Science.gov

Sample records for features hipertransparencia toracica

  1. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  2. Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-28

      Vertical Feature Mask Feature Classification Flag Extraction This routine demonstrates extraction of the ... in a CALIPSO Lidar Level 2 Vertical Feature Mask feature classification flag value. It is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) ...

  3. Adaptive feature extraction expert

    SciTech Connect

    Yuschik, M.

    1983-01-01

    The identification of discriminatory features places an upper bound on the recognition rate of any automatic speech recognition (ASR) system. One way to structure the extraction of features is to construct an expert system which applies a set of rules to identify particular properties of the speech patterns. However, these patterns vary for an individual speaker and from speaker to speaker so that another expert is actually needed to learn the new variations. The author investigates the problem by using sets of discriminatory features that are suggested by a feature generation expert, improves the selectivity of these features with a training expert, and finally develops a minimally spanning feature set with a statistical selection expert. 12 references.

  4. Defeating feature fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rust, Roland T; Thompson, Debora Viana; Hamilton, Rebecca W

    2006-02-01

    Consider a coffeemaker that offers 12 drink options, a car with more than 700 features on the dashboard, and a mouse pad that's also a clock, calculator, and FM radio. All are examples of "feature bloat", or "featuritis", the result of an almost irresistible temptation to load products with lots of bells and whistles. The problem is that the more features a product boasts, the harder it is to use. Manufacturers that increase a product's capability--the number of useful functions it can perform--at the expense of its usability are exposing their customers to feature fatigue. The authors have conducted three studies to gain a better understanding of how consumers weigh a product's capability relative to its usability. They found that even though consumers know that products with more features are harder to use, they initially choose high-feature models. They also pile on more features when given the chance to customize a product for their needs. Once consumers have actually worked with a product, however, usability starts to matter more to them than capability. For managers in consumer products companies, these findings present a dilemma: Should they maximize initial sales by designing high-feature models, which consumers consistently choose, or should they limit the number of features in order to enhance the lifetime value of their customers? The authors' analytical model guides companies toward a happy middle ground: maximizing the net present value of the typical customer's profit stream. The authors also advise companies to build simpler products, help consumers learn which products suit their needs, develop products that do one thing very well, and design market research in which consumers use actual products or prototypes.

  5. Time Varying Feature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex

  6. New features in MEDM.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K., Jr.

    1999-04-13

    MEDM, which is derived from Motif Editor and Display Manager, is the primary graphical interface to the EPICS control system. This paper describes new features that have been added to MEDM in the last two years. These features include new editing capabilities, a PV Info dialog box, a means of specifying limits and precision, a new implementation of the Cartesian Plot, new features for several objects, new capability for the Related Display, help, a user-configurable Execute Menu, reconfigured start-up options, and availability for Windows 95/98/NT. Over one hundred bugs have been fixed, and the program is quite stable and in extensive use.

  7. Feature selection in bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lipo

    2012-06-01

    In bioinformatics, there are often a large number of input features. For example, there are millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are genetic variations which determine the dierence between any two unrelated individuals. In microarrays, thousands of genes can be proled in each test. It is important to nd out which input features (e.g., SNPs or genes) are useful in classication of a certain group of people or diagnosis of a given disease. In this paper, we investigate some powerful feature selection techniques and apply them to problems in bioinformatics. We are able to identify a very small number of input features sucient for tasks at hand and we demonstrate this with some real-world data.

  8. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Feature Characterization Library

    2006-08-03

    FCLib is a data analysis toolkit constructed to meet the needs of data discovery in large-scale, spatio-temporal data such as finite element simulation data. FCLib is a C library toolkit of building blocks that can be assembled into complex analyses. Important features of FCLib include the following: (1) Support of feature-based analysis, (2) minimization of low-oevel processing, (3) ease of use, and (4) applicable to the wide variety of science domains.

  10. Cryovolcanic Features on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Kirk, R. L.; Mitchell, K. L.; LeGall, A.; Barnes, J. W.; Hayes, A.; Kargel, J.; Radebaugh, J.; Janssen, M. A.; Neish, C. D.; Wood, C.; Wall, S. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Malaska, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We present evidence to support the cryovolcanic origin of some features, which includes the deepest pit known on Titan (Sotra Patera) and some of the highest mountains (Doom and Erebor Montes). We interpret this region to be a cryovolcanic complex of multiple cones, craters, and flows. Elsewhere, a circular feature, approximately 100 km across, is morphologically similar to a laccolith, showing a cross pattern interpreted to be extensional fractures. However, we find that some other previously supposed cryovolcanic features were likely formed by other processes. We discuss implications for eruption style and composition of cryovolcanism on Titan. Our analysis shows the great value of combining data sets when interpreting Titan's geology and in particular stresses the value of topographic data.

  11. Three featured plenary sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    The conference included three plenary sessions. The plenary on Governance, Security, Economy, and the Ecosystem of the Changing Arctic featured Vera Alexander, president, Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.; Alan Thornhill, chief environmental officer, U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; and Fran Ulmer, chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission. A plenary on the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea featured Ambassador David Balton, deputy assistant secretary for oceans and fisheries, U.S. Department of State; and Rear Admiral Frederick Kenney Jr., judge advocate general and chief counsel, U.S. Coast Guard. The plenary on Science and the 21st Century featured Phil Keslin, chief technology officer, small lab within Google.

  12. Substation fire protection features

    SciTech Connect

    Hausheer, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes Commonwealth Edison`s (ComEd) approach to substation fire protection. Substation fires can have a major operational, financial, as well as political impact on a utility. The overall Company philosophy encompasses both active and passive fire protection features to provide prompt detection, notification, and confinement of fire and its by-products. Conservatively designed smoke detection systems and floor and wall penetration seals form the backbone of this strategy. The Company has implemented a program to install these features in new and existing substations. Thus far these measures have been successful in mitigating the consequences of substation fires.

  13. Escalator design features evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Deshpande, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Escalators are available with design features such as dual speed (90 and 120 fpm), mat operation and flat steps. These design features were evaluated based on the impact of each on capital and operating costs, traffic flow, and safety. A human factors engineering model was developed to analyze the need for flat steps at various speeds. Mat operation of escalators was found to be cost effective in terms of energy savings. Dual speed operation of escalators with the higher speed used during peak hours allows for efficient operation. A minimum number of flat steps required as a function of escalator speed was developed to ensure safety for the elderly.

  14. Integrated Education. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Jennifer, Ed.; Vandercook, Terri, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This "feature issue" provides various perspectives on a number of integrated education topics, including successful integration practices and strategies, the changing roles of teachers, the appropriate role of research, the history and future of integrated education, and the realization of dreams of life in the mainstream for children with severe…

  15. Searchable solar feature catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Aboudarham, J.; Zharkov, S.; Ipson, S. S.; Benkhalil, A. K.; Fuller, N.

    The searchable Solar Feature Catalogues (SFCs) are developed from digitized solar images using automated pattern recognition techniques. The techniques were applied for the detection of sunspots, active regions, filaments and line-of-sight magnetic neutral lines in automatically standardized full disk solar images in Ca II K1, Ca II K3 and Ha lines taken at the Paris-Meudon Observatory and white light images and magnetograms from SOHO/MDI. The results of the automated recognition were verified with manual synoptic maps and available statistical data that revealed good detection accuracy. Based on the recognized parameters, a structured database of Solar Feature Catalogues was built on a MySQL server for every feature and published with various pre-designed search pages on the Bradford University web site http://www.cyber.brad.ac.uk/egso/SFC/. The SFCs with nine year coverage (1996-2004) is to be used for deeper investigation of the feature classification and solar activity forecast.

  16. Assistive Technologies, Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wobschall, Rachel, Ed.; Lakin, Charlie, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This feature issue of a newsletter on community integration of individuals with developmental disabilities considers the role of assistive technologies. It describes efforts to utilize consumer direction, public policy, creativity, energy, and professional know-how in the pursuit of technology-based opportunities to enhance community inclusion,…

  17. Main features of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 17, outlines the main features of meiosis, beginning with its significance and proceeding through the meiotic stages. Meiosis is the most important modification of mitosis because it is the reduction division that gives rise to the haploid generation in the life cycle. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  19. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  20. North Polar Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows banded terrain of the north polar region of Mars. The bands are exposures of layered material, possibly composed of dust and ice. The dark, rounded to elliptical mounds in this image might be the locations of ancient sand dunes that were completely buried in the north polar layered material. In more recent times, these mounds have been exhumed from within the layered material. Alternatively, the dark features are not ancient, exhumed dunes, but perhaps the remnants of a dark layer of material that once covered the entire area shown in the image. These features are located near 79.9oN, 31.4oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Isidis Planitia Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the most typical features of Isidis Planitia at full (1.5 meters -- 5 feet -- per pixel) resolution. The typical features are: (1) light-toned, ripple-like dunes and (2) mounds with summit pits. The dunes are formed by wind. The double-cone feature in the lower right quarter of the image is similar to many mounds and chains of mounds or cones found all across Isidis Planitia. These were seen at lower resolution in Viking orbiter images in the 1970s and were generally considered to be either small volcanoes or ice-cored mounds known as pingoes. With high resolution MOC images, it became apparent that many of these mounds may simply be the remnants of crater and pit chain floors, elevated above the surrounding plains as the layers of rock into which they formed were stripped away. Like much of Mars, there are more questions than answers. This image is located near 8.6oN, 268.2oW, and covers an area about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  2. Ceraunius Tholus Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    11 December 2004 Today's Mars Picture of the Day features two images. The top picture is a mosaic of Viking orbiter images acquired in the late 1970s. The lower image is a high resolution picture from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The Viking mosaic shows Ceraunius Tholus, a volcano in the Tharsis region that was first viewed in images obtained by Mariner 9 in 1972. Several channels run down the slope of the Ceraunius Tholus volcano. The deepest of those channels ends in an elliptical crater. The elliptical crater was formed by a very oblique meteor impact. Where the channel meets the floor of the elliptical crater, there is a small mound of material. Presumably, this material was deposited in the elliptical crater after running down through the channel on the volcano's northwest flank.

    Near the top/center of the mound in the elliptical crater is a small, circular depression. Some have speculated for years that this depression is related to volcanism, others thought that it may be an impact crater. The MGS MOC image (lower of the two images) shows that crater. It is not the source of lava flows or any other volcanic features. Most likely, it is an old impact crater. This feature is located near 25.2oN, 97.7oW. The MOC image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  3. Feature extraction through LOCOCODE.

    PubMed

    Hochreiter, S; Schmidhuber, J

    1999-04-01

    Low-complexity coding and decoding (LOCOCODE) is a novel approach to sensory coding and unsupervised learning. Unlike previous methods, it explicitly takes into account the information-theoretic complexity of the code generator. It computes lococodes that convey information about the input data and can be computed and decoded by low-complexity mappings. We implement LOCOCODE by training autoassociators with flat minimum search, a recent, general method for discovering low-complexity neural nets. It turns out that this approach can unmix an unknown number of independent data sources by extracting a minimal number of low-complexity features necessary for representing the data. Experiments show that unlike codes obtained with standard autoencoders, lococodes are based on feature detectors, never unstructured, usually sparse, and sometimes factorial or local (depending on statistical properties of the data). Although LOCOCODE is not explicitly designed to enforce sparse or factorial codes, it extracts optimal codes for difficult versions of the "bars" benchmark problem, whereas independent component analysis (ICA) and principal component analysis (PCA) do not. It produces familiar, biologically plausible feature detectors when applied to real-world images and codes with fewer bits per pixel than ICA and PCA. Unlike ICA, it does not need to know the number of independent sources. As a preprocessor for a vowel recognition benchmark problem, it sets the stage for excellent classification performance. Our results reveal an interesting, previously ignored connection between two important fields: regularizer research and ICA-related research. They may represent a first step toward unification of regularization and unsupervised learning.

  4. Features of MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorley, T.; James, M.; Booth, T.; Brown, F.; Bull, J.; Cox, L. J.; Durkee, J.; Elson, J.; Fensin, M.; Forster, R. A.; Hendricks, J.; Hughes, H. G.; Johns, R.; Kiedrowski, B.; Martz, R.; Mashnik, S.; McKinney, G.; Pelowitz, D.; Prael, R.; Sweezy, J.; Waters, L.; Wilcox, T.; Zukaitis, T.

    2014-06-01

    MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, but it is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of six years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in Los Alamos National Laboratory's X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3) and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Radiation Transport Modeling Team (NEN-5) respectively, have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and major bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 1.60 and MCNPX 2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities only will be developed and released in MCNP6. In fact, the initial release of MCNP6 contains numerous new features not previously found in either code. These new features are summarized in this document. Packaged with MCNP6 is also the new production release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data files usable by MCNP. The high quality of the overall merged code, usefulness of these new features, along with the desire in the user community to start using the merged code, have led us to make the first MCNP6 production release: MCNP6 version 1. High confidence in the MCNP6 code is based on its performance with the verification and validation test suites, comparisons to its predecessor codes, our automated nightly software debugger tests, the underlying high quality nuclear and atomic databases, and significant testing by many beta testers.

  5. Onychomatricoma with misleading features.

    PubMed

    Fayol, J; Baran, R; Perrin, C; Labrousse, F

    2000-01-01

    Onychomatricoma is a rare tumour of the nail matrix with peculiar clinical and histological features and electron microscopic findings. We report on 5 cases with appearances which were misleading. Three presented as longitudinal melanonychia, a previously unreported observation. One case had the appearance of a cutaneous horn. In 3 of the 5 cases the tumour was associated with an onychomycosis and this may thus have been a predisposing factor in the secondary fungal infestation. Onychomatricoma appears as a multi-faceted tumour which can be mimicked by longitudinal melanonychia and/or onychomycosis. PMID:11200837

  6. qFeature

    2015-09-14

    This package contains statistical routines for extracting features from multivariate time-series data which can then be used for subsequent multivariate statistical analysis to identify patterns and anomalous behavior. It calculates local linear or quadratic regression model fits to moving windows for each series and then summarizes the model coefficients across user-defined time intervals for each series. These methods are domain agnostic—but they have been successfully applied to a variety of domains, including commercial aviation andmore » electric power grid data.« less

  7. qFeature

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-14

    This package contains statistical routines for extracting features from multivariate time-series data which can then be used for subsequent multivariate statistical analysis to identify patterns and anomalous behavior. It calculates local linear or quadratic regression model fits to moving windows for each series and then summarizes the model coefficients across user-defined time intervals for each series. These methods are domain agnostic—but they have been successfully applied to a variety of domains, including commercial aviation and electric power grid data.

  8. Recursive Feature Extraction in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-14

    ReFeX extracts recursive topological features from graph data. The input is a graph as a csv file and the output is a csv file containing feature values for each node in the graph. The features are based on topological counts in the neighborhoods of each nodes, as well as recursive summaries of neighbors' features.

  9. Feature Engineering for Drug Name Recognition in Biomedical Texts: Feature Conjunction and Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shengyu; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Drug name recognition (DNR) is a critical step for drug information extraction. Machine learning-based methods have been widely used for DNR with various types of features such as part-of-speech, word shape, and dictionary feature. Features used in current machine learning-based methods are usually singleton features which may be due to explosive features and a large number of noisy features when singleton features are combined into conjunction features. However, singleton features that can only capture one linguistic characteristic of a word are not sufficient to describe the information for DNR when multiple characteristics should be considered. In this study, we explore feature conjunction and feature selection for DNR, which have never been reported. We intuitively select 8 types of singleton features and combine them into conjunction features in two ways. Then, Chi-square, mutual information, and information gain are used to mine effective features. Experimental results show that feature conjunction and feature selection can improve the performance of the DNR system with a moderate number of features and our DNR system significantly outperforms the best system in the DDIExtraction 2013 challenge. PMID:25861377

  10. Feature engineering for drug name recognition in biomedical texts: feature conjunction and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Drug name recognition (DNR) is a critical step for drug information extraction. Machine learning-based methods have been widely used for DNR with various types of features such as part-of-speech, word shape, and dictionary feature. Features used in current machine learning-based methods are usually singleton features which may be due to explosive features and a large number of noisy features when singleton features are combined into conjunction features. However, singleton features that can only capture one linguistic characteristic of a word are not sufficient to describe the information for DNR when multiple characteristics should be considered. In this study, we explore feature conjunction and feature selection for DNR, which have never been reported. We intuitively select 8 types of singleton features and combine them into conjunction features in two ways. Then, Chi-square, mutual information, and information gain are used to mine effective features. Experimental results show that feature conjunction and feature selection can improve the performance of the DNR system with a moderate number of features and our DNR system significantly outperforms the best system in the DDIExtraction 2013 challenge.

  11. Dynamic features of combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic features of combustion are discussed for four important cases: ignition, inflammation, explosion, and detonation. Ignition, the initiation of a self-sustained exothermic process, is considered in the simplest case of a closed thermodynamic system and its stochastic distribution. Inflammation, the initiation and propagation of self-sustained flames, is presented for turbulent flow. Explosion, the dynamic effects caused by the deposition of exothermic energy in a compressible medium, is illustrated by self-similar blast waves with energy deposition at the front and the adiabatic non-self-similar wave. Detonation, the most comprehensive illustration of all the dynamic effects of combustion, is discussed with a phenomenological account of the development and structure of the wave.

  12. New microbiological features.

    PubMed

    Lee, A

    1995-04-01

    Recent developments in the microbiology of Helicobacter pylori have aimed to improve our understanding of the organism in order to define better methods of diagnosis and cure, and to explore possible methods of prevention. Investigations of the basic biochemistry of the bacterium have revealed many interesting physiological anomalies including characteristics of a eukaryotic parasite rather than a bacterium. The latest in a growing list of adhesins to be identified shows specificity for the Lewis b antigen, possibly providing an explanation for the postulated link between blood group and peptic ulceration. However, there are many contradictory features in the H. pylori adhesin story in urgent need of resolution. The search for the ulcerogenic strain has revealed only one possible candidate to date, the cagA phenotype, which appears to be inflammatory. Recently, the cloning frenzy has resulted in the sequencing of a multitude of putative virulence factors, the challenge now is to prove their importance in relevant animal models. PMID:7600134

  13. A prototype feature system for feature retrieval using relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Usery, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    Using a feature data model, geographic phenomena can be represented effectively by integrating space, theme, and time. This paper extends and implements a feature data model that supports query and visualization of geographic features using their non-spatial and temporal relationships. A prototype feature-oriented geographic information system (FOGIS) is then developed and storage of features named Feature Database is designed. Buildings from the U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina and subways in Chicago, Illinois are used to test the developed system. The results of the applications show the strength of the feature data model and the developed system 'FOGIS' when they utilize non-spatial and temporal relationships in order to retrieve and visualize individual features.

  14. Approximately Independent Features of Languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Eric W.

    To facilitate the testing of models for the evolution of languages, the present paper offers a set of linguistic features that are approximately independent of each other. To find these features, the adjusted Rand index (R‧) is used to estimate the degree of pairwise relationship among 130 linguistic features in a large published database. Many of the R‧ values prove to be near zero, as predicted for independent features, and a subset of 47 features is found with an average R‧ of -0.0001. These 47 features are recommended for use in statistical tests that require independent units of analysis.

  15. Genetic Features of Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Studies Publications Lab Staff Contact Info Links Genetic Features Quick Navigation Introduction X-monosomy X-mosaicism ... Figure 3. X Chromosome Abnormalities Figure 4. Mosaicism Genetic Features of Turner Syndrome Turner syndrome is a ...

  16. Image feature localization by multiple hypothesis testing of Gabor features.

    PubMed

    Ilonen, Jarmo; Kamarainen, Joni-Kristian; Paalanen, Pekka; Hamouz, Miroslav; Kittler, Josef; Kälviäinen, Heikki

    2008-03-01

    Several novel and particularly successful object and object category detection and recognition methods based on image features, local descriptions of object appearance, have recently been proposed. The methods are based on a localization of image features and a spatial constellation search over the localized features. The accuracy and reliability of the methods depend on the success of both tasks: image feature localization and spatial constellation model search. In this paper, we present an improved algorithm for image feature localization. The method is based on complex-valued multi resolution Gabor features and their ranking using multiple hypothesis testing. The algorithm provides very accurate local image features over arbitrary scale and rotation. We discuss in detail issues such as selection of filter parameters, confidence measure, and the magnitude versus complex representation, and show on a large test sample how these influence the performance. The versatility and accuracy of the method is demonstrated on two profoundly different challenging problems (faces and license plates).

  17. Feature Inference Learning and Eyetracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehder, Bob; Colner, Robert M.; Hoffman, Aaron B.

    2009-01-01

    Besides traditional supervised classification learning, people can learn categories by inferring the missing features of category members. It has been proposed that feature inference learning promotes learning a category's internal structure (e.g., its typical features and interfeature correlations) whereas classification promotes the learning of…

  18. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  19. Clinical features of actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Simon; Catroux, Mélanie; Melenotte, Cléa; Karkowski, Ludovic; Rolland, Ludivine; Trouillier, Sébastien; Raffray, Loic

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Actinomycosis is a rare heterogeneous anaerobic infection with misleading clinical presentations that delay diagnosis. A significant number of misdiagnosed cases have been reported in specific localizations, but studies including various forms of actinomycosis have rarely been published. We performed a multicenter retrospective chart review of laboratory-confirmed actinomycosis cases from January 2000 until January 2014. We described clinical characteristics, diagnostic procedures, differential diagnosis, and management of actinomycosis of clinical significance. Twenty-eight patients were included from 6 hospitals in France. Disease was diagnosed predominately in the abdomen/pelvis (n = 9), orocervicofacial (n = 5), cardiothoracic (n = 5), skeletal (n = 3), hematogenous (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 2), and intracranially (n = 1). Four patients (14%) were immunocompromised. In most cases (92 %), the diagnosis of actinomycosis was not suspected on admission, as clinical features were not specific. Diagnosis was obtained from either microbiology (50%, n = 14) or histopathology (42%, n = 12), or from both methods (7%, n = 2). Surgical biopsy was needed for definite diagnosis in 71% of cases (n = 20). Coinfection was found in 13 patients (46%), among which 3 patients were diagnosed from histologic criteria only. Two-thirds of patients were treated with amoxicillin. Median duration of antibiotics was 120 days (interquartile range 60–180), whereas the median follow-up time was 12 months (interquartile range 5.25–18). Two patients died. This study highlights the distinct and miscellaneous patterns of actinomycosis to prompt accurate diagnosis and earlier treatments, thus improving the outcome. Surgical biopsy should be performed when possible while raising histologist's and microbiologist's awareness of possible actinomycosis to enhance the chance of diagnosis and use specific molecular methods. PMID:27311002

  20. Musculoskeletal mnemonics: differentiating features.

    PubMed

    Currie, Jonathan W; Davis, Kirkland W; Lafita, Vaishali S; Blankenbaker, Donna G; De Smet, Arthur A; Rosas, Humberto; Lee, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    Mnemonics are often used in musculoskeletal radiology to help radiologists remember long differential diagnoses. However, unless the specific appearance of each entity on a differential is also recalled, mnemonics become useless. This article presents 8 mnemonics with their corresponding differential diagnoses and distinguishing features. Bubbly lucent lesions of bone are recalled with the FEGNOMASHIC mnemonic, but when only lucent lesions of the diaphysis are included, a more appropriate mnemonic is FEMALE. The lucent lesions of bone differentials often can be narrowed based on specific characteristics of the lesion but radiographic findings elsewhere and clinical information often help. Osseous metastases may present as lucent or sclerotic lesions; when sclerotic, the differential is best remembered with the mnemonic 5 "BEES" Like Pollen. The mnemonic for Wormian bones is PORKCHOPS. The Wormian bones in most of these entities are indistinguishable, so one must rely on radiographic findings outside the skull for diagnosis. By contrast, differentiating causes of acro-osteolysis is often possible with findings seen only on the hand radiographs; the mnemonic for acro-osteolysis is RADSHIP. In skeletally immature patients with frayed metaphyses, the mnemonic is CHARMS. Although the appearance of the fraying is seldom diagnostic, findings in the adjacent portions of the long bones may be characteristic. FETISH is the mnemonic used to remember the entities for the differential diagnosis of vertebra plana. Age of the patient, clinical history, and findings in the adjacent spine often help to provide the specific diagnosis. Nearly all the entities on the differential diagnosis for distal clavicle erosion (mnemonic: SHIRT Pocket) are included in other differentials in this article. PMID:21266270

  1. Confidence-Based Feature Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; desJardins, Marie; MacGlashan, James

    2010-01-01

    Confidence-based Feature Acquisition (CFA) is a novel, supervised learning method for acquiring missing feature values when there is missing data at both training (learning) and test (deployment) time. To train a machine learning classifier, data is encoded with a series of input features describing each item. In some applications, the training data may have missing values for some of the features, which can be acquired at a given cost. A relevant JPL example is that of the Mars rover exploration in which the features are obtained from a variety of different instruments, with different power consumption and integration time costs. The challenge is to decide which features will lead to increased classification performance and are therefore worth acquiring (paying the cost). To solve this problem, CFA, which is made up of two algorithms (CFA-train and CFA-predict), has been designed to greedily minimize total acquisition cost (during training and testing) while aiming for a specific accuracy level (specified as a confidence threshold). With this method, it is assumed that there is a nonempty subset of features that are free; that is, every instance in the data set includes these features initially for zero cost. It is also assumed that the feature acquisition (FA) cost associated with each feature is known in advance, and that the FA cost for a given feature is the same for all instances. Finally, CFA requires that the base-level classifiers produce not only a classification, but also a confidence (or posterior probability).

  2. Feature++: Automatic Feature Construction for Clinical Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Hao, Bibo; Yu, Yiqin; Li, Jing; Hu, Gang; Xie, Guotong

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid growth of clinical data and knowledge, feature construction for clinical analysis becomes increasingly important and challenging. Given a clinical dataset with up to hundreds or thousands of columns, the traditional manual feature construction process is usually too labour intensive to generate a full spectrum of features with potential values. As a result, advanced large-scale data analysis technologies, such as feature selection for predictive modelling, cannot be fully utilized for clinical data analysis. In this paper, we propose an automatic feature construction framework for clinical data analysis, namely, Feature++. It leverages available public knowledge to understand the semantics of the clinical data, and is able to integrate external data sources to automatically construct new features based on predefined rules and clinical knowledge. We demonstrate the effectiveness of Feature++ in a typical predictive modelling use case with a public clinical dataset, and the results suggest that the proposed approach is able to fulfil typical feature construction tasks with minimal dataset specific configurations, so that more accurate models can be obtained from various clinical datasets in a more efficient way. PMID:27577443

  3. Webcam classification using simple features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramoun, Thitiporn; Choe, Jeehyun; Li, He; Chen, Qingshuang; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat; Lu, Yung-Hsiang; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Thousands of sensors are connected to the Internet and many of these sensors are cameras. The "Internet of Things" will contain many "things" that are image sensors. This vast network of distributed cameras (i.e. web cams) will continue to exponentially grow. In this paper we examine simple methods to classify an image from a web cam as "indoor/outdoor" and having "people/no people" based on simple features. We use four types of image features to classify an image as indoor/outdoor: color, edge, line, and text. To classify an image as having people/no people we use HOG and texture features. The features are weighted based on their significance and combined. A support vector machine is used for classification. Our system with feature weighting and feature combination yields 95.5% accuracy.

  4. Complex Topographic Feature Ontology Patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia E.; Jerris, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Semantic ontologies are examined as effective data models for the representation of complex topographic feature types. Complex feature types are viewed as integrated relations between basic features for a basic purpose. In the context of topographic science, such component assemblages are supported by resource systems and found on the local landscape. Ontologies are organized within six thematic modules of a domain ontology called Topography that includes within its sphere basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Context is constructed not only as a spatial and temporal setting, but a setting also based on environmental processes. Types of spatial relations that exist between components include location, generative processes, and description. An example is offered in a complex feature type ‘mine.’ The identification and extraction of complex feature types are an area for future research.

  5. Boosting Shift-Invariant Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörnlein, Thomas; Jähne, Bernd

    This work presents a novel method for training shift-invariant features using a Boosting framework. Features performing local convolutions followed by subsampling are used to achieve shift-invariance. Other systems using this type of features, e.g. Convolutional Neural Networks, use complex feed-forward networks with multiple layers. In contrast, the proposed system adds features one at a time using smoothing spline base classifiers. Feature training optimizes base classifier costs. Boosting sample-reweighting ensures features to be both descriptive and independent. Our system has a lower number of design parameters as comparable systems, so adapting the system to new problems is simple. Also, the stage-wise training makes it very scalable. Experimental results show the competitiveness of our approach.

  6. FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, ARMCO HUT (FEATURE 4) IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE 3, LARGE GUN POSITION, ARMCO HUT (FEATURE 4) IN BACKGROUND, VIEW FACING NORTH. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Anti-Aircraft Battery Complex-Large Gun Position, East of Coral Sea Road, northwest of Hamilton Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Spatial features register: toward standardization of spatial features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cascio, Janette

    1994-01-01

    As the need to share spatial data increases, more than agreement on a common format is needed to ensure that the data is meaningful to both the importer and the exporter. Effective data transfer also requires common definitions of spatial features. To achieve this, part 2 of the Spatial Data Transfer Standard (SDTS) provides a model for a spatial features data content specification and a glossary of features and attributes that fit this model. The model provides a foundation for standardizing spatial features. The glossary now contains only a limited subset of hydrographic and topographic features. For it to be useful, terms and definitions must be included for other categories, such as base cartographic, bathymetric, cadastral, cultural and demographic, geodetic, geologic, ground transportation, international boundaries, soils, vegetation, water, and wetlands, and the set of hydrographic and topographic features must be expanded. This paper will review the philosophy of the SDTS part 2 and the current plans for creating a national spatial features register as one mechanism for maintaining part 2.

  8. Transfer Learning across Feature-Rich Heterogeneous Feature Spaces via Feature-Space Remapping (FSR)

    PubMed Central

    Feuz, Kyle D.; Cook, Diane J.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer learning aims to improve performance on a target task by utilizing previous knowledge learned from source tasks. In this paper we introduce a novel heterogeneous transfer learning technique, Feature- Space Remapping (FSR), which transfers knowledge between domains with different feature spaces. This is accomplished without requiring typical feature-feature, feature instance, or instance-instance co-occurrence data. Instead we relate features in different feature-spaces through the construction of meta-features. We show how these techniques can utilize multiple source datasets to construct an ensemble learner which further improves performance. We apply FSR to an activity recognition problem and a document classification problem. The ensemble technique is able to outperform all other baselines and even performs better than a classifier trained using a large amount of labeled data in the target domain. These problems are especially difficult because in addition to having different feature-spaces, the marginal probability distributions and the class labels are also different. This work extends the state of the art in transfer learning by considering large transfer across dramatically different spaces. PMID:27019767

  9. Nonlinear features for product inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukder, Ashit; Casasent, David P.

    1999-03-01

    Classification of real-time X-ray images of randomly oriented touching pistachio nuts is discussed. The ultimate objective is the development of a system for automated non-invasive detection of defective product items on a conveyor belt. We discuss the extraction of new features that allow better discrimination between damaged and clean items (pistachio nuts). This feature extraction and classification stage is the new aspect of this paper; our new maximum representation and discriminating feature (MRDF) extraction method computes nonlinear features that are used as inputs to a new modified k nearest neighbor classifier. In this work, the MRDF is applied to standard features (rather than iconic data). The MRDF is robust to various probability distributions of the input class and is shown to provide good classification and new ROC (receiver operating characteristic) data.

  10. The Enigmatic Thirteen Micron Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Queiroz e Souza, Nelson

    Low and intermediate mass stars (0.8--8 solar masses) will eventually evolve into Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and pulsate out their atmosphere into the space around them. That ejected material will eventually cool and form dust. Understanding the nature and formation of cosmic dust is crucial to understanding the Universe. Evolved intermediate mass stars (i.e. AGB stars) are major contributors of dust to the cosmos. Dust around AGB stars are studied by means of infrared spectroscopy from which we observe several interesting spectral features. The observed AGB star spectra have been classified according to their shapes and wavelength positions of the dust features. Alongside the main spectral features around 8-12mum, there is an enigmatic 13mum feature that appears in about half the oxygen-rich AGB stars. The carrier of this feature has not yet been unequivocally identified but has been attributed to various dust species, including corundum (crystalline Al2O3), spinel (MgAl2O4), and silica (SiO2). While there have been several attempts to determine the cause of this 13mum feature, previous studies have been somewhat contradictory. In order to investigate the origin and characteristics of this spectral feature we observe variations in the 13mum feature over varying stellar parameters. We have also acquired spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of nearby O-rich AGB stars using Michelle on Gemini North. Here we present data on the 13mum feature strength mapped over space around their respective AGB star. The most popular hypothesis for the carrier of the 13mm feature is not supported by our findings.

  11. Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Shi Changxu, former vice-president of NSFC wins Top Prize of National Science and Technology Award of China Both China and the world materials community have greatly benefitted from his service, by RPH Chang Shi Changxu—a great teacher and mentor for materials scientists, by Gaoqing Max Lu A bright example for all of us—Professor Shi Changxu, by Wei Gao Professor Shi Changxu—The Giant Materials Scientist of China, by Wuzong Zhou Congratulations to Academician Changxu Shi on the Occasion of His Winning the 2010 Chinese Science & Technology Grand Prize, by Ju Li, Kai Chen, Zhiwei Shan, Guanjun Qiao, Jun Sun and Evan Ma Materials—the foundation for technology revolutions, by Zhong Lin Wang

  12. Feature enhancement and phonological acquisition.

    PubMed

    Yavas, M

    1997-01-01

    Distinctive features have been part of clinical work in phonological assessment and therapy. In almost all studies the set of features used was the Chomsky and Halle system. Stevens and Keyser (1989) offer a new look at distinctive features from the dimension of perceptual saliency, and account for the markedness relationship between segments. This paper explores to what extent it is possible to account for the substitution patterns in child phonologies based on the concepts of feature hierarchy, enhancement, and perceptual saliency as proposed by Stevens and Keyser. Concentrating on the consonantal substitutions in normal and disordered child speech, an attempt is made to distinguish between normal and unusual/idiosyncratic processes. Implications for assessment are discussed. PMID:21271756

  13. Solar Feature Catalogues In Egso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Aboudarham, J.; Zharkov, S.; Ipson, S. S.; Benkhalil, A. K.; Fuller, N.

    2005-05-01

    The Solar Feature Catalogues (SFCs) are created from digitized solar images using automated pattern recognition techniques developed in the European Grid of Solar Observation (EGSO) project. The techniques were applied for detection of sunspots, active regions and filaments in the automatically standardized full-disk solar images in Caii K1, Caii K3 and Hα taken at the Meudon Observatory and white-light images and magnetograms from SOHO/MDI. The results of automated recognition are verified with the manual synoptic maps and available statistical data from other observatories that revealed high detection accuracy. A structured database of the Solar Feature Catalogues is built on the MySQL server for every feature from their recognized parameters and cross-referenced to the original observations. The SFCs are published on the Bradford University web site http://www.cyber.brad.ac.uk/egso/SFC/ with the pre-designed web pages for a search by time, size and location. The SFCs with 9 year coverage (1996 2004) provide any possible information that can be extracted from full disk digital solar images. Thus information can be used for deeper investigation of the feature origin and association with other features for their automated classification and solar activity forecast.

  14. Biomarker Identification by Feature Wrappers

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Momiao; Fang, Xiangzhong; Zhao, Jinying

    2001-01-01

    Gene expression studies bridge the gap between DNA information and trait information by dissecting biochemical pathways into intermediate components between genotype and phenotype. These studies open new avenues for identifying complex disease genes and biomarkers for disease diagnosis and for assessing drug efficacy and toxicity. However, the majority of analytical methods applied to gene expression data are not efficient for biomarker identification and disease diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a general framework to incorporate feature (gene) selection into pattern recognition in the process to identify biomarkers. Using this framework, we develop three feature wrappers that search through the space of feature subsets using the classification error as measure of goodness for a particular feature subset being “wrapped around”: linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, and support vector machines. To effectively carry out this computationally intensive search process, we employ sequential forward search and sequential forward floating search algorithms. To evaluate the performance of feature selection for biomarker identification we have applied the proposed methods to three data sets. The preliminary results demonstrate that very high classification accuracy can be attained by identified composite classifiers with several biomarkers. PMID:11691853

  15. Development of alexithymic personality features

    PubMed Central

    Karukivi, Max; Saarijärvi, Simo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature regarding the development of alexithymic personality features. Modern brain imaging technologies provide interesting data on the associations of alexithymia with different aberrations in brain function related to emotion regulation; however, the development of these deviations is poorly understood. A notable amount of research covers the relation of alexithymia to different environmental factors. Many of these associations, for example, with low socio-economic status and general psychopathology in childhood, are well established. However, the retrospective and cross-sectional designs commonly used in these studies, as well as the use of self-report measures, hinder the ability to firmly establish causality. Certain individual developmental factors, such as lagging speech development and congenital cardiac malformations in childhood, have been associated with the development of alexithymia. Regarding the stability of alexithymia, a systematic review of the literature was conducted for this paper. In addition to being characterized as a personality feature in the general population, alexithymia also clearly has a state-like dimension that results in increases and decreases in alexithymic features in conjunction with mental disorder symptoms. An essential question is whether the alexithymic features in adulthood are, in fact, infantile features of a restricted ability to identify and describe emotions that simply persist in individuals through adolescence to adulthood. To firmly establish the roots of alexithymia development, longitudinal studies, particularly in younger populations, are needed. Furthermore, multifaceted study settings are encouraged. PMID:25540724

  16. Image segmentation using random features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Geoff; Gao, Junbin; Antolovich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for selecting random features via compressed sensing to improve the performance of Normalized Cuts in image segmentation. Normalized Cuts is a clustering algorithm that has been widely applied to segmenting images, using features such as brightness, intervening contours and Gabor filter responses. Some drawbacks of Normalized Cuts are that computation times and memory usage can be excessive, and the obtained segmentations are often poor. This paper addresses the need to improve the processing time of Normalized Cuts while improving the segmentations. A significant proportion of the time in calculating Normalized Cuts is spent computing an affinity matrix. A new algorithm has been developed that selects random features using compressed sensing techniques to reduce the computation needed for the affinity matrix. The new algorithm, when compared to the standard implementation of Normalized Cuts for segmenting images from the BSDS500, produces better segmentations in significantly less time.

  17. Primordial features and Planck polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman; Smoot, George F.; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2016-09-01

    With the Planck 2015 Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization data, we search for possible features in the primordial power spectrum (PPS). We revisit the Wiggly Whipped Inflation (WWI) framework and demonstrate how generation of some particular primordial features can improve the fit to Planck data. WWI potential allows the scalar field to transit from a steeper potential to a nearly flat potential through a discontinuity either in potential or in its derivatives. WWI offers the inflaton potential parametrizations that generate a wide variety of features in the primordial power spectra incorporating most of the localized and non-local inflationary features that are obtained upon reconstruction from temperature and polarization angular power spectrum. At the same time, in a single framework it allows us to have a background parameter estimation with a nearly free-form primordial spectrum. Using Planck 2015 data, we constrain the primordial features in the context of Wiggly Whipped Inflation and present the features that are supported both by temperature and polarization. WWI model provides more than 13 improvement in χ2 fit to the data with respect to the best fit power law model considering combined temperature and polarization data from Planck and B-mode polarization data from BICEP and Planck dust map. We use 2-4 extra parameters in the WWI model compared to the featureless strict slow roll inflaton potential. We find that the differences between the temperature and polarization data in constraining background cosmological parameters such as baryon density, cold dark matter density are reduced to a good extent if we use primordial power spectra from WWI. We also discuss the extent of bispectra obtained from the best potentials in arbitrary triangular configurations using the BI-spectra and Non-Gaussianity Operator (BINGO).

  18. Special Features in Children's Conversations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karjalainen, Merja

    In a study of features that seem to be typical of children's conversations, 10 Finnish preschool children's conversations were videotaped and audiotaped over a period of 10 hours. The children were taped in conversation, play, fairy tale, and eating situations. Among the findings are that all children enjoy playing with language, but some initiate…

  19. Feature Selection and Effective Classifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deogun, Jitender S.; Choubey, Suresh K.; Raghavan, Vijay V.; Sever, Hayri

    1998-01-01

    Develops and analyzes four algorithms for feature selection in the context of rough set methodology. Experimental results confirm the expected relationship between the time complexity of these algorithms and the classification accuracy of the resulting upper classifiers. When compared, results of upper classifiers perform better than lower…

  20. Symbolism in the Feature Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakony, Edward

    A study of symbolism in feature films reveals how the symbolism employed by film makers can serve as a bridge between feeling and thought, and between aesthetics and cognition. What individuals read from and learn through a symbol varies with what they bring to it. The filmmaker's symbolims must be universal and not private. However, symbolism in…

  1. China English: Its Distinctive Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Wei-dong; Dai, Wei-ping

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to expound that China English boasting its own distinctive features on the levels of phonology, words, sentences and discourse has been playing an irreplaceable role in intercultural activities, though still in its infancy and in the process of developing and perfecting itself, and it now makes every effort to move towards…

  2. Where Do Features Come From?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    It is possible to learn multiple layers of non-linear features by backpropagating error derivatives through a feedforward neural network. This is a very effective learning procedure when there is a huge amount of labeled training data, but for many learning tasks very few labeled examples are available. In an effort to overcome the need for…

  3. NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"

    ScienceCinema

    Brian Cox

    2016-07-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

  4. Campus Landscape: Functions, Forms, Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dober, Richard P.

    This guide provides information, instruction, and ideas on planning and designing every aspect of the campus landscape, from parking lots to playing fields. Using real-world examples of classic and contemporary campus landscapes, it features coverage of landscape restoration and regeneration; provides an assessment matrix for consistent, effective…

  5. Semantic Feature Distinctiveness and Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Katherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Lexical access is the process in which basic components of meaning in language, the lexical entries (words) are activated. This activation is based on the organization and representational structure of the lexical entries. Semantic features of words, which are the prominent semantic characteristics of a word concept, provide important information…

  6. Consumer Controlled Housing. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarnulis, Edward, Ed.; Lakin, K. Charlie, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" reports on consumer-controlled housing for persons with developmental disabilities, and explores housing and service options that empower individuals with disabilities to live their lives with independence, privacy, and freedom of choice. It includes an excerpt from the Association for Retarded Citizens position statement on…

  7. NIF featured on BBC "Horizon"

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Cox

    2010-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was featured in the BBC broadcast "Horizon" hosted by physicist Brian Cox. Here is the NIF portion of the program, which was entitled "Can We Make A Star On Earth?" This video is used with the express permission of the BBC.

  8. Faithful Contrastive Features in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    This article pursues the idea of inferring aspects of phonological underlying forms directly from surface contrasts by looking at optimality theoretic linguistic systems (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). The main result proves that linguistic systems satisfying certain conditions have the faithful contrastive feature property: Whenever 2 distinct…

  9. FCLib: The Feature Characterization Library.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, Ann C.; Doyle, Wendy S. K.; Kegelmeyer, W. Philip,; Ulmer, Craig D.

    2008-11-01

    The Feature Characterization Library (FCLib) is a software library that simplifies the process of interrogating, analyzing, and understanding complex data sets generated by finite element applications. This document provides an overview of the library, a description of both the design philosophy and implementation of the library, and examples of how the library can be utilized to extract understanding from raw datasets.

  10. Feature Selection in Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Paz, E; Newsam, S; Kamath, C

    2004-02-27

    Numerous applications of data mining to scientific data involve the induction of a classification model. In many cases, the collection of data is not performed with this task in mind, and therefore, the data might contain irrelevant or redundant features that affect negatively the accuracy of the induction algorithms. The size and dimensionality of typical scientific data make it difficult to use any available domain information to identify features that discriminate between the classes of interest. Similarly, exploratory data analysis techniques have limitations on the amount and dimensionality of the data that can be effectively processed. In this paper, we describe applications of efficient feature selection methods to data sets from astronomy, plasma physics, and remote sensing. We use variations of recently proposed filter methods as well as traditional wrapper approaches where practical. We discuss the importance of these applications, the general challenges of feature selection in scientific datasets, the strategies for success that were common among our diverse applications, and the lessons learned in solving these problems.

  11. Histologic features of nail cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Anolik, Rachel B; Elenitsas, Rosalie; Minakawa, Satoko; Nguyen, Jennifer; Rubin, Adam I

    2012-06-01

    Nail cosmetics and adornments are widely used in today's society. However, their histologic features are not well characterized. Routine histologic examination and polarization of nail plate specimens in our academic dermatopathology practice at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania revealed 3 distinct histologic patterns of nail cosmetics: a hyperpigmented pattern with diffuse fine granular material, a layered pattern with a single linear band of polarizable material, and a hyperpigmented pattern with larger granules containing flecks of polarizable material. In our experience, submitting clinicians rarely indicate the patient's use of nail polish or other enhancements. Recognition of the histologic features of nail cosmetics is important to prevent confusion with dermatoses affecting the nail unit, and it will help dermatopathologists render more accurate diagnoses. PMID:22452953

  12. Automated Extraction of Flow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne (Technical Monitor); Haimes, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely performed as part of the design process of most fluid handling devices. In order to efficiently and effectively use the results of a CFD simulation, visualization tools are often used. These tools are used in all stages of the CFD simulation including pre-processing, interim-processing, and post-processing, to interpret the results. Each of these stages requires visualization tools that allow one to examine the geometry of the device, as well as the partial or final results of the simulation. An engineer will typically generate a series of contour and vector plots to better understand the physics of how the fluid is interacting with the physical device. Of particular interest are detecting features such as shocks, re-circulation zones, and vortices (which will highlight areas of stress and loss). As the demand for CFD analyses continues to increase the need for automated feature extraction capabilities has become vital. In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required in understanding the physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like; isc-surface, cuts and streamlines, were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of a great deal of interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snapshot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments). Methods must be developed to abstract the feature of interest and display it in a manner that physically makes sense.

  13. Titan's rotation - Surface feature observed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, M. T.; Karkoschka, E.; Tomasko, M.

    1993-06-01

    A surface feature or a near-surface fracture is suggested to account for the time variations in the 0.94, 1.08, and 1.28 micron atmospheric windows of Titan's geometric albedo, relative to its albedo in adjacent methane bands. These observations are noted to be consistent with synchronous rotation. They can also be explained by a 0.1-higher surface albedo on Titan's leading hemisphere.

  14. Cutaneous Lymphangioma circumscriptum - dermoscopic features**

    PubMed Central

    Massa, António Fernandes; Menezes, Nuno; Baptista, Armando; Moreira, Ana Isabel; Ferreira, Eduarda Osório

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangiomas are congenital lymphatic malformations and cutaneous lymphangioma circumscriptum is the most common type. It is clinically characterized by clusters of translucent vesicles and the presence of dermoscopically yellow lacunae surrounded by pale septa, as well as reddish to bluish lacunae. In our case, the recently described hypopyon-like feature manifested, aiding in the sometimes difficult differential diagnosis of cutaneous lymphangioma circumscriptum with vascular lesions, further highlighting the importance of dermoscopy in what can be a diagnostic challenge. PMID:25831002

  15. Feature detection for spatial templates

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.

    1996-02-01

    The Color Medical Image System (CMIS), a program that uses segmented mapping techniques to obtain high resolution digital images, is currently trying to develop techniques to transfer microscopic glass slides to electronic image libraries. One technique that has been attempted is to use correlation techniques to scan the image. However, when segments of high magnification are used, it is difficult and time consuming to perform correlation techniques. This project investigates feature detection in microscopic images. Various techniques are implemented to detect the section of the image containing the most feature information, thereby making the correlation process more efficient. Three tests are implemented that eliminate the background in the image and calculate the mean (1st order technique), variance (2nd order technique), and ratio test (1st order technique) of the remaining pixel values. Background elimination involves deleting all pixel values above a certain experimental value from any calculations made. The source code for each of the three tests was implemented and tested on a number of images using the green color band. Each program outputs the box containing the most features and writes that section to a file to be displayed to the screen. A visual rank was also recorded so as to compare it the output of the tests. Each of the three tests proved to be successful. After comparing the visual rank to the output of the tests, it was determined that both first and second order techniques are effective in detecting features in microscopic images. Although all of the purposes and goals were met, this investigation should be expanded to include texturized images and the use of all three color bands.

  16. Rosacea: clinical features and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lavers, Isabel

    2016-03-30

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that predominantly affects the central face. It is characterised by a variable range of symptoms, including erythema, telangiectasia, papules, pustules and changes in skin texture. Rosacea may be transient, recurrent or persistent. Because it affects the most visible part of the body, the psychosocial effects of this condition can be significant. This article describes the features and management of the condition. PMID:27027198

  17. RESIDENTIAL RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION FEATURE SELECTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a proposed residential radon resistant construction feature selection system. The features consist of engineered barriers to reduce radon entry and accumulation indoors. The proposed Florida standards require radon resistant features in proportion to regional...

  18. Qualification of security printing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simske, Steven J.; Aronoff, Jason S.; Arnabat, Jordi

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the statistical and hardware processes involved in qualifying two related printing features for their deployment in product (e.g. document and package) security. The first is a multi-colored tiling feature that can also be combined with microtext to provide additional forms of security protection. The color information is authenticated automatically with a variety of handheld, desktop and production scanners. The microtext is authenticated either following magnification or manually by a field inspector. The second security feature can also be tile-based. It involves the use of two inks that provide the same visual color, but differ in their transparency to infrared (IR) wavelengths. One of the inks is effectively transparent to IR wavelengths, allowing emitted IR light to pass through. The other ink is effectively opaque to IR wavelengths. These inks allow the printing of a seemingly uniform, or spot, color over a (truly) uniform IR emitting ink layer. The combination converts a uniform covert ink and a spot color to a variable data region capable of encoding identification sequences with high density. Also, it allows the extension of variable data printing for security to ostensibly static printed regions, affording greater security protection while meeting branding and marketing specifications.

