have three modules comprising features with 32 nm ground rules in 104 nm pitch, 22 nm ground rules with 80 nm pitch, and 16 nm ground rules with 56 nm pitch (on the wafer scale). In order to determine whether specific defects originate from the substrate, the multilayer film, the absorber stack, or from the patterning process, the reticles were inspected after each fabrication step. Following fabrication, the reticles were used to print wafers on a 0.25 NA full-field ASML EUV exposure tool. The printed wafers were inspected with state of the art bright-field and Deep UV inspection tools. It is observed that the printability of EUV mask defects down to a pitch of 56 nm shows a trend of increased printability as the pitch of the printed pattern gets smaller - a well established trend at larger pitches of 80 nm and 104 nm, respectively. The sensitivity of state-of-the-art reticle inspection tools is greatly improved over that of the previous generation of tools. There appears to be no apparent decline in the sensitivity of these state-of-the-art reticle inspection tools for higher density (smaller) patterns on the mask, even down to 56nm pitch (1x). Preliminary results indicate that a blank defect density of the order of 0.25 defects/cm2 can support very early learning on EUV pilot line production at the 16nm node.

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two demonstrations for classroom use related to precipitation of ferrous hydroxide and to variation of vapor pressure with temperature. The former demonstration is simple and useful when discussing solubility of ionic compounds electrode potential of transition elements, and mixed valence compounds. (Author/SA)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described: (1) a variant of preparing purple benzene by phase transfer catalysis with quaternary ammonium salts and potassium permanganate in which crown ethers are used; (2) a corridor or "hallway" demonstration in which unknown molecular models are displayed and prizes awarded to students correctly identifying the…

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides three descriptions of demonstrations used in various chemistry courses. Includes the use of a simple demonstration model to illustrate principles of chromatography, techniques for using balloons to teach about the behavior of gases, and the use of small concentrations of synthetic polyelectrolytes to induce the flocculation hydrophobic…

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a supplement to the "water to rose" demonstration in which a pink color is produced. Also discusses blood buffer demonstrations, including hydrolysis of sodium bicarbonate, simulated blood buffer, metabolic acidosis, natural compensation of metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, acidosis treatment, and alkalosis treatment. Procedures…

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two laboratory demonstrations in chemistry. One uses dry ice, freon, and freezer bags to demonstrate volume changes, vapor-liquid equilibrium, a simulation of a rain forest, and vaporization. The other uses the clock reaction technique to illustrate fast reactions and kinetic problems in releasing carbon dioxide during respiration. (TW)

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first (useful as an introduction to kinetics) shows how the rate of a reaction is fast at first and then gradually decreases to zero when one reactant has been used up. The second is a gas density demonstration using 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro ethane. (JN)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are two chemistry demonstrations: (1) an alternative method for the demonstration of the properties of alkali metals, water is added to small amounts of metal; (2) an exploration of the properties of hydrogen, helium, propane, and carbon dioxide using an open trough and candle. (MVL)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a second part to the dichromate volcano demonstration. The green ash produced during the demonstration is reduced to metal using aluminothermy (Goldschmide process). Also describes suitable light sources and spectroscopes for student observation of emission spectra in lecture halls. (JN)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Provided are two demonstrations for an introductory course in chemistry. The first one emphasizes the observation and the interpretation of facts to form hypotheses during the heating of a beaker of water. The second demonstration shows the liquid phase of carbon dioxide using dry ice and a pressure gauge. (YP)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provides directions for setup and performance of two demonstrations. The first demonstrates the principles of Raoult's Law; using a simple apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure. The second illustrates the energy available from alcohol combustion (includes safety precautions) using an alcohol-fueled missile. (JM)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Described are demonstrations designed to reveal the important "nonsolvent" properties of water through its interaction with a toy called "Magic Sand" and other synthetic silica derivatives, especially those bonded with organic moities. The procedures for seven demonstrations along with a discussion of the effects are presented. (CW)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Free radical chlorination of methane is used in organic chemistry to introduce free radical/chain reactions. In spite of its common occurrence, demonstrations of the reaction are uncommon. Therefore, such a demonstration is provided, including background information, preparation of reactants/reaction vessel, introduction of reactants, irradiation,…

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a demonstration utilized to measure the heat of vaporization using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Explained is that when measurement is made as part of a demonstration, it raises student's consciousness that chemistry is experimentally based. (Author/DS)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are three demonstrations: "The Construction and Use of Commercial Voltaic Cell Displays in Freshman Chemistry"; Dramatizing Isotopes: Deuterated Ice Cubes Sink"; and "A Simple Apparatus to Demonstrate Differing Gas Diffusion Rates (Graham's Law)." Materials, procedures, and safety considerations are discussed. (CW)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a simple, inexpensive way of demonstrating electroplating using the reaction between nickel ions and copper metal. Explains how to conduct a demonstration of the electrolysis of water by using a colored Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte so that students can observe the pH changes. (TW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the photochromic behavior of mercury(II) bis(dithizonate) in providing a colorful demonstration of the effect that visible light can have on the conformation and bonding of molecules in solution. Provides a description of the demonstration itself, along with the preparation needed to complete it. (TW)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration of a solid state phase transition using a thermodynamic material which changes state at room temperature. Also describes a demonstration on kinetics using a "Big Bang" (trade mark) calcium carbide cannon. Indicates that the cannon is safe to use. (JN)

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Three chemistry demonstrations are described: (1) modification of copper catalysis demonstration apparatus; (2) experiments in gas-liquid chromatography with simple gas chromatography at room temperature; and (3) equilibria in silver arsenate-arsenic acid and silver phosphate-phosphoric acid systems. Procedures and materials needed are provided.…

  15. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations designed to help chemistry students visualize certain chemical properties. One experiment uses balloons to illustrate the behavior of gases under varying temperatures and pressures. The other uses a makeshift pea shooter and a commercial model to demonstrate atomic structure and the behavior of high-speed particles.…

  16. Observation of bandgap guidance of optical vortices in a tunable negative defect.

    PubMed

    Song, Daohong; Wang, Xiaosheng; Shuldman, Daniel; Wang, Jiandong; Tang, Liqin; Lou, Cibo; Xu, Jingjun; Yang, Jianke; Chen, Zhigang

    2010-06-15

    We experimentally demonstrate linear bandgap guidance of optical vortices as high-gap defect modes (DMs) in two-dimensional induced photonic lattices. We show that donut-shaped vortex beams can be guided in a tunable negative (lower-index) defect, provided that the defect strength is set at an appropriate level. Such vortex DMs have fine features in the "tails" associated with the lattice anisotropy and can be considered as a superposition of dipole DMs. Our numerical results find good agreement with experimental observations.

  17. Defects in flexoelectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Sheng; Purohit, Prashant K.

    2015-11-01

    A solid is said to be flexoelectric when it polarizes in proportion to strain gradients. Since strain gradients are large near defects, we expect the flexoelectric effect to be prominent there and decay away at distances much larger than a flexoelectric length scale. Here, we quantify this expectation by computing displacement, stress and polarization fields near defects in flexoelectric solids. For point defects we recover some well known results from strain gradient elasticity and non-local piezoelectric theories, but with different length scales in the final expressions. For edge dislocations we show that the electric potential is a maximum in the vicinity of the dislocation core. We also estimate the polarized line charge density of an edge dislocation in an isotropic flexoelectric solid which is in agreement with some measurements in ice. We perform an asymptotic analysis of the crack tip fields in flexoelectric solids and show that our results share some features from solutions in strain gradient elasticity and piezoelectricity. We also compute the energy release rate for cracks using simple crack face boundary conditions and use them in classical criteria for crack growth to make predictions. Our analysis can serve as a starting point for more sophisticated analytic and computational treatments of defects in flexoelectric solids which are gaining increasing prominence in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  2. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a recipe for the Nylon Rope Trick, which is considered to be one of the most spectacular demonstrations in chemistry. Materials for growing the polymer and some safety precautions are given. (SA)

  3. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a demonstration involving the transformation of a hydrophobic liquid to a partially hydrophobic semisolid. Safety considerations are noted. (JN)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is a Corridor Demonstration which can be set up in readily accessible areas such as hallways or lobbies. Equipment is listed for a display of three cells (solar cells, fuel cells, and storage cells) which develop electrical energy. (CS)

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Presents three demonstrations suitable for undergraduate chemistry classes. Focuses on experiments with calcium carbide, the induction by iron of the oxidation of iodide by dichromate, and the classical iodine clock reaction. (ML)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in college chemistry classes. Includes "Spectroscopy in Large Lecture Halls" and "The Endothermic Dissolution of Ammonium Nitrate." Gives materials lists and procedures as well as a discussion of the results. (CW)

  10. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports two electrochemical demonstrations. Uses a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell to power a clock. Includes description of methods and materials. Investigates the "potato clock" used with different fruits. Lists emf and current for various fruit and electrode combinations. (ML)

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  13. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a room-temperature method for demonstrating phosphorescence by including samples in a polymer matrix. Also discusses the Old Nassau Reaction, a clock reaction which turns orange then black. (MLH)

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeld, D. W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations (1) a dust explosion using a coffee can, candle, rubber tubing, and cornstarch and (2) forming a silicate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer which can be pressed into plastic sheets or molded. Gives specific instructions. (MVL)

  15. Study of Residual Stress and Vacancy Defects in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeň, V.; Veterníková, J.; Kilpeläinen, S.; Tuomisto, F.

    This study was focused on commercial oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels -MA 956 (20%Cr), ODM 751 (16%Cr) and ODS Eurofer (9%Cr), developed for fuel cladding of GEN IV reactors. The ODS steels are described in order to comparison their microstructure features. Vacancy defects were observed by Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS) and Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). Residual stress proportional to all kinds of defects was investigated by Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) measurement. The positron techniques demonstrated the highest defect concentration for ODS Eurofer followed by MA 956. The lowest defect density belongs to ODM 751; although these defects are the largest (three or four vacancy clusters). MA 956 and ODS Eurofer have di-vacancies in predominance. MBN results are in a good accordance with positron techniques. The highest residual stress is for ODS Eurofer, followed by MA 956. Finally, the lowest residual stress proportional to hardness is found for ODM 751.

  16. Defect reduction of patterned media templates and disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kang; Ha, Steven; Fretwell, John; Ramos, Rick; Ye, Zhengmao; Schmid, Gerard; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2010-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for the replication of nano-scale features. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require a demonstration of defect levels commensurate with cost-effective device production. This work summarizes the results of defect inspections of hard disks patterned using Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM). Inspections were performed with optical based automated inspection tools. For the hard drive market, it is important to understand the defectivity of both the template and the imprinted disk. This work presents a methodology for automated pattern inspection and defect classification for imprint-patterned media. Candela CS20 and 6120 tools from KLA-Tencor map the optical properties of the disk surface, producing highresolution grayscale images of surface reflectivity and scattered light. Defects that have been identified in this manner are further characterized according to the morphology. The imprint process was tested after optimizing both the disk cleaning and adhesion layers processes that precede imprinting. An extended imprint run was performed and both the defect types and trends are reported.

  17. Demonstration Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles "Skip"

    1998-05-01

    Last week I did a demonstration that produced a serious explosion. After putting methanol in a big glass carboy and rotating the carboy to build up some methanol vapor, I lit the mouth of the carboy. What normally happens is a "jet engine" effect out of the mouth of the carboy. In my case, the carboy exploded. Two polycarbonate blast shields were shattered and glass was blown as far as 15 feet away. I was not seriously cut and bruised, but had I not been using the two blast shields, I would have been severely injured. At this time, I am not sure what caused the explosion. I have done this demonstration around one hundred times with no problem using the exact same amount of methanol and technique. I think it is important to get the word out that this demonstration may be more dangerous than previously thought. I would also welcome any hypotheses concerning what caused the carboy to explode.

  18. Demonstrating Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Dr. Richard DeLombard of NASA's Glenn Research Center, hands the relase line for the Microgravity Demonstrator to a visitor for her to start a short experiment showing the effects of microgravity on candle flames. Combustion physics will be a major line of investigation for NASA aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The Microgravity Demonstrator is frequently used at shows and schools to illustrate how phenomena change in microgravity. The exhibit was part of the NASA outreach activity at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI

  19. Photomask defect tracing, analysis, and reduction with chemically amplified resist process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-ming; Lai, Rick; Huang, W. H.; Wang, B. C.; Chen, C. Y.; Kung, C. H.; Yoo, Chue-San; Chen, Jieh-Jang; Lee, Sheng-Cha

    2003-08-01

    The features of optical proximity correction are becoming very aggressive as production technology migrates into 90nm/130 nm regime. The complicated optical proximity correction (OPC) patterns often result in un-repairable defects, a major yield loss mechanisms in a mask production line. Defect control is increasingly important. A methodology for identifying defect sources and reduction is demonstrated in this paper. The mechanisms and causes of defect formation could be determined with corresponding process step on the strength of sequence inspections. The cause of half-etched opaque defect on negative CAR process was found from PR fragment contamination of e-beam exposure step. After clean-up of e-beam chamber, yield was increased over 20%. Big pinhole defect and contact of AttPSM positive process was found on ADI step. The possible cause was poor CAR adhesion. These two type defects were decreased by modification of developing recipe, special on rinse step. Design experiment with Taguchi method was used to optimize the interactive recipe of plasma descum and rinse step on developing step of implanted layer. Average defect density was decreased from 0.99 to 0.27, and percentage of zero defect rate has been increased from 29.5 to 63.3%.

  20. Jet and flash imprint defectivity: assessment and reduction for semiconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Litt, Lloyd C.; Johnson, Steve; Resnick, Douglas J.; Lovell, David

    2011-04-01

    Defectivity has been historically identified as a leading technical roadblock to the implementation of nanoimprint lithography for semiconductor high volume manufacturing. The lack of confidence in nanoimprint's ability to meet defect requirements originates in part from the industry's past experiences with 1X lithography and the shortage in end-user generated defect data. SEMATECH has therefore initiated a defect assessment aimed at addressing these concerns. The goal is to determine whether nanoimprint, specifically Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography from Molecular Imprints, is capable of meeting semiconductor industry defect requirements. At this time, several cycles of learning have been completed in SEMATECH's defect assessment, with promising results. J-FIL process random defectivity of < 0.1 def/cm2 has been demonstrated using a 120nm half-pitch template, providing proof of concept that a low defect nanoimprint process is possible. Template defectivity has also improved significantly as shown by a pre-production grade template at 80nm pitch. Cycles of learning continue on feature sizes down to 22nm.

  1. The Renal Functional Defect of Postobstructive Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jaenike, John R.

    1972-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the pathogenesis of the excretory defect produced by bilateral ureteral obstruction in the rat. After release of obstruction of 24 hr duration glomerular filtration rate was reduced to 20% of normal. Free flow proximal tubular pressure was normal, excluding residual obstruction as a cause of depressed filtration, and indicating that an intrarenal hemodynamic abnormality was primarily responsible for the excretory defect. Total renal blood flow and cortical distribution of flow were normal. Clearance and micropuncture studies indicated the presence of marked heterogeneity of nephron function with residual excretory function residing primarily in vasodilated nephrons in which decreased postglomerular arteriolar resistance effected a reduction in glomerular filtration pressure. Heterogeneity of nephron function was evidenced by a wide scatter of values for single nephron filtration rate and from direct intratubular injection of dye which revealed that at least 28% of surface nephrons were either nonfiltering or had filtration rates too low to measure. The observed decrease in Hippuran extraction and increased ratio of Hippuran to inulin clearance ratio is characteristic of the vasodilated kidney. Further evidence of the vasodilated nature of residual functioning nephrons was demonstrated by the failure of intrarenal papaverine infusion to increase filtration rate in this lesion. The hemodynamic defect produced by bilateral obstruction is contrasted with that seen after release of unilateral ureteral ligation in which depression of filtration rate appears to result primarily from preglomerular vasoconstriction. This difference raises the possibility that a vasodilating substance accumulates during total suppression of renal excretory function. Diuresis and natriuresis were constant features of the postobstructive lesion. The present data support previously published studies which localize the defect in sodium transport to the distal

  2. Genetic sperm defects.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Peter J

    2005-08-01

    Genetic sperm defects are specific sperm defects, which have been shown to have a genetic mode of transmission. Such genetic linkage, either direct or indirect, has been associated with a number of sperm defects in different species, with this number increasing with improved diagnostic capabilities. A number of sperm defects, which have proven or suspected genetic modes of transmission are discussed herein, with particular emphasis on cattle. These include: 1. Acrosome defects (knobbed, ruffled and incomplete); 2. Head defects (abnormal condensation, decapitated, round head, rolled head, nuclear crest); 3. Midpiece abnormalities ("Dag" defect, "corkscrew" defect, "pseudo-droplet" defect); 4. Tail defects ("tail stump" defect, primary ciliary dyskinesia).

  3. Surface Defect States in Nanopowder ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzhemechny, Yuri M.; Peters, Raul M.; Shafer, Jacob; Schulman, James; Paramo, J. Antonio

    2010-10-01

    In our work we employed surface photovoltage (SPV) spectroscopy on a number of commercially available ZnO nanopowders to probe surface defect energies within the band gap, conduction vs. valence band nature of the defect-related transitions, as well as the surface photoresponse dynamics. SPV characterization was performed in ultra-high vacuum in situ with remote oxygen plasma treatments. Our experiments revealed a number of common spectral features related to surface states in the as-received and plasma-processed samples. Furthermore, we observed significant plasma-induced changes in the surface defect properties. Complementary ex situ photoluminescence measurements performed on the studied samples were correlated with the SPV results and demonstrated that our approach is efficient in detecting specific surface states in nanoscale ZnO specimens and in elucidating their nature.

  4. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  5. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  6. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  7. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Provides instructions and a list of materials needed to demonstrate: (1) a model of the quantum mechanical atom; (2) principles involved in metal corrosion and in the prevention of this destructive process by electrochemical means; and (3) a Thermit reaction, modified to make it more dramatic and interesting for students. (SK)

  8. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  9. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three broad classes of magnetic behavior: diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic. Presents a simple lecture demonstration using an overhead projector to synthesize triiron tetraoxide and to show its interaction with a magnetic field and comparing it to a paramagnetic material. (MVL)

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  11. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  12. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…

  13. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations that require almost no preparation time, are visually stimulating, and present a variety of material for class discussion (with sample questions provided). The first involves a sodium bicarbonate hydrochloric acid volcano; the second involves a dissolving polystyrene cup. Procedures used and information on…

  14. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  15. Tested Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: one that illustrates the attainment of equilibrium in first-order reactions by changing the volumes of two beakers of water at a specified rate, and another that illustrates the role of indicators in showing pH changes in buffer solutions. (MLH)

  16. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  17. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations to illustrate characteristics of substances. Outlines a method to detect the changes in pH levels during the electrolysis of water. Uses water pistols, one filled with methane gas and the other filled with water, to illustrate the differences in these two substances. (TW)

  18. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results obtained are provided for two demonstrations. The first involves the colorful complexes of copper(II). The second involves reverse-phase separation of Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD & C) dyes using a solvent gradient. (JN)

  19. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations for use in chemistry instruction. The first illustrates the preparation of a less common oxide of iron, showing why this oxide is rare. The second is an explosion reaction of hydrogen and oxygen that is recommended for use as an attention-getting device. (TW)

  20. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. The first shows the effect of polarity on solubility. The second is based on the unexpected formation of a precipitate of barium nitrate when barium carbonate or barium phosphate is treated with dilute nitric acid. List of materials needed and procedures used are included. (JN)

  1. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliche, Jean-Marie; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes two demonstrations: 1) the effect of polarity on solubility using sodium dichromate, TTE, ligroin, and water to form nonpolar-polar-nonpolar layers with the polar layer being colored; 2) determination of egg whites to be yellow by determining the content of yellow colored riboflavin in the egg white. (MVL)

  2. Inspecting rapidly moving surfaces for small defects using CNN cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blug, Andreas; Carl, Daniel; Höfler, Heinrich

    2013-04-01

    A continuous increase in production speed and manufacturing precision raises a demand for the automated detection of small image features on rapidly moving surfaces. An example are wire drawing processes where kilometers of cylindrical metal surfaces moving with 10 m/s have to be inspected for defects such as scratches, dents, grooves, or chatter marks with a lateral size of 100 μm in real time. Up to now, complex eddy current systems are used for quality control instead of line cameras, because the ratio between lateral feature size and surface speed is limited by the data transport between camera and computer. This bottleneck is avoided by "cellular neural network" (CNN) cameras which enable image processing directly on the camera chip. This article reports results achieved with a demonstrator based on this novel analogue camera - computer system. The results show that computational speed and accuracy of the analogue computer system are sufficient to detect and discriminate the different types of defects. Area images with 176 x 144 pixels are acquired and evaluated in real time with frame rates of 4 to 10 kHz - depending on the number of defects to be detected. These frame rates correspond to equivalent line rates on line cameras between 360 and 880 kHz, a number far beyond the available features. Using the relation between lateral feature size and surface speed as a figure of merit, the CNN based system outperforms conventional image processing systems by an order of magnitude.

  3. Development and functional evaluation of biomimetic silicone surfaces with hierarchical micro/nano-topographical features demonstrates favourable in vitro foreign body response of breast-derived fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Daniel J T; Oikonomou, Antonios; Hill, Ernie; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-06-01

    Reproducing extracellular matrix topographical cues, such as those present within acellular dermal matrix (ADM), in synthetic implant surfaces, may augment cellular responses, independent of surface chemistry. This could lead to enhanced implant integration and performance while reducing complications. In this work, the hierarchical micro and nanoscale features of ADM were accurately and reproducibly replicated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), using an innovative maskless 3D grayscale fabrication process not previously reported. Human breast derived fibroblasts (n=5) were cultured on PDMS surfaces and compared to commercially available smooth and textured silicone implant surfaces, for up to one week. Cell attachment, proliferation and cytotoxicity, in addition to immunofluorescence staining, SEM imaging, qRT-PCR and cytokine array were performed. ADM PDMS surfaces promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and survival (p=<0.05), in addition to increased focal contact formation and spread fibroblast morphology when compared to commercially available implant surfaces. PCNA, vinculin and collagen 1 were up-regulated in fibroblasts on biomimetic surfaces while IL8, TNFα, TGFβ1 and HSP60 were down-regulated (p=<0.05). A reduced inflammatory cytokine response was also observed (p=<0.05). This study represents a novel approach to the development of functionalised biomimetic prosthetic implant surfaces which were demonstrated to significantly attenuate the acute in vitro foreign body reaction to silicone.