  19. Sedimentation dynamics about salt features

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Blake, D.W.

    1985-02-01

    Detailed side-scan sonar and gridded bathymetric surveys on continental margins reveal the existence of numerous submarine canyons. Recently published compilations of current velocities in submarine canyons indicate that alternating and undirectionaly flows often exceed 20-30 cm/sec with peak velocities ranging from 70 to 100 cm/sec. Current meters attached to the ocean floor have been lost at current velocities of 190 cm/sec. Such velocities are ample to transport sand-size sediments. The results of DSDP Leg 96 show the existence of massive sands and gravels on the Louisiana slope, deposited during the last glacial advance. Thus, present physical oceanographic data may be an analog to conditions during glacially induced lowered sea levels. Salt ridges and domes underlie much of the Louisiana slope, determining morphology. Submarine canyons lace the slope. Given a prograding shelf, the net sediment transport routes will be down the submarine canyons. Sediment deposition patterns around the salt ridges and domes include parallel-bedded foredrifts on the upslope side, lee drifts on the downslope side, and moats along the lateral flanks of the salt features. Major differences exist between the sedimentation patterns around a ridge and a dome. The size and shape of the flow pattern will determine whether there can be a flow over the salt feature with a resulting turbulent wave that may influence sedimentation. Sedimentation patterns about salt features on the present slope should be applicable to similar paleoenvironments.

  20. Feature dimensionality reduction for myoelectric pattern recognition: a comparison study of feature selection and feature projection methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of the feature dimensionality reduction strategies on the classification of surface electromyography (EMG) signals toward developing a practical myoelectric control system. Two dimensionality reduction strategies, feature selection and feature projection, were tested on both EMG feature sets, respectively. A feature selection based myoelectric pattern recognition system was introduced to select the features by eliminating the redundant features of EMG recordings instead of directly choosing a subset of EMG channels. The Markov random field (MRF) method and a forward orthogonal search algorithm were employed to evaluate the contribution of each individual feature to the classification, respectively. Our results from 15 healthy subjects indicate that, with a feature selection analysis, independent of the type of feature set, across all subjects high overall accuracies can be achieved in classification of seven different forearm motions with a small number of top ranked original EMG features obtained from the forearm muscles (average overall classification accuracy >95% with 12 selected EMG features). Compared to various feature dimensionality reduction techniques in myoelectric pattern recognition, the proposed filter-based feature selection approach is independent of the type of classification algorithms and features, which can effectively reduce the redundant information not only across different channels, but also cross different features in the same channel. This may enable robust EMG feature dimensionality reduction without needing to change ongoing, practical use of classification algorithms, an important step toward clinical utility.

  1. Adding articulatory features to acoustic features for automatic speech recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Zlokarnik, I.

    1995-05-01

    A hidden-Markov-model (HMM) based speech recognition system was evaluated that makes use of simultaneously recorded acoustic and articulatory data. The articulatory measurements were gathered by means of electromagnetic articulography and describe the movement of small coils fixed to the speakers` tongue and jaw during the production of German V{sub 1}CV{sub 2} sequences [P. Hoole and S. Gfoerer, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 {bold 87}, S123 (1990)]. Using the coordinates of the coil positions as an articulatory representation, acoustic and articulatory features were combined to make up an acoustic--articulatory feature vector. The discriminant power of this combined representation was evaluated for two subjects on a speaker-dependent isolated word recognition task. When the articulatory measurements were used both for training and testing the HMMs, the articulatory representation was capable of reducing the error rate of comparable acoustic-based HMMs by a relative percentage of more than 60%. In a separate experiment, the articulatory movements during the testing phase were estimated using a multilayer perceptron that performed an acoustic-to-articulatory mapping. Under these more realistic conditions, when articulatory measurements are only available during the training, the error rate could be reduced by a relative percentage of 18% to 25%.

  2. Ciliate telomerase RNA structural features.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick-Graham, M; Romero, D P

    1995-01-01

    Telomerase RNA is an integral part of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of telomeric DNA. The RNA moiety contains a templating domain that directs the synthesis of a species-specific telomeric repeat and may also be important for enzyme structure and/or catalysis. Phylogenetic comparisons of telomerase RNA sequences from various Tetrahymena spp. and hypotrich ciliates have revealed two conserved secondary structure models that share many features. We have cloned and sequenced the telomerase RNA genes from an additional six Tetrahymena spp. (T. vorax, T. borealis, T. australis, T. silvana, T. capricornis and T. paravorax). Inclusion of these sequences, most notably that from T. paravorax, in a phylogenetic comparative analysis allowed us to more narrowly define structural elements that may be necessary for a minimal telomerase RNA. A primary sequence element, positioned 5' of the template and conserved between all previously known ciliate telomerase RNAs, has been reduced from 5'-(C)UGUCA-3' to the 4 nt sequence 5'-GUCA-3'. Conserved secondary structural features and the impact they have on the general organization of ciliate telomerase RNAs is discussed. PMID:7739888

  3. Histologic features in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dienes, H P; Popper, H; MAnns, M; Baumann, W; Thoenes, W; Meyer Zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1989-06-01

    In order to see if the term of "plasma cell hepatitis", dating back to the early sixties, is still valid as a morphological diagnosis for autoimmune chronic hepatitis (AICH), and to find out if the existence of several subgroups is reflected by histopathology, we investigated 26 patients with chronic hepatitis, who met the criteria of autoimmune hepatitis based on tests for antinuclear, anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) and on immunoassays for liver-kidney-microsomal (LKM) antigen, liver membrane antigen (LMA), and soluble liver antigen (SLA). In our material autoimmune hepatitis represent the entire spectrum of chronic hepatitis with variable inflammatory activity ranging from chronic persistent hepatitis to severe inflammatory lesions in chronic active hepatitis with transition to cirrhosis. When compared to viral chronic hepatitis A and non-A, non-B, however, characteristic features can be evaluated consisting in broad hypocellular areas of collapse and microacinar transformation of hepatocytes with hydropic swelling being the predominant type of cell lesion. Eosinophilic clumping and acidophilic necrosis were insignificant. Plasma cells were not a constituent feature of AICH. From this histopathologic pattern it may be concluded that the disease seems to run a sluggish course in most patients, however, in few cases a dramatic development may determine the disease with fatal acute episodes which are terminated by death or fade into slow progression. The different subgroups could not be distinguished by histopathology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Features of spherical torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.

    1985-12-01

    The spherical torus is a very small aspect ratio (A < 2) confinement concept obtained by retaining only the indispensable components inboard to the plasma torus. MHD equilibrium calculations show that spherical torus plasmas with safety factor q > 2 are characterized by high toroidal beta (..beta../sub t/ > 0.2), low poloidal beta (..beta../sub p/ < 0.3), naturally large elongation (kappa greater than or equal to 2), large plasma current with I/sub p//(aB/sub t0/) up to about 7 MA/mT, strong paramagnetism (B/sub t//B/sub t0/ > 1.5), and strong plasma helicity (F comparable to THETA). A large near-omnigeneous region is seen at the large-major-radius, bad-curvature region of the plasma in comparison with the conventional tokamaks. These features combine to engender the spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost. Because of its strong paramagnetism and helicity, the spherical torus plasma shares some of the desirable features of spheromak and reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas, but with tokamak-like confinement and safety factor q. The general class of spherical tori, which includes the spherical tokamak (q > 1), the spherical pinch (1 > q > O), and the spherical RFP (q < O), have magnetic field configurations unique in comparison with conventional tokamaks and RFPs. 22 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Some Questions about Feature Re-Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary, differences between feature re-assembly and feature selection are discussed. Lardiere's proposals are compared to existing approaches to grammatical features in second language (L2) acquisition. Questions are raised about the predictive power of the feature re-assembly approach. (Contains 1 footnote.)

  6. FMML: A Feature Model Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabdel, Leili; Karataş, Ahmet Serkan; Oǧuztüzün, Halit; Doǧru, Ali

    2011-09-01

    Feature modeling is a common way of representing commonality and variability in Software Product Line Engineering. Alternative notations are available to represent feature models. Compared with graphical notations, text-based notations can be more amenable to automated processing and tool interoperability. In this paper, we propose an XML-based feature modeling language to represent extended feature models with complex relationships.

  7. Suppression effects in feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixue; Miller, James; Liu, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Attending to a feature enhances visual processing of that feature, but it is less clear what occurs to unattended features. Single-unit recording studies in middle temporal (MT) have shown that neuronal modulation is a monotonic function of the difference between the attended and neuron's preferred direction. Such a relationship should predict a monotonic suppressive effect in psychophysical performance. However, past research on suppressive effects of feature-based attention has remained inconclusive. We investigated the suppressive effect for motion direction, orientation, and color in three experiments. We asked participants to detect a weak signal among noise and provided a partially valid feature cue to manipulate attention. We measured performance as a function of the offset between the cued and signal feature. We also included neutral trials where no feature cues were presented to provide a baseline measure of performance. Across three experiments, we consistently observed enhancement effects when the target feature and cued feature coincided and suppression effects when the target feature deviated from the cued feature. The exact profile of suppression was different across feature dimensions: Whereas the profile for direction exhibited a “rebound” effect, the profiles for orientation and color were monotonic. These results demonstrate that unattended features are suppressed during feature-based attention, but the exact suppression profile depends on the specific feature. Overall, the results are largely consistent with neurophysiological data and support the feature-similarity gain model of attention. PMID:26067533

  8. [Compatible low target feature coatings].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Gao, Hai-chao; Dai, Song-tao

    2008-09-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) film has low reflectance in near infrared band while high reflectance in infrared band, and its dielectric constant can be described by Drude free-electron model. SiO film has very strong absorption at certain infrared wavelength By combining them, certain spectral selectivity can be realized. In the present paper, the authors investigated SiO/ITO films in terms of spectrum selectivity, and discussed the influence of film structure on reflection spectrum. By means of the computation of reflection spectrum with characteristic matrix, the authors found that SiO/ITO film can be used as a compatible infrared low target feature coating by properly adjusting film arrangement and selecting suitable film parameters.

  9. Retina mosaicing using local features.

    PubMed

    Cattin, Philippe C; Bay, Herbert; Van Gool, Luc; Székely, Gábor

    2006-01-01

    Laser photocoagulation is a proven procedure to treat various pathologies of the retina. Challenges such as motion compensation, correct energy dosage, and avoiding incidental damage are responsible for the still low success rate. They can be overcome with improved instrumentation, such as a fully automatic laser photocoagulation system. In this paper, we present a core image processing element of such a system, namely a novel approach for retina mosaicing. Our method relies on recent developments in region detection and feature description to automatically fuse retina images. In contrast to the state-of-the-art the proposed approach works even for retina images with no discernable vascularity. Moreover, an efficient scheme to determine the blending masks of arbitrarily overlapping images for multi-band blending is presented.

  10. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  11. New features in Delphes 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Alexandre

    2015-05-01

    Delphes is an open source C++ framework to perform the fast simulation of the response of a multipurpose detector. The simulation includes a tracking system, embedded into a magnetic field, calorimeters and a muon system. The framework is interfaced to standard file formats and outputs observables such as isolated leptons, missing transverse energy and collection of jets that can be used for dedicated analyses. The simulation of the detector response takes into account the effect of magnetic field, the granularity of the calorimeters and subdetector resolutions. The program contains parmetrizations for the CMS and ATLAS detectors, based on published performances. Basic parametrizations for the LHCb and FCC detectors are also available. The Delphes framework also includes a simple event display. Several new features are discussed, such as an emulation of the particle-flow algorithm, pile- up simulation, N-subjettiness and a simple b-tagging algorithm based on counting tracks with large impact parameter.

  12. Mars periglacial punctual features analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Adriane; Barata, Teresa; Ivo Alves, E.; Cunha, Pedro P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of patterned grounds on Mars has been reported in several papers, especially the study of polygons distribution, size and formation processes. In the last years, the presence of basketball terrains has been noticed on Mars. Studies were made to recognize these terrains on Mars through the analysis of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images. We have been developing an algorithm that recognizes automatically and extracts the hummocky patterns on Mars related to landforms generated by freeze-thaw cycles such as mud boils features. The algorithm is based on remote sensing data that establishes a comparison between the hummocks and mud boils morphology and size from Adventdalen at Longyearbyen (Svalbard - Norway) and hummocky patterns on Mars using High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery.

  13. Sonographic features of retroperitoneal neurilemoma.

    PubMed

    Kuo, C H; Changchien, C S

    1993-06-01

    Seven cases of retroperitoneal neurilemoma confirmed by histology had an ultrasound examination. There were 5 women and 2 men with a mean age of 55. Most of the cases (5/7) had a palpable mass clinically. Of the 7 cases, 4 had a mass with cystic degeneration and internal echoes on sonogram, consistent with the macroscopic findings of tumors. The internal echoes represented blood clots and residual tissue (or septa) in cyst. Of the remaining 3 cases, one showed a confluent lobulated mass, the second had a solitary homogeneous mass with small cysts, and the third one, which was the smallest (4 cm x 4 cm x 6 cm), had a hypoechoic and homogeneous pattern. The sonograms of all 7 cases were consistent with the macroscopic features of the tumors. The sonographic pattern of tumor parenchyma is either homogenously hyperechoic or hypoechoic. Because of the cystic degeneration, hemorrhage, and residual tissue of retroperitoneal neurilemoma, the sonographic pattern was variable.

  14. Feature detection and letter identification.

    PubMed

    Pelli, Denis G; Burns, Catherine W; Farell, Bart; Moore-Page, Deborah C

    2006-12-01

    Seeking to understand how people recognize objects, we have examined how they identify letters. We expected this 26-way classification of familiar forms to challenge the popular notion of independent feature detection ("probability summation"), but find instead that this theory parsimoniously accounts for our results. We measured the contrast required for identification of a letter briefly presented in visual noise. We tested a wide range of alphabets and scripts (English, Arabic, Armenian, Chinese, Devanagari, Hebrew, and several artificial ones), three- and five-letter words, and various type styles, sizes, contrasts, durations, and eccentricities, with observers ranging widely in age (3 to 68) and experience (none to fluent). Foreign alphabets are learned quickly. In just three thousand trials, new observers attain the same proficiency in letter identification as fluent readers. Surprisingly, despite this training, the observers-like clinical letter-by-letter readers-have the same meager memory span for random strings of these characters as observers seeing them for the first time. We compare performance across tasks and stimuli that vary in difficulty by pitting the human against the ideal observer, and expressing the results as efficiency. We find that efficiency for letter identification is independent of duration, overall contrast, and eccentricity, and only weakly dependent on size, suggesting that letters are identified by a similar computation across this wide range of viewing conditions. Efficiency is also independent of age and years of reading. However, efficiency does vary across alphabets and type styles, with more complex forms yielding lower efficiencies, as one might expect from Gestalt theories of perception. In fact, we find that efficiency is inversely proportional to perimetric complexity (perimeter squared over "ink" area) and nearly independent of everything else. This, and the surprisingly fixed ratio of detection and identification

  15. Feature Extraction Based on Decision Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chulhee; Landgrebe, David A.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to feature extraction for classification is proposed based directly on the decision boundaries. We note that feature extraction is equivalent to retaining informative features or eliminating redundant features; thus, the terms 'discriminantly information feature' and 'discriminantly redundant feature' are first defined relative to feature extraction for classification. Next, it is shown how discriminantly redundant features and discriminantly informative features are related to decision boundaries. A novel characteristic of the proposed method arises by noting that usually only a portion of the decision boundary is effective in discriminating between classes, and the concept of the effective decision boundary is therefore introduced. Next, a procedure to extract discriminantly informative features based on a decision boundary is proposed. The proposed feature extraction algorithm has several desirable properties: (1) It predicts the minimum number of features necessary to achieve the same classification accuracy as in the original space for a given pattern recognition problem; and (2) it finds the necessary feature vectors. The proposed algorithm does not deteriorate under the circumstances of equal class means or equal class covariances as some previous algorithms do. Experiments show that the performance of the proposed algorithm compares favorably with those of previous algorithms.

  16. Pitch features of environmental sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Kang, Jian

    2016-07-01

    A number of soundscape studies have suggested the need for suitable parameters for soundscape measurement, in addition to the conventional acoustic parameters. This paper explores the applicability of pitch features that are often used in music analysis and their algorithms to environmental sounds. Based on the existing alternative pitch algorithms for simulating the perception of the auditory system and simplified algorithms for practical applications in the areas of music and speech, the applicable algorithms have been determined, considering common types of sound in everyday soundscapes. Considering a number of pitch parameters, including pitch value, pitch strength, and percentage of audible pitches over time, different pitch characteristics of various environmental sounds have been shown. Among the four sound categories, i.e. water, wind, birdsongs, and urban sounds, generally speaking, both water and wind sounds have low pitch values and pitch strengths; birdsongs have high pitch values and pitch strengths; and urban sounds have low pitch values and a relatively wide range of pitch strengths.

  17. Enhanced modeling features within TREETOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervoort, R. J.; Kumar, Manoj N.

    1989-01-01

    The original motivation for TREETOPS was to build a generic multi-body simulation and remove the burden of writing multi-body equations from the engineers. The motivation of the enhancement was twofold: (1) to extend the menu of built-in features (sensors, actuators, constraints, etc.) that did not require user code; and (2) to extend the control system design capabilities by linking with other government funded software (NASTRAN and MATLAB). These enhancements also serve to bridge the gap between structures and control groups. It is common on large space programs for the structures groups to build hi-fidelity models of the structure using NASTRAN and for the controls group to build lower order models because they lack the tools to incorporate the former into their analysis. Now the controls engineers can accept the hi-fidelity NASTRAN models into TREETOPS, add sensors and actuators, perform model reduction and couple the result directly into MATLAB to perform their design. The controller can then be imported directly into TREETOPS for non-linear, time-history simulation.

  18. Epidemiologic features of canine hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Milne, K L; Hayes, H M

    1981-01-01

    This study investigates the epidemiologic features of 3,206 dogs diagnosed with hypothyroidism (including myxedema) from 1.1 million dogs seen at 15 veterinary teaching hospitals between March, 1964 and June, 1978. Nine breeds found to be at high-risk for hypothyroidism were: golden retrievers, Doberman pinschers, dachshunds, Shetland sheepdogs, Irish setters, Pomeranians, miniature schnauzers, cocker spaniels, and Airedales. Two breed with a significant deficit of risk were German shepherds and mixed breed (mongrel) dogs. Age risk was greatest among younger dogs of high-risk breeds, further suggesting a genetic component to the etiology of this disease. In contrast, low-risk dogs had increasing relative risk through nine years of age. Spayed female dogs displayed a significantly higher risk when compared to intact females. Though not statistically significant, male castrated dogs had 30% more hypothyroidism compared to their intact counterparts. Among the case series were 91 endocrine and hormone-related neoplasms and 198 other endocrine-related disorders. Further studies linking canine hypothyroidism to other conditions, particularly cancer, could provide valuable insight into human disease experience.

  19. Recurrent corneal erosion: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Hope-Ross, M W; Chell, P B; Kervick, G N; McDonnell, P J

    1994-01-01

    The clinical features of a group of 30 patients with recalcitrant recurrent corneal erosions (i.e. those who failed to respond to conventional therapy) were evaluated. Associated ocular and facial abnormalities were documented. Meibomian gland dysfunction was present in all patients as manifest by dropout and inspissation of the meibomian glands, reduced tear film break-up time and debris in the tear film. Dropout of meibomian glands was present in 25 (83%) patients and was maximum in the medial half of the lid in 21 (84%) of these 25 patients. Tear film break-up time was reduced in all patients, being instant in 7 (23%), between 1 and 5 seconds in 22 (74%) and between 10 and 15 seconds in 1 (3%) patient. Superficial corneal abnormalities were present in 28 (93%) patients as manifest by maps, dots and fingerprints. Facial abnormalities such as telangiectasia, rhinophyma and acne rosacea were present in 22 (73%) patients. The findings of our study suggest an association between recalcitrant recurrent corneal erosions and meibomian gland dysfunction.

  20. Comprehensive Analysis of Neptune's Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2007-07-01

    Hubble took an amazing data set of Neptune in nine GO programs between 1994 and 2006, consisting of 408 WFPC2 exposures with several filters present in each program. The PIs of these programs, Hammel, Sromovsky, and Rages, published a variety of results about Neptune's atmosphere based on each program. However, the typical size of the grants for each program did not allow all scientific questions of these rich data sets to be addressed.I propose to analyze these 400 images to create a consistent data set spanning 12 years, and I will make even the intermediate results available, such as 400 consistently calibrated images. The combined data set will then be able to address more far reaching questions than could be done by single data sets. Whereas previous studies focused on only a few center-to-limb measurements for a limited selection of latitudes and wavelengths, I will investigate the whole data set and analyze 16,000 center-to-limb curves. I will use the principal component analysis and various statistical tests to find the hidden variations on Neptune. I created software for a similar project on Hubble's Saturn images. I am ready to adapt and apply it to Hubble's Neptune images.The huge number of variable features on Neptune contain an ideal probe about atmospheric dynamics. Previous investigations have only scratched pieces of the surface of this treasure. It is time for a comprehensive study of the whole data to discover fundamenatal insights about atmospheric dynamics.

  1. Geotourism Features of Sinop (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehra Seyyah, Memnune; Güngör, Yıldırım

    2016-04-01

    Sinop and its surrounding area presents pretty interesting geological formations formed between Trias and Quaternary. Permo-Trias aged Boyabat Metamorphites is found at the bottom. Above this formation, Jurassic aged Akgöl and Bürnük Formations and Lower Cretaceous aged İnaltı Formation comes. After these, respectively Çaǧlayan Formation, Upper Cretaceous aged Kaplanboǧazı, Yemişliçay, Hamsaros, Görsökü Formations is observed. These units are also overlaid by Paleocene aged Akveren Formation, Eocene aged Atbaşı, Sakızdaǧı Formations and Miocene aged Sinop Formation. Plio-Quaternary aged Sarıkum Formation is located on this sequence. Boyabat columnar basalts and Bedire Formation are the youngest formations of Sinop and its surrounding area. 
 In this geological sequence, columnar basalts, different forms of laminated rocks, fossil containing levels, various sedimentological processes, faults and folds located in laminated rocks, canyons which has been occurred related tectonism in the region, waterfalls run through fault steps take place among the important geotouristical pieces of Sinop and surroundings. In this study, it will be discussed how these geological features contribute to Sinop district that's most important source of income is tourism. 
 Key Words: Geological Heritage, Geopark, Geosite, Geotourism, Sinop

  2. Contour inflections are adaptable features.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason; Sampasivam, Sinthujaa; McGovern, David P; Meso, Andrew Isaac; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2014-06-03

    An object's shape is a strong cue for visual recognition. Most models of shape coding emphasize the role of oriented lines and curves for coding an object's shape. Yet inflection points, which occur at the junction of two oppositely signed curves, are ubiquitous features in natural scenes and carry important information about the shape of an object. Using a visual aftereffect in which the perceived shape of a contour is changed following prolonged viewing of a slightly different-shaped contour, we demonstrate a specific aftereffect for a contour inflection. Control conditions show that this aftereffect cannot be explained by adaptation to either the component curves or to the local orientation at the point of inflection. Further, we show that the aftereffect transfers weakly to a compound curve without an inflection, ruling out a general compound curvature detector as an explanation of our findings. We assume however that there are adaptable mechanisms for coding other specific forms of compound curves. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that the human visual system contains specific mechanisms for coding contour inflections, further highlighting their role in shape and object coding.

  3. Features and development of Coot

    SciTech Connect

    Emsley, P.; Lohkamp, B.; Scott, W. G.; Cowtan, K.

    2010-04-01

    Coot is a molecular-graphics program designed to assist in the building of protein and other macromolecular models. The current state of development and available features are presented. Coot is a molecular-graphics application for model building and validation of biological macromolecules. The program displays electron-density maps and atomic models and allows model manipulations such as idealization, real-space refinement, manual rotation/translation, rigid-body fitting, ligand search, solvation, mutations, rotamers and Ramachandran idealization. Furthermore, tools are provided for model validation as well as interfaces to external programs for refinement, validation and graphics. The software is designed to be easy to learn for novice users, which is achieved by ensuring that tools for common tasks are ‘discoverable’ through familiar user-interface elements (menus and toolbars) or by intuitive behaviour (mouse controls). Recent developments have focused on providing tools for expert users, with customisable key bindings, extensions and an extensive scripting interface. The software is under rapid development, but has already achieved very widespread use within the crystallographic community. The current state of the software is presented, with a description of the facilities available and of some of the underlying methods employed.

  4. Structural features of lignohumic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, František; Šestauberová, Martina; Hrabal, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The composition and structure of humic acids isolated from lignohumate, which is produced by hydrolytic-oxidative conversion of technical lignosulfonates, were characterized by chemical and spectral methods (UV/VIS, FTIR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy). As comparative samples, humic acids (HA) were isolated also from lignite and organic horizon of mountain spruce forest soil. When compared with other HA studied, the lignohumate humic acids (LHHA) contained relatively few carboxyl groups, whose role is partly fulfilled by sulfonic acid groups. Distinctive 13C NMR signal of methoxyl group carbons, typical for lignin and related humic substances, was found at the shift of 55.9 ppm. Other alkoxy carbons were present in limited quantity, like the aliphatic carbons. Due to the low content of these carbon types, the LHHA has high aromaticity of 60.6%. Comparison with the natural HA has shown that lignohumate obtained by thermal processing of technical lignosulfonate can be regarded as an industrially produced analog of natural humic substances. Based on the chemical and spectral data evaluation, structural features of lignohumate humic acids were clarified and their hypothetical chemical structure proposed, which described typical "average" properties of the isolated fraction.

  5. Feature Tracking Using Reeb Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.; Pascucci, Valerio

    2010-08-02

    Tracking features and exploring their temporal dynamics can aid scientists in identifying interesting time intervals in a simulation and serve as basis for performing quantitative analyses of temporal phenomena. In this paper, we develop a novel approach for tracking subsets of isosurfaces, such as burning regions in simulated flames, which are defined as areas of high fuel consumption on a temperature isosurface. Tracking such regions as they merge and split over time can provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. However, the convoluted nature of the temperature isosurface and its rapid movement make this analysis particularly challenging. Our approach tracks burning regions by extracting a temperature isovolume from the four-dimensional space-time temperature field. It then obtains isosurfaces for the original simulation time steps and labels individual connected 'burning' regions based on the local fuel consumption value. Based on this information, a boundary surface between burning and non-burning regions is constructed. The Reeb graph of this boundary surface is the tracking graph for burning regions.

  6. Characterization of Continuum Coma features in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2016-10-01

    We will present the results of an analysis of continuum coma features of comets belonging to different dynamical classes at geocentric distances less than 1.5 AU. Our analysis focusses on groundbased visible observations of over a dozen comets. The position angles of the continuum features close to the nucleus, the curvatures, and extents of radial features will be determined, and the dynamics of dust grains will be investigated. We will also use the change in position angles (if relevant) to place constraints on the periodicity of the repeatability of the features. The prevalence of the features in the sunward direction compared to other orientations will be investigated. We will further compare continuum features with CN features when available. This investigation will eventually lead to the discrimination between hemispherical and localized outgassing for the sunward continuum features seen in comets.We acknowledge support from the NASA SSW and PAST programs.

  7. Web Search Engines: (More) Features and Commands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Randolph

    2000-01-01

    Provides a summary look at the features provided by nine major World Wide Web search engines. Examines size, Boolean operators, phrase searching capabilities, media searching, format options, and special features. (LRW)

  8. Feature Integration across Space, Time, and Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Thomas U.; Ogmen, Haluk; Herzog, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    The perception of a visual target can be strongly influenced by flanking stimuli. In static displays, performance on the target improves when the distance to the flanking elements increases--presumably because feature pooling and integration vanishes with distance. Here, we studied feature integration with dynamic stimuli. We show that features of…

  9. Novel Features for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Woon, W. L.; Cichocki, A.

    2007-01-01

    While conventional approaches of BCI feature extraction are based on the power spectrum, we have tried using nonlinear features for classifying BCI data. In this paper, we report our test results and findings, which indicate that the proposed method is a potentially useful addition to current feature extraction techniques. PMID:18364991

  10. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  11. Clinicopathologic Features of Pediatric Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Tihan, Tarik; Lin, Doris; McDonald, William; Nigro, Janice; Feuerstein, Burt; Jackson, Sadhana; Cohen, Kenneth; Burger, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrogliomas are an important adult form of diffuse gliomas with a distinctive clinical and genetic profile. Histologically similar tumors occurring rarely in children are incompletely characterized. We studied 50 patients with oligodendrogliomas (median age at diagnosis 8 y, range 7mo to 20 y). Tumors resembling dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors or pilocytic astrocytomas or those having a “mixed” histology were excluded. Tumors at first diagnosis were low grade (n=38) or anaplastic (n=12). Histologic features included uniform round cells with perinuclear halos (100%), secondary structures (predominantly perineuronal satellitosis) (90%), calcifications (46%), and microcysts (44%). Sequential surgical specimens were obtained in 8 low-grade oligodendroglioma patients, with only 1 progressing to anaplasia. Studies for 1p19q performed in 40 cases demonstrated intact 1p19q loci in 29 (73%), 1p19q codeletion in 10 (25%), and 1p deletion with intact 19q in 1 (2%). Except for 2 young patients (3 and 11 y of age), patients with 1p19q codeletion were older than 16 years at diagnosis. Mutant IDH1 (R132H) protein immunohistochemistry was positive in 4 (of 22) (18%) cases, 3 of which also had 1p19q codeletion, whereas 1p19q status was not available on the fourth case. There was a nonsignificant trend for worse overall survival in grade III tumors, but no significant association with age, extent of resection, or 1p19q status. In summary, oligodendrogliomas with classic histology occur in the pediatric population but lack 1p19q codeletion and IDH1 (R132H) mutations in most instances. They are predominantly low grade, recur/clinically progress in a subset, but demonstrate a relatively low frequency of histologic progression. PMID:24805856

  12. Feature integration across space, time, and orientation

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Thomas U.; Öğmen, Haluk; Herzog, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    The perception of a visual target can be strongly influenced by flanking stimuli. In static displays, performance on the target improves when the distance to the flanking elements increases- proposedly because feature pooling and integration vanishes with distance. Here, we studied feature integration with dynamic stimuli. We show that features of single elements presented within a continuous motion stream are integrated largely independent of spatial distance (and orientation). Hence, space based models of feature integration cannot be extended to dynamic stimuli. We suggest that feature integration is guided by perceptual grouping operations that maintain the identity of perceptual objects over space and time. PMID:19968428

  13. A multidimensional representation model of geographic features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Usery, E. Lynn; Timson, George; Coletti, Mark

    2016-01-28

    A multidimensional model of geographic features has been developed and implemented with data from The National Map of the U.S. Geological Survey. The model, programmed in C++ and implemented as a feature library, was tested with data from the National Hydrography Dataset demonstrating the capability to handle changes in feature attributes, such as increases in chlorine concentration in a stream, and feature geometry, such as the changing shoreline of barrier islands over time. Data can be entered directly, from a comma separated file, or features with attributes and relationships can be automatically populated in the model from data in the Spatial Data Transfer Standard format.

  14. A multidimensional representation model of geographic features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Usery, E. Lynn; Timson, George; Coletti, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A multidimensional model of geographic features has been developed and implemented with data from The National Map of the U.S. Geological Survey. The model, programmed in C++ and implemented as a feature library, was tested with data from the National Hydrography Dataset demonstrating the capability to handle changes in feature attributes, such as increases in chlorine concentration in a stream, and feature geometry, such as the changing shoreline of barrier islands over time. Data can be entered directly, from a comma separated file, or features with attributes and relationships can be automatically populated in the model from data in the Spatial Data Transfer Standard format.

  15. Spinoff 2001: Special Millennium Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Research and Processing Laboratory. The new laboratory is the first step toward the development of a proposed 400-acre Space Commerce Park, located at Kennedy Space Center. Spinoff, once again, successfully showcases the variety of commercial successes and benefits resulting from the transfer of NASA technology to private industry. It is with great pride and pleasure that we present Spinoff 2001 with a Special Millennium Feature. With help from U.S. industry and commercial technology programs, NASA will continue to assist in the presentation of innovative new products to our nation.

  16. Spectroscopy of the 3 micron emission features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geballe, T. R.; Lacy, J. H.; Persson, S. E.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Soifer, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    High-spectral-resolution observations of the 3.3 and 3.4 microns features in the three planetary nebulae NGC 7027, IC 418, and BD +30 deg 3639, in the H II region S106, and in the 'red rectangle' HD 44179 are presented. The profile of the unidentified 3.3 microns emission feature is similar in all five sources. The unidentified feature previously referred to as the 3.4 microns feature actually consists of two components, a low-level emission from 3.35 to 3.60 microns and a narrow emission peak at 3.40 microns. The strength of the latter feature relative to that of the 3.3 microns feature varies by a a factor of three from source to source. The origin and properties of these features may be explained by further development of the small-grain models of Sellgren (1984) and Leger and Puget (1984).

  17. Integrating Retinotopic Features in Spatiotopic Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Bex, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The receptive fields of early visual neurons are anchored in retinotopic coordinates (Hubel and Wiesel, 1962). Eye movements shift these receptive fields and therefore require that different populations of neurons encode an object's constituent features across saccades. Whether feature groupings are preserved across successive fixations or processing starts anew with each fixation has been hotly debated (Melcher and Morrone, 2003; Melcher, 2005, 2010; Knapen et al., 2009; Cavanagh et al., 2010a,b; Morris et al., 2010). Here we show that feature integration initially occurs within retinotopic coordinates, but is then conserved within a spatiotopic coordinate frame independent of where the features fall on the retinas. With human observers, we first found that the relative timing of visual features plays a critical role in determining the spatial area over which features are grouped. We exploited this temporal dependence of feature integration to show that features co-occurring within 45 ms remain grouped across eye movements. Our results thus challenge purely feedforward models of feature integration (Pelli, 2008; Freeman and Simoncelli, 2011) that begin de novo after every eye movement, and implicate the involvement of brain areas beyond early visual cortex. The strong temporal dependence we quantify and its link with trans-saccadic object perception instead suggest that feature integration depends, at least in part, on feedback from higher brain areas (Mumford, 1992; Rao and Ballard, 1999; Di Lollo et al., 2000; Moore and Armstrong, 2003; Stanford et al., 2010). PMID:24849367

  18. Budget constrained non-monotonic feature selection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiqin; Xu, Zenglin; Lyu, Michael R; King, Irwin

    2015-11-01

    Feature selection is an important problem in machine learning and data mining. We consider the problem of selecting features under the budget constraint on the feature subset size. Traditional feature selection methods suffer from the "monotonic" property. That is, if a feature is selected when the number of specified features is set, it will always be chosen when the number of specified feature is larger than the previous setting. This sacrifices the effectiveness of the non-monotonic feature selection methods. Hence, in this paper, we develop an algorithm for non-monotonic feature selection that approximates the related combinatorial optimization problem by a Multiple Kernel Learning (MKL) problem. We justify the performance guarantee for the derived solution when compared to the global optimal solution for the related combinatorial optimization problem. Finally, we conduct a series of empirical evaluation on both synthetic and real-world benchmark datasets for the classification and regression tasks to demonstrate the promising performance of the proposed framework compared with the baseline feature selection approaches.

  19. Landsat linear features in Montana plains

    SciTech Connect

    Shurr, G.W.

    1983-08-01

    Multispectral scanner images obtained from satellites provide a unique regional perspective of geologic features on the earth's surface. Linear features observed on Landsat images are particularly conspicuous and can be mapped easily. In Montana, east of long. 110/sup 0/W and in adjoining parts of Canada, the Dakotas, and Wyoming, linear features have been mapped on 14 images. Black and white film products in bands 5 and 7 at a scale of 1:1,000,000 were employed. Specific linear features observed on both bands were compiled on a mosaic covering more than 90,000 mi/sup 2/ (233,000 km/sup 2/). Trends to the northwest and northeast are most common, but north-south and east-west linear features are also observed. Four separate tectonic regions of the Montana plains seem to be characterized by different populations of linear features. Published syntheses of geophysical, structural and stratigraphic data can be used to establish the geologic significance of specific linear features. Magnetic, gravity, and seimsic data suggest that linear features may reflect basement structural elements such as fault-bounded blocks. Some specific geologic structures shown on structure contour maps are marked by linear features. Paleotectonic features interpreted from stratigraphic maps have surface expression on Landsat that have not been recognized previously.

  20. Asymmetrical Sample Training Produces Asymmetrical Retention Functions in Feature-Present/Feature-Absent Matching in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Douglas S.; Blatz, Craig W.

    2004-01-01

    Pigeons were trained in a matching task in which samples involved presentation of a white line on a green background (feature-present) or on an otherwise dark key (feature-absent). After asymmetrical training in which one group was initially trained with the feature-present sample and another was initially trained with the feature-absent sample,…

  1. External facial features modify the representation of internal facial features in the fusiform face area.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Vadim; Yovel, Galit

    2010-08-15

    Most studies of face identity have excluded external facial features by either removing them or covering them with a hat. However, external facial features may modify the representation of internal facial features. Here we assessed whether the representation of face identity in the fusiform face area (FFA), which has been primarily studied for internal facial features, is modified by differences in external facial features. We presented faces in which external and internal facial features were manipulated independently. Our findings show that the FFA was sensitive to differences in external facial features, but this effect was significantly larger when the external and internal features were aligned than misaligned. We conclude that the FFA generates a holistic representation in which the internal and the external facial features are integrated. These results indicate that to better understand real-life face recognition both external and internal features should be included.

  2. Video genre classification using multimodal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sung Ho; Bae, Tae Meon; Choo, Jin Ho; Ro, Yong Man

    2003-12-01

    We propose a video genre classification method using multimodal features. The proposed method is applied for the preprocessing of automatic video summarization or the retrieval and classification of broadcasting video contents. Through a statistical analysis of low-level and middle-level audio-visual features in video, the proposed method can achieve good performance in classifying several broadcasting genres such as cartoon, drama, music video, news, and sports. In this paper, we adopt MPEG-7 audio-visual descriptors as multimodal features of video contents and evaluate the performance of the classification by feeding the features into a decision tree-based classifier which is trained by CART. The experimental results show that the proposed method can recognize several broadcasting video genres with a high accuracy and the classification performance with multimodal features is superior to the one with unimodal features in the genre classification.

  3. Feature fusion based on Wootters metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weimin; Chen, Aihong; Gong, Zhaozhe

    2016-10-01

    For further enhancing the completeness and conciseness of the existing quantum-inspired feature fusion methods, this paper applies the quantum-related theories of Wootters metric and Fisher linear discriminant to dimension reduction and feature fusion. From the perspective of quantum metric spaces, i.e. phase space and probability space, this paper proposes two different feature fusion methods which take the Wootters statistical distance as the key factor to detect and fuse the duplicate feature data, and are different to the already developed quantum-inspired feature fusion methods. The experimental results reflect the superiority of the proposed feature fusion methods based on the Wootters metric for their better performances on relative completeness and conciseness.

  4. Roles and Responsibilities in Feature Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Jutta

    Agile development requires self-organizing teams. The set-up of a (feature) team has to enable self-organization. Special care has to be taken if the project is not only distributed, but also large and more than one feature team is involved. Every feature team needs in such a setting a product owner who ensures the continuous focus on business delivery. The product owners collaborate by working together in a virtual team. Each feature team is supported by a coach who ensures not only the agile process of the individual feature team but also across all feature teams. An architect (or if necessary a team of architects) takes care that the system is technically sound. Contrariwise to small co-located projects, large global projects require a project manager who deals with—among other things—internal and especially external politics.

  5. Feature analysis for indoor radar target classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufler, Travis D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper analyzes the spectral features from human beings and indoor clutter for building and tuning Support Vector Machines (SVMs) classifiers for the purpose of classifying stationary human targets. The spectral characteristics were obtained through simulations using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) techniques where the radar cross section (RCS) of humans and indoor clutter objects were captured over a wide range of frequencies, polarizations, aspect angles, and materials. Additionally, experimental data was obtained using a vector network analyzer. Two different feature sets for class discrimination are used from the acquired target and clutter RCS spectral data sets. The first feature vectors consist of the raw spectral characteristics, while the second set of feature vectors are statistical features extracted over a set frequency interval. Utilizing variables of frequency and polarization, a SVM classifier can be trained to classify unknown targets as a human or clutter. Classification accuracy over 80% can be effectively achieved given appropriate features.

  6. Feature encoding for color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Li, Youfu

    2001-09-01

    An approach for color image segmentation is proposed based on the contributions of color features to segmentation rather than the choice of a particular color space. It is different from the pervious methods where SOFM is used for construct the feature encoding so that the feature-encoding can self-organize the effective features for different color images. Fuzzy clustering is applied for the final segmentation when the well-suited color features and the initial parameter are available. The proposed method has been applied in segmenting different types of color images and the experimental results show that it outperforms the classical clustering method. Our study shows that the feature encoding approach offers great promise in automating and optimizing color image segmentation.

  7. Image segmentation using association rule features.

    PubMed

    Rushing, John A; Ranganath, Heggere; Hinke, Thomas H; Graves, Sara J

    2002-01-01

    A new type of texture feature based on association rules is described. Association rules have been used in applications such as market basket analysis to capture relationships present among items in large data sets. It is shown that association rules can be adapted to capture frequently occurring local structures in images. The frequency of occurrence of these structures can be used to characterize texture. Methods for segmentation of textured images based on association rule features are described. Simulation results using images consisting of man made and natural textures show that association rule features perform well compared to other widely used texture features. Association rule features are used to detect cumulus cloud fields in GOES satellite images and are found to achieve higher accuracy than other statistical texture features for this problem.

  8. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  9. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    DOEpatents

    Coffland, Douglas R.

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  10. Composite, ordered material having sharp surface features

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2006-12-19

    A composite material having sharp surface features includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a sharp surface feature. The sharp surface features can be coated to make the surface super-hydrophobic.

  11. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-07

    LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder is a command line software application which searches for possible molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry, and mass spectrometry data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass values, charge states, elution times, and drift times. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting multiple conformations and co-eluting species in the ion mobility dimension. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder is designed to create an output file with detected features that includes associated information about the detected features.

  12. Ontology patterns for complex topographic feature yypes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia E.

    2011-01-01

    Complex feature types are defined as integrated relations between basic features for a shared meaning or concept. The shared semantic concept is difficult to define in commonly used geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies. The role of spatial relations between complex feature parts was recognized in early GIS literature, but had limited representation in the feature or coverage data models of GIS. Spatial relations are more explicitly specified in semantic technology. In this paper, semantics for topographic feature ontology design patterns (ODP) are developed as data models for the representation of complex features. In the context of topographic processes, component assemblages are supported by resource systems and are found on local landscapes. The topographic ontology is organized across six thematic modules that can account for basic feature types, resource systems, and landscape types. Types of complex feature attributes include location, generative processes and physical description. Node/edge networks model standard spatial relations and relations specific to topographic science to represent complex features. To demonstrate these concepts, data from The National Map of the U. S. Geological Survey was converted and assembled into ODP.

  13. Machine vision method for small feature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Kevin G.; Tang, Shu-Guo G.

    2004-12-01

    Small features such as bevels and edge profiles are a common and often critical feature on many manufactured parts. In the past, the only ways to measure such features was to make a wax mold of the feature and slice it for measurement on an optical comparator, or to do a slow mechanical tracing with a stylus or CMM type measurement system. This paper describes the application of machine vision tools, using controlled lighting to highlight shape information such as curvature, combined with 2D vision processing to extract the 3D shape based upon surface modeling.

  14. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder

    2013-03-07

    LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder is a command line software application which searches for possible molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry, and mass spectrometry data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass values, charge states, elution times, and drift times. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting multiple conformations and co-eluting species in the ion mobility dimension. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder is designed to create an output file with detected features thatmore » includes associated information about the detected features.« less

  15. Automatic extraction of planetary image features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne-Stewart, Jacqueline J. (Inventor); Troglio, Giulia (Inventor); Benediktsson, Jon A. (Inventor); Serpico, Sebastiano B. (Inventor); Moser, Gabriele (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for the extraction of Lunar data and/or planetary features is provided. The feature extraction method can include one or more image processing techniques, including, but not limited to, a watershed segmentation and/or the generalized Hough Transform. According to some embodiments, the feature extraction method can include extracting features, such as, small rocks. According to some embodiments, small rocks can be extracted by applying a watershed segmentation algorithm to the Canny gradient. According to some embodiments, applying a watershed segmentation algorithm to the Canny gradient can allow regions that appear as close contours in the gradient to be segmented.

  16. Choosing efficient feature sets for video classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Stephan; Steinmetz, Ralf

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of choosing appropriate features to describe the content of still pictures or video sequences, including audio. As the computational analysis of these features is often time- consuming, it is useful to identify a minimal set allowing for an automatic classification of some class or genre. Further, it can be shown that deleting the coherence of the features characterizing some class, is not suitable to guarantee an optimal classification result. The central question of the paper is thus, which features should be selected, and how they should be weighted to optimize a classification problem.

  17. Features in visual search combine linearly

    PubMed Central

    Pramod, R. T.; Arun, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Single features such as line orientation and length are known to guide visual search, but relatively little is known about how multiple features combine in search. To address this question, we investigated how search for targets differing in multiple features (intensity, length, orientation) from the distracters is related to searches for targets differing in each of the individual features. We tested race models (based on reaction times) and co-activation models (based on reciprocal of reaction times) for their ability to predict multiple feature searches. Multiple feature searches were best accounted for by a co-activation model in which feature information combined linearly (r = 0.95). This result agrees with the classic finding that these features are separable i.e., subjective dissimilarity ratings sum linearly. We then replicated the classical finding that the length and width of a rectangle are integral features—in other words, they combine nonlinearly in visual search. However, to our surprise, upon including aspect ratio as an additional feature, length and width combined linearly and this model outperformed all other models. Thus, length and width of a rectangle became separable when considered together with aspect ratio. This finding predicts that searches involving shapes with identical aspect ratio should be more difficult than searches where shapes differ in aspect ratio. We confirmed this prediction on a variety of shapes. We conclude that features in visual search co-activate linearly and demonstrate for the first time that aspect ratio is a novel feature that guides visual search. PMID:24715328

  18. Naming from definition: the role of feature type and feature distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Marques, J Frederico

    2005-05-01

    The present paper evaluates the contribution of feature type and feature distinctiveness to naming of living and nonliving things using a naming from definition task. Normal subjects read verbal descriptions containing features varying in type (i.e., sensory vs. functional) and distinctiveness (i.e., distinct vs. shared) and were asked to name the concept described and to select the three features that most contributed to their answer. Main results showed that sensory features were selected more often than functional features to support naming living things and that, independent of feature type, more distinct features were selected to support naming more often than shared features. Results are discussed considering the implications for understanding naming and for neuropsychological evaluation. PMID:16104097

  19. Integration of Supportive Design Features and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazaros, Edward J.; Ahmadi, Reza

    2008-01-01

    Integrating supportive design features and technology into the home are excellent ways to plan to make a home "age-friendly." When an immediate need occurs for eliminating barriers in an existing home, supportive design features and technology will most often need to be examined, and some form of implementation will need to take place. While…

  20. Category Representation for Classification and Feature Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Mark K.; Kruschke, John K.

    2005-01-01

    This research's purpose was to contrast the representations resulting from learning of the same categories by either classifying instances or inferring instance features. Prior inference learning research, particularly T. Yamauchi and A. B. Markman (1998), has suggested that feature inference learning fosters prototype representation, whereas…

  1. Teaching World Music through Feature Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Chee-Hoo

    2009-01-01

    When used effectively, feature films can bring a plethora of visual and aural stimulation to students and enhance their learning about world cultures. Feature films can take students to places, sights, and sounds that they have yet to experience. After watching these films, students might become new admirers or even keen followers of the subject…

  2. Features of Published Analyses of Canonical Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries-Wadsworth, Terresa M.

    D. Wood and J. Erskine (1976) and B. Thompson (1989) provided bibliographies of roughly 130 applications of canonical correlation analysis, but the features of such reports have not been widely studied. This report examines the features of recent canonical reports, including substantive inquiries, but also measurement applications examining…

  3. Pronunciation Features of Thai Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jack

    1969-01-01

    This paper describes some of the pronunciation features of Thai speakers of English in New Zealand, based on the observation of Thai students during their language laboratory sessions in a pre-university English course. Regular pronunciation features and consistent patterns of sound replacement were observed, which seemed to be characteristic of,…

  4. Hemispheric lateralization of semantic feature distinctiveness

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, M.; Machado, N.; Blumstein, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models of semantic memory propose that the semantic representation of concepts is based, in part, on a network of features. In this view, a feature that is distinctive for an object (a zebra has stripes) is processed differently from a feature that is shared across many objects (a zebra has four legs). The goal of this paper is to determine whether there are hemispheric differences in such processing. In a feature verification task, participants responded ‘yes’ or ‘no’ following concepts which were presented to a single visual field (left or right) paired with a shared or distinctive feature. Both hemispheres showed faster reaction times to shared features than to distinctive features, although right hemisphere responses were significantly slower overall and particularly in the processing of distinctive features. These findings support models of semantic processing in which the dominant left hemisphere more efficiently performs highly discriminating ‘fine’ encoding, in contrast to the right hemisphere which performs less discriminating ‘coarse’ encoding. PMID:26022059

  5. 27 CFR 44.249 - Lottery features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lottery features. 44.249... Requirements § 44.249 Lottery features. No certificate, coupon, or other device purporting to be or to represent a ticket, chance, share, or an interest in, or dependent on, the event of a lottery shall...