  4. GASIS demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Vidas, E.H.

    1995-04-01

    A prototype of the GASIS database and retrieval software has been developed and is the subject of this poster session and computer demonstration. The prototype consists of test or preliminary versions of the GASIS Reservoir Data System and Source Directory datasets and the software for query and retrieval. The prototype reservoir database covers the Rocky Mountain region and contains the full GASIS data matrix (all GASIS data elements) that will eventually be included on the CD-ROM. It is populated for development purposes primarily by the information included in the Rocky Mountain Gas Atlas. The software has been developed specifically for GASIS using Foxpro for Windows. The application is an executable file that does not require Foxpro to run. The reservoir database software includes query and retrieval, screen display, report generation, and data export functions. Basic queries by state, basin, or field name will be assisted by scrolling selection lists. A detailed query screen will allow record selection on the basis of any data field, such as depth, cumulative production, or geological age. Logical operators can be applied to any-numeric data element or combination of elements. Screen display includes a {open_quotes}browse{close_quotes} display with one record per row and a detailed single record display. Datasets can be exported in standard formats for manipulation with other software packages. The Source Directory software will allow record retrieval by database type or subject area.

  5. Quantum defect analysis of HD photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Du, N.Y.; Greene, C.H.

    1986-11-15

    A multichannel quantum defect calculation is shown to reproduce most observed features in several portions of the HD photoabsorption spectrum. The rovibrational frame transformation theory of Atabek, Dill, and Jungen is reformulated in terms of a quantum defect matrix. The calculation accounts for spectral regions far from dissociation thresholds despite its neglect of g--u mixing.

  6. A novel case of compound heterozygosity with "Normandy"/type I von Willebrand disease (vWD). Direct demonstration of the segregation of one allele with a defective expression at the mRNA level causing type I vWD.

    PubMed

    Siguret, V; Lavergne, J M; Chérel, G; Boyer-Neumann, C; Ribba, A S; Bahnak, B R; Meyer, D; Piétu, G

    1994-02-01

    We report the case of a family with type I von Willebrand disease (vWD), characterized by a quantitative defect in von Willebrand factor (vWF), associated with a defective binding of vWF to factor VIII (FVIII) also called the "Normandy" variant of vWD. PCR products from genomic DNA of the family members were analysed in the region coding for the binding domain of vWF to FVIII. It showed that the proposita and one of her sons were heterozygous for the Arg91Gln missense mutation, abolishing an MspI restriction enzyme site located in exon 20. The transcription of the normal and mutated alleles was tested by the amplification of cDNA after reverse transcription of platelet mRNA in this region. A total lack of expression of the normal allele was observed in the proposita, who appeared as a compound heterozygous with one allele mutated at Arg91 and a "silent" expression of the other one. The segregation of the "silent" allele was studied in the family with the exonic BstEII RFLP both at the DNA and mRNA levels. The proposita has transmitted her "silent" allele to her daughter and to another son. As this son was informative for this RFLP, the absence of expression of the allele could be demonstrated at the mRNA level, providing evidence that this defect was responsible for his type I vWD.

  7. Defect reduction of high-density full-field patterns in jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lovejeet; Luo, Kang; Ye, Zhengmao; Xu, Frank; Haase, Gaddi; Curran, David; LaBrake, Dwayne; Resnick, Douglas; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-04-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FIL) involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned resist on the substrate. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the defect specifications of high end memory devices. Typical defectivity targets are on the order of 0.10/cm2. This work summarizes the results of defect inspections focusing on two key defect types; random non-fill defects occurring during the resist filling process and repeater defects caused by interactions with particles on the substrate. Non-fill defectivity must always be considered within the context of process throughput. The key limiting throughput step in an imprint process is resist filling time. As a result, it is critical to characterize the filling process by measuring non-fill defectivity as a function of fill time. Repeater defects typically have two main sources; mask defects and particle related defects. Previous studies have indicated that soft particles tend to cause non-repeating defects. Hard particles, on the other hand, can cause either resist plugging or mask damage. In this work, an Imprio 500 twenty wafer per hour (wph) development tool was used to study both defect types. By carefully controlling the volume of inkjetted resist, optimizing the drop pattern and controlling the resist fluid front during spreading, fill times of 1.5 seconds were achieved with non-fill defect levels of approximately 1.2/cm2. Longevity runs were used to study repeater defects and a nickel

  8. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    Mask blanks are the substrates that hold the master patterns for integrated circuits. Integrated circuits are semiconductor devices, such as microprocessors (mPs), dynamic random access memory (DRAMs), and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that are central to the computer, communication, and electronics industries. These devices are fabricated using a set of master patterns that are sequentially imaged onto light-sensitive coated silicon wafers and processed to form thin layers of insulating and conductive materials on top of the wafer. These materials form electrical paths and transistors that control the flow of electricity through the device. For the past forty years the semiconductor industry has made phenomenal improvements in device functionality, compactness, speed, power, and cost. This progress is principally due to the exponential decrease in the minimum feature size of integrated circuits, which has been reduced by a factor of {radical}2 every three years. Since 1992 the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has coordinated the efforts of producing a technology roadmap for semiconductors. In the latest document, ''The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors: 1999'', future technology nodes (minimum feature sizes) and targeted dates were specified and are summarized in Table 1. Lithography is the imaging technology for producing a de-magnified image of the mask on the wafer. A typical de-magnification factor is 4. Mask blank defects as small as one-eighth the equivalent minimum feature size are printable and may cause device failure. Defects might be the result of the surface preparation, such as polishing, or contamination due to handling or the environment. Table 2 shows the maximum tolerable defect sizes on the mask blank for each technology node. This downward trend puts a tremendous burden on mask fabrication, particularly in the area of defect detection and reduction. A new infrastructure for mask inspection will be

  9. Fusion of geometric and thermographic data for automated defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald-Tranta, Beata; O'Leary, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Many workpieces produced in large numbers with a large variety of sizes and geometries, e.g. castings and forgings, have to be 100% inspected. In addition to geometric tolerances, material defects, e.g. surface cracks, also have to be detected. We present a fully automated nondestructive testing technique for both types of defects. The workpiece is subject to continuous motion, and during this motion two measurements are performed. In the first step, after applying a short inductive heating, a thermographic measurement is carried out. An infrared camera records the surface temperature of the workpiece enabling the localization of material defects and surface cracks. In the second step, a light sectioning measurement is performed to measure the three-dimensional geometry of the piece. With the help of feature-based registration the data from the two different sources are fused and evaluated together. The advantage of this technique is that a more reliable decision can be made about the nature of the failures and their possible causes. The same registration technique also can be used for the comparison of different pieces and therefore to localize different failure types, via comparison with a ``golden,'' defect-free piece. The registration technique can be applied to any part that has unique geometric features, around which moments can be computed. Consequently, the inspection technique can be applied to many different parts. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated with measurements on three parts having different geometries.

  10. Adaptive classifier for steel strip surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingming; Li, Guangyao; Xie, Li; Xiao, Mang; Yi, Li

    2017-01-01

    Surface defects detection system has been receiving increased attention as its precision, speed and less cost. One of the most challenges is reacting to accuracy deterioration with time as aged equipment and changed processes. These variables will make a tiny change to the real world model but a big impact on the classification result. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive classifier with a Bayes kernel (BYEC) which update the model with small sample to it adaptive for accuracy deterioration. Firstly, abundant features were introduced to cover lots of information about the defects. Secondly, we constructed a series of SVMs with the random subspace of the features. Then, a Bayes classifier was trained as an evolutionary kernel to fuse the results from base SVMs. Finally, we proposed the method to update the Bayes evolutionary kernel. The proposed algorithm is experimentally compared with different algorithms, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can be updated with small sample and fit the changed model well. Robustness, low requirement for samples and adaptive is presented in the experiment.

  11. Comparison of fast 3D simulation and actinic inspection for EUV masks with buries defects

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, C. H.; Wiraatmadja, S.; Chan, T. T.; Neureuther, A. R.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Liang, T.

    2009-02-23

    Aerial images for isolated defects and the interactions of defects with features are compared between the Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the fast EUV simulation program RADICAL. Comparisons between AIT images from August 2007 and RADICAL simulations are used to extract aberrations. At this time astigmatism was the dominant aberration with a value of 0.55 waves RMS. Significant improvements in the imaging performance of the AIT were made between August 2007 and December 2008. A good match will be shown between the most recent AIT images and RADICAL simulations without aberrations. These comparisons will demonstrate that a large defect, in this case 7nm tall on the surface, is still printable even if it is centered under the absorber line. These comparisons also suggest that the minimum defect size is between 1.5nm and 0.8nm surface height because a 1.5nm defect was printable but a 0.8nm was not. Finally, the image of a buried defect near an absorber line through focus will demonstrate an inversion in the effect of the defect from a protrusion of the dark line into the space to a protrusion of the space into the line.

  12. The essential echocardiographic features of tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Norman H

    2013-12-01

    This presentation will demonstrate the essential features of tetralogy of Fallot in the infant and child before surgery, as well as some noteworthy features in the foetus. The four features, namely, subpulmonary stenosis, ventricular septal defect, aortic override, and right ventricular hypertrophy, can all be easily demonstrated by echocardiography. In addition, morphology of the pulmonary valve and the main and branch pulmonary arteries can be seen. The position of the coronary arteries and the major variants of proximal coronary anatomy can be defined. The arch anatomy and the presence of associated major aortopulmonary collateral arteries can be defined. All these features can be demonstrated in the foetus as well, after the first trimester, and the presence of major aortopulmonary collateral arteries can be seen more clearly because the lungs, being fluid filled, aid in ultrasound and do not provide the barrier that the air-filled lung presents after birth.

  13. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  14. Facts about Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  15. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... there is a problem with a baby's body chemistry, it is called a metabolic birth defect. Metabolic defects prevent the body from properly breaking down food to create energy. Examples of metabolic defects include ...

  16. Atrial septal defect (ASD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... other heart defects of the ventricular septum and mitral valve . Secundum defects can be a single, small ... Sometimes, open-heart surgery may be needed to repair the defect. The type of surgery is more ...

  17. Defects at semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzler, Martin

    1985-04-01

    Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) is widely used for detection of periodicity at the surface and of atom arrangement within the unit cell. Experiments and results, however, are increasing, which use the spot profile analysis (SPA-LEED) for the study of nonperiodic surfaces. Here the kinematical approximation provides a wider range of validity than expected. For semiconductors defects are especially important, since the surface states in the gap are determined or strongly influenced by almost any kind of defects at the surface. Atomic steps at the interface {Si}/{SiO2} have been shown to be correlated with many electronic properties of MOS devices like mobility, interface states and fixed charge. The epitaxy on Si and GaAs has been studied with LEED and RHEED, showing the density of the nuclei during formation of a layer and the layer-by-layer growth. The formation of metal suicides in the monolayer range is accompanied by many different superstructures and other rearrangements. It is demonstrated, that the new high resolution instruments provide additional qualitative and quantitative informations on any kind of surface defects.

  18. Enhancing radiation tolerance by controlling defect mobility and migration pathways in multicomponent single-phase alloys

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenyang; Niu, Liangliang; Chen, Nanjun; Jin, Ke; Yang, Taini; Xiu, Pengyuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Gao, Fei; Bei, Hongbin; Shi, Shi; He, Mo-Rigen; Robertson, Ian M.; Weber, William J.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-01-01

    A grand challenge in material science is to understand the correlation between intrinsic properties and defect dynamics. Radiation tolerant materials are in great demand for safe operation and advancement of nuclear and aerospace systems. Unlike traditional approaches that rely on microstructural and nanoscale features to mitigate radiation damage, this study demonstrates enhancement of radiation tolerance with the suppression of void formation by two orders magnitude at elevated temperatures in equiatomic single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys, and more importantly, reveals its controlling mechanism through a detailed analysis of the depth distribution of defect clusters and an atomistic computer simulation. The enhanced swelling resistance is attributed to the tailored interstitial defect cluster motion in the alloys from a long-range one-dimensional mode to a short-range three-dimensional mode, which leads to enhanced point defect recombination. The results suggest design criteria for next generation radiation tolerant structural alloys. PMID:27976669

  19. Enhancing radiation tolerance by controlling defect mobility and migration pathways in multicomponent single-phase alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chenyang; Niu, Liangliang; Chen, Nanjun; Jin, Ke; Yang, Taini; Xiu, Pengyuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Gao, Fei; Bei, Hongbin; Shi, Shi; He, Mo-Rigen; Robertson, Ian M.; Weber, William J.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-12-15

    A grand challenge in material science is to understand the correlation between intrinsic properties and defect dynamics. Radiation tolerant materials are in great demand for safe operation and advancement of nuclear and aerospace systems. Unlike traditional approaches that rely on microstructural and nanoscale features to mitigate radiation damage, this study demonstrates enhancement of radiation tolerance with the suppression of void formation by two orders magnitude at elevated temperatures in equiatomic single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys, and more importantly, reveals its controlling mechanism through a detailed analysis of the depth distribution of defect clusters and an atomistic computer simulation. The enhanced swelling resistance is attributed to the tailored interstitial defect cluster motion in the alloys from a long-range one-dimensional mode to a short-range three-dimensional mode, which leads to enhanced point defect recombination. Finally, the results suggest design criteria for next generation radiation tolerant structural alloys.

  20. Enhancing radiation tolerance by controlling defect mobility and migration pathways in multicomponent single-phase alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Chenyang; Niu, Liangliang; Chen, Nanjun; ...

    2016-12-15

    A grand challenge in material science is to understand the correlation between intrinsic properties and defect dynamics. Radiation tolerant materials are in great demand for safe operation and advancement of nuclear and aerospace systems. Unlike traditional approaches that rely on microstructural and nanoscale features to mitigate radiation damage, this study demonstrates enhancement of radiation tolerance with the suppression of void formation by two orders magnitude at elevated temperatures in equiatomic single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys, and more importantly, reveals its controlling mechanism through a detailed analysis of the depth distribution of defect clusters and an atomistic computer simulation. The enhancedmore » swelling resistance is attributed to the tailored interstitial defect cluster motion in the alloys from a long-range one-dimensional mode to a short-range three-dimensional mode, which leads to enhanced point defect recombination. Finally, the results suggest design criteria for next generation radiation tolerant structural alloys.« less

  1. Enhancing radiation tolerance by controlling defect mobility and migration pathways in multicomponent single-phase alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chenyang; Niu, Liangliang; Chen, Nanjun; Jin, Ke; Yang, Taini; Xiu, Pengyuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Gao, Fei; Bei, Hongbin; Shi, Shi; He, Mo-Rigen; Robertson, Ian M.; Weber, William J.; Wang, Lumin

    2016-12-01

    A grand challenge in material science is to understand the correlation between intrinsic properties and defect dynamics. Radiation tolerant materials are in great demand for safe operation and advancement of nuclear and aerospace systems. Unlike traditional approaches that rely on microstructural and nanoscale features to mitigate radiation damage, this study demonstrates enhancement of radiation tolerance with the suppression of void formation by two orders magnitude at elevated temperatures in equiatomic single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys, and more importantly, reveals its controlling mechanism through a detailed analysis of the depth distribution of defect clusters and an atomistic computer simulation. The enhanced swelling resistance is attributed to the tailored interstitial defect cluster motion in the alloys from a long-range one-dimensional mode to a short-range three-dimensional mode, which leads to enhanced point defect recombination. The results suggest design criteria for next generation radiation tolerant structural alloys.

  2. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Technology Center (MPMask). The Calibre ADC tool was qualified on production mask blanks against the manual classification. The classification accuracy of ADC is greater than 95% for critical defects with an overall accuracy of 90%. The sensitivity to weak defect signals and locating the defect in the images is a challenge we are resolving. The performance of the tool has been demonstrated on multiple mask types and is ready for deployment in full volume mask manufacturing production flow. Implementation of Calibre ADC is estimated to reduce the misclassification of critical defects by 60-80%.

  3. Online feature selection with streaming features.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xindong; Yu, Kui; Ding, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xingquan

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new online feature selection framework for applications with streaming features where the knowledge of the full feature space is unknown in advance. We define streaming features as features that flow in one by one over time whereas the number of training examples remains fixed. This is in contrast with traditional online learning methods that only deal with sequentially added observations, with little attention being paid to streaming features. The critical challenges for Online Streaming Feature Selection (OSFS) include 1) the continuous growth of feature volumes over time, 2) a large feature space, possibly of unknown or infinite size, and 3) the unavailability of the entire feature set before learning starts. In the paper, we present a novel Online Streaming Feature Selection method to select strongly relevant and nonredundant features on the fly. An efficient Fast-OSFS algorithm is proposed to improve feature selection performance. The proposed algorithms are evaluated extensively on high-dimensional datasets and also with a real-world case study on impact crater detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithms achieve better compactness and higher prediction accuracy than existing streaming feature selection algorithms.

  4. Origin of highly active metal-organic framework catalysts: defects? Defects!

    PubMed

    Canivet, J; Vandichel, M; Farrusseng, D

    2016-03-14

    This article provides a comprehensive review of the nature of catalytic sites in MOFs. In the last decade, a number of striking studies have reported outstanding catalytic activities of MOFs. In all cases, the authors were intrigued as it was unexpected from the ideal structure. We demonstrate here that (surface) defects are at the origin of the catalytic activities for the reported examples. The vacancy of ligands or linkers systematically generates (surface) terminations which can possibly show Lewis and/or Brønsted acido-basic features. The engineering of catalytic sites at the nodes by the creation of defects (on purpose) appears today as a rational approach for the design of active MOFs. Similarly to zeolite post-treatments, post-modifications of MOFs by linker or metal cation exchange appear to be methods of choice. Despite the mild acidity of defective MOFs, we can account for very active MOFs in a number of catalytic applications which show higher performances than zeolites or benchmark catalysts.

  5. Formation, migration, and clustering of point defects in CuInSe2 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikkonen, L. E.; Ganchenkova, M. G.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    The electronic properties of high-efficiency CuInSe2 (CIS)-based solar cells are affected by the microstructural features of the absorber layer, such as point defect types and their distribution. Recently, there has been controversy over whether some of the typical point defects in CIS—VCu, VSe, InCu, CuIn—can form stable complexes in the material. In this work, we demonstrate that the presence of defect complexes during device operational time can be justified by taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces acting behind defect microstructure formation. Our conclusions are backed up by thorough state-of-the-art calculations of defect interaction potentials as well as the activation barriers surrounding the complexes. Defect complexes such as InCu-2VCu, InCu-CuIn, and VSe-VCu are shown to be stable against thermal dissociation at device operating temperatures, but can anneal out within tens of minutes at temperatures higher than 150-200 °C (VCu-related complexes) or 400 °C (antisite pair). Our results suggest that the presence of these complexes can be controlled via growth temperatures, which provides a mechanism for tuning the electronic activity of defects and the device altogether.

  6. Effect of aspect ratio and surface defects on the photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Qin, Jiaqian; Xue, Yanan; Yu, Pengfei; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Limin; Liu, Riping

    2014-01-01

    ZnO, aside from TiO2, has been considered as a promising material for purification and disinfection of water and air, and remediation of hazardous waste, owing to its high activity, environment-friendly feature and lower cost. However, their poor visible light utilization greatly limited their practical applications. Herein, we demonstrate the fabrication of different aspect ratios of the ZnO nanorods with surface defects by mechanical-assisted thermal decomposition method. The experiments revealed that ZnO nanorods with higher aspect ratio and surface defects show significantly higher photocatalytic performances. PMID:24699790

  7. Air coupled ultrasonic detection of surface defects in food cans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Fernando; Ramón Jiménez, Antonio; del Castillo, María Dolores

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe an ultrasonic inspection system used for detection of surface defects in food cans. The system operates in the pulse-echo mode and analyses the 220 kHz ultrasonic signal backscattered by the object. The classification of samples into valid or defective is achieved with χ2 statistics and the k nearest neighbour method, applied to features computed from the envelope of the ultrasonic echo. The performance of the system is demonstrated empirically in detection of the presence of the pull tab on the removable lid of easy-open food cans, in a production line. It is found that three factors limit the performance of the classification: the misalignment of the samples, their separation of the ultrasonic transducer, and the vibration of the conveyor belt. When these factors are controlled, classification success rates between 94% and 99% are achieved.

  8. Automated Defect Classification Using AN Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Caryk, M.; Piekarczyk, B.

    2009-03-01

    The automated defect classification algorithm based on artificial neural network with multilayer backpropagation structure was utilized. The selected features of flaws were used as input data. In order to train the neural network it is necessary to prepare learning data which is representative database of defects. Database preparation requires the following steps: image acquisition and pre-processing, image enhancement, defect detection and feature extraction. The real digital radiographs of welded parts of a ship were used for this purpose.

  9. AUTOMATED DEFECT CLASSIFICATION USING AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Caryk, M.; Piekarczyk, B.

    2009-03-03

    The automated defect classification algorithm based on artificial neural network with multilayer backpropagation structure was utilized. The selected features of flaws were used as input data. In order to train the neural network it is necessary to prepare learning data which is representative database of defects. Database preparation requires the following steps: image acquisition and pre-processing, image enhancement, defect detection and feature extraction. The real digital radiographs of welded parts of a ship were used for this purpose.

  10. Non-Topological Inflation from Embedded Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Stephon H.S

    2003-02-28

    We discuss a new mechanism of obtaining a period of cosmological inflation in the context of string theory. This mechanism is based on embedded defects which form dynamically on higher dimensional D-branes. Such defects generate topological inflation, but unlike topological inflation from stable defects, here there is a natural graceful exit from inflation: the decay of the embedded defect. We demonstrate the idea in the context of a brane-antibrane annihilation process. The graceful exit mechanism suggested here applies generically to all realizations of inflation on D-branes.

  11. Holographic Experiments on Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wapler, Matthias C.

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study the anisotropic charge transport properties of both supersymmetric and nonsupersymmetric matter fields on (2+1)-dimensional defects coupled to a (3+1)-dimensional { N} = 4 SYM "heat bath." We focus on the cases of a finite external background magnetic field, finite net charge density and finite mass and their combinations. In this context, we also discuss the limitations due to operator mixing that appears in a few situations and that we ignore in our analysis. At high frequencies, we discover a spectrum of quasiparticle resonances due to the magnetic field and finite density and at small frequencies, we perform a Drude-like expansion around the DC limit. Both of these regimes display many generic features and some features that we attribute to strong coupling, such as a minimum DC conductivity and an unusual behavior of the "cyclotron" and plasmon frequencies, which become related to the resonances found in the conformal case in an earlier paper. We further study the hydrodynamic regime and the relaxation properties, from which the system displays a set of different possible transitions to the collisionless regime. The mass dependence can be cast in two regimes: a generic relativistic behavior dominated by the UV and a nonlinear hydrodynamic behavior dominated by the IR. In the massless case, we furthermore extend earlier results from the literature to find an interesting selfduality under a transformation of the conductivity and the exchange of density and magnetic field.

  12. Repairing 45 nm node defects through nano-machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Roy; Dinsdale, Andrew; Robinson, Tod; Brinkley, David; Csuy, Jeffrey; Lee, David

    2007-10-01

    Recently questions have been raised about whether high aspect ratio (HAR) NanoBits TM can be effectively utilized to repair extension defects in 45 nm node and beyond. The primary concern has been how the effect of NanoBit TM deflection impacts edge placement, sidewall angle and z-depth control repeatability. Higher aspect ratio bits are required for defects that arise as mask feature sizes become smaller. As the aspect ratio of the NanoBit TM continues to increase to meet these demands, the cross sectional area of the bit used for nanomachining becomes thinner and more susceptible to bending under the forces applied during the nanomachining process. This is especially true when deeper features that require HAR NanoBits TM are being repaired. To overcome this trend RAVE LLC has developed a new repair process that utilizes the strength of the bit shape. Repair of 45 nm node defects that require HAR NanoBits TM will be demonstrated using a new repair process and cantilever design.

  13. Context-based automated defect classification system using multiple morphological masks

    DOEpatents

    Gleason, Shaun S.; Hunt, Martin A.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    2002-01-01

    Automatic detection of defects during the fabrication of semiconductor wafers is largely automated, but the classification of those defects is still performed manually by technicians. This invention includes novel digital image analysis techniques that generate unique feature vector descriptions of semiconductor defects as well as classifiers that use these descriptions to automatically categorize the defects into one of a set of pre-defined classes. Feature extraction techniques based on multiple-focus images, multiple-defect mask images, and segmented semiconductor wafer images are used to create unique feature-based descriptions of the semiconductor defects. These feature-based defect descriptions are subsequently classified by a defect classifier into categories that depend on defect characteristics and defect contextual information, that is, the semiconductor process layer(s) with which the defect comes in contact. At the heart of the system is a knowledge database that stores and distributes historical semiconductor wafer and defect data to guide the feature extraction and classification processes. In summary, this invention takes as its input a set of images containing semiconductor defect information, and generates as its output a classification for the defect that describes not only the defect itself, but also the location of that defect with respect to the semiconductor process layers.

  14. [Congenital defects and incapacity].

    PubMed

    Jouve de la Barreda, Nicolás

    2009-01-01

    As a whole the congenital defects constitute an important section of the medical attention affecting near 3% of the population. A 15% of spontaneous abortions take place of which the greater frequency corresponds to the chromosome anomalies (25%) and the monogenic mutations (20%) and in a lesser extent to the effects of teratogenic agents. Between the genetic causes determining the congenital defects the mutations that affect genes acting in the early stages of development occupy a main place. These alterations can affect to homeotic genes or monogenic systems that act during the critical phases of the organogenesis. It seems evident that an alteration in the expression of a necessary gene for the appearance of a morphogenetic change constitutes the angular stone to understand resurging of a malformation or discapacity. In the last years has been demonstrated the importance of the teratogenic or environmental agents on the delicate internal physiological balance during the critical stages of the development. In this context must be included the inductive environmental factors inducing epigenetic modifications in the early stage of the development of the embryos produced by fertilization in vitro.

  15. Toward defect guard-banding of EUV exposures by full chip optical wafer inspection of EUV mask defect adders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halle, Scott D.; Meli, Luciana; Delancey, Robert; Vemareddy, Kaushik; Crispo, Gary; Bonam, Ravi; Burkhardt, Martin; Corliss, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    The detection of EUV mask adder defects has been investigated with an optical wafer defect inspection system employing a methodology termed Die-to-"golden" Virtual Reference Die (D2VRD). Both opaque and clear type mask absorber programmed defects were inspected and characterized over a range of defect sizes, down to (4x mask) 40 nm. The D2VRD inspection system was capable of identifying the corresponding wafer print defects down to the limit of the defect printability threshold at approximately 30 nm (1x wafer). The efficacy of the D2VRD scheme on full chip wafer inspection to suppress random process defects and identify real mask defects is demonstrated. Using defect repeater analysis and patch image classification of both the reference die and the scanned die enables the unambiguous identification of mask adder defects.

  16. Influence of material quality and process-induced defects on semiconductor device performance and yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Mckee, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of major causes of device yield degradation is presented. The relationships of device types to critical processes and typical defects are discussed, and the influence of the defect on device yield and performance is demonstrated. Various defect characterization techniques are described and applied. A correlation of device failure, defect type, and cause of defect is presented in tabular form with accompanying illustrations.

  17. Atrioventricular Canal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... birth (congenital). The condition is often associated with Down syndrome. Atrioventricular canal defect allows extra blood to flow ... baby's heart is developing. Some factors, such as Down syndrome, might increase the risk of atrioventricular canal defect. ...

  18. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to create energy. Examples of metabolic defects include Tay-Sachs disease , a fatal disease that affects the central nervous ... called recessive inheritance and includes conditions such as Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis . A disease or defect also ...

  19. Duralumin - Defects and Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    It is proposed in this paper to identify some of the defects and failures in duralumin most frequently encountered by the aircraft industry with a view to indicate their importance. The defects and failures in duralumin may be classified into the following groups: 1) defects produced during manufacture; 2) defects produced during fabrication; 3) corrosion and erosion; and 4) fatigue failures. Only the first two will be covered in this report.

  20. Backside defect printability for contact layer with different reticle blank material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Holfeld, Christian; Fischer, Daniel; Ackmann, Paul; Holfeld, Andre; Kurth, Karin; Sczyrba, Martin; Hertzsch, Tino; Seltmann, Rolf; Ho, Angeline; GN, Fang H.

    2012-11-01

    Backside defects are out of focus during wafer exposure by the mask thickness and cannot be directly imaged on wafer. However, backside defects will induce transmission variation during wafer exposure. When the size of backside defect is larger than 200 microns, the shadow of such particles will locally change the illumination conditions of the mask patterns and may result in a long range critical dimension (CD) variation on wafer depending on numerical aperture (NA) and pupil shape. Backside defects will affect both wafer CD and critical dimension uniformity (CDU), especially for two-dimensional (2D) structures. This paper focuses on the printability of backside defects on contact layer using annular and quadrupole illumination mode, as well as using different reticle blank material. It also targets for gaining better understanding of critical sizes of backside defects on contact layer for different reticle blanks. We have designed and manufactured two test reticles with repeating patterns of 28nm and 40nm technology node of contact layers. Programmed chrome defects of varying size are placed on the backside opposite to the repeating front side patterns in order to measure the spatial variation of transmission and wafer CD. The test mask was printed on a bare silicon wafer, and the printed features measured for size by spatial sampling. We have investigated two contact layers with different illumination conditions. One is advance binary with single exposure; another is phase shift mask with double exposure. Wafer CD variation for different backside defect sizes are demonstrated for the two contact layers. The comparison between backside defect size with inter-field and intra-field CD variation is also discussed.

  1. Defect-tolerant extreme ultraviolet nanoscale printing.

    PubMed

    Urbanski, L; Isoyan, A; Stein, A; Rocca, J J; Menoni, C S; Marconi, M C

    2012-09-01

    We present a defect-free lithography method for printing periodic features with nanoscale resolution using coherent extreme ultraviolet light. This technique is based on the self-imaging effect known as the Talbot effect, which is produced when coherent light is diffracted by a periodic mask. We present a numerical simulation and an experimental verification of the method with a compact extreme ultraviolet laser. Furthermore, we explore the extent of defect tolerance by testing masks with different defect layouts. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations.

  2. [Detection of Hawthorn Fruit Defects Using Hyperspectral Imaging].

    PubMed

    Liu, De-hua; Zhang, Shu-juan; Wang, Bin; Yu, Ke-qiang; Zhao, Yan-ru; He, Yong

    2015-11-01

    feature of 86 Hawthorn could be recognized. Lastly, the detect precision of bruised, insect damage and two-defect samples is 95.65%, 86.67% and 100%, respectively. This investigation demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging technology could detect the defects of bruise, insect damage, calyx, and stem-end in hawthorn fruit in qualitative analysis and feature detection which provided a theoretical reference for the defects nondestructive detection of hawthorn fruit.

  3. A WSI approach towards defect/fault-tolerant reconfigurable serial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Mavor, John; Denyer, Peter B.; Renshaw, David

    1988-06-01

    A superchip for realizing ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) systems based on a wafer-scale integrated (WSI) circuit concept, which incorporates defect/fault tolerance and system reconfiguration, is introduced. The key features of the central architectural component, a large crossbar switch matrix, are described. A prototype has been fabricated in silicon technology. Hypothetical processor examples demonstrate the power of the superchip approach, and design/performance figures are discussed.

  4. Autogeneous Friction Stir Weld Lack-of-Penetration Defect Detection and Sizing Using Directional Conductivity Measurements with MWM Eddy Current Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfine, Neil; Zilberstei, Vladimir; Lawson, Ablode; Kinchen, David; Arbegast, William

    2000-01-01

    Al 2195-T8 plate specimens containing Friction Stir Welds (FSW), provided by Lockheed Martin, were inspected using directional conductivity measurements with the MWM sensor. Sensitivity to lack-of-penetration (LOP) defect size has been demonstrated. The feature used to determine defect size was the normalized longitudinal component of the MWM conductivity measurements. This directional conductivity component was insensitive to the presence of a discrete crack. This permitted correlation of MWM conductivity measurements with the LOP defect size as changes in conductivity were apparently associated with metallurgical features within the first 0.020 in. of the LOP defect zone. Transverse directional conductivity measurements also provided an indication of the presence of discrete cracks. Continued efforts are focussed on inspection of a larger set of welded panels and further refinement of LOP characterization tools.

  5. Congenital defects of sheep.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S M

    1993-03-01

    With increasing incrimination of viruses, plants, and drugs as causes of ovine congenital defects, concerted efforts are required to identify environmental teratogens. Expanding knowledge of congenital defects requires studying as many defective lambs as possible; recording and documenting; detailed diagnostic examinations; genetic analyses and chromosomal examinations, whenever possible; and field investigations. Adopting standardized classification, terminology, and diagnostic procedures should improve descriptions, diagnoses, and interdisciplinary exchange of information. That, in turn, should improve our knowledge of and diagnosis of congenital defects of sheep in the future. Finally, veterinary clinicians and diagnosticians are encouraged to take an interest in congenital defects and teratology.

  6. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  7. Topological defect lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knitter, Sebastian; Fatt Liew, Seng; Xiong, Wen; Guy, Mikhael I.; Solomon, Glenn S.; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a topological defect to a regular photonic crystal defect cavity with anisotropic unit cell. Spatially localized resonances are formed and have high quality factor. Unlike the regular photonic crystal defect states, the localized resonances in the topological defect structures support powerflow vortices. Experimentally we realize lasing in the topological defect cavities with optical pumping. This work shows that the spatially inhomogeneous variation of the unit cell orientation adds another degree of freedom to the control of lasing modes, enabling the manipulation of the field pattern and energy flow landscape.

  8. Optical manipulation and imaging of assemblies of topological defects and colloids in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Rahul P.

    Liquid Crystals (LCs) have proven to be important for electro-optic device applications such as displays, spatial light modulators, non-mechanical beam-steerers, etc. Owing to their unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, they are also being explored for wide array of advanced technological applications such as biosensors, tunable lenses, distributed feedback lasers, muscle-like actuators, etc. The thesis explores LC media from the standpoint of controlling their elastic and optical properties by generating and manipulating assemblies of defects and colloidal particles. To achieve the goal of optically manipulating these configurations comprising defects and particles at microscale with an unprecedented control, and then to visualize the resultant molecular director patterns, requires development of powerful optical system. The thesis discusses design and implementation of such an integrated system capable of 3D holographic optical manipulation and multi-modal 3D imaging (in nonlinear optical modes like multiphoton fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, etc.) and how they are used to extensively study a vast number of LC based systems. Understanding of LCs and topological defects go hand in hand. Appreciation of defects leads to their precise control, which in turn can lead to applications. The thesis describes discovery of optically generated stable, quasiparticle-like, localized defect structures in a LC cell, that we call "Torons". Torons enable twist of molecules in three dimensions and resemble both Skyrmion-like and Hopf fibration features. Under different conditions of generation, we optically realize an intriguing variety of novel solitonic defect structures comprising rather complicated configurations of point and line topological defects. Introducing colloidal particles to LC systems imparts to these hybrid material system a fascinating degree of richness of properties on account of colloidal assemblies supported by networks

  9. Fermi level dependent native defect formation: Consequences for metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.

    1988-02-01

    The amphoteric native defect model of the Schottky barrier formation is used to analyze the Fermi level pinning at metal/semiconductor interfaces for submonolayer metal coverages. It is assumed that the energy required for defect generation is released in the process of surface back-relaxation. Model calculations for metal/GaAs interfaces show a weak dependence of the Fermi level pinning on the thickness of metal deposited at room temperature. This weak dependence indicates a strong dependence of the defect formation energy on the Fermi level, a unique feature of amphoteric native defects. This result is in very good agreement with experimental data. It is shown that a very distinct asymmetry in the Fermi level pinning on p- and n-type GaAs observed at liquid nitrogen temperatures can be understood in terms of much different recombination rates for amphoteric native defects in those two types of materials. Also, it is demonstrated that the Fermi level stabilization energy, a central concept of the amphoteric defect system, plays a fundamental role in other phenomena in semiconductors such as semiconductor/semiconductor heterointerface intermixing and saturation of free carrier concentration. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Postdevelopment defect evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Osamu; Kiba, Yukio; Ono, Yuko

    2001-08-01

    Reduction of defects after development is a critical issue in photolithography. A special category of post development defects is the satellite defect which is located in large exposed areas generally in proximity to large unexposed regions of photoresist. We have investigated the formation of this defect type on ESCAP and ACETAL DUV resists with and without underlying organic BARCs, In this paper, we will present AFM and elemental analysis data to determine the origin of the satellite defect. Imaging was done on a full-field Nikon 248nm stepper and resist processing was completed on a TEL CLEAN TRACK ACT 8 track. Defect inspection and review were performed on a KLA-Tencor and Hitachi SEM respectively. Results indicate that the satellite defect is generated on both BARC and resist films and defect counts are dependent on the dark erosion. Elemental analysis indicates that the defects are composed of sulfur and nitrogen compounds. We suspect that the defect is formed as a result of a reaction between PAG, quencher and TMAH. This defect type is removed after a DIW re-rinse.

  11. Defect-mediated turbulence in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chun; Wang, Hongli; Ouyang, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Statistical properties of topological defects in defect-mediated turbulence due to the Doppler instability are examined experimentally in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. By applying the phase space reconstruction approach, processes of defect creation, annihilation, and defect movement are analyzed. The defect dynamics can be well interpreted within the framework of stochastic Markovian process. In contrast to previous studies that made direct measure of the gain and loss rates, which is practically difficult, we demonstrate that the rates can be obtained directly from the analysis of the time series of defects, and the shape of the probability distribution function can be reproduced in a simple way.

  12. Ventricular Septal Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System ECG (Electrocardiogram) Anesthesia - What to Expect Tetralogy of ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  13. Ventricular Septal Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System ECG (Electrocardiogram) Anesthesia - What to Expect Tetralogy of ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  14. Discrete Sources Method for light scattering analysis of non-axisymmetric features of a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yuri; Wriedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Discrete Sources Method (DSM) has been extended to analyze polarized light scattering by non-axial symmetric nano-sized features on a plane substrate. A detailed description of the corresponding numerical scheme is provided. Using a "fictitious" particle approach the new DSM model enables to consider scattering from such substrate defects as a line bump and a line pit. The developed computer model has been employed for demonstrating the ability to perform a comparative analysis of light scattering from such line features. Simulation results corresponding to the Differential Scattering Cross-Section (DSC) and the integral response for P/S polarized light are presented. It was found that the integral response can change by an order of magnitude depending on the orientation of the linear defect with respect to the direction of the incident laser light. In addition, it was shown that some defects can turn out to be "invisible" if an oblique angle of incidence is chosen.

  15. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    chest CT was performed to evaluate for pulmonary embolism (figure 2). The chest radiograph (figure 1) demonstrates increased central pulmonary ...Fig. 5 Sinus venosus defect at birth . The shaded area in purple represents the sinus venosum. The anomalous right pulmonary venous anatomy...department (ED) with chest pain and an ankle fracture after being hit by a car while riding a horse. Chest imaging noted enlarged central pulmonary

  16. Eggshell defects detection based on color processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alegre, Maria C.; Ribeiro, Angela; Guinea, Domingo; Cristobal, Gabriel

    2000-03-01

    The automatic classification of defective eggs constitutes a fundamental issue at the poultry industry for both economical and sanitary reasons. The early separation of eggs with spots and cracks is a relevant task as the stains can leak while progressing on the conveyor-belts, degrading all the mechanical parts. Present work is focused on the implementation of an artificial vision system for detecting in real time defective eggs at the poultry farm. First step of the algorithmic process is devoted to the detection of the egg shape to fix the region of interest. A color processing is then performed only on the eggshell to obtain an image segmentation that allows the discrimination of defective eggs from clean ones in critic time. The results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed visual process on a wide sample of both defective and non-defective eggs.

  17. Multiscale simulations of defect dipole-enhanced electromechanical coupling at dilute defect concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi; Cohen, R. E.

    2017-08-01

    The role of defects in solids of mixed ionic-covalent bonds such as ferroelectric oxides is complex. Current understanding of defects on ferroelectric properties at the single-defect level remains mostly at the empirical level, and the detailed atomistic mechanisms for many defect-mediated polarization-switching processes have not been convincingly revealed quantum mechanically. We simulate the polarization-electric field (P-E) and strain-electric field (ɛ-E) hysteresis loops for BaTiO3 in the presence of generic defect dipoles with large-scale molecular dynamics and provide a detailed atomistic picture of the defect dipole-enhanced electromechanical coupling. We develop a general first-principles-based atomistic model, enabling a quantitative understanding of the relationship between macroscopic ferroelectric properties and dipolar impurities of different orientations, concentrations, and dipole moments. We find that the collective orientation of dipolar defects relative to the external field is the key microscopic structure feature that strongly affects materials hardening/softening and electromechanical coupling. We show that a small concentration (≈0.1 at. %) of defect dipoles dramatically improves electromechanical responses. This offers the opportunity to improve the performance of inexpensive polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics through defect dipole engineering for a range of applications including piezoelectric sensors, actuators, and transducers.

  18. Repair of Auricular Defects.

    PubMed

    Watson, Deborah; Hecht, Avram

    2017-08-01

    Repairing defects of the auricle requires an appreciation of the underlying 3-dimensional framework, the flexible properties of the cartilages, and the healing contractile tendencies of the surrounding soft tissue. In the analysis of auricular defects and planning of their reconstruction, it is helpful to divide the auricle into subunits for which different techniques may offer better functional and aesthetic outcomes. This article reviews many of the reconstructive options for defects of the various auricular subunits. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Robust defect segmentation in woven fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Sari-Sarraf, H.; Goddard, J.S. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a robust segmentation algorithm for the detection and localization of woven fabric defects. The essence of the presented segmentation algorithm is the localization of those events (i.e., defects) in the input images that disrupt the global homogeneity of the background texture. To this end, preprocessing modules, based on the wavelet transform and edge fusion, are employed with the objective of attenuating the background texture and accentuating the defects. Then, texture features are utilized to measure the global homogeneity of the output images. If these images are deemed to be globally nonhomogeneous (i.e., defects are present), a local roughness measure is used to localize the defects. The utility of this algorithm can be extended beyond the specific application in this work, that is, defect segmentation in woven fabrics. Indeed, in a general sense, this algorithm can be used to detect and to localize anomalies that reside in images characterized by ordered texture. The efficacy of this algorithm has been tested thoroughly under realistic conditions and as a part of an on-line fabric inspection system. Using over 3700 images of fabrics, containing 26 different types of defects, the overall detection rate of this approach was 89% with a localization accuracy of less than 0.2 inches and a false alarm rate of 2.5%.

  20. Thoracoabdominal wall defect with complete ectopia cordis and gastroschisis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Michael A; Fishbein, Gregory A; Teitell, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Ventral wall defects are extremely rare anomalies that are likely caused by the failure of the ventral wall to close during week 4 of development. We report a case of severe thoracoabdominal wall defect including complete thoracic ectopia cordis and gastroschisis. This combination represents a novel constellation of findings in a single patient. This unique case further demonstrates an anatomically normal heart with age-appropriate development and an intact diaphragm. We review the literature of other reports and discussions of entities that share overlapping features with this case.