  6. 27 CFR 44.182 - Lottery features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lottery features. 44.182... Lottery features. No certificate, coupon, or other device purporting to be or to represent a ticket, chance, share, or an interest in, or dependent on, the event of a lottery shall be contained in,...

  7. A Linguistic Approach to Distinctive Feature Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blache, Stephen E.; Parsons, Carl L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes an instructional procedure for teaching distinctive features to children with articulation problems. The procedure uses minimal pairs to teach a feature. A four step program is described that considers conceptual skills, discrimination and production training, as well as carry-over. (Author/SBH)

  8. System Complexity Reduction via Feature Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Houtao

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation transforms a set of system complexity reduction problems to feature selection problems. Three systems are considered: classification based on association rules, network structure learning, and time series classification. Furthermore, two variable importance measures are proposed to reduce the feature selection bias in tree…

  9. Carriers of the astronomical 2175 ? extinction feature

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J; Dai, Z; Ernie, R; Browning, N; Graham, G; Weber, P; Smith, J; Hutcheon, I; Ishii, H; Bajt, S; Floss, C; Stadermann, F

    2004-07-20

    The 2175 {angstrom} extinction feature is by far the strongest spectral signature of interstellar dust observed by astronomers. Forty years after its discovery the origin of the feature and the nature of the carrier remain controversial. The feature is enigmatic because although its central wavelength is almost invariant its bandwidth varies strongly from one sightline to another, suggesting multiple carriers or a single carrier with variable properties. Using a monochromated transmission electron microscope and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy we have detected a 5.7 eV (2175 {angstrom}) feature in submicrometer-sized interstellar grains within interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere. The carriers are organic carbon and amorphous silicates that are abundant and closely associated with one another both in IDPs and in the interstellar medium. Multiple carriers rather than a single carrier may explain the invariant central wavelength and variable bandwidth of the astronomical 2175 {angstrom} feature.

  10. Audio feature extraction using probability distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhaib, A.; Wan, Khairunizam; Aziz, Azri A.; Hazry, D.; Razlan, Zuradzman M.; Shahriman A., B.

    2015-05-01

    Voice recognition has been one of the popular applications in robotic field. It is also known to be recently used for biometric and multimedia information retrieval system. This technology is attained from successive research on audio feature extraction analysis. Probability Distribution Function (PDF) is a statistical method which is usually used as one of the processes in complex feature extraction methods such as GMM and PCA. In this paper, a new method for audio feature extraction is proposed which is by using only PDF as a feature extraction method itself for speech analysis purpose. Certain pre-processing techniques are performed in prior to the proposed feature extraction method. Subsequently, the PDF result values for each frame of sampled voice signals obtained from certain numbers of individuals are plotted. From the experimental results obtained, it can be seen visually from the plotted data that each individuals' voice has comparable PDF values and shapes.

  11. Earth feature identification and tracking technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. G.; Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses needs for smart sensing in terrestrial and atmospheric remote sensing as related to current technology and a scheduled Shuttle experiment. An approach is outlined involving Shuttle-borne experiments to develop earth feature identification and tracking technology including a Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE) scheduled for flight on the NASA Shuttle with an objective of classifying earth features into categories of bare land, water, vegetation, and clouds, snow, and ice. The plan for evolution of the FILE-related technology leads to capabilities for pointing instruments to predetermined sites, reacquiring earth features or landmarks, and tracking features such as coastlines and rivers. Technology concepts relative to an overall system transfer function is discussed, and the development status outlined.

  12. Fall Detection Using Smartphone Audio Features.

    PubMed

    Cheffena, Michael

    2016-07-01

    An automated fall detection system based on smartphone audio features is developed. The spectrogram, mel frequency cepstral coefficents (MFCCs), linear predictive coding (LPC), and matching pursuit (MP) features of different fall and no-fall sound events are extracted from experimental data. Based on the extracted audio features, four different machine learning classifiers: k-nearest neighbor classifier (k-NN), support vector machine (SVM), least squares method (LSM), and artificial neural network (ANN) are investigated for distinguishing between fall and no-fall events. For each audio feature, the performance of each classifier in terms of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and computational complexity is evaluated. The best performance is achieved using spectrogram features with ANN classifier with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy all above 98%. The classifier also has acceptable computational requirement for training and testing. The system is applicable in home environments where the phone is placed in the vicinity of the user.

  13. Sensor feature fusion for detecting buried objects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Sherwood, R.J.; Hernandez, J.E.; Buhl, M.R.; Schaich, P.C.; Kane, R.J.; Barth, M.J.; DelGrande, N.K.

    1993-04-01

    Given multiple registered images of the earth`s surface from dual-band sensors, our system fuses information from the sensors to reduce the effects of clutter and improve the ability to detect buried or surface target sites. The sensor suite currently includes two sensors (5 micron and 10 micron wavelengths) and one ground penetrating radar (GPR) of the wide-band pulsed synthetic aperture type. We use a supervised teaming pattern recognition approach to detect metal and plastic land mines buried in soil. The overall process consists of four main parts: Preprocessing, feature extraction, feature selection, and classification. These parts are used in a two step process to classify a subimage. Thee first step, referred to as feature selection, determines the features of sub-images which result in the greatest separability among the classes. The second step, image labeling, uses the selected features and the decisions from a pattern classifier to label the regions in the image which are likely to correspond to buried mines. We extract features from the images, and use feature selection algorithms to select only the most important features according to their contribution to correct detections. This allows us to save computational complexity and determine which of the sensors add value to the detection system. The most important features from the various sensors are fused using supervised teaming pattern classifiers (including neural networks). We present results of experiments to detect buried land mines from real data, and evaluate the usefulness of fusing feature information from multiple sensor types, including dual-band infrared and ground penetrating radar. The novelty of the work lies mostly in the combination of the algorithms and their application to the very important and currently unsolved operational problem of detecting buried land mines from an airborne standoff platform.

  14. Robust feature-based object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing; Roberts, William; Wu, Dapeng; Li, Jian

    2007-04-01

    Object tracking is an important component of many computer vision systems. It is widely used in video surveillance, robotics, 3D image reconstruction, medical imaging, and human computer interface. In this paper, we focus on unsupervised object tracking, i.e., without prior knowledge about the object to be tracked. To address this problem, we take a feature-based approach, i.e., using feature points (or landmark points) to represent objects. Feature-based object tracking consists of feature extraction and feature correspondence. Feature correspondence is particularly challenging since a feature point in one image may have many similar points in another image, resulting in ambiguity in feature correspondence. To resolve the ambiguity, algorithms, which use exhaustive search and correlation over a large neighborhood, have been proposed. However, these algorithms incur high computational complexity, which is not suitable for real-time tracking. In contrast, Tomasi and Kanade's tracking algorithm only searches corresponding points in a small candidate set, which significantly reduces computational complexity; but the algorithm may lose track of feature points in a long image sequence. To mitigate the limitations of the aforementioned algorithms, this paper proposes an efficient and robust feature-based tracking algorithm. The key idea of our algorithm is as below. For a given target feature point in one frame, we first find a corresponding point in the next frame, which minimizes the sum-of-squared-difference (SSD) between the two points; then we test whether the corresponding point gives large value under the so-called Harris criterion. If not, we further identify a candidate set of feature points in a small neighborhood of the target point; then find a corresponding point from the candidate set, which minimizes the SSD between the two points. The algorithm may output no corresponding point due to disappearance of the target point. Our algorithm is capable of tracking

  15. Innovations in individual feature history management - The significance of feature-based temporal model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Seong, J.C.; Kim, B.; Usery, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    A feature relies on three dimensions (space, theme, and time) for its representation. Even though spatiotemporal models have been proposed, they have principally focused on the spatial changes of a feature. In this paper, a feature-based temporal model is proposed to represent the changes of both space and theme independently. The proposed model modifies the ISO's temporal schema and adds new explicit temporal relationship structure that stores temporal topological relationship with the ISO's temporal primitives of a feature in order to keep track feature history. The explicit temporal relationship can enhance query performance on feature history by removing topological comparison during query process. Further, a prototype system has been developed to test a proposed feature-based temporal model by querying land parcel history in Athens, Georgia. The result of temporal query on individual feature history shows the efficiency of the explicit temporal relationship structure. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  16. Detection and tracking of facial features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, Liyanage C.; Aizawa, Kiyoharu; Hatori, Mitsutoshi

    1995-04-01

    Detection and tracking of facial features without using any head mounted devices may become required in various future visual communication applications, such as teleconferencing, virtual reality etc. In this paper we propose an automatic method of face feature detection using a method called edge pixel counting. Instead of utilizing color or gray scale information of the facial image, the proposed edge pixel counting method utilized the edge information to estimate the face feature positions such as eyes, nose and mouth in the first frame of a moving facial image sequence, using a variable size face feature template. For the remaining frames, feature tracking is carried out alternatively using a method called deformable template matching and edge pixel counting. One main advantage of using edge pixel counting in feature tracking is that it does not require the condition of a high inter frame correlation around the feature areas as is required in template matching. Some experimental results are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Untangling features in the primordial spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, Gonzalo A.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss the possible existence of features in both the primordial power spectrum and bispectrum generated during a stage of single field cosmic inflation. We argue that there are two main classes of features: those produced by a sudden time variation of the sound speed of curvature perturbations, and those produced by a sudden change in the expansion rate during inflation. The former are known to be produced by heavy fields, when the inflationary background trajectory in field space undergoes a bend, whereas the latter are known to be produced by features in the inflaton potential encountered as the inflaton field descends its slope. In general, features are expected to be the result of these two sources combined, however, it is possible that one source dominated over the other, resulting in a distinctive pattern that may be observationally tested. We deduce a relation that gives us the shape of features in the bispectrum provided that we know the shape of features in the power spectrum, and show that each one of these two classes of features leaves a particular footprint in the distribution of perturbations that could be uncovered by a joint analysis of the primordial power spectrum and bispectrum.

  18. Genetic feature selection for gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafazzoli, Faezeh; Bebis, George; Louis, Sushil; Hussain, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Many research studies have demonstrated that gait can serve as a useful biometric modality for human identification at a distance. Traditional gait recognition systems, however, have mostly been evaluated without explicitly considering the most relevant gait features, which might have compromised performance. We investigate the problem of selecting a subset of the most relevant gait features for improving gait recognition performance. This is achieved by discarding redundant and irrelevant gait features while preserving the most informative ones. Motivated by our previous work on feature subset selection using genetic algorithms (GAs), we propose using GAs to select an optimal subset of gait features. First, features are extracted using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) on spatiotemporal projections of gait silhouettes. Then, GA is applied to select a subset of eigenvectors in KPCA space that best represents a subject's identity. Each gait pattern is then represented by projecting it only on the eigenvectors selected by the GA. To evaluate the effectiveness of the selected features, we have experimented with two different classifiers: k nearest-neighbor and Naïve Bayes classifier. We report considerable gait recognition performance improvements on the Georgia Tech and CASIA databases.

  19. Hierarchical feature selection for erythema severity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Shi, Chenbo; Shu, Chang

    2014-10-01

    At present PASI system of scoring is used for evaluating erythema severity, which can help doctors to diagnose psoriasis [1-3]. The system relies on the subjective judge of doctors, where the accuracy and stability cannot be guaranteed [4]. This paper proposes a stable and precise algorithm for erythema severity estimation. Our contributions are twofold. On one hand, in order to extract the multi-scale redness of erythema, we design the hierarchical feature. Different from traditional methods, we not only utilize the color statistical features, but also divide the detect window into small window and extract hierarchical features. Further, a feature re-ranking step is introduced, which can guarantee that extracted features are irrelevant to each other. On the other hand, an adaptive boosting classifier is applied for further feature selection. During the step of training, the classifier will seek out the most valuable feature for evaluating erythema severity, due to its strong learning ability. Experimental results demonstrate the high precision and robustness of our algorithm. The accuracy is 80.1% on the dataset which comprise 116 patients' images with various kinds of erythema. Now our system has been applied for erythema medical efficacy evaluation in Union Hosp, China.

  20. Protein sequence classification using feature hashing.

    PubMed

    Caragea, Cornelia; Silvescu, Adrian; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2012-06-21

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have resulted in an exponential increase in the rate at which protein sequence data are being acquired. The k-gram feature representation, commonly used for protein sequence classification, usually results in prohibitively high dimensional input spaces, for large values of k. Applying data mining algorithms to these input spaces may be intractable due to the large number of dimensions. Hence, using dimensionality reduction techniques can be crucial for the performance and the complexity of the learning algorithms. In this paper, we study the applicability of feature hashing to protein sequence classification, where the original high-dimensional space is "reduced" by hashing the features into a low-dimensional space, using a hash function, i.e., by mapping features into hash keys, where multiple features can be mapped (at random) to the same hash key, and "aggregating" their counts. We compare feature hashing with the "bag of k-grams" approach. Our results show that feature hashing is an effective approach to reducing dimensionality on protein sequence classification tasks.

  1. Pneumonia identification using statistical feature selection

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Fei; Vanderwende, Lucy; Wurfel, Mark M; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2012-01-01

    Objective This paper describes a natural language processing system for the task of pneumonia identification. Based on the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with a patient, the task is to identify whether or not the patient is positive for pneumonia. Design A binary classifier was employed to identify pneumonia from a dataset of multiple types of clinical notes created for 426 patients during their stay in the intensive care unit. For this purpose, three types of features were considered: (1) word n-grams, (2) Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts, and (3) assertion values associated with pneumonia expressions. System performance was greatly increased by a feature selection approach which uses statistical significance testing to rank features based on their association with the two categories of pneumonia identification. Results Besides testing our system on the entire cohort of 426 patients (unrestricted dataset), we also used a smaller subset of 236 patients (restricted dataset). The performance of the system was compared with the results of a baseline previously proposed for these two datasets. The best results achieved by the system (85.71 and 81.67 F1-measure) are significantly better than the baseline results (50.70 and 49.10 F1-measure) on the restricted and unrestricted datasets, respectively. Conclusion Using a statistical feature selection approach that allows the feature extractor to consider only the most informative features from the feature space significantly improves the performance over a baseline that uses all the features from the same feature space. Extracting the assertion value for pneumonia expressions further improves the system performance. PMID:22539080

  2. Global map of eolian features on Mars.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, A.W.; Doyle, K.B.; Helm, P.J.; Weisman, M.K.; Witbeck, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    Ten basic categories of eolian features on Mars were identified from a survey of Mariner 9 and Viking orbiter images. The ten features mapped are 1) light streaks (including frost streaks), 2) dark streaks, 3) sand sheets or splotches, 4) barchan dunes, 5) transverse dunes, 6) crescentic dunes, 7) anomalous dunes, 8) yardangs, 9) wind grooves, and 10) deflation pits. The features were mapped in groups, not as individual landforms, and recorded according to their geographic positions and orientations on maps of 1:12.5 million or 1:25 million scale. -from Authors

  3. Image fusion using sparse overcomplete feature dictionaries

    DOEpatents

    Brumby, Steven P.; Bettencourt, Luis; Kenyon, Garrett T.; Chartrand, Rick; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2015-10-06

    Approaches for deciding what individuals in a population of visual system "neurons" are looking for using sparse overcomplete feature dictionaries are provided. A sparse overcomplete feature dictionary may be learned for an image dataset and a local sparse representation of the image dataset may be built using the learned feature dictionary. A local maximum pooling operation may be applied on the local sparse representation to produce a translation-tolerant representation of the image dataset. An object may then be classified and/or clustered within the translation-tolerant representation of the image dataset using a supervised classification algorithm and/or an unsupervised clustering algorithm.

  4. Features of semiplanotron surface plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Features of the semiplanotron surface plasma sources (SPS) with cesiation used for high efficient negative ion beam production from first development to modern condition are considered. Design features of semiplanotrons SPS with cylindrical and spherical geometric focusing and the features of the negative ion production in the semiplanotrons are reviewed. Several versions of semiplanotrons with efficiency up to 0.1 A of H{sup -} per kW of discharge power are discussed. Modifications of the semiplanotrons for dc operation and for heavy negative ion production are reviewed.

  5. Features: Real-Time Adaptive Feature and Document Learning for Web Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zhixiang; Meng, Xiannong; Fowler, Richard H.; Zhu, Binhai

    2001-01-01

    Describes Features, an intelligent Web search engine that is able to perform real-time adaptive feature (i.e., keyword) and document learning. Explains how Features learns from users' document relevance feedback and automatically extracts and suggests indexing keywords relevant to a search query, and learns from users' keyword relevance feedback…

  6. Feature-positive and feature-negative learning in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Charles I; Cakmak, Ibrahim; Duell, Meghan E; Bates-Albers, Leah M; Zuniga, Enoc M; Pendegraft, Loma; Barnett, Amanda; Cowo, Carmen L; Warren, Joshua J; Albritton-Ford, Aaron C; Barthell, John F; Hranitz, John M; Wells, Harrington

    2013-01-15

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera anatolica) were subjected to sequential trials where they were given the choice between a feature-positive and a feature-negative feeding plate. The 'feature' being manipulated is the presence of a single blue circle among three circles marking the location of a small sucrose reward. That is, a 'feature-negative' target had three white circles, while a 'feature-positive' target had two white circles and one blue one. Two experiments were performed. In both experiments, each bee was tested under two different reward scenarios (treatments). In the first experiment, during the feature-positive treatment bees received 4 μl of 2 mol l(-1) sucrose when choosing the feature-positive plate, but received 4 μl of saturated NaCl solution (saltwater) when choosing the feature-negative plate. During the feature-negative treatment, bees were rewarded when visiting the feature-negative plate, while visitation to the feature-positive plate only offered bees the saltwater. The second experiment was a repeat of the first except that pure water was offered instead of saltwater in the non-rewarding feeding plate. As an experimental control, a set of bees was offered sequential trials where both the feature-positive and feature-negative plates offered the sucrose reward. Bee feeding plate choice differed between the feature-positive and feature-negative treatments in both experiments. Bees favored the feeding plate type with the sucrose reward in each treatment, and never consumed the saltwater or pure water when encountered in either treatment. Further, behavior of bees during both the feature-positive and feature-negative treatments differed from that of control bees. However, neither feature-positive nor feature-negative learning reached high levels of success. Further, a feature-positive effect was seen when pure water was offered; bees learned to solve the feature-positive problem more rapidly. When we tested bees using simply the choice of blue versus

  7. Feature Based Measuring, Version 2.1

    2002-07-22

    A model-based tool that uses Measurement Features for generating measurement plans that facilitate DMIS compliant CMM Measurement part programs for both manufacturing verification and/or product acceptance.

  8. Educational Wikis: Features and Selection Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Linda; Clark, Sharon; Cossarin, Mary; Rudolph, Jim

    2004-01-01

    This report discusses the educational uses of the "wiki," an increasingly popular approach to online community development. Wikis are defined and compared with "blogging" methods; characteristics of major wiki engines are described; and wiki features and selection criteria are examined.

  9. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  10. Schizophrenia classification using functional network features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rish, Irina; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Heuton, Kyle

    2012-03-01

    This paper focuses on discovering statistical biomarkers (features) that are predictive of schizophrenia, with a particular focus on topological properties of fMRI functional networks. We consider several network properties, such as node (voxel) strength, clustering coefficients, local efficiency, as well as just a subset of pairwise correlations. While all types of features demonstrate highly significant statistical differences in several brain areas, and close to 80% classification accuracy, the most remarkable results of 93% accuracy are achieved by using a small subset of only a dozen of most-informative (lowest p-value) correlation features. Our results suggest that voxel-level correlations and functional network features derived from them are highly informative about schizophrenia and can be used as statistical biomarkers for the disease.

  11. Wood Recognition Using Image Texture Features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hang-jun; Zhang, Guang-qun; Qi, Heng-nian

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by theories of higher local order autocorrelation (HLAC), this paper presents a simple, novel, yet very powerful approach for wood recognition. The method is suitable for wood database applications, which are of great importance in wood related industries and administrations. At the feature extraction stage, a set of features is extracted from Mask Matching Image (MMI). The MMI features preserve the mask matching information gathered from the HLAC methods. The texture information in the image can then be accurately extracted from the statistical and geometrical features. In particular, richer information and enhanced discriminative power is achieved through the length histogram, a new histogram that embodies the width and height histograms. The performance of the proposed approach is compared to the state-of-the-art HLAC approaches using the wood stereogram dataset ZAFU WS 24. By conducting extensive experiments on ZAFU WS 24, we show that our approach significantly improves the classification accuracy. PMID:24146821

  12. Laboratory arc furnace features interchangeable hearths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. L.; Kruger, O. L.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory arc furnace using rapidly interchangeable hearths gains considerable versatility in casting so that buttons or special shaped castings can be produced. It features a sight glass for observation.

  13. Capacity for visual features in mental rotation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yangqing; Franconeri, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Although mental rotation is a core component of scientific reasoning, we still know little about its underlying mechanism. For instance - how much visual information can we rotate at once? Participants rotated a simple multi-part shape, requiring them to maintain attachments between features and moving parts. The capacity of this aspect of mental rotation was strikingly low – only one feature could remain attached to one part. Behavioral and eyetracking data showed that this single feature remained ‘glued’ via a singular focus of attention, typically on the object’s top. We argue that the architecture of the human visual system is not suited for keeping multiple features attached to multiple parts during mental rotation. Such measurement of the capacity limits may prove to be a critical step in dissecting the suite of visuospatial tools involved in mental rotation, leading to insights for improvement of pedagogy in science education contexts. PMID:26174781

  14. Seachable Solar Feature Catalogues in EGSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Aboudarham, J.; Zharkov, S. I.; Ipson, S. S.; Benkhalil, A. K.; Fuller, N.

    2004-12-01

    The searchable Solar Feature Catalogues (SFC) developed using automated pattern recognition techniques from digitized solar images are presented. The techniques were applied for detection of sunspots, active regions, filaments and line-on-sight magnetic neutral lines in the automatically standardized full disk solar images in Ca II K1, Ca II K3 and Ha taken at the Meudon Observatory and white light images and magnetograms from SOHO/MDI. The results of automated recognition were verified with the manual synoptic maps and available statistical data that revealed good detection accuracy. Based on the recognized parameters a structured database of the Solar Feature Catalogues was built on a mysql server for every feature and published with various pre-designed search pages on the Bradford University web site. The SFCs with 10 year coverage (1996-2005) is to be used for deeper investigation of the solar activity, activity feature classification and forecast.

  15. Inherent design features of the GCFR

    SciTech Connect

    Medwid, W.; Breher, W.; Shenoy, A.; Elliott, R.

    1980-05-01

    This paper discusses several inherent design features of the GCFR that enhance its safety and presents analyses to demonstrate the degree of protection they provide. These features are a subset of a larger group of potential inherent features that form the third line of protection (LOP-3) for the GCFR. The function of LOP-3 is to demonstrate that the inherent response of the reactor system will limit core damage even if active cooling and shutdown systems in LOP-1 and LOP-2 fail. By providing this function with inherent features, which do not depend on active components and are self-controlling, an additional level of protection against common cause failure mechanisms is provided for both protected and unprotected events. The examples of LOP-3 discussed in this paper are natural circulation core cooling to the ultimate atmospheric heat sink and inherent reactor shutdown mechanisms.

  16. Parabolic Ejecta Features on Titan? Probably Not

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Melosh, H. J.

    1996-03-01

    Radar mapping of Venus by Magellan indicated a number of dark parabolic features, associated with impact craters. A suggested mechanism for generating such features is that ejecta from the impact event is 'winnowed' by the zonal wind field, with smaller ejecta particles falling out of the atmosphere more slowly, and hence drifting further. What discriminates such features from simple wind streaks is the 'stingray' or parabolic shape. This is due to the ejecta's spatial distribution prior to being winnowed during fallout, and this distribution is generated by the explosion plume of the impact piercing the atmosphere, allowing the ejecta to disperse pseudoballistically before re-entering the atmosphere, decelerating to terminal velocity and then being winnowed. Here we apply this model to Titan, which has a zonal wind field similar to that of Venus. We find that Cassini will probably not find parabolic features, as the winds stretch the deposition so far that ejecta will form streaks or bands instead.

  17. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  18. Elderly fall detection using SIFT hybrid features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Chao; Guo, Yongcai

    2015-10-01

    With the tendency of aging society, countries all over the world are dealing with the demographic change. Fall had been proven to be of the highest fatality rate among the elderly. To realize the elderly fall detection, the proposed algorithm used the hybrid feature. Based on the rate of centroid change, the algorithm adopted VEI to offer the posture feature, this combined motion feature with posture feature. The algorithm also took advantage of SIFT descriptor of VEI(V-SIFT) to show more details of behaviors with occlusion. An improved motion detection method was proposed to improve the accuracy of front-view motion detection. The experimental results on CASIA database and self-built database showed that the proposed approach has high efficiency and strong robustness which effectively improved the accuracy of fall detection.

  19. MCNP4A: Features and philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes MCNP, states its philosophy, introduces a number of new features becoming available with version MCNP4A, and answers a number of questions asked by participants in the workshop. MCNP is a general-purpose three-dimensional neutron, photon and electron transport code. Its philosophy is ``Quality, Value and New Features.`` Quality is exemplified by new software quality assurance practices and a program of benchmarking against experiments. Value includes a strong emphasis on documentation and code portability. New features are the third priority. MCNP4A is now available at Los Alamos. New features in MCNP4A include enhanced statistical analysis, distributed processor multitasking, new photon libraries, ENDF/B-VI capabilities, X-Windows graphics, dynamic memory allocation, expanded criticality output, periodic boundaries, plotting of particle tracks via SABRINA, and many other improvements. 23 refs.

  20. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  1. The crater density of a linear feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spong, L.

    1984-01-01

    The standard method of crater counting presently employed permits determination of the relative ages of areal geologic features on cratered planets and satellites. A new method is presented which calculates the areal density of the craters superposed upon linear features. The method produces an effective synthetic area around the linear feature for each crater bin size, permitting the line counts to be compared directly with standard area counts. The shape of the synthetic area produced by the method is an oval, with the calculation of this area for each in being dependent on the median crater size for that bin, as well as the length and width of the linear feature. Incorporated into the method's equation is a factor to normalize the count to one million square kilometers for each bin. Because of the dependence of the method on the crater sizes, the largest possible number of bins should be counted for the method to be the most effective.

  2. ECG Feature Extraction using Time Frequency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Mahesh A.

    The proposed algorithm is a novel method for the feature extraction of ECG beats based on Wavelet Transforms. A combination of two well-accepted methods, Pan Tompkins algorithm and Wavelet decomposition, this system is implemented with the help of MATLAB. The focus of this work is to implement the algorithm, which can extract the features of ECG beats with high accuracy. The performance of this system is evaluated in a pilot study using the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database.

  3. Real-Time Feature Tracking Using Homography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel S.; Cheng, Yang; Ansar, Adnan I.; Trotz, David C.; Padgett, Curtis W.

    2010-01-01

    This software finds feature point correspondences in sequences of images. It is designed for feature matching in aerial imagery. Feature matching is a fundamental step in a number of important image processing operations: calibrating the cameras in a camera array, stabilizing images in aerial movies, geo-registration of images, and generating high-fidelity surface maps from aerial movies. The method uses a Shi-Tomasi corner detector and normalized cross-correlation. This process is likely to result in the production of some mismatches. The feature set is cleaned up using the assumption that there is a large planar patch visible in both images. At high altitude, this assumption is often reasonable. A mathematical transformation, called an homography, is developed that allows us to predict the position in image 2 of any point on the plane in image 1. Any feature pair that is inconsistent with the homography is thrown out. The output of the process is a set of feature pairs, and the homography. The algorithms in this innovation are well known, but the new implementation improves the process in several ways. It runs in real-time at 2 Hz on 64-megapixel imagery. The new Shi-Tomasi corner detector tries to produce the requested number of features by automatically adjusting the minimum distance between found features. The homography-finding code now uses an implementation of the RANSAC algorithm that adjusts the number of iterations automatically to achieve a pre-set probability of missing a set of inliers. The new interface allows the caller to pass in a set of predetermined points in one of the images. This allows the ability to track the same set of points through multiple frames.

  4. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression.

    PubMed

    Flevaris, Anastasia V; Murray, Scott O

    2015-01-28

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension.

  5. Optical Ethernet: introduction to the feature issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Cedric F.; Tsang, Danny H. K.

    2002-08-01

    Ethernet and IP (Internet Protocol) have become the ubiquitous protocols for today's data communication networks, with Ethernet being used to provide the physical layer and data-link layer functions and IP for routing and internetworking in the network layer. Here feature editors Cedric F. Lam and Danny H. K. Tsang discuss the emerging technology of Optical Ethernet and introduce the papers in this feature issue of JON.

  6. Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois; Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae; Nishio, Mayuko; Worden, Keith; Takeda, Nobuo

    2010-11-08

    This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

  7. Feature Assignment in Perception of Auditory Figure

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Melissa K.; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2012-01-01

    Because the environment often includes multiple sounds that overlap in time, listeners must segregate a sound of interest (the auditory figure) from other co-occurring sounds (the unattended auditory ground). We conducted a series of experiments to clarify the principles governing the extraction of auditory figures. We distinguish between auditory “objects” (relatively punctate events, such as a dog's bark) and auditory “streams” (sounds involving a pattern over time, such as a galloping rhythm). In Experiments 1 and 2, on each trial two sounds -- an object (a vowel) and a stream (a series of tones) – were presented with one target feature that could be perceptually grouped with either source. In each block of these experiments, listeners were required to attend to one of the two sounds, and report its perceived category. Across several experimental manipulations, listeners were more likely to allocate the feature to an impoverished object if the result of the grouping was a good, identifiable object. Perception of objects was quite sensitive to feature variation (noise masking), whereas perception of streams was more robust to feature variation. In Experiment 3, the number of sound sources competing for the feature was increased to three. This produced a shift toward relying more on spatial cues than on the potential contribution of the feature to an object's perceptual quality. The results support a distinction between auditory objects and streams, and provide new information about the way that the auditory world is parsed. PMID:22288691

  8. Electronic Nose Feature Extraction Methods: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jia; Guo, Xiuzhen; Duan, Shukai; Jia, Pengfei; Wang, Lidan; Peng, Chao; Zhang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    Many research groups in academia and industry are focusing on the performance improvement of electronic nose (E-nose) systems mainly involving three optimizations, which are sensitive material selection and sensor array optimization, enhanced feature extraction methods and pattern recognition method selection. For a specific application, the feature extraction method is a basic part of these three optimizations and a key point in E-nose system performance improvement. The aim of a feature extraction method is to extract robust information from the sensor response with less redundancy to ensure the effectiveness of the subsequent pattern recognition algorithm. Many kinds of feature extraction methods have been used in E-nose applications, such as extraction from the original response curves, curve fitting parameters, transform domains, phase space (PS) and dynamic moments (DM), parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), energy vector (EV), power density spectrum (PSD), window time slicing (WTS) and moving window time slicing (MWTS), moving window function capture (MWFC), etc. The object of this review is to provide a summary of the various feature extraction methods used in E-noses in recent years, as well as to give some suggestions and new inspiration to propose more effective feature extraction methods for the development of E-nose technology. PMID:26540056

  9. Error margin analysis for feature gene extraction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Feature gene extraction is a fundamental issue in microarray-based biomarker discovery. It is normally treated as an optimization problem of finding the best predictive feature genes that can effectively and stably discriminate distinct types of disease conditions, e.g. tumors and normals. Since gene microarray data normally involves thousands of genes at, tens or hundreds of samples, the gene extraction process may fall into local optimums if the gene set is optimized according to the maximization of classification accuracy of the classifier built from it. Results In this paper, we propose a novel gene extraction method of error margin analysis to optimize the feature genes. The proposed algorithm has been tested upon one synthetic dataset and two real microarray datasets. Meanwhile, it has been compared with five existing gene extraction algorithms on each dataset. On the synthetic dataset, the results show that the feature set extracted by our algorithm is the closest to the actual gene set. For the two real datasets, our algorithm is superior in terms of balancing the size and the validation accuracy of the resultant gene set when comparing to other algorithms. Conclusion Because of its distinct features, error margin analysis method can stably extract the relevant feature genes from microarray data for high-performance classification. PMID:20459827

  10. Topology-based Feature Definition and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Gyulassy, Attila; Pascucci, Valerio

    2010-12-10

    Defining high-level features, detecting them, tracking them and deriving quantities based on them is an integral aspect of modern data analysis and visualization. In combustion simulations, for example, burning regions, which are characterized by high fuel-consumption, are a possible feature of interest. Detecting these regions makes it possible to derive statistics about their size and track them over time. However, features of interest in scientific simulations are extremely varied, making it challenging to develop cross-domain feature definitions. Topology-based techniques offer an extremely flexible means for general feature definitions and have proven useful in a variety of scientific domains. This paper will provide a brief introduction into topological structures like the contour tree and Morse-Smale complex and show how to apply them to define features in different science domains such as combustion. The overall goal is to provide an overview of these powerful techniques and start a discussion how these techniques can aid in the analysis of astrophysical simulations.

  11. Simultaneous Channel and Feature Selection of Fused EEG Features Based on Sparse Group Lasso

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-Jia; Xue, Fang; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Feature extraction and classification of EEG signals are core parts of brain computer interfaces (BCIs). Due to the high dimension of the EEG feature vector, an effective feature selection algorithm has become an integral part of research studies. In this paper, we present a new method based on a wrapped Sparse Group Lasso for channel and feature selection of fused EEG signals. The high-dimensional fused features are firstly obtained, which include the power spectrum, time-domain statistics, AR model, and the wavelet coefficient features extracted from the preprocessed EEG signals. The wrapped channel and feature selection method is then applied, which uses the logistical regression model with Sparse Group Lasso penalized function. The model is fitted on the training data, and parameter estimation is obtained by modified blockwise coordinate descent and coordinate gradient descent method. The best parameters and feature subset are selected by using a 10-fold cross-validation. Finally, the test data is classified using the trained model. Compared with existing channel and feature selection methods, results show that the proposed method is more suitable, more stable, and faster for high-dimensional feature fusion. It can simultaneously achieve channel and feature selection with a lower error rate. The test accuracy on the data used from international BCI Competition IV reached 84.72%. PMID:25802861

  12. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  13. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  14. Interactive music composition driven by feature evolution.

    PubMed

    Kaliakatsos-Papakostas, Maximos A; Floros, Andreas; Vrahatis, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary music composition is a prominent technique for automatic music generation. The immense adaptation potential of evolutionary algorithms has allowed the realisation of systems that automatically produce music through feature and interactive-based composition approaches. Feature-based composition employs qualitatively descriptive music features as fitness landmarks. Interactive composition systems on the other hand, derive fitness directly from human ratings and/or selection. The paper at hand introduces a methodological framework that combines the merits of both evolutionary composition methodologies. To this end, a system is presented that is organised in two levels: the higher level of interaction and the lower level of composition. The higher level incorporates the particle swarm optimisation algorithm, along with a proposed variant and evolves musical features according to user ratings. The lower level realizes feature-based music composition with a genetic algorithm, according to the top level features. The aim of this work is not to validate the efficiency of the currently utilised setup in each level, but to examine the convergence behaviour of such a two-level technique in an objective manner. Therefore, an additional novelty in this work concerns the utilisation of artificial raters that guide the system through the space of musical features, allowing the exploration of its convergence characteristics: does the system converge to optimal melodies, is this convergence fast enough for potential human listeners and is the trajectory to convergence "interesting' and "creative" enough? The experimental results reveal that the proposed methodological framework represents a fruitful and robust, novel approach to interactive music composition.

  15. Interactive music composition driven by feature evolution.

    PubMed

    Kaliakatsos-Papakostas, Maximos A; Floros, Andreas; Vrahatis, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary music composition is a prominent technique for automatic music generation. The immense adaptation potential of evolutionary algorithms has allowed the realisation of systems that automatically produce music through feature and interactive-based composition approaches. Feature-based composition employs qualitatively descriptive music features as fitness landmarks. Interactive composition systems on the other hand, derive fitness directly from human ratings and/or selection. The paper at hand introduces a methodological framework that combines the merits of both evolutionary composition methodologies. To this end, a system is presented that is organised in two levels: the higher level of interaction and the lower level of composition. The higher level incorporates the particle swarm optimisation algorithm, along with a proposed variant and evolves musical features according to user ratings. The lower level realizes feature-based music composition with a genetic algorithm, according to the top level features. The aim of this work is not to validate the efficiency of the currently utilised setup in each level, but to examine the convergence behaviour of such a two-level technique in an objective manner. Therefore, an additional novelty in this work concerns the utilisation of artificial raters that guide the system through the space of musical features, allowing the exploration of its convergence characteristics: does the system converge to optimal melodies, is this convergence fast enough for potential human listeners and is the trajectory to convergence "interesting' and "creative" enough? The experimental results reveal that the proposed methodological framework represents a fruitful and robust, novel approach to interactive music composition. PMID:27386275

  16. Facial Feature Extraction Based on Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Nguyen Viet

    Facial feature extraction is one of the most important processes in face recognition, expression recognition and face detection. The aims of facial feature extraction are eye location, shape of eyes, eye brow, mouth, head boundary, face boundary, chin and so on. The purpose of this paper is to develop an automatic facial feature extraction system, which is able to identify the eye location, the detailed shape of eyes and mouth, chin and inner boundary from facial images. This system not only extracts the location information of the eyes, but also estimates four important points in each eye, which helps us to rebuild the eye shape. To model mouth shape, mouth extraction gives us both mouth location and two corners of mouth, top and bottom lips. From inner boundary we obtain and chin, we have face boundary. Based on wavelet features, we can reduce the noise from the input image and detect edge information. In order to extract eyes, mouth, inner boundary, we combine wavelet features and facial character to design these algorithms for finding midpoint, eye's coordinates, four important eye's points, mouth's coordinates, four important mouth's points, chin coordinate and then inner boundary. The developed system is tested on Yale Faces and Pedagogy student's faces.

  17. Face Alignment via Regressing Local Binary Features.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shaoqing; Cao, Xudong; Wei, Yichen; Sun, Jian

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a highly efficient and accurate regression approach for face alignment. Our approach has two novel components: 1) a set of local binary features and 2) a locality principle for learning those features. The locality principle guides us to learn a set of highly discriminative local binary features for each facial landmark independently. The obtained local binary features are used to jointly learn a linear regression for the final output. This approach achieves the state-of-the-art results when tested on the most challenging benchmarks to date. Furthermore, because extracting and regressing local binary features are computationally very cheap, our system is much faster than previous methods. It achieves over 3000 frames per second (FPS) on a desktop or 300 FPS on a mobile phone for locating a few dozens of landmarks. We also study a key issue that is important but has received little attention in the previous research, which is the face detector used to initialize alignment. We investigate several face detectors and perform quantitative evaluation on how they affect alignment accuracy. We find that an alignment friendly detector can further greatly boost the accuracy of our alignment method, reducing the error up to 16% relatively. To facilitate practical usage of face detection/alignment methods, we also propose a convenient metric to measure how good a detector is for alignment initialization.

  18. Absorption Features in Soil Spectra Assessment.

    PubMed

    Vašát, Radim; Kodešová, Radka; Borůvka, Luboš; Jakšík, Ondřej; Klement, Aleš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2015-12-01

    From a wide range of techniques appropriate to relate spectra measurements with soil properties, partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector machines (SVM) are most commonly used. This is due to their predictive power and the availability of software tools. Both represent exclusively statistically based approaches and, as such, benefit from multiple responses of soil material in the spectrum. However, physical-based approaches that focus only on a single spectral feature, such as simple linear regression using selected continuum-removed spectra values as a predictor variable, often provide accurate estimates. Furthermore, if this approach extends to multiple cases by taking into account three basic absorption feature parameters (area, width, and depth) of all occurring features as predictors and subjecting them to best subset selection, one can achieve even higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression. Here, we attempt to further extend this approach by adding two additional absorption feature parameters (left and right side area), as they can be important diagnostic markers, too. As a result, we achieved higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression and SVM for exchangeable soil pH, slightly higher or comparable for dithionite-citrate and ammonium oxalate extractable Fe and Mn forms, but slightly worse for oxidizable carbon content. Therefore, we suggest incorporating the multiple linear regression approach based on absorption feature parameters into existing working practices. PMID:26555184

  19. Breast Cancer Detection with Reduced Feature Set

    PubMed Central

    Kılıç, Niyazi; Bilgili, Erdem

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores feature reduction properties of independent component analysis (ICA) on breast cancer decision support system. Wisconsin diagnostic breast cancer (WDBC) dataset is reduced to one-dimensional feature vector computing an independent component (IC). The original data with 30 features and reduced one feature (IC) are used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of the classifiers such as k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), artificial neural network (ANN), radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and support vector machine (SVM). The comparison of the proposed classification using the IC with original feature set is also tested on different validation (5/10-fold cross-validations) and partitioning (20%–40%) methods. These classifiers are evaluated how to effectively categorize tumors as benign and malignant in terms of specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, F-score, Youden's index, discriminant power, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with its criterion values including area under curve (AUC) and 95% confidential interval (CI). This represents an improvement in diagnostic decision support system, while reducing computational complexity. PMID:26078774

  20. Absorption Features in Soil Spectra Assessment.

    PubMed

    Vašát, Radim; Kodešová, Radka; Borůvka, Luboš; Jakšík, Ondřej; Klement, Aleš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2015-12-01

    From a wide range of techniques appropriate to relate spectra measurements with soil properties, partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector machines (SVM) are most commonly used. This is due to their predictive power and the availability of software tools. Both represent exclusively statistically based approaches and, as such, benefit from multiple responses of soil material in the spectrum. However, physical-based approaches that focus only on a single spectral feature, such as simple linear regression using selected continuum-removed spectra values as a predictor variable, often provide accurate estimates. Furthermore, if this approach extends to multiple cases by taking into account three basic absorption feature parameters (area, width, and depth) of all occurring features as predictors and subjecting them to best subset selection, one can achieve even higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression. Here, we attempt to further extend this approach by adding two additional absorption feature parameters (left and right side area), as they can be important diagnostic markers, too. As a result, we achieved higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression and SVM for exchangeable soil pH, slightly higher or comparable for dithionite-citrate and ammonium oxalate extractable Fe and Mn forms, but slightly worse for oxidizable carbon content. Therefore, we suggest incorporating the multiple linear regression approach based on absorption feature parameters into existing working practices.

  1. Flexible spatial configuration of local image features.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Gustavo; Jepson, Allan D

    2007-12-01

    Local image features have been designed to be informative and repeatable under rigid transformations and illumination deformations. Even though current state-of-the-art local image features present a high degree of repeatability, their local appearance alone usually does not bring enough discriminative power to support a reliable matching, resulting in a relatively high number of mismatches in the correspondence set formed during the data association procedure. As a result, geometric filters, commonly based on global spatial configuration, have been used to reduce this number of mismatches. However, this approach presents a trade off between the effectiveness to reject mismatches and the robustness to non-rigid deformations. In this paper, we propose two geometric filters, based on semilocal spatial configuration of local features, that are designed to be robust to non-rigid deformations and to rigid transformations, without compromising its efficacy to reject mismatches. We compare our methods to the Hough transform, which is an efficient and effective mismatch rejection step based on global spatial configuration of features. In these comparisons, our methods are shown to be more effective in the task of rejecting mismatches for rigid transformations and non-rigid deformations at comparable time complexity figures. Finally, we demonstrate how to integrate these methods in a probabilistic recognition system such that the final verification step uses not only the similarity between features, but also their semi-local configuration.

  2. Feature detection techniques for preprocessing proteomic data.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kimberly F; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C

    2010-01-01

    Numerous gel-based and nongel-based technologies are used to detect protein changes potentially associated with disease. The raw data, however, are abundant with technical and structural complexities, making statistical analysis a difficult task. Low-level analysis issues (including normalization, background correction, gel and/or spectral alignment, feature detection, and image registration) are substantial problems that need to be addressed, because any large-level data analyses are contingent on appropriate and statistically sound low-level procedures. Feature detection approaches are particularly interesting due to the increased computational speed associated with subsequent calculations. Such summary data corresponding to image features provide a significant reduction in overall data size and structure while retaining key information. In this paper, we focus on recent advances in feature detection as a tool for preprocessing proteomic data. This work highlights existing and newly developed feature detection algorithms for proteomic datasets, particularly relating to time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Note, however, that the associated data structures (i.e., spectral data, and images containing spots) used as input for these methods are obtained via all gel-based and nongel-based methods discussed in this manuscript, and thus the discussed methods are likewise applicable.

  3. Imaging features of spinal tanycytic ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Tomek, Michal; Jayajothi, Anandapadmanabhan; Brandner, Sebastian; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Lee, Cheong Hung; Davagnanam, Indran

    2016-02-01

    Tanycytic ependymoma is an unusual morphological variant of WHO grade II ependymoma, typically arising from the cervical or thoracic spinal cord. Although the literature deals extensively with pathological features of this tumour entity, imaging features have not been well characterised. The purpose of this study was to review magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of spinal tanycytic ependymomas reported in the literature to date, exemplified by a case of a patient with tanycytic ependymoma of the conus medullaris presenting to our hospital. A Medline search of the English literature for all previously published cases of spinal tanycytic ependymoma was carried out and the reported MRI features reviewed. The tumours were found to be typically well-demarcated masses, predominantly showing isointensity on T1-weighted signal, and T2-weighted hyperintensity, with variable patterns of contrast enhancement. A cystic component was seen in half of the cases, and in a minority a mural nodule was present within the cyst wall. Associated syrinx formation was observed in one-third of the cases and haemorrhage was rare, which may be helpful pointers in differentiating the lesion from other ependymoma subtypes. In conclusion, MRI characteristics of spinal tanycytic ependymoma are variable and non-specific, and radiological diagnosis thus remains challenging, although certain predominant features are identified in this report. Knowledge of these is important in the diagnostic differentiation from other intramedullary and extramedullary spinal tumours in order to guide appropriate surgical management. PMID:26755489

  4. Attention and non-retinotopic feature integration

    PubMed Central

    Öğmen, Haluk; Herzog, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Features of moving objects are non-retinotopically integrated along their motion trajectories as demonstrated by a variety of recent studies. The mechanisms of non-retinotopic feature integration are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of attention in non-retinotopic feature integration by using the sequential metacontrast paradigm. A central line was offset either to the left or right. A sequence of flanking lines followed eliciting the percept of two diverging motion streams. Although the central line was invisible, its offset was perceived within the streams. Observers attended to one stream. If an offset was introduced to one of the flanking lines in the attended stream, this offset integrated with the central line offset. No integration occurred when the offset was in the non-attended stream. Here, we manipulated the allocation of attention by using an auditory cueing paradigm. First, we show that mandatory non-retinotopic integration occurred even when the cue came long after the motion sequence. Second, we used more than two streams of which two could merge. Offsets in different streams were integrated when the streams merged. However, offsets of one stream were not integrated when this stream had to be ignored. We propose a hierarchical two stage model, in which motion grouping determines mandatory feature integration while attention selects motion streams for optional feature integration. PMID:21047740

  5. Feature Profile Simulations and Finite Penetration Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul; Moroz, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    In plasma materials processing, energetic ions, neutrals and UV photons typically penetrate deep inside solid materials breaking atomic bonds and displacing atoms on their paths. These important phenomena are rarely taken into consideration in processing simulation software, primarily because the proper penetration depths and the corresponding energy depositions, breaking bonds, and atom displacements are difficult and computationally expensive to compute. The FPS-3D feature profile simulator [1-2] is doing that computationally efficiently by utilizing tabulated results obtained with other methods. We discuss, compare, and present results of such simulations made with different methods, one of which is the molecular dynamics analysis. In general, molecular dynamics could be used for simulating materials processing, etching and deposition, but it is extremely computationally expensive to be used for large groups of atoms. In practice, molecular dynamics methods are too slow to be used for feature profile simulations. However, they could help in defining proper chemical reactions and corresponding rates to be used in an advanced feature profile simulator such as FPS-3D. We present results of FPS-3D simulations for Si and SiO2 etching in Ar/Cl2 and Ar/C4F6/O2 plasmas. [4pt] [1] P. Moroz, ``General Feature Profile Simulator FPS-3D,'' ECS Transactions, 35, 25 (2011). [0pt] [2] P. Moroz, ``Numerical Simulation of Feature Profile Evolution using FPS-3D,'' IEEE Transactions of Plasma Science, 39, 2804 (2011).

  6. Seismic features of Winnipegosis mounds in Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Gendzwill, D.J.

    1988-07-01

    The Winnipegosis Formation of southern Saskatchewan is characterized by reefs or reeflike mounds in its upper member. Several characteristic features of the mounds permit their identification from seismic-reflection data. These features include reflections from the flanks of the mound, a change in the reflection continuity in the middle and base of the mound, a velocity pullup under the mound, and subsidence of strata over the mound. Dissolution of the salt which surrounds the mounds sometimes occurs, resulting in a drape structure. Some or all of these features may be present at the correct seismic stratigraphic level for Winnipegosis mounds, depending on the local conditions. Subsidence of strata over the mounds indicates compaction and porosity loss from the original mound or possibly the degree of dolomitization or pressure dissolution. Salt-removal features over or adjacent to the mounds indicate fluid movements. Approximate ages can be estimated from stratigraphic thinning and thickening relationships above such features. Complications in identifying Winnipegosis mounds may arise from thin-bed effects if the mounds are not very thick compared to a seismic wavelength. Confusion may also arise from anhydrite, which may encase the mounds or which may form a thick horizontal layer at the tops of the mounds, causing an interfering signal.