  1. Segmental Bone Defect Treated With the Induced Membrane Technique.

    PubMed

    Konda, Sanjit R; Gage, Mark; Fisher, Nina; Egol, Kenneth A

    2017-08-01

    Posttraumatic bone defects in the setting of severe open injuries of the lower extremity present a significant challenge for orthopaedic trauma surgeons. The induced membrane technique, also known as the Masquelet technique, has been shown to be generally successful in achieving bony union. This video demonstrates the use of the Masquelet technique for a large (18 cm) femoral defect. The Masquelet technique is a 2-stage process. The first stage involves debridement of all devitalized tissue, using open reduction and internal fixation, and placement of a cement spacer with or without antibiotics. In the second stage, which is performed at least 6 weeks after the first, the spacer is removed and the resulting void is filled with bone graft. This surgical case video reviews the relevant patient injury presentation, initial management, and indications for the Masquelet technique. The second stage of the Masquelet technique is featured in this video. The Masquelet technique is a generally reliable method for treating large segmental bone defects. In addition, this relatively simple technique is suitable for both infected and noninfected cases.

  2. Fabric defects identification based on on-line 3D measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Limei; An, Hongwei; Dong, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Chunbo

    2011-08-01

    This paper using on-line identification of three dimensions to solve some difficult problems of two dimensional defects identification. Different defects have different 3D structural features, thus to identify and classify defects based on 3D testing data. Compared with fabric defects processed by two-dimensional image, 3D identification can more exclude cloth wrinkles and the flying thick silk floss. So the 3D identification is of high accuracy and reliability to identify fabric defects.

  3. Phenol dissociation on pristine and defective graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Hantarto; Oluwoye, Ibukun; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Hamra, A. A. B.; Lim, H. N.; Huang, N. M.; Yin, Chun-Yang; Jiang, Zhong-Tao

    2017-03-01

    Phenol (C6H5O‒H) dissociation on both pristine and defective graphene sheets in terms of associated enthalpic requirements of the reaction channels was investigated. Here, we considered three common types of defective graphene, namely, Stone-Wales, monovacancy and divacancy configurations. Theoretical results demonstrate that, graphene with monovacancy creates C atoms with dangling bond (unpaired valence electron), which remains particularly useful for spontaneous dissociation of phenol into phenoxy (C6H5O) and hydrogen (H) atom. The reactions studied herein appear barrierless with reaction exothermicity as high as 2.2 eV. Our study offers fundamental insights into another potential application of defective graphene sheets.

  4. Model based defect characterization in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Holland, S.

    2017-02-01

    Work is reported on model-based defect characterization in CFRP composites. The work utilizes computational models of the interaction of NDE probing energy fields (ultrasound and thermography), to determine 1) the measured signal dependence on material and defect properties (forward problem), and 2) an assessment of performance-critical defect properties from analysis of measured NDE signals (inverse problem). Work is reported on model implementation for inspection of CFRP laminates containing multi-ply impact-induced delamination, with application in this paper focusing on ultrasound. A companion paper in these proceedings summarizes corresponding activity in thermography. Inversion of ultrasound data is demonstrated showing the quantitative extraction of damage properties.

  5. The NASA telerobot technology demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, P. S.; French, R. L.; Sirota, A. R.; Matijevic, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The ongoing development of a telerobot technology demonstrator is reported. The demonstrator is implemented as a laboratory-based research testbed, and will show proof-of-concept for supervised automation of space assembly, servicing, and repair operations. The demonstrator system features a hierarchically layered intelligent control architecture which enables automated planning and run-time sequencing of complex tasks by a supervisory human operator. The demonstrator also provides a full bilateral force-reflecting hand control teleoperations capability. The operator may switch smoothly between the automated and teleoperated tasking modes in run-time, either on a preplanned or operator-designated basis.

  6. NIL defect performance toward high volume mass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Kashiwagi, Hiroyuki; Tokue, Hiroshi; Kono, Takuya; Tetsuro, Nakasugi; Choi, Eun Hyuk; Jung, Wooyung

    2016-03-01

    A low cost alternative lithographic technology is desired to meet with the decreasing feature size of semiconductor devices. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is one of the candidates for alternative lithographic technologies. NIL has advantages such as good resolution, critical dimension (CD) uniformity and smaller line edge roughness (LER). 4 On the other hand, NIL involves some risks. Defectivity is the most critical issue in NIL. The progress in the defect reduction on templates shows great improvement recently. In other words, the defect reduction of the NIIL process is a key to apply NIL to mass production. In this paper, we describe the evaluation results of the defect performance of NIL using an up-to-date tool, Canon FPA-1100 NZ2, and discuss the future potential of NIL in terms of defectivity. The impact of various kinds defects, such as the non-filling defect, plug defect, line collapse, and defects on replica templates are discussed. We found that non-fill defects under the resist pattern cause line collapse. It is important to prevent line collapse. From these analyses based on actual NIL defect data on long-run stability, we will show the way to reduce defects and the possibility of NIL in device high volume mass production. For the past one year, we have been are collaborating with SK Hynix to bring this promising technology into mainstream manufacturing. This work is the result of this collaboration.

  7. Defects in hardwood timber

    Treesearch

    Roswell D. Carpenter; David L. Sonderman; Everette D. Rast; Martin J. Jones

    1989-01-01

    Includes detailed information on all common defects that may aRect hardwood trees and logs. Relationships between manufactured products and those forms of round material to be processed from the tree for conversion into marketable products are discussed. This handbook supersedes Agriculture Handbook No. 244, Grade defects in hardwood timber and logs, by C.R. Lockard, J...

  8. Why Search for Congenital Defects?

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John F.

    1966-01-01

    The causation of congenital malformation is receiving increased study. In Canada, epidemiologic surveys are being planned, based upon the institution of Provincial Registries to which physicians and other agencies will voluntarily report cases coming to their attention. The literature in regard to prevalence studies of congenital cardiac defects in school children is reviewed. Over the past 25 years, studies employing the proposed technique demonstrated a rising trend, from 1.4 per 1000 to 2.6 per 1000. By contrast, specific surveys for congenital cardiac defect carried out by expert personnel using radiographs and electrocardiographs, resulted in essentially uniform rates, approximating 5 to 6 per 1000. It is concluded that the latter is a superior technique of epidemiologic survey over the “Central Registry” method, and should command a due proportion of health resources directed towards congenital malformation research. PMID:5914837

  9. Microtubule defects & Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Baird, Fiona J; Bennett, Craig L

    2013-12-06

    One of the major challenges facing the long term survival of neurons is their requirement to maintain efficient axonal transport over long distances. In humans as large, long-lived vertebrates, the machinery maintaining neuronal transport must remain efficient despite the slow accumulation of cell damage during aging. Mutations in genes encoding proteins which function in the transport system feature prominently in neurologic disorders. Genes known to cause such disorders and showing traditional Mendelian inheritance have been more readily identified. It has been more difficult, however, to isolate factors underlying the complex genetics contributing to the more common idiopathic forms of neurodegenerative disease. At the heart of neuronal transport is the rail network or scaffolding provided by neuron specific microtubules (MTs). The importance of MT dynamics and stability is underscored by the critical role tau protein plays in MT-associated stabilization versus the dysfunction seen in Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and other tauopathies. Another example of the requirement for tight regulation of MT dynamics is the need to maintain balanced levels of post-translational modification of key MT building-blocks such as α-tubulin. Tubulins require extensive polyglutamylation at their carboxyl-terminus as part of a novel post-translational modification mechanism to signal MT growth versus destabilization. Dramatically, knock-out of a gene encoding a deglutamylation family member causes an extremely rapid cell death of Purkinje cells in the ataxic mouse model, pcd. This review will examine a range of neurodegenerative conditions where current molecular understanding points to defects in the stability of MTs and axonal transport to emphasize the central role of MTs in neuron survival.

  10. Systematic defect donor levels in III-V and II-VI semiconductors revealed by hybrid functional density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petretto, Guido; Bruneval, Fabien

    2015-12-01

    The identification of defect levels from photoluminescence spectroscopy is a useful but challenging task. Density-functional theory (DFT) is a highly valuable tool to this aim. However, the semilocal approximations of DFT that are affected by a band gap underestimation are not reliable to evaluate defect properties, such as charge transition levels. It is now established that hybrid functional approximations to DFT improve the defect description in semiconductors. Here we demonstrate that the use of hybrid functionals systematically stabilizes donor defect states in the lower part of the band gap for many defects, impurities or vacancies, in III-V and in II-VI semiconductors, even though these defects are usually considered as acceptors. These donor defect states are a very general feature and, to the best of our knowledge, have been overlooked in previous studies. The states we identify here may challenge the older assignments to photoluminescent peaks. Though appealing to screen quickly through the possible stable charge states of a defect, semilocal approximations should not be trusted for that purpose.

  11. High-resolution defect detection and noise reduction using wavelet methods for surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recknagel, Rolf-Jürgen; Kowarschik, Richard; Notni, Gunther

    2000-11-01

    Nowadays the demands on quality control are constantly increasing, hence an important step is a completely automated control with well defined risks. Very promising solutions are optical 3D, in addition to surface measurement. Here, an algorithm is presented to separate local defects from the surface and the noise (measurement error and surface roughness) with a given manufacturer's risk for piecewise smooth surfaces. The algorithm consists of a feature enhancement by means of special wavelets and thresholding and interpolation schemes to recover a defect- and noise-free surface and subsequently the extension and shape of the defects in all directions with reduced random errors. The limits of the algorithm such as accuracy, sensitivity, maximum cover rate of the surface with defects and rotation and translation invariance are shown theoretically and by numerical simulations. Experimentally, nanoindents are measured by means of confocal microscopy, and a reduction of the random errors by one order of magnitude is observed. Furthermore, a ceramic plate is measured by means of fringe projection and features are detected which are much smaller than the noise. Finally, a white light measurement is evaluated to demonstrate the scale and instrument independence of the method.

  12. Comparison of defects identified through Minnesota's Birth Defects Information System And Vital Records, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Emily; Zabel, Erik; Alexander, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in birth defects identified through passive and active surveillance systems in Hennepin and Ramsey counties in Minnesota, 2006-2008. This was done by comparing birth defects identified on birth certificates through the Minnesota Department of Health's Office of the State Registrar's Birth and Death Registry (vital records) with those identified by the Minnesota Department of Health's Birth Defects Information System (BDIS), an active birth defects surveillance system. The study population included 73,059 babies born to residents of Hennepin and Ramsey counties. There were 1,882 babies that either vital records and/or BDIS identified as having 1 or more birth defects. Cases identified by BDIS were then linked with matching birth certificates found in the vital records database. Using BDIS as the gold standard, it was observed that the vital records database had an overall underreporting rate of 89% when all broad groups of defects were compared, and 72% when 11 specific defects tracked by both registries were compared. The sensitivity and positive predictive values of vital records to identify cases were also compared using BDIS as the gold standard, and demonstrated low sensitivities for most of the 11 comparable defects (range: 0% for tracheoesophageal fistula to 80% for anencephalus). These observations indicate that BDIS has significantly improved the quality of birth defects surveillance in Minnesota.

  13. Nonequilibrium occupancy of tail states and defects in a-Si:H: Implications for defect structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, G.; Jackson, W. B.; Street, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    A detailed investigation of the electron and hole occupancy of tail states in undoped amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as well as changes in the dangling-bond occupancy as a function of excitation intensity was carried out using light-induced electron-spin-resonance (LESR) measurements. For very thick films the band-tail electron and hole densities are not proportional. Over a wide range of excitation conditions the excess hole density is constant, suggesting the presence of charged defects with a density that is 5-10 times larger than the neutral defect density in annealed or as-grown a-Si:H. Light soaking increases mainly the neutral defect density. The dependence of the excess hole density on film thickness and absorption profiles indicates that this effect is a bulk property, which may be masked in thinner films by the comparatively high interface defect density. Model calculations of nonequilibrium occupation statistics confirm the experimental results. For a defect distribution that includes charged defects, the calculations suggest a very small positive LESR signature of the dangling bond, in spite of the high density of charged defects in the material, as a necessary consequence of the asymmetries observed between electron and hole capture rates and tail-state distributions. The calculations demonstrate that the lack of this signature does not imply a defect structure that contains predominantly neutral defects.

  14. Data Fusion for Combining Techniques to Detect and Size Surface and Near-Surface Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R. S.; Dixon, S.; Sophian, A.; Tian, G. Y.

    2007-03-21

    In NDT it is important to have a high probability of detection and reliable sizing of defects in a sample. This can be gained by using several techniques, which leads to an increase in cost and time for testing. Another option is to use several techniques combined into a single probe, in which case data fusion for the techniques is possible. We report measurements using a dual probe containing a pair of electro-magnetic acoustic transducers generating and detecting low frequency broadband ultrasonic surface waves, combined with a pulsed eddy current probe. These two techniques are complementary but can be combined to work as competitive or cooperative sensors depending on the type of defect being investigated. Our work gives the depth of surface breaking defects by performing data fusion on certain features of data from each technique in a competitive sense, with data fusion by mathematical algorithm. Further analysis of the results using cooperative data fusion can give details of the depth and type of defect, for example surface breaking or near surface. The dual probe has been demonstrated on several samples, including aluminium and steel samples with several simulated defects on each side.

  15. Computational mask defect review for contamination and haze inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram; Wolf, Yulian; Shah, Pinkesh

    2013-09-01

    the mask manufacturing process. The latter characterization qualifies real defect signatures, such as pin-dots or pin-holes, extrusions or intrusions, assist-feature or dummy-fill defects, writeerrors or un-repairable defects, chrome-on-shifter or missing chrome-from-shifter defects, particles, etc., and also false defect signatures, such as those due to inspection tool registration or image alignment, interlace artifacts, CCD camera artifacts, optical shimmer, focus errors, etc. Such qualitative characterization of defects has enabled better inspection tool SPC and process defect control in the mask shop. In this paper, the same computational approach to defect review has been extended to contamination style defect inspections, including Die-to-Die reflected, and non Die-to-Die or single-die inspections. In addition to the computational methods used for transmitted aerial images, defects detected in die-to-die reflected light mode are analyzed based on special defect and background coloring in reflected-light, and other characteristics to determine the exact type and severity. For those detected in the non Die-to-Die mode, only defect images are available from the inspection tool. Without a reference, i.e., defect-free image, it is often difficult to determine the true nature or impact of the defect in question. Using a combination of inspection-tool modeling and image inversion techniques, Luminescent's LAIPHTM system generates an accurate reference image, and then proceeds with automated defect characterization as if the images were simply from a die-to-die inspection. The disposition of contamination style defects this way, filters out >90% of false and nuisance defects that otherwise would have been manually reviewed or measured on AIMSTM. Such computational defect review, unifying defect disposition across all available inspection modes, has been imperative to ensuring no yield losses due to errors in operator defect classification on one hand, and on the other

  16. Axillary shoulder with exaggerated rotation: the Hill-Sachs defect.

    PubMed

    Rafert, J A; Long, B W; Hernandez, E M; Kreipke, D L

    1990-01-01

    One of the most common fractures of the humeral head resulting from an anterior dislocation is the Hill-Sachs defect. Other special radiographic positions to demonstrate this injury may prove difficult for the patient to assume and maintain. An axillary shoulder projection with exaggerated external rotation is easy to position and clearly demonstrates the Hill-Sachs defect.

  17. Demonstration-Based Training: A Review of Instructional Features

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    constructivist , discovery, problem-based, experiential, and inquiry-based training. Educational Psychologist, 41, 75–86. Kohl, R. M., & Shea, C. H. (1992...Review of Neuroscience , 27, 169–192. Robinson, J. C. (1982). Developing managers through behavior modeling. San Diego, CA: Learning Concepts. Russell...Foundations of augmented cognition: Neuroergonomics and operational neuroscience (pp. 678–686). Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag. Wexley, K. N

  18. Demonstrational Features of the Tuskegee Institute Retraining Project, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuskegee Inst., AL.

    This 52-week Tuskegee Institute project, undertaken in 1964 to train a sample of culturally deprived male heads of households in Alabama, included vocational skills (brickmasonry, carpentry, farm machinery, and meat processing), academic skills (mathematics, English, and remedial reading), group, individual, and family counseling, medical care,…

  19. Diabetes mellitus and birth defects

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Adolfo; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Besser, Lilah M.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Moore, Cynthia A.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Cleves, Mario A.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Waller, D. Kim; Reece, E. Albert

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to examine associations between diabetes mellitus and 39 birth defects. STUDY DESIGN This was a multicenter case-control study of mothers of infants who were born with (n = 13,030) and without (n = 4895) birth defects in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1997–2003). RESULTS Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) was associated significantly with noncardiac defects (isolated, 7/23 defects; multiples, 13/23 defects) and cardiac defects (isolated, 11/16 defects; multiples, 8/16 defects). Adjusted odds ratios for PGDM and all isolated and multiple defects were 3.17 (95% CI, 2.20–4.99) and 8.62 (95% CI, 5.27–14.10), respectively. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was associated with fewer noncardiac defects (isolated, 3/23 defects; multiples, 3/23 defects) and cardiac defects (isolated, 3/16 defects; multiples, 2/16 defects). Odds ratios between GDM and all isolated and multiple defects were 1.42 (95% CI, 1.17–1.73) and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.13–2.00), respectively. These associations were limited generally to offspring of women with prepregnancy body mass index ≥25 kg/m2. CONCLUSION PGDM was associated with a wide range of birth defects; GDM was associated with a limited group of birth defects. PMID:18674752

  20. Rapid yield learning through optical defect and electrical test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Shaun S.; Tobin, Kenneth W., Jr.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Lakhani, Fred

    1998-06-01

    As semiconductor device density and wafer area continue to increase, the volume of in-line and off-line data required to diagnose yield-limiting conditions is growing exponentially. To manage this data in the future, analysis tools will be required that can automatically reduce this data to useful information, e.g., by assisting the engineer in rapid root- cause diagnosis of defect generating mechanisms. In this paper, we describe a technology known as Spatial Signature Analysis (SSA) and its application to both optically-detected defect data as well as electrical test (e-test) bin data. The results of a validation study are summarized that demonstrate the effectiveness of the SSA approach on optical defect wafermaps through field-testing at three semiconductor manufacturing sites on ASIC, DRAM and SRAM products. This method has been extended to analyze and interpret electrical test data and to provide a pathway for correlation of this data with in-line optical measurements. The image processing- based, fuzzy classifier system used for optical defect SSA has been adopted and applied to e-test binmaps to interpret and rapidly identify characteristic patterns, or 'signatures,' in the binmap data that are uniquely associated with the manufacturing process. An image of the binmap is created, and features such as mass, simple moments, and invariant moments are extracted and presented to a pair-wise, fuzzy, k-NN classifier. The preliminary performance results show an 84% correct e-test signature classification rate, even under sub- optimal training conditions.

  1. Defects in Calcite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-13

    AD-A245 645 A TRIDENT SCHOLAR PROJECT REPORT NO. 181 "DEFECTS IN CALCITE " DTTC %N FEB 5-1912 UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 92-02841...report; no. 181 (1991) "DEFECTS IN CALCITE " A Trident Scholar Project Report by Midshipman Anthony J. Kotarski, Class of 1991 U. S. Naval Academy Annapolis...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 13 May 1991 Final 1990/91 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE s. FUNDING NUMBERS DEFECTS IN CALCITE 6. AUTHOR(S) Anthony J. Kotarski 7

  2. Aerial image measurement technique for automated reticle defect disposition (ARDD) in wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Schmid, Rainer M.; Stegemann, B.; Scheruebl, Thomas; Harnisch, Wolfgang; Kobiyama, Yuji

    2004-08-01

    The Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS)* for 193 nm lithography emulation has been brought into operation successfully worldwide. A second generation system comprising 193 nm AIMS capability, mini-environment and SMIF, the AIMS fab 193 plus is currently introduced into the market. By adjustment of numerical aperture (NA), illumination type and partial illumination coherence to match the conditions in 193 nm steppers or scanners, it can emulate the exposure tool for any type of reticles like binary, OPC and PSM down to the 65 nm node. The system allows a rapid prediction of wafer printability of defects or defect repairs, and critical features, like dense patterns or contacts on the masks without the need to perform expensive image qualification consisting of test wafer exposures followed by SEM measurements. Therefore, AIMS is a mask quality verification standard for high-end photo masks and established in mask shops worldwide. The progress on the AIMS technology described in this paper will highlight that besides mask shops there will be a very beneficial use of the AIMS in the wafer fab and we propose an Automated Reticle Defect Disposition (ARDD) process. With smaller nodes, where design rules are 65 nm or less, it is expected that smaller defects on reticles will occur in increasing numbers in the wafer fab. These smaller mask defects will matter more and more and become a serious yield limiting factor. With increasing mask prices and increasing number of defects and severability on reticles it will become cost beneficial to perform defect disposition on the reticles in wafer production. Currently ongoing studies demonstrate AIMS benefits for wafer fab applications. An outlook will be given for extension of 193 nm aerial imaging down to the 45 nm node based on emulation of immersion scanners.

  3. Engaging Hill-Sachs Defects

    PubMed Central

    Burns, David; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Shahrokhi, Shahram; Henry, Patrick; Wasserstein, David; Whyne, Cari; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell; Dwyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Anatomic studies have demonstrated that bipolar glenoid and humeral bone loss have a cumulative impact on shoulder instability, and that these defects may engage in functional positions depending on their size, location, and orientation, potentially resulting in failure of stabilization procedures. Determining which lesions pose a risk for engagement remains a challenge, with arthroscopic assessment and Itoi’s 3DCT based glenoid track method being the accepted approaches at this time. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of humeral and glenoid bone defects on shoulder engagement in a cadaveric model. Two alternative approaches to predicting engagement were evaluated; 1) CT scanning the shoulder in abduction and external rotation 2) measurement of Bankart lesion width and a novel parameter, the intact anterior articular angle (IAAA), on conventional 2D multi-plane reformats. The results of these two approaches were compared to the results obtained using Itoi’s glenoid track method for predicting engagement. Methods: Hill-Sachs and Bony Bankart defects of varying size were created in 12 cadaveric upper limbs, producing 45 bipolar defect combinations. The shoulders were assessed for engagement using cone beam CT in various positions of function, from 30 to 90 degrees of both abduction and external rotation. The humeral and glenoid defects were characterized by measurement of their size, location, and orientation. Diagnostic performance measures for predicting engagement were calculated for both the abduction external rotation scan and 2D IAAA approaches using the glenoid track method as reference standard. Results: Engagement was predicted by Itoi’s glenoid track method in 24 of 45 specimens (53%). The abduction external rotation CT scan performed at 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction (corresponding to 90 degrees of abduction relative to the trunk) and 90 degrees of external rotation predicted engagement accurately in 43 of

  4. Nanoparticle Solubility in Liquid Crystalline Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Joshi, Abhijeet A.; Roberts, Tyler F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2013-03-01

    Liquid crystalline materials often incorporate regions (defects) where the orientational ordering present in the bulk phase is disrupted. These include point hedgehogs, line disclinations, and domain boundaries. Recently, it has been shown that defects will accumulate impurities such as small molecules, monomer subunits or nanoparticles. Such an effect is thought to be due to the alleviation of elastic stresses within the bulk phase, or to a solubility gap between a nematic phase and the isotropic defect core. This presents opportunities for encapsulation and sequestration of molecular species, in addition to the formation of novel structures within a nematic phase through polymerization and nanoparticle self-assembly. Here, we examine the solubility of nanoparticles within a coarse-grained liquid crystalline phase and demonstrate the effects of nanoparticle size and surface interactions in determining sequestration into defect regions.