  7. Improving Naive Bayes with Online Feature Selection for Quick Adaptation to Evolving Feature Usefulness

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-19

    The definition of what makes an article interesting varies from user to user and continually evolves even for a single user. As a result, for news recommendation systems, useless document features can not be determined a priori and all features are usually considered for interestingness classification. Consequently, the presence of currently useless features degrades classification performance [1], particularly over the initial set of news articles being classified. The initial set of document is critical for a user when considering which particular news recommendation system to adopt. To address these problems, we introduce an improved version of the naive Bayes classifier with online feature selection. We use correlation to determine the utility of each feature and take advantage of the conditional independence assumption used by naive Bayes for online feature selection and classification. The augmented naive Bayes classifier performs 28% better than the traditional naive Bayes classifier in recommending news articles from the Yahoo! RSS feeds.

  8. Feature isolation and quantification of evolving datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Identifying and isolating features is an important part of visualization and a crucial step for the analysis and understanding of large time-dependent data sets (either from observation or simulation). In this proposal, we address these concerns, namely the investigation and implementation of basic 2D and 3D feature based methods to enhance current visualization techniques and provide the building blocks for automatic feature recognition, tracking, and correlation. These methods incorporate ideas from scientific visualization, computer vision, image processing, and mathematical morphology. Our focus is in the area of fluid dynamics, and we show the applicability of these methods to the quantification and tracking of three-dimensional vortex and turbulence bursts.

  9. Handwriting: Feature Correlation Analysis for Biometric Hashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielhauer, Claus; Steinmetz, Ralf

    2004-12-01

    In the application domain of electronic commerce, biometric authentication can provide one possible solution for the key management problem. Besides server-based approaches, methods of deriving digital keys directly from biometric measures appear to be advantageous. In this paper, we analyze one of our recently published specific algorithms of this category based on behavioral biometrics of handwriting, the biometric hash. Our interest is to investigate to which degree each of the underlying feature parameters contributes to the overall intrapersonal stability and interpersonal value space. We will briefly discuss related work in feature evaluation and introduce a new methodology based on three components: the intrapersonal scatter (deviation), the interpersonal entropy, and the correlation between both measures. Evaluation of the technique is presented based on two data sets of different size. The method presented will allow determination of effects of parameterization of the biometric system, estimation of value space boundaries, and comparison with other feature selection approaches.

  10. Facial symmetry assessment based on geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoping; Cao, Hanqiang

    2015-12-01

    Face image symmetry is an important factor affecting the accuracy of automatic face recognition. Selecting high symmetrical face image could improve the performance of the recognition. In this paper, we proposed a novel facial symmetry evaluation scheme based on geometric features, including centroid, singular value, in-plane rotation angle of face and the structural similarity index (SSIM). First, we calculate the value of the four features according to the corresponding formula. Then, we use fuzzy logic algorithm to integrate the value of the four features into a single number which represents the facial symmetry. The proposed method is efficient and can adapt to different recognition methods. Experimental results demonstrate its effectiveness in improving the robustness of face detection and recognition.

  11. Automated Extraction of Secondary Flow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne M.; Haimes, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become standard practice in the design and development of the major components used for air and space propulsion. To aid in the post-processing and analysis phase of CFD many researchers now use automated feature extraction utilities. These tools can be used to detect the existence of such features as shocks, vortex cores and separation and re-attachment lines. The existence of secondary flow is another feature of significant importance to CFD engineers. Although the concept of secondary flow is relatively understood there is no commonly accepted mathematical definition for secondary flow. This paper will present a definition for secondary flow and one approach for automatically detecting and visualizing secondary flow.

  12. Feature recognition applications in mesh generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, T.J.; Liu, S.S.; Lu, Y.; Kraftcheck, J.; Gadh, R.

    1997-06-01

    The use of feature recognition as part of an overall decomposition-based hexahedral meshing approach is described in this paper. The meshing approach consists of feature recognition, using a c-loop or hybrid c-loop method, and the use of cutting surfaces to decompose the solid model. These steps are part of an iterative process, which proceeds either until no more features can be recognized or until the model has been completely decomposed into meshable sub-volumes. This method can greatly reduce the time required to generate an all-hexahedral mesh, either through the use of more efficient meshing algorithms on more of the geometry or by reducing the amount of manual decomposition required to mesh a volume.

  13. Intrinsic two-dimensional features as textons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, E.; Zetzsche, C.; Rentschler, I.

    1998-01-01

    We suggest that intrinsic two-dimensional (i2D) features, computationally defined as the outputs of nonlinear operators that model the activity of end-stopped neurons, play a role in preattentive texture discrimination. We first show that for discriminable textures with identical power spectra the predictions of traditional models depend on the type of nonlinearity and fail for energy measures. We then argue that the concept of intrinsic dimensionality, and the existence of end-stopped neurons, can help us to understand the role of the nonlinearities. Furthermore, we show examples in which models without strong i2D selectivity fail to predict the correct ranking order of perceptual segregation. Our arguments regarding the importance of i2D features resemble the arguments of Julesz and co-workers regarding textons such as terminators and crossings. However, we provide a computational framework that identifies textons with the outputs of nonlinear operators that are selective to i2D features.

  14. Statistics over features: EEG signals analysis.

    PubMed

    Derya Ubeyli, Elif

    2009-08-01

    This paper presented the usage of statistics over the set of the features representing the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Since classification is more accurate when the pattern is simplified through representation by important features, feature extraction and selection play an important role in classifying systems such as neural networks. Multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) architectures were formulated and used as basis for detection of electroencephalographic changes. Three types of EEG signals (EEG signals recorded from healthy volunteers with eyes open, epilepsy patients in the epileptogenic zone during a seizure-free interval, and epilepsy patients during epileptic seizures) were classified. The selected Lyapunov exponents, wavelet coefficients and the power levels of power spectral density (PSD) values obtained by eigenvector methods of the EEG signals were used as inputs of the MLPNN trained with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The classification results confirmed that the proposed MLPNN has potential in detecting the electroencephalographic changes. PMID:19555931

  15. A Collection of Features for Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassi-Rad, T; Fodor, I K; Gallagher, B

    2007-05-02

    Semantic graphs are commonly used to represent data from one or more data sources. Such graphs extend traditional graphs by imposing types on both nodes and links. This type information defines permissible links among specified nodes and can be represented as a graph commonly referred to as an ontology or schema graph. Figure 1 depicts an ontology graph for data from National Association of Securities Dealers. Each node type and link type may also have a list of attributes. To capture the increased complexity of semantic graphs, concepts derived for standard graphs have to be extended. This document explains briefly features commonly used to characterize graphs, and their extensions to semantic graphs. This document is divided into two sections. Section 2 contains the feature descriptions for static graphs. Section 3 extends the features for semantic graphs that vary over time.

  16. Coevolution of active vision and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Kato, Toshifumi; Marocco, Davide; Sauser, Eric

    2004-03-01

    We show that complex visual tasks, such as position- and size-invariant shape recognition and navigation in the environment, can be tackled with simple architectures generated by a coevolutionary process of active vision and feature selection. Behavioral machines equipped with primitive vision systems and direct pathways between visual and motor neurons are evolved while they freely interact with their environments. We describe the application of this methodology in three sets of experiments, namely, shape discrimination, car driving, and robot navigation. We show that these systems develop sensitivity to a number of oriented, retinotopic, visual-feature-oriented edges, corners, height, and a behavioral repertoire to locate, bring, and keep these features in sensitive regions of the vision system, resembling strategies observed in simple insects. PMID:15052484

  17. Video salient event classification using audio features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corchs, Silvia; Ciocca, Gianluigi; Fiori, Massimiliano; Gasparini, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work is to detect the events in video sequences that are salient with respect to the audio signal. In particular, we focus on the audio analysis of a video, with the goal of finding which are the significant features to detect audio-salient events. In our work we have extracted the audio tracks from videos of different sport events. For each video, we have manually labeled the salient audio-events using the binary markings. On each frame, features in both time and frequency domains have been considered. These features have been used to train different classifiers: Classification and Regression Trees, Support Vector Machine, and k-Nearest Neighbor. The classification performances are reported in terms of confusion matrices.

  18. Coevolution of active vision and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Kato, Toshifumi; Marocco, Davide; Sauser, Eric

    2004-03-01

    We show that complex visual tasks, such as position- and size-invariant shape recognition and navigation in the environment, can be tackled with simple architectures generated by a coevolutionary process of active vision and feature selection. Behavioral machines equipped with primitive vision systems and direct pathways between visual and motor neurons are evolved while they freely interact with their environments. We describe the application of this methodology in three sets of experiments, namely, shape discrimination, car driving, and robot navigation. We show that these systems develop sensitivity to a number of oriented, retinotopic, visual-feature-oriented edges, corners, height, and a behavioral repertoire to locate, bring, and keep these features in sensitive regions of the vision system, resembling strategies observed in simple insects.

  19. Melanoma detection algorithm based on feature fusion.

    PubMed

    Barata, Catarina; Emre Celebi, M; Marques, Jorge S

    2015-08-01

    A Computer Aided-Diagnosis (CAD) System for melanoma diagnosis usually makes use of different types of features to characterize the lesions. The features are often combined into a single vector that can belong to a high dimensional space (early fusion). However, it is not clear if this is the optimal strategy and works on other fields have shown that early fusion has some limitations. In this work, we address this issue and investigate which is the best approach to combine different features comparing early and late fusion. Experiments carried on the datasets PH2 (single source) and EDRA (multi source) show that late fusion performs better, leading to classification scores of Sensitivity = 98% and Specificity = 90% (PH(2)) and Sensitivity = 83% and Specificity = 76% (EDRA). PMID:26736837

  20. Supai salt karst features: Holbrook Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    More than 300 sinkholes, fissures, depressions, and other collapse features occur along a 70 km (45 mi) dissolution front of the Permian Supai Formation, dipping northward into the Holbrook Basin, also called the Supai Salt Basin. The dissolution front is essentially coincident with the so-called Holbrook Anticline showing local dip reversal; rather than being of tectonic origin, this feature is likely a subsidence-induced monoclinal flexure caused by the northward migrating dissolution front. Three major areas are identified with distinctive attributes: (1) The Sinks, 10 km WNW of Snowflake, containing some 200 sinkholes up to 200 m diameter and 50 m depth, and joint controlled fissures and fissure-sinks; (2) Dry Lake Valley and contiguous areas containing large collapse fissures and sinkholes in jointed Coconino sandstone, some of which drained more than 50 acre-feet ({approximately}6 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3}) of water overnight; and (3) the McCauley Sinks, a localized group of about 40 sinkholes 15 km SE of Winslow along Chevelon Creek, some showing essentially rectangular jointing in the surficial Coconino Formation. Similar salt karst features also occur between these three major areas. The range of features in Supai salt are distinctive, yet similar to those in other evaporate basins. The wide variety of dissolution/collapse features range in development from incipient surface expression to mature and old age. The features began forming at least by Pliocene time and continue to the present, with recent changes reportedly observed and verified on airphotos with 20 year repetition. The evaporate sequence along interstate transportation routes creates a strategic location for underground LPG storage in leached caverns. The existing 11 cavern field at Adamana is safely located about 25 miles away from the dissolution front, but further expansion initiatives will require thorough engineering evaluation.

  1. Munitions related feature extraction from LIDAR data.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Barry L.

    2010-06-01

    The characterization of former military munitions ranges is critical in the identification of areas likely to contain residual unexploded ordnance (UXO). Although these ranges are large, often covering tens-of-thousands of acres, the actual target areas represent only a small fraction of the sites. The challenge is that many of these sites do not have records indicating locations of former target areas. The identification of target areas is critical in the characterization and remediation of these sites. The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) of the DoD have been developing and implementing techniques for the efficient characterization of large munitions ranges. As part of this process, high-resolution LIDAR terrain data sets have been collected over several former ranges. These data sets have been shown to contain information relating to former munitions usage at these ranges, specifically terrain cratering due to high-explosives detonations. The location and relative intensity of crater features can provide information critical in reconstructing the usage history of a range, and indicate areas most likely to contain UXO. We have developed an automated procedure using an adaptation of the Circular Hough Transform for the identification of crater features in LIDAR terrain data. The Circular Hough Transform is highly adept at finding circular features (craters) in noisy terrain data sets. This technique has the ability to find features of a specific radius providing a means of filtering features based on expected scale and providing additional spatial characterization of the identified feature. This method of automated crater identification has been applied to several former munitions ranges with positive results.

  2. Feature Selection via Chaotic Antlion Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zawbaa, Hossam M.; Emary, E.; Grosan, Crina

    2016-01-01

    Background Selecting a subset of relevant properties from a large set of features that describe a dataset is a challenging machine learning task. In biology, for instance, the advances in the available technologies enable the generation of a very large number of biomarkers that describe the data. Choosing the more informative markers along with performing a high-accuracy classification over the data can be a daunting task, particularly if the data are high dimensional. An often adopted approach is to formulate the feature selection problem as a biobjective optimization problem, with the aim of maximizing the performance of the data analysis model (the quality of the data training fitting) while minimizing the number of features used. Results We propose an optimization approach for the feature selection problem that considers a “chaotic” version of the antlion optimizer method, a nature-inspired algorithm that mimics the hunting mechanism of antlions in nature. The balance between exploration of the search space and exploitation of the best solutions is a challenge in multi-objective optimization. The exploration/exploitation rate is controlled by the parameter I that limits the random walk range of the ants/prey. This variable is increased iteratively in a quasi-linear manner to decrease the exploration rate as the optimization progresses. The quasi-linear decrease in the variable I may lead to immature convergence in some cases and trapping in local minima in other cases. The chaotic system proposed here attempts to improve the tradeoff between exploration and exploitation. The methodology is evaluated using different chaotic maps on a number of feature selection datasets. To ensure generality, we used ten biological datasets, but we also used other types of data from various sources. The results are compared with the particle swarm optimizer and with genetic algorithm variants for feature selection using a set of quality metrics. PMID:26963715

  3. Noisy neural nets exhibiting epileptic features.

    PubMed

    Kokkinidis, M; Anninos, P

    1985-04-01

    On the basis of our previous studies of noisy neural nets we propose a model for the explanation of epileptic phenomena. Our neural net model is capable of exhibiting epileptic features if the number of spontaneously firing neurons is periodically increased beyond a certain threshold. Some alternative epileptogenic mechanisms are also discussed. The epileptic behavior of the neural net is determined by a combination of certain parameters of its phase diagram. The general features of the model are consistent with several experimental observations and explain some poorly understood clinical phenomena. The differences between normal and epileptic neural nets are explained in terms of the structural properties of the model.

  4. ROCS-derived features for virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Kearnes, Steven; Pande, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    Rapid overlay of chemical structures (ROCS) is a standard tool for the calculation of 3D shape and chemical ("color") similarity. ROCS uses unweighted sums to combine many aspects of similarity, yielding parameter-free models for virtual screening. In this report, we decompose the ROCS color force field into color components and color atom overlaps, novel color similarity features that can be weighted in a system-specific manner by machine learning algorithms. In cross-validation experiments, these additional features significantly improve virtual screening performance relative to standard ROCS. PMID:27624668

  5. Hepatic haemangioma: common and uncommon imaging features.

    PubMed

    Klotz, T; Montoriol, P-F; Da Ines, D; Petitcolin, V; Joubert-Zakeyh, J; Garcier, J-M

    2013-09-01

    The haemangioma, the most common non-cystic hepatic lesion, most often discovered by chance, may in certain situations raise diagnostic problems in imaging. In this article, the authors first demonstrate that the radiological appearance of the hepatic haemangioma, in its typical form, is closely related to three known histological sub-types. They then show that certain atypical features should be known in order to establish a diagnosis. They also observe the potential interactions between the haemangioma, an active vascular lesion, and the adjacent hepatic parenchyma. Finally, they discuss the specific paediatric features of hepatic haemangiomas and illustrate the case of a hepatic angiosarcoma.

  6. Mass wasting features in Juventae Chasma, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Ranjan; Singh, Pragya; Porwal, Alok; Ganesh, Indujaa

    2016-07-01

    Introduction : We report mass-wasting features preserved as debris aprons from Juventae Chasma. Diverse lines of evidence and associated geomorphological features indicate that fluidized ice or water within the wall rocks of the chasma could be responsible for mobilizing the debris. Description : The distinctive features of the landslides in Juvenate Chasma are: (1) lack of a well-defined crown or a clear-cut section at their point of origin and instead the presence of amphitheatre-headed tributary canyons; (2) absence of slump blocks; (3) overlapping of debris aprons; (4) a variety of surface textures from fresh and grooved to degraded and chaotic; (5) rounded lobes of debris aprons; (6) large variation of sizes from small lumps (~0.52 m2) to large tongue shaped ones (~ 80 m2); (7) smaller average size of landslides as compared to other chasmas; and (8) occasional preservation of fresh surficial features indicating recent emplacement. Discussion : Amphitheatre-headed tributary canyons, which are formed due to ground water sapping, indicate that the same was responsible for wall-section collapse, although a structural control cannot be completely ruled out. The emplacement of the mass wasting features preferentially at the mouths of amphitheatre-headed tributary canyons along with the rounded flow fronts of the debris suggest fluids may have played a vital role in their emplacement. The mass-wasting features in Juventae Chasma are unique compared to other landslides in Valles Marineris despite commonalities such as the radial furrows, fan-shaped outlines, overlapping aprons and overtopped obstacles. The unique set of features and close association with amphitheatre-headed tributary canyons imply that the trigger of the landslides was not structural or tectonic but possibly weakness imparted by the presence of water or ice in the pore-spaces of the wall. Craters with fluidized ejecta blankets and scalloped depressions in the surrounding plateau also support this

  7. Multiscale Features of Large Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michelis, P.; Consolini, G.

    2011-12-01

    The present study is focused on the analysis of the multiscale features of four large geomagnetic storms that occurred from 2000 to 2003. In particular, we analyse the fluctuations of these extreme events as recorded along the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field in seven different canadian geomagnetic observatories, by decomposing the signal via the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). This empirical method, that is alternative to traditional data-analysis methods, consists in an empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and in the Hilbert spectral analysis, and it is designed specifically for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data. The features of the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) are studied as a function of the magnetic latitude.

  8. Large datasets: Segmentation, feature extraction, and compression

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, D.J.; Fedorov, V.; Lawkins, W.F.; Morris, M.D.; Ostrouchov, G.

    1996-07-01

    Large data sets with more than several mission multivariate observations (tens of megabytes or gigabytes of stored information) are difficult or impossible to analyze with traditional software. The amount of output which must be scanned quickly dilutes the ability of the investigator to confidently identify all the meaningful patterns and trends which may be present. The purpose of this project is to develop both a theoretical foundation and a collection of tools for automated feature extraction that can be easily customized to specific applications. Cluster analysis techniques are applied as a final step in the feature extraction process, which helps make data surveying simple and effective.

  9. Dramatic Improvements to Feature Based Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyansky, V. N.; Morris, R. D.; Kuehnel, F. O.; Maluf, D. A.; Cheeseman, P.

    2004-01-01

    The camera registration extracted from feature based stereo is usually considered sufficient to accurately localize the 3D points. However, for natural scenes the feature localization is not as precise as in man-made environments. This results in small camera registration errors. We show that even very small registration errors result in large errors in dense surface reconstruction. We describe a method for registering entire images to the inaccurate surface model. This gives small, but crucially important improvements to the camera parameters. The new registration gives dramatically better dense surface reconstruction.

  10. Guidance in feature extraction to resolve uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalerchuk, Boris; Kovalerchuk, Michael; Streltsov, Simon; Best, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Automated Feature Extraction (AFE) plays a critical role in image understanding. Often the imagery analysts extract features better than AFE algorithms do, because analysts use additional information. The extraction and processing of this information can be more complex than the original AFE task, and that leads to the "complexity trap". This can happen when the shadow from the buildings guides the extraction of buildings and roads. This work proposes an AFE algorithm to extract roads and trails by using the GMTI/GPS tracking information and older inaccurate maps of roads and trails as AFE guides.

  11. Eccentric features in Saturn's outer C ring

    SciTech Connect

    Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.

    1987-11-01

    The present search for possible eccentric and inclined features in the outer C ring of Saturn measured all sharp-edged feature radii in Voyager C ring data. The Maxwell ringlet and two other narrow ringlets, 1.470R(s) and 1.495R(s) are found to be eccentric; the latter is best fitted by a model describing a freely precessing Keplerian ellipse, while the former is not conclusively fitted by either a resonant forcing or a free precession model. These two eccentric ringlets are compared with the Titan and Maxwell ringlets. 51 references.

  12. Maximum likelihood clustering with dependent feature trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The decomposition of mixture density of the data into its normal component densities is considered. The densities are approximated with first order dependent feature trees using criteria of mutual information and distance measures. Expressions are presented for the criteria when the densities are Gaussian. By defining different typs of nodes in a general dependent feature tree, maximum likelihood equations are developed for the estimation of parameters using fixed point iterations. The field structure of the data is also taken into account in developing maximum likelihood equations. Experimental results from the processing of remotely sensed multispectral scanner imagery data are included.

  13. Detecting Nematode Features from Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    de la Blanca, N. Pérez; Fdez-Valdivia, J.; Castillo, P.; Gómez-Barcina, A.

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for estimating and calibrating nematode features from digitial images are described and evaluated by illustration and mathematical formulae. Technical problems, such as capturing and cleaning raw images, standardizing the grey level range of images, and the detection of characteristics of the body habitus, presence or absence of stylet knobs, and tail and lip region shape are discussed. This study is the first of a series aimed at developing a set of automated methods to permit more rapid, objective characterizations of nematode features than is achievable by cumbersome conventional methods. PMID:19282998

  14. Feature confirmation in object perception: Feature integration theory 26 years on from the Treisman Bartlett lecture.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Glyn W

    2016-10-01

    The Treisman Bartlett lecture, reported in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology in 1988, provided a major overview of the feature integration theory of attention. This has continued to be a dominant account of human visual attention to this day. The current paper provides a summary of the work reported in the lecture and an update on critical aspects of the theory as applied to visual object perception. The paper highlights the emergence of findings that pose significant challenges to the theory and which suggest that revisions are required that allow for (a) several rather than a single form of feature integration, (b) some forms of feature integration to operate preattentively, (c) stored knowledge about single objects and interactions between objects to modulate perceptual integration, (d) the application of feature-based inhibition to object files where visual features are specified, which generates feature-based spreading suppression and scene segmentation, and (e) a role for attention in feature confirmation rather than feature integration in visual selection. A feature confirmation account of attention in object perception is outlined.

  15. Linear dimensionality reduction applied to scale invariant feature transformation and speeded up robust feature descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Ricardo Eugenio González; Schwartz, William Robson; Pedrini, Helio

    2014-05-01

    Robust local descriptors usually consist of high-dimensional feature vectors to describe distinctive characteristics of images. The high dimensionality of a feature vector incurs considerable costs in terms of computational time and storage. It also results in the curse of dimensionality that affects the performance of several tasks that use feature vectors, such as matching, retrieval, and classification of images. To address these problems, it is possible to employ some dimensionality reduction techniques, leading frequently to information lost and, consequently, accuracy reduction. This work aims at applying linear dimensionality reduction to the scale invariant feature transformation and speeded up robust feature descriptors. The objective is to demonstrate that even risking the decrease of the accuracy of the feature vectors, it results in a satisfactory trade-off between computational time and storage requirements. We perform linear dimensionality reduction through random projections, principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and partial least squares in order to create lower dimensional feature vectors. These new reduced descriptors lead us to less computational time and memory storage requirements, even improving accuracy in some cases. We evaluate reduced feature vectors in a matching application, as well as their distinctiveness in image retrieval. Finally, we assess the computational time and storage requirements by comparing the original and the reduced feature vectors.

  16. Feature confirmation in object perception: Feature integration theory 26 years on from the Treisman Bartlett lecture.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Glyn W

    2016-10-01

    The Treisman Bartlett lecture, reported in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology in 1988, provided a major overview of the feature integration theory of attention. This has continued to be a dominant account of human visual attention to this day. The current paper provides a summary of the work reported in the lecture and an update on critical aspects of the theory as applied to visual object perception. The paper highlights the emergence of findings that pose significant challenges to the theory and which suggest that revisions are required that allow for (a) several rather than a single form of feature integration, (b) some forms of feature integration to operate preattentively, (c) stored knowledge about single objects and interactions between objects to modulate perceptual integration, (d) the application of feature-based inhibition to object files where visual features are specified, which generates feature-based spreading suppression and scene segmentation, and (e) a role for attention in feature confirmation rather than feature integration in visual selection. A feature confirmation account of attention in object perception is outlined. PMID:25588297

  17. Undercounting features and missing features: evidence for a high-level deficit in strabismic amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V; Levi, D M; Klein, S A

    2000-05-01

    Abnormal visual development in strabismic amblyopia drastically affects visual perception and properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). To test the notion that amblyopia also has consequences for higher visual areas, we asked humans with amblyopia to count briefly presented features. Using the amblyopic eye, strabismic amblyopes counted inaccurately, markedly underestimating the number of features. This inaccuracy was not due to low-level considerations (blur, visibility, crowding, undersampling or topographical jitter), as they also underestimated the number of features missing from a uniform grid. Rather, counting deficits in strabismic amblyopes reflected a higher-level limitation in the number of features the amblyopic visual system can individuate. PMID:10769391

  18. Distinctive Feature Extraction for Indian Sign Language (ISL) Gesture using Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Sandeep Baburao; Sinha, G. R.

    2016-07-01

    India, having less awareness towards the deaf and dumb peoples leads to increase the communication gap between deaf and hard hearing community. Sign language is commonly developed for deaf and hard hearing peoples to convey their message by generating the different sign pattern. The scale invariant feature transform was introduced by David Lowe to perform reliable matching between different images of the same object. This paper implements the various phases of scale invariant feature transform to extract the distinctive features from Indian sign language gestures. The experimental result shows the time constraint for each phase and the number of features extracted for 26 ISL gestures.

  19. Item Feature Effects in Evolution Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehm, Ross H.; Ha, Minsu

    2011-01-01

    Despite concerted efforts by science educators to understand patterns of evolutionary reasoning in science students and teachers, the vast majority of evolution education studies have failed to carefully consider or control for item feature effects in knowledge measurement. Our study explores whether robust contextualization patterns emerge within…

  20. The Process of Designing Task Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Malcolm Bauer, from Education Testing Services, provides his comments on the Focus article in this issue of "Measurement" entitled : "How Task Features Impact Evidence from Assessments Embedded in Simulations and Games" (Russell G. Almond, Yoon Jeon Kim, Gertrudes Velasquez, Valerie J. Shute). Bauer begins his remarks by noting…

  1. Adversarial Feature Selection Against Evasion Attacks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Chan, Patrick P K; Biggio, Battista; Yeung, Daniel S; Roli, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition and machine learning techniques have been increasingly adopted in adversarial settings such as spam, intrusion, and malware detection, although their security against well-crafted attacks that aim to evade detection by manipulating data at test time has not yet been thoroughly assessed. While previous work has been mainly focused on devising adversary-aware classification algorithms to counter evasion attempts, only few authors have considered the impact of using reduced feature sets on classifier security against the same attacks. An interesting, preliminary result is that classifier security to evasion may be even worsened by the application of feature selection. In this paper, we provide a more detailed investigation of this aspect, shedding some light on the security properties of feature selection against evasion attacks. Inspired by previous work on adversary-aware classifiers, we propose a novel adversary-aware feature selection model that can improve classifier security against evasion attacks, by incorporating specific assumptions on the adversary's data manipulation strategy. We focus on an efficient, wrapper-based implementation of our approach, and experimentally validate its soundness on different application examples, including spam and malware detection. PMID:25910268

  2. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Charlie, Ed.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This feature issue focuses on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), with articles discussing provisions of the ADA and its impact on people with developmental disabilities. Articles have the following titles and authors: "The ADA: What Does It Mean for People with Developmental Disabilities?" (Deborah L. McFadden and Edward P. Burke); "The…

  3. Writing Feature Articles with Intermediate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Denise N.

    2010-01-01

    Students need regular opportunities to write expository text. However, focusing on report writing often leaves students without strong examples to study or analyze to guide and grow their own writing. Writing and studying feature articles, meant to inform and explain, can become an alternative to report writing, as they can easily be located in…

  4. Teaching Group Communication with Feature Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Russell F., II

    While a number of feature films can be used in group-process instruction, "Twelve Angry Men" and "The Breakfast Club" are particularly valuable for analyzing group communication patterns and strategies. "Twelve Angry Men" demonstrates that persuasion in groups can take place through a variety of methods. Exercises based on the film can raise…

  5. Citing geospatial feature inventories with XML manifests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, R.; McGarva, G.

    2006-12-01

    Today published scientific papers include a growing number of citations for online information sources that either complement or replace printed journals and books. We anticipate this same trend for cartographic citations used in the geosciences, following advances in web mapping and geographic feature-based services. Instead of using traditional libraries to resolve citations for print material, the geospatial citation life cycle will include requesting inventories of objects or geographic features from distributed geospatial data repositories. Using a case study from the UK Ordnance Survey MasterMap database, which is illustrative of geographic object-based products in general, we propose citing inventories of geographic objects using XML feature manifests. These manifests: (1) serve as a portable listing of sets of versioned features; (2) could be used as citations within the identification portion of an international geospatial metadata standard; (3) could be incorporated into geospatial data transfer formats such as GML; but (4) can be resolved only with comprehensive, curated repositories of current and historic data. This work has implications for any researcher who foresees the need to make or resolve references to online geospatial databases.

  6. An unusual landslide feature on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Liang, T.

    1975-01-01

    A flow feature on a crater wall, characteristic of a landslide, has been identified in a Mariner 9 high resolution photograph. Although other evidence of mass wasting is common in Mariner 9 photography, the case presented appears unique. A tentative conclusion is that, at least in some cases, Martian soil exhibits significant internal friction in mass movements.

  7. 5 CFR 9701.311 - Major features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Major features. 9701.311 Section 9701.311 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN...

  8. Full-Featured Web Conferencing Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Joel; Jenkins, Roy

    2005-01-01

    In order to match the customary strengths of the still dominant face-to-face instructional mode, a high-performance online learning system must employ synchronous as well as asynchronous communications; buttress graphics, animation, and text with live audio and video; and provide many of the features and processes associated with course management…

  9. Aging and Developmental Disabilities. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Deborah, Ed.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This feature issue of a bulletin on community integration points out the challenge of making service systems more familiar with and responsive to the needs of older adults with developmental disabilities and their families. It includes articles with the following titles and authors: "Living on the Edge" (Arthur Campbell, Jr.); "Aging and…

  10. Structural Features of Algebraic Quantum Notations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The formalism of quantum mechanics includes a rich collection of representations for describing quantum systems, including functions, graphs, matrices, histograms of probabilities, and Dirac notation. The varied features of these representations affect how computations are performed. For example, identifying probabilities of measurement outcomes…

  11. Nomenclature for topographic features on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. A.

    The background behind the creation of a nomenclature for the topographic features of Mercury is examined, with particular attention given to developments associated with recent probe studies. The nomenclature is presented in Russian and Latin transcriptions, and problems in the transcription of Mercury topographic names into Russian are considered.

  12. MEVTV Workshop on Tectonic Features on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, Thomas R. (Editor); Golombek, Matthew P. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The state of knowledge of tectonic features on Mars was determined and kinematic and mechanical models were assessed for their origin. Three sessions were held: wrinkle ridges and compressional structure; strike-slip faults; and extensional structures. Each session began with an overview of the features under discussion. In the case of wrinkle ridges and extensional structures, the overview was followed by keynote addresses by specialists working on similar structures on the Earth. The first session of the workshop focused on the controversy over the relative importance of folding, faulting, and intrusive volcanism in the origin of wrinkle ridges. The session ended with discussions of the origin of compressional flank structures associated with Martian volcanoes and the relationship between the volcanic complexes and the inferred regional stress field. The second day of the workshop began with the presentation and discussion of evidence for strike-slip faults on Mars at various scales. In the last session, the discussion of extensional structures ranged from the origin of grabens, tension cracks, and pit-crater chains to the origin of Valles Marineris canyons. Shear and tensile modes of brittle failure in the formation of extensional features and the role of these failure modes in the formation of pit-crater chains and the canyons of Valles Marineris were debated. The relationship of extensional features to other surface processes, such as carbonate dissolution (karst) were also discussed.

  13. Monocular precrash vehicle detection: features and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zehang; Bebis, George; Miller, Ronald

    2006-07-01

    Robust and reliable vehicle detection from images acquired by a moving vehicle (i.e., on-road vehicle detection) is an important problem with applications to driver assistance systems and autonomous, self-guided vehicles. The focus of this work is on the issues of feature extraction and classification for rear-view vehicle detection. Specifically, by treating the problem of vehicle detection as a two-class classification problem, we have investigated several different feature extraction methods such as principal component analysis, wavelets, and Gabor filters. To evaluate the extracted features, we have experimented with two popular classifiers, neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). Based on our evaluation results, we have developed an on-board real-time monocular vehicle detection system that is capable of acquiring grey-scale images, using Ford's proprietary low-light camera, achieving an average detection rate of 10 Hz. Our vehicle detection algorithm consists of two main steps: a multiscale driven hypothesis generation step and an appearance-based hypothesis verification step. During the hypothesis generation step, image locations where vehicles might be present are extracted. This step uses multiscale techniques not only to speed up detection, but also to improve system robustness. The appearance-based hypothesis verification step verifies the hypotheses using Gabor features and SVMs. The system has been tested in Ford's concept vehicle under different traffic conditions (e.g., structured highway, complex urban streets, and varying weather conditions), illustrating good performance. PMID:16830921

  14. Linguistic Features of Pidgin Arabic in Kuwait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Ashraf Atta M. S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper sheds the light on Asian pidgin Arabic, particularly linguistic features of pidgin Arabic in Kuwait. The phonology, syntax and lexicon of the language are described on the basis of interviews conducted with forty Asian informants. The data are discussed in its relation to other studies. Also, the researcher discussed the implication of…

  15. Web Search Engines: Search Syntax and Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Marydee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a chart that explains the search syntax, features, and commands used by the 12 most widely used general Web search engines. Discusses Web standardization, expanded types of content searched, size of databases, and search engines that include both simple and advanced versions. (LRW)

  16. Unique features in the ARIES glovebox line

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.E.; Brown, W.G.; Flamm, B.; James, C.A.; Laskie, R.; Nelson, T.O.; Wedman, D.E.

    1998-12-31

    A series of unique features have been incorporated into the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-55 Plutonium Facility. The features enhance the material handling in the process of the dismantlement of nuclear weapon primaries in the glovebox line. Incorporated into these features are the various plutonium process module`s different ventilation zone requirements that the material handling systems must meet. These features include a conveyor system that consists of a remotely controlled cart that transverses the length of the conveyor glovebox, can be operated from a remote location and can deliver process components to the entrance of any selected module glovebox. Within the modules there exists linear motion material handling systems with lifting hoist, which are controlled via an Allen Bradley control panel or local control panels. To remove the packaged products from the hot process line, the package is processed through an air lock/electrolytic decontamination process that removes the radioactive contamination from the outside of the package container and allows the package to be removed from the process line.

  17. Clinical and radiographic maxillofacial features of pycnodysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Nilton; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review of the literature to determine the radiographic and clinical maxillofacial features of pycnodysostosis emphasizing the main aspects of interest to the dentist in order to make them fit for the proper treatment of this population. It is important to make the diagnosis as early as possible in order to plan the treatment more suitable to provide a better life’s quality to the patients. The most frequent clinical maxillofacial features were: grooved palate, midfacial hypoplasia, mandibular hypoplasia and enamel hypoplasia. The most common radiographic maxillofacial features were: obtuse mandibular angle, frontal/parietal/occiptal bossing, open fontanels and sutures, multiple impacted teeth. The earlier diagnostic of pycnodysostosis has a fundamental role in general health of the patients. We consider that is very important that the dentist know recognize the radiographic and clinical maxillofacial features of pycnodysostosis, which allows correct treatment planning avoiding risks and ensuring better life’s quality to the patients. PMID:24753741

  18. Enhancing skeletal features in digitally reconstructed radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dongshan; Kuduvalli, Gopinath

    2006-03-01

    Generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) is a critical part of 2D-3D image registration that is utilized in patient position alignment for image-guided radiotherapy and radiosurgery. The DRRs are generated from a pre-operative CT scan and used as the references to match the X-ray images for determining the change of patient position. Skeletal structures are the primary image features to facilitate the registration between the DRR and X-ray images. In this paper, we present a method to enhance skeletal features of spinal regions in DRRs. The attenuation coefficient at each voxel is first calculated by applying an exponential transformation of the original attenuation coefficient in the CT scan. This is a preprocessing step that is performed prior to DRR generation. The DRR is then generated by integrating the newly calculated attenuation coefficients along the ray that connects the X-ray source and the pixel in the DRR. Finally, the DRR is further enhanced using a weighted top-hat filter. During the entire process, because there is no original CT information lost, even the small skeletal features contributed by low intensity part of CT data are preserved in the enhanced DRRs. Experiments on clinical data were conducted to compare the image quality of DRRs with and without enhancement. The results showed that the image contrast of skeletal features in the enhanced DRRs is significantly improved. This method has potential to be applied for more accurate and robust 2D-3D image registration.

  19. 5 CFR 9701.311 - Major features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Major features. 9701.311 Section 9701.311 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN...

  20. 5 CFR 9701.311 - Major features.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Major features. 9701.311 Section 9701.311 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN...

  1. Essential features for proactive risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashov, Vladimir; Howard, John

    2009-08-01

    We propose a proactive approach to the management of occupational health risks in emerging technologies based on six features: qualitative risk assessment; the ability to adapt strategies and refine requirements; an appropriate level of precaution; global applicability; the ability to elicit voluntary cooperation by companies; and stakeholder involvement.

  2. Arabic writer identification based on diacritic's features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliki, Makki; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2012-06-01

    Natural languages like Arabic, Kurdish, Farsi (Persian), Urdu, and any other similar languages have many features, which make them different from other languages like Latin's script. One of these important features is diacritics. These diacritics are classified as: compulsory like dots which are used to identify/differentiate letters, and optional like short vowels which are used to emphasis consonants. Most indigenous and well trained writers often do not use all or some of these second class of diacritics, and expert readers can infer their presence within the context of the writer text. In this paper, we investigate the use of diacritics shapes and other characteristic as parameters of feature vectors for Arabic writer identification/verification. Segmentation techniques are used to extract the diacritics-based feature vectors from examples of Arabic handwritten text. The results of evaluation test will be presented, which has been carried out on an in-house database of 50 writers. Also the viability of using diacritics for writer recognition will be demonstrated.

  3. Imaging features of benign adrenal cysts.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Yildirim, Duzgun; Bulakbasi, Nail; Guvenc, Inanc; Tayfun, Cem; Ucoz, Taner

    2006-12-01

    Benign adrenal gland cysts (BACs) are rare lesions with a variable histological spectrum and may mimic not only each other but also malignant ones. We aimed to review imaging features of BACs which can be helpful in distinguishing each entity and determining the subsequent appropriate management. PMID:16962278

  4. LIC for Surface Flow Feature Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Bryson, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm has received a lot of attention and interest. Yet, only a few of the current LIC related algorithms deal specifically with color textures for automatic detection of flow features. This paper provides an overview of research in this area.

  5. Hypermedia: Functional Features and Research Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Ok-choon

    1991-01-01

    Examines desirable functional features of hypermedia; describes its instructional uses and limitations; and discusses research issues, including learner control principles, the selection of information representation forms, the use of hypermedia as a knowledge base for computer-based instruction (CBI), and the development of intelligent…

  6. Effective Preparation Program Features: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Gary M.; Whiteman, Rodney S.

    2016-01-01

    This article is a summary of a report prepared for the University Council for Educational Administration Program Improvement Project for the Wallace Foundation. This explores the research base for educational leadership preparation programs, specifically examining literature on program features. The review covers context, candidates, faculty,…

  7. Microanatomic features of unilateral condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Luz, J G; de Rezende, J R; Jaeger, R G; de Araújo, V C

    1994-01-01

    Microanatomic features of unilateral condylar hyperplasia (UCH) are described. The articular surface exhibited clefts with surrounding elevations, and globules varying 0.5-2 microns in diameter. The articular zone presented giant coiled fibers, and the proliferative zone was composed of small round cells. The findings suggest that degenerative changes occur in UCH, both in adult and juvenile forms. PMID:8000234

  8. A Clearer View of Vista Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses some features of Windows Vista that may be of interest to teachers and/or their students. These are: (1) User Account Control; (2) Windows Firewall; (3) Windows Backup; (4) Parental Controls; (5) Windows Sidebar and Gadgets; (6) Instant Search; and (7) Windows ReadyBoost.

  9. Monocular precrash vehicle detection: features and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zehang; Bebis, George; Miller, Ronald

    2006-07-01

    Robust and reliable vehicle detection from images acquired by a moving vehicle (i.e., on-road vehicle detection) is an important problem with applications to driver assistance systems and autonomous, self-guided vehicles. The focus of this work is on the issues of feature extraction and classification for rear-view vehicle detection. Specifically, by treating the problem of vehicle detection as a two-class classification problem, we have investigated several different feature extraction methods such as principal component analysis, wavelets, and Gabor filters. To evaluate the extracted features, we have experimented with two popular classifiers, neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). Based on our evaluation results, we have developed an on-board real-time monocular vehicle detection system that is capable of acquiring grey-scale images, using Ford's proprietary low-light camera, achieving an average detection rate of 10 Hz. Our vehicle detection algorithm consists of two main steps: a multiscale driven hypothesis generation step and an appearance-based hypothesis verification step. During the hypothesis generation step, image locations where vehicles might be present are extracted. This step uses multiscale techniques not only to speed up detection, but also to improve system robustness. The appearance-based hypothesis verification step verifies the hypotheses using Gabor features and SVMs. The system has been tested in Ford's concept vehicle under different traffic conditions (e.g., structured highway, complex urban streets, and varying weather conditions), illustrating good performance.

  10. New Electrocardiographic Features in Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Luna, Antonio B; García-Niebla, Javier; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is a genetically determined familial disease with autosomal dominant transmission and variable penetrance, conferring a predisposition to sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. The syndrome is characterized by a typical electrocardiographic pattern in the right precordial leads. This article will focus on the new electrocardiographic features recently agreed on by expert consensus helping to identify this infequent electrocardiographic pattern. PMID:24827804

  11. Microcomputers for Libraries: Features, Descriptions, Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warden, William H.; Warden, Bette M.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses major features of microcomputers (word length, memory, size, disk size and capacity, central processing unit speed, peripherals, software) and provides descriptions of 19 models. Comparative analysis on basis of cost, software support, machine capacity, storage capacity, and types of peripherals is presented. A 173-item bibliography is…

  12. Tracking flow features using overset grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana; Banks, David W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is proposed to use overset grid topology to track dynamic flow features. Features of interest such as moving shock waves and vortices are overset with relatively fine tracker grids. Solutions are computed on the various grids and information is exchanged at intergrid boundaries. A grid track-sensor variable such as pressure is used to track the position of the flow feature to be resolved. The tracker grid is moved to the position where the track-sensor variable has the desired value (generally a maximum or a minimum) and new interpolation coefficients are computed for information exchange across grid boundaries. Solutions are computed at the current location and time-step, and grid motion is brought into the solution via time metrics. The method is demonstrated by tracking a moving shock and vortices shed behind a circular cylinder. It is conjectured that the method would show significant benefits in resolving features such as wakes behind oscillating airfoils and trajectories of jets issuing from rotating nozzles as encountered during thrust-vectoring.

  13. Linguistic Labels: Conceptual Markers or Object Features?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloutsky, Vladimir M.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2012-01-01

    Linguistic labels affect inductive generalization; however, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. According to one similarity-based model, SINC (similarity, induction, naming, and categorization), early in development labels are features of objects contributing to the overall similarity of compared entities, with early induction…

  14. Feature Analysis and the Teaching of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Karl C.

    The word-identification approach has long been the basis for teaching reading in both native and second languages. Recent work has a new approach, particularly that of Frank Smith, who developed a feature analysis model of reading. As we can identify letters in different configurations or before all the strokes are completed, so can we identify…

  15. Visualizing Meta-Features in Proteomic Maps

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The steps of a high-throughput proteomics experiment include the separation, differential expression and mass spectrometry-based identification of proteins. However, the last and more challenging step is inferring the biological role of the identified proteins through their association with interaction networks, biological pathways, analysis of the effect of post-translational modifications, and other protein-related information. Results In this paper, we present an integrative visualization methodology that allows combining experimentally produced proteomic features with protein meta-features, typically coming from meta-analysis tools and databases, in synthetic Proteomic Feature Maps. Using three proteomics analysis scenarios, we show that the proposed visualization approach is effective in filtering, navigating and interacting with the proteomics data in order to address visually challenging biological questions. The novelty of our approach lies in the ease of integration of any user-defined proteomic features in easy-to-comprehend visual representations that resemble the familiar 2D-gel images, and can be adapted to the user's needs. The main capabilities of the developed VIP software, which implements the presented visualization methodology, are also highlighted and discussed. Conclusions By using this visualization and the associated VIP software, researchers can explore a complex heterogeneous proteomics dataset from different perspectives in order to address visually important biological queries and formulate new hypotheses for further investigation. VIP is freely available at http://pelopas.uop.gr/~egian/VIP/index.html. PMID:21798033

  16. Feature Analysis of ToxCast Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    ToxCast was initiated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prioritize environmental chemicals for toxicity testing. Phase I generated data for 309 unique chemicals, mostly pesticide actives, that span diverse chemical feature/property space, as determined by quantu...

  17. Adversarial Feature Selection Against Evasion Attacks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Chan, Patrick P K; Biggio, Battista; Yeung, Daniel S; Roli, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition and machine learning techniques have been increasingly adopted in adversarial settings such as spam, intrusion, and malware detection, although their security against well-crafted attacks that aim to evade detection by manipulating data at test time has not yet been thoroughly assessed. While previous work has been mainly focused on devising adversary-aware classification algorithms to counter evasion attempts, only few authors have considered the impact of using reduced feature sets on classifier security against the same attacks. An interesting, preliminary result is that classifier security to evasion may be even worsened by the application of feature selection. In this paper, we provide a more detailed investigation of this aspect, shedding some light on the security properties of feature selection against evasion attacks. Inspired by previous work on adversary-aware classifiers, we propose a novel adversary-aware feature selection model that can improve classifier security against evasion attacks, by incorporating specific assumptions on the adversary's data manipulation strategy. We focus on an efficient, wrapper-based implementation of our approach, and experimentally validate its soundness on different application examples, including spam and malware detection.

  18. Developing the Essential Features of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robin; Burke, Kathaleen

    2008-01-01

    This lesson can be used at the beginning of the year to teach students how to conduct inquiries using the essential features described in "Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards" (NRC 1996). The lesson is divided into several activities which may be spread over several days or interspersed with your other beginning-of-the-year…

  19. Remapping Nominal Features in the Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Ji-Hyeon Jacee

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates second language (L2) development in the domains of morphosyntax and semantics. Specifically, it examines the acquisition of definiteness and specificity in Russian within the Feature Re-assembly framework (Lardiere, 2009), according to which the hardest L2 learning task is not to reset parameters but to reconfigure,…

  20. Anisotropic elliptic PDEs for feature classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengfa; Hou, Tingbo; Li, Shuai; Su, Zhixun; Qin, Hong

    2013-10-01

    The extraction and classification of multitype (point, curve, patch) features on manifolds are extremely challenging, due to the lack of rigorous definition for diverse feature forms. This paper seeks a novel solution of multitype features in a mathematically rigorous way and proposes an efficient method for feature classification on manifolds. We tackle this challenge by exploring a quasi-harmonic field (QHF) generated by elliptic PDEs, which is the stable state of heat diffusion governed by anisotropic diffusion tensor. Diffusion tensor locally encodes shape geometry and controls velocity and direction of the diffusion process. The global QHF weaves points into smooth regions separated by ridges and has superior performance in combating noise/holes. Our method's originality is highlighted by the integration of locally defined diffusion tensor and globally defined elliptic PDEs in an anisotropic manner. At the computational front, the heat diffusion PDE becomes a linear system with Dirichlet condition at heat sources (called seeds). Our new algorithms afford automatic seed selection, enhanced by a fast update procedure in a high-dimensional space. By employing diffusion probability, our method can handle both manufactured parts and organic objects. Various experiments demonstrate the flexibility and high performance of our method. PMID:23929843

  1. Collisional Features in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attree, Nicholas; Murray, Carl D; Cooper, Nicholas; Williams, Gareth

    2014-05-01

    Saturn’s F ring is a highly dynamic environment; changeable over timescales from hours to years and displaying a variety of features caused by both gravitational and collisional interactions with local objects. These objects range from the ‘shepherding’ moons Prometheus and Pandora down to small (radius < 1 km) moonlets, embedded in the ring or on nearby orbits. Previously (Attree et al. 2014) we catalogued nearly 900 small-scale collisional features (“mini-jets”) from Cassini images, placing constraints on the size and orbital distribution of the local colliding population. Here we will present the latest work on F ring collisions; updating the catalogue with new Cassini images to further refine our statistics of the population as well as discussing specific, interesting features which shed light on the collision process. We will also present the results of N-body simulations of the collisions and discuss ongoing work to survey the larger “jet” features. These are caused by higher velocity collisions 30m/s) with more distant objects like S/2004 S 6 which may represent the upper end of the moonlet population in size and in orbit.

  2. Corporate Features and Faith-Based Academies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This article forms an introductory exploration into the relationship between corporate features and religious values in Academies sponsored by a Christian foundation. This is a theme which arose from research comprising the ethnography of a City Technology College (CTC) with a Christian ethos. The Christian foundation which sponsors the CTC also…

  3. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate betweenmore » age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.« less

  4. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  5. Extracting textural features from tactile sensors.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J; Lawry, J; Rossiter, J; Melhuish, C

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes an experiment to quantify texture using an artificial finger equipped with a microphone to detect frictional sound. Using a microphone to record tribological data is a biologically inspired approach that emulates the Pacinian corpuscle. Artificial surfaces were created to constrain the subsequent analysis to specific textures. Recordings of the artificial surfaces were made to create a library of frictional sounds for data analysis. These recordings were mapped to the frequency domain using fast Fourier transforms for direct comparison, manipulation and quantifiable analysis. Numerical features such as modal frequency and average value were calculated to analyze the data and compared with attributes generated from principal component analysis (PCA). It was found that numerical features work well for highly constrained data but cannot classify multiple textural elements. PCA groups textures according to a natural similarity. Classification of the recordings using k nearest neighbors shows a high accuracy for PCA data. Clustering of the PCA data shows that similar discs are grouped together with few classification errors. In contrast, clustering of numerical features produces erroneous classification by splitting discs between clusters. The temperature of the finger is shown to have a direct relation to some of the features and subsequent data in PCA. PMID:18583731

  6. Features and the ‘primal sketch’

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is concerned primarily with psychophysical and physiological evidence relevant to the question of the existence of spatial features or spatial primitives in human vision. The review will be almost exclusively confined to features defined in the luminance domain. The emphasis will be on the experimental and computational methods that have been used for revealing features, rather than on a detailed comparison between different models of feature extraction. Color and texture fall largely outside the scope of the review, though the principles may be similar. Stereo matching and motion matching are also largely excluded because they are covered in other contributions to this volume, although both have addressed the question of the spatial primitives involved in matching. Similarities between different psychophysically-based model will be emphasized rather than minor differences. All the models considered in the review are based on the extraction of directional spatial derivatives of the luminance profile, typically the first and second, but in one case the third order, and all have some form of non-linearity, be it rectification or thresholding. PMID:20696182

  7. Web Search Engines: Features and Commands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Randolph

    1999-01-01

    Presents a chart comparing Web search engines. Discusses features covered in the chart: size; Boolean Operators and Parentheses; phrase searching; proximity; truncation; title, date and URL fields; links to a URL; language; media searching; name; case sensitivity; searches all common words; directory attached; gives count for answer; gives term…

  8. Feature Acquisition with Imbalanced Training Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.; Jones, Dayton L.

    2011-01-01

    This work considers cost-sensitive feature acquisition that attempts to classify a candidate datapoint from incomplete information. In this task, an agent acquires features of the datapoint using one or more costly diagnostic tests, and eventually ascribes a classification label. A cost function describes both the penalties for feature acquisition, as well as misclassification errors. A common solution is a Cost Sensitive Decision Tree (CSDT), a branching sequence of tests with features acquired at interior decision points and class assignment at the leaves. CSDT's can incorporate a wide range of diagnostic tests and can reflect arbitrary cost structures. They are particularly useful for online applications due to their low computational overhead. In this innovation, CSDT's are applied to cost-sensitive feature acquisition where the goal is to recognize very rare or unique phenomena in real time. Example applications from this domain include four areas. In stream processing, one seeks unique events in a real time data stream that is too large to store. In fault protection, a system must adapt quickly to react to anticipated errors by triggering repair activities or follow- up diagnostics. With real-time sensor networks, one seeks to classify unique, new events as they occur. With observational sciences, a new generation of instrumentation seeks unique events through online analysis of large observational datasets. This work presents a solution based on transfer learning principles that permits principled CSDT learning while exploiting any prior knowledge of the designer to correct both between-class and withinclass imbalance. Training examples are adaptively reweighted based on a decomposition of the data attributes. The result is a new, nonparametric representation that matches the anticipated attribute distribution for the target events.

  9. Automatic measurement and representation of prosodic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Goangshiuan Shawn

    Effective measurement and representation of prosodic features of the acoustic signal for use in automatic speech recognition and understanding systems is the goal of this work. Prosodic features-stress, duration, and intonation-are variations of the acoustic signal whose domains are beyond the boundaries of each individual phonetic segment. Listeners perceive prosodic features through a complex combination of acoustic correlates such as intensity, duration, and fundamental frequency (F0). We have developed new tools to measure F0 and intensity features. We apply a probabilistic global error correction routine to an Average Magnitude Difference Function (AMDF) pitch detector. A new short-term frequency-domain Teager energy algorithm is used to measure the energy of a speech signal. We have conducted a series of experiments performing lexical stress detection on words in continuous English speech from two speech corpora. We have experimented with two different approaches, a segment-based approach and a rhythm unit-based approach, in lexical stress detection. The first approach uses pattern recognition with energy- and duration-based measurements as features to build Bayesian classifiers to detect the stress level of a vowel segment. In the second approach we define rhythm unit and use only the F0-based measurement and a scoring system to determine the stressed segment in the rhythm unit. A duration-based segmentation routine was developed to break polysyllabic words into rhythm units. The long-term goal of this work is to develop a system that can effectively detect the stress pattern for each word in continuous speech utterances. Stress information will be integrated as a constraint for pruning the word hypotheses in a word recognition system based on hidden Markov models.

  10. Features and heterogeneities in growing network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Luca; Cortelezzi, Michele; Yang, Bin; Marmorini, Giacomo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2012-06-01

    Many complex networks from the World Wide Web to biological networks grow taking into account the heterogeneous features of the nodes. The feature of a node might be a discrete quantity such as a classification of a URL document such as personal page, thematic website, news, blog, search engine, social network, etc., or the classification of a gene in a functional module. Moreover the feature of a node can be a continuous variable such as the position of a node in the embedding space. In order to account for these properties, in this paper we provide a generalization of growing network models with preferential attachment that includes the effect of heterogeneous features of the nodes. The main effect of heterogeneity is the emergence of an “effective fitness” for each class of nodes, determining the rate at which nodes acquire new links. The degree distribution exhibits a multiscaling behavior analogous to the the fitness model. This property is robust with respect to variations in the model, as long as links are assigned through effective preferential attachment. Beyond the degree distribution, in this paper we give a full characterization of the other relevant properties of the model. We evaluate the clustering coefficient and show that it disappears for large network size, a property shared with the Barabási-Albert model. Negative degree correlations are also present in this class of models, along with nontrivial mixing patterns among features. We therefore conclude that both small clustering coefficients and disassortative mixing are outcomes of the preferential attachment mechanism in general growing networks.

  11. Features and heterogeneities in growing network models.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Luca; Cortelezzi, Michele; Yang, Bin; Marmorini, Giacomo; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2012-06-01

    Many complex networks from the World Wide Web to biological networks grow taking into account the heterogeneous features of the nodes. The feature of a node might be a discrete quantity such as a classification of a URL document such as personal page, thematic website, news, blog, search engine, social network, etc., or the classification of a gene in a functional module. Moreover the feature of a node can be a continuous variable such as the position of a node in the embedding space. In order to account for these properties, in this paper we provide a generalization of growing network models with preferential attachment that includes the effect of heterogeneous features of the nodes. The main effect of heterogeneity is the emergence of an "effective fitness" for each class of nodes, determining the rate at which nodes acquire new links. The degree distribution exhibits a multiscaling behavior analogous to the the fitness model. This property is robust with respect to variations in the model, as long as links are assigned through effective preferential attachment. Beyond the degree distribution, in this paper we give a full characterization of the other relevant properties of the model. We evaluate the clustering coefficient and show that it disappears for large network size, a property shared with the Barabási-Albert model. Negative degree correlations are also present in this class of models, along with nontrivial mixing patterns among features. We therefore conclude that both small clustering coefficients and disassortative mixing are outcomes of the preferential attachment mechanism in general growing networks.

  12. Feature and Region Selection for Visual Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ji; Wang, Liantao; Cabral, Ricardo; De la Torre, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Visual learning problems, such as object classification and action recognition, are typically approached using extensions of the popular bag-of-words (BoWs) model. Despite its great success, it is unclear what visual features the BoW model is learning. Which regions in the image or video are used to discriminate among classes? Which are the most discriminative visual words? Answering these questions is fundamental for understanding existing BoW models and inspiring better models for visual recognition. To answer these questions, this paper presents a method for feature selection and region selection in the visual BoW model. This allows for an intermediate visualization of the features and regions that are important for visual learning. The main idea is to assign latent weights to the features or regions, and jointly optimize these latent variables with the parameters of a classifier (e.g., support vector machine). There are four main benefits of our approach: 1) our approach accommodates non-linear additive kernels, such as the popular χ(2) and intersection kernel; 2) our approach is able to handle both regions in images and spatio-temporal regions in videos in a unified way; 3) the feature selection problem is convex, and both problems can be solved using a scalable reduced gradient method; and 4) we point out strong connections with multiple kernel learning and multiple instance learning approaches. Experimental results in the PASCAL VOC 2007, MSR Action Dataset II and YouTube illustrate the benefits of our approach. PMID:26742135

  13. Remote sensing image classification based on block feature point density analysis and multiple-feature fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shijin; Jiang, Yaping; Zhang, Yang; Feng, Jun

    2015-10-01

    With the development of remote sensing (RS) and the related technologies, the resolution of RS images is enhancing. Compared with moderate or low resolution images, high-resolution ones can provide more detailed ground information. However, a variety of terrain has complex spatial distribution. The different objectives of high-resolution images have a variety of features. The effectiveness of these features is not the same, but some of them are complementary. Considering the above information and characteristics, a new method is proposed to classify RS images based on hierarchical fusion of multi-features. Firstly, RS images are pre-classified into two categories in terms of whether feature points are uniformly or non-uniformly distributed. Then, the color histogram and Gabor texture feature are extracted from the uniformly-distributed categories, and the linear spatial pyramid matching using sparse coding (ScSPM) feature is obtained from the non-uniformly-distributed categories. Finally, the classification is performed by two support vector machine classifiers. The experimental results on a large RS image database with 2100 images show that the overall classification accuracy is boosted by 10.1% in comparison with the highest accuracy of single feature classification method. Compared with other multiple-feature fusion methods, the proposed method has achieved the highest classification accuracy on this dataset which has reached 90.1%, and the time complexity of the algorithm is also greatly reduced.

  14. Feature selection versus feature compression in the building of calibration models from FTIR-spectrophotometry datasets.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Alexander; Llobet, Eduard

    2012-01-15

    Undoubtedly, FTIR-spectrophotometry has become a standard in chemical industry for monitoring, on-the-fly, the different concentrations of reagents and by-products. However, representing chemical samples by FTIR spectra, which spectra are characterized by hundreds if not thousands of variables, conveys their own set of particular challenges because they necessitate to be analyzed in a high-dimensional feature space, where many of these features are likely to be highly correlated and many others surely affected by noise. Therefore, identifying a subset of features that preserves the classifier/regressor performance seems imperative prior any attempt to build an appropriate pattern recognition method. In this context, we investigate the benefit of utilizing two different dimensionality reduction methods, namely the minimum Redundancy-Maximum Relevance (mRMR) feature selection scheme and a new self-organized map (SOM) based feature compression, coupled to regression methods to quantitatively analyze two-component liquid samples utilizing FTIR spectrophotometry. Since these methods give us the possibility of selecting a small subset of relevant features from FTIR spectra preserving the statistical characteristics of the target variable being analyzed, we claim that expressing the FTIR spectra by these dimensionality-reduced set of features may be beneficial. We demonstrate the utility of these novel feature selection schemes in quantifying the distinct analytes within their binary mixtures utilizing a FTIR-spectrophotometer.

  15. What Do We Learn from Binding Features? Evidence for Multilevel Feature Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Raffone, Antonino; Hommel, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to investigate the relationship between the binding of visual features (as measured by their after-effects on subsequent binding) and the learning of feature-conjunction probabilities. Both binding and learning effects were obtained, but they did not interact. Interestingly, (shape-color) binding effects…

  16. Feature Integration Theory Revisited: Dissociating Feature Detection and Attentional Guidance in Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Louis K. H.; Hayward, William G.

    2009-01-01

    In feature integration theory (FIT; A. Treisman & S. Sato, 1990), feature detection is driven by independent dimensional modules, and other searches are driven by a master map of locations that integrates dimensional information into salience signals. Although recent theoretical models have largely abandoned this distinction, some observed results…

  17. A Review of Feature Selection and Feature Extraction Methods Applied on Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Hira, Zena M.; Gillies, Duncan F.

    2015-01-01

    We summarise various ways of performing dimensionality reduction on high-dimensional microarray data. Many different feature selection and feature extraction methods exist and they are being widely used. All these methods aim to remove redundant and irrelevant features so that classification of new instances will be more accurate. A popular source of data is microarrays, a biological platform for gathering gene expressions. Analysing microarrays can be difficult due to the size of the data they provide. In addition the complicated relations among the different genes make analysis more difficult and removing excess features can improve the quality of the results. We present some of the most popular methods for selecting significant features and provide a comparison between them. Their advantages and disadvantages are outlined in order to provide a clearer idea of when to use each one of them for saving computational time and resources. PMID:26170834

  18. The Heliophysics Feature Catalogue, a tool for the study of solar features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnin, Xavier; Fuller, Nicolas; Renié, Christian; Aboudarham, Jean; Cecconi, Baptiste; Bentley, Robert D.; Csillaghy, André

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of filaments and prominences during the Solar Cycle is a signature of Sun's activity. It is therefore important to follow their evolution during the cycle, in order to be able to associate it with the various phases of the Solar Cycle as well as with other Solar features or events. The virtual observatory HELIO provides information that can be used for such studies, especially its Heliophysics Feature Catalogue gives a unique access to the description of various features during around one cycle. Features available are: filaments, prominences, photospheric and coronal active regions, coronal radio emission, type III radio bursts, coronal holes and sunspots. Web interfaces allow the user to query data for these features. Useful information can also be shared with other HELIO services, such as Heliophysics Event Catalogue, which provides access to dozens of tables of events such as flares, CMEs, . . .

  19. Method of generating features optimal to a dataset and classifier

    DOEpatents

    Bruillard, Paul J.; Gosink, Luke J.; Jarman, Kenneth D.

    2016-10-18

    A method of generating features optimal to a particular dataset and classifier is disclosed. A dataset of messages is inputted and a classifier is selected. An algebra of features is encoded. Computable features that are capable of describing the dataset from the algebra of features are selected. Irredundant features that are optimal for the classifier and the dataset are selected.

  20. Metacatalog of Planetary Surface Features for Multicriteria Evaluation of Surface Evolution: the Integrated Planetary Feature Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargitai, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    We have created a metacatalog, or catalog or catalogs, of surface features of Mars that also includes the actual data in the catalogs listed. The goal is to make mesoscale surface feature databases available in one place, in a GIS-ready format. The databases can be directly imported to ArcGIS or other GIS platforms, like Google Mars. Some of the catalogs in our database are also ingested into the JMARS platform.All catalogs have been previously published in a peer-reviewed journal, but they may contain updates of the published catalogs. Many of the catalogs are "integrated", i.e. they merge databases or information from various papers on the same topic, including references to each individual features listed.Where available, we have included shapefiles with polygon or linear features, however, most of the catalogs only contain point data of their center points and morphological data.One of the unexpected results of the planetary feature metacatalog is that some features have been described by several papers, using different, i.e., conflicting designations. This shows the need for the development of an identification system suitable for mesoscale (100s m to km sized) features that tracks papers and thus prevents multiple naming of the same feature.The feature database can be used for multicriteria analysis of a terrain, thus enables easy distribution pattern analysis and the correlation of the distribution of different landforms and features on Mars. Such catalog makes a scientific evaluation of potential landing sites easier and more effective during the selection process and also supports automated landing site selections.The catalog is accessible at https://planetarydatabase.wordpress.com/.

  1. Special feature on imaging systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George

    2013-07-01

    The IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST'2012) was held in Manchester, UK, on 16-17 July 2012. The participants came from 26 countries or regions: Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, UAE, UK and USA. The technical program of the conference consisted of a series of scientific and technical sessions, exploring physical principles, engineering and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, as reflected by the diversity of the submitted papers. Following a rigorous review process, a total of 123 papers were accepted, and they were organized into 30 oral presentation sessions and a poster session. In addition, six invited keynotes were arranged. The conference not only provided the participants with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and disseminate research outcomes but also paved a way to establish global collaboration. Following the IST'2012, a total of 55 papers, which were technically extended substantially from their versions in the conference proceeding, were submitted as regular papers to this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology . Following a rigorous reviewing process, 25 papers have been finally accepted for publication in this special feature and they are organized into three categories: (1) industrial tomography, (2) imaging systems and techniques and (3) image processing. These papers not only present the latest developments in the field of imaging systems and techniques but also offer potential solutions to existing problems. We hope that this special feature provides a good reference for researchers who are active in the field and will serve as a catalyst to trigger further research. It has been our great pleasure to be the guest editors of this special feature. We would like to thank the authors for their contributions, without which it would

  2. Emergence of network features from multiplexity.

    PubMed

    Cardillo, Alessio; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zanin, Massimiliano; Romance, Miguel; Papo, David; del Pozo, Francisco; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Many biological and man-made networked systems are characterized by the simultaneous presence of different sub-networks organized in separate layers, with links and nodes of qualitatively different types. While during the past few years theoretical studies have examined a variety of structural features of complex networks, the outstanding question is whether such features are characterizing all single layers, or rather emerge as a result of coarse-graining, i.e. when going from the multilayered to the aggregate network representation. Here we address this issue with the help of real data. We analyze the structural properties of an intrinsically multilayered real network, the European Air Transportation Multiplex Network in which each commercial airline defines a network layer. We examine how several structural measures evolve as layers are progressively merged together. In particular, we discuss how the topology of each layer affects the emergence of structural properties in the aggregate network.

  3. Io's Non-SO2 Spectral Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, W. D.; Soderblom, L. A.; Nelson, R. M.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: Several absorptions have been identified in the Galileo NIMS spectra of Io that are not related to SO_2. [1,2]. These absorptions have band centers at 2.97, 3.15, 3.85, and 3.91 microns. There are also broad absorptions in the regions 1-1.3 and 3-3.4 microns. "Patterning" noise in wavelength registration, arising from the pushbroom imaging and grating motion of the NIMS instrument have previously inhibited reliable mapping of weak absorptions. Recent improvements in techniques to remove the coherent pattern noise from the NIMS dataset have been made by Soderblom. This greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and enables mapping of weak spectral signatures such as the 3.15 micron absorption on Io. The 3.15μ feature: The 3.15μ feature is a very weak band having an apparent band depth of less than 4% of the continuum - in contrast to many of the SO_2 features, which have apparent band depths ranging from 15-70%. The 3.15μ feature is reasonably ubiquitous on the surface of Io so it was seen in global average spectra obtained early in the Galileo mission [2]. The feature has not been identified but has been attributed variously to H_2S, H_2O, or OH stretch [2,3]. A map of this feature shows a variety of correlations. The feature is strongly present at lower latitudes, which suggests that it may be associated with a material less volatile than SO_2. However the absorption does appear above 30 degrees (north and south), suggesting its presence in not strictly a thermal issue. It is interesting that the absorption moves north of the equator above Pele apparently avoiding Pele's large plume deposit, is not present at Culann, yet covers Prometheus completely. The distribution at Prometheus suggests that the material leading to the 3.15μ absorption may be associated with the Prometheus SO_2 reservoir - but it is difficult to reconcile that with the behavior of the absorption about Pele and Culann. There is a reasonably good correlation with visibly white

  4. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  5. Surface features of Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.

    1979-01-01

    Viking Orbiter images have provided nearly complete coverage of the two satellites of Mars and have been used to construct maps of the surface features of Phobos and Deimos. The satellites have radically different appearances although nearly all features on both objects were formed directly or indirectly by impact cratering. Phobos has an extensive network of linear depressions (grooves) that probably were formed indirectly by the largest impact recorded on Phobos. Deimos lacks grooves as well as the large number of ridges that occur on Phobos. Craters on Deimos have substantial sediment fill; those on Phobos have none. Evidence of downslope movement of debris is prominent on Deimos but is rare on Phobos. Many of the differences between Phobos and Deimos may be caused by modest differences in mechanical properties. However, the lack of a very large crater on Deimos may be responsible for its lack of grooves.

  6. Semantic Features for Classifying Referring Search Terms

    SciTech Connect

    May, Chandler J.; Henry, Michael J.; McGrath, Liam R.; Bell, Eric B.; Marshall, Eric J.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-05-11

    When an internet user clicks on a result in a search engine, a request is submitted to the destination web server that includes a referrer field containing the search terms given by the user. Using this information, website owners can analyze the search terms leading to their websites to better understand their visitors needs. This work explores some of the features that can be used for classification-based analysis of such referring search terms. We present initial results for the example task of classifying HTTP requests countries of origin. A system that can accurately predict the country of origin from query text may be a valuable complement to IP lookup methods which are susceptible to the obfuscation of dereferrers or proxies. We suggest that the addition of semantic features improves classifier performance in this example application. We begin by looking at related work and presenting our approach. After describing initial experiments and results, we discuss paths forward for this work.

  7. Episodic Ataxias: Clinical and Genetic Features.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by recurrent spells of truncal ataxia and incoordination lasting minutes to hours. Most have an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. To date, 8 subtypes have been defined according to clinical and genetic characteristics, and five genes are known to be linked to EAs. Both EA1 and EA2, which are caused by mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A, account for the majority of EA, but many patients with no identified mutations still exhibit EA-like clinical features. Furthermore, genetically confirmed EAs have mostly been identified in Caucasian families. In this article, we review the current knowledge on the clinical and genetic characteristics of EAs. Additionally, we summarize the phenotypic features of the genetically confirmed EA2 families in Korea. PMID:27667184

  8. Feature Descriptor by Convolution and Pooling Autoencoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present several descriptors for feature-based matching based on autoencoders, and we evaluate the performance of these descriptors. In a training phase, we learn autoencoders from image patches extracted in local windows surrounding key points determined by the Difference of Gaussian extractor. In the matching phase, we construct key point descriptors based on the learned autoencoders, and we use these descriptors as the basis for local keypoint descriptor matching. Three types of descriptors based on autoencoders are presented. To evaluate the performance of these descriptors, recall and 1-precision curves are generated for different kinds of transformations, e.g. zoom and rotation, viewpoint change, using a standard benchmark data set. We compare the performance of these descriptors with the one achieved for SIFT. Early results presented in this paper show that, whereas SIFT in general performs better than the new descriptors, the descriptors based on autoencoders show some potential for feature based matching.

  9. DAB: Multiplex and system support features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. L.

    This Report describes the multiplex and system support features of the Eureka 147/DAB digital audio system. It sets out the requirements of all users along the broadcast chain from service providers and broadcaster through to the listener. The contents of the transmission frame are examined drawing the distinction between the main service multiplex and the provision of control information in a separate fast data channel. The concept of the DAB service structure is introduced and the inherent system flexibility for altering the service arrangement is explained. A wide range of service information features builds on those provided in earlier systems, such as RDS (Radio Data System) and is intended to make it easier for a listener to find any required service and to add a further dimension to audio broadcasting. The choices available to users in all of these areas are examined.

  10. Episodic Ataxias: Clinical and Genetic Features

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Choi, Jae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by recurrent spells of truncal ataxia and incoordination lasting minutes to hours. Most have an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. To date, 8 subtypes have been defined according to clinical and genetic characteristics, and five genes are known to be linked to EAs. Both EA1 and EA2, which are caused by mutations in KCNA1 and CACNA1A, account for the majority of EA, but many patients with no identified mutations still exhibit EA-like clinical features. Furthermore, genetically confirmed EAs have mostly been identified in Caucasian families. In this article, we review the current knowledge on the clinical and genetic characteristics of EAs. Additionally, we summarize the phenotypic features of the genetically confirmed EA2 families in Korea. PMID:27667184

  11. Unique features of animal mitochondrial translation systems

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kimitsuna

    2010-01-01

    In animal mitochondria, several codons are non-universal and their meanings differ depending on the species. In addition, the tRNA structures that decipher codons are sometimes unusually truncated. These features seem to be related to the shortening of mitochondrial (mt) genomes, which occurred during the evolution of mitochondria. These organelles probably originated from the endosymbiosis of an aerobic eubacterium into an ancestral eukaryote. It is plausible that these events brought about the various characteristic features of animal mt translation systems, such as genetic code variations, unusually truncated tRNA and rRNA structures, unilateral tRNA recognition mechanisms by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, elongation factors and ribosomes, and compensation for RNA deficits by enlarged proteins. In this article, we discuss molecular mechanisms for these phenomena. Finally, we describe human mt diseases that are caused by modification defects in mt tRNAs. PMID:20075606

  12. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  13. Model atmospheres - Tool for identifying interstellar features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Slojkowski, S. E.; Rodriguez-Bell, T.; York, D.

    1993-01-01

    Model atmosphere parameters are derived for 14 early A stars with rotation velocities, from optical spectra, in excess of 80 km/s. The models are compared with IUE observations of the stars in regions where interstellar lines are expected. In general, with the assumption of solar abundances, excellent fits are obtained in regions longward of 2580 A, and accurate interstellar equivalent widths can be derived using models to establish the continuum. The fits are poorer at shorter wavelengths, particularly at 2026-2062 A, where the stellar model parameters seem inadequate. Features indicating mass flows are evident in stars with known infrared excesses. In gamma TrA, variability in the Mg II lines is seen over the 5-year interval of these data, and also over timescales as short as 26 days. The present technique should be useful in systematic studies of episodic mass flows in A stars and for stellar abundance studies, as well as interstellar features.

  14. MULTITASK FEATURE SELECTION WITH TASK DESCRIPTORS.

    PubMed

    Bellón, Víctor; Stoven, Véronique; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning applications in precision medicine are severely limited by the scarcity of data to learn from. Indeed, training data often contains many more features than samples. To alleviate the resulting statistical issues, the multitask learning framework proposes to learn different but related tasks jointly, rather than independently, by sharing information between these tasks. Within this framework, the joint regularization of model parameters results in models with few non-zero coefficients and that share similar sparsity patterns. We propose a new regularized multitask approach that incorporates task descriptors, hence modulating the amount of information shared between tasks according to their similarity. We show on simulated data that this method outperforms other multitask feature selection approaches, particularly in the case of scarce data. In addition, we demonstrate on peptide MHC-I binding data the ability of the proposed approach to make predictions for new tasks for which no training data is available. PMID:26776192

  15. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    2000-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required in understanding the physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines, were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of a great deal of interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one 'snap-shot' of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense.

  16. Neurobiological features of binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Balodis, Iris M; Grilo, Carlos M; Potenza, Marc N

    2015-12-01

    Biobehavioral features associated with binge-eating disorder (BED) have been investigated; however, few systematic reviews to date have described neuroimaging findings from studies of BED. Emerging functional and structural studies support BED as having unique and overlapping neural features as compared with other disorders. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence linking heightened responses to palatable food cues with prefrontal areas, particularly the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), with specific relationships to hunger and reward-sensitivity measures. While few studies to date have investigated non-food-cue responses; these suggest a generalized hypofunctioning in frontostriatal areas during reward and inhibitory control processes. Early studies applying neuroimaging to treatment efforts suggest that targeting neural function underlying motivational processes may prove important in the treatment of BED.

  17. Geochemical dynamics in selected Yellowstone hydrothermal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G.; Kamyshny, A.; Findlay, A.; Nuzzio, D.

    2010-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park has a wide diversity of thermal features, and includes springs with a range of pH conditions that significantly impact sulfur speciation. We have utilized a combination of voltammetric and spectroscopic techniques to characterize the intermediate sulfur chemistry of Cinder Pool, Evening Primrose, Ojo Caliente, Frying Pan, Azure, and Dragon thermal springs. These measurements additionally have demonstrated the geochemical dynamics inherent in these systems; significant variability in chemical speciation occur in many of these thermal features due to changes in gas supply rates, fluid discharge rates, and thermal differences that occur on second time scales. The dynamics of the geochemical settings shown may significantly impact how microorganisms interact with the sulfur forms in these systems.

  18. Emergence of network features from multiplexity.

    PubMed

    Cardillo, Alessio; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zanin, Massimiliano; Romance, Miguel; Papo, David; del Pozo, Francisco; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Many biological and man-made networked systems are characterized by the simultaneous presence of different sub-networks organized in separate layers, with links and nodes of qualitatively different types. While during the past few years theoretical studies have examined a variety of structural features of complex networks, the outstanding question is whether such features are characterizing all single layers, or rather emerge as a result of coarse-graining, i.e. when going from the multilayered to the aggregate network representation. Here we address this issue with the help of real data. We analyze the structural properties of an intrinsically multilayered real network, the European Air Transportation Multiplex Network in which each commercial airline defines a network layer. We examine how several structural measures evolve as layers are progressively merged together. In particular, we discuss how the topology of each layer affects the emergence of structural properties in the aggregate network. PMID:23446838

  19. Neurobiological features of binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Balodis, Iris M; Grilo, Carlos M; Potenza, Marc N

    2015-12-01

    Biobehavioral features associated with binge-eating disorder (BED) have been investigated; however, few systematic reviews to date have described neuroimaging findings from studies of BED. Emerging functional and structural studies support BED as having unique and overlapping neural features as compared with other disorders. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence linking heightened responses to palatable food cues with prefrontal areas, particularly the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), with specific relationships to hunger and reward-sensitivity measures. While few studies to date have investigated non-food-cue responses; these suggest a generalized hypofunctioning in frontostriatal areas during reward and inhibitory control processes. Early studies applying neuroimaging to treatment efforts suggest that targeting neural function underlying motivational processes may prove important in the treatment of BED. PMID:26530404

  20. Religious features of curanderismo training and practice.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Cindy Lynn; Levin, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate religious features of curanderismo, specifically the role of ostensibly Roman Catholic beliefs and practices in the training and work of curandero/as. The integration of religious beliefs and practices within the rituals of curanderismo and how this potential clash of worldviews negatively and positively impacts clients and practitioners are examined. Interviews were conducted with practicing curandero/as and clients who had sought their services. Factors observed to have potential to facilitate healing include psychological reassurance gained through incorporating familiar religious beliefs and paraphernalia and the therapeutic healing property of features of curanderismo practice, such as herbs used in many remedies. Negative effects may result from feelings of distrust, fear, and embarrassment engendered by seeking care from a curandero/a. Future research targeting the complexities of the relationship between Roman Catholicism and curanderismo might focus specifically on how negotiating this conflict of worldviews may affect health.

  1. The relationship between 2D static features and 2D dynamic features used in gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawar, Hamad M.; Ugail, Hassan; Kamala, Mumtaz; Connah, David

    2013-05-01

    In most gait recognition techniques, both static and dynamic features are used to define a subject's gait signature. In this study, the existence of a relationship between static and dynamic features was investigated. The correlation coefficient was used to analyse the relationship between the features extracted from the "University of Bradford Multi-Modal Gait Database". This study includes two dimensional dynamic and static features from 19 subjects. The dynamic features were compromised of Phase-Weighted Magnitudes driven by a Fourier Transform of the temporal rotational data of a subject's joints (knee, thigh, shoulder, and elbow). The results concluded that there are eleven pairs of features that are considered significantly correlated with (p<0.05). This result indicates the existence of a statistical relationship between static and dynamics features, which challenges the results of several similar studies. These results bare great potential for further research into the area, and would potentially contribute to the creation of a gait signature using latent data.

  2. Visual Features: Featural Strength and Visual Strength Are Two Dissociable Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liqiang

    2015-01-01

    Visual features are often assumed to be the general building blocks for various visual tasks. However, it is well known that some stimulus categories (i.e., basic features) can be processed in parallel, but others (e.g., Ts in different orientations) need to be scanned serially, and this difference in featural strength seems to be on a fundamentally different dimension from differences in visual strength (e.g., reduction in contrast). This study compared two high-level tasks, namely tasks that require a lot of attentional operations (change detection and pattern comparison), with one low-level task, namely a task that requires few attentional operations (perceptual discrimination). The results confirmed that featural strength has substantial effects on high-level tasks but only a negligible effect on the low-level task. The results also revealed a complementary interaction: Visual strength has a substantial effect on the low-level task, but a negligible effect on high-level tasks. Overall, featural strength and visual strength are two dissociable dimensions in processing of visual features. The present results, along with other findings, challenge the generality of processing visual features. PMID:26348155

  3. Feature mixing rather than feature replacement during perceptual filling-in.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, P-J; Tse, P U

    2009-02-01

    'Filling-in' occurs when a retinally stabilized object subjectively appears to vanish following perceptual fading of its boundaries. The term 'filling-in' literally means that information about the apparently vanished object is lost and replaced solely by information arising from the surrounding background. However, we find evidence that the mechanism of 'filling-in' can actually involve a process of 'feature mixing' rather than 'feature replacement,' whereby features on either side of a perceptually faded boundary merge. Here we investigate the properties of feature mixing and specify certain conditions under which such mixing occurs. Our results show that, when using visual stimuli composed of spatially alternating stripes containing different luminances or motion signals, and when using the neon-color-spreading paradigm, the filled-in luminance, motion, or color is approximately the area and magnitude weighted average of the background and the foreground luminance, motion, or color, respectively. Together, these results demonstrate that, under at least certain conditions, 'filling-in' may involve a process of feature mixing or feature averaging rather than one of feature replacement. PMID:19135078

  4. Visual Features: Featural Strength and Visual Strength Are Two Dissociable Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liqiang

    2015-09-08

    Visual features are often assumed to be the general building blocks for various visual tasks. However, it is well known that some stimulus categories (i.e., basic features) can be processed in parallel, but others (e.g., Ts in different orientations) need to be scanned serially, and this difference in featural strength seems to be on a fundamentally different dimension from differences in visual strength (e.g., reduction in contrast). This study compared two high-level tasks, namely tasks that require a lot of attentional operations (change detection and pattern comparison), with one low-level task, namely a task that requires few attentional operations (perceptual discrimination). The results confirmed that featural strength has substantial effects on high-level tasks but only a negligible effect on the low-level task. The results also revealed a complementary interaction: Visual strength has a substantial effect on the low-level task, but a negligible effect on high-level tasks. Overall, featural strength and visual strength are two dissociable dimensions in processing of visual features. The present results, along with other findings, challenge the generality of processing visual features.

  5. Acute arsenic poisoning: clinical and histopathological features.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, B; Córdoba, S; Nieto, S; Fernández-Herrera, J; García-Díez, A

    1999-12-01

    We report a woman with acute arsenic poisoning, who developed an erythroderma with vesicles and pustules after the ingestion of 8-16 g of sodium arsenite. Simultaneously, she presented a herpes simplex virus infection. Skin biopsies showed unique features which included multiple small pigment granules inside and outside the histiocytes. In our opinion, these findings are consistent with acute arsenic poisoning, and constitute the first histological description of this entity in skin.

  6. Tarsal tunnel syndrome: ultrasonographic and MRI features.

    PubMed

    Machiels, F; Shahabpour, M; De Maeseneer, M; Schmedding, E; Wylock, P; Osteaux, M

    1999-04-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a well-known but rare entrapment neuropathy involving the posterior tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel, a fibro-osseous channel extending from the medial aspect of the ankle to the midfoot. Posttraumatic fibrosis, ganglion cyst, tenosynovitis, tumor of the nerves or other structures, dilated or tortuous veins can cause significant nerve compression in this anatomic region. Herein, we present the typical ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance features of this disorder in patient with a ganglion cyst.

  7. Patient perceptions of stock footwear design features.

    PubMed

    Williams, A E; Nester, C J

    2006-04-01

    Patients with diseases which impact on foot health, for example diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, are known to have some benefit from prescribed stock footwear with regards to clinical outcomes. Achieving this is not just about getting the footwear designed and fitted to meet the clinical needs, but it also requires that the patient wears the shoes. This means meeting the non-clinical needs or criteria of patients. The aim of this study was to compare perceptions of the same footwear between patients with diabetes and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with regard to specific design features. Fifty-four patients with RA and 40 patients with diabetes who required prescription footwear were asked to identify issues of importance, and to assess the features of five different pairs of stock footwear using a Likert scale scoring form. There was a difference between the RA and the diabetes groups with regards their overall requirements from the footwear with comfort being a priority in RA and style a priority for diabetes. Both groups rated the same footwear as overall best from the selection, but the scores suggest that there were features with the 'best' shoe which were not acceptable suggesting that even the 'best' shoe was a compromise This possibly indicates that existing footwear ranges do not meet all the patients' requirements. Patients have different perceptions with regard to what is important to them in terms of footwear with regards to the specific features of the footwear and one of the influences appears to be the underlying systemic disease. Patient-based criteria may be an important consideration in the design of the footwear.

  8. Featured Organism: Schizosaccharomyces pombe, The Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the fission yeast, has long been a crucial model for the study of the eukaryote cell cycle. We take a look at this important yeast, whose genome has recently been completed, featuring comments from Valerie Wood, Jürg Bähler, Ramsay McFarlane, Susan Forsburg, Iain Hagan and Paul Nurse on the implications of having the complete sequence and future prospects for pombe genomics. PMID:18628834

  9. Prognostic features of renal sarcomas (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ÖZTÜRK, HAKAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present review was to evaluate the prognostic features of primary sarcomas of the kidney. A literature review was conducted using a number of databases, including Medline (PubMed) and Scopus, for studies published between January 1992 and December 2013. Of the studies published in English, those describing the prognostic features of primary sarcomas of the kidney were recorded. The electronic search was limited to the following keywords: Sarcoma, renal sarcoma, prognosis, diagnosis, immunohistochemistry, genetic and survey. Subsequent to the search, no review articles and/or meta-analyses associated with the prognosis of primary sarcomas of the kidney were identified. In total, 31 studies, which consisted of case studies, case series and studies concerned with the overall prognosis of urological soft-tissue sarcomas, were reviewed. Primary sarcoma of the kidney has a poor prognosis compared with other sarcomas of the urogenital system. In addition to the surgical excision of renal sarcomas, pathological, molecular and genetic prognostic factors are also considered. Due to the small number of cases, previous studies have not randomized the prognostic features of primary sarcomas of the kidney. The elucidation of the so-called ‘chaotic’ genetic and molecular basis of renal sarcomas will help to predict patient prognoses. Surgical excision is the most significant parameter for determining the prognosis of sarcomas of the kidney. However, sarcomas also exhibit prognostic features that are based upon pathological, genetic and molecular factors. The present review suggests that additional factors may be important in predicting the prognosis of patients with renal sarcomas, and that clinicians should plan treatment and follow-up regimens according to these factors. PMID:25663853

  10. Coordinates of features on the Galilean satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The coordinate systems of each of the Galilean satellites are defined and coordinates of features seen in the Voyager pictures of these satellites are presented. The control nets of the satellites were computed by means of single block analytical triangulations. The normal equations were solved by the conjugate iterative method which is convenient and which converges rapidly as the initial estimates of the parameters are very good.

  11. Digital audio authentication by robust feature embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmudzinski, Sascha; Munir, Badar; Steinebach, Martin

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an approach for verifying the integrity of digital audio recording by means of content-based integrity watermarking. Here an audio fingerprint is extracted from the Fourier domain and embedded as a digital watermark in the same domain. The design of the feature extraction allows a fine temporal resolution of the verification of the integrity. Experimental results show a good distinction between authentic and tampered audio content.

  12. The distinctive features of Indian malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparup

    2015-03-01

    Malaria and factors driving malaria are heterogeneous in India, unlike in other countries, and the epidemiology of malaria therefore is considered 'highly complex'. This complexity is primarily attributed to several unique features of the malaria parasites, mosquito vectors, malaria-susceptible populations, and ecoclimatic variables in India. Recent research on the genetic epidemiology of Indian malaria parasites has been successful in partly unraveling the mysteries underlying these complexities.

  13. MAMA Software Features: Visual Examples of Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-20

    This document shows examples of the results from quantifying objects of certain sizes and types in the software. It is intended to give users a better feel for some of the quantification calculations, and, more importantly, to help users understand the challenges with using a small set of ‘shape’ quantification calculations for objects that can vary widely in shapes and features. We will add more examples to this in the coming year.

  14. New spectral features from bound dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature that we predict can provide a complementary verification of dark matter discovery at experiments with positive signal but unclear background. The effect is generically expected, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section.

  15. Projecting WEIRD features on ancient religions.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Pascal; Baumard, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The proposed narrative relies on an anachronistic projection of current religions onto prehistorical and historical cultures that were not concerned with prosocial morality or with public statement of belief. Prosocial morality appeared in wealthier post-Axial environments. Public demonstrations of belief are possible and advantageous when religious diversity starts interacting with coalitional recruitment dynamics in large-scale societies, a typical feature of modern, so-called WEIRD societies. PMID:26948751

  16. Wavelet features in motion data classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczesna, Agnieszka; Świtoński, Adam; Słupik, Janusz; Josiński, Henryk; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the problem of motion data classification based on result of multiresolution analysis implemented in form of quaternion lifting scheme. Scheme processes directly on time series of rotations coded in form of unit quaternion signal. In the work new features derived from wavelet energy and entropy are proposed. To validate the approach gait database containing data of 30 different humans is used. The obtained results are satisfactory. The classification has over than 91% accuracy.

  17. Quick survey of smartphone features and functions.

    PubMed

    Fox, Brent I; Felkey, Bill G

    2014-06-01

    What do you do when you leave the house without your smartphone? Do you sleep with it beside your bed? For us, these devices are as much a part of our lives as the belts around our waists. But, how long has it been since you surveyed the market? We provide a topical update on the current features and functions of these immensely important devices.

  18. Clinical features of neuromyelitis optica in children

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Jayne; Krupp, Lauren; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Hunt, Tyler; Olsen, Cody S.; Rodriguez, Moses; Lotze, Tim; Gorman, Mark; Benson, Leslie; Belman, Anita; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Aaen, Greg; Graves, Jennifer; Patterson, Marc; Rose, John W.; Casper, T. Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare clinical features of pediatric neuromyelitis optica (NMO) to other pediatric demyelinating diseases. Methods: Review of a prospective multicenter database on children with demyelinating diseases. Case summaries documenting clinical and laboratory features were reviewed by an adjudication panel. Diagnoses were assigned in the following categories: multiple sclerosis (MS), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, NMO, and recurrent demyelinating disease not otherwise specified. Results: Thirty-eight cases of NMO were identified by review panel, 97% of which met the revised International Panel on NMO Diagnosis NMO-SD 2014 criteria, but only 49% met 2006 Wingerchuk criteria. Serum or CSF NMO immunoglobulin G (IgG) was positive in 65% of NMO cases that were tested; however, some patients became seropositive more than 3 years after onset despite serial testing. No patient had positive CSF NMO IgG and negative serum NMO IgG in contemporaneous samples. Other than race (p = 0.02) and borderline findings for sex (p = 0.07), NMO IgG seropositive patients did not differ in demographic, clinical, or laboratory features from seronegatives. Visual, motor, and constitutional symptoms (including vomiting, fever, and seizures) were the most common presenting features of NMO. Initiation of disease-modifying treatment was delayed in NMO vs MS. Two years after onset, patients with NMO had higher attack rates, greater disability accrual measured by overall Expanded Disability Status Scale score, and visual scores than did patients with MS. Conclusion: The new criteria for NMO spectrum disorders apply well to the pediatric setting, and given significant delay in treatment of NMO compared to pediatric MS and worse short-term outcomes, it is imperative to apply these to improve access to treatment. PMID:26683648

  19. An Overview of Electronic Passport Security Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Říha, Zdeněk

    Electronic passports include contactless chip which stores personal data of the passport holder, information about the passport and the issuing institution. In its simplest form an electronic passport contains just a collection of read-only files, more advanced variants can include sophisticated cryptographic mechanisms protecting security of the document and / or privacy of the passport holder. This paper describes security features of electronic passports and discusses their efficiency.

  20. Urogenital mesenteric cyst with fallopian tubal features.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, N; Gellman, E

    1987-01-01

    Urogenital cysts are retroperitoneal or mesenteric cysts that are derived from vestigial remnants of the embryonic urogenital apparatus. Although their precise embryonic origins are usually obscure, occasionally they display histologic features indicative of a mesonephric or metanephric origin. This report describes an unusual mesenteric müllerian cyst consisting of an endosalpingial lining and two-layered smooth muscle walls, probably representing a müllerian duct duplication cyst.

  1. Online Feature Extraction Algorithms for Data Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Seiichi

    Along with the development of the network technology and high-performance small devices such as surveillance cameras and smart phones, various kinds of multimodal information (texts, images, sound, etc.) are captured real-time and shared among systems through networks. Such information is given to a system as a stream of data. In a person identification system based on face recognition, for example, image frames of a face are captured by a video camera and given to the system for an identification purpose. Those face images are considered as a stream of data. Therefore, in order to identify a person more accurately under realistic environments, a high-performance feature extraction method for streaming data, which can be autonomously adapted to the change of data distributions, is solicited. In this review paper, we discuss a recent trend on online feature extraction for streaming data. There have been proposed a variety of feature extraction methods for streaming data recently. Due to the space limitation, we here focus on the incremental principal component analysis.

  2. Visual attention to features by associative learning.

    PubMed

    Gozli, Davood G; Moskowitz, Joshua B; Pratt, Jay

    2014-11-01

    Expecting a particular stimulus can facilitate processing of that stimulus over others, but what is the fate of other stimuli that are known to co-occur with the expected stimulus? This study examined the impact of learned association on feature-based attention. The findings show that the effectiveness of an uninformative color transient in orienting attention can change by learned associations between colors and the expected target shape. In an initial acquisition phase, participants learned two distinct sequences of stimulus-response-outcome, where stimuli were defined by shape ('S' vs. 'H'), responses were localized key-presses (left vs. right), and outcomes were colors (red vs. green). Next, in a test phase, while expecting a target shape (80% probable), participants showed reliable attentional orienting to the color transient associated with the target shape, and showed no attentional orienting with the color associated with the alternative target shape. This bias seemed to be driven by learned association between shapes and colors, and not modulated by the response. In addition, the bias seemed to depend on observing target-color conjunctions, since encountering the two features disjunctively (without spatiotemporal overlap) did not replicate the findings. We conclude that associative learning - likely mediated by mechanisms underlying visual object representation - can extend the impact of goal-driven attention to features associated with a target stimulus. PMID:25173722

  3. Bone feature analysis using image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Austin, T; Thomas, C D; Clement, J G

    1996-01-01

    In order to establish the correlation between bone structure and age, and information about age-related bone changes, it is necessary to study microstructural features of human bone. Traditionally, in bone biology and forensic science, the analysis if bone cross-sections has been carried out manually. Such a process is known to be slow, inefficient and prone to human error. Consequently, the results obtained so far have been unreliable. In this paper we present a new approach to quantitative analysis of cross-sections of human bones using digital image processing techniques. We demonstrate that such a system is able to extract various bone features consistently and is capable of providing more reliable data and statistics for bones. Consequently, we will be able to correlate features of bone microstructure with age and possibly also with age related bone diseases such as osteoporosis. The development of knowledge-based computer vision-systems for automated bone image analysis can now be considered feasible.

  4. Structural features of algebraic quantum notations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] The formalism of quantum mechanics includes a rich collection of representations for describing quantum systems, including functions, graphs, matrices, histograms of probabilities, and Dirac notation. The varied features of these representations affect how computations are performed. For example, identifying probabilities of measurement outcomes for a state described in Dirac notation may involve identifying expansion coefficients by inspection, but if the state is described as a function, identifying those expansion coefficients often involves performing integrals. In this study, we focus on three notational systems: Dirac notation, algebraic wave-function notation, and matrix notation. These quantum notations must include information about basis states and their associated complex probability amplitudes. In this theory paper, we identify four structural features of quantum notations, which we term individuation, degree of externalization, compactness, and symbolic support for computational rules. We illustrate how student reasoning interacts with these structural features with episodes from interviews with advanced undergraduate physics majors reasoning about a superposition state of an infinite square well system. We find evidence of the students coordinating different notations through the use of Dirac notation, using an expression in Dirac notation to guide their work in another notation. These uses are supported by the high degree of individuation, compactness, and symbolic support for computation and the moderate degree of externalization provided by Dirac notation.

  5. Diversity priors for learning early visual features.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hanchen; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Antonio J; Szedmak, Sandor; Piater, Justus

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how utilizing diversity priors can discover early visual features that resemble their biological counterparts. The study is mainly motivated by the sparsity and selectivity of activations of visual neurons in area V1. Most previous work on computational modeling emphasizes selectivity or sparsity independently. However, we argue that selectivity and sparsity are just two epiphenomena of the diversity of receptive fields, which has been rarely exploited in learning. In this paper, to verify our hypothesis, restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are employed to learn early visual features by modeling the statistics of natural images. Considering RBMs as neural networks, the receptive fields of neurons are formed by the inter-weights between hidden and visible nodes. Due to the conditional independence in RBMs, there is no mechanism to coordinate the activations of individual neurons or the whole population. A diversity prior is introduced in this paper for training RBMs. We find that the diversity prior indeed can assure simultaneously sparsity and selectivity of neuron activations. The learned receptive fields yield a high degree of biological similarity in comparison to physiological data. Also, corresponding visual features display a good generative capability in image reconstruction. PMID:26321941

  6. Visually Comparing Weather Features in Forecasts.

    PubMed

    Quinan, P Samuel; Meyer, Miriah

    2016-01-01

    Meteorologists process and analyze weather forecasts using visualization in order to examine the behaviors of and relationships among weather features. In this design study conducted with meteorologists in decision support roles, we identified and attempted to address two significant common challenges in weather visualization: the employment of inconsistent and often ineffective visual encoding practices across a wide range of visualizations, and a lack of support for directly visualizing how different weather features relate across an ensemble of possible forecast outcomes. In this work, we present a characterization of the problems and data associated with meteorological forecasting, we propose a set of informed default encoding choices that integrate existing meteorological conventions with effective visualization practice, and we extend a set of techniques as an initial step toward directly visualizing the interactions of multiple features over an ensemble forecast. We discuss the integration of these contributions into a functional prototype tool, and also reflect on the many practical challenges that arise when working with weather data.