  5. Infrared computations of defect Schur indices

    SciTech Connect

    Córdova, Clay; Gaiotto, Davide; Shao, Shu-Heng

    2016-11-18

    We conjecture a formula for the Schur index of four-dimensional N = 2 theories in the presence of boundary conditions and/or line defects, in terms of the low-energy effective Seiberg-Witten description of the system together with massive BPS excitations. We test our proposal in a variety of examples for SU(2) gauge theories, either conformal or asymptotically free. We use the conjecture to compute these defect-enriched Schur indices for theories which lack a Lagrangian description, such as Argyres-Douglas theories. We demonstrate in various examples that line defect indices can be expressed as sums of characters of the associated two-dimensional chiral algebra and that for Argyres-Douglas theories the line defect OPE reduces in the index to the Verlinde algebra.

  6. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    DOE PAGES

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; ...

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than themore » conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.« less

  7. Phase measurements of EUV mask defects

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Wang, Yow-Gwo; Wojdyla, Antoine; Benk, Markus P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Waller, Laura

    2015-02-22

    Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Lithography mask defects were examined on the actinic mask imaging system, SHARP, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Also, a quantitative phase retrieval algorithm based on the Weak Object Transfer Function was applied to the measured through-focus aerial images to examine the amplitude and phase of the defects. The accuracy of the algorithm was demonstrated by comparing the results of measurements using a phase contrast zone plate and a standard zone plate. Using partially coherent illumination to measure frequencies that would otherwise fall outside the numerical aperture (NA), it was shown that some defects are smaller than the conventional resolution of the microscope. We found that the programmed defects of various sizes were measured and shown to have both an amplitude and a phase component that the algorithm is able to recover.

  8. Exploration of defect structures on graphene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shansheng; Zheng, Weitao

    2013-02-01

    For graphene obtained by chemical vapor deposition, there are large amount of defects in the crystalline structures. The carbon atoms from the feedstock can attack the graphene surface in annealing process, which may be one of the reasons affecting the structure of graphene. In order to explore some defect structures on graphene, we investigate the adsorption of carbon adatoms and vacancies on graphene using first-principles calculations. It is demonstrated that the adatoms can form strong covalent bonds with the graphene and the C-C dimmer adsorption may be the most prolific defect model. The C adatom can even fill simple vacancy of graphene. Our numerical simulations also show that the defect structures can lead to the splitting of the mid-gap peak of perfect graphene in the electronic structures. It is suggested that its conductivity would be lower than that of the perfect graphene, which can explain the low mobility of the charge carriers in some experiments.

  9. Infrared computations of defect Schur indices

    DOE PAGES

    Córdova, Clay; Gaiotto, Davide; Shao, Shu-Heng

    2016-11-18

    We conjecture a formula for the Schur index of four-dimensional N = 2 theories in the presence of boundary conditions and/or line defects, in terms of the low-energy effective Seiberg-Witten description of the system together with massive BPS excitations. We test our proposal in a variety of examples for SU(2) gauge theories, either conformal or asymptotically free. We use the conjecture to compute these defect-enriched Schur indices for theories which lack a Lagrangian description, such as Argyres-Douglas theories. We demonstrate in various examples that line defect indices can be expressed as sums of characters of the associated two-dimensional chiral algebramore » and that for Argyres-Douglas theories the line defect OPE reduces in the index to the Verlinde algebra.« less

  10. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News ...

  11. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... specially sized mesh device to close the hole. Hybrid procedure. A hybrid procedure uses surgical and catheter-based techniques. Access ... clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 15, 2014. Konetti NR. Hybrid muscular ventricular defect closure: Surgeon or physician. Indian ...

  12. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you exert yourself or when you lie down Rapid or irregular heartbeat Fatigue or weakness Causes Congenital heart defects arise from problems early in the heart's development, but there's often no clear cause. Genetics and ...

  13. Single Ventricle Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery and blood reaches the aorta through a patent ductus arteriosus (see diagram). How does the defect ... only source of lung blood flow is the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), an open passageway between the ...

  14. Detecting Speech Defects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryza, Frank T., II

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early detection of speech defects and briefly describes the activities of the Pre-School Diagnostic Center for Severe Communication Disorders in New Haven, Connecticut. (ED)

  15. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News ...

  16. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News ...

  17. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  18. Birth defects monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Klingberg, M.A.; Papier, C.M.; Hart, J.

    1983-01-01

    Population monitoring of birth defects provides a means for detecting relative changes in their frequency. Many varied systems have been developed throughout the world since the thalidomide tragedy of the early 1960s. Although it is difficult to pinpoint specific teratogenic agents based on rises in rates of a particular defect or a constellation of defects, monitoring systems can provide clues for hypothesis testing in epidemiological investigations. International coordination of efforts in this area resulted in the founding of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems (ICBDMS) in 1974. In this paper we will describe the functions and basic requirements of monitoring systems in general, and look at the development and activities of the ICBDMS. A review of known and suspected environmental teratogenic agents (eg, chemical, habitual, biological, physical, and nutritional) is also presented.

  19. Toward defect-free fabrication of extreme ultraviolet photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhengqing John; Rankin, Jed H.; Lawliss, Mark; Badger, Karen D.; Turley, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Defect-free fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks relies on the appropriate detection of native defects and subsequent strategies for their elimination. Commercial unavailability of actinic mask-blank inspection systems motivates the identification of an optical inspection methodology most suitable for finding relevant EUV blank defects. Studies showed that 193-nm wavelength inspection found the greatest number of printable defects as compared with rival higher-wavelength systems, establishing deep ultraviolet inspections as the blank defectivity baseline for subsequent mitigation strategies. Next, defect avoidance via pattern shifting was explored using representative 7-nm node metal/contact layer designs and 193-nm mask-blank inspection results. It was found that a significant percentage of native defects could be avoided only when the design was limited to active patterns (i.e., layouts without dummy fill). Total pattern-defect overlap remained ≤5 when metal layer blanks were chosen from the top 35% least defective substrates, while the majority of blanks remained suitable for contacts layers due to a lower active pattern density. Finally, nanomachining was used to address remaining native/multilayer defects. Native catastrophic defects were shown to recover 40% to 70% of target critical dimension after nanomachining, demonstrating the enormous potential for compensating multilayer defects.

  20. A novel ATM-dependent checkpoint defect distinct from loss of function mutation promotes genomic instability in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Spoerri, Loredana; Brooks, Kelly; Chia, KeeMing; Grossman, Gavriel; Ellis, Jonathan J; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Škalamera, Dubravka; Pavey, Sandra; Burmeister, Bryan; Gabrielli, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Melanomas have high levels of genomic instability that can contribute to poor disease prognosis. Here, we report a novel defect of the ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoint in melanoma cell lines that promotes genomic instability. In defective cells, ATM signalling to CHK2 is intact, but the cells are unable to maintain the cell cycle arrest due to elevated PLK1 driving recovery from the arrest. Reducing PLK1 activity recovered the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest, and over-expressing PLK1 was sufficient to overcome the checkpoint arrest and increase genomic instability. Loss of the ATM-dependent checkpoint did not affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation demonstrating that this defect is distinct from ATM loss of function mutations. The checkpoint defective melanoma cell lines over-express PLK1, and a significant proportion of melanomas have high levels of PLK1 over-expression suggesting this defect is a common feature of melanomas. The inability of ATM to impose a cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage increases genomic instability. This work also suggests that the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest is likely to be defective in a higher proportion of cancers than previously expected. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Robotic atrial septal defect closure.

    PubMed

    Senay, Sahin; Gullu, Ahmet Umit; Kocyigit, Muharrem; Degirmencioglu, Aleks; Karabulut, Hasan; Alhan, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) is one of the most common congenital cardiac diseases. This pathology can be treated with percutaneous devices. However, some of the ASDs are not suitable for device closure. Also, there may be device-related late complications of transcatheter ASD closure. Currently, robotic surgical techniques allow surgeons to close ASDs in a totally endoscopic fashion with a high success rate and a low complication rate. This study demonstrates the basic concepts and technique of robotic ASD closure. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. The Characterization of Crack-Like Defects Using Ultrasonic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Velichko, A.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-02-01

    The use of ultrasonic arrays to image and size crack-like defects is an important area in non-destructive evaluation. The features in the ultrasonic data from a crack-like defect provide information about the size and orientation angle of the defect. In this paper, the characteristics of a crack-like defect were measured from its scattering coefficient matrix, when the angular coverage of measurement includes the specular regions of its scattering matrix. Alternatively, the imaged features for a large crack-like defect (its length more than two wavelengths) were directly used to characterize the defect through a rectangular box fitting approach. An efficient hybrid model was used to generate the full matrix of array data from samples with a defect and for a specified inspection configuration. This hybrid model combines far-field scattering coefficient matrix for defects with a ray based forward model. This model offers the potential to compile a look-up table through which defects can be classified and then sized. Good agreement was achieved between simulation and experimental results hence validating this model based approach.

  3. Nonlinear features for product inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Casasent, David P.

    1999-03-01

    Classification of real-time X-ray images of randomly oriented touching pistachio nuts is discussed. The ultimate objective is the development of a system for automated non-invasive detection of defective product items on a conveyor belt. We discuss the extraction of new features that allow better discrimination between damaged and clean items (pistachio nuts). This feature extraction and classification stage is the new aspect of this paper; our new maximum representation and discriminating feature (MRDF) extraction method computes nonlinear features that are used as inputs to a new modified k nearest neighbor classifier. In this work, the MRDF is applied to standard features (rather than iconic data). The MRDF is robust to various probability distributions of the input class and is shown to provide good classification and new ROC (receiver operating characteristic) data.

  4. Enhanced gamma ray sensitivity in bismuth triiodide sensors through volumetric defect control

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Paul M.; Baciak, James E.; Nino, Juan C.

    2016-08-29

    Some of the more attractive semiconducting compounds for ambient temperature radiation detector applications are impacted by low charge collection efficiency due to the presence of point and volumetric defects. This has been particularly true in the case of BiI{sub 3}, which features very attractive properties (density, atomic number, band gap, etc.) to serve as a gamma ray detector, but has yet to demonstrate its full potential. We show that by applying growth techniques tailored to reduce defects, the spectral performance of this promising semiconductor can be realized. Gamma ray spectra from >100 keV source emissions are now obtained from high quality Sb:BiI{sub 3} bulk crystals with limited concentrations of defects (point and extended). The spectra acquired in these high quality crystals feature photopeaks with resolution of 2.2% at 662 keV. Infrared microscopy is used to compare the local microstructure between radiation sensitive and non-responsive crystals. This work demonstrates that BiI{sub 3} can be prepared in melt-grown detector-grade samples with superior quality and can acquire the spectra from a variety of gamma ray sources.

  5. Defect reduction and defect stability in IMEC's 14nm half-pitch chemo-epitaxy DSA flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronheid, Roel; Rincon Delgadillo, Paulina; Pathangi, Hari; Van den Heuvel, Dieter; Parnell, Doni; Chan, Boon Teik; Lee, Yu-Tsung; Van Look, Lieve; Cao, Yi; Her, YoungJun; Lin, Guanyang; Harukawa, Ryota; Nagaswami, Venkat; D'Urzo, Lucia; Somervell, Mark; Nealey, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) of Block Co-Polymers (BCP) has become an intense field of study as a potential patterning solution for future generation devices. The most critical challenges that need to be understood and controlled include pattern placement accuracy, achieving low defectivity in DSA patterns and how to make chip designs DSA-friendly. The DSA program at imec includes efforts on these three major topics. Specifically, in this paper the progress in DSA defectivity within the imec program will be discussed. In previous work, defectivity levels of ~560 defects/cm2 were reported and the root causes for these defects were identified, which included particle sources, material interactions and pre-pattern imperfections. The specific efforts that have been undertaken to reduce defectivity in the line/space chemoepitaxy DSA flow that is used for the imec defectivity studies are discussed. Specifically, control of neutral layer material and improved filtration during the block co-polymer manufacturing have enabled a significant reduction in the defect performance. In parallel, efforts have been ongoing to enhance the defect inspection capabilities and allow a high capture rate of the small defects. It is demonstrated that transfer of the polystyrene patterns into the underlying substrate is critical for detecting the DSA-relevant defect modes including microbridges and small dislocations. Such pattern transfer enhances the inspection sensitivity by ~10x. Further improvement through process optimization allows for substantial defectivity reduction.

  6. SpaceFibre Demonstrator (Demonstration and Testing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfers, T.; Rastetter, P.; Papadas, C.; Parkes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Currently Astrium GmbH and ISD S.A. are planning the development of a demonstrator for SpaceFibre. The SpaceFibre demonstrator will be used to execute functional performance tests and EMC (Electro Magnetic Compatibility) tests. University of Dundee is program prime contractor and provides Astrium with the SpaceFibre IP core. The work si shared between the two partners in the following way: • Astrium: Prime Contractor and Technical Coordination; FPGA Design; EMC Testing• ISD: Development of Demonstrator Board including housing, development of test bed and functional performance testingThe driving requirements for this development are:• SpaceFibre performance, while implementing it into space equivalent components• Design and MAIT of the demonstrator in such a way that representative EMC testing is possible.

  7. Defect-induced fatigue microcrack formation in cement mantle.

    PubMed

    Qi, Gang; Li, Jihui; Mouchon, W Paul; Lewis, Gladius

    2005-11-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was used to monitor the progress of the fatigue damage process in the cement mantles of two cemented femur stem constructs that contained naturally occurring defects. After the fatigue tests, morphological features of the defects were investigated using an environmental scanning electron microscope. It showed that the regions with no visible defects were mainly microcrack free, whereas the defect regions were the main sources generating microcracks. Two types of microcracks were identified: type I and type II. Signal energies associated with type I microcracks were about an order of magnitude higher than that of type II. The microstructural investigations of the defects and the areas in the vicinity of the defects suggested their categorization into stable and unstable. The accumulative energy-time relationships revealed that stable and unstable microcrack curves had convex [formula: see text], and concave [formula: see text] shapes, respectively. The progress of fatigue microcrack formation occurred over three distinct phases: initiation, transition, and stableness.

  8. Global defect topology in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machon, Thomas; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2016-07-01

    We give the global homotopy classification of nematic textures for a general domain with weak anchoring boundary conditions and arbitrary defect set in terms of twisted cohomology, and give an explicit computation for the case of knotted and linked defects in R3, showing that the distinct homotopy classes have a 1-1 correspondence with the first homology group of the branched double cover, branched over the disclination loops. We show further that the subset of those classes corresponding to elements of order 2 in this group has representatives that are planar and characterize the obstruction for other classes in terms of merons. The planar textures are a feature of the global defect topology that is not reflected in any local characterization. Finally, we describe how the global classification relates to recent experiments on nematic droplets and how elements of order 4 relate to the presence of τ lines in cholesterics.

  9. Global defect topology in nematic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Machon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We give the global homotopy classification of nematic textures for a general domain with weak anchoring boundary conditions and arbitrary defect set in terms of twisted cohomology, and give an explicit computation for the case of knotted and linked defects in R3, showing that the distinct homotopy classes have a 1–1 correspondence with the first homology group of the branched double cover, branched over the disclination loops. We show further that the subset of those classes corresponding to elements of order 2 in this group has representatives that are planar and characterize the obstruction for other classes in terms of merons. The planar textures are a feature of the global defect topology that is not reflected in any local characterization. Finally, we describe how the global classification relates to recent experiments on nematic droplets and how elements of order 4 relate to the presence of τ lines in cholesterics. PMID:27493576

  10. Defect coarsening in a biological system: the vascular cambium of cottonwood trees.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Eric M; Groves, Joseph V

    2003-04-01

    We present micrographic evidence for the annihilation of topological defect pairs and defect-mediated coarsening in the vascular cambium of cottonwood trees (Populus deltoides). We also show that a recently published mathematical model of cell orientation dynamics in the cambium reproduces many qualitative features of the defect coarsening process.

  11. ORION II bus demonstration. Demonstration report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanley, J.

    1989-02-01

    The Central New York Regional Transportation Authority conducted an 18-month demonstration to determine how the ORION II bus operates in actual service. The ORION II vehicle is a small low floor, accessible heavy duty, diesel-powered transit bus designed to meet the needs of the elderly and handicapped. It has the capacity to seat 26 passengers with 4 wheelchair lockdowns. Side and rear doors are equipped with electrically powered ramps. Eight Thomas vehicles (22-foot, 11,500 lbs, wheelchair equipped, gasoline fueled) were also tested during the demonstration period. Operations (fuel and oil usage) and maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) data were collected and charted-out in the report as well as driver, passenger, and maintenance surveys. This report provides descriptions, photographs, and comparison charts of both the diesel-fueled ORION II transit bus and the gasoline-fueled Thomas vehicles along with the demonstration test plan, evaluations, conclusions, and survey results.

  12. Birth Defects. Matrix No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, Robert L.

    This report discusses the magnitude of the problem of birth defects, outlines advances in the birth defects field in the past decade, and identifies those areas where research is needed for the prevention, treatment, and management of birth defects. The problem of birth defects has consumed a greater portion of our health care resources because of…

  13. Trapping of drops by wetting defects

    PubMed Central

    't Mannetje, Dieter; Ghosh, Somnath; Lagraauw, Rudy; Otten, Simon; Pit, Arjen; Berendsen, Christian; Zeegers, Jos; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the motion of drops on solid surfaces is crucial in many natural phenomena and technological processes including the collection and removal of rain drops, cleaning technology and heat exchangers. Topographic and chemical heterogeneities on solid surfaces give rise to pinning forces that can capture and steer drops in desired directions. Here we determine general physical conditions required for capturing sliding drops on an inclined plane that is equipped with electrically tunable wetting defects. By mapping the drop dynamics on the one-dimensional motion of a point mass, we demonstrate that the trapping process is controlled by two dimensionless parameters, the trapping strength measured in units of the driving force and the ratio between a viscous and an inertial time scale. Complementary experiments involving superhydrophobic surfaces with wetting defects demonstrate the general applicability of the concept. Moreover, we show that electrically tunable defects can be used to guide sliding drops along actively switchable tracks—with potential applications in microfluidics. PMID:24721935

  14. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  15. A Fluorescence Lecture Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzelli, Joseph W.; Kemp, Marwin

    1982-01-01

    Describes fluorescence demonstrations related to several aspects of molecular theory and quantitized energy levels. Demonstrations use fluorescent chemical solutions having luminescence properties spanning the visible spectrum. Also describes a demonstration of spontaneous combustion of familiar substances in chlorine. (JN)

  16. Isolation and characterization of Pichia heedii mutants defective in xylose uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Does, A.L.; Bisson, L.F. )

    1990-11-01

    To investigate the role of xylose uptake in xylose metabolism in yeasts, we isolated a series of mutated strains of the yeast Pichia heedii which are defective in xylose utilization. Four of these demonstrated defects in xylose uptake. Overlaps between the functional or regulatory mechanisms for glucose and xylose uptake may exist in this yeast since some of the mutants defective in xylose uptake were also defective in glucose transport. None of the mutants were defective in xylose reductase or xylitol dehydrogenase activities.

  17. Structural birth defects associated with neural tube defects in Hawai'i from 1986 until 2001.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B; Merz, Ruth D

    2007-09-01

    Using birth defects registry data, this study identified birth defects associated with anencephaly, spina bifida, and encephalocele. Musculoskeletal defects were associated with anencephaly; central nervous system defects, gastrointestinal atresia/stenosis, genitourinary system defects, and musculoskeletal system defects with spina bifida; and central nervous system defects, respiratory defects, oral clefts, genitourinary system defects, and musculoskeletal system defects with encephalocele.

  18. Local and nonlocal defect-mediated electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Davis, A.; Prokopec, T.; Trodden, M. |||

    1996-04-01

    We consider the effects of particle transport in topological defect-mediated electroweak baryogenesis scenarios. We analyze the cases of both thin and thick defects and demonstrate an enhancement of the original mechanism in both cases due to an increased effective volume in which baryogenesis occurs. This phenomenon is a result of an imperfect cancellation between the baryons and antibaryons produced on opposite faces of the defect. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Defect Tolerant Semiconductors for Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Zakutayev, Andriy; Caskey, Christopher M; Fioretti, Angela N; Ginley, David S; Vidal, Julien; Stevanovic, Vladan; Tea, Eric; Lany, Stephan

    2014-04-03

    Defect tolerance is the tendency of a semiconductor to keep its properties despite the presence of crystallographic defects. Scientific understanding of the origin of defect tolerance is currently missing. Here we show that semiconductors with antibonding states at the top of the valence band are likely to be tolerant to defects. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that Cu3N with antibonding valence band maximum has shallow intrinsic defects and no surface states, in contrast to GaN with bonding valence band maximum. Experimental measurements indicate shallow native donors and acceptors in Cu3N thin films, leading to 10(16)-10(17) cm(-3) doping with either electrons or holes depending on the growth conditions. The experimentally measured bipolar doping and the solar-matched optical absorption onset (1.4 eV) make Cu3N a promising candidate absorber for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical solar cells, despite the calculated indirect fundamental band gap (1.0 eV). These conclusions can be extended to other materials with antibonding character of the valence band, defining a class of defect-tolerant semiconductors for solar energy conversion applications.

  20. Finite-size supercell correction schemes for charged defect calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Rantala, Tapio T.; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2012-07-01

    Various schemes for correcting the finite-size supercell errors in the case of charged defect calculations are analyzed and their performance for a series of defect systems is compared. We focus on the schemes proposed by Makov and Payne (MP), Freysoldt, Neugebauer, and Van de Walle (FNV), and Lany and Zunger (LZ). The role of the potential alignment is also assessed. We demonstrate a connection between the defect charge distribution and the potential alignment, which establishes a relation between the MP and FNV schemes. Calculations are performed using supercells of various sizes and the corrected formation energies are compared to the values obtained by extrapolation to infinitely large supercells. For defects with localized charge distributions, we generally find that the FNV scheme improves upon the LZ one, while the MP scheme tends to overcorrect except for point-charge-like defects. We also encountered a class of defects, for which all the correction schemes fail to produce results consistent with the extrapolated values. This behavior is found to be caused by partial delocalization of the defect charge. We associate this effect to hybridization between the defect state and the band-edge states of the host. The occurrence of defect charge delocalization also reflects in the evolution of the defect Kohn-Sham levels with increasing supercell size. We discuss the physical relevance of the latter class of defects.

  1. A novel approach to mask defect inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiv, Amir; Shirman, Yuri; Mangan, Shmoolik

    2008-10-01

    Memory chips, now constituting a major part of semiconductor market, posit a special challenge for inspection, as they are generally produced with the smallest half-pitch available with today's technology. This is true, in particular, to photomasks of advanced memory devices, which are at the forefront of the "low-k1" regime. In this paper we present a novel photomask inspection approach, that is particularly suitable for low-k1 layers of advanced memory chips, owing to their typical dense and periodic structure. The method we present can produce a very strong signal for small mask defects, by suppression of the modulation of the pattern's image. Unlike dark-field detection, however, here a single diffraction order associated with the pattern generates a constant "gray" background image, that is used for signal enhancement. We define the theoretical basis for the new detection technique, and show, both analytically and numerically, that it can easily achieve a detection line past the printability spec, and that in cases it is at least as sensitive as high-resolution based detection. We also demonstrate this claim experimentally on a customer mask, using the platform of Applied Material's newly released Aera2TM mask inspection tool. The high sensitivity demonstrates the important and often overlooked concept that resolution is not synonymous with sensitivity. The novel detection method is advantageous in several other aspects, such as the very simple implementation, the high throughput, and the relatively simple pre- and post-processing algorithms required for signal extraction. These features, and in particular the very high sensitivity, make this novel detection method an attractive inspection option for advanced memory devices.

  2. Reconstruction of Mandibular Defects

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Harvey; Salgado, Christopher J.; Mardini, Samir; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Defects requiring reconstruction in the mandible are commonly encountered and may result from resection of benign or malignant lesions, trauma, or osteoradionecrosis. Mandibular defects can be classified according to location and extent, as well as involvement of mucosa, skin, and tongue. Vascularized bone flaps, in general, provide the best functional and aesthetic outcome, with the fibula flap remaining the gold standard for mandible reconstruction. In this review, we discuss classification and approach to reconstruction of mandibular defects. We also elaborate upon four commonly used free osteocutaneous flaps, inclusive of fibula, iliac crest, scapula, and radial forearm. Finally, we discuss indications and use of osseointegrated implants as well as recent advances in mandibular reconstruction. PMID:22550439

  3. Wire insulation defect detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greulich, Owen R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Wiring defects are located by detecting a reflected signal that is developed when an arc occurs through the defect to a nearby ground. The time between the generation of the signal and the return of the reflected signal provides an indication of the distance of the arc (and therefore the defect) from the signal source. To ensure arcing, a signal is repeated at gradually increasing voltages while the wire being tested and a nearby ground are immersed in a conductive medium. In order to ensure that the arcing occurs at an identifiable time, the signal whose reflection is to be detected is always made to reach the highest potential yet seen by the system.

  4. Fundamental Resolution of Difficulties in the Theory of Charged Point Defects in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ning; Zhang, X.-G.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2017-09-01

    A defect's formation energy is a key theoretical quantity that allows the calculation of equilibrium defect concentrations in solids and aids in the identification of defects that control the properties of materials and device performance, efficiency, and reliability. The theory of formation energies is rigorous only for neutral defects, but the Coulomb potentials of charged defects require additional ad hoc numerical procedures. Here we invoke statistical mechanics to derive a revised theory of charged-defect formation energies, which eliminates the need for ad hoc numerical procedures. Calculations become straightforward and transparent. We present calculations demonstrating the significance of the revised theory for defect formation energies and thermodynamic transition levels.

  5. Scanning electron microscope automatic defect classification of process induced defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Scott; McGarvey, Steve

    2017-03-01

    With the integration of high speed Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) based Automated Defect Redetection (ADR) in both high volume semiconductor manufacturing and Research and Development (R and D), the need for reliable SEM Automated Defect Classification (ADC) has grown tremendously in the past few years. In many high volume manufacturing facilities and R and D operations, defect inspection is performed on EBeam (EB), Bright Field (BF) or Dark Field (DF) defect inspection equipment. A comma separated value (CSV) file is created by both the patterned and non-patterned defect inspection tools. The defect inspection result file contains a list of the inspection anomalies detected during the inspection tools' examination of each structure, or the examination of an entire wafers surface for non-patterned applications. This file is imported into the Defect Review Scanning Electron Microscope (DRSEM). Following the defect inspection result file import, the DRSEM automatically moves the wafer to each defect coordinate and performs ADR. During ADR the DRSEM operates in a reference mode, capturing a SEM image at the exact position of the anomalies coordinates and capturing a SEM image of a reference location in the center of the wafer. A Defect reference image is created based on the Reference image minus the Defect image. The exact coordinates of the defect is calculated based on the calculated defect position and the anomalies stage coordinate calculated when the high magnification SEM defect image is captured. The captured SEM image is processed through either DRSEM ADC binning, exporting to a Yield Analysis System (YAS), or a combination of both. Process Engineers, Yield Analysis Engineers or Failure Analysis Engineers will manually review the captured images to insure that either the YAS defect binning is accurately classifying the defects or that the DRSEM defect binning is accurately classifying the defects. This paper is an exploration of the feasibility of the

  6. Supersymmetric k-defects

    DOE PAGES

    Koehn, Michael; Trodden, Mark

    2016-03-03

    In supersymmetric theories, topological defects can have nontrivial behaviors determined purely by whether or not supersymmetry is restored in the defect core. A well-known example of this is that some supersymmetric cosmic strings are automatically superconducting, leading to important cosmological effects and constraints. We investigate the impact of nontrivial kinetic interactions, present in a number of particle physics models of interest in cosmology, on the relationship between supersymmetry and supercurrents on strings. Furthermore, we find that in some cases it is possible for superconductivity to be disrupted by the extra interactions.

  7. Supersymmetric k-defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Michael; Trodden, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In supersymmetric theories, topological defects can have nontrivial behaviors determined purely by whether or not supersymmetry is restored in the defect core. A well-known example of this is that some supersymmetric cosmic strings are automatically superconducting, leading to important cosmological effects and constraints. We investigate the impact of nontrivial kinetic interactions, present in a number of particle physics models of interest in cosmology, on the relationship between supersymmetry and supercurrents on strings. We find that in some cases it is possible for superconductivity to be disrupted by the extra interactions.

  8. Why Demonstrations Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Richard

    2005-01-01

    With the current focus on constructivist perspectives, science demonstrations have fallen out of favor in some circles. Demonstrations are easy to do and offer many benefits and unique opportunities in the constructivist classroom. With careful use, demonstrations can be powerful teaching tools. A wonderful quality of a demonstration (or a series…

  9. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  10. Laparoscopic Repair of Cesarean Scar Defect "Isthmocele".

    PubMed

    Urman, Bulent; Arslan, Tonguc; Aksu, Sertan; Taskiran, Cagatay

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the technique of laparoscopic repair of a large cesarean scar defect (isthmocele). Case report (Canadian Task Force classification III). Cesarean scar defect, also known as an isthmocele, is the result of incomplete healing of the isthmic myometrium after a low transverse uterine incision performed for cesarean section. Although mostly asymptomatic, it may cause menstrual abnormalities (typically postmenstrual spotting), chronic pelvic pain, and secondary infertility. Scar tissue dehiscence, scar pregnancy, and abnormally adherent placenta are some of the obstetric complications associated with this defect. No standardized treatment has yet been accepted. Hysteroscopy and laparoscopy are the minimally invasive approaches currently used to repair the defect. A 40-year-old patient, G2P2, presented with postmenstrual spotting and secondary infertility for the past 2 years. She had a history of 2 previous cesarean deliveries. Transvaginal ultrasound revealed a large (2.5 × 1.5 cm) niche. Thickness of the myometrium over the defect was 3 mm. Laparoscopic repair of the uterine defect was performed. The bladder that was densely adherent to the lower uterine segment was freed by careful dissection. The defect was then localized with a sharp curette placed transcervically into the uterus. The curette was pushed anteriorly to delineate the margins of the defect and puncture the ceiling of the isthmocele cavity. The fibrotic tissue that formed the ceiling and the lateral borders of the defect was excised using laparoscopic scissors. Reapproximation of the edges was done with continuous nonlocking 3-0 V-Loc sutures. The procedure took 90 minutes, and there were no associated complications. Postoperative ultrasound performed in the second month after the operation showed a minimal defect measuring 0.5 cm, with a residual myometrial thickness of 7 mm. At the time of this writing, the patient was free of symptoms. Laparoscopic repair, although not

  11. Biotinidase deficiency: a novel vitamin recycling defect.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B; Grier, R E; Secor McVoy, J R; Heard, G S

    1985-01-01

    The recent finding that biotinidase deficiency is the primary biochemical defect in late-onset multiple carboxylase deficiency was stimulated new interest in the inherited disorders of biotin-dependent carboxylases. The clinical and biochemical features of biotinidase deficiency are discussed. We also speculate about two exciting areas currently being investigated: the localization of action biotinidase, and the possible role of the enzyme as a binding or carrier protein for biotin.

  12. Intrinsic Bonding Defects in Transition Metal Elemental Oxides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    deposition, ALD. Spectroscopic studies have also been performed on nanocrystalline TiO2 , ZrO2, HfO2, and complex mixed oxides such as ZrTiO4, LaAlO3 and...5d-state and defect features are identified. Figure 2(b). SXPS valence band spectrum of TiO2 . 5d-state and defect features... TiO2 . 3d-state features are identified. Figure 4. Ti L3 edge XAS spectrum of TiO2 . Ti 3d J-T term split states are

  13. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  14. Computer-aided approach for customized cell-based defect reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ulrich; Neunzehn, Jörg; Wiesmann, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    Computer-aided technologies like computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), and a lot of other features like finite element method (FEM) have been recently employed for use in medical ways like in extracorporeal bone tissue engineering strategies. Aim of this pilot experimental study was to test whether autologous osteoblast-like cells cultured in vitro on individualized scaffolds can be used to support bone regeneration in a clinical environment. Mandibular bone defects were surgically introduced into the mandibles of Göttinger minipigs and the scaffold of the defect site was modelled by CAD/CAM techniques. From the minipigs harvested autologous bone cells from the porcine calvaria were cultivated in bioreactors. The cultured osteoblast-like cells were seeded on polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid (PLA/PGA) copolymer scaffolds being generated by rapid prototyping. The bone defects were then reconstructed by implanting these tissue-constructs into bone defects. The postoperative computerized topographic scans as well as the intraoperative sites demonstrated the accurate fit in the defect sites. The individual created, implanted scaffold constructs enriched with the porcine osteoblast-like cells were well tolerated and appeared to support bone formation, as revealed by immunohistochemical and histological analyses. The results of this investigations indicated that the in vitro expanded osteoblast-like cells spread on a resorbable individualized, computer-aided fabricated scaffold is capable of promoting the repair of bone tissue defects in vivo. The shown results warrant further attempts to combine computer modelling and tissue engineering for use in different ways in bone reconstructive surgery.

  15. Hush puppy: a new mouse mutant with pinna, ossicle, and inner ear defects.

    PubMed

    Pau, Henry; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Steel, Karen P

    2005-01-01

    Deafness can be associated with abnormalities of the pinna, ossicles, and cochlea. The authors studied a newly generated mouse mutant with pinna defects and asked whether these defects are associated with peripheral auditory or facial skeletal abnormalities, or both. Furthermore, the authors investigated where the mutation responsible for these defects was located in the mouse genome. The hearing of hush puppy mutants was assessed by Preyer reflex and electrophysiological measurement. The morphological features of their middle and inner ears were investigated by microdissection, paint-filling of the labyrinth, and scanning electron microscopy. Skeletal staining of skulls was performed to assess the craniofacial dimensions. Genome scanning was performed using microsatellite markers to localize the mutation to a chromosomal region. Some hush puppy mutants showed early onset of hearing impairment. They had small, bat-like pinnae and normal malleus but abnormal incus and stapes. Some mutants had asymmetrical defects and showed reduced penetrance of the ear abnormalities. Paint-filling of newborns' inner ears revealed no morphological abnormality, although half of the mice studied were expected to carry the mutation. Reduced numbers of outer hair cells were demonstrated in mutants' cochlea on scanning electron microscopy. Skeletal staining showed that the mutants have significantly shorter snouts and mandibles. Genome scan revealed that the mutation lies on chromosome 8 between markers D8Mit58 and D8Mit289. The study results indicate developmental problems of the first and second branchial arches and otocyst as a result of a single gene mutation. Similar defects are found in humans, and hush puppy provides a mouse model for investigation of such defects.

  16. Three-dimensional textures and defects of soft material layering revealed by thermal sublimation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dong Ki; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Dae Seok; Oh, Seong Dae; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Clark, Noel A.; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Layering is found and exploited in a variety of soft material systems, ranging from complex macromolecular self-assemblies to block copolymer and small-molecule liquid crystals. Because the control of layer structure is required for applications and characterization, and because defects reveal key features of the symmetries of layered phases, a variety of techniques have been developed for the study of soft-layer structure and defects, including X-ray diffraction and visualization using optical transmission and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and SEM and transmission electron microscopy, including freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy. Here, it is shown that thermal sublimation can be usefully combined with such techniques to enable visualization of the 3D structure of soft materials. Sequential sublimation removes material in a stepwise fashion, leaving a remnant layer structure largely unchanged and viewable using SEM, as demonstrated here using a lamellar smectic liquid crystal. PMID:24218602

  17. Waveguides based on linear defects in metal electromagnetic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetluzhskii, A. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    Waveguides that represent linear defects in 2D metal photonic crystals are considered. Guiding properties of such structures at the frequencies of the first allowed band are demonstrated. The physical effect leading to the localization of radiation in defect area in the crystal is discussed.

  18. Quantum computing with defects.

    PubMed

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  19. Quantum computing with defects

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J. R.; Koehl, W. F.; Varley, J. B.; Janotti, A.; Buckley, B. B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center stands out for its robustness—its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors. PMID:20404195

  20. Defect-Induced Optoelectronic Response in Single-layer Group-VI Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Philippe K.

    The ever-evolving symbiosis between mankind and nanoelectronics-driven technology pushes the limits of its constituent materials, largely due to the dominance of undesirable hetero-interfacial physiochemical behavior at the few-nanometer length scale, which dominates over bulk material characteristics. Driven by such instabilities, research into two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals-layered materials (e.g. graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), boron nitride), which have characteristically inert surface chemistry, has virtually exploded over the past few years. The discovery of an indirect- to direct-gap conversion in semiconducting group-VI TMDCs (e.g. MoS2) upon thinning to a single atomic layer provided the critical link between metallic and insulating 2D materials. While proof-of-concept demonstrations of single-layer TMDC-based devices for visible-range photodetection, light-emission and solar energy conversion have showed promising results, the exciting qualities are downplayed by poorly-understood defectinduced photocarrier traps, limiting the best-achieved external quantum efficiencies to approximately ~1%. This thesis explores the behavior of defects in atomically-thin TMDC layers in response to optical stimuli using a combination of steady-state photoluminescence, reflectance and Raman spectroscopy at room-temperature. By systematically varying the defect density using plasma-irradiation techniques, an unprecedented room-temperature defect-induced monolayer PL feature was discovered. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy correlated the defect-induced PL with plasma-generation of sulfur vacancy defects while reflectance measurements indicate defect-induced sub-bandgap light absorption. Excitation intensity-dependent PL measurements and exciton rate modeling further help elucidate the origin of the defect-induced PL response and highlights the role of non-radiative recombination on exciton conversion processes. The results in this

  1. Regenerative Potential of Tissue-Engineered Nasal Chondrocytes in Goat Articular Cartilage Defects.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Steinitz, Amir; Nuss, Katja M; Klein, Karina; Feliciano, Sandra; Kronen, Peter; Jakob, Marcel; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Martin, Ivan; Barbero, Andrea; Pelttari, Karoliina

    2016-11-01

    Nasal chondrocytes (NC) were previously demonstrated to remain viable and to participate in the repair of articular cartilage defects in goats. Here, we investigated critical features of tissue-engineered grafts generated by NC in this large animal model, namely cell retention at the implantation site, architecture and integration with adjacent tissues, and effects on subchondral bone changes. In this study, isolated autologous goat NC (gNC) and goat articular chondrocytes (gAC, as control) were expanded, green fluorescent protein-labelled and seeded on a type I/III collagen membrane. After chondrogenic differentiation, tissue-engineered grafts were implanted into chondral defects (6 mm in diameter) in the stifle joint for 3 or 6 months. At the time of explantation, surrounding tissues showed no or very low (only in the infrapatellar fat pad <0.32%) migration of the grafted cells. In repair tissue, gNC formed typical structures of articular cartilage, such as flattened cells at the surface and column-like clusters in the middle layers. Semi-quantitative histological evaluation revealed efficient integration of the grafted tissues with the adjacent native cartilage and underlying subchondral bone. A significantly increased subchondral bone area, as a sign for the onset of osteoarthritis, was observed following treatment of cartilage defects with gAC-, but not with gNC-grafts. Our results reinforce the use of NC-based engineered tissue for articular cartilage repair and preliminarily indicate their potential for the treatment of early osteoarthritic defects.

  2. A computational framework for automation of point defect calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Goyal, Anuj; Gorai, Prashun; Peng, Haowei; ...

    2017-01-13

    We have developed a complete and rigorously validated open-source Python framework to automate point defect calculations using density functional theory. Furthermore, the framework provides an effective and efficient method for defect structure generation, and creation of simple yet customizable workflows to analyze defect calculations. This package provides the capability to compute widely-accepted correction schemes to overcome finite-size effects, including (1) potential alignment, (2) image-charge correction, and (3) band filling correction to shallow defects. Using Si, ZnO and In2O3 as test examples, we demonstrate the package capabilities and validate the methodology.

  3. Defect-induced loading of Pt nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Yong Jin; Ra, Eun Ju; Kim, Ki Kang; An, Kay Hyeok; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Chan Ho; Doo, Seok Kwang; Park, Min Ho; Yang, Cheol Woong

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticles were loaded using a microwave oven on the defective carbon nanotubes generated by an additional oxidant during acid treatment. The authors' Raman spectra and x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that defects created during oxidation and microwave treatment acted as nucleation seeds for Pt adsorption. The generated Pt nanoparticles had the size distributions of 2-3nm and were uniformly distributed on the defects of carbon nanotubes. The authors' density functional calculations showed that the adsorption of Pt atom on the vacancy of nanotube was significantly stronger by s-p hybridization with carbon atoms near the defect site.

  4. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  5. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Describes several chemistry demonstrations that use an overhead projector. Some of the demonstrations deal with electrochemistry, and another deals with the reactions of nonvolatile immiscible liquid in water. (TW)

  6. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Described are demonstrations of the optical activity of two sugar solutions, and the effects of various substituents on acid strength using an overhead projector. Materials and procedures for each demonstration are discussed. (CW)

  7. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  8. Internal defect inspection in magnetic tile by using acoustic resonance technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luofeng; Yin, Ming; Huang, Qinyuan; Zhao, Yue; Deng, Zhenbo; Xiang, Zhaowei; Yin, Guofu

    2016-11-01

    This paper focuses on the validity of a nondestructive methodology for magnetic tile internal defect inspection based on acoustic resonance. The principle of this methodology is to analyze the acoustic signal collected from the collision of magnetic tile with a metal block. To accomplish the detection process, the separating part of the detection system is designed and discussed in detail in this paper. A simplified mathematical model is constructed to analyze the characteristics of the impact of magnetic tile with a metal block. The results demonstrate that calculating the power spectrum density (PSD) can diagnose the internal defect of magnetic tile. Two different data-driven multivariate algorithms are adopted to obtain the feature set, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical nonlinear principal component analysis (h-NLPCA). Three different classifiers are then performed to deal with magnetic tile classification problem based on features extracted by PCA or h-NLPCA. The classifiers adopted in this paper are fuzzy neural networks (FNN), variable predictive model based class discrimination (VPMCD) method and support vector machine (SVM). Experimental results show that all six methods are successful in identifying the magnetic tile internal defect. In this paper, the effect of environmental noise is also considered, and the classification results show that all the methods have high immunity to background noise, especially PCA-SVM and h-NLPCA-SVM. Considering the accuracy rate, computation cost problem and the ease of implementation, PCA-SVM turns out to be the best method for this purpose.

  9. Phase field crystal modeling as a unified atomistic approach to defect dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Provatas, Nikolas; Rottler, Jörg; Sinclair, Chad W.