  7. Testing of Critical Features of Polysilicon MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    LAVAN,DAVID A.; BUCHHEIT,THOMAS E.

    1999-12-02

    The behavior of MEMS devices is limited by the strength of critical features such as thin ligaments, oxide cuts joining layers, pin joints and hinges. Devices fabricated at Sandia's Microelectronic Development Laboratory have been successfully tested to investigate these features. A series of measurements were performed on samples with gage lengths of 15 to 1000 microns, using conventional and tungsten coated samples as well as samples that include the critical features of standard components in the test section. Specimens have a freely moving pin joint on one end that anchors the sample to the silicon die to allow rotation to reduce effects of bending. Each sample is loaded in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a computer-controlled Nanoindenter. Load is calculated by resolving the measured lateral and normal forces into the applied tensile force and frictional losses. The specimen cross section and gage length dimensions were verified by measuring against a standard in the SEM. Multiple tests can be programmed at one time and performed without operator assistance allowing the collection of significant populations of data.

  8. Recognizing Materials using Perceptually Inspired Features

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Lavanya; Liu, Ce; Rosenholtz, Ruth; Adelson, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Our world consists not only of objects and scenes but also of materials of various kinds. Being able to recognize the materials that surround us (e.g., plastic, glass, concrete) is important for humans as well as for computer vision systems. Unfortunately, materials have received little attention in the visual recognition literature, and very few computer vision systems have been designed specifically to recognize materials. In this paper, we present a system for recognizing material categories from single images. We propose a set of low and mid-level image features that are based on studies of human material recognition, and we combine these features using an SVM classifier. Our system outperforms a state-of-the-art system [Varma and Zisserman, 2009] on a challenging database of real-world material categories [Sharan et al., 2009]. When the performance of our system is compared directly to that of human observers, humans outperform our system quite easily. However, when we account for the local nature of our image features and the surface properties they measure (e.g., color, texture, local shape), our system rivals human performance. We suggest that future progress in material recognition will come from: (1) a deeper understanding of the role of non-local surface properties (e.g., extended highlights, object identity); and (2) efforts to model such non-local surface properties in images. PMID:23914070

  9. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert; Lovely, David

    1999-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required to understand the underlying physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of much interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snap-shot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense. The following is a list of the important physical phenomena found in transient (and steady-state) fluid flow: (1) Shocks, (2) Vortex cores, (3) Regions of recirculation, (4) Boundary layers, (5) Wakes. Three papers and an initial specification for the (The Fluid eXtraction tool kit) FX Programmer's guide were included. The papers, submitted to the AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, are entitled : (1) Using Residence Time for the Extraction of Recirculation Regions, (2) Shock Detection from Computational Fluid Dynamics results and (3) On the Velocity Gradient Tensor and Fluid Feature Extraction.

  10. Feature saltation and the evolution of mimicry.

    PubMed

    Gamberale-Stille, Gabriella; Balogh, Alexandra C V; Tullberg, Birgitta S; Leimar, Olof

    2012-03-01

    In Batesian mimicry, a harmless prey species imitates the warning coloration of an unpalatable model species. A traditional suggestion is that mimicry evolves in a two-step process, in which a large mutation first achieves approximate similarity to the model, after which smaller changes improve the likeness. However, it is not known which aspects of predator psychology cause the initial mutant to be perceived by predators as being similar to the model, leaving open the question of how the crucial first step of mimicry evolution occurs. Using theoretical evolutionary simulations and reconstruction of examples of mimicry evolution, we show that the evolution of Batesian mimicry can be initiated by a mutation that causes prey to acquire a trait that is used by predators as a feature to categorize potential prey as unsuitable. The theory that species gain entry to mimicry through feature saltation allows us to formulate scenarios of the sequence of events during mimicry evolution and to reconstruct an initial mimetic appearance for important examples of Batesian mimicry. Because feature-based categorization by predators entails a qualitative distinction between nonmimics and passable mimics, the theory can explain the occurrence of imperfect mimicry.

  11. Retinal vasculature classification using novel multifractal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Ward, W. O. C.; Duan, Jinming; Auer, D. P.; Gowland, Penny; Bai, L.

    2015-11-01

    Retinal blood vessels have been implicated in a large number of diseases including diabetic retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases, which cause damages to retinal blood vessels. The availability of retinal vessel imaging provides an excellent opportunity for monitoring and diagnosis of retinal diseases, and automatic analysis of retinal vessels will help with the processes. However, state of the art vascular analysis methods such as counting the number of branches or measuring the curvature and diameter of individual vessels are unsuitable for the microvasculature. There has been published research using fractal analysis to calculate fractal dimensions of retinal blood vessels, but so far there has been no systematic research extracting discriminant features from retinal vessels for classifications. This paper introduces new methods for feature extraction from multifractal spectra of retinal vessels for classification. Two publicly available retinal vascular image databases are used for the experiments, and the proposed methods have produced accuracies of 85.5% and 77% for classification of healthy and diabetic retinal vasculatures. Experiments show that classification with multiple fractal features produces better rates compared with methods using a single fractal dimension value. In addition to this, experiments also show that classification accuracy can be affected by the accuracy of vessel segmentation algorithms.

  12. Automatic Feature Extraction from Planetary Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troglio, Giulia; Le Moigne, Jacqueline; Benediktsson, Jon A.; Moser, Gabriele; Serpico, Sebastiano B.

    2010-01-01

    With the launch of several planetary missions in the last decade, a large amount of planetary images has already been acquired and much more will be available for analysis in the coming years. The image data need to be analyzed, preferably by automatic processing techniques because of the huge amount of data. Although many automatic feature extraction methods have been proposed and utilized for Earth remote sensing images, these methods are not always applicable to planetary data that often present low contrast and uneven illumination characteristics. Different methods have already been presented for crater extraction from planetary images, but the detection of other types of planetary features has not been addressed yet. Here, we propose a new unsupervised method for the extraction of different features from the surface of the analyzed planet, based on the combination of several image processing techniques, including a watershed segmentation and the generalized Hough Transform. The method has many applications, among which image registration and can be applied to arbitrary planetary images.

  13. Spectral feature classification and spatial pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Wilson, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper introduces a spatial pattern recognition processing concept involving the use of spectral feature classification technology and coherent optical correlation. The concept defines a hybrid image processing system incorporating both digital and optical technology. The hybrid instrument provides simplified pseudopattern images as functions of pixel classification from information embedded within a real-scene image. These pseudoimages become simplified inputs to an optical correlator for use in a subsequent pattern identification decision useful in executing landmark pointing, tracking, or navigating functions. Real-time classification is proposed as a research tool for exploring ways to enhance input signal-to-noise ratio as an aid in improving optical correlation. The approach can be explored with developing technology, including a current NASA Langley Research Center technology plan that involves a series of related Shuttle-borne experiments. A first-planned experiment, Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE), is undergoing final ground testing, and is scheduled for flight on the NASA Shuttle (STS2/flight OSTA-1) in 1980. FILE will evaluate a technique for autonomously classifying earth features into the four categories: bare land; water; vegetation; and clouds, snow, or ice.

  14. Primary Sjogren syndrome: clinical and immunopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Fox, R I; Howell, F V; Bone, R C; Michelson, P

    1984-11-01

    Primary Sjogren syndrome is an autoimmune condition in which dry eyes (keratoconjunctivitis sicca) and dry mouth (xerostomia) result from lymphocytic infiltration of lacrimal and salivary glands. Clinical and laboratory features of 60 primary Sjogren syndrome patients seen at our clinic during the past three years are presented. These patients illustrate the wide spectrum of extraglandular features that may occur as a result of lymphoid infiltration of lung, kidney, skin, stomach, liver, and muscle. They further emphasize the difficulty in classifying a patient as primary or secondary Sjogren syndrome (ie, sicca symptoms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, or scleroderma), particularly early in the disease course. As an initial step in understanding the pathogenesis, the lymphocytes that infiltrate the salivary glands and lymph nodes were characterized by using monoclonal antibodies that recognize distinct lymphocyte subsets and by using in vitro functional assays. These studies have demonstrated that affected tissues have infiltrates of T cells with helper/inducer activity and with a high frequency of "activation antigens." The immunohistologic techniques are useful in differentiating "benign" and "pseudolymphoma" lesions (both due predominantly to T cells) from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (usually due to B-cell infiltrates). Although there is no "cure" for primary Sjogren syndrome patient's symptoms may be significantly improved by measures aimed at prevention of ocular and dental complications and by the recognition of extraglandular features that may be amenable to specific treatment.

  15. SAPHIRE 8 New Features and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) software performs probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) calculations. SAPHIRE is used in support of NRC’s risk-informed programs such as the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program, Management Directive 8.3, “NRC Incident Investigation Program,” or the Significance Determination Process (SDP). It is also used to develop and run the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. SAPHIRE Version 8 is a new version of the software with an improved interface and capabilities to support risk-informed programs. SAPHIRE Version 8 is designed to easily handle larger and more complex models. Applications of previous SAPHIRE versions indicated the need to build and solve models with a large number of sequences. Risk assessments that include endstate evaluations for core damage frequency and large, early release frequency evaluations have greatly increased the number of sequences required. In addition, the complexity of the models has increased since risk assessments evaluate both potential internal and external events, as well as different plant operational states. Special features of SAPHIRE 8 help create and run integrated models which may be composed of different model types. SAPHIRE 8 includes features and capabilities that are new or improved over the current Version 7 to address the new requirements for risk-informed programs and SPAR models. These include: • Improved User Interfaces • Model development • Methods • General Support Features

  16. Feature selection using Haar wavelet power spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, Prabakaran; Sahu, Rajendra; Verma, Shekhar

    2006-01-01

    Background Feature selection is an approach to overcome the 'curse of dimensionality' in complex researches like disease classification using microarrays. Statistical methods are utilized more in this domain. Most of them do not fit for a wide range of datasets. The transform oriented signal processing domains are not probed much when other fields like image and video processing utilize them well. Wavelets, one of such techniques, have the potential to be utilized in feature selection method. The aim of this paper is to assess the capability of Haar wavelet power spectrum in the problem of clustering and gene selection based on expression data in the context of disease classification and to propose a method based on Haar wavelet power spectrum. Results Haar wavelet power spectra of genes were analysed and it was observed to be different in different diagnostic categories. This difference in trend and magnitude of the spectrum may be utilized in gene selection. Most of the genes selected by earlier complex methods were selected by the very simple present method. Each earlier works proved only few genes are quite enough to approach the classification problem [1]. Hence the present method may be tried in conjunction with other classification methods. The technique was applied without removing the noise in data to validate the robustness of the method against the noise or outliers in the data. No special softwares or complex implementation is needed. The qualities of the genes selected by the present method were analysed through their gene expression data. Most of them were observed to be related to solve the classification issue since they were dominant in the diagnostic category of the dataset for which they were selected as features. Conclusion In the present paper, the problem of feature selection of microarray gene expression data was considered. We analyzed the wavelet power spectrum of genes and proposed a clustering and feature selection method useful for

  17. Various Landscapes and Features on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These 15 frames show the great variety of surface features on Jupiter's icy moon, Europa, which have been revealed by the Galileo spacecraft Solid State Imaging (CCD) system during its first six orbits around Jupiter from June 1996 to February 1997. North is to the top of each of the images. The features seen on Europa's surface document both internal and external processes shaping the icy crust. Internal processes and the possible presence of liquid water beneath the ice are indicated by features such as 'dark spots', lobe-shaped flow features, 'puddles','mottled terrain', knobs, pits, and the darker areas along ridges and triple bands.

    Europa is subjected to constant tugging from the giant planet, Jupiter, as well as from its neighboring moons, Io and Ganymede. This causes 'tidal' forces that affect Europa's interior and surface. Evidence for such forces includes ridges, fractures, wedge-shaped bands, and areas of 'chaos'. Some of these features result from alternate extension and compression buckling and pulling apart Europa's icy shell.

    Impact craters document external effects on a planet's surface. Although present on Europa, impact craters are relatively scarce compared to the number seen on Ganymede, Callisto, and on the surfaces of most other 'rocky' planets and moons in our solar system. This scarcity of craters suggests that the surface of Europa is very young. 'Maculae' on Europa may be the scars from large impact events.

    These images have resolutions from 27 meters (89 feet) to 7 kilometers (4.3 miles) per picture element (pixel) and were taken by Galileo at ranges of 2,500 kilometers (1,525 miles) to 677,000 kilometers (413,000 miles) from Europa.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web

  18. Robust Features Of Surface Electromyography Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, M. I.; Miskon, M. F.; Yaacob, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, application of robotics in human life has been explored widely. Robotics exoskeleton system are one of drastically areas in recent robotic research that shows mimic impact in human life. These system have been developed significantly to be used for human power augmentation, robotics rehabilitation, human power assist, and haptic interaction in virtual reality. This paper focus on solving challenges in problem using neural signals and extracting human intent. Commonly, surface electromyography signal (sEMG) are used in order to control human intent for application exoskeleton robot. But the problem lies on difficulty of pattern recognition of the sEMG features due to high noises which are electrode and cable motion artifact, electrode noise, dermic noise, alternating current power line interface, and other noise came from electronic instrument. The main objective in this paper is to study the best features of electromyography in term of time domain (statistical analysis) and frequency domain (Fast Fourier Transform).The secondary objectives is to map the relationship between torque and best features of muscle unit activation potential (MaxPS and RMS) of biceps brachii. This project scope use primary data of 2 male sample subject which using same dominant hand (right handed), age between 20-27 years old, muscle diameter 32cm to 35cm and using single channel muscle (biceps brachii muscle). The experiment conduct 2 times repeated task of contraction and relaxation of biceps brachii when lifting different load from no load to 3kg with ascending 1kg The result shows that Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) has less error than mean value of reading compare to root mean square (RMS) value. Thus, Fast Fourier Transform maximum power spectrum (MaxPS) show the linear relationship against torque experience by elbow joint to lift different load. As the conclusion, the best features is MaxPS because it has the lowest error than other features and show

  19. Robust feature detection using sonar sensors for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinwoo; Ahn, Sunghwan; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2005-12-01

    Sonar sensor is an attractive tool for the SLAM of mobile robot because of their economic aspects. This cheap sensor gives relatively accurate range readings if disregarding angular uncertainty and specular reflections. However, these defects make feature detection difficult for the most part of the SLAM. This paper proposed a robust sonar feature detection algorithm. This algorithm gives feature detection methods for both point features and line features. The point feature detection method was based on the TBF scheme. Moreover, three additional processes improved the performance of feature detection as follows; 1) stable intersections, 2) efficient sliding window update and 3) removal of the false point features on the wall. The line feature detection method was based on the basic property of adjacent sonar sensors. Along the line feature, three adjacent sonar sensors gave similar range readings. Using this sensor property, it proposed a novel algorithm for line feature detection, which is simple and the feature can be obtained by using only current sensor data. The proposed feature detection algorithm gives a good solution for the SLAM of mobile robots because it gives accurate feature information for both the point and line features even with sensor errors. Furthermore, a sufficient number of features are available to correct mobile robot pose. Experimental results for point feature and line feature detection demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm in a home-like environment.

  20. Extract the Relational Information of Static Features and Motion Features for Human Activities Recognition in Videos

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Both static features and motion features have shown promising performance in human activities recognition task. However, the information included in these features is insufficient for complex human activities. In this paper, we propose extracting relational information of static features and motion features for human activities recognition. The videos are represented by a classical Bag-of-Word (BoW) model which is useful in many works. To get a compact and discriminative codebook with small dimension, we employ the divisive algorithm based on KL-divergence to reconstruct the codebook. After that, to further capture strong relational information, we construct a bipartite graph to model the relationship between words of different feature set. Then we use a k-way partition to create a new codebook in which similar words are getting together. With this new codebook, videos can be represented by a new BoW vector with strong relational information. Moreover, we propose a method to compute new clusters from the divisive algorithm's projective function. We test our work on the several datasets and obtain very promising results. PMID:27656199

  1. Invariant Feature Matching for Image Registration Application Based on New Dissimilarity of Spatial Features.

    PubMed

    Mousavi Kahaki, Seyed Mostafa; Nordin, Md Jan; Ashtari, Amir H; J Zahra, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    An invariant feature matching method is proposed as a spatially invariant feature matching approach. Deformation effects, such as affine and homography, change the local information within the image and can result in ambiguous local information pertaining to image points. New method based on dissimilarity values, which measures the dissimilarity of the features through the path based on Eigenvector properties, is proposed. Evidence shows that existing matching techniques using similarity metrics--such as normalized cross-correlation, squared sum of intensity differences and correlation coefficient--are insufficient for achieving adequate results under different image deformations. Thus, new descriptor's similarity metrics based on normalized Eigenvector correlation and signal directional differences, which are robust under local variation of the image information, are proposed to establish an efficient feature matching technique. The method proposed in this study measures the dissimilarity in the signal frequency along the path between two features. Moreover, these dissimilarity values are accumulated in a 2D dissimilarity space, allowing accurate corresponding features to be extracted based on the cumulative space using a voting strategy. This method can be used in image registration applications, as it overcomes the limitations of the existing approaches. The output results demonstrate that the proposed technique outperforms the other methods when evaluated using a standard dataset, in terms of precision-recall and corner correspondence. PMID:26985996

  2. Extract the Relational Information of Static Features and Motion Features for Human Activities Recognition in Videos

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Both static features and motion features have shown promising performance in human activities recognition task. However, the information included in these features is insufficient for complex human activities. In this paper, we propose extracting relational information of static features and motion features for human activities recognition. The videos are represented by a classical Bag-of-Word (BoW) model which is useful in many works. To get a compact and discriminative codebook with small dimension, we employ the divisive algorithm based on KL-divergence to reconstruct the codebook. After that, to further capture strong relational information, we construct a bipartite graph to model the relationship between words of different feature set. Then we use a k-way partition to create a new codebook in which similar words are getting together. With this new codebook, videos can be represented by a new BoW vector with strong relational information. Moreover, we propose a method to compute new clusters from the divisive algorithm's projective function. We test our work on the several datasets and obtain very promising results.

  3. Important pharmacophoric features of pan PPAR agonists: common chemical feature analysis and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2009-09-01

    HipHop program was used to generate a common chemical feature hypothesis for pan Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) agonists. The top scoring hypothesis (hypo-1) was found to differentiate the pan agonists (actives) from subtype-specific and dual PPAR agonists (inactives). The importance of individual features in hypo-1 was assessed by deleting a particular feature to generate a new hypothesis and observing its discriminating ability between 'actives' and 'inactives'. Deletion of aromatic features AR-1 (hypo-1b), AR-2 (hypo-1e) and a Hydrophobic feature HYD-1 (hypo-1c) individually did not affect the discriminating power of the hypo-1 significantly. However, deletion of a Hydrogen Bond Acceptor (HBA) feature (hypo-1f) in the hydrophobic tail group was found to be highly detrimental for the specificity of hypo-1 leading to high hit rate of 'inactives'. Since hypo-1 did not produce any useful hits from the database search, hypo-1b, hypo-1c and hypo-1e were used for virtual screening leading to the identification of new potential pan PPAR ligands. The docking studies were used to predict the binding pose of the proposed molecules in PPARgamma active site. PMID:19268404

  4. Invariant Feature Matching for Image Registration Application Based on New Dissimilarity of Spatial Features

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi Kahaki, Seyed Mostafa; Nordin, Md Jan; Ashtari, Amir H.; J. Zahra, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    An invariant feature matching method is proposed as a spatially invariant feature matching approach. Deformation effects, such as affine and homography, change the local information within the image and can result in ambiguous local information pertaining to image points. New method based on dissimilarity values, which measures the dissimilarity of the features through the path based on Eigenvector properties, is proposed. Evidence shows that existing matching techniques using similarity metrics—such as normalized cross-correlation, squared sum of intensity differences and correlation coefficient—are insufficient for achieving adequate results under different image deformations. Thus, new descriptor’s similarity metrics based on normalized Eigenvector correlation and signal directional differences, which are robust under local variation of the image information, are proposed to establish an efficient feature matching technique. The method proposed in this study measures the dissimilarity in the signal frequency along the path between two features. Moreover, these dissimilarity values are accumulated in a 2D dissimilarity space, allowing accurate corresponding features to be extracted based on the cumulative space using a voting strategy. This method can be used in image registration applications, as it overcomes the limitations of the existing approaches. The output results demonstrate that the proposed technique outperforms the other methods when evaluated using a standard dataset, in terms of precision-recall and corner correspondence. PMID:26985996

  5. Important pharmacophoric features of pan PPAR agonists: common chemical feature analysis and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2009-09-01

    HipHop program was used to generate a common chemical feature hypothesis for pan Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) agonists. The top scoring hypothesis (hypo-1) was found to differentiate the pan agonists (actives) from subtype-specific and dual PPAR agonists (inactives). The importance of individual features in hypo-1 was assessed by deleting a particular feature to generate a new hypothesis and observing its discriminating ability between 'actives' and 'inactives'. Deletion of aromatic features AR-1 (hypo-1b), AR-2 (hypo-1e) and a Hydrophobic feature HYD-1 (hypo-1c) individually did not affect the discriminating power of the hypo-1 significantly. However, deletion of a Hydrogen Bond Acceptor (HBA) feature (hypo-1f) in the hydrophobic tail group was found to be highly detrimental for the specificity of hypo-1 leading to high hit rate of 'inactives'. Since hypo-1 did not produce any useful hits from the database search, hypo-1b, hypo-1c and hypo-1e were used for virtual screening leading to the identification of new potential pan PPAR ligands. The docking studies were used to predict the binding pose of the proposed molecules in PPARgamma active site.

  6. Feature Selection and Pedestrian Detection Based on Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shihong; Wang, Tao; Shen, Weiming; Pan, Shaoming; Chong, Yanwen; Ding, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian detection have been currently devoted to the extraction of effective pedestrian features, which has become one of the obstacles in pedestrian detection application according to the variety of pedestrian features and their large dimension. Based on the theoretical analysis of six frequently-used features, SIFT, SURF, Haar, HOG, LBP and LSS, and their comparison with experimental results, this paper screens out the sparse feature subsets via sparse representation to investigate whether the sparse subsets have the same description abilities and the most stable features. When any two of the six features are fused, the fusion feature is sparsely represented to obtain its important components. Sparse subsets of the fusion features can be rapidly generated by avoiding calculation of the corresponding index of dimension numbers of these feature descriptors; thus, the calculation speed of the feature dimension reduction is improved and the pedestrian detection time is reduced. Experimental results show that sparse feature subsets are capable of keeping the important components of these six feature descriptors. The sparse features of HOG and LSS possess the same description ability and consume less time compared with their full features. The ratios of the sparse feature subsets of HOG and LSS to their full sets are the highest among the six, and thus these two features can be used to best describe the characteristics of the pedestrian and the sparse feature subsets of the combination of HOG-LSS show better distinguishing ability and parsimony. PMID:26295480

  7. Feature Selection and Pedestrian Detection Based on Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Shihong; Wang, Tao; Shen, Weiming; Pan, Shaoming; Chong, Yanwen; Ding, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Pedestrian detection have been currently devoted to the extraction of effective pedestrian features, which has become one of the obstacles in pedestrian detection application according to the variety of pedestrian features and their large dimension. Based on the theoretical analysis of six frequently-used features, SIFT, SURF, Haar, HOG, LBP and LSS, and their comparison with experimental results, this paper screens out the sparse feature subsets via sparse representation to investigate whether the sparse subsets have the same description abilities and the most stable features. When any two of the six features are fused, the fusion feature is sparsely represented to obtain its important components. Sparse subsets of the fusion features can be rapidly generated by avoiding calculation of the corresponding index of dimension numbers of these feature descriptors; thus, the calculation speed of the feature dimension reduction is improved and the pedestrian detection time is reduced. Experimental results show that sparse feature subsets are capable of keeping the important components of these six feature descriptors. The sparse features of HOG and LSS possess the same description ability and consume less time compared with their full features. The ratios of the sparse feature subsets of HOG and LSS to their full sets are the highest among the six, and thus these two features can be used to best describe the characteristics of the pedestrian and the sparse feature subsets of the combination of HOG-LSS show better distinguishing ability and parsimony. PMID:26295480

  8. Features of triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plasilova, Magdalena L.; Hayse, Brandon; Killelea, Brigid K.; Horowitz, Nina R.; Chagpar, Anees B.; Lannin, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the features of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) using a large national database. TNBC is known to be an aggressive subtype, but national epidemiologic data are sparse. All patients with invasive breast cancer and known molecular subtype diagnosed in 2010 to 2011 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Patients with and without TNBC were compared with respect to their sociodemographic and clinicopathologic features. TNBC was present in 38,628 of 295,801 (13%) female patients compared to 185 of 3136 (6%) male patients (P < 0.001). The incidence of TNBC varied by region from 10.8% in New England to 15.8% in the east south central US (P < 0.001), as well as by race with the highest rates in African-Americans (23.7%), and lowest in Filipino patients (8.9%). The incidence of TNBC also varied by histology, accounting for 76% of metaplastic cancers, but only 2% of infiltrating lobular carcinomas. TNBCs were significantly larger than non-TNBC (mean 2.8 cm vs 2.1 cm, P < 0.001), and more TNBC were poorly differentiated compared to other subtypes (79.7% vs 25.8%, P < 0.001). On univariate analysis, TNBC was no more likely than non-TNBC to have node-positive disease (32.0% vs 31.7%, respectively, P = 0.218) but in a multivariable analysis controlling for tumor size and grade, TNBC was associated with significantly less node-positivity (OR = 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57–0.60). TNBC has distinct features regarding age, gender, geographic, and racial distribution. Compared to non-TNBC, TNBC is larger and higher grade, but less likely to have lymph node metastases. PMID:27583878

  9. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Baran, Joachim; Durgahee, Bibi Sehnaaz Begum; Eilbeck, Karen; Antezana, Erick; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology's GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use.

  10. Implementation of assist features in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fan; Burkhardt, Martin; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Torres, Andres; Gupta, Rachit; Word, James

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of EUV lithography will happen at a critical feature pitch which corresponds to a k1 factor of roughly 0.45. While this number seems not very aggressive compared to recent ArF lithography nodes, the number is sufficiently low that the introduction of assist features has to be considered. While the small NA makes the k1 factor larger, the depth of focus still needs to be scaled down with wavelength. However the exposure tool's focus control is not greatly improved over the ArF tools, so other solutions to improve the depth of focus, e.g. SRAFs, are needed. On the other hand, sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) require very small mask dimensions, which make masks more costly to write and inspect. Another disadvantage of SRAFs is the fact that they may cause pattern-dependent best focus shift due to thick mask effects. Those effects can be predicted, but the shift of best focus and the associated tilt of Bossung curves make the process more difficult to control. We investigate the impact of SRAFs on printing in EUV lithography and evaluate advantages and disadvantages. By using image quality parameters such as best focus (BF), and depth of focus (DOF), respectively with and without SRAFs, we will answer the question if we can gain a net benefit for 1D and 2D patterns by adding SRAFs. SRAFs will only be introduced if any net improvement in process variation (PV) outweighs the additional expense of assist patterning on the mask. In this paper, we investigate the difference in printing behavior of symmetric and asymmetric SRAF placement and whether through slit effect needs to be considered in SRAF placement for EUV lithography.

  11. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Durgahee, Bibi Sehnaaz Begum; Eilbeck, Karen; Antezana, Erick; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology’s GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use. PMID:26019997

  12. GFVO: the Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology.

    PubMed

    Baran, Joachim; Durgahee, Bibi Sehnaaz Begum; Eilbeck, Karen; Antezana, Erick; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Falling costs in genomic laboratory experiments have led to a steady increase of genomic feature and variation data. Multiple genomic data formats exist for sharing these data, and whilst they are similar, they are addressing slightly different data viewpoints and are consequently not fully compatible with each other. The fragmentation of data format specifications makes it hard to integrate and interpret data for further analysis with information from multiple data providers. As a solution, a new ontology is presented here for annotating and representing genomic feature and variation dataset contents. The Genomic Feature and Variation Ontology (GFVO) specifically addresses genomic data as it is regularly shared using the GFF3 (incl. FASTA), GTF, GVF and VCF file formats. GFVO simplifies data integration and enables linking of genomic annotations across datasets through common semantics of genomic types and relations. Availability and implementation. The latest stable release of the ontology is available via its base URI; previous and development versions are available at the ontology's GitHub repository: https://github.com/BioInterchange/Ontologies; versions of the ontology are indexed through BioPortal (without external class-/property-equivalences due to BioPortal release 4.10 limitations); examples and reference documentation is provided on a separate web-page: http://www.biointerchange.org/ontologies.html. GFVO version 1.0.2 is licensed under the CC0 1.0 Universal license (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0) and therefore de facto within the public domain; the ontology can be appropriated without attribution for commercial and non-commercial use. PMID:26019997

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Software Features and Performances.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of two-dimensional gel images is a crucial step for the determination of changes in the protein expression, but at present, it still represents one of the bottlenecks in 2-DE studies. Over the years, different commercial and academic software packages have been developed for the analysis of 2-DE images. Each of these shows different advantageous characteristics in terms of quality of analysis. In this chapter, the characteristics of the different commercial software packages are compared in order to evaluate their main features and performances.

  14. Clinical features and electrodiagnosis of ulnar neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Mark E; Campbell, William W

    2013-02-01

    In this review, we delineate clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic features of ulnar mononeuropathies. Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE) is most commonly due to lesions at the level of the retroepicondylar groove (RTC), with approximately 25% at the humeroulnar arcade (HUA). The term 'cubital tunnel syndrome' should be reserved for the latter. The diagnostic accuracy of nerve conduction studies is limited by biological (e.g. low elbow temperature) and technical factors. Across-elbow distance measurements greater than 10 cm improve diagnostic specificity at the expense of decreased sensitivity. Short-segment incremental studies can differentiate lesions at the HUA from those at the RTC.

  15. Superoscillatory field features with evanescent waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chremmos, Ioannis; Fikioris, George

    2015-12-01

    We show how to obtain optical fields possessing superoscillatory features by superposing the evanescent tails of waves undergoing total internal reflection at a plane dielectric interface. In doing so, we essentially extend the definition of superoscillations to functions expressed as a continuum of slowly decaying exponentials, while not necessarily being bandlimited in the standard (Fourier) sense. We obtain such functions by complexifying the argument of standard bandlimited superoscillatory functions with a strictly positive spectrum. Combined with our recent method for superoscillations with arbitrary polynomial shape, the present approach offers flexibility for locally shaping the evanescent field near dielectric interfaces for applications such as particle or atom trapping.

  16. Features of plastics edge cutting machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handozhko, A. V.; Shcherbakov, A. N.; Zaharov, L. A.; Gavrilenko, T. V.

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the features of pieces from thermoplastic materials in the form of electrical insulators cut by a disk edge tool. The problems in question are possible defects arising during machining and technological conditions that reduce their quantity. The necessity of required machining conditions matching substantiated in accordance with a specific grade of the material which is treated. Equipment and machining attachments, developed for experimental studies, determine the rational conditions of plastic electrical insulators machining. As a result of experiments the dependences of cut face quality parameters of plastics are obtained by machining conditions. The obtained results allowed us to make valid conclusions and recommendations.

  17. The acoustic features of human laughter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachorowski, Jo-Anne; Owren, Michael J.

    2002-05-01

    Remarkably little is known about the acoustic features of laughter, despite laughter's ubiquitous role in human vocal communication. Outcomes are described for 1024 naturally produced laugh bouts recorded from 97 young adults. Acoustic analysis focused on temporal characteristics, production modes, source- and filter-related effects, and indexical cues to laugher sex and individual identity. The results indicate that laughter is a remarkably complex vocal signal, with evident diversity in both production modes and fundamental frequency characteristics. Also of interest was finding a consistent lack of articulation effects in supralaryngeal filtering. Outcomes are compared to previously advanced hypotheses and conjectures about this species-typical vocal signal.

  18. An Active Model for Facial Feature Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlberg, Jörgen

    2002-12-01

    We present a system for finding and tracking a face and extract global and local animation parameters from a video sequence. The system uses an initial colour processing step for finding a rough estimate of the position, size, and inplane rotation of the face, followed by a refinement step drived by an active model. The latter step refines the pre­vious estimate, and also extracts local animation parame­ters. The system is able to track the face and some facial features in near real-time, and can compress the result to a bitstream compliant to MPEG-4 face and body animation.

  19. The Amyloidoses: Clinical Features, Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kelty R.; Rice, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare disorder in which insoluble amyloid proteins are deposited in body organs, causing abnormal protein build-up in tissues and eventually leading to organ dysfunction and death. It affects less than 200,000 people in the United States, classifying it as a rare disease according to the National Institutes of Health. Definitive determination of the underlying protein is critical since prognosis and treatment of amyloidosis can vary widely depending on the responsible protein. The following paper describes the various types and clinical features of amyloidosis and provides an overview of current diagnostic tools and therapies. PMID:23227278

  20. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM FEATURES, EVENTS AND PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, W.

    2005-08-30

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of engineered barrier system (EBS) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to models and analyses used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for exclusion screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with those features, events, and processes relevant to the EBS focusing mainly on those components and conditions exterior to the waste package and within the rock mass surrounding emplacement drifts. The components of the EBS are the drip shield, waste package, waste form, cladding, emplacement pallet, emplacement drift excavated opening (also referred to as drift opening in this report), and invert. FEPs specific to the waste package, cladding, and drip shield are addressed in separate FEP reports: for example, ''Screening of Features, Events, and Processes in Drip Shield and Waste Package Degradation'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174995]), ''Clad Degradation--FEPs Screening Arguments (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170019]), and Waste-Form Features, Events, and Processes'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170020]). For included FEPs, this report summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This report also documents changes to the EBS FEPs list that have occurred since the previous versions of this report. These changes have resulted due to a reevaluation of the FEPs for TSPA-LA as identified in Section 1.2 of this report and described in more detail in Section 6.1.1. This revision addresses updates in Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) administrative procedures as they

  1. Opinion mining feature-level using Naive Bayes and feature extraction based analysis dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanda, Regi; Baizal, Z. K. Abdurahman; Nhita, Fhira

    2015-12-01

    Development of internet and technology, has major impact and providing new business called e-commerce. Many e-commerce sites that provide convenience in transaction, and consumers can also provide reviews or opinions on products that purchased. These opinions can be used by consumers and producers. Consumers to know the advantages and disadvantages of particular feature of the product. Procuders can analyse own strengths and weaknesses as well as it's competitors products. Many opinions need a method that the reader can know the point of whole opinion. The idea emerged from review summarization that summarizes the overall opinion based on sentiment and features contain. In this study, the domain that become the main focus is about the digital camera. This research consisted of four steps 1) giving the knowledge to the system to recognize the semantic orientation of an opinion 2) indentify the features of product 3) indentify whether the opinion gives a positive or negative 4) summarizing the result. In this research discussed the methods such as Naï;ve Bayes for sentiment classification, and feature extraction algorithm based on Dependencies Analysis, which is one of the tools in Natural Language Processing (NLP) and knowledge based dictionary which is useful for handling implicit features. The end result of research is a summary that contains a bunch of reviews from consumers on the features and sentiment. With proposed method, accuration for sentiment classification giving 81.2 % for positive test data, 80.2 % for negative test data, and accuration for feature extraction reach 90.3 %.

  2. Marine Biocatalysts: Enzymatic Features and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Trincone, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    In several recent reports related to biocatalysis the enormous pool of biodiversity found in marine ecosystems is considered a profitable natural reservoir for acquiring an inventory of useful biocatalysts. These enzymes are characterized by well-known habitat-related features such as salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity and cold adaptivity. In addition, their novel chemical and stereochemical characteristics increase the interest of biocatalysis practitioners both in academia and research industry. In this review, starting from the analysis of these featuring habitat-related properties, important examples of marine enzymes in biocatalysis will be reported. Completion of this report is devoted to the analysis of novel chemical and stereochemical biodiversity offered by marine biocatalysts with particular emphasis on current or potential applications of these enzymes in chemical and pharmaceutical fields. The analysis of literature cited here and the many published patent applications concerning the use of marine enzymes supports the view that these biocatalysts are just waiting to be discovered, reflecting the importance of the marine environment. The potential of this habitat should be thoroughly explored and possibly the way to access useful biocatalysts should avoid destructive large-scale collections of marine biomass for enzyme production. These two aspects are day by day increasing in interest and a future increase in the use of marine enzymes in biocatalysis should be expected. PMID:21731544

  3. New Dust Features Observed with ISO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper will review our current knowledge of circumstellar and interstellar dust with the emphasis on infrared spectroscopy with ISO. Objects embedded in or located behind molecular clouds show a wealth of absorption features due to simple molecules in an icy mantle. The SWS on ISO has provided us, for the first time, with complete 3-45 um spectra which allow an inventory of interstellar ice. Among the species identified are H2O, CH3OH, CH4, CO2, CO, and OCS. These species are formed through simple reactions among gas phase species accreted on grain surfaces, possibly modified by FUV photolysis and warm-up (ie., outgassing). The implications of the observations for our understanding of these processes will be reviewed. The IR spectra of many UV bright objects are dominated by strong emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, and 11.3 micrometers. These are generally attributed to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) molecules. The observational evidence will be reviewed. The emphasis will be on recent data which show widespread spectral variations, particularly among protoplanetary and planetary nebulae, and their implications. One of the most exciting, recent discoveries on interstellar and circumstellar dust has been the detection of spectral structure due to crystalline olivine and enstatite in a variety of objects surrounded by circumstellar silicates. These spectra will be reviewed and circumstellar silicate mineralogy will be discussed.

  4. Waveform feature extraction based on tauberian approximation.

    PubMed

    De Figueiredo, R J; Hu, C L

    1982-02-01

    A technique is presented for feature extraction of a waveform y based on its Tauberian approximation, that is, on the approximation of y by a linear combination of appropriately delayed versions of a single basis function x, i.e., y(t) = ¿M i = 1 aix(t - ¿i), where the coefficients ai and the delays ¿i are adjustable parameters. Considerations in the choice or design of the basis function x are given. The parameters ai and ¿i, i=1, . . . , M, are retrieved by application of a suitably adapted version of Prony's method to the Fourier transform of the above approximation of y. A subset of the parameters ai and ¿i, i = 1, . . . , M, is used to construct the feature vector, the value of which can be used in a classification algorithm. Application of this technique to the classification of wide bandwidth radar return signatures is presented. Computer simulations proved successful and are also discussed.

  5. Persistent topological features of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Maletić, Slobodan; Zhao, Yi; Rajković, Milan

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by an early work of Muldoon et al., Physica D 65, 1-16 (1993), we present a general method for constructing simplicial complex from observed time series of dynamical systems based on the delay coordinate reconstruction procedure. The obtained simplicial complex preserves all pertinent topological features of the reconstructed phase space, and it may be analyzed from topological, combinatorial, and algebraic aspects. In focus of this study is the computation of homology of the invariant set of some well known dynamical systems that display chaotic behavior. Persistent homology of simplicial complex and its relationship with the embedding dimensions are examined by studying the lifetime of topological features and topological noise. The consistency of topological properties for different dynamic regimes and embedding dimensions is examined. The obtained results shed new light on the topological properties of the reconstructed phase space and open up new possibilities for application of advanced topological methods. The method presented here may be used as a generic method for constructing simplicial complex from a scalar time series that has a number of advantages compared to the mapping of the same time series to a complex network.

  6. Onshore seismic amplifications due to bathymetric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Castellanos, A.; Carbajal-Romero, M.; Flores-Guzmán, N.; Olivera-Villaseñor, E.; Kryvko, A.

    2016-08-01

    We perform numerical calculations for onshore seismic amplifications, taking into consideration the effect of bathymetric features on the propagation of seismic movements. To this end, the boundary element method is applied. Boundary elements are employed to irradiate waves and, consequently, force densities can be obtained for each boundary element. From this assumption, Huygens’ principle is applied, and since the diffracted waves are built at the boundary from which they are radiated, this idea is equivalent to Somigliana’s representation theorem. The application of boundary conditions leads to a linear system being obtained (Fredholm integral equations). Several numerical models are analyzed, with the first one being used to verify the proposed formulation, and the others being used to estimate onshore seismic amplifications due to the presence of bathymetric features. The results obtained show that compressional waves (P-waves) generate onshore seismic amplifications that can vary from 1.2 to 5.2 times the amplitude of the incident wave. On the other hand, the shear waves (S-waves) can cause seismic amplifications of up to 4.0 times the incident wave. Furthermore, an important result is that in most cases the highest seismic amplifications from an offshore earthquake are located on the shoreline and not offshore, despite the seafloor configuration. Moreover, the influence of the incident angle of seismic waves on the seismic amplifications is highlighted.

  7. Clinicopathological Features of Telbivudine-Associated Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Telbivudine, a thymidine nucleoside analog, is a common therapeutic option for chronic hepatitis B infection. While raised serum creatine kinase is common, myopathy associated with telbivudine is rare. Reports on its myopathological features are few and immunohistochemical analyses of inflammatory cell infiltrates have not been previously described. We describe the clinical, myopathological and immunohistochemical features of four patients who developed myopathy after telbivudine therapy for chronic hepatitis B infection. All four patients presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness, elevation of serum creatine kinase and myopathic changes on electromyography. Muscle biopsies showed myofiber degeneration/necrosis, regeneration, and fibers with cytoplasmic bodies and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. There was minimal inflammation associated with strong sarcolemmal overexpression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I). Upon withdrawal of telbivudine, muscle weakness improved in all patients and eventually completely resolved in three. In our series, telbivudine-associated myopathy is characterized by necrotizing myopathy which improved on drug withdrawal. Although the occasional loss of cytochrome c oxidase is consistent with mitochondrial toxicity, the overexpression of MHC class I in all patients could suggest an underlying immune-mediated mechanism which may warrant further investigation. PMID:27611456

  8. Clinicopathological Features of Telbivudine-Associated Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Ambang, Tomica; Tan, Joo-San; Ong, Sheila; Wong, Kum-Thong; Goh, Khean-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Telbivudine, a thymidine nucleoside analog, is a common therapeutic option for chronic hepatitis B infection. While raised serum creatine kinase is common, myopathy associated with telbivudine is rare. Reports on its myopathological features are few and immunohistochemical analyses of inflammatory cell infiltrates have not been previously described. We describe the clinical, myopathological and immunohistochemical features of four patients who developed myopathy after telbivudine therapy for chronic hepatitis B infection. All four patients presented with progressive proximal muscle weakness, elevation of serum creatine kinase and myopathic changes on electromyography. Muscle biopsies showed myofiber degeneration/necrosis, regeneration, and fibers with cytoplasmic bodies and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. There was minimal inflammation associated with strong sarcolemmal overexpression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I). Upon withdrawal of telbivudine, muscle weakness improved in all patients and eventually completely resolved in three. In our series, telbivudine-associated myopathy is characterized by necrotizing myopathy which improved on drug withdrawal. Although the occasional loss of cytochrome c oxidase is consistent with mitochondrial toxicity, the overexpression of MHC class I in all patients could suggest an underlying immune-mediated mechanism which may warrant further investigation. PMID:27611456

  9. Statistical and linguistic features of DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havlin, S.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing noncoding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, base pairs thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene. We resolve the problem of the "non-stationary" feature of the sequence of base pairs by applying a new algorithm called Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). We address the claim of Voss that there is no difference in the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions of DNA by systematically applying the DFA algorithm, as well as standard FFT analysis, to all eukaryotic DNA sequences (33 301 coding and 29 453 noncoding) in the entire GenBank database. We describe a simple model to account for the presence of long-range power-law correlations which is based upon a generalization of the classic Levy walk. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work showing that the noncoding sequences have certain statistical features in common with natural languages. Specifically, we adapt to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts, and the Shannon approach to quantifying the "redundancy" of a linguistic text in terms of a measurable entropy function. We suggest that noncoding regions in plants and invertebrates may display a smaller entropy and larger redundancy than coding regions, further supporting the possibility that noncoding regions of DNA may carry biological information.

  10. Biochemical and clinical features of hereditary hyperprolinemia

    PubMed Central

    Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Matsumoto, Shirou; Endo, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    There are two classifications of hereditary hyperprolinemia: type I (HPI) and type II (HPII). Each type is caused by an autosomal recessive inborn error of the proline metabolic pathway. HPI is caused by an abnormality in the proline-oxidizing enzyme (POX). HPII is caused by a deficiency of Δ-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase (P5CDh). The clinical features of HPI are unclear. Nephropathy, uncontrolled seizures, mental retardation or schizophrenia have been reported in HPI, but a benign phenotype without neurological problems has also been reported. The clinical features of HPII are also unclear. In addition, the precise incidences of HPI and HPII are unknown. Only two cases of HPI and one case of HPII have been identified in Japan through a questionnaire survey and by a study of previous reports. This suggests that hyperprolinemia is a very rare disease in Japan, consistent with earlier reports in Western countries. The one case of HPII found in Japan was diagnosed in an individual with influenza-associated encephalopathy. This suggests that HPII might reduce the threshold for convulsions, thereby increasing the sensitivity of individuals with influenza-associated encephalopathy. The current study presents diagnostic criteria for HPI and HPII, based on plasma proline level, with or without measurements of urinary P5C. In the future, screening for HPI and HPII in healthy individuals, or patients with relatively common diseases such as developmental disabilities, epilepsy, schizophrenia or behavioral problems will be important. PMID:24931297

  11. Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) Special Feature: Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Andy; Failler, Pierre; Bavinck, J. Maarten

    2011-04-01

    The number of MPAs has increased sharply, from just 118 in 1970 to well over 6,300 today. This growth in numbers has also been accompanied by a voluminous growth in the academic literature on the theme, with writers employing ecologic, economic and governance lenses (or a combination thereof) to both support the case for MPA creation, and to evaluate just how successfully (or not) existing MPAs match up to their promises. Research suggests effective management of such protected areas is vital if desired outcomes are to be achieved within the allotted time period. This Special Feature on MPAs therefore seeks to address two key questions derived from the management effectiveness framework of Hockings and others (2000), namely: `How appropriate are the management systems and processes in place?' and `Were the desired Objectives achieved—and if so, why?' Fourteen articles, drawing on different disciplinary perspectives relating to MPA experiences from across the globe, offers insights into these questions by considering, inter alia, how: are MPA sites selected?; is `buy-in' to the process from the various stakeholders achieved?; are these stakeholder's views reflected in the management systems that evolve?, and what monitoring and evaluation mechanisms are in place? Bringing these perspectives and approaches together through the medium of this Special Feature is thus intended to further our understanding of the different issues that may confront both planners and managers of Marine Protected Areas.

  12. Uterine sarcomas: clinical presentation and MRI features

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pedro; Cunha, Teresa Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas are a rare heterogeneous group of tumors of mesenchymal origin, accounting for approximately 8% of uterine malignancies. They comprise leiomyosarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma, and adenosarcoma. Compared with the more common endometrial carcinomas, uterine sarcomas behave more aggressively and are associated with a poorer prognosis. Due to their distinct clinical and biological behavior, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics introduced a new staging system for uterine sarcomas in 2009, categorizing uterine carcinosarcoma as a variant of endometrial carcinoma, rather than a pure sarcoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a developing role in the assessment of these malignancies. Features such as tumor localization, irregular or nodular margins, necrosis, rapid growth, intense contrast enhancement, and restriction at diffusion-weighted imaging can suggest the diagnosis and help differentiate from more common leiomyomas and endometrial carcinoma. MRI is therefore extremely useful in preoperative detection and staging and, consequently, in determination of appropriate management. This pictorial review aims to discuss the clinical features of uterine sarcomas, as well as their most common appearances and distinct characteristics in MRI. PMID:25347940

  13. Batten disease: features to facilitate early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J; Holder, G E; Herbert, H; Adams, G G W

    2006-01-01

    Aims To ascertain the clinical and electrophysiological features in patients with juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (jNCL/Batten disease) and to identify those features that facilitate early diagnosis. Methods Nine patients with jNCL were identified retrospectively and their case notes reviewed. All had undergone an extensive clinical examination, including electrophysiology. Blood and molecular genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis. Results Age at onset ranged from 4–8 years. At presentation, two of nine patients had normal fundi; only two of nine patients had a bull's eye maculopathy. The electroretinogram (ERG) findings in this series included undetectable rod specific ERGs, an electronegative maximal response, reduced and delayed cone flicker ERGs, reduction in the b:a ratio in the photopic single flash ERG, and an undetectable pattern ERG. Vacuolated lymphocytes on peripheral blood film testing were present in eight of nine patients. Five of eight patients were homozygous for the 1.02 kb deletion on the CLN3 gene on molecular genetic testing; two of eight patients were heterozygous for that deletion. Conclusion jNCL should be considered in children of 10 years and under presenting with visual loss and fundal changes ranging from normal through to pigmentary/atrophic changes or a bull's eye maculopathy. Electrophysiology may suggest jNCL. Although currently untreatable, early diagnosis is important to institute appropriate counselling and support. PMID:16754648

  14. Biometric feature embedding using robust steganography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Rasber D.; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper is concerned with robust steganographic techniques to hide and communicate biometric data in mobile media objects like images, over open networks. More specifically, the aim is to embed binarised features extracted using discrete wavelet transforms and local binary patterns of face images as a secret message in an image. The need for such techniques can arise in law enforcement, forensics, counter terrorism, internet/mobile banking and border control. What differentiates this problem from normal information hiding techniques is the added requirement that there should be minimal effect on face recognition accuracy. We propose an LSB-Witness embedding technique in which the secret message is already present in the LSB plane but instead of changing the cover image LSB values, the second LSB plane will be changed to stand as a witness/informer to the receiver during message recovery. Although this approach may affect the stego quality, it is eliminating the weakness of traditional LSB schemes that is exploited by steganalysis techniques for LSB, such as PoV and RS steganalysis, to detect the existence of secrete message. Experimental results show that the proposed method is robust against PoV and RS attacks compared to other variants of LSB. We also discussed variants of this approach and determine capacity requirements for embedding face biometric feature vectors while maintain accuracy of face recognition.

  15. Microscopic features of moving traffic jams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.; Hiller, Andreas; Rehborn, Hubert

    2006-04-01

    Empirical and numerical microscopic features of moving traffic jams are presented. Based on a single vehicle data analysis, it is found that within wide moving jams, i.e., between the upstream and downstream jam fronts there is a complex microscopic spatiotemporal structure. This jam structure consists of alternations of regions in which traffic flow is interrupted and flow states of low speeds associated with “moving blanks” within the jam. Moving blanks within a wide moving jam resemble electron holes in the valence band of semiconductors: As the moving blanks that propagate upstream appear due to downstream vehicle motion within the jam, so appearance of electron holes moving with the electric field results from electron motion against the electric field in the valence band of semiconductors. Empirical features of moving blanks are found. Based on microscopic models in the context of the Kerner’s three-phase traffic theory, physical reasons for moving blanks emergence within wide moving jams are disclosed. Microscopic nonlinear effects of moving jam emergence, propagation, and dissolution as well as a diverse variety of hysteresis effects in freeway traffic associated with phase transitions and congested traffic propagation are numerically investigated. Microscopic structure of moving jam fronts is numerically studied and compared with empirical results.

  16. Mapping female bodily features of attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Bovet, Jeanne; Lao, Junpeng; Bartholomée, Océane; Caldara, Roberto; Raymond, Michel

    2016-01-01

    "Beauty is bought by judgment of the eye" (Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost), but the bodily features governing this critical biological choice are still debated. Eye movement studies have demonstrated that males sample coarse body regions expanding from the face, the breasts and the midriff, while making female attractiveness judgements with natural vision. However, the visual system ubiquitously extracts diagnostic extra-foveal information in natural conditions, thus the visual information actually used by men is still unknown. We thus used a parametric gaze-contingent design while males rated attractiveness of female front- and back-view bodies. Males used extra-foveal information when available. Critically, when bodily features were only visible through restricted apertures, fixations strongly shifted to the hips, to potentially extract hip-width and curvature, then the breast and face. Our hierarchical mapping suggests that the visual system primary uses hip information to compute the waist-to-hip ratio and the body mass index, the crucial factors in determining sexual attractiveness and mate selection. PMID:26791105

  17. Radiological features of azygous vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Moore, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Mediastinal masses are most commonly associated with malignancy. Azygous vein aneurysm is a very rare differential diagnosis of mediastinal mass. We report here three cases of azygous vein aneurysm including children and adult patients. In the pediatric patient it was further complicated by thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism. We describe the radiological features on CXR, MRI, CT, PET-CT, US and angiogram and their differential diagnosis. Imaging findings of continuity with azygous vein, layering of contrast medium on enhanced CT and dynamic MRA showing filling of the mass at the same time as the azygous vein without prior enhancement will be strongly suggestive of azygous vein aneurysm with transtracheal ultrasound being the definitive test in these patients. It is important to keep a vascular origin mass in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal masses. Also, in young healthy patients with pulmonary embolism, a vascular etiology such as azygous vein aneurysm should be carefully evaluated. This article will help the clinicians to learn about the imaging features of azygous vein aneurysm on different imaging modalities.

  18. Histopathological and scintigraphic features of condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Gray, R J; Sloan, P; Quayle, A A; Carter, D H

    1990-04-01

    This investigation was undertaken to correlate the scintigraphic and histological features of condylar hyperplasia to identify consistent diagnostic findings. A series of 34 surgically excised condyles were examined from a 5 year period. Of these, 20 were diagnosed clinically and histologically as condylar hyperplasia. In 18 of these the presentation was one of increasing facial asymmetry. In all 20 cases there was an increased uptake of Technetium 99 as determined by gamma scintigraphy. The thickness of the fibrous articular layer, undifferentiated germinal mesenchyme layer and the hyperplastic cartilage layer were measured using an eyepiece graticule and the presence and frequency of islands of cartilage in the subchondral bone were noted. 7 patients received tetracycline hydrochloride 14 and 4 days pre-operatively in an attempt to quantify the calcification rate. An uninterrupted layer of undifferentiated germinal mesenchyme is a consistent feature of condylar hyperplasia. An increased uptake on scintigraphy is proportionally related to the thickness of the hypertrophic cartilage and not only to the presence but also the frequency of cartilage islands in the subchondral bone. PMID:2111360

  19. Clinicopathologic Features of Advanced Squamous NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Socinski, Mark A; Obasaju, Coleman; Gandara, David; Hirsch, Fred R; Bonomi, Philip; Bunn, Paul; Kim, Edward S; Langer, Corey J; Natale, Ronald B; Novello, Silvia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pérol, Maurice; Reck, Martin; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Reynolds, Craig H; Spigel, David R; Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Wakelee, Heather; Mayo, Carlos; Thatcher, Nick

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. NSCLC accounts for more than 85% of all lung cancers, and the prognosis for advanced-stage disease is typically poor. In recent years, the importance of histologic subtypes of NSCLC has been recognized, and the distinction between squamous and other NSCLC histologic subtypes is now critical to patient management. Squamous cell lung cancer (sqCLC) represents approximately 25% to 30% of NSCLC. The prognosis for patients with advanced NSCLC is poorer for those with sqCLC than for those with adenocarcinoma. This is partly due to a number of clinical characteristics that distinguish sqCLC from other NSCLC histologic subtypes, such as smoking history, comorbid diseases, age, and molecular profile. Together, these factors make sqCLC an especially challenging disease to manage. Herein, we review some of the key clinicopathologic features of sqCLC. Understanding these features to optimally address many of the unique therapeutic challenges of this disease is likely to be central to ultimately improving outcomes for patients with squamous NSCLC.

  20. Dome shaped features on Europa's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Solid State Imaging system aboard the spacecraft Galileo took this image of the surface of Europa on February 20, 1997 during its sixth orbit around Jupiter. The image is located near 16 North, 268 West; illumination is from the lower-right. The area covered is approximately 48 miles (80 kilometers) by 56 miles (95 kilometers) across. North is toward the top of the image.

    This image reveals that the icy surface of Europa has been disrupted by ridges and faults numerous times during its past. These ridges have themselves been disrupted by the localized formation of domes and other features that may be indicative of thermal upwelling of water from beneath the crust. These features provide strong evidence for the presence of subsurface liquid during Europa's recent past.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  1. Spatial Relation Predicates in Topographic Feature Semantics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varanka, Dalia E.; Caro, Holly K.

    2013-01-01

    Topographic data are designed and widely used for base maps of diverse applications, yet the power of these information sources largely relies on the interpretive skills of map readers and relational database expert users once the data are in map or geographic information system (GIS) form. Advances in geospatial semantic technology offer data model alternatives for explicating concepts and articulating complex data queries and statements. To understand and enrich the vocabulary of topographic feature properties for semantic technology, English language spatial relation predicates were analyzed in three standard topographic feature glossaries. The analytical approach drew from disciplinary concepts in geography, linguistics, and information science. Five major classes of spatial relation predicates were identified from the analysis; representations for most of these are not widely available. The classes are: part-whole (which are commonly modeled throughout semantic and linked-data networks), geometric, processes, human intention, and spatial prepositions. These are commonly found in the ‘real world’ and support the environmental science basis for digital topographical mapping. The spatial relation concepts are based on sets of relation terms presented in this chapter, though these lists are not prescriptive or exhaustive. The results of this study make explicit the concepts forming a broad set of spatial relation expressions, which in turn form the basis for expanding the range of possible queries for topographical data analysis and mapping.

  2. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert

    1998-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required to understand the underlying physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of much interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one 'snap-shot' of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense. The following is a list of the important physical phenomena found in transient (and steady-state) fluid flow: Shocks; Vortex ores; Regions of Recirculation; Boundary Layers; Wakes.

  3. Persistent topological features of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletić, Slobodan; Zhao, Yi; Rajković, Milan

    2016-05-01

    Inspired by an early work of Muldoon et al., Physica D 65, 1-16 (1993), we present a general method for constructing simplicial complex from observed time series of dynamical systems based on the delay coordinate reconstruction procedure. The obtained simplicial complex preserves all pertinent topological features of the reconstructed phase space, and it may be analyzed from topological, combinatorial, and algebraic aspects. In focus of this study is the computation of homology of the invariant set of some well known dynamical systems that display chaotic behavior. Persistent homology of simplicial complex and its relationship with the embedding dimensions are examined by studying the lifetime of topological features and topological noise. The consistency of topological properties for different dynamic regimes and embedding dimensions is examined. The obtained results shed new light on the topological properties of the reconstructed phase space and open up new possibilities for application of advanced topological methods. The method presented here may be used as a generic method for constructing simplicial complex from a scalar time series that has a number of advantages compared to the mapping of the same time series to a complex network.

  4. Correlation metric for generalized feature extraction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yun; Yan, Shuicheng; Huang, Thomas S

    2008-12-01

    Beyond conventional linear and kernel-based feature extraction, we propose in this paper the generalized feature extraction formulation based on the so-called Graph Embedding framework. Two novel correlation metric based algorithms are presented based on this formulation. Correlation Embedding Analysis (CEA), which incorporates both correlational mapping and discriminating analysis, boosts the discriminating power by mapping data from a high-dimensional hypersphere onto another low-dimensional hypersphere and preserving the intrinsic neighbor relations with local graph modeling. Correlational Principal Component Analysis (CPCA) generalizes the conventional Principal Component Analysis (PCA) algorithm to the case with data distributed on a high-dimensional hypersphere. Their advantages stem from two facts: 1) tailored to normalized data, which are often the outputs from the data preprocessing step, and 2) directly designed with correlation metric, which shows to be generally better than Euclidean distance for classification purpose. Extensive comparisons with existing algorithms on visual classification experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. PMID:18988954

  5. Identification of apolipoprotein using feature selection technique.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hua; Zou, Ping; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Rong; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein is a kind of protein which can transport the lipids through the lymphatic and circulatory systems. The abnormal expression level of apolipoprotein always causes angiocardiopathy. Thus, correct recognition of apolipoprotein from proteomic data is very crucial to the comprehension of cardiovascular system and drug design. This study is to develop a computational model to predict apolipoproteins. In the model, the apolipoproteins and non-apolipoproteins were collected to form benchmark dataset. On the basis of the dataset, we extracted the g-gap dipeptide composition information from residue sequences to formulate protein samples. To exclude redundant information or noise, the analysis of various (ANOVA)-based feature selection technique was proposed to find out the best feature subset. The support vector machine (SVM) was selected as discrimination algorithm. Results show that 96.2% of sensitivity and 99.3% of specificity were achieved in five-fold cross-validation. These findings open new perspectives to improve apolipoproteins prediction by considering the specific dipeptides. We expect that these findings will help to improve drug development in anti-angiocardiopathy disease. PMID:27443605

  6. Features of temporomandibular disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Gui, Maisa Soares; Martins de Aquino, Luana Maria; Rizzatti-Barbosa, Célia Marisa

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of clinical features of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with fibromyalgia. The test group (FMG) consisted of 40 women with fibromyalgia (FM) compared to the control group of 40 healthy subjects using the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD). The variables were compared using Fisher's exact test and a Mann-Whitney test. Facial pain was reported by 85% of the FM group, and 77.5% were diagnosed with myofascial TMD. Muscle pain during jaw movements, daytime bruxism/clenching, and limited mouth opening were significantly higher in the test group. There was no difference between groups in: (1) joint noises; (2) sleep bruxism/clenching; and (3) excursive or non-excursive movements. Classic signs of TMD, such as joint noise and self-reporting of clenching at night, are not associated with fibromyalgia syndrome as demonstrated in the current study. However, the self-reported daytime parafunctions, muscle pain in jaw movements, and limited mouth opening are features of the patients in the current study. This study revealed specific muscle involvement of TMD is also presence in FM.

  7. Physics of Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sschoenherr, Gabriele; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Falkner, Sebastian; Dauser, Thomas; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kretschmar, Peter; Klochkov, Dmitry; Ferrigno, Carlo; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Cyclotron resonant scattering features (short: cyclotron lines) are sensitive tracers of the physics of the accretion columns and mounds of X-ray pulsars. They form by interaction of X-ray photons with magnetically quantized electrons in the accreted plasma close to the neutron star. Such lines have been observed as absorption-like features for about 20 X-ray pulsars. Their energies provide a direct measure of the magnetic field strength in the line-forming region. By detailed modelling of the lines and of their parameter dependencies we can further decipher the physical conditions in the accretion column. For instance the fact that the complex scattering cross sections have a strong angle-dependence relates the phase-resolved cyclotron line shapes to parameters that constrain the systems’ still poorly understood geometry. Modelling the physics of cyclotron lines to a degree that allows for detailed and solid comparison to data therefore provides a unique access also to a better understanding of the overall picture of magnetically accreting neutron star systems.

  8. Texture and color features for tile classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldrich, Ramon; Vanrell, Maria; Villanueva, Juan J.

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we present the results of a preliminary computer vision system to classify the production of a ceramic tile industry. We focus on the classification of a specific type of tiles whose production can be affected by external factors, such as humidity, temperature, origin of clays and pigments. Variations on these uncontrolled factors provoke small differences in the color and the texture of the tiles that force to classify all the production. A constant and non- subjective classification would allow avoiding devolution from customers and unnecessary stock fragmentation. The aim of this work is to simulate the human behavior on this classification task by extracting a set of features from tile images. These features are induced by definitions from experts. To compute them we need to mix color and texture information and to define global and local measures. In this work, we do not seek a general texture-color representation, we only deal with textures formed by non-oriented colored-blobs randomly distributed. New samples are classified using Discriminant Analysis functions derived from known class tile samples. The last part of the paper is devoted to explain the correction of acquired images in order to avoid time and geometry illumination changes.

  9. Transient features in a Titan sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Hayes, A. G.; Lunine, J. I.; Zebker, H.; Stiles, B. W.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Turtle, E. P.; Baines, K. H.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Encrenaz, P.; Kirk, R. D.; Le Gall, A.; Lopes, R. M.; Lorenz, R. D.; Malaska, M. J.; Mitchell, K. L.; Nicholson, P. D.; Paillou, P.; Radebaugh, J.; Wall, S. D.; Wood, C.

    2014-07-01

    Titan's surface-atmosphere system bears remarkable similarities to Earth's, the most striking being an active, global methane cycle akin to Earth's water cycle. Like the hydrological cycle of Earth, Titan's seasonal methane cycle is driven by changes in the distribution of solar energy. The Cassini spacecraft, which arrived at Saturn in 2004 in the midst of northern winter and southern summer, has observed surface changes, including shoreline recession, at Titan's south pole and equator. However, active surface processes have yet to be confirmed in the lakes and seas in Titan's north polar region. As the 2017 northern summer solstice approaches, the onset of dynamic phenomena in this region is expected. Here we present the discovery of bright features in recent Cassini RADAR data that appeared in Titan's northern sea, Ligeia Mare, in July 2013 and disappeared in subsequent observations. We suggest that these bright features are best explained by the occurrence of ephemeral phenomena such as surface waves, rising bubbles, and suspended or floating solids. We suggest that our observations are an initial glimpse of dynamic processes that are commencing in the northern lakes and seas as summer nears in the northern hemisphere.

  10. Identification of apolipoprotein using feature selection technique

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hua; Zou, Ping; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Rong; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein is a kind of protein which can transport the lipids through the lymphatic and circulatory systems. The abnormal expression level of apolipoprotein always causes angiocardiopathy. Thus, correct recognition of apolipoprotein from proteomic data is very crucial to the comprehension of cardiovascular system and drug design. This study is to develop a computational model to predict apolipoproteins. In the model, the apolipoproteins and non-apolipoproteins were collected to form benchmark dataset. On the basis of the dataset, we extracted the g-gap dipeptide composition information from residue sequences to formulate protein samples. To exclude redundant information or noise, the analysis of various (ANOVA)-based feature selection technique was proposed to find out the best feature subset. The support vector machine (SVM) was selected as discrimination algorithm. Results show that 96.2% of sensitivity and 99.3% of specificity were achieved in five-fold cross-validation. These findings open new perspectives to improve apolipoproteins prediction by considering the specific dipeptides. We expect that these findings will help to improve drug development in anti-angiocardiopathy disease. PMID:27443605

  11. Interesting Features in Spirit's Uphill View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Planetary scientists got excited when they saw this imagery coming in from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit because they could see hints of rock strata and other interesting geologic features ahead. In the middle of this image, from upper left to the lower right, lies a trough that resembles a small ravine. To the right of that and a little way up the hill, beyond a rock-strewn surface, sits a small rounded ridge. Fine horizontal streaks, just perceptible in this image, suggest possible layering in the bedrock. Above that are rock features that appear to drape across the slopes. Scientists are discussing whether to take the rover closer or select other interesting targets for further study. This view looks eastward from the 'West Spur' of the 'Columbia Hills,' where Spirit has been conducting scientific investigations. It is a mosaic of several frames Spirit took with its panoramic camera on the rover's 229th martian day, or sol, (Aug. 24, 2004). The field of view is 48 degrees from left to right. The image is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometrical seam correction.

  12. Standard Features and Their Impact on 3D Engineering Graphics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldenmeyer, K. M.; Hartman, N. W.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of feature-based 3D modeling in industry has necessitated the accumulation and maintenance of standard feature libraries. Currently, firms who use standard features to design parts are storing and utilizing these libraries through their existing product data management (PDM) systems. Standard features have enabled companies to…

  13. Select Features in "Finale 2011" for Music Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Douglas Earl

    2011-01-01

    A feature-laden software program such as "Finale" is an overwhelming tool to master--if one hopes to master many features in a short amount of time. Believing that working with a fewer number of features can be a helpful approach, this article looks at a select number of features in "Finale 2011" of obvious use to music educators. These features…

  14. Structure damage detection based on random forest recursive feature elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qifeng; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Qingqing; Yang, Fan; Luo, Linkai

    2014-05-01

    Feature extraction is a key former step in structural damage detection. In this paper, a structural damage detection method based on wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) and random forest recursive feature elimination (RF-RFE) is proposed. In order to gain the most effective feature subset and to improve the identification accuracy a two-stage feature selection method is adopted after WPD. First, the damage features are sorted according to original random forest variable importance analysis. Second, using RF-RFE to eliminate the least important feature and reorder the feature list each time, then get the new feature importance sequence. Finally, k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm, as a benchmark classifier, is used to evaluate the extracted feature subset. A four-storey steel shear building model is chosen as an example in method verification. The experimental results show that using the fewer features got from proposed method can achieve higher identification accuracy and reduce the detection time cost.

  15. Feature Import Vector Machine: A General Classifier with Flexible Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yazhen

    2015-01-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) and other reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) based classifier systems are drawing much attention recently due to its robustness and generalization capability. General theme here is to construct classifiers based on the training data in a high dimensional space by using all available dimensions. The SVM achieves huge data compression by selecting only few observations which lie close to the boundary of the classifier function. However when the number of observations are not very large (small n) but the number of dimensions/features are large (large p), then it is not necessary that all available features are of equal importance in the classification context. Possible selection of an useful fraction of the available features may result in huge data compression. In this paper we propose an algorithmic approach by means of which such an optimal set of features could be selected. In short, we reverse the traditional sequential observation selection strategy of SVM to that of sequential feature selection. To achieve this we have modified the solution proposed by Zhu and Hastie (2005) in the context of import vector machine (IVM), to select an optimal sub-dimensional model to build the final classifier with sufficient accuracy. PMID:27081431

  16. Titan's Impact Craters and Associated Fluvial Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, A.; Jurdy, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has detected remarkably few impact craters on the surface of Titan. By early 2010, with surface radar coverage reaching 33%, seven certain impact craters were discovered, with another 52 nearly certain and probable ones. The paucity of craters implies that the surface of Titan is very dynamic and relatively young. Dynamical models of the internal structure of Titan suggest the possibility of a subsurface ocean of ammonia-water liquid beneath its icy shell. If a large subsurface ocean does exist, it should have measurable effects on Titan's surface and the morphology of its craters. Using a combination of available Cassini radar-SAR, ISS, and VIMS data, we construct geomorphologic maps of Titan's "certain" impact craters with associated features we interpret as fluvial in origin. The best example, Menrva, a 445 km wide double-ring impact basin, hosts a complex network of channels. On the western, more degraded side of the crater, channels cut through the outer rim. To the east of Menrva, a curious network of channels start near the rim crest and appear to have flowed away into a large catchment basin; the complex is termed Elivagar Flumina. Channels surrounding Menrva display a low order - a classification of stream segments based on the number of tributaries upstream - measuring one or two, occasionally up to three. This matches observations of two other confirmed impact craters with associated fluvial features. A halo of low-order channels encircles Selk, an 80 km diameter crater with a small central peak. Also, Ksa, a 30 km diameter crater with a bright central peak and radial ejecta, has a feature that appears to be a first order channel. These differ radically from the tree-shaped dendritic channels common on Titan, which are generally attributed to heavy rainfall. For example, the Xanadu region, as observed on the T13 swath, exhibits a very complex and dendritic network of channels, where the order of channels reaches six to seven. The

  17. Waste Form Features, Events, and Processes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schreiner

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the waste form features, events and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical bases for screening decisions. This information is required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with the issues related to the degradation and potential failure of the waste form and the migration of the waste form colloids. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA, (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical bases for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). This revision addresses the TSPA-LA FEP list (DTN: MO0407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analyses and resolution of the features, events, and processes (FEPs) associated with the waste form performance in the repository. Forty FEPs were identified that are associated with the waste form performance. This report has been prepared to document the screening methodology used in the process of FEP inclusion and exclusion. The analyses documented in this report are for the license application (LA) base case design (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). In this design, a drip shield is placed over the waste package and no backfill is placed over the drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]). Each FEP may include one or more specific issues that are collectively described by a FEP name and a FEP description. The FEP description may encompass a single feature, process or event, or a few closely related or coupled processes if the entire FEP can be addressed by a single specific screening argument or TSPA-LA disposition. The FEPs are

  18. Neuromyelitis optica: clinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Jarius, S; Wildemann, B; Paul, F

    2014-05-01

    The term 'neuromyelitis optica' ('Devic's syndrome', NMO) refers to a syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and myelitis. In recent years, the condition has raised enormous interest among scientists and clinical neurologists, fuelled by the detection of a specific serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G reactivity (NMO-IgG) in up to 80% of patients with NMO. These autoantibodies were later shown to target aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the most abundant water channel in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we give an up-to-date overview of the clinical and paraclinical features, immunopathogenesis and treatment of NMO. We discuss the widening clinical spectrum of AQP4-related autoimmunity, the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and new diagnostic means such as optical coherence tomography in the diagnosis of NMO, the role of NMO-IgG, T cells and granulocytes in the pathophysiology of NMO, and outline prospects for new and emerging therapies for this rare, but often devastating condition.

  19. Face feature processor on mobile service robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Ho Seok; Park, Myoung Soo; Na, Jin Hee; Choi, Jin Young

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, many mobile service robots have been developed. These robots are different from industrial robots. Service robots were confronted to unexpected changes in the human environment. So many capabilities were needed to service mobile robot, for example, the capability to recognize people's face and voice, the capability to understand people's conversation, and the capability to express the robot's thinking etc. This research considered face detection, face tracking and face recognition from continuous camera image. For face detection module, it used CBCH algorithm using openCV library from Intel Corporation. For face tracking module, it used the fuzzy controller to control the pan-tilt camera movement smoothly with face detection result. A PCA-FX, which adds class information to PCA, was used for face recognition module. These three procedures were called face feature processor, which were implemented on mobile service robot OMR to verify.

  20. Visual feature learning in artificial grammar classification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Grace Y; Knowlton, Barbara J

    2004-05-01

    The Artificial Grammar Learning task has been used extensively to assess individuals' implicit learning capabilities. Previous work suggests that participants implicitly acquire rule-based knowledge as well as exemplar-specific knowledge in this task. This study investigated whether exemplar-specific knowledge acquired in this task is based on the visual features of the exemplars. When a change in the font and case occurred between study and test, there was no effect on sensitivity to grammatical rules in classification judgments. However, such a change did virtually eliminate sensitivity to training frequencies of letter bigrams and trigrams (chunk strength) in classification judgments. Performance of a secondary task during study eliminated this font sensitivity and generally reduced the contribution of chunk strength knowledge. The results are consistent with the idea that perceptual fluency makes a contribution to artificial grammar judgments.

  1. Multivariate dice recognition using invariant features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Gee-Sern; Peng, Hsiao-Chia; Yeh, Shang-Min; Lin, Chyi-Yeu

    2013-04-01

    A system is proposed for automatic reading of the number of dots on dice in general table game settings. Different from previous dice recognition systems that recognize dice of a specific color using a single top-view camera in an enclosure with controlled settings, the proposed one uses multiple cameras to recognize dice of various colors and under uncontrolled conditions. It is composed of three modules. Module-1 locates the dice using the gradient-conditioned color segmentation, proposed, to segment dice of arbitrary colors from the background. Module-2 exploits the local invariant features good for building homographies, giving a solution to segment the top faces of the dice. To identify the dots on the segmented top faces, a maximally stable extremal region detector is embedded in module-3 for its consistency in locating the dot region. Experiments show that the proposed system performs satisfactorily in various test conditions.

  2. Classification trees with neural network feature extraction.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Gelfand, S B

    1992-01-01

    The ideal use of small multilayer nets at the decision nodes of a binary classification tree to extract nonlinear features is proposed. The nets are trained and the tree is grown using a gradient-type learning algorithm in the multiclass case. The method improves on standard classification tree design methods in that it generally produces trees with lower error rates and fewer nodes. It also reduces the problems associated with training large unstructured nets and transfers the problem of selecting the size of the net to the simpler problem of finding a tree of the right size. An efficient tree pruning algorithm is proposed for this purpose. Trees constructed with the method and the CART method are compared on a waveform recognition problem and a handwritten character recognition problem. The approach demonstrates significant decrease in error rate and tree size. It also yields comparable error rates and shorter training times than a large multilayer net trained with backpropagation on the same problems.

  3. The clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Grassi, W; De Angelis, R; Lamanna, G; Cervini, C

    1998-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by progressive damage of synovial-lined joints and variable extra-articular manifestations. Tendon and bursal involvement are frequent and often clinically dominant in early disease. RA can affect any joint, but it is usually found in metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as in the wrists and knee. Articular and periarticular manifestations include joint swelling and tenderness to palpation, with morning stiffness and severe motion impairment in the involved joints. The clinical presentation of RA varies, but an insidious onset of pain with symmetric swelling of small joints is the most frequent finding. RA onset is acute or subacute in about 25% of patients, but its patterns of presentation also include palindromic onset, monoarticular presentation (both slow and acute forms), extra-articular synovitis (tenosynovitis, bursitis), polymyalgic-like onset, and general symptoms (malaise, fatigue, weight loss, fever). The palindromic onset is characterized by recurrent episodes of oligoarthritis with no residual radiologic damage, while the polymyalgic-like onset may be clinically indistinguishable from polymyalgia rheumatica in elderly subjects. RA is characteristically a symmetric erosive disease. Although any joint, including the cricoarytenoid joint, can be affected, the distal interphalangeal, the sacroiliac, and the lumbar spine joints are rarely involved. The clinical features of synovitis are particularly apparent in the morning. Morning stiffness in and around the joints, lasting at least 1 h before maximal improvement is a typical sign of RA. It is a subjective sign and the patient needs to be carefully informed as to the difference between pain and stiffness. Morning stiffness duration is related to disease activity. Hand involvement is the typical early manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Synovitis involving the metacarpophalangeal

  4. 1088 A feature toward reddened stars

    SciTech Connect

    Federman, S.R.

    1986-10-01

    An analysis of the interstellar feature near 1088 A in spectra obtained with the Copernicus satellite suggests that neutral chlorine is the absorber. The mean wavelength, as determined from 15 lines of sight, of 1088.052 + or - 0.023 A compares favorably with the chlorine line at 1088.062 A. A strong correlation with Cl I 1347 A indicates an oscillator strength for 1088 A of 0.04. Above a threshold at N(H2) of roughly 10 to the 19th/sq cm, the equivalent width of 1088 A varies approximately with N(H2). The variation with H2 is similar to the variation of Na I and C I with H2. 18 references.

  5. The 1088 A feature toward reddened stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the interstellar feature near 1088 A in spectra obtained with the Copernicus satellite suggests that neutral chlorine is the absorber. The mean wavelength, as determined from 15 lines of sight, of 1088.052 + or - 0.023 A compares favorably with the chlorine line at 1088.062 A. A strong correlation with Cl I 1347 A indicates an oscillator strength for 1088 A of 0.04. Above a threshold at N(H2) of roughly 10 to the 19th/sq cm, the equivalent width of 1088 A varies approximately with N(H2). The variation with H2 is similar to the variation of Na I and C I with H2.

  6. Calcifying odontogenic cyst with atypical features.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S M; Rooban, Thavarajah

    2012-01-01

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) was first delineated in 1962. It is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst with notable presence of histopathological features which include a cystic lining demonstrating characteristic "Ghost" epithelial cells with a propensity to calcify. In addition, the COC may be associated with other recognized odontogenic tumors. This gives rise to a spectrum of variants of COC according to clinical, histopathological, and radiological characteristics. Very few reports have actually captured the actual transformation while most reported cases are documents of co-existing lesions. This article presents one such entity, where the asymptomatic presentation misled the diagnosis and on histopathological examination revealed the COC with areas suggestive of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor.

  7. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  8. Some features of secretory systems in plants.

    PubMed

    Juniper, B E; Gilchrist, A J; Robins, R J

    1977-09-01

    Recent work on secretion in plants is reviewed, with emphasis on the anatomy and physiology of root cap cells in higher plants, the stalked glands of Drosera capensis, and the secretory mechanism of Dionaea muscipula. Cells of the root cap of higher plants switch from a geo-perceptive role to one of mucilage secretion at maturation. Features of this process, the role of the Golgi and the pathway for mucilage distribution are reviewed. In contrast, the stalked glands of the leaves of Drosera capensis are much longer lived and have a complex anatomy. The mechanisms for mucilage secretion, protein absorption and the role of the cell membranes in the internal secretion of the protein are described, using data from X-ray microscopv. The secretion of fluid and protein by Dionaea is stimulated by various nitrogen-containing compounds. Uric acid, often excreted by captured insects, is particularly effective in this respect.

  9. Multifractal intensity in features of dynamical behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungsik; Jung, Jae-Won; Kim, Baek-Jo

    2014-03-01

    We simulate and analyze the dynamical behavior of multifractals in typhoons. A significant and fascinating feature of this behavior is that it provides a proper interpretation for the pattern of typhoon in terms of the numerical values of the generalized dimension and the scaling exponent. For our case, these statistical quantities can be estimated numerically from four meteorological factors (the moving speed, the central pressure, the strong wind radius, and the maximum wind speed) after and before landing typhoon. We perform a computer-simulation from a typhoon data of five years from 2008 to 2012 provided to the Korea Meteorological Administration The result from the multifractal structure allows us to calculate a definite and reliable fractal dimension. In particularly, we find the strengths of multifractal structures from four meteorological factors. This work was supported by the KMAR and DP under Grant WISE project (153-3100-3133-302-350).

  10. Onboard Image Registration from Invariant Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi; Ng, Justin; Garay, Michael J.; Burl, Michael C

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a feature-based image registration technique that is potentially well-suited for onboard deployment. The overall goal is to provide a fast, robust method for dynamically combining observations from multiple platforms into sensors webs that respond quickly to short-lived events and provide rich observations of objects that evolve in space and time. The approach, which has enjoyed considerable success in mainstream computer vision applications, uses invariant SIFT descriptors extracted at image interest points together with the RANSAC algorithm to robustly estimate transformation parameters that relate one image to another. Experimental results for two satellite image registration tasks are presented: (1) automatic registration of images from the MODIS instrument on Terra to the MODIS instrument on Aqua and (2) automatic stabilization of a multi-day sequence of GOES-West images collected during the October 2007 Southern California wildfires.

  11. Component with inspection-facilitating features

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John J; Zombo, Paul J

    2014-02-11

    A turbine airfoil can be formed with features to facilitate measurement of its wall thickness. An outer wall of the airfoil can include an outer surface and an inner surface. The outer surface of the airfoil can have an outer inspection target surface, and the inner surface of the airfoil can have an inner inspection target surface. The inner and outer target surfaces can define substantially flat regions in surfaces that are otherwise highly contoured. The inner and outer inspection target surfaces can be substantially aligned with each other. The inner and outer target surfaces can be substantially parallel to each other. As a result of these arrangements, a highly accurate measurement of wall thickness can be obtained. In one embodiment, the outer inspection target surface can be defined by an innermost surface of a groove formed in the outer surface of the outer wall of the airfoil.

  12. Important features of Sustainable Aggregate Resource Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solar, Slavko V.; Shields, Deborah J.; Langer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Every society, whether developed, developing or in a phase of renewal following governmental change, requires stable, adequate and secure supplies of natural resources. In the latter case, there could be significant need for construction materials for rebuilding infrastructure, industrial capacity, and housing. It is essential that these large-volume materials be provided in a rational manner that maximizes their societal contribution and minimizes environmental impacts. We describe an approach to resource management based on the principles of sustainable developed. Sustainable Aggregate Resource Management offers a way of addressing the conflicting needs and interests of environmental, economic, and social systems. Sustainability is an ethics based concept that utilizes science and democratic processes to reach acceptable agreements and tradeoffs among interests, while acknowledging the fundamental importance of the environment and social goods. We discuss the features of sustainable aggregate resource management.

  13. [ULTRASOUND MONITORING FEATURES OF POSTOPERATIVE HEPATIC ECHINOCOCCOSIS].

    PubMed

    Melia, Kh; Kokaia, N; Manjgaladze, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate ultrasound features (US) of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis. The clinical analyses of 50 patients were carried out. It was concluded that the use of ultrasound can provide valuable data to the clinician to assess and monitor anti parasitic therapy echinococcosis of liver in post operative period. During the monitoring the positive dynamics of disease was observed in 94,5% of cases, in 5% оf cases toxic hepatites with septic complication was diagnosed, and in 0,5% of cases the disease recurrence was revealed. Ultrasound semiotics of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis was presented. Control and monitoring of patients in the postoperative period echinococcosis with appropriate antirelapse antiparasitic therapy should be held not less than 1-5 years. PMID:26870968

  14. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schrödinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of “natural” Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, “deformed” quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale l are obtained, which for l → 0 reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form “multipartite” systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce the essential quantum effects of interference and entanglement.

  15. Clinical features of sporadic fatal insomnia.

    PubMed

    Barash, Jed A

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in neuropathology, genotyping, and physiochemical characterization of proteins have allowed for the classification and verification of MM2-thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). CJD is a fatal neurodegenerative illness belonging to the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, also known as prion diseases. Sporadic CJD is generally classified by the genotype at codon 129 of the prion protein gene and the distinct physiochemical features of the pathologic prion protein (PrP(sc)). The entity is characterized by methionine homozygosity at codon 129, type 2 PrP(sc), and, primarily, thalamic pathology (MM2-thalamic CJD). It shares clinical and pathologic similarities with the genetic prion disorder fatal familial insomnia; the MM2-thalamic phenotype has therefore been called sporadic fatal insomnia (SFI). SFI may also present like other neurodegenerative diseases, and common diagnostic findings that are seen in other forms of sporadic CJD may be absent.

  16. Feature issue introduction: biophotonic materials and applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang-Sup; Andraud, Chantal; Tamada, Kaoru; Sokolov, Konstantin; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Zheng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Biophotonics can be defined as the interplay of light and biological matter. The percolation of new optical technology into the realm of biology has literally shed new light into the inner workings of biological systems. This has revealed new applications for optics in biology. In a parallel trend, biomolecules have been investigated for their optical applications. Materials are playing a central role in the development of biophotonics. New materials, fabrication methods, and structures are enabling new biosensors, contrast agents, imaging strategies, and assay methods. Similarly, biologic materials themselves can be used in photonic devices. In this context, two open-access, rapid-publication journals from The Optical Society of America (OSA), Optical Materials Express and Biomedical Optics Express, will publish a joint feature issue covering advances in biophotonics materials. PMID:27231644

  17. Widespread Recurrent Evolution of Genomic Features

    PubMed Central

    Maeso, Ignacio; Roy, Scott William; Irimia, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The recent explosion of genome sequences from all major phylogenetic groups has unveiled an unexpected wealth of cases of recurrent evolution of strikingly similar genomic features in different lineages. Here, we review the diverse known types of recurrent evolution in eukaryotic genomes, with a special focus on metazoans, ranging from reductive genome evolution to origins of splice-leader trans-splicing, from tandem exon duplications to gene family expansions. We first propose a general classification scheme for evolutionary recurrence at the genomic level, based on the type of driving force—mutation or selection—and the environmental and genomic circumstances underlying these forces. We then discuss various cases of recurrent genomic evolution under this scheme. Finally, we provide a broader context for repeated genomic evolution, including the unique relationship of genomic recurrence with the genotype–phenotype map, and the ways in which the study of recurrent genomic evolution can be used to understand fundamental evolutionary processes. PMID:22417916

  18. Unexpected features of the dark proteome

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S.; Buckley, Michael J.; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S.; Hammang, Christopher J.; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed the “dark” proteome–that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44–54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  19. Our Solar System Features Eight Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Our solar system features eight planets, seen in this artist's diagram. Although there is some debate within the science community as to whether Pluto should be classified as a Planet or a dwarf planet, the International Astronomical Union has decided on the term plutoid as a name for dwarf planets like Pluto.

    This representation is intentionally fanciful, as the planets are depicted far closer together than they really are. Similarly, the bodies' relative sizes are inaccurate. This is done for the purpose of being able to depict the solar system and still represent the bodies with some detail. (Otherwise the Sun would be a mere speck, and the planets even the majestic Jupiter would be far too small to be seen.)

  20. Picture Detection in RSVP: Features or Identity?

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Mary C.; Wyble, Brad; Pandav, Rijuta; Olejarczyk, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    A pictured object can be readily detected in an RSVP sequence when the target is specified by a superordinate category name such as animal or vehicle. Are category features the initial basis for detection, with identification of the specific object occurring in a second stage (Evans & Treisman, 2005), or is identification of the object the basis for detection? When two targets in the same superordinate category are presented successively (lag 1), only the identification-first hypothesis predicts lag 1 sparing of the second target. The results of two experiments with novel pictures and a wide range of categories supported the identification-first hypothesis and a transient-attention model of lag 1 sparing and the attentional blink (Wyble, Bowman, & Potter, 2009). PMID:20695696

  1. Method of identifying features in indexed data

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Daly, Don Simone [Richland, WA; Anderson, Kevin K [Richland, WA; Wahl, Karen L [Richland, WA

    2001-06-26

    The present invention is a method of identifying features in indexed data, especially useful for distinguishing signal from noise in data provided as a plurality of ordered pairs. Each of the plurality of ordered pairs has an index and a response. The method has the steps of: (a) providing an index window having a first window end located on a first index and extending across a plurality of indices to a second window end; (b) selecting responses corresponding to the plurality of indices within the index window and computing a measure of dispersion of the responses; and (c) comparing the measure of dispersion to a dispersion critical value. Advantages of the present invention include minimizing signal to noise ratio, signal drift, varying baseline signal and combinations thereof.

  2. The clinicopathological features of sinonasal angiomatous polyps

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Yuan-Yun; Wu, Chia-Chen; Lee, Ta-Jen; Lin, Yang-Yu; Chen, Tai-Di; Huang, Chi-Che

    2016-01-01

    Background Sinonasal angiomatous polyp (SAP) is a rare subtype of sinonasal polyp that might be misdiagnosed as a malignant lesion due to its clinical symptoms. Methods We retrospectively enrolled the patients who were diagnosed with SAP in our hospital during 2008–2015. We analyzed the clinical symptoms, radiological findings, and pathological features of all patients diagnosed with SAP. Results Unilateral nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, and epistaxis were the common symptoms. SAPs all originated from maxillary sinus and extended to nasal cavity with or without involving the nasopharynx. Expansile mass with surrounding bony destruction is typical on computed tomography imaging but specific for SAPs. The magnetic resonance revealed high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and hypointense rim on T2-weighted images. Conclusion Computed tomography and magnetic resonance together might give rise to more accurate diagnosis of SAP. Incisional biopsy does help if the clinician suspects a malignant lesion. To treat SAP, complete removal is the optimal choice. PMID:27382326

  3. Unexpected features of the dark proteome.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Buckley, Michael J; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S; Hammang, Christopher J; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-12-29

    We surveyed the "dark" proteome-that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44-54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  4. Pockmarks: self-scouring seep features?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Laura L.; Kelley, Joseph T.; Belknap, Daniel F.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Koons, Peter O.

    2011-01-01

    Pockmarks, or seafloor craters, occur worldwide in a variety of geologic settings and are often associated with fluid discharge. The mechanisms responsible for pockmark preservation, and pockmarks? relation to active methane venting are not well constrained. Simple numerical simulations run in 2-and 3-dimensions, and corroborated by flume tank experiments, indicate turbulence may play a role in pockmark maintenance, and, potentially, in pockmark excavation. Morphological analysis of the pockmarks indicates an abundance of flat-bottomed and/or elongated pockmarks. Pockmarks transition into furrows as the bay narrows and tidal flow is enhanced, providing unmistakable evidence of post-formation evolution. We hypothesize that some pockmarks formed from seafloor perturbations (e.g., gas or methane discharge), are1 maintained and gradually modified by vortical flow. This hypothesis provides a mechanism for pockmark preservation and enlargement without active fluid venting, which has implications for the interpretation of seafloor seep features in gas hydrates areas.

  5. Unexpected features of the dark proteome.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Buckley, Michael J; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S; Hammang, Christopher J; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-12-29

    We surveyed the "dark" proteome-that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44-54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology.

  6. [ULTRASOUND MONITORING FEATURES OF POSTOPERATIVE HEPATIC ECHINOCOCCOSIS].

    PubMed

    Melia, Kh; Kokaia, N; Manjgaladze, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate ultrasound features (US) of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis. The clinical analyses of 50 patients were carried out. It was concluded that the use of ultrasound can provide valuable data to the clinician to assess and monitor anti parasitic therapy echinococcosis of liver in post operative period. During the monitoring the positive dynamics of disease was observed in 94,5% of cases, in 5% оf cases toxic hepatites with septic complication was diagnosed, and in 0,5% of cases the disease recurrence was revealed. Ultrasound semiotics of liver after post operative anti-parasite recurrence treatment of patients with echinococcosis was presented. Control and monitoring of patients in the postoperative period echinococcosis with appropriate antirelapse antiparasitic therapy should be held not less than 1-5 years.

  7. Discerning Spectral Features in L Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, Alejandro; Cruz, K.; Burgasser, A. J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Reid, I. N.

    2011-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are star-like objects that, due to their very low masses (less than 75 Jupiter masses,) never reach the main sequence, and instead cool with time. This cooling leads to a breakdown of the relationship between temperature and mass that exists for stars. Therefore, brown dwarfs with similar temperatures (as indicated by spectral type) could have very different masses and ages. We are investigating the near-infrared spectra of L dwarfs with the same optically derived spectral types (implying similar effective temperatures) with the goal of distinguishing subtle differences, patterns, and/or correlations among absorption features that could reveal information about their ages and masses. Our sample consists of 43 L0-L8 dwarfs with both optical and near-infrared spectra, thus covering the 0.65 to 2.4-micron range. Our analysis included objects with either "typical” or peculiar spectra. Some of the objects with peculiar spectra are suspected low-gravity/young and blue/low-metallicity dwarfs. For each optical type, we normalized and overplotted the spectra in four bands separately: Optical, J, H, and K band. Each resulting plot was examined by eye to look for subtle differences in spectral absorption features, likely due to age and mass. We present the preliminary results from this detailed spectral analysis. In particular, our analysis reveals the major spectral differences in the near infrared of both "red” and "blue” L dwarfs. This work was funded by the RISE Grant GM R25 6066, and we acknowledge the hospitality of the American Museum of Natural History.

  8. Deep bottleneck features for spoken language identification.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bing; Song, Yan; Wei, Si; Liu, Jun-Hua; McLoughlin, Ian Vince; Dai, Li-Rong

    2014-01-01

    A key problem in spoken language identification (LID) is to design effective representations which are specific to language information. For example, in recent years, representations based on both phonotactic and acoustic features have proven their effectiveness for LID. Although advances in machine learning have led to significant improvements, LID performance is still lacking, especially for short duration speech utterances. With the hypothesis that language information is weak and represented only latently in speech, and is largely dependent on the statistical properties of the speech content, existing representations may be insufficient. Furthermore they may be susceptible to the variations caused by different speakers, specific content of the speech segments, and background noise. To address this, we propose using Deep Bottleneck Features (DBF) for spoken LID, motivated by the success of Deep Neural Networks (DNN) in speech recognition. We show that DBFs can form a low-dimensional compact representation of the original inputs with a powerful descriptive and discriminative capability. To evaluate the effectiveness of this, we design two acoustic models, termed DBF-TV and parallel DBF-TV (PDBF-TV), using a DBF based i-vector representation for each speech utterance. Results on NIST language recognition evaluation 2009 (LRE09) show significant improvements over state-of-the-art systems. By fusing the output of phonotactic and acoustic approaches, we achieve an EER of 1.08%, 1.89% and 7.01% for 30 s, 10 s and 3 s test utterances respectively. Furthermore, various DBF configurations have been extensively evaluated, and an optimal system proposed.

  9. Features of migraine aura in teenagers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex migraine aura in teenagers can be complicated to diagnose. The aim of this study was to present detailed features of migraine aura in teenage migraineurs. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the period from 2008 till 2013. A total number of 40 teenage migraineurs (20 females and 20 males) met criteria for this study. The patients were interviewed using a specially designed questionnaire for collecting data about migraine aura features. Main outcome measures were frequency of visual, somatosensory and higher cortical dysfunction (HCD) symptoms in teenage migraineurs population during the aura, and also within each individual. Results Visual aura was reported in every attack, followed by somatosensory (60%) and dysphasic (36.4%) aura. Scintillating scotoma and blurry vision were mostly reported and predominant visual symptoms. The most common somatosensory symptom was numbness in hand. HCD were reported by 22 (55%) patients. Slowed speech was mostly reported symptom of HCD, followed by dyslexia, déjà vu phenomenon, color dysgnosia, and dyspraxia. In patients with HCD, aura frequency per year (6.18 ± 3.17 vs. 3.33 ± 2.03, p = 0.003) and prevalence of somatosensory symptoms (77.3% vs. 38.9%, p = 0.014) were significantly higher than in patients without HCD. Conclusions Aura symptoms vary to a great extent in complexity in teenage migraineurs. Consequently, results obtained in this study provide useful information for clinicians when faced with unusual migraine aura. PMID:25496701

  10. Surface osteosarcoma: Clinical features and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, H.; Ben Maitigue, M.; Abid, L.; Nouri, N.; Abdelkader, A.; Bouaziz, M.; Mestiri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surface osteosarcoma are rare variant of osteosarcoma that include parosteal osteosarcoma, periosteal osteosarcoma and high grade surface osteosarcoma. These lesions have different clinical presentation and biological behavior compared to conventional osteosarcoma, and hence need to be managed differently. Goal The aim of this study is to analyze the clinico-pathological features and outcome of a series of surface osteosarcoma in an attempt to define the adequate treatment of this rare entity. Patient and method It is a retrospective and bicentric study of 18 surface osteosarcoma that were seen at the KASSAB’s Institute and SAHLOUL Hospital from 2006 to 2013. The authors reviewed the clinical and radiologic features, histologic sections, treatments, and outcomes in this group of patients. Results Seven patients were male (38.9%) and 11 were female (61.1%) with mean age of 25 years (range from 16 to 55 years). Eleven lesions were in the femur and 7 in the tibia. We identified 11 parosteal osteosarcoma (six of them were dedifferentiated), 3 periosteal osteosarcoma and 4 high grade surface osteosarcoma. Six patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy and all lesions had surgical resection. Margins were wide in 15 cases and intra lesional in 3 cases. Histological response to chemotherapy was poor in all cases. The mean follow up was 34.5 months. Six patients (33.3%) presented local recurrence and 8 patients (44.4%) presented lung metastases. Six patients (33.3%) died from the disease after a mean follow up of 12 months (6–30 months); all of them had high grade lesions. Conclusion Histological grade of malignancy is the main point to assess in surface osteosarcoma since it determines treatment and prognosis. Low grade lesions should be treated by wide resection, while high grade lesions need more aggressive surgical approach associated to post operative chemotherapy. PMID:26730360

  11. New Features in the ADS Abstract Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Accomazzi, A.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; ReyBacaicoa, V.; Murray, S. S.