    2014-06-01

    Material properties controlled by evolving defect structures, such as mechanical response, often involve processes spanning many length and time scales which can not be modeled using a single approach. We present a variety of results that demonstrate the ability of phase field crystal (PFC) models to describe complex defect evolution phenomena on atomistic length scales and over long, diffusive time scales. Primary emphasis is given to the unification of conservative and nonconservative dislocation creation mechanisms in three-dimensional fcc and bcc materials. These include Frank-Read-type glide mechanisms involving closed dislocation loops or grain boundaries as well as Bardeen-Herring-type climb mechanisms involving precipitates, inclusions, and/or voids. Both source classes are naturally and simultaneously captured at the atomistic level by PFC descriptions, with arbitrarily complex defect configurations, types, and environments. An unexpected dipole-to-quadrupole source transformation is identified, as well as various complex geometrical features of loop nucleation via climb from spherical particles. Results for the strain required to nucleate a dislocation loop from such a particle are in agreement with analytic continuum theories. Other basic features of fcc and bcc dislocation structure and dynamics are also outlined, and initial results for dislocation-stacking fault tetrahedron interactions are presented. These findings together highlight various capabilities of the PFC approach as a coarse-grained atomistic tool for the study of three-dimensional crystal plasticity.

  10. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice.

    PubMed

    Soenjaya, Y; Foster, B L; Nociti, F H; Ao, M; Holdsworth, D W; Hunter, G K; Somerman, M J; Goldberg, H A

    2015-09-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp(-/-)) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp(-/-) mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp(-/-) and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro-computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp(-/-) mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp(-/-) mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp(-/-) mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp(-/-) mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp(-/-) mice. Bsp(-/-) incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the

  11. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  12. Classroom Demonstrations: Individual Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Sandra M.

    These demonstrations stress individual differences, a concept becoming increasingly important in psychological research. Intended for use in undergraduate psychology courses, four demonstrations that illustrate common examples of human variation are described. The demonstrations deal with the following individual differences: taste blindness,…

  13. Bent Creek demonstration program

    Treesearch

    Erik C. Berg

    1997-01-01

    Bent Creek Research and Demonstration Forest scientists have transferred the results of research on the ecology and management of Southern Appalachian hardwoods since 1925. Since 1989, a full-time technology transfer specialist has led demonstration efforts. The demonstration program was designed to quickly transfer research results to interested users and to free...

  14. Bent Creek demonstration program

    Treesearch

    Erik C. Berg

    1997-01-01

    Bent Creek Research and Demonstration Forest scientists have transferred the results of research on the ecology and management of Southern Appalachian hardwoods since 1925. Since 1989, a full-time technology transfer specialist has led demonstration efforts. The demonstration program was designed to quickly transfer research results to interested users, and free-up...

  15. A Boyle's Law Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sathe, Dileep V.

    1984-01-01

    The usual apparatus for demonstrating Boyle's law produces reasonably accurate results, but is not impressive as a demonstration because students cannot easily appreciate the change in pressure. An apparatus designed to produce a more effective demonstration is described. Procedures employed are also described. (JN)

  16. Adolescents' Demonstrative Behavior Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parfilova, Gulfiya G.; Karimova, Lilia Sh.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of demonstrative behavior is very topical among teenagers and this issue has become the subject of systematic scientific research. Demonstrative manifestations in adolescents disrupt the favorable socialization; therefore, understanding, prevention and correction of demonstrative behavior at this age is relevant and requires special…

  17. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Details two demonstrations for use with an overhead projector in a chemistry lecture. Includes "A Very Rapidly Growing Silicate Crystal" and "A Colorful Demonstration to Simulate Orbital Hybridization." The materials and directions for each demonstration are included as well as a brief explanation of the essential learning involved. (CW)

  18. Classical Demonstration of Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Moore, Dennis R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a classical demonstration of polarization for high school students. The initial state of this model, which demonstrates the important concepts of the optical and quantum problems, was developed during the 1973 summer program on lecture demonstration at the U.S. Naval Academy. (HM)

  19. Defect-induced supercollision cooling of photoexcited carriers in graphene.

    PubMed

    Alencar, Thonimar V; Silva, Mychel G; Malard, Leandro M; de Paula, Ana M

    2014-10-08

    Defects play a fundamental role in the energy relaxation of hot photoexcited carriers in graphene, thus a complete understanding of these processes are vital for improving the development of graphene devices. Recently, it has been theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated that defect-assisted acoustic phonon supercollision, the collision between a carrier and both an acoustic phonon and a defect, is an important energy relaxation process for carriers with excess energy below the optical phonon emission. Here, we studied samples with defects optically generated in a controlled manner to experimentally probe the supercollision model as a function of the defect density. We present pump and probe transient absorption measurements showing that the decay time decreases as the density of defect increases as predicted by the supercollision model.

  20. Structural phase transitions and topological defects in ion Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Partner, Heather L.; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Burgermeister, Tobias; Keller, Jonas; Pyka, Karsten; Plenio, Martin B.; Retzker, Alex; Zurek, Wojciech Hubert; del Campo, Adolfo; Mehlstaubler, Tanja E.

    2014-11-19

    We use laser-cooled ion Coulomb crystals in the well-controlled environment of a harmonic radiofrequency ion trap to investigate phase transitions and defect formation. Topological defects in ion Coulomb crystals (kinks) have been recently proposed for studies of nonlinear physics with solitons and as carriers of quantum information. Defects form when a symmetry breaking phase transition is crossed non-adiabatically. For a second order phase transition, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism predicts that the formation of these defects follows a power law scaling in the rate of the transition. We demonstrate a scaling of defect density and describe kink dynamics and stability. We further discuss the implementation of mass defects and electric fields as first steps toward controlled kink preparation and manipulation.

  1. Edible Astronomy Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D. A.

    2006-08-01

    By using astronomy demonstrations with edible ingredients, I have been able to increase student interest and knowledge of astronomical concepts. This approach has been successful with all age groups from elementary school through college students. I will present some of the edible demonstrations I have created including using popcorn to simulate radioactivity; using chocolate, nuts, and marshmallows to illustrate density and differentiation during the formation of the planets; and making big-bang brownies or chocolate chip-cookies to illustrate the expansion of the Universe. Sometimes the students eat the results of the astronomical demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool and the students remember these demonstrations after they are presented.

  2. Data surety demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Draelos, T.; Harris, M.; Herrington, P.; Kromer, D.

    1998-08-01

    The use of data surety within the International Monitoring System (IMS) is designed to offer increased trust of acquired sensor data at a low cost. The demonstrations discussed in the paper illustrate the feasibility of hardware authentication for sensor data and commands in a retrofit environment and a new system and of the supporting key management system. The individual demonstrations which are summarized in the paper are: (1) demonstration of hardware authentication for communication authentication in a retrofit environment; (2)demonstration of hardware authentication in a new system; and (3) demonstration of key management for sensor data and command authentication.

  3. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  4. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  5. Experimental demonstration of topologically protected efficient sound propagation in an acoustic waveguide network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Tian, Ye; Zuo, Shu-Yu; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Acoustic topological states support sound propagation along the boundary in a one-way direction with inherent robustness against defects and disorders, leading to the revolution of the manipulation on acoustic waves. A variety of acoustic topological states relying on circulating fluid, chiral coupling, or temporal modulation have been proposed theoretically. However, experimental demonstration has so far remained a significant challenge, due to the critical limitations such as structural complexity and high losses. Here, we experimentally demonstrate an acoustic anomalous Floquet topological insulator in a waveguide network. The acoustic gapless edge states can be found in the band gap when the waveguides are strongly coupled. The scheme features simple structure and high-energy throughput, leading to the experimental demonstration of efficient and robust topologically protected sound propagation along the boundary. The proposal may offer a unique, promising application for design of acoustic devices in acoustic guiding, switching, isolating, filtering, etc.

  6. Defects and Ion-Solid Interactions in Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Gao, Fei; Devanathan, Ram; Jiang, Weilin; Zhang, Yanwen

    2005-01-03

    Atomic-level simulations are used to determine defect production, cascade-overlap effects, and defect migration energies in SiC. Energetic C and Si collision cascades primarily produce single interstitials, mono-vacancies, antisite defects, and small defect clusters, while amorphous clusters are produced within 25% of Au cascades. Cascade overlap results in defect stimulated cluster growth that produces amorphization. The good agreement of disordering behavior and changes in volume and elastic modulus obtained computationally and experimentally provides atomic-level interpretation of experimentally observed features. Simulations indicate that close-pair recombination activation energies range from 0.24 to 0.38 eV, and long-range migration energies for interstitials and vacancies have been determined.

  7. STM fingerprints of point defects in graphene: a theoretical prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Amara, Hakim; Latil, Sylvain; Meunier, Vincent; Lambin, Philippe; Charlier, Jean Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is one of the most appropriate techniques to investigate the atomic structure of carbon nanomaterials. However, the experimental identification of topological and nontopological modifications of the hexagonal network of sp{sup 2} carbon nanostructures remains a great challenge. The goal of the present theoretical work is to predict the typical electronic features of a few defects that are likely to occur in sp{sup 2} carbon nanostructures, such as atomic vacancy, divacancy, adatom, and Stone-Wales defect. The modifications induced by those defects in the electronic properties of the graphene sheet are investigated using first-principles calculations. In addition, computed constant-current STM images of these defects are calculated within a tight-binding approach in order to facilitate the interpretation of STM images of defected carbon nanostructures.

  8. Orientational order of motile defects in active nematics

    SciTech Connect

    DeCamp, Stephen J.; Redner, Gabriel S.; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael F.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-08-17

    The study of equilibrium liquid crystals has led to fundamental insights into the nature of ordered materials, as well as many practical applications such as display technologies. Active nematics are a fundamentally different class of liquid crystals, which are driven away from equilibrium by the autonomous motion of their constituent rodlike particles. This internally-generated activity powers the continuous creation and annihilation of topological defects, leading to complex streaming flows whose chaotic dynamics appear to destroy long-range order. Here, we study these dynamics in experimental and computational realizations of active nematics. By tracking thousands of defects over centimeter distances in microtubule-based active nematics, we identify a non-equilibrium phase characterized by system-spanning orientational order of defects. This emergent order persists over hours despite defect lifetimes of only seconds. Lastly, similar dynamical structures are observed in coarse-grained simulations, suggesting that defect-ordered phases are a generic feature of active nematics.

  9. Identification of surface defects on glass by parallel spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyan; Shen, Yi; Bao, Wen; Li, Peng; Wang, Xiaoping; Ding, Zhihua

    2015-09-07

    Defects can dramatically degrade glass quality, and automatic inspection is a trend of quality control in modern industry. One challenge in inspection in an uncontrolled environment is the misjudgment of fake defects (such as dust particles) as surface defects. Fortunately, optical changes within the periphery of a surface defect are usually introduced while those of a fake defect are not. The existence of changes within the defect peripheries can be adopted as a criterion for defect identification. However, modifications within defect peripheries can be too small to be noticeable in intensity based optical image of the glass surface, and misjudgments of modifications may occur due to the incorrectness in defect demarcation. Thus, a sensitive and reliable method for surface defect identification is demanded. To this end, a nondestructive method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is proposed to precisely demarcate surface defects and sensitively measure surface deformations. Suspected surface defects are demarcated using the algorithm based on complex difference from expectation. Modifications within peripheries of suspected surface defects are mapped by phase information from complex interface signal. In this way, surface defects are discriminated from fake defects using a parallel spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. Both simulations and experiments are conducted, and these preliminary results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method to identify glass surface defects.

  10. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair; Tetralogy of Fallot repair; Coarctation of the aorta repair; Atrial septal defect repair; Ventricular septal defect ... the pulmonary valve and removing the thickened muscle (stenosis). Placing a patch on the right ventricle and ...

  11. Birth Defects Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Data & Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... of birth defects in the United States. For data on specific birth defects, please visit the specific ...

  12. Guidance for Preventing Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention. Commit to Healthy Choices to Help Prevent Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... Tweet Share Compartir We know that not all birth defects can be prevented. But, we also know ...

  13. Atrial Septal Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Defect Preparing Your Child for Surgery Heart and Circulatory System Anesthesia Basics Congenital Heart Defects Activity: The Heart ... EKG (Video) Going to the Hospital Your Heart & Circulatory System Quiz: Heart & Circulatory System EKG (Video) What's It ...

  14. Decision-Level Fusion of Spatially Scattered Multi-Modal Data for Nondestructive Inspection of Surface Defects

    PubMed Central

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the fusion of flaw indications from multi-sensor nondestructive materials testing. Because each testing method makes use of a different physical principle, a multi-method approach has the potential of effectively differentiating actual defect indications from the many false alarms, thus enhancing detection reliability. In this study, we propose a new technique for aggregating scattered two- or three-dimensional sensory data. Using a density-based approach, the proposed method explicitly addresses localization uncertainties such as registration errors. This feature marks one of the major of advantages of this approach over pixel-based image fusion techniques. We provide guidelines on how to set all the key parameters and demonstrate the technique’s robustness. Finally, we apply our fusion approach to experimental data and demonstrate its capability to locate small defects by substantially reducing false alarms under conditions where no single-sensor method is adequate. PMID:26784200

  15. Decision-Level Fusion of Spatially Scattered Multi-Modal Data for Nondestructive Inspection of Surface Defects.

    PubMed

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa

    2016-01-15

    This article focuses on the fusion of flaw indications from multi-sensor nondestructive materials testing. Because each testing method makes use of a different physical principle, a multi-method approach has the potential of effectively differentiating actual defect indications from the many false alarms, thus enhancing detection reliability. In this study, we propose a new technique for aggregating scattered two- or three-dimensional sensory data. Using a density-based approach, the proposed method explicitly addresses localization uncertainties such as registration errors. This feature marks one of the major of advantages of this approach over pixel-based image fusion techniques. We provide guidelines on how to set all the key parameters and demonstrate the technique's robustness. Finally, we apply our fusion approach to experimental data and demonstrate its capability to locate small defects by substantially reducing false alarms under conditions where no single-sensor method is adequate.

  16. The Microgravity Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Wargo, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The Demonstrator is a tool to create microgravity conditions in your classroom. A series of demonstrations is used to provide a dramatically visual, physical connection between free-fall and microgravity conditions and to understand why various types of experiments are performed under microgravity conditions. A wealth of back-round material on free-fall, microgravity, and micro-gravity sciences is available in two educational documents available through the NASA Teacher Resource Centers: Microgravity-Activity Guide for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, and The Mathematics of Microgravity. The remainder of this manual is divided into five sections. The first explains how to put the Microgravity Demonstrator together. The next section introduces the individual demonstrations and discusses the underlying physical science concepts. Following that are detailed steps for conducting each demonstration to make your use of the Demonstrator most effective. Next are some ideas on how to make your own Microgravity Demonstrator. The last section is a tips and troubleshooting guide for video connections and operations. If you have one of the NASA Microgravity Demonstrators, this entire manual should be useful. If you have a copy of the Microgravity Demonstrator Videotape and would like to use that as a teaching tool, the Demonstrations and Scientific Background section of this manual will give you insight into the science areas studied in microgravity.

  17. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies.

  18. A method of gear defect intelligent detection based on transmission noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-fang; Zhao, Yun; Lin, Jia-chun; Guo, Mian

    2015-02-01

    A new approach was proposed by combing Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) algorithm and Back Propagation (BP) neural network for detection of gear through transmission noise analysis. Then feature values of the feature signals are calculated. The feature values which have a great difference for different defect types are chosen to build an eigenvector. BP neural network is used to train and learn on the eigenvector for recognition of gear defects intelligently. In this study, a comparative experiment has been performed among normal gears, cracked gears and eccentric gears with fifteen sets of different gears. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can detect gear defect features carried by the transmission noise effectively.

  19. Controversies in Parotid Defect Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tamplen, Matthew; Knott, P Daniel; Fritz, Michael A; Seth, Rahul

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of the parotid defect is a complex topic that encompasses restoration of both facial form and function. The reconstructive surgeon must consider facial contour, avoidance of Frey syndrome, skin coverage, tumor surveillance, potential adjuvant therapy, and facial reanimation when addressing parotid defects. With each defect there are several options within the reconstructive ladder, creating controversies regarding optimal management. This article describes surgical approaches to reconstruction of parotid defects, highlighting areas of controversy.

  20. Molecular defects in the chondrodysplasias

    SciTech Connect

    Rimoin, D.L.

    1996-05-03

    There has been a recent explosion of knowledge concerning the biochemical and molecular defects in the skeletal dysplasia. Through both the candidate gene approach and positional cloning, specific gene defects that produce the skeletal dysplasia have been identified and may be classified into several general categories: (1) qualitative or quantitative abnormalities in the structural proteins of cartilage; (2) inborn errors of cartilage metabolism; (3) defects in local regulators of cartilage growth; and (4) systemic defects influencing cartilage development. 35 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Composite Defect Significance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-13

    A12i 299 COMPOSITE DEFECT SIGNIFICANCE(U) MATERIALS SCIENCES 1/1 \\ CORP SPRING HOUSE PA S N CHATTERJEE ET AL. 13 JUL 82 MSC/TFR/1288/il87 NADC-80848...Directorate 30 Sensors & Avionics Technology Directorate 40 Communication & Navigation Technology Directorate 50 Software Computer Directorate 60 Aircraft ...instructions concerning commercial products herein do not constitute an endorsement by the Government nor do they convey or imply the license or right to use

  2. Programmed defects study on masks for 45nm immersion lithography using the novel AIMS 45-193i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherübl, Thomas; Dürr, Arndt C.; Böhm, Klaus; Birkner, Robert; Richter, Rigo; Strößner, Ulrich

    2007-02-01

    Mask manufacturing for the 45nm node for hyper NA lithography requires tight defect and printability control at small features sizes. The AIMS TM1 technology is a well established methodology to analyze printability of mask defects, repairs and critical features by scanner emulation. With the step towards hyper NA imaging by immersion lithography the AIMS TM technology has been faced with new challenges like vector effects, polarized illumination and tighter specs for repeatability and tool stability. These requirements pushed the development of an entirely new AIMS TM generation. The AIMS TM 45-193i has been designed and developed by Carl Zeiss to address these challenges. A new mechanical platform with a thermal and environmental control unit enables high tool stability. Thus a new class of specification becomes available. The 193nm optical beam path together with an improved beam homogenizer is dedicated to emulate scanners up to 1.4 NA. New features like polarized illumination and vector effect emulation make the AIMS TM 45- 193i a powerful tool for defect disposition and scanner emulation for 45nm immersion lithography. In this paper results from one of the first production tools will be presented. Aerial images from phase shifting and binary masks with different immersion relevant settings will be discussed. Also, data from a long term repeatability study performed on masks with programmed defects will be shown. This study demonstrates the tool's ability to perform defect disposition with high repeatability. It is found that the tool will fulfill the 45nm node requirements to perform mask qualification for production use.

  3. Photonic defect modes in a cholesteric liquid crystal with a resonant nanocomposite layer and a twist defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, Stepan Ya.; Pyatnov, Maxim V.; Timofeev, Ivan V.

    2014-09-01

    We have studied spectral properties of a cholesteric liquid crystal with a combined defect consisting of a nanocomposite layer and a twist. The nanocomposite layer is made of metallic nanoballs dispersed in a transparent matrix and featuring effective resonant permittivity. A solution has been found for the transmission spectrum of circularly polarized waves in the structure. We have analyzed spectral splitting of the defect mode in the band gap of the cholesteric when its frequency coincides with the nanocomposite resonant frequency. Defect modes have characteristics strongly dependent on the magnitude and the sign of the phase difference of the cholesteric helix on both sides of the defect layer. It has been found that the band gap width and the position and localization degree of defect modes can be effectively controlled by external fields applied to the cholesteric.

  4. Photonic defect modes in a cholesteric liquid crystal with a resonant nanocomposite layer and a twist defect.

    PubMed

    Vetrov, Stepan Ya; Pyatnov, Maxim V; Timofeev, Ivan V

    2014-09-01

    We have studied spectral properties of a cholesteric liquid crystal with a combined defect consisting of a nanocomposite layer and a twist. The nanocomposite layer is made of metallic nanoballs dispersed in a transparent matrix and featuring effective resonant permittivity. A solution has been found for the transmission spectrum of circularly polarized waves in the structure. We have analyzed spectral splitting of the defect mode in the band gap of the cholesteric when its frequency coincides with the nanocomposite resonant frequency. Defect modes have characteristics strongly dependent on the magnitude and the sign of the phase difference of the cholesteric helix on both sides of the defect layer. It has been found that the band gap width and the position and localization degree of defect modes can be effectively controlled by external fields applied to the cholesteric.

  5. Defect mapping system

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-04-11

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. 20 figures.

  6. Defect mapping system

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities.

  7. Fetal Valproate Syndrome with Limb Defects: An Indian Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashok; Sharma, Manish; Mathur, Priyanshu; Bansal, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common disorder and exposure to antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy increases the risk of teratogenicity. Older AEDs such as valproate and phenobarbital are associated with a higher risk of major malformations in the fetus than newer AEDs like lamotrigine and levetiracetam. Exposure to valproic acid during first trimester can result in fetal valproate syndrome (FVS), comprising typical facial features, developmental delay, and a variety of malformations such as neural tube defects, cardiac and genitourinary malformations, and limb defects. We are presenting an Indian case of FVS with major limb defects. PMID:28003925

  8. In-Process Detection of Weld Defects Using Laser-Based Ultrasonic Lamb Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S W

    2001-01-04

    Laser-based ultrasonic (LBU) measurement shows great promise for on-line monitoring of weld quality in tailor-welded blanks. Tailor-welded blanks are steel blanks made from plates of differing thickness and/or properties butt-welded together; they are used in automobile manufacturing to produce body, frame, and closure panels. LBU uses a pulsed laser to generate the ultrasound and a continuous wave (CW) laser interferometer to detect the ultrasound at the point of interrogation to perform ultrasonic inspection. LBU enables in-process measurements since there is no sensor contact or near-contact with the workpiece. The authors have used laser-generated plate (Lamb) waves to propagate from one plate into the weld nugget as a means of detecting defects. This report recounts an investigation of a number of inspection architectures based on processing of signals from selected plate waves, which are either reflected from or transmitted through the weld zone. Bayesian parameter estimation and wavelet analysis (both continuous and discrete) have shown that the LBU time-series signal is readily separable into components that provide distinguishing features, which describe weld quality. The authors anticipate that, in an on-line industrial application, these measurements can be implemented just downstream from the weld cell. Then the weld quality data can be fed back to control critical weld parameters or alert the operator of a problem requiring maintenance. Internal weld defects and deviations from the desired surface profile can then be corrected before defective parts are produced. The major conclusions of this study are as follows. Bayesian parameter estimation is able to separate entangled Lamb wave modes. Pattern recognition algorithms applied to Lamb mode features have produced robust features for distinguishing between several types of weld defects. In other words, the information is present in the output of the laser ultrasonic hardware, and it is feasible to

  9. Study of lattice defect vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report on the vibrations of defects in crystals relates how defects, well localized in a crystal but interacting strongly with the other atoms, change the properties of a perfect crystal. The methods used to solve defect problems relate the properties of an imperfect lattice to the properties of a perfect lattice.

  10. Pattern of congenital heart diseases in Rwandan children with genetic defects

    PubMed Central

    Teteli, Raissa; Uwineza, Annette; Butera, Yvan; Hitayezu, Janvier; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Umurerwa, Lamberte; Ndinkabandi, Janvier; Hellin, Anne-Cécile; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Muganga, Narcisse; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Rusingiza, Emmanuel Kamanzi; Mutesa, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congenital heart diseases (CHD) are commonly associated with genetic defects. Our study aimed at determining the occurrence and pattern of CHD association with genetic defects among pediatric patients in Rwanda. Methods A total of 125 patients with clinical features suggestive of genetic defects were recruited. Echocardiography and standard karyotype studies were performed in all patients. Results CHDs were detected in the majority of patients with genetic defects. The commonest isolated CHD was ventricular septal defect found in many cases of Down syndrome. In total, chromosomal abnormalities represented the majority of cases in our cohort and were associated with various types of CHDs. Conclusion Our findings showed that CHDs are common in Rwandan pediatric patients with genetic defects. These results suggest that a routine echocardiography assessment combined with systematic genetic investigations including standard karyotype should be mandatory in patients presenting characteristic clinical features in whom CHD is suspected to be associated with genetic defect. PMID:25722758

  11. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  12. Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Chris Moore delivers a presentation from the Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX....

  13. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  14. Tested Demonstrations: Spectroscopy Illustrated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for an experiment to prepare three metal derivatives of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and to determine some structural features of these derivatives based on their infrared spectra. Results and discussion of reactions involved are also provided. (JN)

  15. Tested Demonstrations: Spectroscopy Illustrated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for an experiment to prepare three metal derivatives of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and to determine some structural features of these derivatives based on their infrared spectra. Results and discussion of reactions involved are also provided. (JN)

  16. Microgravity Plant Growth Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Two visitors watch a TV monitor showing plant growth inside a growth chamber designed for operation aboard the Space Shuttle as part of NASA's Space Product Development program. The exhibit, featuring work by the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics, was at AirVenture 2000 sponsored by the Experimental Aircraft Association in Oshkosh, WI.

  17. Interstellar Analogs from Defective Carbon Nanostructures Account for Interstellar Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhenquan; Chihara, Hiroki; Koike, Chiyoe; Abe, Hiroya; Kaneko, Kenji; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Ohara, Satoshi

    2010-11-01

    Because interstellar dust is closely related to the evolution of matter in the galactic environment and many other astrophysical phenomena, the laboratory synthesis of interstellar dust analogs has received significant attention over the past decade. To simulate the ultraviolet (UV) interstellar extinction feature at 217.5 nm originating from carbonaceous interstellar dust, many reports focused on the UV absorption properties of laboratory-synthesized interstellar dust analogs. However, no general relation has been established between UV interstellar extinction and artificial interstellar dust analogs. Here, we show that defective carbon nanostructures prepared by high-energy collisions exhibit a UV absorption feature at 220 nm which we suggest accounts for the UV interstellar extinction at 217.5 nm. The morphology of some carbon nanostructures is similar to that of nanocarbons discovered in the Allende meteorite. The similarity between the absorption feature of the defective carbon nanostructures and UV interstellar extinction indicates a strong correlation between the defective carbon nanostructures and interstellar dust.

  18. INTERSTELLAR ANALOGS FROM DEFECTIVE CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES ACCOUNT FOR INTERSTELLAR EXTINCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zhenquan; Abe, Hiroya; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Ohara, Satoshi; Chihara, Hiroki; Koike, Chiyoe; Kaneko, Kenji

    2010-11-15

    Because interstellar dust is closely related to the evolution of matter in the galactic environment and many other astrophysical phenomena, the laboratory synthesis of interstellar dust analogs has received significant attention over the past decade. To simulate the ultraviolet (UV) interstellar extinction feature at 217.5 nm originating from carbonaceous interstellar dust, many reports focused on the UV absorption properties of laboratory-synthesized interstellar dust analogs. However, no general relation has been established between UV interstellar extinction and artificial interstellar dust analogs. Here, we show that defective carbon nanostructures prepared by high-energy collisions exhibit a UV absorption feature at 220 nm which we suggest accounts for the UV interstellar extinction at 217.5 nm. The morphology of some carbon nanostructures is similar to that of nanocarbons discovered in the Allende meteorite. The similarity between the absorption feature of the defective carbon nanostructures and UV interstellar extinction indicates a strong correlation between the defective carbon nanostructures and interstellar dust.

  19. A Greener Chemiluminescence Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Osman; Donahue, Trisha M.; Mitchell, Miguel O.

    2011-01-01

    Because they are dramatic and intriguing, chemiluminescence demonstrations have been used for decades to stimulate interest in chemistry. One of the most intense chemiluminescent reactions is the oxidation of diaryl oxalate diesters with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a fluorescer. In typical lecture demonstrations, the commercially…

  20. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  1. A Greener Chemiluminescence Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jilani, Osman; Donahue, Trisha M.; Mitchell, Miguel O.

    2011-01-01

    Because they are dramatic and intriguing, chemiluminescence demonstrations have been used for decades to stimulate interest in chemistry. One of the most intense chemiluminescent reactions is the oxidation of diaryl oxalate diesters with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a fluorescer. In typical lecture demonstrations, the commercially…

  2. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  3. Better Ira Remsen Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, David K.; Maynard, James H.; Moore, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of the classic Ira Remsen experience involving copper and concentrated nitric acid have been used as lecture demonstrations. Remsen's original reminiscence from 150 years ago is included in the Supporting Information, and his biography can be found on the Internet. This article presents a new version that makes the demonstration more…

  4. Demonstrating Newton's Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for demonstrating the second law of motion. Provides sample data and discusses the merits of this method over traditional methods of supplying a constant force. The method produces empirical best-fit lines which convincingly demonstrate that for a fixed mass, acceleration is proportional to force. (DDR)

  5. Demonstrating Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Stocker, Dennis; Gotti, Daniel; Urban, David; Ross, Howard; Sours, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A miniature drop tower, Reduced-Gravity Demonstrator is developed to illustrate the effects of gravity on a variety of phenomena including the way fluids flow, flames burn, and mechanical systems (such as pendulum) behave. A schematic and description of the demonstrator and payloads are given, followed by suggestions for how one can build his (her) own.

  6. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  7. Demonstrating Newton's Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricker, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for demonstrating the second law of motion. Provides sample data and discusses the merits of this method over traditional methods of supplying a constant force. The method produces empirical best-fit lines which convincingly demonstrate that for a fixed mass, acceleration is proportional to force. (DDR)

  8. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  9. Kinetics and Catalysis Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falconer, John L.; Britten, Jerald A.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven videotaped kinetics and catalysis demonstrations are described. Demonstrations include the clock reaction, oscillating reaction, hydrogen oxidation in air, hydrogen-oxygen explosion, acid-base properties of solids, high- and low-temperature zeolite reactivity, copper catalysis of ammonia oxidation and sodium peroxide decomposition, ammonia…

  10. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  11. USFWS demonstration fees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Jonathan; Vaske, Jerry; Donnelly, Maureen; Shelby, Lori

    2002-01-01

    This study examined National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) visitors' reactions to changes in fees implemented as part of the fee demonstration program. Visitors' evaluations of the fees paid were examined in addition to their beliefs about fees and the fee demonstration program, and the impact of fees paid on their intention to return. All results were analyzed relative to socio-demographic characteristics.

  12. A Stellar Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of the stellar demonstrator is to help explain the movement of stars. In particular, students have difficulties understanding why, if they are living in the Northern Hemisphere, they may observe starts in the Southern Hemisphere, or why circumpolar stars are not the same in different parts of Europe. Using the demonstrator, these…

  13. The Microgravity Demonstrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Wargo, Michael J.

    The Microgravity Demonstrator is a tool used to create microgravity conditions in the classroom. A series of demonstrations is used to provide a dramatically visual, physical connection between free-fall and microgravity conditions in order to understand why various types of experiments are performed under microgravity conditions. The manual is…

  14. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  15. Image feature localization by multiple hypothesis testing of Gabor features.

    PubMed

    Ilonen, Jarmo; Kamarainen, Joni-Kristian; Paalanen, Pekka; Hamouz, Miroslav; Kittler, Josef; Kälviäinen, Heikki

    2008-03-01

    Several novel and particularly successful object and object category detection and recognition methods based on image features, local descriptions of object appearance, have recently been proposed. The methods are based on a localization of image features and a spatial constellation search over the localized features. The accuracy and reliability of the methods depend on the success of both tasks: image feature localization and spatial constellation model search. In this paper, we present an improved algorithm for image feature localization. The method is based on complex-valued multi resolution Gabor features and their ranking using multiple hypothesis testing. The algorithm provides very accurate local image features over arbitrary scale and rotation. We discuss in detail issues such as selection of filter parameters, confidence measure, and the magnitude versus complex representation, and show on a large test sample how these influence the performance. The versatility and accuracy of the method is demonstrated on two profoundly different challenging problems (faces and license plates).

  16. Experimental verification of the effect of phase defect shape on ABI signal intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Noriaki; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Arisawa, Yukiyasu

    2014-04-01

    In this study, influence of geometric features of phase defect on EUV optical images, such as dark field images(ABI tool) and bright field images (Exposure tool), was studied with experiment and simulation. It is confirmed that ABI signal intensity has a direct relationship not only with defect volume but also with geometric features of the phase defect. A new method for the making of phase defect models for simulation purpose was attempted. With this new method, the simulated ABI signal intensity exhibited a good proportionality relationship with the experimentally obtained ABI signal intensity. This method is believed to be effective in the estimation of ABI signal intensity with simulation. These results lead to the conclusion that it is important to take into consideration the geometric features of phase defects when a relationship between ABI signal intensity and phase defect feature is to be examined. Also, the relationship between ABI signal intensity and impact of defect on wafer was studied with simulation. In this study, many geometric types of phase defects were used, and relationships between these defects and their impacts on wafers were studied. As a result, it was confirmed that the geometric features did not strongly affect the relationship between the ABI signal intensity and the defects' impacts on wafer however the ABI signal intensity is found to have a close relationship with impact of defect on wafer. These results lead to the conclusion that information about ABI signal intensity is important not only for the detection of phase defect but also for estimating the impact of phase defects on wafers.

  17. A graphical automated detection system to locate hardwood log surface defects using high-resolution three-dimensional laser scan data

    Treesearch

    Liya Thomas; R. Edward. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an automated defect detection system and a state-of-the-art Graphic User Interface (GUI) for hardwood logs. The algorithm identifies defects at least 0.5 inch high and at least 3 inches in diameter on barked hardwood log and stem surfaces. To summarize defect features and to build a knowledge base, hundreds of defects were measured, photographed, and...

  18. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  19. Thermal properties of defective fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the thermal conductivity of defective fullerene (C60) by using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) method. It is found that the thermal conductivity of C60 with one defect is lower than the thermal conductivity of perfect C60. However, double defects in C60 have either positive or negative influence on the thermal conductivity, which depends on the positions of the defects. The phonon spectra of perfect and defective C60 are also provided to give corresponding supports. Our results can be extended to long C60 chains, which is helpful for the thermal management of C60.

  20. Understanding of Defect Physics in Polycrystalline Photovoltaic Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.

    2011-07-01

    The performance of thin-film solar cells is influenced by the quality of interfaces and formation of defects such as point defects, stacking faults, twins, dislocations, and grain boundaries. It is important to understand the defect physics so that appropriate methods may be developed to suppress the formation of harmful defects. Here, we review our understanding of defect physics in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) materials such as Si, CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), Cu2ZnSnSe2 (CZTSe), and Cu2ZnSnS2 (CZTS) using the combination of nanoscale electron microscopy characterization and density-functional theory (DFT). Although these thin-film PV materials share the same basic structural feature - diamond structure based - the defect physics in them could be very different. Some defects, such as stacking faults and special twins, have similar electronic properties in these thin-film materials. However, some other defects, such as grain boundaries and interfaces, have very different electronic properties in these materials. For example, grain boundaries produce harmful deep levels in Si and CdTe, but they do not produce significant deep levels in CIGS, CZTSe, and CZTS. These explain why passivation is critical for Si and CdTe solar cells, but is less important in CIS and CZTS solar cells. We further provide understanding of the effects of interfaces on the performance of solar cells made of these PV materials.

  1. Defect detection for end surface of ferrite magnetic tile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiayuan; Wang, Yuwei; Wang, Keyi

    2016-09-01

    A visual automatic detection method is proposed for defect detection on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile to tackle the disadvantages generated by human work which has low efficiency and unstable accuracy. Because the defects on end surface of ferrite magnetic tile with dark colors and low contrasts are negative for defect detection, uniform illumination is provided by LED light source and a dedicated optical system is designed to extract defects conveniently. The approach uses comparison of the fitting and actual edge curves to detect defects mainly with most defects located on the edge. Firstly improved adaptive median filter is used as the image preprocessing. Subsequently the appropriate threshold is calculated by Otsu algorithm based on the extreme points in the gray-level histogram to segment the preprocessing image. Then the Sobel operator can be used to extract the edge of end surface precisely. Finally through comparing the ideal fitting and actual edge curves of end surface, to detect the defects with some relevant features. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme could detect defects on the end surface of ferrite magnetic tile efficiency and accurately with 93.33% accuracy rate, 2.30% false acceptance rate and 8.45% correct rejection rate.

  2. Effect of aberrations on defect printing and inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Paul D.; McCallum, Martin

    2002-07-01

    As we introduce alternating phase-shifting masks (altPSM) to production we have been very aware of our inability to detect quartz defects in the phase-shifted well. Much work has been completed to establish the printability of various defects. This paper will show, using rigorous three dimensional electro-magnetic simulation, that it is the effect upon the aerial image of the surrounding features and the resultant CD variation that is most critical, not the actual printing of the defects. Data will be presented showing that smaller defects in the center of the shifted space than at the edge of the space cause the allowable CD variation to be reached. It will also be shown that the most sensitive position for a quartz defect in a shifted space is not at the edge or center of the space, but rather at a point between these two. We will further present work showing that asymmetrical aberrations enhance the effects of these defects, especially at defocus, while symmetric aberrations reduce the effect. We will then use advanced techniques, that take into account the extra non-planar incident waves we must consider in 1X imaging, to establish how these defects are 'seen' by 1X actinic mask inspection systems. In 1X imaging we will show again how the transmitted aerial images of these defects are effected by the aberrations present.

  3. Topological Defects by Size Polydispersity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2014-03-01

    The engineering of defects in crystalline matter introduces entirely new physical properties of materials. The fascinating possible applications of defects, known as topological defects, provide great motivations to perform fundamental investigations to uncover their role on the physical properties of various systems. Here we investigate topological defects in size polydispersity on flat surfaces. Our simulations show that in polydispersed systems topological defects play the role of order-restoring. The perfect hexagonal lattice beyond a small defective region around the impurity particle is well protected. Moreover, size polydispersity is shown numerically here to be an essential ingredient to understand short-range attractions between like-charge disclinations. Our study suggests the promising potential of size polydispersity to engineer defects in real systems. We thank the support of the Office of the Secretary of Defense under the NSSEFF program award number FA9550-10-1-0167.

  4. High Defect Tolerance in Lead Halide Perovskite CsPbBr3.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2017-01-19

    The formation energies and charge-transition levels of intrinsic point defects in lead halide perovskite CsPbBr3 are studied from first-principles calculations. It is shown that the formation energy of dominant defect under Br-rich growth condition is much lower than that under moderate or Br-poor conditions. Thus avoiding the Br-rich condition can help to reduce the defect concentration. Interestingly, CsPbBr3 is found to be highly defect-tolerant in terms of its electronic structure. Most of the intrinsic defects induce shallow transition levels. Only a few defects with high formation energies can create deep transition levels. Therefore, CsPbBr3 can maintain its good electronic quality despite the presence of defects. Such defect tolerance feature can be attributed to the lacking of bonding-antibonding interaction between the conduction bands and valence bands.

  5. Defect-induced magnetism in neutron irradiated 6H-SiC single crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Gang; Wang, Shunchong; Yang, Jianhui; Chen, Liang; Qin, Xiubo; Song, Bo; Wang, Baoyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2011-02-25

    Defect-induced magnetism is firstly observed in neutron irradiated SiC single crystals. We demonstrated that the intentionally created defects dominated by divacancies (V(Si)V(C)) are responsible for the observed magnetism. First-principles calculations revealed that defect states favor the formation of local moments and the extended tails of defect wave functions make long-range spin couplings possible. Our results confirm the existence of defect-induced magnetism, implying the possibility of tuning the magnetism of wide band-gap semiconductors by defect engineering. © 2011 American Physical Society

  6. Characterization of Defects in Lumber Using Color, Shape, and Density Information

    Treesearch

    B.H. Bond; D. Earl Kline; Philip A. Araman

    1998-01-01

    To help guide the development of multi-sensor machine vision systems for defect detection in lumber, a fundamental understanding of wood defects is needed. The purpose of this research was to advance the basic understanding of defects in lumber by describing them in terms of parameters that can be derived from color and x-ray scanning technologies and to demonstrate...

  7. Skin Barrier Defects in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rachana; Woodfolk, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with complex etiology that is dependent upon interactions between the host and the environment. Acute skin lesions exhibit the features of a Th2-driven inflammatory disorder and many patients are highly atopic. The skin barrier plays key roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, and in preventing penetration of microbial products and allergens. Defects that compromise the structural integrity, or else the immune function of the skin barrier play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This article provides an overview of the array of molecular building blocks that are essential to maintaining healthy skin. The basis for structural defects in the skin is discussed in relation to AD, with an emphasis on filaggrin and its genetic underpinnings. Aspects of innate immunity, including the role of anti-microbial peptides and proteases are also discussed. PMID:24633617

  8. Skin barrier defects in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rachana; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2014-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with complex etiology that is dependent upon interactions between the host and the environment. Acute skin lesions exhibit the features of a Th2-driven inflammatory disorder, and many patients are highly atopic. The skin barrier plays key roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, and in preventing penetration of microbial products and allergens. Defects that compromise the structural integrity or else the immune function of the skin barrier play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This article provides an overview of the array of molecular building blocks that are essential to maintaining healthy skin. The basis for structural defects in the skin is discussed in relation to AD, with an emphasis on filaggrin and its genetic underpinnings. Aspects of innate immunity, including the role of antimicrobial peptides and proteases, are also discussed.

  9. Pulsed infrared thermography processing and defects edge detection using FCA and ACA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanlin, Liu; Qingju, Tang; Chiwu, Bu; Chen, Mei; Pingshan, Wang; Jiansuo, Zang

    2015-09-01

    CFRP sheet with delamination defects was detected using pulsed infrared thermography. The principle of polynomial fitting the derivative time algorithm (FDA) and related coefficient algorithm (RCA) was described. A new polynomial fitting the derivative time-related coefficient algorithm (FCA) was formed by combining FDA and RCA, which improves the signal to noise (SNR) of feature images, and is benefit for the detection and identification of defects. The defects edge identification procedure using ant colony algorithm (ACA) is given, and the defect edge features in the infrared image have been extracted using ACA effectively.

  10. METCAN demonstration manual, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-J.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1992-01-01

    The various features of the Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) computer program to simulate the high temperature nonlinear behavior of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites are demonstrated. Different problems are used to demonstrate various capabilities of METCAN for both static and cyclic analyses. A complete description of the METCAN output file is also included to help interpret results.

  11. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  12. Experimental Demonstrations in Teaching Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugerat, Muhamad; Basheer, Sobhi

    2001-01-01

    Presents demonstrations of chemical reactions by employing different features of various compounds that can be altered after a chemical change occurs. Experimental activities include para- and dia-magnetism in chemical reactions, aluminum reaction with base, reaction of acid with carbonates, use of electrochemical cells for demonstrating chemical…

  13. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  14. Overhead Projector Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambly, Gordon F.; Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a method of demonstrating the optical activity of glucose using an overhead projector and easily obtainable materials. Explores the difference between reflected and transmitted light (Tyndall Effect) using sodium thiosulfate, hydrochloric acid, and an overhead projector. (ML)

  15. Commissioning the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenqin; Majorana Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator deploys high purity germanium (HPGe) detector modules to search for neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay in 76Ge. The experiment is aimed at demonstrating the technical feasibility and low backgrounds for a next generation Ge-based BBz experiment. The program of testing and commissioning the Demonstrator modules is a critical step to debug and improve the experimental apparatus, to establish and refine operational procedures, and to develop data analysis tools. In this talk, we will discuss our experience commissioning the Demonstrator modules and show how this program leads to successful data-taking. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  16. EVA Retriever Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The EVA retriever is demonstrated in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF). The retriever moves on the air bearing table 'searching' for its target, in this case tools 'dropped' by astronauts on orbit.

  17. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  18. Floating Magnet Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Masayoshi

    1990-01-01

    A room-temperature demonstration of a floating magnet using a high-temperature superconductor is described. The setup and operation of the apparatus are described. The technical details of the effect are discussed. (CW)

  19. Classroom Demonstration of Sunspots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Thomas O.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    An overhead projector, projection screen, and clear tungsten Filament light bulb operated through a dimmer or variac switch are used to demonstrate the fact that black appearance of sunspots is due only to contrast and that sunspots are bright. (SK)

  20. Demonstrating Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, David S.; Amundson, John C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes laboratory exercises with chickens selecting their food from dyed and natural corn kernels as a method of demonstrating natural selection. The procedure is based on the fact that organisms that blend into their surroundings escape predation. (BR)