    2001-11-01

    The ADS Abstract Service contains over 2.3 million references in four databases: Astronomy/Astrophysics/Planetary Sciences, Instrumentation, Physics/Geophysics, and Preprints. We provide abstracts and articles free to the astronomical community for all major and many smaller astronomy journals, PhD theses, conference proceedings, and technical reports. These four databases can be queried either separately of jointly. The ADS also has scanned 1.3 million pages in 180,000 articles in the ADS Article Service. This literature archive contains all major Astronomy journals and many smaller journals, as well as conference proceedings, including the abstract books from all the LPSCs back to volume 2. A new feature gives our users the ability to see list of articles that were also read by the readers of a given article. This is a powerful tool to find out what current articles are relevant in a particular field of study. We have recently expanded the citation and reference query capabilities. It allows our users to select papers for which they want to see references or citations and then retrieve these citations/references. Another new capability is the ability to sort a list of articles by their citation count. As usual, users should be reminded that the citations in ADS are incomplete because we do not obtain reference lists from all publishers. In addition, we cannot match all references (e.g. in press, private communications, author errors, some conference papers, etc.). Anyone using the citations for analysis of publishing records should keep this in mind. More work on expanding the citation and reference features is planned over the next year. ADS Home Page http://ads.harvard.edu/

  12. Deep Bottleneck Features for Spoken Language Identification

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bing; Song, Yan; Wei, Si; Liu, Jun-Hua; McLoughlin, Ian Vince; Dai, Li-Rong

    2014-01-01

    A key problem in spoken language identification (LID) is to design effective representations which are specific to language information. For example, in recent years, representations based on both phonotactic and acoustic features have proven their effectiveness for LID. Although advances in machine learning have led to significant improvements, LID performance is still lacking, especially for short duration speech utterances. With the hypothesis that language information is weak and represented only latently in speech, and is largely dependent on the statistical properties of the speech content, existing representations may be insufficient. Furthermore they may be susceptible to the variations caused by different speakers, specific content of the speech segments, and background noise. To address this, we propose using Deep Bottleneck Features (DBF) for spoken LID, motivated by the success of Deep Neural Networks (DNN) in speech recognition. We show that DBFs can form a low-dimensional compact representation of the original inputs with a powerful descriptive and discriminative capability. To evaluate the effectiveness of this, we design two acoustic models, termed DBF-TV and parallel DBF-TV (PDBF-TV), using a DBF based i-vector representation for each speech utterance. Results on NIST language recognition evaluation 2009 (LRE09) show significant improvements over state-of-the-art systems. By fusing the output of phonotactic and acoustic approaches, we achieve an EER of 1.08%, 1.89% and 7.01% for 30 s, 10 s and 3 s test utterances respectively. Furthermore, various DBF configurations have been extensively evaluated, and an optimal system proposed. PMID:24983963

  13. Feature detection algorithms in computed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbuz, Ali Cafer

    2008-10-01

    The problem of sensing a medium by several sensors and retrieving interesting features is a very general one. The basic framework is generally the same for applications from MRI, tomography, Radar SAR imaging to subsurface imaging, even though the data acquisition processes, sensing geometries and sensed properties are different. In this thesis we introduced a new perspective to the problem of remote sensing and information retrieval by studying the problem of subsurface imaging using GPR and seismic sensors. We have shown that if the sensed medium is sparse in some domain then it can be imaged using many fewer measurements than required by the standard methods. This leads to much lower data acquisition times and better images. We have used the ideas from Compressive Sensing, which show that a small number of random measurements about a signal are sufficient to completely characterize it, if the signal is sparse or compressible in some domain. Although we have applied our ideas to the subsurface imaging problem, our results are general and can be extended to other remote sensing applications. A second objective in remote sensing is information retrieval which involves searching for important features in the computed image. In this thesis we focus on detecting buried structures like pipes, and tunnels in computed GPR or seismic images. The problem of finding these structures in high clutter and noise conditions, and finding them faster than the standard shape detecting methods is analyzed. One of the most important contributions of this thesis is where the sensing and the information retrieval stages are unified in a single framework using compressive sensing. Instead of taking lots of standard measurements to compute the image of the medium and search the necessary information in the computed image, only a small number of measurements as random projections are used to infer the information without generating the image of the medium.

  14. Innovative safety features of the modular HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Silady, F.A.; Simon, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. Near-term development is focused on electricity generation. The top-level safety requirement is that the plant's operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. Quantitatively, this requires that the design meet the US Environmental Protection Agency's Protective Action Guides at the site boundary and hence preclude the need for sheltering or evacuation of the public. To meet these stringent safety requirements and at the same time provide a cost competitive design requires the innovative use of the basic high temperature gas-cooled reactor features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The specific fuel composition and core size and configuration have been selected to the use the natural characteristics of these materials to develop significantly higher margins of safety. In this document the innovative safety features of the MHTGR are reviewed by examining the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal are examined, including a loss of helium pressure of a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation consider not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems but also the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control of chemical attack of the ceramic-coated fuel are considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator, which allows water ingress, or failure of the pressure vessels, which allows air ingress. The plant's response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action, and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors.

  15. Innovative safety features of the modular HTGR

    SciTech Connect

    Silady, F.A.; Simon, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept under development through a cooperative program involving the US Government, the nuclear industry, and the utilities. Near-term development is focused on electricity generation. The top-level safety requirement is that the plant`s operation not disturb the normal day-to-day activities of the public. Quantitatively, this requires that the design meet the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Protective Action Guides at the site boundary and hence preclude the need for sheltering or evacuation of the public. To meet these stringent safety requirements and at the same time provide a cost competitive design requires the innovative use of the basic high temperature gas-cooled reactor features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The specific fuel composition and core size and configuration have been selected to the use the natural characteristics of these materials to develop significantly higher margins of safety. In this document the innovative safety features of the MHTGR are reviewed by examining the safety response to events challenging the functions relied on to retain radionuclides within the coated fuel particles. A broad range of challenges to core heat removal are examined, including a loss of helium pressure of a simultaneous loss of forced cooling of the core. The challenges to control of heat generation consider not only the failure to insert the reactivity control systems but also the withdrawal of control rods. Finally, challenges to control of chemical attack of the ceramic-coated fuel are considered, including catastrophic failure of the steam generator, which allows water ingress, or failure of the pressure vessels, which allows air ingress. The plant`s response to these extreme challenges is not dependent on operator action, and the events considered encompass conceivable operator errors.

  16. Advanced features of SCD's uncooled detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, A.; Mizrahi, U.; Bykov, L.; Adin, A.; Malkinson, E.; Zabar, Y.; Seter, D.; Gebil, Y.; Kopolovich, Z.

    2006-03-01

    SCD has recently presented an uncooled detector product line based on the high-end VOx bolometer technology. The first FPA launched, BIRD, is a 384×288 (or 320×240) configurable format with 25 μm pitch. Typical NETD values for these FPAs range at 50 mK with an F/1 aperture and 60 Hz frame rate. These detectors also exhibit a relatively fast thermal time constant of approximately 10 ms. In this paper we elaborate on the special advanced features that were incorporated within the ROIC and supporting algorithms. In this framework we have addressed two important issues: the power consumption and the time span between shutter activations. Minimum power consumption is a critical issue for many un-cooled applications. SCD has addressed this by introducing the "power-save" concept accompanied with flexible dilution architecture. The paper will present recent results exhibiting the various advantages. One of the limiting factors on the performance of uncooled detectors is their vulnerability to ambient drift. Usually, even minor temperature fluctuations are manifested as high residual non-uniformity (RNU) or fixed pattern noise (FPN). As a result frequent shutter operations must be applied, with the risk of blocking the scenery in critical time frames. The challenge is thus twofold: to increase the time span between shutter corrections and achieve better control of its activation. For this purpose BIRD provides two complementing mechanisms: A real-time (frame-by-frame) ambient drift compensation accompanied by an RNU prediction mechanism. The paper will discuss these features in detail and present illustrative system implementations.

  17. Advanced features of SCD's uncooled detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, A.; Mizrahi, U.; Bykov, L.; Adin, A.; Malkinson, E.; Zabar, Y.; Seter, D.; Gebil, Y.; Kopolovich, Z.

    2005-09-01

    SCD has recently presented an un-cooled detector product line based on the high-end VOx bolometer technology1. The first PFA launched, BIRD, is a 384x288 (or 320x240) configurable format with 25μm pitch. Typical NETD values for these FPAs range at 50mK with an F/1 aperture and 60 Hz frame rate. These detectors also exhibit a relatively fast thermal time constant of approximately 10 msec. In this paper we elaborate on the special advanced features that were incorporated within the ROIC and supporting algorithms. In this framework we have addressed two important issues: the power consumption and the time span between shutter activations. Minimum power consumption is a critical issue for many un-cooled applications. SCD has addressed this by introducing the "Power-Save" concept accompanied with flexible dilution architecture. The paper will present recent results exhibiting the various advantages. One of the limiting factors on the performance of un-cooled detectors is their vulnerability to ambient drift. Usually, even minor temperature fluctuations are manifested as high residual non-uniformity (RNU) or fixed pattern noise (FPN). As a result frequent shutter operations must be applied, with the risk of blocking the scenery in critical time frames. The challenge is thus twofold: increase the time span between shutter corrections and achieve better control of its activation. For this purpose BIRD provides two complementing mechanisms: A real-time (frame-by-frame) ambient drift compensation accompanied by an RNU prediction mechanism. The paper will discuss these features in detail and present illustrative system implementations.

  18. Deep bottleneck features for spoken language identification.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bing; Song, Yan; Wei, Si; Liu, Jun-Hua; McLoughlin, Ian Vince; Dai, Li-Rong

    2014-01-01

    A key problem in spoken language identification (LID) is to design effective representations which are specific to language information. For example, in recent years, representations based on both phonotactic and acoustic features have proven their effectiveness for LID. Although advances in machine learning have led to significant improvements, LID performance is still lacking, especially for short duration speech utterances. With the hypothesis that language information is weak and represented only latently in speech, and is largely dependent on the statistical properties of the speech content, existing representations may be insufficient. Furthermore they may be susceptible to the variations caused by different speakers, specific content of the speech segments, and background noise. To address this, we propose using Deep Bottleneck Features (DBF) for spoken LID, motivated by the success of Deep Neural Networks (DNN) in speech recognition. We show that DBFs can form a low-dimensional compact representation of the original inputs with a powerful descriptive and discriminative capability. To evaluate the effectiveness of this, we design two acoustic models, termed DBF-TV and parallel DBF-TV (PDBF-TV), using a DBF based i-vector representation for each speech utterance. Results on NIST language recognition evaluation 2009 (LRE09) show significant improvements over state-of-the-art systems. By fusing the output of phonotactic and acoustic approaches, we achieve an EER of 1.08%, 1.89% and 7.01% for 30 s, 10 s and 3 s test utterances respectively. Furthermore, various DBF configurations have been extensively evaluated, and an optimal system proposed. PMID:24983963

  19. Clinicopathological features of gallbladder papillary adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xueshuai; Zhang, Haohai; Chen, Cuimin; Yang, Xiaobo; Wang, Anqiang; Zhu, Chengpei; Fu, Lilan; Miao, Ruoyu; He, Lian; Yang, Huayu; Zhao, Haitao; Sang, Xinting

    2014-12-01

    Although patients with gallbladder papillary adenocarcinoma (GBPA) appear to have better prognoses than patients with other pathological subtypes of gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), the clinicopathological features and outcomes of GBPA have not been fully explored. This study therefore analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of GBPA.This study included 16 patients with GBPA and 101 with gallbladder adenocarcinoma (GBA) not otherwise specified (NOS), all diagnosed pathologically after surgical resection. Clinicopathological and survival data were retrospectively collected and compared. Fever was significantly more common in GBPA (7/16 vs 10/101; P = 0.000). Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level was increased in 1 of 9 patients with GBPA and 39 of 76 with GBA (P = 0.022). More patients with GBPA underwent curative resection (15/16 vs 54/101; P = 0.009). Pathologically, patients with GBPA were at much earlier tumor (T) (4 in situ, 8 T1; P = 0.000) and Tumor, Node, Metastases (TNM) stages (P = 0.000). The overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were significantly higher in patients with GBPA (100%, 76.9%, and 76.9%, respectively), than in patients with GBA (72.2%, 38.8%, and 31.0%, respectively; P = 0.001). Preoperative jaundice (odds ratio 7.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-38.76; P = 0.013) was a significant prognostic factor in patients with GBA, but was no longer significant when the patients with GBA and GBPA were pooled together. The clinicopathological features of patients with GBPA differed from those in patients with GBA (not otherwise specified). Pooling of patients may mask prognostic factors in each group.

  20. Geophysical imaging of karst features in Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obi, Jeremiah Chukwunonso

    Automated electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) supported with multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and boring data were used to map karst related features in Missouri in order to understand karst processes better in Missouri. Previous works on karst in Missouri were mostly surficial mapping of bedrock outcrops and joints, which are not enough to define the internal structure of karst system, since most critical processes in karst occur underground. To understand these processes better, the density, placement and pattern of karst related features like solution-widened joints and voids, as well as top of bedrock were mapped. In the course of the study, six study sites were visited in Missouri. The sites were in Nixa, Gasconade River Bridge in Lebanon, Battlefield, Aurora, Protem and Richland. The case studies reflect to a large extent some of the problems inherent in karst terrain, ranging from environmental problems to structural problems especially sinkhole collapses. The result of the study showed that karst in Missouri is mostly formed as a result of piping of sediments through solution-widened joints, with a pattern showing that the joints/fractures are mostly filled with moist clay-sized materials of low resistivity values. The highest density of mapped solution-widened joints was one in every one hundred and fifty feet, and these areas are where intense dissolution is taking place, and bedrock pervasively fractured. The study also showed that interpreted solution-widened joints trend in different directions, and often times conform with known structural lineaments in the area. About 40% of sinkhole collapses in the study areas are anthropogenic. Karst in Missouri varies, and can be classified as a combination of kI (juvenile), kIII (mature) and kIV (complex) karsts.

  1. Feature Selection with Neighborhood Entropy-Based Cooperative Game Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Kai; She, Kun; Niu, Xinzheng

    2014-01-01

    Feature selection plays an important role in machine learning and data mining. In recent years, various feature measurements have been proposed to select significant features from high-dimensional datasets. However, most traditional feature selection methods will ignore some features which have strong classification ability as a group but are weak as individuals. To deal with this problem, we redefine the redundancy, interdependence, and independence of features by using neighborhood entropy. Then the neighborhood entropy-based feature contribution is proposed under the framework of cooperative game. The evaluative criteria of features can be formalized as the product of contribution and other classical feature measures. Finally, the proposed method is tested on several UCI datasets. The results show that neighborhood entropy-based cooperative game theory model (NECGT) yield better performance than classical ones. PMID:25276120

  2. Naive Bayes-Guided Bat Algorithm for Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Ahmed Majid; Mustapha, Aida; Chen, Soong-Der

    2013-01-01

    When the amount of data and information is said to double in every 20 months or so, feature selection has become highly important and beneficial. Further improvements in feature selection will positively affect a wide array of applications in fields such as pattern recognition, machine learning, or signal processing. Bio-inspired method called Bat Algorithm hybridized with a Naive Bayes classifier has been presented in this work. The performance of the proposed feature selection algorithm was investigated using twelve benchmark datasets from different domains and was compared to three other well-known feature selection algorithms. Discussion focused on four perspectives: number of features, classification accuracy, stability, and feature generalization. The results showed that BANB significantly outperformed other algorithms in selecting lower number of features, hence removing irrelevant, redundant, or noisy features while maintaining the classification accuracy. BANB is also proven to be more stable than other methods and is capable of producing more general feature subsets. PMID:24396295

  3. Feature selection with neighborhood entropy-based cooperative game theory.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kai; She, Kun; Niu, Xinzheng

    2014-01-01

    Feature selection plays an important role in machine learning and data mining. In recent years, various feature measurements have been proposed to select significant features from high-dimensional datasets. However, most traditional feature selection methods will ignore some features which have strong classification ability as a group but are weak as individuals. To deal with this problem, we redefine the redundancy, interdependence, and independence of features by using neighborhood entropy. Then the neighborhood entropy-based feature contribution is proposed under the framework of cooperative game. The evaluative criteria of features can be formalized as the product of contribution and other classical feature measures. Finally, the proposed method is tested on several UCI datasets. The results show that neighborhood entropy-based cooperative game theory model (NECGT) yield better performance than classical ones.

  4. Further evidence for feature correlations in semantic memory.

    PubMed

    McRae, K; Cree, G S; Westmacott, R; de Sa, V R

    1999-12-01

    The role of feature correlations in semantic memory is a central issue in conceptual representation. In two versions of the feature verification task, participants were faster to verify that a feature (< is juicy >) is part of a concept (grapefruit) if it is strongly rather than weakly intercorrelated with the other features of that concept. Contrasting interactions between feature correlations and SOA were found when the concept versus the feature was presented first. An attractor network model of word meaning that naturally learns and uses feature correlations predicted those interactions. This research provides further evidence that semantic memory includes implicitly learned statistical knowledge of feature relationships, in contrast to theories such as spreading activation networks, in which feature correlations play no role.

  5. Polygons of global undersea features for geographic searches (undersea_features.shp)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartwell, Stephen R.; Wingfield, Dana K.; Allwardt, Alan O.; Lightsom, Frances L.; Wong, Florence L.

    2014-01-01

    A shapefile of 311 undersea features from all major oceans and seas has been created as an aid for retrieving georeferenced information resources. Geospatial information systems with the capability to search user-defined, polygonal geographic areas will be able to utilize this shapefile or secondary products derived from it, such as well-known text representations of the individual polygons within the shapefile.

  6. Influence of Familiar Features on Diagnosis: Instantiated Features in an Applied Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dore, Kelly L.; Brooks, Lee R.; Weaver, Bruce; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Medical diagnosis can be viewed as a categorization task. There are two mechanisms whereby humans make categorical judgments: "analytical reasoning," based on explicit consideration of features and "nonanalytical reasoning," an unconscious holistic process of matching against prior exemplars. However, there is evidence that prior experience can…

  7. Prosodic boundary tone classification with voice quality features.

    PubMed

    Han, Ran; Choi, Jeung-Yoon

    2013-04-01

    Voice quality features such as harmonic structure and spectral tilt are investigated in classifying vocalic segments into one of five boundary tones in the tones and break indices system. Static and nonstatic features are examined, and performance is compared with features related to duration, pitch, and amplitude, along with adjacent segment characteristics. From statistical tests, voice quality features are found to be significant for classifying prosodic boundary tones, and especially for distinguishing low-tone boundaries. Classification results using features selected from Kruskal-Wallis tests, Akaike information criterion values, and from sequential forward search show that using voice quality features leads to lower balanced error rates.

  8. Feature selection for physics model based object discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunmei; Collins, Leslie

    2005-06-01

    We investigated the application of two state-of-the-art feature selection algorithms for subsurface target discrimination. One is called joint classification and feature optimization (JCFO), which imposes a sparse prior on the features, and optimizes the classifier and its predictors simultaneously via an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. The other selects features by directly maximizing the hypothesis margin between targets and clutter. The results of feature selection and target discrimination are demonstrated using wideband electromagnetic induction data measured at data collected at the Aberdeen Proving Ground Standardized Test Site for UXO discrimination. It is shown that the classification performance is significantly improved by only including a compact set of relevant features.

  9. Classifying depth of anesthesia using EEG features, a comparison.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Vahid; Shamsollahi, Mohammad Bagher; Arefian, Noor Mohammad; Assareh, Amin

    2007-01-01

    Various EEG features have been used in depth of anesthesia (DOA) studies. The objective of this study was to find the excellent features or combination of them than can discriminate between different anesthesia states. Conducting a clinical study on 22 patients we could define 4 distinct anesthetic states: awake, moderate, general anesthesia, and isoelectric. We examined features that have been used in earlier studies using single-channel EEG signal processing method. The maximum accuracy (99.02%) achieved using approximate entropy as the feature. Some other features could well discriminate a particular state of anesthesia. We could completely classify the patterns by means of 3 features and Bayesian classifier.

  10. Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Kramer

    1999-11-17

    The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and

  11. Non-binding relationship between visual features.

    PubMed

    Rangelov, Dragan; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    The answer as to how visual attributes processed in different brain loci at different speeds are bound together to give us our unitary experience of the visual world remains unknown. In this study we investigated whether bound representations arise, as commonly assumed, through physiological interactions between cells in the visual areas. In a focal attentional task in which correct responses from either bound or unbound representations were possible, participants discriminated the color or orientation of briefly presented single bars. On the assumption that representations of the two attributes are bound, the accuracy of reporting the color and orientation should co-vary. By contrast, if the attributes are not mandatorily bound, the accuracy of reporting the two attributes should be independent. The results of our psychophysical studies reported here supported the latter, non-binding, relationship between visual features, suggesting that binding does not necessarily occur even under focal attention. We propose a task-contingent binding mechanism, postulating that binding occurs at late, post-perceptual (PP), stages through the intervention of memory. PMID:25339879

  12. Developmental dyscalculia: prevalence and demographic features.

    PubMed

    Gross-Tsur, V; Manor, O; Shalev, R S

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and forty-three 11-year-old children with development dyscalculia, from a cohort of 3029 students, were studied to determine demographic features and prevalence of this primary cognitive disorder. They were evaluated for gender, IQ, linguistic and perceptual skills, symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), socio-economic status and associated learned disabilities. The IQs of the 140 children (75 girls and 65 boys) retained in the study group (three were excluded because of low IQs) ranged from 80 to 129 (mean 98.2, SD 9.9). 26 per cent of the children had symptoms of ADHD, and 17 per cent had dyslexia. Their socio-economic status was significantly lower than that of the rest of the cohort, and 42 per cent had first-degree relatives with learning disabilities. The prevalence of dyscalculia in the original cohort was 6.5 per cent, similar to that of dyslexia and ADHD. However, unlike these other learning disabilities, dyscalculia affected the two sexes in about the same proportions. PMID:8606013

  13. Cooperative inference: Features, objects, and collections.

    PubMed

    Searcy, Sophia Ray; Shafto, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Cooperation plays a central role in theories of development, learning, cultural evolution, and education. We argue that existing models of learning from cooperative informants have fundamental limitations that prevent them from explaining how cooperation benefits learning. First, existing models are shown to be computationally intractable, suggesting that they cannot apply to realistic learning problems. Second, existing models assume a priori agreement about which concepts are favored in learning, which leads to a conundrum: Learning fails without precise agreement on bias yet there is no single rational choice. We introduce cooperative inference, a novel framework for cooperation in concept learning, which resolves these limitations. Cooperative inference generalizes the notion of cooperation used in previous models from omission of labeled objects to the omission values of features, labels for objects, and labels for collections of objects. The result is an approach that is computationally tractable, does not require a priori agreement about biases, applies to both Boolean and first-order concepts, and begins to approximate the richness of real-world concept learning problems. We conclude by discussing relations to and implications for existing theories of cognition, cognitive development, and cultural evolution. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27379575

  14. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  15. Safety features of subcritical fluid fueled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Charles R.

    1995-09-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology has been under study at Los Alamos for several years for application to nuclear waste treatment, tritium production, energy generation, and recently, to the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. Studies and evaluations performed to date at Los Alamos have led to a current focus on a fluid-fuel, fission system operating in a neutron source-supported subcritical mode, using molten salt reactor technology and accelerator-driven proton-neutron spallation. In this paper, the safety features and characteristics of such systems are explored from the perspective of the fundamental nuclear safety objectives that any reactor-type system should address. This exploration is qualitative in nature and uses current vintage solid-fueled reactors as a baseline for comparison. Based on the safety perspectives presented, such systems should be capable of meeting the fundamental nuclear safety objectives. In addition, they should be able to provide the safety robustness desired for advanced reactors. However, the manner in which safety objectives and robustness are achieved is very different from that associated with conventional reactors. Also, there are a number of safety design and operational challenges that will have to be addressed for the safety potential of such systems to be credible.

  16. Pigmented eccrine poroma: dermoscopic and confocal features.

    PubMed

    Bombonato, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Moscarella, Elvira; Lallas, Aimillios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina

    2016-07-01

    Eccrine poroma is a rare benign adnexal tumor of epithelial cells originating from the terminal ductal portion of the sweat glands that is typically located on palms and soles, although other cutaneous sites can be affected [1]. It is usually nonpigmented even if there is a pigmented variant that corresponds to 17% of cases and it is usually underdiagnosed, since it is mistakenly confused with other pigmented tumors [2,3]. Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may assist in the correct diagnosis of this tumor. Herein, we report one case of pigmented eccrine poroma (PEP) that simulated clinically a cutaneous melanoma or a basal cell carcinoma. Dermoscopy and RCM excluded the possibilities of those two diagnoses; the overall confocal findings were suggestive for a benign epithelial tumor. Histology was fundamental to diagnose this lesion as a pigmented eccrine poroma. Even if the diagnosis of eccrine poroma remains histopathological still, as in this case report, noninvasive tools such as dermoscopy and RCM examinations can be of help to rule out the diagnosis of melanoma. Larger studies on this rare pigmented variant of eccrine poroma could shed new light on the identification of specific diagnostic dermoscopic and confocal features. PMID:27648386

  17. Biological features and biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Saito, Tomoko; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tawada, Akinobu; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Similar to other cancers, a multistep process of carcinogenesis is observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although the mechanisms underlying the development of HCC have been investigated in terms of oncology, virology, and stem cell biology, the whole picture of hepatocarcinogenesis remains to be elucidated. Recent progress in molecular biology has provided clues to the underlying cause of various diseases. In particular, sequencing technologies, such as whole genome and exome sequencing analyses, have made an impact on genomic research on a variety of cancers including HCC. Comprehensive genomic analyses have detected numerous abnormal genetic alterations, such as mutations and copy number alterations. Based on these findings, signaling pathways and cancer-related genes involved in hepatocarcinogenesis could be analyzed in detail. Simultaneously, a number of novel biomarkers, both from tissue and blood samples, have been recently reported. These biomarkers have been successfully applied to early diagnosis and prognostic prediction of patients with HCC. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in molecular cancer research on HCC and explain the biological features and novel biomarkers. PMID:26261691

  18. Featured Image: Mapping Jupiter with Hubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Zonal wind profile for Jupiter, describing the speed and direction of its winds at each latitude. [Simon et al. 2015]This global map of Jupiters surface (click for the full view!) was generated by the Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, which aims to createnew yearly global maps for each of the outer planets. Presented in a study led by Amy Simon (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), the map above is the first generated for Jupiter in the first year of the OPAL campaign. It provides a detailed look at Jupiters atmospheric structure including the Great Red Spot and allowed the authors to measure the speed and direction of the wind across Jupiters latitudes, constructing an updated zonal wind profile for Jupiter.In contrast to this study, the Juno mission (which will be captured into Jupiters orbit today after a 5-year journey to Jupiter!) will be focusing more on the features below Jupiters surface, studying its deep atmosphere and winds. Some of Junos primary goals are to learn about Jupiters composition, gravitational field, magnetic field, and polar magnetosphere. You can follow along with the NASATV livestream as Juno arrives at Jupiter tonight; orbit insertion coverage starts at 10:30 EDT.CitationAmy A. Simon et al 2015 ApJ 812 55. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/812/1/55

  19. Kinetic features of an intraresin reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.; Kirszensztejn, P.; Bolikal, D.; Regen, S.L.

    1983-03-23

    The kinetic features of the intraresin displacement by pendant ammonium acetate groups on chloromethylated polystrene have been investigated as a function of temperature, swelling solvent, and cross-link density. In all cases, intraresin displacement proceeds with a rapid initial rate followed by a very slow stage; the latter represents that fraction of reactants which become ''kinetically isolated''. The free energy of activation for the first stage, under the various swelling conditions used, lies in the range 24.4-26.8 kcal mol/sup -1/, which is similar to that found for analogous homogeneous reactions. The absolute rates measured for the homogeneous and the initial intraresin displacement in dioxane were similar; with n-hexane and toluene as solvents, polymeric rates were considerably slower than those of their homogeneous counterparts. Intraresin displacement was rapid even when a poor swelling solvent (n-hexane) was used. As the rate of intrapolymeric reaction decreased (through a decrease in temperature, increase in cross-link density, or change in solvent), the percent of ''kinetical isolated'' sites increased.

  20. Clinical features of symptomatic Rathke's cleft cyst.

    PubMed

    Isono, M; Kamida, T; Kobayashi, H; Shimomura, T; Matsuyama, J

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the clinical features of Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs), we retrospectively analyzed 15 cases with histologically confirmed RCCs. All patients underwent formal testing of visual field, endocrinological evaluation and magnetic resonance imagings. As overall presenting symptoms, endocrine disturbance was the most common symptoms, followed by visual disturbance and headache. Among the endocrine disturbances based on adenohypophysial dysfunction, hyperprolactinemia was most common. Considering the size of RCCs, RCCs could induce hyperprolactinemia only when the cysts became large enough to compress the infundibular system. Our series showed relative high incidence of pituitary dwarfism and diabetes insipidus (DI). These facts indicated that RCCs could evoke hyposecretion of growth hormone in young patients and DI in aged patients by direct compression of the pituitary gland in the early stage of progression. All cases who had headache had no other symptoms. We could not prove the evidence that RCCs could induce headaches in these cases. This might be suggested that headache could not be a sole symptom in cases of RCCs. PMID:11516552

  1. Features of the Java commodity grid kit.

    SciTech Connect

    von Laszewski, G.; Gawor, J.; Lane, P.; Rehn, N.; Russell, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we report on the features of the Java Commodity Grid Kit (Java CoG Kit). The Java CoG Kit provides middleware for accessing Grid functionality from the Java framework. Java CoG Kit middleware is general enough to design a variety of advanced Grid applications with quite different user requirements. Access to the Grid is established via Globus Toolkit protocols, allowing the Java CoG Kit to also communicate with the services distributed as part of the C Globus Toolkit reference implementation. Thus, the Java CoG Kit provides Grid developers with the ability to utilize the Grid, as well as numerous additional libraries and frameworks developed by the Java community to enable network, Internet, enterprise and peer-to-peer computing. A variety of projects have successfully used the client libraries of the Java CoG Kit to access Grids driven by the C Globus Toolkit software. In this paper we also report on the efforts to develop serverside Java CoG Kit components. As part of this research we have implemented a prototype pure Java resource management system that enables one to run Grid jobs on platforms on which a Java virtual machine is supported, including Windows NT machines.

  2. Popliteal pterygium syndrome: orofacial and general features.

    PubMed

    Bahetwar, S K; Pandey, R K; Bahetwar, T S

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 13-year-old Indian boy with popliteal pterygium syndrome. The popliteal pterygium syndrome is an extremely rare hereditary disorder thought to occur with an incidence of approximately 1 in 300000 live births. It is a congenital malformation syndrome affecting the face, limbs, and genitalia with highly characteristic features, including popliteal webbing, cleft palate (with or without cleft lip), lower lip pits, syndactyly, and genital and nail anomalies. This patient was referred to our department because of complaints of pain in the mouth and poor oral health. The orofacial findings included cleft lip, cleft palate, lower lip pits, a few missing teeth, and severely decayed teeth. In this syndrome, the orodental problems are overshadowed by the major syndromic manifestations but nevertheless need appropriate management. These patients have special dental needs and early diagnosis of the affected children is therefore important in order to initiate preventive dental care and carry out appropriate dental treatment at the optimal time. PMID:22016320

  3. Pigmented eccrine poroma: dermoscopic and confocal features

    PubMed Central

    Bombonato, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Moscarella, Elvira; Lallas, Aimillios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine poroma is a rare benign adnexal tumor of epithelial cells originating from the terminal ductal portion of the sweat glands that is typically located on palms and soles, although other cutaneous sites can be affected [1]. It is usually nonpigmented even if there is a pigmented variant that corresponds to 17% of cases and it is usually underdiagnosed, since it is mistakenly confused with other pigmented tumors [2,3]. Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may assist in the correct diagnosis of this tumor. Herein, we report one case of pigmented eccrine poroma (PEP) that simulated clinically a cutaneous melanoma or a basal cell carcinoma. Dermoscopy and RCM excluded the possibilities of those two diagnoses; the overall confocal findings were suggestive for a benign epithelial tumor. Histology was fundamental to diagnose this lesion as a pigmented eccrine poroma. Even if the diagnosis of eccrine poroma remains histopathological still, as in this case report, noninvasive tools such as dermoscopy and RCM examinations can be of help to rule out the diagnosis of melanoma. Larger studies on this rare pigmented variant of eccrine poroma could shed new light on the identification of specific diagnostic dermoscopic and confocal features. PMID:27648386

  4. Real Time Estimation Of Object Spectrocolorimettic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Peter V.; Lukarsky, Christo D.; Christov, Victor V.; Grancharov, Parashkev A.; Arshinkova, Iren I.

    1989-03-01

    The results obtained in the development of a laboratory prototype of intelligent spectrometric system with real time digital signal processing are shown in this paper. The system is acombination of visible range spectrophotometer and focussing holographic grid with photodiode linear structure, i.e.the sensor, real time digital signal processing controller and display processor for gray level visualization, together with PC/XT controlLing computer. The twodimesional adaptive differential pulse code modulator with simultaneous correction of sensor dark current introduced into the real time controller allows the registration of measurments with resolution of 10 bit/el and real time data compression 2.5 times. During computation of colorimetric estimations or wideband photo-metric compression the possibilities for express analysis increase together with the enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio. The system control and the visualization of spectral and colorimetric features in the data flux is made with personal computer together with display processor with resolution 512x512x8 and interactive software. It may be used for ground-based and onboard complexes.

  5. Features, Events, and Processes: system Level

    SciTech Connect

    D. McGregor

    2004-10-15

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the system-level features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.113 (d, e, and f) (DIRS 156605). The system-level FEPs addressed in this report typically are overarching in nature, rather than being focused on a particular process or subsystem. As a result, they are best dealt with at the system level rather than addressed within supporting process-level or subsystem-level analyses and models reports. The system-level FEPs also tend to be directly addressed by regulations, guidance documents, or assumptions listed in the regulations; or are addressed in background information used in development of the regulations. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in the TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from the TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). The initial version of this report (Revision 00) was developed to support the total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR). This revision addresses the license application (LA) FEP List (DIRS 170760).

  6. Collisional Features in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attree, Nicholas Oliver; Murray, Carl; Cooper, Nicholas; Williams, Gareth

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's highly dynamic F ring contains a population of small (radius ~ 1 km) moonlets embedded within its core or on nearby orbits. These objects interact, both gravitationally and collisionally, with the ring producing a range of features, some of which are unique to it. Here we present a brief overview of F ring collisional processes, investigated using a combination of Cassini imaging, simulations and orbital dynamics. Collisions produce linear debris clouds, known as 'jets' and 'mini-jets', which evolve, due to differential orbital motion, over periods ranging from hours to months. Mini-jet-forming collisions occur daily in the F ring whilst larger, more dramatic, events are rarer but produce jets that persist for many months, 'wrapping around' the ring to form almost parallel strands. Measuring jet properties, such as formation rates and relative orbits, allows us to infer a local population of order hundreds of objects colliding at relative velocities of a few metres per second. N-body modelling of the collisions shows good agreement with observations when two aggregates are allowed to impact and partially fragment (as opposed to a solid moonlet encountering dust), implying massive objects both in the core and nearby. Multiple, repeated collisions by the same, or fragments of the same, object are also important in explaining some jet morphology, showing that many objects survive the collisions. The F ring represents a natural laboratory for observing low-velocity collisions between icy objects as well as the ongoing aggregation and accretion that most-likely forms them.

  7. Intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess: Computed tomography features

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Chen, Jing-Jing; Wang, Xi-Zhen; Wang, Ya-Qin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) features of intraperitoneal tuberculous abscess (IPTA). METHODS: Eight patients with IPTA confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical symptoms, medical images, and surgical findings were evaluated. Involvement of the intestine, peritoneum, viscera, and lymph nodes was also assessed. RESULTS: All 8 patients had a history of abdominal discomfort for 1 to 6 mo. Physical examination revealed a palpable abdominal mass in 6 patients. Three patients had no evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). All IPTAs (11 abscesses) were seen as a multiseptated, peripherally enhanced, hypodense mass with enlarged, rim-enhanced lymph nodes. The largest abscess diameter ranged from 4.5 cm to 12.2 cm. CT showed 2 types of IPTA: Lymph node fusion and encapsulation. Of the 8 patients, one had liver tuberculosis and one had splenic and ovarian tuberculosis. Two cases showed involvement of the terminal ileum and ileocecal junction. Ascites were found in 4 cases. Three patients had peritonitis and mesenteritis. Three patients showed involvement of the omentum. Three patients had histological evidence of caseating granuloma, and 5 had histological evidence of acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSION: CT is crucial in the detection and characterization of IPTA. Certain CT findings are necessary for correct diagnosis. PMID:26435779

  8. Features of Red Sea Water Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartadikaria, Aditya; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Features of Red Sea water mass can be divided into three types but best to be grouped into two different classes that are split at the potential density line σθ=27.4. The surface water (0-50 m) and the intermediate water (50-200 m) have nearly identical types of water mass. They appear as a maxima salinity layer for the water mass that has σθ > 26.0, and as a minimum salinity layer for water mass that has σθ < 26.0. These types of water masses are strongly affected by mixing that is controlled by seasonal variability, fresh water intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water (GAIW), and eddies variability. Two types of mixing; isopycnal and diapycnal mixing are part of important physical phenomena that explain the change of water mass in the Red Sea. The isopycnal mixing occurs at the neutral potential density line, connecting the Red Sea with its adjacent channel, the Gulf of Aden. Diapycnal mixing is found as a dominant mixing mode in the surface of the Red Sea Water and mainly due to energetic eddy activity. Density gradients, across which diapycnal mixing occurs, in the Red Sea are mainly due to large variations in salinity. The isolation of an extreme haline water mass below the thermocline contributes to the generation of the latitudinal shift and low diapycnal mixing. This finding further explains the difference of spatial kinetic mixing between the RSW and the Indian Ocean basin.

  9. Radiological Features of Long-Standing Hypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    John, Deepa Regina; Suthar, Pokhraj P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism is an extremely rare endocrinal disorder with a prevalence of 37 per 100,000. Herein we presented a case of a 30-year-old male who came with symptoms of muscle weakness, carpopedal spasms and limitation of movement which gradually progressed over 8 years. Case Report A 30-year-old male patient presented in an outpatient department of a tertiary care centre with a complaint of severe pain in both hip joints. He had generalized muscle weakness, facial discomfort, recurrent episodes of carpopedal spasms and crampy abdominal pains. On clinical examination, the patient had Chvostek sign and Trousseau sign. Biochemical tests revealed hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypomagnesemia with low plasma parathyroid hormone level. X-ray of the pelvis and spine revealed spondylarthropathic changes of long-standing hypoparathyroidism. Computed Tomography of the brain revealed bilateral basal ganglia calcifications. The patient was treated with intravenous calcium gluconate, magnesium and oral vitamin D3. On follow-up the patient showed improvement of muscle weakness and carpopedal spasm with near-normal biochemical parameters. However, there was no improvement in symptoms related to spondyloarthropathy. Conclusions Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism is a rare endocrine disorder with clinic and biochemical features of hypocalcemia. Long- standing hypoparathyroidism can cause spondyloarthropathic changes closely resembling ankylosing spondylitis and DISH. Skeletal changes of long-standing hypoparathyroidism are irreversible. If left untreated, life-threatening complications like cardiac arrhythmias and broncholaryngospasm may occur. PMID:26937260

  10. Pigmented eccrine poroma: dermoscopic and confocal features

    PubMed Central

    Bombonato, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Moscarella, Elvira; Lallas, Aimillios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine poroma is a rare benign adnexal tumor of epithelial cells originating from the terminal ductal portion of the sweat glands that is typically located on palms and soles, although other cutaneous sites can be affected [1]. It is usually nonpigmented even if there is a pigmented variant that corresponds to 17% of cases and it is usually underdiagnosed, since it is mistakenly confused with other pigmented tumors [2,3]. Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may assist in the correct diagnosis of this tumor. Herein, we report one case of pigmented eccrine poroma (PEP) that simulated clinically a cutaneous melanoma or a basal cell carcinoma. Dermoscopy and RCM excluded the possibilities of those two diagnoses; the overall confocal findings were suggestive for a benign epithelial tumor. Histology was fundamental to diagnose this lesion as a pigmented eccrine poroma. Even if the diagnosis of eccrine poroma remains histopathological still, as in this case report, noninvasive tools such as dermoscopy and RCM examinations can be of help to rule out the diagnosis of melanoma. Larger studies on this rare pigmented variant of eccrine poroma could shed new light on the identification of specific diagnostic dermoscopic and confocal features.

  11. Dermatoglyphic features in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabanciogullari, Vedat; Cevik, Seyda; Karacan, Kezban; Bolayir, Ertugrul; Cimen, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine dermatoglyphic features to clarify implicated genetic predisposition in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: The study was conducted between January and December 2013 in the Departments of Anatomy, and Neurology, Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey. The dermatoglyphic data of 61 patients, and a control group consisting of 62 healthy adults obtained with a digital scanner were transferred to a computer environment. The ImageJ program was used, and atd, dat, adt angles, a-b ridge count, sample types of all fingers, and ridge counts were calculated. Results: In both hands of the patients with MS, the a-b ridge count and ridge counts in all fingers increased, and the differences in these values were statistically significant. There was also a statistically significant increase in the dat angle in both hands of the MS patients. On the contrary, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of dermal ridge samples, and the most frequent sample in both groups was the ulnar loop. Conclusions: Aberrations in the distribution of dermatoglyphic samples support the genetic predisposition in MS etiology. Multiple sclerosis susceptible individuals may be determined by analyzing dermatoglyphic samples. PMID:25274586

  12. New Features about Tau Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Miguel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a brain microtubule-associated protein that directly binds to a microtubule and dynamically regulates its structure and function. Under pathological conditions, tau self-assembles into filamentous structures that end up forming neurofibrillary tangles. Prominent tau neurofibrillary pathology is a common feature in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, collectively referred to as tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Beyond its classical role as a microtubule-associated protein, recent advances in our understanding of tau cellular functions have revealed novel insights into their important role during pathogenesis and provided potential novel therapeutic targets. Regulation of tau behavior and function under physiological and pathological conditions is mainly achieved through post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, and truncation, among others, indicating the complexity and variability of factors influencing regulation of tau toxicity, all of which have significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in various neurodegenerative disorders. A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating tau function and dysfunction will provide us with a better outline of tau cellular networking and, hopefully, offer new clues for designing more efficient approaches to tackle tauopathies in the near future. PMID:27104579

  13. New features in OSIRIS 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Martins, S. F.; Abreu, P.; Martins, J.; Fiúza, F.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L. O.; Decyk, V.; Tsung, F.; Tonge, J.; Mori, W. B.

    2009-11-01

    OSIRIS 2.0 [1] is a state of the art, fully relativistic massively parallel particle in cell code, that is widely used in kinetic plasma modeling for many astrophysical and laboratory scenarios. We report on the new developments done in the code, focusing on the new high performance vector SIMD code (Altivec/SSE3) for single precision calculations, detailing performance and floating point efficiency, and also parallel I/O for diagnostics, allowing for higher performance and scalability on HPC systems. We will also describe the new numerical precision features in the code, and we will also present the new algorithms incorporated into the code, in terms of field solver (4^th order Yee solver, etc.), new filtering techniques, perfectly matched layers (PML) boundary conditions, and boosted frame simulations. Finally, we also report on a new diagnostic tool to calculate the radiation produced with wavelengths below the simulation grid resolution. [4pt] [1] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342, (2002)

  14. Clinical features of Bednar's aphthae in infants

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung-Woo; Ahn, Seol Hee; Shin, Son-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although Bednar's aphthae are common and regress spontaneously, these lesions may lead to feeding intolerance and are often misdiagnosed, rendering examinations useless. This study sheds new light on the clinical features of Bednar's aphthae. Methods Sixteen neonates and infants were newly diagnosed with Bednar's aphthae via routine health check-ups in an outpatient clinic. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed, and the following parameters were analyzed; sex, gestational age, birth weight, mode of delivery, and perinatal problems. A physical examination was carried out during the next outpatient visit to examine the healing process and check for the existence of scars or complications. Results Initial presentation included changes in feeding habits (n=10), longer feeding time, reduced intake, and increased irritability. In 6 patients, Bednar's aphthae were discovered incidentally, without prior symptoms. Feeding posture and method of feeding are important causes of Bednar's aphthae. Eleven patients were fed in a horizontal position, whereas 5 patients were fed in a semiseated position. Fifteen patients were bottle-fed, whereas 1 patient was exclusively breastfed. After correcting the feeding position, the ulcerative lesions disappeared within 1 month of diagnosis. During the follow-up period, lesions did not recur in any of the patients. Conclusion This study suggests that Bednar's aphthae are caused by mechanical pressure. A diagnosis of Bednar's aphthae should be considered when lesions are found on the palate of infants and when symptoms seem to be feeding related. Proper education of parents can both treat Bednar's aphthae and easily prevent its recurrence. PMID:26893601

  15. Object Tracking by Oversampling Local Features.

    PubMed

    Pernici, Federico; Del Bimbo, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present the ALIEN tracking method that exploits oversampling of local invariant representations to build a robust object/context discriminative classifier. To this end, we use multiple instances of scale invariant local features weakly aligned along the object template. This allows taking into account the 3D shape deviations from planarity and their interactions with shadows, occlusions, and sensor quantization for which no invariant representations can be defined. A non-parametric learning algorithm based on the transitive matching property discriminates the object from the context and prevents improper object template updating during occlusion. We show that our learning rule has asymptotic stability under mild conditions and confirms the drift-free capability of the method in long-term tracking. A real-time implementation of the ALIEN tracker has been evaluated in comparison with the state-of-the-art tracking systems on an extensive set of publicly available video sequences that represent most of the critical conditions occurring in real tracking environments. We have reported superior or equal performance in most of the cases and verified tracking with no drift in very long video sequences. PMID:26353156

  16. Features of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Tsikouras, P; Spyros, L; Manav, B; Zervoudis, S; Poiana, C; Nikolaos, T; Petros, P; Dimitraki, M; Koukouli, C; Galazios, G; von Tempelhoff, GF

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: To elucidate the prepubertal risk factors associated with the development of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) and determine the special clinical manifestations of the syndrome in this transitional time of a woman’s life. Objective: To propose therapeutic targets and regimens, not only to prevent the long-term complications of the syndrome, but also to improve the self-esteem of a young girl who matures into womanhood. Methods and Results: A systematic review of literature was performed through electronic database searches (Pubmed, Medline and Embase). Studies published in English-language, peer-reviewed journals from 1996 to 2013 were included. The selected studies focused on the risk factors, the unique features and treatment options of the PCOS in puberty. The pathogenesis of the PCOS was hypothesized to be based on interactions between genetic and certain environmental factors. The diagnosis was usually difficult in young girls. The syndrome was related to a greater risk of future infertility, type II diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Early treatment was crucial to prevent the long-term complications of the syndrome, especially infertility and cardiovascular disease. Discussion:The recognition of the early signs of PCOS during or even before adolescence is of great importance. It is essential to establish the correct diagnosis for PCOS and rule out other causes of androgen excess in young women with hyperandrogenism. The type of treatment applied should be considered on an individual basis. Abbreviations: PCOS = Polycystic Ovary Syndrome PMID:26351529

  17. Cannabis-associated psychosis with hypomanic features.

    PubMed

    Rottanburg, D; Robins, A H; Ben-Arie, O; Teggin, A; Elk, R

    1982-12-18

    The mental state of 20 psychotic men with high urinary cannabinoid levels on admission to a psychiatric hospital was compared with that of 20 matched cannabis-free controls. All patients underwent toxicological analysis to exclude the presence of alcohol and other exogenous agents. Cannabis levels were measured by a semiquantitative enzyme immunological technique and mental state was assessed by the use of the Present State Examination (PSE), once shortly after admission and again 7 days later. The cannabis group showed significantly more hypomania and agitation and significantly less affective flattening, auditory hallucinations, incoherence of speech, and hysteria than did the controls. Clouding of consciousness was absent in most cannabis patients. After 1 week the cannabis group showed marked improvement (particularly in the psychotic syndromes), whereas the controls remained virtually unchanged. There was no significant difference in amount of medication received between the two groups. Our data suggest that a high intake of cannabis may be related to a rapidly resolving psychosis manifesting with marked hypomanic features, though often presenting as a schizophrenia-like illness.

  18. [Feature extraction for breast cancer data based on geometric algebra theory and feature selection using differential evolution].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hong, Wenxue

    2014-12-01

    The feature extraction and feature selection are the important issues in pattern recognition. Based on the geometric algebra representation of vector, a new feature extraction method using blade coefficient of geometric algebra was proposed in this study. At the same time, an improved differential evolution (DE) feature selection method was proposed to solve the elevated high dimension issue. The simple linear discriminant analysis was used as the classifier. The result of the 10-fold cross-validation (10 CV) classification of public breast cancer biomedical dataset was more than 96% and proved superior to that of the original features and traditional feature extraction method. PMID:25868233

  19. [Feature extraction for breast cancer data based on geometric algebra theory and feature selection using differential evolution].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hong, Wenxue

    2014-12-01

    The feature extraction and feature selection are the important issues in pattern recognition. Based on the geometric algebra representation of vector, a new feature extraction method using blade coefficient of geometric algebra was proposed in this study. At the same time, an improved differential evolution (DE) feature selection method was proposed to solve the elevated high dimension issue. The simple linear discriminant analysis was used as the classifier. The result of the 10-fold cross-validation (10 CV) classification of public breast cancer biomedical dataset was more than 96% and proved superior to that of the original features and traditional feature extraction method.

  20. 3. VIEW OF STORAGE (FEATURE 24), FACING NORTH. HEADFRAME AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF STORAGE (FEATURE 24), FACING NORTH. HEADFRAME AND STORAGE TANKS (FEATURE 18) VISIBLE AT RIGHT. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Storage, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV