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Sample records for febrile patient yunnan

  1. Isolation of Kyasanur Forest Disease Virus from Febrile Patient, Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinglin; Zhang, Hailin; Fu, Shihong; Wang, Huanyu; Ni, Daxin; Nasci, Roger; Tang, Qing

    2009-01-01

    We recently determined that Nanjianyin virus, isolated from serum of a patient in Yunnan Province, China, in 1989, is a type of Kyasanur Forest disease virus. Results of a 1987–1990 seroepidemiologic investigation in Yunnan Province had shown that residents of the Hengduan Mountain region had been infected with Nanjianyin virus. PMID:19193286

  2. Febrile neutropaenia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, M; Nicholson, A; Lee, M G; Wharfe, G; Frankson, M A

    2010-03-01

    Febrile neutropaenia is a common complication of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Empirical antibiotic regimes are based on the epidemiological characteristics of bacterial isolates globally and locally. This study retrospectively reviewed all cases of febrile neutropaenia in patients with confirmed cancer admitted at the University Hospital of the West Indies in the four-year period between, January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2006 and who received chemotherapy. Cases were identified from blood culture records and hospital charts which were reviewed to determine the aetiological agents causing bacteraemia, their antimicrobial susceptibilities and clinicalfeatures. These cases were compared with non-neutropaenic cancer patients admitted with fever. A total of 197 febrile episodes in cancer patients were reviewed. Thirty-seven per cent had febrile neutropaenia while 62% were non-neutropaenic. Acute myeloid leukaemia was the most common haematological malignancy and the most common solid tumour was breast cancer. Twenty-six per cent of patients had a positive blood culture. In febrile neutropaenic patients, Escherichia coli was the most common organism isolated followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci while in non-neutropaenic patients, coagulase-negative staphylococci was most common. Acinetobacter infections was prominent in non-neutropaenic patients but absent in neutropaenic patients. More than one organism was cultured in 9 neutropaenic and 18 non-neutropaenic patients. Mortality was 10.8% in neutropaenic and 24.4% in non-neutropaenic patients. Gram-negative organisms are the predominant isolates in febrile neutropaenic episodes in this cohort of patients. Non-neutropaenic patients had an increased mortality with an increase in Acinetobacter infections and multiple isolates.

  3. Borrelia crocidurae infection in acutely febrile patients, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Ratmanov, Pavel; Fenollar, Florence; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier

    2014-08-01

    As malaria cases in Africa decline, other causes of acute febrile illness are being explored. To determine incidence of Borrelia crocidurae infection during June 2010-October 2011, we collected 1,566 blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal. Incidence was high (7.3%). New treatment strategies, possibly doxycycline, might be indicated for febrile patients.

  4. [Special features of febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Olivé-Oliveras, M Teresa; Ruiz-Camps, Isabel

    2005-12-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a common complication in pediatric oncohematological patients. It is defined by fever > or = 38.3 degrees C or > or = 38 for more than one hour together with a neutrophil count of < or = 500/microl(3). These children are usually admitted to hospital and receive empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Recent studies support the possibility of early discharge or outpatient management in selected cases of febrile neutropenia. This translates into a lower risk of nosocomial infections and a reduction in the discriminate use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, with a consequent reduction in resistance, toxicity and costs. All of these factors would improve the patient's quality of life. The estimated incidence of bacteremia in children with febrile neutropenia is 10-36%. However, the experience of multiple centers suggests that not all children have the same risk of complications or death due to infection and that the risk is much lower than that in adults.

  5. Bacterial lung sepsis in patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Schmit, Jean-Luc; Douadi, Youcef

    2012-05-01

    This review provides an update on microbiological and therapeutic data in febrile neutropenic patients in general and those with bacterial lung sepsis in particular. Although the Infectious Diseases Society of America updated its guidelines on febrile neutropenia in 2010, changing epidemiological factors and the spread of new drug resistance constitutes challenges for initial treatment of this condition. Lung sepsis stands out because of the frequent absence of microbiological identification. We review the use of newly available, novel, broad-spectrum antibiotics (linezolid, tigecycline, daptomycin, etc.) in this indication. Although the incidence of Gram-negative infections in neutropenic fever is leveling off, there is a worrying increase in resistance. New drugs are available but not well studied in febrile neutropenia; daptomycin and tigecycline should not be used in suspected lung sepsis in these patients. New diagnostic tools (such as the procalcitonin assay and the LightCycler SeptiFast assay, Roche Molecular Systems) appear to be unhelpful in febrile neutropenia, although more data on fungal sepsis are required. There are no specific features of the treatment of pneumonia or septic shock in neutropenic fever, but both conditions increase the mortality rate.

  6. Empiric antifungal therapy in patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Jenna J; MacDougall, Conan; Gallagher, Jason C

    2011-04-01

    Invasive fungal infections, most commonly candidiasis or aspergillosis, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with neutropenia. Difficulty in diagnosing invasive fungal infections in these patients complicates decisions regarding pharmacotherapy. Because of the difficult diagnosis and the significant morbidity and mortality of fungal infections in patients with neutropenia, systemic antifungal agents are used as empiric antifungal therapy in patients with febrile neutropenia who are not responding to antibacterial therapy. The pharmacotherapy of invasive fungal infections has evolved rapidly within the past several years as numerous antifungal agents--different formulations of amphotericin B, azoles, and echinocandins--have become available for use as empiric antifungal therapy in patients with febrile neutropenia. Various levels of evidence support the use of these agents for this indication. Their use is limited, however, by drug intolerance, drug interactions, adverse-event profiles, and limited activity with some mold species. Thus, considerations for selecting an antifungal drug for empiric use in patients with febrile neutropenia should include the epidemiology of fungal infections in the individual patient's institution and the specific clinical circumstances of the patient.

  7. Bacterial infection profiles in lung cancer patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Pluquet, Emilie; Lescure, Francois Xavier; Bentayeb, Houcine; Lecuyer, Emmanuelle; Boutemy, Marie; Dumont, Patrick; Jounieaux, Vincent; Schmit, Jean Luc; Dayen, Charles; Douadi, Youcef

    2011-06-27

    The chemotherapy used to treat lung cancer causes febrile neutropenia in 10 to 40% of patients. Although most episodes are of undetermined origin, an infectious etiology can be suspected in 30% of cases. In view of the scarcity of data on lung cancer patients with febrile neutropenia, we performed a retrospective study of the microbiological characteristics of cases recorded in three medical centers in the Picardy region of northern France. We analyzed the medical records of lung cancer patients with neutropenia (neutrophil count < 500/mm(3)) and fever (temperature > 38.3°C). The study included 87 lung cancer patients with febrile neutropenia (mean age: 64.2). Two thirds of the patients had metastases and half had poor performance status. Thirty-three of the 87 cases were microbiologically documented. Gram-negative bacteria (mainly enterobacteriaceae from the urinary and digestive tracts) were identified in 59% of these cases. Staphylococcus species (mainly S. aureus) accounted for a high proportion of the identified Gram-positive bacteria. Bacteremia accounted for 60% of the microbiologically documented cases of fever. 23% of the blood cultures were positive. 14% of the infections were probably hospital-acquired and 14% were caused by multidrug-resistant strains. The overall mortality rate at day 30 was 33% and the infection-related mortality rate was 16.1%. Treatment with antibiotics was successful in 82.8% of cases. In a multivariate analysis, predictive factors for treatment failure were age >60 and thrombocytopenia < 20000/mm(3). Gram-negative species were the most frequently identified bacteria in lung cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. Despite the success of antibiotic treatment and a low-risk neutropenic patient group, mortality is high in this particular population.

  8. [Pathophysiology and diagnosis of cancer patients with febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Aiba, Keisuke

    2013-06-01

    Exogenous pyrogens induce several cytokines which activate immune responses, and produce fever. In Japan, febrile neutropenia is defined as having an axillary temperature of>37. 5°C, and neutropenia showing an absolute neutrophil count (ANC)of<500 cells/mL or an ANC that is expected to reduce to<500 cells/mL during the next 48 hours. Signs and symptoms of inflammation are often attenuated or absent in neutropenic patients. Therefore, careful physical examination is required to detect subtle symptoms and signs of infection. As an initial assessment, laboratory tests should include the following: a ) complete blood cell count with differential leukocyte count and platelet count, b ) measurement of serum levels of creatinine, electrolytes, and hepatic transaminase enzymes, c ) serologic assay for fungal infection, and d ) at least 2 sets of blood cultures. Radiographical approaches are also important for detecting the focus of infection. Proper risk classification should be performed using the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer(MASCC)scoring system to distinguish high-risk and low-risk patients with febrile neutropenia.

  9. Leptospirosis among Hospitalized Febrile Patients in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Holly M.; Bui, Duy M.; Galloway, Renee L.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Shadomy, Sean V.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Bartlett, John A.; Onyango, Jecinta J.; Maro, Venance P.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Crump, John A.

    2011-01-01

    We enrolled consecutive febrile admissions to two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed leptospirosis was defined as a ≥ 4-fold increase in microscopic agglutination test (MAT) titer; probable leptospirosis as reciprocal MAT titer ≥ 800; and exposure to pathogenic leptospires as titer ≥ 100. Among 870 patients enrolled in the study, 453 (52.1%) had paired sera available, and 40 (8.8%) of these met the definition for confirmed leptospirosis. Of 832 patients with ≥ 1 serum sample available, 30 (3.6%) had probable leptospirosis and an additional 277 (33.3%) had evidence of exposure to pathogenic leptospires. Among those with leptospirosis the most common clinical diagnoses were malaria in 31 (44.3%) and pneumonia in 18 (25.7%). Leptospirosis was associated with living in a rural area (odds ratio [OR] 3.4, P < 0.001). Among those with confirmed leptospirosis, the predominant reactive serogroups were Mini and Australis. Leptospirosis is a major yet underdiagnosed cause of febrile illness in northern Tanzania, where it appears to be endemic. PMID:21813847

  10. Febrile Urinary Tract Infection after Radical Cystectomy and Ileal Neobladder in Patients with Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Yoon, Hyun Suk; Yoon, Hana; Chung, Woo Sik; Sim, Bong Suk; Lee, Dong Hyeon

    2016-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common complications after radical cystectomy and orthotopic neobladder reconstruction. This study investigated the incidence and implicated pathogen of febrile UTI after ileal neobladder reconstruction and identify clinical and urodynamic parameters associated with febrile UTI. From January 2001 to May 2015, 236 patients who underwent radical cystectomy and ileal neobladder were included in this study. Fifty-five episodes of febrile UTI were identified in 46 patients (19.4%). The probability of febrile UTI was 17.6% and 19.8% at 6 months and 24 months after surgery, respectively. While, Escherichia coli was the most common implicated pathogen (22/55, 40.0%), Enterococcus spp. were the most common pathogen during the first month after surgery (18/33, 54.5%). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, ureteral stricture was an independent risk factor associated with febrile UTI (OR 5.93, P = 0.023). However, ureteral stricture accounted for only 6 episodes (10.9%, 6/55) of febrile UTI. Most episodes of febrile UTI occurred within 6 months after surgery. Thus, to identify risk factors associated with febrile UTI in the initial postoperative period, we assessed videourodynamics within 6 months after surgery in 38 patients. On videourodyamic examination, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was identified in 16 patients (42.1%). The rate of VUR presence in patients who had febrile UTI was not significantly different from those in patients without febrile UTI (50% vs. 39.3%, P = 0.556). Patients with febrile UTI had significantly larger residual urine volume (212.0 ± 193.7 vs. 90.5 ± 148.2, P = 0.048) than those without. E. coli and Enterococcus spp. are common pathogens and ureteral stricture and residual urine are risk factors for UTI after ileal neobladder reconstruction.

  11. Identifying risk factors for refractory febrile neutropenia in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masaki; Tokunaga, Shoji; Ikegame, Satoshi; Harada, Eiji; Matsumoto, Takemasa; Uchino, Junji; Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-02-01

    Information about the development of febrile neutropenia in patients with solid tumors remains insufficient. In this study, we tried to identify the risk factors for refractory febrile neutropenia in patients with lung cancer. A total of 59 neutropenic fever episodes associated with anti-tumor chemotherapy for lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed. We compared patient characteristics according to their initial response to treatment with antibiotics. For 34 of 59 (58%) episodes a response to initial antibiotics was obtained whereas 25 of 59 (42%) were refractory to treatment. Multivariate analysis demonstrated independent risk factors for refractory febrile neutropenia with lung cancer. These risk factors were the severity of febrile neutropenia (odds ratio (OR) 6.11; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.85-20.14) and C-reactive protein more than 10 mg/dl (OR 4.39; 95% CI 1.22-15.74). These factors could predict outcome for patients with lung cancer who develop refractory febrile neutropenia.

  12. Single intramuscular injection of diclofenac sodium in febrile pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Yeol; Cho, Jun Hwi; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Lee, Hui Young; Park, Chan Woo

    2015-01-01

    There are few reports on the effectiveness and safety of intramuscular (IM) antipyretic injections in pediatric patients. This study reports the efficacy and adverse effects of a single IM injection of diclofenac sodium in pediatric patients. This was an observational study in which records of febrile pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department were analyzed. Subjects included pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department with a temperature of 38°C or higher. Infants under 12 months of age were excluded. Patients were excluded if they received antipyretics within 4 h prior to presenting to the emergency department. Body temperature was measured at 30-60 min intervals following diclofenac sodium injections. Fever alleviation was defined as the temperature decline to 1°C below the temperature at presentation. Patients who received diclofenac sodium twice or more on different days were observed for side effects such as allergic reaction. Records from the emergency department and outpatient clinics were analyzed. The dose of diclofenac sodium injected was approximately 2 mg/kg. The average time elapsed until antipyresis was 69.1 ± 23.8 min. The average temperature reduction after 1 h was 1.1 ± 0.6°C. The average proportion of temperature change after 1 h was 40.6 ± 22.2%. During the period at the emergency department, there were no reported serious side effects. A single dose of diclofenac sodium provided effective antipyresis in pediatric patients. Serious side effects were not observed.

  13. Diagnostic significance of indium-111 granulocyte scintigraphy in febrile patients

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjaelae, M.T.Va.; Valtonen, V.; Liewendahl, K.; Myllylae, G.

    1987-02-01

    Sixty-eight patients with fever of unknown origin, 32 patients with postoperative fever, and 26 patients with therapy-resistant fever after bacteremia were investigated with (/sup 111/In) granulocyte scintigraphy for the detection of abscesses. The results showed that the value of (/sup 111/In)granulocyte scintigraphy in the detection of infectious foci vary in these three types of febrile conditions. The overall sensitivity and specificity were 86.5% and 87.8%, respectively. We observed, however, a relatively low predictive value of a positive result in the fever of unknown origin group (73.1%), and also a low predictive value of a negative result in the bacteremia group (66.7%). The C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients with a true-positive scintigram were significantly (p less than 0.001) higher than in patients with a true-negative scintigram. There was also a significant positive correlation (p less than 0.01) between the serum CRP concentration and the intensity of the granulocyte accumulations. There was no correlation between the peripheral leukocyte count or the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and the intensity of the granulocyte uptake. Therefore CRP, but not the leukocyte count or ESR, appears useful for selecting the patients who benefit most from granulocyte scintigraphy.

  14. Comorbidities among patients with cancer who do and do not develop febrile neutropenia during the first chemotherapy cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Luthra, Rakesh; Morrow, Phuong K; Fisher, Maxine D; Reiner, Maureen; Barron, Richard L; Langeberg, Wendy J

    2016-10-01

    Patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy with certain comorbidities are at increased risk of febrile neutropenia. A comprehensive evaluation of febrile neutropenia-related comorbidities across cancers is needed. This study compared comorbidity prevalence among patients with cancer who did and did not develop febrile neutropenia during the first chemotherapy cycle. This case-control study used administrative claims from adult patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, or gastric cancer who received chemotherapy between 2007 and 2012. Each patient who developed febrile neutropenia (case) was matched with up to four patients without febrile neutropenia (controls) by cancer type, metastasis, chemotherapy regimen, age group, and sex. For each comorbidity (identified in the year before chemotherapy began), the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for febrile neutropenia by cancer type was evaluated using conditional logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounding factors. Of 31,331 eligible patients, 672 developed febrile neutropenia in the first chemotherapy cycle. A total of 3312 febrile neutropenia cases and matched controls were analyzed. Across tumor types, comorbidity prevalence was higher in patients who developed febrile neutropenia than in those without febrile neutropenia. Among patients with breast cancer, osteoarthritis was more prevalent in patients with febrile neutropenia (aOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.18). Among patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, renal disease was more prevalent in patients with febrile neutropenia (aOR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.23 to 4.11). Patients who developed febrile neutropenia in the first chemotherapy cycle presented with comorbidities more often than otherwise similar patients who did not develop febrile neutropenia. These findings warrant further investigation and support the inclusion of comorbidities into febrile neutropenia risk models. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Evaluation of predictors of adverse outcome in febrile neutropenic episodes in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Bothra, Meenakshi; Seth, Rachna; Kapil, Arti; Dwivedi, S N; Bhatnagar, Shinjini; Xess, Immaculata

    2013-04-01

    To identify predictors associated with adverse outcome in febrile neutropenic episodes among pediatric oncology patients between 1 and 18 y age, to ascertain the prevalence of invasive bacterial or fungal infection/mortality, to determine the common organisms causing invasive bacterial infection in children with febrile neutropenia and to evaluate their current antimicrobial sensitivity pattern. It was an observational descriptive study conducted between February 2009 through July 2010. Febrile neutropenic episodes satisfying the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Relevant history was taken followed by a detailed clinical examination and laboratory examination. Logistic Regression analysis was used to identify significant predictors of adverse outcome in febrile neutropenic episodes. Out of the 155 febrile neutropenic episodes studied, adverse outcome occurred in 53(34 %) of the episodes. History of three or more previous episodes of febrile neutropenia, child being already on oral antibiotics and Chest Radiograph abnormality at presentation were found to be significantly associated with adverse outcome on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Documented invasive bacterial and fungal infection was seen in 27.8 % and 14.2 % episodes. Mortality occurred in 8 (5 %) of episodes. Gram negative bacterial infections were more common. Most common bacteria isolated was Escherichia coli and the commonest gram positive organism isolated was Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). On multivariate analysis, the variables found to be significantly associated with adverse outcome in febrile neutropenic episodes were three or more previous episodes of febrile neutropenia, child being already on oral antibiotics and Chest Radioraph abnormality at presentation.

  16. PRRT2 Mutations Are Related to Febrile Seizures in Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng-Wen; Qu, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Mao, Chen-Xue; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Deng, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Bo-Ting; Yin, Ji-Ye; Long, Hong-Yu; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies reported that the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) gene was identified to be related to paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), infantile convulsions with PKD, PKD with migraine and benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE). The present study explores whether the PRRT2 mutation is a potential cause of febrile seizures, including febrile seizures plus (FS+), generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and Dravet syndrome (DS); thus, it may provide a new drug target for personalized medicine for febrile seizure patients. We screened PRRT2 exons in a cohort of 136 epileptic patients with febrile seizures, including FS+, GEFS+ and DS. PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 25 out of 136 (18.4%) febrile seizures in epileptic patients. Five loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified: c.649delC (p.R217Efs*12), c.649_650insC (p.R217Pfs*8), c.412C>G (p.Pro138Ala), c.439G>C (p.Asp147His) and c.623C>A (p.Ser208Tyr). PRRT2 variants were probably involved in the etiology of febrile seizures in epileptic patients. PMID:25522171

  17. [Febrile responses in patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shumpei; Kikuchi, Masako; Nozawa, Tomo; Kizawa, Toshitaka; Kanetaka, Taichi; Kadota, Keisuke; Miyamae, Takako; Mori, Masaaki

    2012-01-01

    Fever is one of the critical symptoms of patients in pediatrics field. It indicates inflammatory focus somewhere in the body, and the major causes of fever are infectious diseases. Recent progresses of our knowledge about autoinflammatory syndrome promoted the investigation of the mechanism of fever, and suggested that the pro-inflammatory cytokines are the direct causative agents of fever. The basic science revealed that cooperation of IL-6 and IL-1β induces febrile response. Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains a challenging problem. Rheumatic diseases, rare infectious diseases, and benign tumors and malignancies are diagnoses to be differentiated. FDG-PET is recently proved a valuable tool for the identification of the etiology in patients with FUO. Since the introduction of biological response modifiers into the treatment of patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases has shifted the therapeutic paradigm, a new concept that the blockade of a unique pro-inflammatory cytokine brings cessation of whole inflammatory responses affected tremendously the clinical medicine. A more investigation of inflammation and its pathophisiology will be needed in pediatric rheumatology.

  18. Single intramuscular injection of diclofenac sodium in febrile pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Yeol; Cho, Jun Hwi; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Lee, Hui Young; Park, Chan Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: There are few reports on the effectiveness and safety of intramuscular (IM) antipyretic injections in pediatric patients. This study reports the efficacy and adverse effects of a single IM injection of diclofenac sodium in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: This was an observational study in which records of febrile pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department were analyzed. Subjects included pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department with a temperature of 38°C or higher. Infants under 12 months of age were excluded. Patients were excluded if they received antipyretics within 4 h prior to presenting to the emergency department. Body temperature was measured at 30–60 min intervals following diclofenac sodium injections. Fever alleviation was defined as the temperature decline to 1°C below the temperature at presentation. Patients who received diclofenac sodium twice or more on different days were observed for side effects such as allergic reaction. Records from the emergency department and outpatient clinics were analyzed. Results: The dose of diclofenac sodium injected was approximately 2 mg/kg. The average time elapsed until antipyresis was 69.1 ± 23.8 min. The average temperature reduction after 1 h was 1.1 ± 0.6°C. The average proportion of temperature change after 1 h was 40.6 ± 22.2%. During the period at the emergency department, there were no reported serious side effects. Conclusions: A single dose of diclofenac sodium provided effective antipyresis in pediatric patients. Serious side effects were not observed. PMID:26069364

  19. Acute Q fever in febrile patients in northwestern of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Saber; Golzar, Farhad; Ayubi, Erfan; Naghili, Behrooz; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Background Q fever is an endemic disease in different parts of Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of acute Q fever disease among at-risk individuals in northwestern Iran. Methodology An etiological study was carried out in 2013 in Tabriz County. A total of 116 individuals who were in contact with livestock and had a nonspecific febrile illness were enrolled in the study. IgG phase II antibodies against Coxiella burnetii were detected using ELISA. Principal findings The prevalence of acute Q fever was 13.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0, 21.0%). Headache (87.5%) and fatigue and weakness (81.3%) were the dominant clinical characteristics among patients whit acute Q fever. Acute lower respiratory tract infection and chills were poorly associated with acute Q fever. Furthermore, 32% (95% CI: 24, 41%) of participants had a history of previous exposure to Q fever agent (past infection). Consumption of unpasteurized dairy products was a weak risk factor for previous exposure to C. burnetii. Conclusion This study identified patients with acute Q fever in northwestern of Iran. The evidence from this study and previous studies conducted in different regions of Iran support this fact that Q fever is one of the important endemic zoonotic diseases in Iran and needs due attention by clinical physicians and health care system. PMID:28394892

  20. Acute Q fever in febrile patients in northwestern of Iran.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Saber; Golzar, Farhad; Ayubi, Erfan; Naghili, Behrooz; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2017-04-01

    Q fever is an endemic disease in different parts of Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of acute Q fever disease among at-risk individuals in northwestern Iran. An etiological study was carried out in 2013 in Tabriz County. A total of 116 individuals who were in contact with livestock and had a nonspecific febrile illness were enrolled in the study. IgG phase II antibodies against Coxiella burnetii were detected using ELISA. The prevalence of acute Q fever was 13.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0, 21.0%). Headache (87.5%) and fatigue and weakness (81.3%) were the dominant clinical characteristics among patients whit acute Q fever. Acute lower respiratory tract infection and chills were poorly associated with acute Q fever. Furthermore, 32% (95% CI: 24, 41%) of participants had a history of previous exposure to Q fever agent (past infection). Consumption of unpasteurized dairy products was a weak risk factor for previous exposure to C. burnetii. This study identified patients with acute Q fever in northwestern of Iran. The evidence from this study and previous studies conducted in different regions of Iran support this fact that Q fever is one of the important endemic zoonotic diseases in Iran and needs due attention by clinical physicians and health care system.

  1. Nurse-driven protocols for febrile pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Dobrasz, Gina; Hatfield, Marianne; Jones, Laura Masak; Berdis, Jennifer Joan; Miller, Erin Elizabeth; Entrekin, Melanie Smith

    2013-05-01

    Infection is a frequent complication experienced by many children with cancer, with potentially life-threatening consequences that may result in hospitalization, prolonged length of stay, and increased mortality. The need for prompt assessment and early intervention for infection is widely recognized by ED staff as best practice; however, the average length of time to antibiotic administration varies widely in published studies. An interdisciplinary quality improvement initiative including physician, nursing, and pharmacy leaders was created to streamline the identification and treatment for this high-risk population. Based on published evidence for best practice and national recognition of the need for rapid treatment, the goal was set for administration of antibiotic therapy to less than 60 minutes after ED arrival. This project was conducted at 2 emergency departments in a pediatric health care system with 520 beds and a level I and level II trauma designation. Approximately 154,000 patients are seen annually. In the emergency departments, 271 staff members, including registered nurses, paramedics, and patient care technicians, required education about using the newly designed process. Records from all patients with fever and a known history of pediatric cancer who presented to the emergency departments were included in the retrospective review, including patients with solid tumors, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic myelogenous leukemia. Exclusion criteria included patients in known remission, those with prior antibiotic therapy at another facility, congenital neutropenia, or parental concern or objection to treatment. A retrospective medical record review of febrile oncology patients treated from September 2008 until May 2012 was conducted to evaluate the impact of this evidence-based practice change to streamline the "door to drug" process. The average length of time until antibiotic administration, nurses' compliance initiating

  2. IL-8 predicts pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia at low risk for bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Cost, Carrye R; Stegner, Martha M; Leonard, David; Leavey, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Despite a low bacteremia rate, pediatric oncology patients are frequently admitted for febrile neutropenia. A pediatric risk prediction model with high sensitivity to identify patients at low risk for bacteremia is not available. We performed a single-institution prospective cohort study of pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia to create a risk prediction model using clinical factors, respiratory viral infection, and cytokine expression. Pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia were enrolled between March 30, 2010 and April 1, 2011 and managed per institutional protocol. Blood samples for C-reactive protein and cytokine expression and nasopharyngeal swabs for respiratory viral testing were obtained. Medical records were reviewed for clinical data. Statistical analysis utilized mixed multiple logistic regression modeling. During the 12-month period, 195 febrile neutropenia episodes were enrolled. There were 24 (12%) episodes of bacteremia. Univariate analysis revealed several factors predictive for bacteremia, and interleukin (IL)-8 was the most predictive variable in the multivariate stepwise logistic regression. Low serum IL-8 predicted patients at low risk for bacteremia with a sensitivity of 0.9 and negative predictive value of 0.98. IL-8 is a highly sensitive predictor for patients at low risk for bacteremia. IL-8 should be utilized in a multi-institution prospective trial to assign risk stratification to pediatric patients admitted with febrile neutropenia.

  3. Augmented Renal Clearance in Pediatric Patients With Febrile Neutropenia Associated With Vancomycin Clearance.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Keita; Ihara, Setsuko; Kinae, Ayumi; Ikegaya, Kenichi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Hirano, Keiko; Itoh, Kunihiko

    2016-06-01

    Vancomycin (VCM) dosage optimization in the early stages of therapy is required to achieve target trough serum concentrations, particularly in critically ill patients. Augmented renal clearance (ARC), commonly characterized by an enhanced renal clearance, has been associated with subtherapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors including febrile neutropenia for both ARC and VCM clearance in Japanese pediatric patients. A total of 109 pediatric patients with normal renal function were included in this observational study. From VCM serum concentrations, individual VCM clearance was estimated by the Bayesian method using a 1-compartment model. Patients were classified on the basis of the presence of febrile neutropenia, cancer, trauma, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and surgical operation. Risk factors for ARC, as defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) above median value (≥160 mL·min·1.73 m), were evaluated. Febrile neutropenia was only an independent risk factor for ARC (odds ratio, 5.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.98-21.66, P = 0.0030), which was the result of a stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis. Although univariate analysis demonstrated a significant association of febrile neutropenia with VCM clearance, the significant independent factors of VCM clearance were age and eGFR but not febrile neutropenia, as estimated by the stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis. This observational study concluded that febrile neutropenia, a significant risk factor for ARC, indirectly influenced VCM clearance towing to an elevated eGFR. Cancer, trauma, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and surgical operation were not significantly associated with ARC; however, more studies are needed to validate this observation. Adjustment of the initial dosage of VCM is required for achieving optimal therapeutic concentrations in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia.

  4. Meropenem versus piperacillin-tazobactam as empiric therapy for febrile neutropenia in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, Gulay; Acipayam, Can; Ozkan, Ayse; Bayram, Ibrahim; Tanyeli, Atila

    2014-01-01

    Infection is a serious cause of mortality in febrile neutropenia of pediatric cancer patients. Recently, monotherapy has replaced the combination therapy in empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia. Since there has been no reported trial comparing the efficacy of meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam (PIP/ TAZ) monotherapies, the present retrospective study was conducted to compare safety and efficacy in febrile neutropenic children with cancer. Charts of febrile, neutropenic children hospitalized at our center between March 2008 and April 2011 for hemato-oncological malignancies were reviewed. Patients received PIP/TAZ 360 mg/kg/day or meropenem 60 mg/kg/day intravenously in three divided doses. Duration of fever and neutropenia, absolute neutrophil count, modification, and success rate were compared between the two groups. Resolution of fever without antibiotic change was defined as success and resolution of fever with antibiotic change or death of a patient was defined as failure. Modification was defined as changing the empirical antimicrobial agent during a febrile episode. Two hundred eighty four febrile neutropenic episodes were documented in 136 patients with a median age of 5 years. In 198 episodes meropenem and in 86 episodes PIP/ TAZ were used. Duration of fever and neutropenia, neutrophil count, sex, and primary disease were not different between two groups. Success rates and modification rate between two groups showed no significant differences (p>0.05). Overall success rate in the meropenem and PIP/TAZ groups were 92.4% and 91.9% respectively. No serious adverse effects occurred in either of the groups. Meropenem and PIP/TAZ monotherapy are equally safe and effective in the initial treatment of febrile neutropenia in children with cancer.

  5. Soluble CD14 as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker in Hematological Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Intke, Carina; Hämäläinen, Sari; Jantunen, Esa; Juutilainen, Auni

    2017-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of a cell surface glycoprotein, soluble cluster of differentiation 14 (sCD14), have been observed in patients with sepsis. Only scarce data are available on sCD14 in hematological patients with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. The study aim was to investigate sCD14 as an early biomarker in febrile neutropenia after intensive chemotherapy to detect a rapidly deteriorating clinical course early enough to avoid serious infectious complications. Patients and Methods This prospective study included 87 adult hematological patients at the start of febrile neutropenia after intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia or after autologous stem cell transplantation. The study endpoints were septic shock, severe sepsis, and positive blood culture findings. sCD14 was analyzed from day 0 to day 2, and its prognostic capacity was compared to that of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin. Results Plasma level of sCD14 predicted the development of septic shock on day 1 (p = 0.001) and day 2 but not the development of severe sepsis or blood culture positivity in hematological patients with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. Conclusions Soluble CD14 did not predict an overall complicated course at the early stages of febrile neutropenia. However, it was helpful in predicting the progression of the clinical course of neutropenic fever to septic shock. PMID:28845081

  6. Protracted febrile myalgia in a patient with Familial Mediterranean Fever and Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ekşioğlu, Emel; Kesikburun, Bilge; Çakçı, Aytül

    2016-06-03

    Protracted Febrile Myalgia is a rare form of vasculitis that is diagnosed in patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever. To present a case with Familial Mediterranean and Anklosing Spondylitis on anti-TNF therapy for three years, who developed protracted febrile myalgia syndrome. Case report. A 35-year-old woman with known Familial Mediterranean Fever and Anklosing Spondylitis for 3 years presented with fever, diarrhea, intermittent abdominal pain and severe diffuse muscular pain lasting for two weeks. The patient was investigated for any infection focus. The patient was diagnosed as having Protracted Febrile Myalgia four weeks after the onset of the symptoms. Prednisolone 1 mg/kg per day was applied. Her fever and muscle pain resolved within 48 hours. The coexisting Ankylosing Spondylitis disease and the use of anti-TNF treatment in patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever could be a confounding factor for the investigation of fever. Steroid therapy has a dramatic response.

  7. Assessing the prevalence distribution of abnormal laboratory tests in patients with simple febrile seizure.

    PubMed

    Yousefichaijan, Parsa; Dorreh, Fatemeh; Abbasian, Ladan; Pakniyat, Abdol Ghader

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizure is an important issue in pediatric practice. Even some pediatricians do not have a proper approach to febrile seizure, making the sick child undergo complex laboratory tests or invasive procedures or even long-term treatment with anticonvulsant drugs. In spite of multiple studies, many controversies have still remained about the significance of febrile seizure. The goal of this study is to assess the prevalence distribution of routinely requested laboratory tests results in simple febrile seizure. In a descriptive study, 549 patients with simple febrile seizure were studied. The routine lab tests including complete blood count, electrolyte, urine analysis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis had already been performed for all patients and the results had been recorded in their medical data. These results were collected and statistically analyzed through SPSS software. About 58.7% of our cases were male. Most of the cases were 12-24 months old and the mean body temperature of them was 38.2°C. 99.3% of blood sugar tests, 98% of blood calcium tests, 100% and 99.5% of sodium, and potassium tests, respectively, 100% of blood creatinine, 96.9% of blood urea nitrogen, and 99.1% of urine analysis tests were normal. CSF analysis was done in only 49 cases and the results were normal in all of them. The percentage of abnormal laboratory test results was not statistically significant in febrile seizure and shows that performing all these tests in all patients with simple febrile seizure as routine is not necessary.

  8. Management of febrile neutropenia in pediatric oncology patients: a Canadian survey.

    PubMed

    Boragina, Mariana; Patel, Hema; Reiter, Stephanie; Dougherty, Geoffrey

    2007-05-01

    Traditionally, febrile neutropenia in pediatric oncology patients has been managed aggressively with hospital admission and intravenous antibiotics. Recent studies suggest that less intensive interventions are effective for selected children. Study of Canadian practice patterns may help better understand the current context of care for these patients. We carried out a cross-sectional mailed survey of the 17 tertiary pediatric centers in Canada. A 36-item questionnaire gathered information on oncology department characteristics, the existence of protocols for management of febrile neutropenia, use of outpatient therapy or early discharge, criteria used to identify patients at low risk, and opinions of oncologists. A total of 16 (94%) completed questionnaires were returned, reflecting a treatment population of approximately 2,100 children with febrile neutropenia/year. Three out of seventeen centers carry out exclusively traditional management. The remaining 14 offer modified treatment for low risk children. The majority (n = 10) carry out an early discharge approach. Two thirds of the episodes of febrile neutropenia are treated this way with good results. The rest (n = 4) implement complete outpatient management. Approximately 120 patients benefit from this annually, with a reportedly high success rate. Most specialists agreed on the benefits of decreased hospitalization for children with cancer. However, about half considered the level of evidence is not sufficient to fully implement complete outpatient management. Variations in the treatment of pediatric febrile neutropenia have been extensively implemented across Canada. However more evidence, ideally in the form of multicenter clinical trials, appears to be needed to further safely modify practice.

  9. Antibiotic Rotation for Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Clinical Significance of Antibiotic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Yong; Shimoda, Shinji; Yakushiji, Hiroko; Ito, Yoshikiyo; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Kamimura, Tomohiko; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Akashi, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Our unit adopted the single administration of cefepime as the initial treatment for febrile episodes in neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies. However, recently, cefepime-resistant gram-negative bacteremia, including those with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producers, was frequently observed in these patients. Therefore, we instituted a rotation of primary antibiotics for febrile neutropenic patients in an attempt to control antibiotic resistance. Methods This prospective trial was performed from August 2008 through March 2011 at our unit. After a pre-intervention period, in which cefepime was used as the initial agent for febrile neutropenia, 4 primary antibiotics, namely, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, meropenem, and cefepime, were rotated at 1-month intervals over 20 months. Blood and surveillance cultures were conducted for febrile episodes, in order to assess the etiology, the resistance pattern (particularly to cefepime), and the prognosis. Results In this trial, 219 patients were registered. A 65.9% reduction in the use of cefepime occurred after the antibiotic rotation. In the surveillance stool cultures, the detection rate of cefepime-resistant gram-negative isolates, of which ESBL-producers were predominant, declined significantly after the intervention (8.5 vs 0.9 episodes per 1000 patient days before and after intervention respectively, P<0.01). Interestingly, ESBL-related bacteremia was not detected after the initiation of the trial (1.7 vs 0.0 episodes per 1000 patient days before and after intervention respectively, P<0.01). Infection-related mortality was comparable between the 2 periods. Conclusions We implemented a monthly rotation of primary antibiotics for febrile neutropenic patients. An antibiotic heterogeneity strategy, mainly performed as a cycling regimen, would be useful for controlling antimicrobial resistance among patients treated for febrile neutropenia. PMID:23372683

  10. Increased interleukin-10 levels correlate with bacteremia and sepsis in febrile neutropenia pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Urbonas, Vincas; Eidukaitė, Audronė; Tamulienė, Indrė

    2012-03-01

    Early diagnosis of bacteremia and sepsis in pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia still remains unresolved task due to lack of sensitive and specific laboratory markers particularly at the beginning of the infectious process. The objective of our study was to assess the potentiality of interleukin-10 (IL-10) to predict or exclude bacteremia or sepsis at the beginning of febrile episode in childhood oncology patients. A total of 36 febrile neutropenic episodes in 24 children were studied. Serum samples were collected after confirmation of febrile neutropenia and analyzed using automated random access analyzer. The sensitivity of IL-10 was 73% and specificity - 92% (cut-off=18pg/ml, area under the curve - 0.87, 95% CI for sensitivity 39-94%, 95% CI for specificity 74-99%) with negative predictive value (NPV) - 83%. IL-10 evaluation might be used as an additional diagnostic tool for clinicians in excluding bacteremia or clinical sepsis in oncology patients with febrile neutropenia because of high NPV and specificity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Home intravenous antibiotic treatment for febrile episodes in immune-compromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, E; Yaniv, I; Drucker, M; Hadad, S; Goshen, Y; Stein, J; Ash, S; Fisher, S; Zaizov, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of home intravenous antibiotic treatment (HIAT) for febrile episodes in immune-compromised (neutropenic, splenectomized), low-risk pediatric patients. Thirty hematology-oncology patients who presented to our emergency room from January 1993 to January 1995 and who suffered from a febrile episode and were considered at low risk for septic complications were immediately discharged on HIAT. Patients were followed for at least 3 weeks after recovery. Patients and parents were retrospectively questioned about adverse effects and about their degree of satisfaction with home treatment. Patients who required hospitalization during this period were considered unresponsive to HIAT and were analyzed for causes and adverse effects. Thirteen out of 60 (22%) febrile episodes, or eight out of 42 (19%) episodes of fever and neutropenia eventually led to hospitalization. Pseudomonas species infections were associated with the highest rate of unresponsiveness (88%). A central venous catheter infection developed in two cases following HIAT (two cases out of 640 days of therapy). No other complications were identified. No infection-related morbidity was observed. Patients and parents were highly satisfied with HIAT and wanted to use it again, if necessary. Immediate discharge on HIAT for low-risk pediatric immune-compromised patients suffering from a febrile episode is feasible, safe, and well accepted by patients and families. Patients who are found to have Pseudomonas infections should probably be hospitalized. Our results are preliminary and must be confirmed by a prospective, randomized trial before definite recommendations can be made.

  12. Pegfilgrastim for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Matteo; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Del Mastro, Lucia; Danesi, Romano; Pronzato, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia are the most common and most severe bone marrow toxicities of chemotherapy. Recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs), both daily (filgrastim and biosimilars, and lenograstim) and long-acting (pegfilgrastim and lipegfilgrastim) formulations, are currently available to counteract the negative consequences of these side effects. The purpose of this article is to review the physiopathology of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia and its consequences, and the current evidence regarding the pharmacological properties, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of pegfilgrastim as a strategy to prevent chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with solid tumors. Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia and its complications are still a major health-care concern, and the inappropriate employment of G-CSFs in clinical practice can partially explain its burden. Pegfilgrastim has pharmacological advantages over daily G-CSFs that makes it easily administrable, thus reducing the chance of incorrect delivery. The once-per-cycle administration might explain the findings derived from observational studies suggesting a possible superior efficacy of pegfilgrastim over daily G-CSFs. For patients at higher risk of failure with daily G-CSF prophylaxis (e.g. risk of non-compliance, difficulties on performing regular hemograms, high risk of developing febrile neutropenia), pegfilgrastim might be the most appropriate option.

  13. Is the addition of aminoglycosides to beta-lactams in cancer patients with febrile neutropenia needed?

    PubMed

    Contreras, Valeria; Sepúlveda, Sebastián; Heredia, Ana

    2016-02-24

    It is still controversial if the combined use of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycosides has advantages over broad-spectrum beta-lactam monotherapy for the empirical treatment of cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including 14 pertinent randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded the combination of beta-lactam antibiotics and aminoglycosides probably does not lead to a reduced mortality in febrile neutropenic cancer patients and it might increase nephrotoxicity.

  14. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  15. Prospective cohort study of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy: CSPOR-BC FN study.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Narui, Kazutaka; Kaise, Hiroshi; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Mukai, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    With the increasing use of adjuvant chemotherapy for treating early breast cancer, febrile neutropenia management has become crucial. Guidelines for febrile neutropenia management are mostly based on a Caucasian population survey although ethnic differences are reported in terms of adverse events. We survey the current status of febrile neutropenia and risk factors in Japanese female breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens potential for febrile neutropenia. Subsequently, we plan to conduct a multicenter prospective cohort study involving 1000 patients with operable breast cancer. With the current state of oral antibiotics being routinely prescribed without hematology tests, we survey febrile neutropenia based on two different definitions, namely, true febrile neutropenia: ≥37.5°C and Grade 4 neutropenia, and surrogate febrile neutropenia: ≥37.5°C and oral antibiotic and antipyretic intake. The comparison of true febrile neutropenia and surrogate febrile neutropenia incidences is anticipated to provide information on the safety and feasibility of chemotherapy management without performing blood tests.

  16. Temperature management in haematology patients with febrile neutropenia: a practice survey.

    PubMed

    Weinkove, Robert; Clay, Jennifer; Wood, Catherine

    2013-04-19

    To assess the attitudes of clinicians to temperature management in haematology patients with febrile neutropenia. An online scenario-based survey was circulated to consultant members of the New Zealand branch of the Haematology Society of Australia and New Zealand, to haematology advanced trainees, and to nursing representatives at each haematology department in New Zealand. Eighty-eight responses were obtained, from 34 doctors and 54 nurses. Most respondents would advise a neutropenic patient to take paracetamol as needed for pain. Median temperature intervention threshold for an asymptomatic patient with febrile neutropenia was higher for doctors than for nurses (38.5 versus 38.0 degrees Celcius), despite considerable heterogeneity. Both groups indicated they would intervene at a median 38.0 degrees Celcius for a patient with rigors. Paracetamol was the preferred first-line cooling measure, with physical methods second-line, and pethidine third-line. All respondents favoured oral over intravenous or rectal paracetamol. Most believed a clinical trial of antipyretic treatment for febrile neutropenia was warranted, and indicated willingness to enrol their patients in such a study. This survey documents clinicians' preferred temperature intervention thresholds and methods for haematology patients with neutropenic fever, and shows considerable variation in practice. Most respondents supported a trial of antipyretic management in febrile neutropenia.

  17. Dengue and Scrub Typhus Coinfection in a Patient Presenting with Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever and scrub typhus are common causes of acute febrile illness of unclear origin in Asia. Though coinfections of many vector-borne diseases have been described, articles on dengue and scrub typhus coinfection are distinctly limited. In case of coinfection with dengue and scrub typhus, vigilant monitoring of vitals, platelets transfusion, and timely treatment with doxycycline are necessary. High degree of suspicion has to be made for coinfection in a patient presenting with febrile illness with thrombocytopenia and deranged laboratory parameters in postmonsoon season in endemic regions in Asia. PMID:28386493

  18. IL-10 combined with procalcitonin improves early prediction of complications of febrile neutropenia in hematological patients.

    PubMed

    Vänskä, Matti; Koivula, Irma; Jantunen, Esa; Hämäläinen, Sari; Purhonen, Anna-Kaisa; Pulkki, Kari; Juutilainen, Auni

    2012-12-01

    Early diagnosis of complicated course in febrile neutropenia is cumbersome due to the non-specificity of clinical and laboratory signs of severe infection. This prospective study included 100 adult hematological patients with febrile neutropenia after intensive chemotherapy at the onset of fever (d0) and for 3 days (d1-d3) thereafter. The study aim was to find early predictors for complicated course of febrile neutropenia, defined as bacteremia or septic shock. Interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) all predicted complicated course of febrile neutropenia on d0, but only PCT was predictive throughout the study period. For IL-10 on d0-1 with cut-off 37 ng/L, sensitivity was 0.71, specificity 0.82, positive predictive value 0.52 and negative predictive value 0.92. For PCT on d0-1 with cut-off 0.13 μg/L, the respective measures were 0.95, 0.53, 0.36, and 0.98. For the combination of IL-10 and PCT on d0-1 with the same cut-offs, specificity improved to 0.85 and positive predictive value to 0.56. In conclusion, the present study confirms the high negative predictive value of PCT and provides new evidence for IL-10 as an early predictor for complicated course of febrile neutropenia in hematological patients. Combining IL-10 with PCT improves the early prediction for complicated course of febrile neutropenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Yasunori; Kasai, Mari; Fukuda, Takeshi; Ichimura, Tomoyuki; Yasui, Tomoyo; Sumi, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a common complication in cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated chemotherapy-induced neutropenia that was recently detected in all patients with gynecologic malignancy. Between January 2009 and December 2011, we examined cases of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia reported in our hospital. We analyzed the incidence and clinical features of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with gynecologic malignancy. During the study period, we administered over 1614 infusions (29 regimens) to 291 patients. The median age of the patients was 60 years (range 24-84 years). Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia occurred in 147 (50.5%) patients over 378 (23.4%) chemotherapy cycles. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 20 (6.9%) patients over 25 (1.5%) cycles. The mean duration of neutropenia and fever was 3.6 days (range 1-12 days) and 3.4 days (range 1-9 days), respectively. The source of fever was unexplained by examination or cultures in 14 (56.0%) cycles. There were two cases of neutropenia-related death. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia was associated with older age (over 70 years) (P<0.0001), less than five previous chemotherapy cycles (P=0.02), disseminated disease (P=0.03), platinum-based regimens (P<0.0001), taxane-containing regimens (P<0.0001), and combined therapy (P<0.0001). Febrile neutropenia was associated with poor performance status (P<0.0001), no previous chemotherapy (P<0.05), disseminated disease (P<0.0001), and distant metastatic disease (P=0.03). Neither chemotherapy-induced neutropenia nor febrile neutropenia was associated with bone marrow metastases or previous radiotherapy. By identifying risk factors for febrile neutropenia, such as performance status, no previous chemotherapy, disseminated disease, and distant metastatic disease, the safe management of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia may be possible in patients with gynecologic malignancy.

  20. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with gynecologic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Mari; Fukuda, Takeshi; Ichimura, Tomoyuki; Yasui, Tomoyo; Sumi, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is a common complication in cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated chemotherapy-induced neutropenia that was recently detected in all patients with gynecologic malignancy. Between January 2009 and December 2011, we examined cases of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia reported in our hospital. We analyzed the incidence and clinical features of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with gynecologic malignancy. During the study period, we administered over 1614 infusions (29 regimens) to 291 patients. The median age of the patients was 60 years (range 24–84 years). Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia occurred in 147 (50.5%) patients over 378 (23.4%) chemotherapy cycles. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 20 (6.9%) patients over 25 (1.5%) cycles. The mean duration of neutropenia and fever was 3.6 days (range 1–12 days) and 3.4 days (range 1–9 days), respectively. The source of fever was unexplained by examination or cultures in 14 (56.0%) cycles. There were two cases of neutropenia-related death. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia was associated with older age (over 70 years) (P<0.0001), less than five previous chemotherapy cycles (P=0.02), disseminated disease (P=0.03), platinum-based regimens (P<0.0001), taxane-containing regimens (P<0.0001), and combined therapy (P<0.0001). Febrile neutropenia was associated with poor performance status (P<0.0001), no previous chemotherapy (P<0.05), disseminated disease (P<0.0001), and distant metastatic disease (P=0.03). Neither chemotherapy-induced neutropenia nor febrile neutropenia was associated with bone marrow metastases or previous radiotherapy. By identifying risk factors for febrile neutropenia, such as performance status, no previous chemotherapy, disseminated disease, and distant metastatic disease, the safe management of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia may be possible in patients with gynecologic malignancy. PMID:26267078

  1. Febrile neutropenia in chemotherapy treated small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kukec, Renata Rezonja; Grabnar, Iztok; Vovk, Tomaz; Mrhar, Ales; Kovac, Viljem; Cufer, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background. Chemotherapy with platinum agent and etoposide for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is supposed to be associated with intermediate risk (10–20%) of febrile neutropenia. Primary prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) is not routinely recommended by the treatment guidelines. However, in clinical practice febrile neutropenia is often observed with standard etoposide/platinum regimen. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in advanced SCLC patients in the first cycle of standard chemotherapy. Furthermore, we explored the association between severe neutropenia and etoposide peak plasma levels in the same patients. Methods. The case series based analysis of 17 patients with advanced SCLC treated with standard platinum/etoposide chemotherapy, already included in the pharmacokinetics study with etoposide, was performed. Grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia, observed after the first cycle are reported. The neutrophil counts were determined on day one of the second cycle unless symptoms potentially related to neutropenia occurred. Adverse events were classified according to Common Toxicity Criteria 4.0. Additionally, association between severe neutropenia and etoposide peak plasma concentrations, which were measured in the scope of pharmacokinetic study, was explored. Results. Two out of 17 patients received primary GCS-F prophylaxis. In 15 patient who did not receive primary prophylaxis the rates of both grade 3/4 neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were high (8/15 (53.3%) and 2/15 (13.3%), respectively), already in the first cycle of chemotherapy. One patient died due to febrile neutropenia related pneumonia. Neutropenic events are assumed to be related to increased etoposide plasma concentrations after a standard etoposide and cisplatin dose. While the mean etoposide peak plasma concentration in the first cycle of chemotherapy was 17.6 mg/l, the highest levels of 27.07 and

  2. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Márquez, S; Carrera, J; Pullan, S T; Lewandowski, K; Paz, V; Loman, N; Quick, J; Bonsall, D; Powell, R; Thézé, J; Pybus, O G; Klenerman, P; Eisenberg, J; Coloma, J; Carroll, M W; Trueba, G; Logue, C H

    2017-02-23

    Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador.

  3. First case of human "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" infection in a febrile patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Welinder-Olsson, Christina; Kjellin, Eva; Vaht, Krista; Jacobsson, Stefan; Wennerås, Christine

    2010-05-01

    An immunocompromised patient presented with febrile episodes, an erysipelas-like rash, and thromboembolic complications. Amplification of 16S rRNA gene sequences from blood and sequence analysis revealed "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis." We report the first case of human disease caused by "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis."

  4. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, S.; Carrera, J.; Pullan, S. T.; Lewandowski, K.; Paz, V.; Loman, N.; Quick, J.; Bonsall, D.; Powell, R.; Thézé, J.; Pybus, O. G.; Klenerman, P.; Eisenberg, J.; Coloma, J.; Carroll, M. W.; Trueba, G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador. PMID:28232448

  5. Unsuspected rickettsioses among patients with acute febrile illness, Sri Lanka, 2007.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Bodinayake, Champica; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J; Flom, Judith E; Østbye, Truls; Woods, Christopher W; Dumler, J Stephen

    2012-05-01

    We studied rickettsioses in southern Sri Lanka. Of 883 febrile patients with paired serum samples, 156 (17.7%) had acute rickettsioses; rickettsioses were unsuspected at presentation. Additionally, 342 (38.7%) had exposure to spotted fever and/or typhus group rickettsioses and 121 (13.7%) scrub typhus. Increased awareness of rickettsioses and better tests are needed.

  6. [Leptospirosis frequency and socio-demographic characteristics associated in febrile patients from northern Perú].

    PubMed

    Silva-Díaz, Heber; Llatas-Cancino, Dunalia N; Campos-Sánchez, Marcos J; Aguilar-Gamboa, Franklin R; Mera-Villasis, Katya M; Valderrama-Ayén, Mayra Y

    2015-10-01

    INDRODUCTION: Leptospirosis is a frequent cause of febrile illness around the world, particularly in tropical and subtropical areas such as Perú. To estimate the frequency and socio-demographic characteristics associated with leptospirosis in febrile patients in northern Perú. A cross sectional study was conducted from January to December 2014 in 143 fever cases admitted to the Hospital Regional Lambayeque, Perú. Structured for socio-demographic information and sanitation questionnaire was used. Serum samples were examined to quantitatively determine the presence of IgM antibodies to leptospira using ELISA IgM. The frequency was 26.6% (95% CI 19.3 to 33.8) and independently associated features were: be between 20-54 years (OR: 3.36, 95% CI 1.17 to 9, 64), work in agriculture-livestock (OR: 6.15, 95% CI 1.99 to 19.05),contact with animals (OR: 4,13, IC 95%: 1,76-9,65) and consumption of unsafe water(OR: 3,33, IC 95%: 1,49-7,43). This study reveals a high frequency of leptospirosis among febrile patients from northern Perú. These results indicate the need to investigate routinely leptospirosis in febrile patients, especially those exhibiting risk characteristics.

  7. [Epidemiology of febrile neutropenia in patients with hematological disease-a prospective multicentre survey in China].

    PubMed

    Yan, C H; Xu, T; Zheng, X Y; Sun, J; Duan, X L; Gu, J L; Zhao, C L; Zhu, J; Wu, Y H; Wu, D P; Hu, J D; Huang, H; Jiang, M; Li, J; Hou, M; Wang, C; Shao, Z H; Liu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, X J

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the incidence, clinical and microbiological features of febrile, and risk factors during neutropenia periods in patients with hematological diseases. From October 20, 2014 to March 20, 2015, consecutive patients who had hematological diseases and developed neutropenia during hospitalization were enrolled in the prospective, multicenter and observational study. A total of 784 episodes of febrile occurred in 1 139 neutropenic patients with hematological diseases. The cumulative incidence of febrile was 81.9% at 21 days after neutropenia. Multivariate analysis suggested that central venous catheterization (P<0.001, HR=3.407, 95% CI 2.276-4.496), gastrointestinal mucositis (P<0.001, HR=10.548, 95% CI 3.245-28.576), previous exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics within 90 days (P<0.001, HR=3.582, 95% CI 2.387-5.770) and duration of neutropenia >7 days (P<0.001,HR=4.194, 95% CI 2.572-5.618) were correlated with higher incidence of febrile during neutropenia. With the increase of the risk factors, the incidence of febrile increased gradually (35.4%, 69.2%, 86.1%, 95.6%, P<0.001). Of 784 febrile cases, 253 (32.3%) were unknown origin, 429 (54.7% )of clinical documented infections and 102(13.0%) of microbiological documented infections. The most common sites of infection were pulmonary (49.5%), upper respiratory (16.0%), crissum (9.8%), blood stream (7.7%). The most common pathogens were gram-negative bacteria (44.54%), followed by gram-positive bacteria (37.99% ) and fungi (17.47% ). There was no significant difference in mortality rates between cases with febrile and cases without febrile (9.2% vs 4.8%, P=0.099). Multivariate analysis also suggested that >40 years old (P=0.047, HR=5.000, 95% CI 0.853-28.013), hemodynamic instability (P=0.001, HR=13.185, 95% CI 2.983-54.915), prior colonization or infection by resistant pathogens (P=0.005, HR=28.734, 95% CI 2.921-313.744), blood stream infection (P=0.038, HR=9.715, 95% CI 1.110-81.969) and pulmonary

  8. [Fever profile of febrile neutropenia in patients treated with cancer chemotherapy for hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Tamai, Yotaro; Imataki, Osamu; Kawakami, Kimihiro

    2010-05-01

    It is important to diagnose infectious events in cancer patients during chemotherapy. Since many of them have complications of febrile neutropenia (FN), determining its cause is critical for their treatment course. We analyzed all febrile events (>38.0 degrees C, single axillary temperature) in hospitalized cancer patients treated at Shizuoka Cancer Center over a period of 8 months. Based on the clinical presentation at the onset, we estimated the cause of fever and classified it as infection, tumor fever, immunologic reaction or unknown. Clinical presentations found at the onset of FN were categorized into 4 groups: (1) oral mucositis, and (2) respiratory, (3) gastrointestinal and (4) cutaneous findings. We detected 85 febrile episodes (median age 58, range 26 approximately 86; 37 males and 48 females). Neutropenia was observed (500/mL) in 52. 9% (45/85) of the patients and clinical symptoms were detected in 74.1% (63/85). In eleven of 18 infection-proven cases, we successfully predicted the infection focus at the onset of fever. Multivariate analysis revealed that initial high fever, antimicrobial prophylaxis, cutaneous findings and severe neutropenia were important influencing factors in predicting infectious disease during FN. Physical examination can support the diagnosis of the cause of fever in FN patients.

  9. [Dengue infection: A common cause of febrile syndrome in patients from Quibdó, Chocó, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Berta Nelly; Piedrahita, Leidy Diana; Agudelo, Ivony Yireth; Marín, Katherine; Ramírez, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Quibdó, a municipality in Chocó, has poor public services and weather and social conditions that favor dengue transmission. However, there are few studies about this problem in this district. To determine the frequency of dengue infection in patients with acute febrile syndrome and to compare clinical features among dengue infected patients with other febrile diseases. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January, 2008, to March, 2010. The study population comprised patients with febrile syndrome of seven or fewer days of evolution, recruited from hospitals in the town. Dengue diagnosis was made in serum samples by detection of IgM antibodies, NS1 antigen, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation. Clinical and laboratory information from the patients was obtained. During the study period, 469 patients with acute febrile syndrome were recruited, of whom 98.3% were Afro-descendant. Dengue fever was found in 28.4% of the cases. Four dengue serotypes were identified with DENV-1 predominance. The ages ranged from zero to 76 years. From all patients, 70.7% of cases were classified as dengue without warning signs. Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, cough, nasal congestion and sore throat were significantly more frequent in patients with another febrile disease. Active surveillance of the acute febrile syndrome allowed for the detection of undiagnosed cases of dengue; the observed frequency of this infection suggests that the study area has a high risk of dengue infection.

  10. Association of time to antibiotics and clinical outcomes in adult hematologic malignancy patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Butts, Allison R; Bachmeier, Christina Carracedo; Dressler, Emily V; Liu, Meng; Cowden, Ann; Talbert, Jeff; Adams, Val R

    2017-06-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the clinical impact of time to antibiotic administration in adult inpatients who have hematologic malignancies and develop febrile neutropenia. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted to screen for all febrile neutropenia events amongst adult hematologic malignancy patients between 1 January 2010 and 1 September 2014. All included patients were admitted to the hospital at the time of fever onset, having been admitted for a diagnosis other than febrile neutropenia. Descriptive statistics and logistic generalized estimated equations were used to analyze the data. Results Two hundred forty-four neutropenic fever events met inclusion criteria. Thirty-five events (14.34%) led to negative clinical outcomes (in-hospital mortality, intensive care unit transfer, or vasopressor requirement), with an in-house mortality rate of 7.4%. The time to antibiotics ranged from 10 min to 1495 min. The median time to antibiotics in the events that led to negative outcomes was 120 min compared to 102 min in the events that did not lead to the negative outcome ( p = 0.93). Conditional order sets were used to order empiric antibiotics in 176 events (72.1%) and significantly reduced time to antibiotics from 287 min to 143 min ( p = 0.0019). Conclusion Prolonged time to antibiotic administration in hematologic malignancy patients who develop neutropenic fever was not shown to be associated with negative clinical outcomes.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim as primary prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Lathia, Nina; Isogai, Pierre K; De Angelis, Carlo; Smith, Thomas J; Cheung, Matthew; Mittmann, Nicole; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Walker, Scott

    2013-08-07

    Febrile neutropenia is a serious toxicity of cancer chemotherapy that is usually treated in hospital. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim as primary prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients undergoing chemotherapy. We used a Markov model that followed patients through induction chemotherapy to compare the three prophylaxis strategies: 1) no primary prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia; 2) primary prophylaxis with 10 days of filgrastim therapy; and 3) primary prophylaxis with a single dose of pegfilgrastim. The target population was a hypothetical cohort of 64-year-old men and women with DLBCL. Data sources included published literature and current clinical practice. The analysis was conducted from a publicly funded health-care system perspective. The main outcome measures included costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). In the base-case analysis, costs associated with no primary prophylaxis, primary prophylaxis with 10 days of filgrastim, and primary prophylaxis with pegfilgrastim were CaD $7314, CaD $13947, and CaD $16290, respectively. The QALYs associated with the three strategies were 0.2004, 0.2015, and 0.2024, respectively. The ICER for the filgrastim vs no primary prophylaxis strategy was CaD $5796000 per QALY. The ICER for the pegfilgrastim vs filgrastim primary prophylaxis strategy was CaD $2611000 per QALY. All one-way sensitivity analyses yielded ICERs greater than CaD $400000 per QALY. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves show that 20.0% of iterations are cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of CaD $1595000 for the filgrastim strategy and CaD $561000 for the pegfilgrastim strategy. Primary prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia with either filgrastim or pegfilgrastim is not cost-effective in DLBCL patients.

  12. The prevalence of Familial Mediterranean Fever common gene mutations in patients with simple febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Ozen, F; Kocak, N; Kelekci, S; Yildirim, I H; Hacimuto, G; Ozdemir, O

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) represent the most common form of childhood seizures that occurs in 2-5 % of the children younger than 6 years. There have been many recent reports on the molecular genetic and pathogenesis of FC. It has been recognized that there is significant genetic component for susceptibility of FC with different reported mutation. FEB1, FEB2, FEB4, SCNA1, SCNA2, GABRG2 and IL-1β are related to with febrile convulsions (FCs). Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) is a cytokine that contributes to febrile inflammatory responses. There are conflicting results on increasing this cytokine in serum during FC. The determine the association between mutations of MEFV gene product pyrine and febrile seizures. The study was carried out on 104 children that were diagnosed as FS and 96 healthy children. MEFV gene mutations were detected and analyzed with PyroMark Q24. PCR was performed using the PyroMark PCR Kit and pyrosequencing reaction was conducted on instrument instructions. M694V is the most common mutation in our patient group and we found a significant association between MEFV gene mutations and FSs. Of 104 patients, 68 were heterozygotes for any mutation and 10 patients were compound. 17.7% of control group were heterozygotes for any studied mutation.Statistical analyses showed that there was strongly significant statistical difference between results obtained from FS and control group (X = 46.20, p < 0.0001). MEFV gene mutations, especially M694V mutation, are positively associated with FSs.

  13. Mucosal barrier injury, fever and infection in neutropenic patients with cancer: introducing the paradigm febrile mucositis.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Walter J F M; Herbers, Alexandra H E; Netea, Mihai G; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2014-11-01

    Infection remains one of the most prominent complications after cytotoxic treatment for cancer. The connection between neutropenia and both infections and fever has long been designated as 'febrile neutropenia', but treatment with antimicrobial agents and haematopoietic growth factors has failed to significantly reduce its incidence. Moreover, emerging antimicrobial resistance is becoming a concern that necessitates the judicious use of available antimicrobial agents. In addition to neutropenia, patients who receive cytotoxic therapy experience mucosal barrier injury (MBI) or 'mucositis'. MBI creates a port-de-entrée for resident micro-organisms to cause blood stream infections and contributes directly to the occurrence of fever by disrupting the highly regulated host-microbe interactions, which, even in the absence of an infection, can result in strong inflammatory reactions. Indeed, MBI has been shown to be a pivotal factor in the occurrence of inflammatory complications after cytotoxic therapy. Hence, the concept 'febrile neutropenia' alone may no longer suffice and a new concept 'febrile mucositis' should be recognized as the two are at least complementary. This review we summarizes the existing evidence for both paradigms and proposes new therapeutic approaches to tackle the perturbed host-microbe interactions arising from cytotoxic therapy-induced tissue damage in order to reduce fever in neutropenic patients with cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Use of computed tomography abdomen and pelvis for investigation of febrile neutropenia in adult haematology patients.

    PubMed

    Lim, H Y; Ashby, M; Williams, B; Grigg, A

    2016-11-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the use of computed tomography abdomen and pelvis (CTAP) in febrile neutropenic autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. CTAP was more common in ASCT patients (59%) compared with AML (31%; P  < 0.001). Although abnormal findings were reported in 51%, only 10% resulted in therapy change (addition of anaerobic antibiotic/bowel rest), which would have otherwise been instituted based on clinical grounds. CTAP in these patients rarely provide useful information unsuspected clinically. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  15. Preemptive Antifungal Therapy for Febrile Neutropenic Hematological Malignancy Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Ren, Jinhai; Guo, Xiaonan; Guo, Xiaoling; Cai, Shengxin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency, adverse effects, and pharmacoeconomic impact of empirical and preemptive antifungal therapy for febrile neutropenic hematological malignancy patients in China. Material/Methods Patients with febrile neutropenia during hematological malignancy were randomly divided into an empirical group and a preemptive group. The preemptive antifungal treatment was initiated if patient status was confirmed by clinical manifestation, imaging diagnosis, 1-3-β-D glucan(G) testing, and galactomannan (GM) test. The treatment was ended 2 weeks later if the patient was recovered from neutropenia. Voriconazole was used as the first-line medicine. All patients received intravenous administration of voriconazole every 12 h, with an initiating dose of 400 mg, then the dose was reduced to 200 mg. Results The overall survival rate was 97.1% and 94.6% in the empirical group and preemptive group, respectively, with no significant difference observed (χ2=1.051, P=0.305). However, the occurrence rate of invasive fungal disease (IFD) in the preemptive group was 9.2% vs. 2.2% in the empirical group. Moreover, the mortality rate due to IFD was 0.7% and 2.3% for the empirical group and preemptive group, respectively. The average duration and cost of preemptive antifungal therapy were 13.8±4.7 days and 8379.00±2253.00 RMB, respectively, which were lower than for empirical therapy. However, no significant differences were observed for incidence of adverse effects and hospital stay between the 2 groups. Conclusions Preemptive antifungal therapy for patients with febrile neutropenic hematological malignancy demonstrated a similar survival rate as with empirical therapy but is economically favorable in a Chinese population. PMID:27819257

  16. A national health facility survey of malaria infection among febrile patients in Kenya, 2014.

    PubMed

    Githinji, Sophie; Noor, Abdisalan M; Malinga, Josephine; Macharia, Peter M; Kiptui, Rebecca; Omar, Ahmeddin; Njagi, Kiambo; Waqo, Ejersa; Snow, Robert W

    2016-12-08

    The use of malaria infection prevalence among febrile patients at clinics has a potential to be a valuable epidemiological surveillance tool. However, routine data are incomplete and not all fevers are tested. This study was designed to screen all fevers for malaria infection in Kenya to explore the epidemiology of fever test positivity rates. Random sampling was used within five malaria epidemiological zones of Kenya (i.e., high lake endemic, moderate coast endemic, highland epidemic, seasonal low transmission and low risk zones). The selected sample was representative of the number of hospitals, health centres and dispensaries within each zone. Fifty patients with fever presenting to each sampled health facility during the short rainy season were screened for malaria infection using a rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Details of age, pregnancy status and basic demographics were recorded for each patient screened. 10,557 febrile patients presenting to out-patient clinics at 234 health facilities were screened for malaria infection. 1633 (15.5%) of the patients surveyed were RDT positive for malaria at 124 (53.0%) facilities. Infection prevalence among non-pregnant patients varied between malaria risk zones, ranging from 0.6% in the low risk zone to 41.6% in the high lake endemic zone. Test positivity rates (TPR) by age group reflected the differences in the intensity of transmission between epidemiological zones. In the lake endemic zone, 6% of all infections were among children aged less than 1 year, compared to 3% in the coast endemic, 1% in the highland epidemic zone, less than 1% in the seasonal low transmission zone and 0% in the low risk zone. Test positivity rate was 31% among febrile pregnant women in the high lake endemic zone compared to 9% in the coast endemic and highland epidemic zones, 3.2% in the seasonal low transmission zone and zero in the low risk zone. Malaria infection rates among febrile patients, with supporting data on age and pregnancy status

  17. Parovirus B19 infection in an HIV-infected patient with febrile pancytopenia and acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Alliot, C; Barrios, M; Taib, J; Brunel, M

    2001-01-01

    The case of a 34-year-old male patient with HIV infection referred for severe febrile pancytopenia is reported. Clinical and laboratory evaluations revealed acute hepatitis B infection and concomitant parvovirus B19 infection. The patient died just before treatment with immune globulin was to be administered. Parvovirus B19 has been found to cause a wide variety of hematologic disorders such as neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, and hemophagocytic syndrome. The role of parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of bone marrow or liver involvement is briefly discussed.

  18. Asymmetric dimethylarginine in the assessment of febrile neutropenia in hematological patients.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Marika; Hämäläinen, Sari; Juutilainen, Auni; Koivula, Irma; Pulkki, Kari; Jantunen, Esa

    2017-04-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) has been recognized as an independent prognostic factor for sepsis mortality in intensive care units. No data are available on kinetics or prognostic value of ADMA in hematological patients. We evaluated the ability of ADMA to act as a predictor for complicated course of febrile neutropenia, defined as bacteremia and/or septic shock in adult hematological patients receiving intensive chemotherapy. This prospective study included 87 adult hematological patients with febrile neutropenia after an intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or after an autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Plasma ADMA and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured from the onset of fever (d0) and for 2 days (d1-d2) thereafter. The levels of ADMA were stable or had only minimal changes during the study period. There was no difference between the levels at any time-point in patients having complicated course compared to those without it. On the other hand, CRP levels were significantly higher on d1 (p = 0.016) in patients with bacteremia and/or septic shock than in those without. ADMA was not able to differentiate hematological patients with a complicated course from those without complications. Elevated ADMA levels are probably associated with organ dysfunction, which is rare in this group of patients, of whom about 95% can be successfully managed at the hematology ward.

  19. Effect and safety of granulocyte transfusions in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia or defective granulocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Atay, Didem; Ozturk, Gulyuz; Akcay, Arzu; Yanasik, Melek; Anak, Sema; Devecioglu, Omer

    2011-08-01

    Despite the introduction of new broad-spectrum antibiotics and antifungal therapies over the past decade, infections remains the most frequent cause of death in patients with neutropenia. The aim of this study is to assess the effect and safety of granulocyte transfusions (GTX) for the treatment of severe life-threatening infections in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia or defective granulocyte functions. In this study, 35 pediatric patients with high-risk febrile neutropenia or defective granulocyte functions, who received 111 GTX, were included. GTX were used for 3 consecutive days during infections not responding to antimicrobial therapy. The mean granulocyte content per concentrate was 27.4×10⁹ (min: 4.2×10⁹ to max: 68.4×10⁹) depending on donor's white blood cell count before harvest. GTX were well tolerated in all patients. The infection-related survival rate was 82.4% and overall survival rate was 77.1% at day 30. The overall survival rate was 65.7% and 52% at 3 and 48 months, respectively. GTX is safe and effective in controlling the life-threatening infections. Further randomized controlled studies with long-term follow-up are needed to assess the exact role of GTX in the outcome of patients with neutropenia and patients with defective granulocyte functions.

  20. Management of febrile urinary tract infection among spinal cord injured patients.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Aurélien; Toumi, Adnène; Blanc, Constance; Descatha, Alexis; Bouchand, Frédérique; Salomon, Jérôme; Hanslik, Thomas; Bernuz, Benjamin; Denys, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2016-04-16

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) among patients with neurogenic bladder is a major problem but its management is not well known. We studied the relationship between antibiotic regimen use and the cure rate of those infections among 112 patients with neurogenic bladder. We studied a retrospective cohort of febrile UTI among patients with neurogenic bladder. Drug selection was left to the discretion of the treating physicians, in accordance with current guidelines. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to antibiotic treatment duration (<10 days, between 10 and 15 days, and >15 days). We analysed clinical and microbiogical cure rate one month after the end of antibiotic treatment. The three groups of patients were similar, especially in terms of drug treatment (equal distribution). The cure rates were not significantly different (71.4 %, 54.2 %, and 57.1 %, respectively; p = 0.34). Moreover, there was no difference in cure rate between mono and dual therapy (44 % for monotherapy vs. 40 % for dual therapy; p = 0.71). This descriptive study supports the efficacy of antimicrobial treatment duration of less than 10 days and the use of monotherapy to treat febrile UTI among patients with neurogenic bladder. A randomized control trial is required to confirm these data.

  1. Plasma levels of procalcitonin and eight additional inflammatory molecules in febrile neutropenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Neuenschwander, Letícia Carvalho; Bittencourt, Henrique; Tibúrcio Ribeiro, Ana Flávia; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Teixeira, Jairo Cerqueira; Nobre, Vandack

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the association between different inflammatory markers and specific clinical endpoints in patients with febrile neutropenia. METHOD: We prospectively evaluated the expression of procalcitonin (PCT), interleukin 8 (IL-8), induced protein-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), two soluble TNF-α receptors (sTNF-R I and sTNF-R II), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha, and eotaxin in 37 episodes of febrile neutropenia occurring in 31 hospitalized adult onco-hematologic patients. Peripheral blood samples were collected in the morning at inclusion (day of fever onset) and on days 1, 3, and 7 after the onset of fever. Approximately 2–3 ml of plasma was obtained from each blood sample and stored at -80°C. RESULTS: The sTNF-R II level at inclusion (day 1), the PCT level on the day of fever onset, and the change (day 3 - day 1) in the IL-8 and eotaxin levels were significantly higher in patients who died during the 28-day follow-up. A requirement for early adjustment of antimicrobial treatment was associated with higher day 3 levels of IL-8, sTNF-R II, PCT, and MCP-1. CONCLUSION: Procalcitonin, sTNF-R II, IL-8, MCP-1, and eotaxin could potentially be used to assess the risk of death and the requirement for early adjustment of antimicrobial treatment in febrile, neutropenic onco-hematologic patients. The levels of the other markers showed no association with any of the evaluated endpoints. PMID:22012040

  2. Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chand, Vikram K; Link, Brian K; Ritchie, Justine M; Shannon, Mary; Wooldridge, James E

    2006-04-01

    When uncomplicated neutropenia during doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma is encountered, it is unclear whether or not treatment should be modified. In the present study, we determined the incidence of neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, and the relationship of febrile neutropenia to grade III/IV neutropenia and dose modification, in a large university patient population. We reviewed the charts of patients diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2002 who were treated with ABVD chemotherapy, and seen at the University of Iowa with complete diagnosis, staging, and treatment dosing records. Adequate data was available on 894 treatments in 81 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with ABVD chemotherapy. Grade III/IV neutropenia was present on the scheduled day of treatment in 187 (20.9%) treatments in 64 (79%) patients. Grade III/IV neutropenia was most common at cycle 1 day 15. Febrile neutropenia developed nine times in eight patients, and eight episodes of febrile neutropenia developed when the treatment-day absolute neutrophil count (ANC) > or =1000. Dose delay of >4 days and/or dose reduction to <80% of original doxorubicin dose following grade III/IV neutropenia occurred in 29 of 187 treatments, with no episodes of febrile neutropenia. With grade III/IV neutropenia on the day of therapy, 158 treatments were administered without dose reduction or dose delay with one subsequent episode of febrile neutropenia. Neutropenia during ABVD is common, and dose modification for uncomplicated neutropenia on the day of treatment may not reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia. It may be possible to maintain dose intensity in the face of uncomplicated neutropenia during ABVD therapy.

  3. High dengue NS1 antigenemia in febrile patients in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oyero, Olufunmilayo G; Ayukekbong, James A

    2014-10-13

    We conducted a dengue seroprevalence survey among febrile patients positive or negative for malaria in Ibadan, Nigeria. Dengue IgG and NS1 seroprevalence of 73% and 35%, respectively, was observed, and 43% of those with malaria had acute dengue infection (NS1 determination). On the other hand, all participants with malaria were IgG dengue seropositive consistent with the endemicity of both arthropod-borne infections in the region. These data indicate that dengue is emerging as a major and neglected cause of fever in Nigeria.

  4. Serological Evidence of Chikungunya Virus among Acute Febrile Patients in Southern Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Gudo, Eduardo Samo; Pinto, Gabriela; Vene, Sirkka; Mandlaze, Arcildo; Muianga, Argentina Felisbela; Cliff, Julie; Falk, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has rapidly expanded to several geographical areas, causing frequent outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, South East Asia, South America, and Europe. Therefore, the disease remains heavily neglected in Mozambique, and no recent study has been conducted. Between January and September 2013, acute febrile patients with no other evident cause of fever and attending a health center in a suburban area of Maputo city, Mozambique, were consecutively invited to participate. Paired acute and convalescent serum samples were requested from each participant. Convalescent samples were initially screened for anti-CHIKV IgG using a commercial indirect immunofluorescence test, and if positive, the corresponding acute sample was screened using the same test. Four hundred patients were enrolled. The median age of study participants was 26 years (IQR: 21-33 years) and 57.5% (224/391) were female. Paired blood samples were obtained from 209 patients, of which 26.4% (55/208) were presented anti-CHIKV IgG antibodies in the convalescent sample. Seroconversion or a four-fold titer rise was confirmed in 9 (4.3%) patients. The results of this study strongly suggest that CHIKV is circulating in southern Mozambique. We recommend that CHIKV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute febrile illness in Mozambique and that systematic surveillance for CHIKV should be implemented.

  5. Serological Evidence of Chikungunya Virus among Acute Febrile Patients in Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Gudo, Eduardo Samo; Pinto, Gabriela; Vene, Sirkka; Mandlaze, Arcildo; Muianga, Argentina Felisbela; Cliff, Julie; Falk, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Background In the last two decades, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has rapidly expanded to several geographical areas, causing frequent outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, South East Asia, South America, and Europe. Therefore, the disease remains heavily neglected in Mozambique, and no recent study has been conducted. Methods Between January and September 2013, acute febrile patients with no other evident cause of fever and attending a health center in a suburban area of Maputo city, Mozambique, were consecutively invited to participate. Paired acute and convalescent serum samples were requested from each participant. Convalescent samples were initially screened for anti-CHIKV IgG using a commercial indirect immunofluorescence test, and if positive, the corresponding acute sample was screened using the same test. Results Four hundred patients were enrolled. The median age of study participants was 26 years (IQR: 21–33 years) and 57.5% (224/391) were female. Paired blood samples were obtained from 209 patients, of which 26.4% (55/208) were presented anti-CHIKV IgG antibodies in the convalescent sample. Seroconversion or a four-fold titer rise was confirmed in 9 (4.3%) patients. Conclusion The results of this study strongly suggest that CHIKV is circulating in southern Mozambique. We recommend that CHIKV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute febrile illness in Mozambique and that systematic surveillance for CHIKV should be implemented. PMID:26473605

  6. Piperacillin/tazobactam versus cefozopran for the empirical treatment of pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Mizuho; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ohshima, Junjiro; Cho, Yuko; Kaneda, Makoto; Iguchi, Akihiro; Ariga, Tadashi

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of piperacillin/tazobactam (PIP/TAZO) and cefozopran (CZOP) monotherapy in pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia (FN). A total of 119 febrile episodes in 49 neutropenic pediatric cancer patients (20 females and 29 males) with a median age of 6.8 years (range, 0.3-18.4 years) received randomized treatment either with PIP/TAZO 125 mg/kg every 8 hr or CZOP 25 mg/kg every 6 hr. Clinical response was determined at completion of therapy. Durations of fever and neutropenia, the need for modification of the therapy, and mortality rates were compared between the two groups. The frequency of success without modification of treatment was not significantly different between PIP/TAZO (59.6%) and CZOP (53.2%). Durations of fever and antibiotic therapy did not differ between the treatment groups, and no major side effects were observed in either group. PIP/TAZO and CZOP monotherapy were both effective and safe for the initial empirical treatment of pediatric cancer patients with FN. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder of childhood, and occurs in an age-related manner. FS are classified into simple and complex. FS has a multifactorial inheritance, suggesting that both genetic and environmental factors are causative. Various animal models have elucidated the pathophysiological mechanisms of FS. Risk factors for a first FS are a family history of the disorder and a developmental delay. Risk factors for recurrent FS are a family history, age below 18 months at seizure onset, maximum temperature, and duration of fever. Risk factors for subsequent development of epilepsy are neurodevelopmental abnormality and complex FS. Clinicians evaluating children after a simple FS should concentrate on identifying the cause of the child's fever. Meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for any febrile child. A simple FS does not usually require further evaluation such as ordering electroencephalography, neuroimaging, or other studies. Treatment is acute rescue therapy for prolonged FS. Antipyretics are not proven to reduce the recurrence risk for FS. Some evidence shows that both intermittent therapy with oral/rectal diazepam and continuous prophylaxis with oral phenobarbital or valproate are effective in reducing the risk of recurrence, but there is no evidence that these medications reduce the risk of subsequent epilepsy. Vaccine-induced FS is a rare event that does not lead to deleterious outcomes, but could affect patient and physician attitudes toward the safety of vaccination. PMID:25324864

  8. Clinical factors associated with invasive testing and imaging in patients with complex febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Deborah A; Sturm, Jesse J

    2013-04-01

    Complex febrile seizures (CFSs) are a common diagnosis in the pediatric emergency department (PED). Although multiple studies have shown a low likelihood of intracranial infections and abnormal neuroimaging findings among those who present with CFS, the absence of a consensus recommendation and the diversity of CFS presentations (ie, multiple seizures, prolonged seizure, focal seizure) often drive physicians to do a more extensive workup than needed. Few studies examine the factors that influence providers to pursue invasive testing and emergent neuroimaging. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical factors associated with a more extensive workup in a cohort of patients who present to the PED with CFSs. Patient visits to a tertiary care PED with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis of CFS were reviewed from April 2009 to November 2011. Patients included were 6 months to 6 years of age. Complex febrile seizures were defined as febrile seizures lasting 15 minutes or longer, more than 1 seizure in 24 hours, and/or a focal seizure. Charts were reviewed for demographics, clinical parameters (duration of fever, history of febrile seizure, focality of seizure, antibiotic use before PED, and immunization status), PED management (antiepileptic drugs given in the PED or by Emergency Medical Services, empiric antibiotics given in the PED, laboratory testing, lumbar puncture, or computed tomography [CT] scan), and results (cultures, laboratories, or imaging). A logistic regression model was created to determine which clinical parameters were associated with diagnostic testing. One hundred ninety patients were diagnosed with CFS and met study criteria. Clinical management in the PED included a lumbar puncture in 37%, blood cultures in 88%, urine cultures in 47%, and a head CT scan in 28%. There were no positive cerebral spinal fluid or blood cultures in this cohort. Of the 90 patients, 4 (4.4%) with urine cultures had a urinary

  9. Detection of abnormalities in febrile AIDS patients with In-111-labeled leukocyte and Ga-67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fineman, D.S.; Palestro, C.J.; Kim, C.K.; Needle, L.B.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Solomon, R.W.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1989-03-01

    Thirty-six patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), who were febrile but without localizing signs, underwent indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy 24 hours after injection of labeled white blood cells (WBCs) and were restudied 48 hours after injection of gallium-67 citrate. Fifty-six abnormalities were identified as possible sources of the fever; 27 were confirmed with biopsy. Of these 27, 15 were identified only on In-111 WBC scans (including colitis, sinusitis, and focal bacterial pneumonia); six, only on Ga-67 scans (predominantly Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and lymphadenopathy); and six, on both studies (predominantly pulmonary lesions). In-111 WBC scanning revealed 21 of 27 abnormalities (78%) and gallium scanning, 12 of 27 (44%). If only one scintigraphic study has been performed, particularly with Ga-67, a significant number of lesions would not have been detected. The authors believe radionuclide evaluation of the febrile AIDS patient without localizing signs should begin with In-111 WBC scintigraphy. Gallium scanning may be used depending on results of In-111 WBC scans or if there is a high index of suspicion for P carinii pneumonia.

  10. [Bacteremia due to Abiotrophia defectiva in a febrile neutropenic pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Lopardo, H; Mastroianni, A; Casimir, L

    2007-01-01

    The presence of Granulicatella spp. in bacteremic episodes of neutropenic patients was recently highlighted whereas Abiotrophia defectiva, was only isolated in cases of infectious endocarditis. The aim of this study is to describe a case of A.defectiva bacteremia in a leukemic and febrile (40 degrees C) neutropenic (200 GB/mm3) boy. A.defectiva was only isolated from one of the two processed blood samples. Although the patient was undergoing an episode of varicela which could have accounted as the possible cause of fever, A. defectiva was considered a significant finding because this species is not part of the commensal skin flora. This case suggests that both A. defectiva and Granulicatella spp. should be regarded as possible causes of bacteremia in immunocompromised patients.

  11. [Management of Infection and Febrile Neutropenia in Patients with Solid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Aguado, José María; Cruz, Juan Jesús; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; Aguilar, Manuela; Carmona, Alberto; Cassinello, Javier; Gudiol, Carlota; Jiménez Fonseca, Paula; Lizasoain, Manuel; Marco, Francesc; Ruiz, Isabel; Ruiz, Maribel; Salavert, Miguel; Vicente, David; Carratalà, Jordi

    2015-08-13

    A group of experts from the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) have reviewed in this paper the main aspects to be considered in the evaluation of patients with solid cancer and infectious diseases. They have established a series of recommendations on the prevention of the most prevalent infections in these patients, the use of vaccines, the control measures of vascular catheter infection and prevention of infections before certain surgical procedures. Also the criteria for management of febrile neutropenia and the use of colony-stimulating factors were revised. Finally they provide a series of recommendations for the treatment of cancer patients with severe infection. The document is completed with a series of measures for the control of hospital infection.

  12. Management of infection and febrile neutropenia in patients with solid cancer.

    PubMed

    Virizuela, J A; Carratalà, J; Aguado, J M; Vicente, D; Salavert, M; Ruiz, M; Ruiz, I; Marco, F; Lizasoain, M; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; Gudiol, C; Cassinello, J; Carmona-Bayonas, A; Aguilar, M; Cruz, J J

    2016-06-01

    An expert group from the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC, for its acronym in Spanish) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM, for its acronym in Spanish) have reviewed the main aspects to be considered when evaluating patients with solid cancer and infectious complications contained in this article. Recommendations have, therefore, been put forth regarding the prophylaxis of the most prevalent infections in these patients, the use of vaccines, measures to control infection through vascular catheters, and preventing infection in light of certain surgical maneuvers. The following is a revision of the criteria for febrile neutropenia management and the use of colony-stimulating factors and closes with several guidelines for treating the cancer patient with serious infection. The document concludes with a series of measures to control hospital infection.

  13. Chikungunya and dengue fever among hospitalized febrile patients in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Julian T; Munishi, O Michael; Ooi, Eng Eong; Howe, Shiqin; Lim, Wen Yan; Chow, Angelia; Morrissey, Anne B; Bartlett, John A; Onyango, Jecinta J; Maro, Venance P; Kinabo, Grace D; Saganda, Wilbrod; Gubler, Duane J; Crump, John A

    2012-01-01

    Consecutive febrile admissions were enrolled at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed acute Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Dengue virus (DENV), and flavivirus infection were defined as a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result. Presumptive acute DENV infection was defined as a positive anti-DENV immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunsorbent assay (ELISA) result, and prior flavivirus exposure was defined as a positive anti-DENV IgG ELISA result. Among 870 participants, PCR testing was performed on 700 (80.5%). Of these, 55 (7.9%) had confirmed acute CHIKV infection, whereas no participants had confirmed acute DENV or flavivirus infection. Anti-DENV IgM serologic testing was performed for 747 (85.9%) participants, and of these 71 (9.5%) had presumptive acute DENV infection. Anti-DENV IgG serologic testing was performed for 751 (86.3%) participants, and of these 80 (10.7%) had prior flavivirus exposure. CHIKV infection was more common among infants and children than adults and adolescents (odds ratio [OR] 1.9, P = 0.026) and among HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression (OR 10.5, P = 0.007). CHIKV infection is an important but unrecognized cause of febrile illness in northern Tanzania. DENV or other closely related flaviviruses are likely also circulating.

  14. Incidence and predictors of febrile morbidity after radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for early stage cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kietpeerakool, Chumnan; Lattiwongsakorn, Worashorn; Srisomboon, Jatupol

    2008-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence and independent predictors for febrile morbidity after radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients with FIGO stage IB-IIA cervical cancers who had undergone RHPL at Chiang Mai University Hospital between January 2003 and December 2005, were reviewed. The clinical variables including the age at diagnosis, menopausal status, body mass index, previous cervical conization, tumor size, preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative anemia, operative time, and estimated blood loss were analyzed for prediction of postoperative febrile morbidity. During the study period, 357 women were reviewed. The mean age was 44.7 years. Sixty-five (18.2%) women were postmenopausal. The majority of women (77.3%) were in FIGO stage IB1. The most common histology was squamous cell carcinoma (69.2%). Febrile morbidity was noted in 94 women (26.3%, 95% CI= 21.8-31.2) in whom 25 (7.0%) had urinary tract infection (19), abdominal wound infection (4), and vaginal cuff infection (2), respectively. Only massive blood loss (>1,500 ml) was noted as the significantly independent predictor for febrile morbidity (aOR= 2.7, 95% CI=1.1-6.6, P=0.028). In conclusion, approximately one-fourth of the women undergoing RHPL at our institute had postoperative febrile morbidity. Only massive blood loss is a significant predictor for this complication.

  15. Frequency of Epstein - Barr Virus in Patients Presenting with Acute Febrile Illness in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Masakhwe, Clement; Ochanda, Horace; Nyakoe, Nancy; Ochiel, Daniel; Waitumbi, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Most acute febrile illnesses (AFI) are usually not associated with a specific diagnosis because of limitations of available diagnostics. This study reports on the frequency of EBV viremia and viral load in children and adults presenting with febrile illness in hospitals in Kenya. Methodology/Principal Findings A pathogen surveillance study was conducted on patients presenting with AFI (N = 796) at outpatient departments in 8 hospitals located in diverse regions of Kenya. Enrollment criterion to the study was fever without a readily diagnosable infection. All the patients had AFI not attributable to the common causes of fever in Kenyan hospitals, such as malaria or rickettsiae, leptospira, brucella and salmonella and they were hence categorized as having AFI of unknown etiology. EBV was detected in blood using quantitative TaqMan-based qPCR targeting a highly conserved BALF5 gene. The overall frequency of EBV viremia in this population was 29.2%, with significantly higher proportion in younger children of <5years (33.8%, p = 0.039) compared to patients aged ≥5 years (26.3% for 5–15 years or 18.8% for >15 years). With respect to geographical localities, the frequency of EBV viremia was higher in the Lake Victoria region (36.4%), compared to Kisii highland (24.6%), Coastal region (22.2%) and Semi-Arid region (25%). Furthermore, patients from the malaria endemic coastal region and the Lake Victoria region presented with significantly higher viremia than individuals from other regions of Kenya. Conclusions/Significance This study provides profiles of EBV in patients with AFI from diverse eco-regions of Kenya. Of significant interest is the high frequency of EBV viremia in younger children. The observed high frequencies of EBV viremia and elevated viral loads in residents of high malaria transmission areas are probably related to malaria induced immune activation and resultant expansion of EBV infected B-cells. PMID:27163791

  16. Independent Factors for Prediction of Poor Outcomes in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Günalp, Müge; Koyunoğlu, Merve; Gürler, Serdar; Koca, Ayça; Yeşilkaya, İlker; Öner, Emre; Akkaş, Meltem; Aksu, Nalan Metin; Demirkan, Arda; Polat, Onur; Elhan, Atilla Halil

    2014-01-01

    Background Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a life-threatening condition that requires urgent management in the emergency department (ED). Recent progress in the treatment of neutropenic fever has underscored the importance of risk stratification. In this study, we aimed to determine independent factors for prediction of poor outcomes in patients with FN. Material/Methods We retrospectively evaluated 200 chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenic patients who visited the ED. Upon arrival at the ED, clinical data, including sex, age, vital signs, underlying systemic diseases, laboratory test results, estimated GFR, blood cultures, CRP, radiologic examinations, and Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) score of all febrile neutropenic patients were obtained. Outcomes were categorized as “poor” if serious complications during hospitalization, including death, occurred. Results The platelet count <50 000 cells/mm3 (OR 3.90, 95% CI 1.62–9.43), pulmonary infiltration (OR 3.45, 95% CI 1.48–8.07), hypoproteinemia <6 g/dl (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.27–8.56), respiratory rate >24/min (OR 8.75, 95% CI 2.18–35.13), and MASCC score <21 (OR 9.20, 95% CI 3.98–21.26) were determined as independent risk factors for the prediction of death. The platelet count <50 000 cells/mm3 (OR 3.93, 95% CI 1.42–10.92), serum CRP >50 mg/dl (OR 3.80, 95% CI 1.68–8.61), hypoproteinemia (OR 7.81, 95% CI 3.43–17.78), eGFR ≤90 ML/min/1.73 m2 (OR 3.06, 95% CI 1.13–8.26), and MASCC score <21 (OR 3.45, 95% CI 1.53–7.79) were determined as independent risk factors for the prediction of poor clinical outcomes of FN patients. Platelet count, protein level, respiratory rate, pulmonary infiltration, CRP, MASCC score, and eGFR were shown to have a significant association with outcome. Conclusions The results of our study may help emergency medicine physicians to prevent serious complications with proper use of simple independent risk factors besides MASCC score. PMID

  17. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-04-06

    Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis.

  18. Microorganisms Isolated from Blood Cultures of Febrile Neutropenic Patients in ‹bn-i Sina Hospital.

    PubMed

    Arıkan Akan, Özay

    2003-12-05

    Patients with profound neutropenia have increased risk of septicemia associated with significant morbidity. To provide the appropriate broad-spectrum antimicrobial cover, documentation of causative agents and their antimicrobial susceptibilities should be established in each hospital. During 2001 in Ibn-i Sina Hospital Hematology unit, among 125 isolates from blood cultures of febrile neutropenic patients, gram-negative bacteria was prevalent (56.8%). Among the gram-positives (34.4% of isolates) coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the predominant bacteria (15/43) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (12/43). Escherichia coli (23/71) and Klebsiella spp. (15/71) were the most common species among 71 gram-negative bacteria. Nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli were 21.6% of the isolates. Increase in the isolation rate of Acinetobacter baumannii (7 strains) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (6 strains) was noticed.

  19. The incidence and risk factors of febrile neutropenia in chemotherapy-naïve lung cancer patients receiving etoposide plus platinum.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takumi; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki; Kawamura, Takahisa; Mamesaya, Nobuaki; Kotake, Mie; Kobayashi, Haruki; Omori, Shota; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Wakuda, Kazushige; Ono, Akira; Taira, Tetsuhiko; Murakami, Haruyasu; Omae, Katsuhiro; Mori, Keita; Endo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    This study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of febrile neutropenia in chemotherapy-naïve Japanese patients treated systemically with etoposide plus platinum for lung cancer. The study was a retrospective analysis of 244 patients who were monitored for febrile neutropenia through multiple cycles of the combination of etoposide with platinum, and the associations between incidence of febrile neutropenia and patient characteristics were evaluated. Eighty-eight patients were treated with etoposide plus cisplatin and 156 were treated with etoposide plus carboplatin. Of the 244 patients treated, 198 (81.1%) completed 4 cycles for chemotherapy. Febrile neutropenia was observed in 48 of 244 patients (19.7%), including 18 of 88 (20.5%) patients who received etoposide plus cisplatin and 30 of 156 (19.2%) patients who received etoposide plus carboplatin. Grade 3 or 4 of neutropenia was experienced by a total of 208 patients (85.2%); 79 of 88 (89.8%) receiving etoposide plus cisplatin and 129 of 156 (82.7%) receiving etoposide plus carboplatin. Male gender and previous radiotherapy were identified by multivariate analysis as independent risk factors for febrile neutropenia. These results contrast with findings in Western patients and suggest that ethnic differences exist in the incidence of febrile neutropenia in patients receiving etoposide plus platinum chemotherapy. In addition, our results suggest that primary prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor should be considered for patients with these risk factors for febrile neutropenia prior to treatment with etoposide plus platinum.

  20. Cefepime and amikacin as empirical therapy in patients with febrile neutropaenia: a single-centre phase II prospective survey.

    PubMed

    Mebis, J; Vandeplassche, S; Goossens, H; Berneman, Z N

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the survey was to prospectively evaluate the effectiveness of the combination therapy cefepime and amikacin in the initial treatment of haematology patients with febrile neutropaenia. Two hundred twenty (220) episodes of febrile neutropaenia were analysed in 54 males and 82 females (median age 58 years), most patients had a severe neutropaenia with in 72% of all periods a neutrophil count of less than 100. Microbiological infection was confirmed in 72 cases (32.8%). Sixty-one (61) bacteria were isolated from blood cultures of which 22 were identified as Gram-negative bacteria and 38 as Gram-positive bacteria. Sixty-three (63) episodes (28.6%) were clinically documented, 85 episodes (38.6%) were fever of unknown origin. Clinical cure was achieved in 123 febrile episodes (56%) after initiation of the current antibiotic protocol; another 22 patients (10%) became afebrile after modifying the initial antibiotic regimen 48 hours or longer after treatment initiation. In 61 cases (27.7%) there was persistent fever or re-occurrence of fever, these cases were considered as treatment failure. Eight patients (3.6%) died during the study. This survey has demonstrated that the combination therapy with cefepime and amikacin can be considered as an effective treatment for febrile neutropaenia in high-risk haematological patients in our centre with a high incidence of resistance to Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Successful emergency department interventions that reduce time to antibiotics in febrile pediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sandra; Nypaver, MIchele; Hebert, Katherine; Benner, Christopher; Stanley, Rachel; Cohen, Daniel; Rogers, Alexander; Goldstick, Jason; Mahajan, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Children with cancer and fever are at high risk for sepsis related death. Rapid antibiotic delivery (< 60 minutes) has been shown to reduce mortality. We compared patient outcomes and describe interventions from three separate quality improvement (QI) projects conducted in three United States (US) tertiary care pediatric emergency departments (EDs) with the shared aim to reduce time to antibiotic (TTA) to < 60 minutes in febrile pediatric oncology patients (Temperature > 38.0 C). A secondary objective was to identify interventions amenable to translation to other centers. We conducted a post project analysis of prospectively collected observational data from children < 18 years visiting these EDs during independently conducted QI projects. Comparisons were made pre to post intervention periods within each institution. All interventions were derived independently using QI methods by each institution. Successful as well as unsuccessful interventions were described and common interventions adopted by all sites identified. A total of 1032 ED patient visits were identified from the three projects. Improvement in median TTA delivery (min) pre to post intervention(s) was 118.5–57.0 at site 1, 163.0–97.5 at site 2, and 188.0–111.5 at site 3 (p<.001 all sites). The eight common interventions were 1) Triage application of topical anesthetic 2) Rapid room placement & triage 3) Resuscitation room placement of ill appearing children 4) Close proximity to central line equipment 5) Antibiotic administration before laboratory analyses 6) Consensus clinical practice guideline establishment 7) Family pre-ED education for fever and 8) Staff project updates. This core set of eight low cost, high yield QI interventions were developed independently by the three ED's which led to substantial reduction in time to antibiotic delivery in children with cancer presenting with fever. These interventions may inform future QI initiatives in other settings caring for febrile pediatric

  2. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pinpoint factors that can help predict which children are likely to have reoccurring or prolonged febrile seizures. Investigators continue to monitor the long-term impact that febrile seizures might have on intelligence, behavior, school achievement, and the development of epilepsy. ...

  3. Febrile seizures and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+).

    PubMed

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2015-06-01

    To review the literature about febrile seizures and GEFS plus with special emphasis on management and outcome. Selected literature review. Febrile seizures are the most common convulsive event in humans, occurring in 2-6% of the population. The aetiology is complex with strong evidence for a heterogeneous genetic predisposition interacting with fever of any cause, with certain viral infections having a greater effect. A large amount of literature has established that febrile seizures have no long-term consequences on cognition or behaviour. Unfortunately, about 40% of children with a first febrile seizure will have a recurrence. The strongest predictor of recurrence is age <14-16 months at the time of the first febrile seizure. Epilepsy follows febrile seizures in ∼3% cases, with the concepts of simple and complex febrile seizures providing relatively weak prediction. Very prolonged febrile seizures may lead to mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy although the degree of risk remains uncertain. Investigations beyond establishing the cause of the provoking fever are nearly always unnecessary. Treatment is mainly reassurance and there is some evidence that parents eventually "come to grips" with the fear that their children are dying during a febrile seizure. Antipyretic medications are remarkably ineffective to prevent recurrences. Daily and intermittent prophylactic medications are ineffective or have unacceptable side effects or risks. "Rescue" benzodiazepines may prevent prolonged recurrences for selected patients with a first prolonged febrile seizure although this has not been proven. Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a complex autosomal dominant disorder usually caused by mutations in SCN1A (a voltage-gated sodium channel). One third of patients have febrile seizures only; two thirds have a variety of epilepsy syndromes, both focal and generalized. Febrile seizures may distress parents but rarely have any long

  4. High seroprevalence of antibodies against spotted fever and scrub typhus bacteria in patients with febrile Illness, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Thiga, Jacqueline W; Mutai, Beth K; Eyako, Wurapa K; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L; Waitumbi, John N

    2015-04-01

    Serum samples from patients in Kenya with febrile illnesses were screened for antibodies against bacteria that cause spotted fever, typhus, and scrub typhus. Seroprevalence was 10% for spotted fever group, <1% for typhus group, and 5% for scrub typhus group. Results should help clinicians expand their list of differential diagnoses for undifferentiated fevers.

  5. Procalcitonin as a potent marker of bacterial infection in febrile Afro-Caribbean patients at the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Limper, M; de Kruif, M D; Ajubi, N E; van Zanten, A P; Brandjes, D P M; Duits, A J; van Gorp, E C M

    2011-07-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) has been shown to be of additional value in the work-up of a febrile patient. This study is the first to investigate the additional value of PCT in an Afro-Caribbean febrile population at the emergency department (ED) of a general hospital. Febrile patients were included at the ED. Prospective, blinded PCT measurements were performed in patients with a microbiologically or serologically confirmed diagnosis or a strongly suspected diagnosis on clinical grounds. PCT analysis was performed in 93 patients. PCT levels differentiated well between confirmed bacterial and confirmed viral infection (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.82, sensitivity 85%, specificity 69%, cut-off 0.24 ng/mL), between confirmed bacterial infection and non-infectious fever (AUC of 0.84, sensitivity 90%, specificity 71%, cut-off 0.21 ng/mL) and between all bacterial infections (confirmed and suspected) and non-infectious fever (AUC of 0.80, sensitivity 85%, specificity 71%, cut-off 0.21 ng/mL). C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were shown to be less accurate when comparing the same groups. This is the first study showing that, in a non-Caucasian febrile population at the ED, PCT is a more valuable marker of bacterial infection than CRP. These results may improve diagnostics and eventually decrease antibiotic prescriptions in resource-limited settings.

  6. Plasma presepsin level is an early diagnostic marker of severe febrile neutropenia in hematologic malignancy patients.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kaoru; Shigeta, Masayo; Okuno, Takafumi; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Kito, Katsuyuki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yamagishi, Yuka; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2017-01-05

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a common infectious complication in chemotherapy. The mortality of FN is higher in hematologic malignancy patients, and early diagnostic marker is needed. Presepsin is a prompt and specific marker for bacterial sepsis, but its efficacy in severe febrile neutropenia (FN) is not well confirmed. We tried to clarify whether it is a useful maker for early diagnosis of FN in patients during massive chemotherapy. We measured plasma presepsin levels every 2-3 day in FN cases and evaluated its change during the course of massive chemotherapy. The patients had hematologic malignancy or bone marrow failure, and in all cases, neutropenia was severe during the episode. The baseline levels, onset levels, increase rate at FN onset, and onset / baseline ratio were evaluated for their efficacy of early FN diagnosis. Eleven episodes of bacteremia (six gram negatives and five gram positives) in severe neutropenia were analyzed in detail. While plasma presepsin level was strongly associated to the CRP level (r = 0.61, p < 0.01), it was not associated with the absolute WBC count (r = -0.19, p = 0.19), absolute neutrophil count (r = -0.11, p = 0.41) or absolute monocyte count (r = -0.12, p = 0.40). The average of onset presepsin level was 638 ± 437 pg/mL and the cutoff value (314 pg/mL) has detected FN onset in 9 of 11 cases. The two cases undetected by presepsin were both Bacillus species bacteremia. Plasma presepsin level is a reliable marker of FN even in massive chemotherapy with very low white blood cell counts. Closer monitoring of this molecule could be a help for early diagnosis in FN. But bacteremia caused by Bacillus species was an exception in our study.

  7. Acute oral candidiasis during febrile episodes in immunocompromised patients with haematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, O J; Andersen, P L

    1990-01-01

    To estimate clinical, pathogenic and serological aspects of acute oral candidiasis (AOC) during febril episodes in patients with haematologic malignancies, 23 consecutive patients who developed AOC within 7 days from start of fever were compared with 23 consecutive patients who did not develop AOC. The duration of fever and severe granulocytopenia (less than 0.5 x 10(9)/l) was significantly longer in patients with AOC than in patients without AOC, the median differences between the patients with and without AOC being 4 and 3 days, respectively. Development of AOC could not be correlated to a change in the qualitative composition of the oral microflora. The thrombocyte count was lower in patients with AOC on day 4, whereas no differences were found in leukocyte counts. The prevalences of Candida albicans agglutinin titres greater than or equal to 5 were similar in patients with (24%) and without AOC (33%), and in controls (29%). Seroconversion or a significant increase in the agglutinin titre occurred in 4 patients with AOC and long-lasting fever, who became afebrile after systemic antifungal therapy. It is concluded that AOC is associated with long-lasting fever and decreased bone marrow function as judged by low thrombocyte counts, but not related to specific bacteria in the oral cavity or to an increased occurrence of C. albicans antibodies in the serum.

  8. Imbalances in serum angiopoietin concentrations are early predictors of septic shock development in patients with post chemotherapy febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Febrile neutropenia carries a high risk of sepsis complications, and the identification of biomarkers capable to identify high risk patients is a great challenge. Angiopoietins (Ang -) are cytokines involved in the control microvascular permeability. It is accepted that Ang-1 expression maintains endothelial barrier integrity, and that Ang-2 acts as an antagonizing cytokine with barrier-disrupting functions in inflammatory situations. Ang-2 levels have been recently correlated with sepsis mortality in intensive care units. Methods We prospectively evaluated concentrations of Ang-1 and Ang-2 at different time-points during febrile neutropenia, and explored the diagnostic accuracy of these mediators as potential predictors of poor outcome in this clinical setting before the development of sepsis complications. Results Patients that evolved with septic shock (n = 10) presented higher levels of Ang-2 measured 48 hours after fever onset, and of the Ang-2/Ang-1 ratio at the time of fever onset compared to patients with non-complicated sepsis (n = 31). These levels correlated with sepsis severity scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that imbalances in the concentrations of Ang-1 and Ang-2 are independent and early markers of the risk of developing septic shock and of sepsis mortality in febrile neutropenia, and larger studies are warranted to validate their clinical usefulness. Therapeutic strategies that manipulate this Ang-2/Ang-1 imbalance can potentially offer new and promising treatments for sepsis in febrile neutropenia. PMID:20509945

  9. Monotherapy with piperacillin/tazobactam versus cefepime as empirical therapy for febrile neutropenia in pediatric cancer patients: a randomized comparison.

    PubMed

    Corapcioglu, Funda; Sarper, Nazan; Zengin, Emine

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and cost of piperacillin/tazobactam with cefepime monotherapy in children with febrile neutropenia. A prospective randomized study in children and adolescent with cancer was conducted. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either 80 mg/kg piperacillin/10 mg/kg tazobactam every 6 h (maximum 4.5 g/dose) or cefepime 50 mg/kg every 8 h (maximum 2 g/dose). Treatment modification was defined as all the changes in the empirical antimicrobials after the first 96 h. Overall treatment success was defined as cure of febrile episode with or without modification. Cost of hospitalization, antimicrobial drugs, and supportive therapy were calculated. Fifty febrile neutropenic episodes (25 in the piperacillin/tazobactam group, 25 in the cefepime group) in 27 pediatric cancer patients were evaluated. The groups were comparable in terms of age, gender, body weight, primary diagnosis, disease status, initial neutrophil count, and duration of neutropenia. Microbiologically and clinically documented infection rate was 46%. There was no infection-related mortality in the study period. The treatment success of initial empirical therapy without modification was not different in the 2 groups (56% in piperacillin/tazobactam group and 48% in cefepime group). Anti-anaerobic drugs were added more frequently in the cefepime group. Duration of fever, neutropenia, treatment, and cost of therapy were not different in the treatment groups. Piperacillin/tazobactam monotherapy is as effective as cefepime monotherapy in febrile neutropenia of pediatric cancer patients.

  10. [Quality analysis of malaria blood smear preparations of febrile patients in Chenzhou Prefecture, 2014].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-qin; Zhu, Han-wu

    2015-10-01

    To standardize the malaria smear preparations of febrile patients in Chenzhou Prefecture, Hunan Province, so as to provide the technical support for malaria elimination. According to the Technical Solutions to Eliminate Malaria (2011 edition) , the blood smear preparations of febrile patients from each county, included more than 3% negatives and all positives, were reviewed monthly in 2014. The quality of blood smear manufacture, dyeing, cleanliness and results was reviewed by malaria microscopic examination experts. The data were analyzed with the descriptive epidemiological methods. Totally 231 blood smears were reviewed in 2014 with a reviewed rate of 6.91%. The blood smear production qualified rate was 80.52%, the dyeing pass rate was 84.42%, the cleanliness pass rate was 86.58%, and there were no false detections and no leak detections. The highest blood smear production qualified rate, dyeing pass rate and cleanliness pass rate were found in Guiyang County and Linwu County, with all the rates of 100% respectively. The lowest blood smear production qualified rate and cleanliness pass rate were found in Yizhang County, with the rates of 52.94 % and 70.59% respectively. The lowest blood smear dyeing pass rate was found in Yongxing County with the rate of 63.64%. There were statistically significant differences between Guiyang County and Yizhang County in the production qualified rates and cleanliness pass rates (χ2 = 18.60, 9.73, both P < 0.01). There was a statistically significant difference between Guiyang County and Yongxing County in the dyeing pass rates (χ2 = 11.43, P < 0.01). Through the review of blood smears, the problems will be timely discovered. Therefore, the blood smear quality should improve, which is helpful for achieving the goal of malaria elimination.

  11. Early discontinuation of intravenous antimicrobial therapy in pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson-Viden, Heather; Grundy, Paul E; Robinson, Joan L

    2005-01-01

    Background There are no standard criteria for when to discontinue intravenous antimicrobial therapy (IVAMT) in children with febrile neutropenia (FN), but it is now common to discontinue IVAMT and discharge patients with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ≤ 500 /mm3. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of a large cohort of children with FN who had IVAMT discontinued with an ANC ≤ 500 /mm3 Methods A retrospective chart review was completed of patients in the Northern Alberta Children's Cancer Program with FN and no apparent clinical source of fever from June 1, 1997 to July 1, 2002. Results Out of a total of 275 patients, 127 (46%) had at least one episode of FN, with FN occurring in patients with sarcomas more commonly than in those with leukemia/ lymphoma and least in those with other solid tumors. In 59 of 276 episodes of FN (21%) patients had a microbiologically defined infection at admission. Of the 217 remaining episodes, 112 of 199 patients (56%) with known neutrophil counts had IVAMT discontinued before their absolute neutrophil count (ANC) reached 500 /mm3 at the discretion of the clinician. Fever recurred in only two of these patients after discharge, and there were no bacterial infections diagnosed after parenteral antibiotics were discontinued. Conclusion Even without use of standard criteria for early discharge, clinicians appear to be skilled at selecting children with FN who can safely have IVAMT discontinued with an ANC ≤ 500 /mm3. PMID:15904510

  12. Hippocampal atrophy, epilepsy duration, and febrile seizures in patients with partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Theodore, W H; Bhatia, S; Hatta, J; Fazilat, S; DeCarli, C; Bookheimer, S Y; Gaillard, W D

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a variety of factors that may be associated with the presence of hippocampal formation (HF) atrophy in patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), including a history of complex or prolonged febrile seizures (FS), age at seizure onset, and epilepsy duration. To determine whether epilepsy duration is related to HF atrophy. We performed MRIs on 35 patients with uncontrolled CPS who had temporal lobe ictal onset on video-EEG. None had evidence for an alien tissue lesion or extra-hippocampal seizure onset. All had a history of secondary generalization. Brain structures were drawn on consecutive images and pixel points summed from successive pictures to calculate volumes. Nine patients with a history of complex or prolonged FS had smaller ipsilateral HF volume and ipsilateral/contralateral ratio than did patients without a history of FS. Epilepsy duration had a significant relation to ipsilateral HF volume and ipsilateral/contralateral ratio. In a multivariate analysis, the effect of duration, but not age at onset or scan, was significant. Patients with a history of FS did not have earlier age at epilepsy onset or longer duration. A history of FS predicted the severity of HF atrophy in our patients. Age at onset or study was not a significant factor. Epilepsy duration, however, did have a significant effect, suggesting that, after an initial insult, progressive HF damage may occur in patients with persistent seizures.

  13. Bloodstream infections and inpatient length of stay among pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Robles, Martha; Ojha, Rohit P; González, Miriam; Ojeda-Diezbarroso, Karla; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Jackson, Bradford E; Johnson, Kyle M; Caniza, Miguela A

    2014-11-01

    We assessed the association between bloodstream infections (BSIs) and inpatient length of stay among pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia in Mexico City. The estimated length of stay for BSIs was 19 days, which corresponded with a 100% (95% confidence limits, 60%-160%) relative increase in the length of stay compared with patients for whom no pathogen was identified. Feasible options for reducing the length of stay should be considered to alleviate patient and resource burden.

  14. Colony-stimulating factor use and impact on febrile neutropenia among patients with newly diagnosed breast, colorectal, or non-small cell lung cancer who were receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    McCune, Jeannine S; Sullivan, Sean D; Blough, David K; Clarke, Lauren; McDermott, Cara; Malin, Jennifer; Ramsey, Scott

    2012-01-01

    To determine the impact of primary prophylactic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) use on febrile neutropenia in a large patient population receiving contemporary chemotherapy regimens to treat breast cancer, colorectal cancer, or non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Retrospective claims analysis. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Puget Sound cancer registry and insurance claims records. A total of 2728 patients aged 25 years or older who received a diagnosis of breast cancer (998 patients), colorectal cancer (688 patients), or NSCLC (1042 patients) between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2005, and received chemotherapy. Initial chemotherapy regimen, CSF use (filgrastim or pegfilgrastim), and febrile neutropenia events were evaluated after the first chemotherapy administration. Subsequently, febrile neutropenia rates in patients receiving primary prophylactic CSF were compared with febrile neutropenia rates in patients receiving CSF in settings other than primary prophylaxis or not at all. The impact of primary prophylactic CSF could not be assessed for patients with colorectal cancer or NSCLC because only 1 and 18 febrile neutropenia events, respectively, occurred in those receiving primary prophylactic CSF. Of the 998 patients with breast cancer, 72 (7.2%) experienced febrile neutropenia, 28 of whom received primary prophylactic CSF. In the patients with breast cancer, we observed that primary prophylactic CSF use was associated with reduced febrile neutropenia rates; however, the analysis may have been confounded by unmeasured factors associated with febrile neutropenia. The impact of primary prophylactic CSFs on febrile neutropenia rates could not be demonstrated. Given the substantive cost of CSFs to pharmacy budgets, there are numerous opportunities for pharmacists to optimize CSF use. Research studies are needed to evaluate if guideline-directed prescribing of primary prophylactic CSFs can improve clinical outcomes. © 2012

  15. ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia and Haematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Camus, Vincent; Edet-Sanson, Agathe; Bubenheim, Michael; Hitzel, Anne; Becker, Stéphanie; David, Marion; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Lenain, Pascal; Jardin, Fabrice; Contentin, Nathalie; Fontoura, Marie Laure; Cardinael, Nathalie; Vaudaux, Sandrine; Dubois, Sydney; Tilly, Hervé; Vera, Pierre; Leprêtre, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of hyper-metabolic infection sites revealed by fluorine-18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT) in patients with febrile neutropenia (FN). Forty-eight consecutive patients with haematological malignancies and persistent FN (temperature ≥ 38°C and neutrophil count <500 cells/μl for more than two days) as a consequence of intensive chemotherapy were prospectively included. Pathological FDG uptakes identified 31 foci of infections located in the lungs (n=15, 48.4 %), colon (n=4, 12.9%), pancreas (n=2, 6.5%), skin (n=3, 9.7%), ear-nose-throat area (n=5, 16.1%), central venous catheter tract (n=1, 3.2%) and gallbladder (n=1, 3.2%). These pathological FDG uptakes were observed in half of the 48 patients (n=24). Among the 38 patients with a clinical diagnosis of infection, 23 showed a pathological FDG uptake, resulting in a FDG-PET/CT sensitivity of 61% (95% CI, 43-76%). Our study confirmed the ability of FDG-PET/CT to diagnose infections in patients with persistent FN. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Randomized controlled trial comparing ciprofloxacin and cefepime in febrile neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Takahiko; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Terakura, Seitaro; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanada, Masamitsu; Nagai, Hirokazu; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Ozeki, Kazutaka; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Emi, Nobuhiko; Naoe, Tomoki

    2013-06-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CPFX) is a potential alternative in patients with febrile neutropenia (FN) because of its activity against Gram-negative organisms. We conducted a non-inferiority, open-label, randomized controlled trial comparing intravenous CPFX and cefepime (CFPM) for FN patients with hematological malignancies. Patients aged from 15 to 79 years with an absolute neutrophil count of <0.500 × 10(9/)l were eligible, and were randomized to receive 300 mg of CPFX or 2g of CFPM every 12h. Initial treatment efficacy, overall response, and early toxicity were evaluated. Fifty-one episodes were included in this trial, and 49 episodes (CPFX vs. CFPM: 24 vs. 25) were evaluated. Treatment efficacy at day 7 was significantly higher in the CFPM group (successful clinical response: nine with CPFX and 19 with CFPM; p=0.007). The response was better in high-risk patients with neutrophil counts of ≤ 0.100 × 10(9/)l (p=0.003). The overall response during the study period was similar between the CPFX and CFPM groups (p=0.64). Adverse events were minimal, and all patients could continue the treatment. We could not prove the non-inferiority of CPFX in comparison with CFPM for the initial treatment of FN. CFPM remains the standard treatment of choice for FN. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of gentamicin 7 mg/kg once daily for pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia: a pilot project.

    PubMed

    Newby, Brandi; Prevost, Derek; Lotocka-Reysner, Hanna

    2009-12-01

    Use of once daily aminoglycosides continues to increase for the pediatric population, including oncology patients. Concerns have been identified and still need to be resolved including the optimal dose, frequency, and monitoring parameters. We completed a study to determine if empiric use of gentamicin 7 mg/kg once daily in pediatric patients admitted with febrile neutropenia provided extrapolated peaks and drug-free intervals consistent with suggested preferred levels. A review of the patient's chart was completed following their discharge from the hospital between September 2006 and October 2007. A community hospital. A consecutive sample of 17 encounters for pediatric patients admitted for febrile neutropenia that received once daily gentamicin. Extrapolated peak levels and drug-free intervals. There were seven patients with a total of 17 encounters. The mean extrapolated peak level was 16.9 mg/L. The mean drug-free interval was 15.7 h. Both target peak and drug-free interval were obtained for two encounters (12%), which was one patient. Gentamicin 7 mg/kg/dose once daily does not provide preferred levels for all pediatric febrile neutropenic patients. Further investigation is required to ensure that once daily gentamicin regimens for pediatric oncology patients provide adequate clinical success.

  18. Febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, Leena D

    2010-11-24

    Simple febrile seizures are generalised in onset, last <15 minutes, and do not occur more than once in 24 hours. Complex febrile seizures are longer lasting, have focal symptoms, and can recur within 24 hours. This review only deals with simple febrile seizures. About 2% to 5% of children in the USA and Western Europe, and 6% to 9% of infants and children in Japan will have experienced at least one febrile seizure by the age of 5 years. Simple febrile seizures may slightly increase the risk of developing epilepsy, but have no known adverse effects on behaviour, scholastic performance, or neurocognition. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments given during episodes of fever in children with one or more previous simple febrile seizures? What are the effects of long-term (daily, for >1 month) anticonvulsant treatment in children with a history of simple febrile seizures? What are the effects of treatments on reducing the risk of subsequent epilepsy in children with a history of simple febrile seizures? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: anticonvulsants (intermittent or continuous) and antipyretic treatments (physical antipyretic measures, paracetamol, ibuprofen).

  19. Febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Janet L; Carapetian, Stephanie A; Hageman, Joseph R; Kelley, Kent R

    2013-12-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures, affecting 2% to 5% of children. They are considered benign and self-limiting; however, a febrile seizure is a terrifying event for most parents, and is one of the most common causes of trips to the emergency room. A febrile seizure is "an event in infancy or childhood, usually occurring between 3 months and 5 years of age, associated with fever but without evidence of intracranial infection or defined cause." This definition excludes seizures with fever in children who have had a prior afebrile seizure. In 2011, The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published a clinical practice guideline defining a febrile seizure as "a seizure accompanied by fever (temperature ≥ 100.4°F or 38°C by any method), without central nervous system infection, that occurs in infants and children 6 through 60 months of age." Febrile seizures are further classified as simple or complex. This article reviews the evaluation, management, and prognosis of simple and complex seizures, including febrile status epilepticus. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Prognostic evaluation of febrile neutropenia in apparently stable adult cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Bayonas, A; Gómez, J; González-Billalabeitia, E; Canteras, M; Navarrete, A; Gonzálvez, M L; Vicente, V; Ayala de la Peña, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Predictive models to identify low-risk febrile neutropenia (FN) have been developed with heterogeneous samples, which included stable and unstable patients, solid tumours, acute leukaemia and bone marrow transplantation. These models fail to recognise 5–15% of cases with unexpected complications, and literature specifically addressing apparently stable patients (ASPs) is scarce. Methods: We reviewed 861 episodes of FN in outpatients with solid tumours, including 692 (80%) episodes with apparent clinical stability. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of this latter group and explore the possibility of stratifying it according to the presenting features. A case–control study was performed and the MASCC index was evaluated. Results: The rates of complications and bacteraemia in ASPs were 7.3% and 6.2%, respectively. The MASCC index yielded a low sensitivity to detect complications (36%). Prognostic factors were identified: ECOG performance status ⩾2, chronic bronchitis, chronic heart failure, stomatitis NCI grade ⩾2, monocytes <200 mm−3 and stress hyperglycaemia. Conclusion: A very simple assessment is useful to classify the patients with FN according to the risk of complications. A few additional variables may predict the clinical course of the patients. We additionally show that the MASCC index applied to this specific group has a low sensitivity to predict complications. PMID:21811253

  1. Bacteria causing bacteremia in pediatric cancer patients presenting with febrile neutropenia--species distribution and susceptibility patterns.

    PubMed

    Miedema, Karin G E; Winter, Rik H L J; Ammann, Roland A; Droz, Sara; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; de Bont, Eveline S J M; Kamps, Willem A; van de Wetering, Marianne D; Tissing, Wim J E

    2013-09-01

    Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric cancer patients. The aim of this study was to establish the microbiological spectrum and the susceptibility patterns of bacteremia-causing bacteria in pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia in relation to the use of prophylactic and empirical antibiotics. We analyzed positive blood cultures of pediatric cancer patients presenting with febrile neutropenia between 2004 and 2011 in Groningen and Amsterdam (the Netherlands) and in Bern (Switzerland), using different antibiotic prophylactic and empirical regimens. A total of 156 patients with 202 bacteremias, due to 248 bacteria species, were enrolled. The majority (73%) of bacteremias were caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were observed significantly more often in Bern, where no fluoroquinolone prophylaxis was used. Ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria were cultured more often from patients who did receive ciprofloxacin prophylaxis, compared to the patients who did not (57 versus 11%, p = 0.044). Gram-positive bacteria predominated in this study. We showed that the use of prophylactic antibiotics in pediatric cancer patients was associated with increased resistance rates, which needs further study. The strategy for empiric antimicrobial therapy for febrile neutropenia should be adapted to local antibiotic resistance patterns.

  2. Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) spectrum: clinical manifestations and SCN1A mutations in Indonesian patients.

    PubMed

    Herini, Elisabeth Siti; Gunadi; Harahap, Indra Sari Kusuma; Yusoff, Surini; Morikawa, Satoru; Patria, Suryono Yudha; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Sunartini; Sutaryo; Takada, Satoshi; Matsuo, Masafumi; Nishio, Hisahide

    2010-06-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a childhood genetic epilepsy syndrome. GEFS+ includes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, and SCN1A mutations have frequently been reported among the GEFS+-related gene abnormalities. In this study, to clarify the distributions of the clinical subtypes, we analyzed 34 families with GEFS+ in Indonesia using the hospital records of the patients and questionnaires for the family members. The number of patients with febrile seizures plus (FS+), FS+ and afebrile generalized/partial seizures, borderline severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEB) and severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI) were 9, 11, 7, and 7, respectively. Most patients had a family history of febrile seizures. Next, we performed molecular analyses to clarify the contributions of SCN1A mutations to the development of the GEFS+ subtypes. Only 3 of 34 probands showed SCN1A mutations. These mutations were two missense mutations, p.V1612I and p.C1756G, in two patients with SMEI and SMEB, and one silent mutation, p.G1762G, in a patient with FS+ and afebrile partial seizures. In conclusion, the majority of GEFS+ patients in Indonesia were not associated with SCN1A mutations. To detect the GEFS+-causing mutations, we must search and analyze other genes in these patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Emergency Department Management of Patients With Febrile Neutropenia: Guideline Concordant or Overly Aggressive?

    PubMed

    Baugh, Christopher W; Wang, Thomas J; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Baker, Olesya N; Brooks, Gabriel A; Reust, Audrey C; Pallin, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    The Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend risk stratification of patients with febrile neutropenia (FN) and discharge with oral antibiotics for low-risk patients. We studied guideline concordance and clinical outcomes of FN management in our emergency department (ED). Our urban, tertiary care teaching hospital provides all emergency and inpatient services to a large comprehensive cancer center. We performed a structured chart review of all FN patients seen in our ED from January 2010 to December 2014. Using electronic medical records, we identified all visits by patients with fever and an absolute neutrophil count of <1000 cells/mm(3) and then included only patients without a clear source of infection. Following national guidelines, we classified patients as low or high risk and assessed guideline concordance in disposition and parenteral versus oral antibiotic therapy by risk category as our main outcome measure. Of 173 qualifying visits, we classified 44 (25%) as low risk and 129 (75%) as high risk. Management was guideline concordant in 121 (70%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 63% to 77%). Management was guideline discordant in 43 (98%, 95% CI = 88% to 100%) of low-risk patients versus 9 (7%, 95% CI = 3% to 13%) of high-risk patients (relative risk [RR] = 14, 95% CI = 7.5 to 26). Of 52 guideline-discordant cases, 36 (83%, 95% CI = 72% to 93%) involved low-risk cases with treatment that was more aggressive than recommended. Guideline concordance was low among low-risk patients, with management tending to be more aggressive than recommended. Unless data emerge that undermine the guidelines, we believe that many of these hospitalizations and parenteral antibiotic regimens can be avoided, decreasing the risks associated with hospitalization, while improving antibiotic stewardship and patient comfort. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. A study on the serum adenosine deaminase activity in patients with typhoid Fever and other febrile illnesses.

    PubMed

    Ketavarapu, Sameera; Ramani G, Uma; Modi, Prabhavathi

    2013-04-01

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity, but its clinical significance in typhoid fever has not yet been characterized. The present study was taken up to evaluate the serum ADA activity in patients of typhoid fever. The levels of ADA were also measured in the patients who were suffering from other febrile illnesses. This was a case control study. The subjects who were included in this study were divided into 3 groups. Group A consisted of 50 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 50 patients, both males and females of all age groups, who were suffering from culture positive typhoid fever. Group C consisted of 50 patients who were suffering from febrile illnesses other than typhoid fever like viral fever, gastro enteritis, malaria, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infections, etc. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects who were under study. The serum ADA level was found to be increased in the patients of typhoid fever as compared to that in those with other febrile illnesses and in the controls. From the present study, it can be concluded that there was a statistically significant increase in the serum ADA levels in the patients with typhoid.

  5. A Study on the Serum Adenosine Deaminase Activity in Patients with Typhoid Fever and Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Ketavarapu, Sameera; Ramani G., Uma; Modi, Prabhavathi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity, but its clinical significance in typhoid fever has not yet been characterized. The present study was taken up to evaluate the serum ADA activity in patients of typhoid fever. The levels of ADA were also measured in the patients who were suffering from other febrile illnesses. Material and Method: This was a case control study. The subjects who were included in this study were divided into 3 groups. Group A consisted of 50 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 50 patients, both males and females of all age groups, who were suffering from culture positive typhoid fever. Group C consisted of 50 patients who were suffering from febrile illnesses other than typhoid fever like viral fever, gastro enteritis, malaria, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infections, etc. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects who were under study. Results: The serum ADA level was found to be increased in the patients of typhoid fever as compared to that in those with other febrile illnesses and in the controls. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that there was a statistically significant increase in the serum ADA levels in the patients with typhoid. PMID:23730630

  6. C-reactive protein and the MASCC risk index identify high-risk patients with febrile neutropenia and hematologic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Combariza, Juan F; Lombana, Milton; Pino, Luis E; Arango, Marcos

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the prognostic usefulness of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) risk score in association with the value of C-reactive protein (CRP) to identify high-risk patients with febrile neutropenia and hematologic neoplasms. A retrospective cohort study in which the MASCC score and the CRP values were used to assess the mortality risk at 30 days among patients with febrile neutropenia and hematologic malignancies was performed. Two hundred thiry-seven patients with febrile neutropenia were analyzed; the mortality rate within 30 days was 9 %. High-risk patients according to the MASCC score were significantly more likely to experience adverse outcomes, such as being transferred to the intensive care unit (RR 3.55; CI 95 % 2.73-6.62, p < 0.001) and death (RR 2.21; CI 95 % 1.74-2.79, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed a strong association between the high-risk group identified by the MASCC score (HR 3.0; CI 95 % 1.12-13.54, p = 0.032) and the mean levels of CRP (HR 17; CI 95 % 2.21-136.48, p = 0.007) and survival. The survival rate within 30 days was 100 % for the patients with a low-risk MASCC score and a mean CRP less than 15 mg/dL. This rate was only 64 % for high-risk patients with a mean CRP greater than 15 mg/dL. The MASCC risk score combined with the mean CRP value successfully identifies patients with febrile neutropenia and hematological malignancies and a high risk of death.

  7. Association between use of air-conditioning or fan and survival of elderly febrile patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, G; Tansarli, G S; Mavros, M N; Spiropoulos, T; Barbas, S G; Falagas, M E

    2013-09-01

    Elderly individuals are more susceptible to excess summer heat. We sought to examine whether the use of cooling systems (air-conditioning or fan) affected the clinical outcomes of elderly febrile patients. We prospectively followed elderly (≥ 75 years old) febrile patients requesting the medical services of the SOS Doctors (a network of physicians performing house-call visits) from July 10 to August 20, 2011. Patients who used cooling systems ("users") were compared with those who did not ("non-users") regarding mortality, clinical outcome of primary illness (improvement or deterioration), and emergency hospitalization. Prospectively collected data were available for 339 individual elderly febrile patients. "Users" had lower mortality (10 % vs. 19 %, p < 0.05) than "non-users"; no difference was noted on clinical improvement (85 % vs. 76 %, p = 0.11) and emergency hospitalization rates (21 % vs. 30 %, p = 0.16). No difference was noted between users of air-conditioning and fan regarding mortality or clinical improvement, but fan use was associated with more hospitalizations (37 % vs. 19 %, p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis (assessing daily ambient temperature, use of cooling systems, patient age, and living conditions), the sole variable significantly associated with mortality was the non-use of cooling systems [odds ratio (OR): 2.18, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 1.06-4.50]. The use of air-conditioning or fan during hot summer periods appeared to be beneficial for elderly febrile patients living in a large city. Large prospective studies are warranted in order to provide further insight into potential individual and public health initiatives aiming to alleviate the impact of excess summer heat on the health of elderly patients.

  8. Cost effectiveness of outpatient treatment for febrile neutropaenia in adult cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Teuffel, O; Amir, E; Alibhai, S; Beyene, J; Sung, L

    2011-04-26

    There is uncertainty whether low-risk episodes of febrile neutropaenia (FN) in adult cancer patients are best managed in the in- or outpatient setting. A Monte Carlo cost-utility model was created to compare four treatment strategies for low-risk FN: (1) treatment in hospital with intravenous antibiotics (HospIV); (2) early discharge after 48 h in-patient observation, followed by oral outpatient treatment (EarlyDC); (3) outpatient management with IV antibiotics (HomeIV); and (4) outpatient management with oral antibiotics (HomePO). The model used a health-care payer perspective and a time horizon of one FN episode. Outcome measures were quality-adjusted FN episodes (QAFNE), costs (Canadian dollars) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER). Parameter uncertainty was assessed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses. HomePO was cost saving ($3470 vs $4183), but less effective (0.65 QAFNE vs 0.72 QAFNE) than HomeIV. The corresponding ICER was $10,186 per QAFNE. Both EarlyDC ($6115; 0.66 QAFNE) and HospIV ($13,557; 0.62 QAFNE) were dominated strategies. At a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $4,000 per QAFNE, HomePO and HomeIV were cost effective in 54 and 38% of simulations, respectively. For adult cancer patients with an episode of low-risk FN, treatment in hospital is more expensive and less effective than outpatient strategies.

  9. Cost effectiveness of outpatient treatment for febrile neutropaenia in adult cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Teuffel, O; Amir, E; Alibhai, S; Beyene, J; Sung, L

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is uncertainty whether low-risk episodes of febrile neutropaenia (FN) in adult cancer patients are best managed in the in- or outpatient setting. Methods: A Monte Carlo cost–utility model was created to compare four treatment strategies for low-risk FN: (1) treatment in hospital with intravenous antibiotics (HospIV); (2) early discharge after 48 h in-patient observation, followed by oral outpatient treatment (EarlyDC); (3) outpatient management with IV antibiotics (HomeIV); and (4) outpatient management with oral antibiotics (HomePO). The model used a health-care payer perspective and a time horizon of one FN episode. Outcome measures were quality-adjusted FN episodes (QAFNE), costs (Canadian dollars) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER). Parameter uncertainty was assessed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results: HomePO was cost saving ($3470 vs $4183), but less effective (0.65 QAFNE vs 0.72 QAFNE) than HomeIV. The corresponding ICER was $10 186 per QAFNE. Both EarlyDC ($6115; 0.66 QAFNE) and HospIV ($13 557; 0.62 QAFNE) were dominated strategies. At a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $4 000 per QAFNE, HomePO and HomeIV were cost effective in 54 and 38% of simulations, respectively. Interpretation: For adult cancer patients with an episode of low-risk FN, treatment in hospital is more expensive and less effective than outpatient strategies. PMID:21468048

  10. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium perfringens infection Symptoms: Anemia • fever • shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Antimicrobial chemotherapy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. Case Report: We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. Conclusions: C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  11. The predictive and diagnostic values of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein for clinical outcome in febrile neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Erten, Nilgun; Genc, Sema; Besisik, Sevgi K; Saka, Bulent; Karan, M Akif; Tascioglu, Cemil

    2004-05-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) represents a new marker of systemic inflammatory reactions to bacterial infections. The main aim in this study was to determine the diagnostic value of PCT in predicting the clinical severity of febril neutropenic attacks, compare it with that of C-reactive protein (CRP), and clarify its importance in culture-positive attacks. Between February 2001 and April 2002, 36 patients who were neutropenic due to various hematologic disorders and febrile were entered into the study. Blood samples were obtained on the first day of fever for the measurement of serum PCT and CRP levels. In clinically severe neutropenic fever attacks, means of serum PCT and CRP levels were measured as 0.93+/-1.33 ng/mL and 67+/-24 mg/L, while they were 0.37+/-0.23 ng/mL and 32+/-19 mg/L in clinically mild ones (p = 0.033 and p < 0.001). On the other hand, no statistical significance was found between culture-positive and negative attacks when either serum PCT or CRP levels were taken into consideration (p = 0.133 and p = 0.141). The specificity and positive predictive value of the serum PCT test for severe febrile neutropenia was higher than that of the serum CRP test (0.80 vs. 0.57 and 0.50 vs. 0.39). However, sensitivity and negative predictive value for CRP were higher than the values for PCT (1.00 vs. 0.40 and 1.00 vs. 0.73). Diagnostic value and positive likelihood ratio of CRP for severe febrile neutropenia were higher than those of PCT (71 vs. 67 and 2.32 vs. 2.00). PCT and CRP are comparable with each other in prediction of the clinical severity of febrile neutropenic attacks. Furthermore, serum CRP levels correlate with the duration of fever.

  12. Safety of Early Discharge for Low-Risk Patients With Febrile Neutropenia: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Talcott, James A.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Clark, Jack A.; Siegel, Robert D.; Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Lu, Charles; Godley, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Febrile neutropenia commonly complicates cancer chemotherapy. Outpatient treatment may reduce costs and improve patient comfort but risk progression of undetected medical problems. Patients and Methods By using our validated algorithm, we identified medically stable inpatients admitted for febrile neutropenia (neutrophils < 500/μL) after chemotherapy and randomly assigned them to continued inpatient antibiotic therapy or early discharge to receive identical antibiotic treatment at home. Our primary outcome was the occurrence of any serious medical complication, defined as evidence of medical instability requiring urgent medical attention. Results We enrolled 117 patients with 121 febrile neutropenia episodes before study termination for poor accrual. We excluded five episodes as ineligible and three because of inadequate documentation of the study outcome. Treatment groups were clinically similar, but sociodemographic imbalances occurred because of block randomization. The median presenting absolute neutrophil count was 100/μL. Hematopoietic growth factors were used in 38% of episodes. The median neutropenia duration was 4 days (range, 1 to 15 days). Five outpatients were readmitted to the hospital. Major medical complications occurred in five episodes (8%) in the hospital arm and four (9%) in the home arm (95% CI for the difference, −10% to 13%; P = .56). No study patient died. Patient-reported quality of life was similar on both arms. Conclusion We found no evidence of adverse medical consequences from home care, despite a protocol designed to detect evidence of clinical deterioration. These results should reassure clinicians who elect to treat rigorously characterized low-risk patients with febrile neutropenia in suitable outpatient settings with appropriate surveillance for unexpected clinical deterioration. PMID:21931024

  13. Intensified prophylaxis of febrile neutropenia with ofloxacin plus rifampin during severe short-duration neutropenia in patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, L; Martino, R; Subirà, M; Brunet, S; Sureda, A; Sierra, J

    1999-08-01

    To analyse the impact of intensified prophylaxis with ofloxacin plus rifampin (O+R) in neutropenic patients we used this combination in 40 consecutive cycles of ifosfamide, cytarabine, prednisolone and etoposide (IAPVP-16). This salvage chemotherapy regimen for lymphoma usually produces four to six days of severe neutropenia without significant extrahematologic toxicities. We compared the infectious morbidity during neutropenia under O+R with 58 consecutives cycles using either norfloxacin or no prophylaxis (control group). Fifty-three percent of control group patients and 20% of the O+R group developed febrile neutropenia that required hospital admission (p<0.001, 95% CI for the difference between both proportions of 16% to 51%). Bacteremia was documented in two patients in the O+R group and six in the control group (p=0.08). Gram-positive cocci (GPC) accounted for all six bacteremias in the control group, while both cases in O+R group were due to a quinolone-resistant gram-negative bacteria (GNB) (p<0.01 for GPC). Five patients (13%) who received O+R and 23 (40%) in control group developed fever of unknown origin, p<0.001, while the total duration of hospitalization due to febril neutropenia was 42 days and 158 days, respectively (p<0.001). In conclusion, intensified prophylaxis with O+R appears to reduce the rate of febrile neutropenia and GPC bacteremia in patients with short and severe neutropenia, which translates into a reduction in the need for hospitalization.

  14. Chikungunya Fever Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Galate, Lata Baswanna; Agrawal, Sachee R; Shastri, Jayanthi S; Londhey, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chikungunya fever (CHIK) is an arboviral disease. Dengue fever (DENG) and CHIK are indistinguishable clinically and need to be differentiated by laboratory investigations. Purpose: This study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence of CHIK mono-infection and CHIK and DENG dual infection in suspected patients. We also analyzed the age, sex distribution, joint involvement, and relation of joint movement restriction with visual analog scale (VAS). Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients clinically suspected with DENG and CHIK were enrolled from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai from April 2012 to October 2013. The detailed history and examination findings were recorded. Serum samples were subjected to DENG and CHIK immunoglobulin G (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The seroprevalence of CHIK was 12.5%. Mono-infection of CHIK was 3%, and CHIK and DENG dual infection was 9.5%. Most affected age group in CHIK cases was 46–60 years wherein female preponderance was seen. All 6 patients with CHIK mono-infection had fever and joint involvement; knee and elbow were the most commonly affected joints. All CHIK patients had VAS score of 6–10 with restricted joint movement. Of the patients with dual infection, the majorities were from 31 to 45 years with male preponderance; all had fever and joint pain mainly affecting knee and elbow. Of patients who had VAS score 6–10 in patients with dual infection, only 5.26% had restricted joint movement. Conclusion: IgM ELISA for Chikungunya infection should be included in the routine laboratory tests for acute febrile illness. PMID:27365916

  15. Pharmacokinetics of piperacillin/tazobactam in cancer patients with hematological malignancies and febrile neutropenia after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with febrile neutropenia (FN) exhibit changes in extracellular fluid that may alter the plasma concentrations of beta-lactams and result in therapeutic failure or toxicity. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin/tazobactam in patients with hematological malignancies and FN after receiving chemotherapy at a primary public cancer center. Methods This was an open, nonrandomized, observational, descriptive, and prospective study. Samples from 15 patients with hematological malignancies and FN were evaluated after the administration of chemotherapy. Five blood samples were taken from each patient when the antibiotic level was at steady-state 10, 60, 120, 180, and 350 min after each dose. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using gel diffusion with Bacillus subtilis. All study participants provided written informed consent. Results We investigated the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in 14 patients between the ages of 18 years and 59 years and with a mean absolute neutrophil count of 208 cells per mm3 (standard deviation (SD) ± 603.2). The following pharmacokinetic measurements were obtained: maximum concentration, 94.1–1133 mg/L; minimum concentration, 0.47–37.65 mg/L; volume of distribution, 0.08–0.65 L/kg (mean, 0.34 L/kg); drug clearance (CL), 4.42–27.25 L/h (mean, 9.93 L/h); half-life (t1/2), 0.55–2.65 h (mean, 1.38 h); and area under the curve, 115.12–827.16 mg · h/L. Conclusion Patients with FN after receiving chemotherapy exhibited significant variations in the pharmacokinetic parameters of piperacillin compared with healthy individuals; specifically, FN patients demonstrated an increase in t1/2 and decreased CL. PMID:24286231

  16. Dose-Dependent Effect of Granulocyte Transfusions in Hematological Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Di Blasi, Roberta; Orlando, Nicoletta; Fianchi, Luana; Zini, Gina; Sica, Simona; De Stefano, Valerio; Pagano, Livio

    2016-01-01

    It is still under debate whether granulocyte transfusions (GTs) substantially increase survival in patients with febrile neutropenia. We retrospectively examined data relative to 96 patients with hematological malignancies receiving 491 GTs during 114 infectious episodes (IE). Patients were grouped according to the median doses of granulocytes transfused during the infectious episode (low-dose group: <1.5-x108 cells/Kg; standard-dose group: 1.5–3.0x108 cells/Kg and high-dose group: >3.0x108 cells/Kg). The impact of clinical, microbiological and GT-related variables on the infection-related mortality (IRM) was investigated. The IRM was not influenced by the number of GTs or by the total amount of granulocytes received, whereas a dose-related effect of the median dose received for IE was detected at univariate analysis (IRM of 18.4% in the standard-dose group, 44.4% in the low-dose group and 48.4% in the high-dose group, p = 0.040) and confirmed at multivariate analysis (OR 3.7, IC 95% 1.5–8.9; 0.004 for patients not receiving standard doses of GTs). Moreover, patients receiving GTs at doses lower or greater than standard had increased risk for subsequent ICU admission and reduced overall survival. The dose-related effect of GTs was confirmed in bacterial but not in fungal infections. Preliminary findings obtained from a subgroup of patients candidate to GTs revealed that levels of inflammatory response mediators increase in a dose-related manner after GTs, providing a possible explanation for the detrimental effect exerted by high-dose transfusions. GTs can constitute a valuable tool to improve the outcome of infections in neutropenic patients, provided that adequate recipient-tailored doses are supplied. Further investigations of the immunomodulatory effects of GTs are recommended. PMID:27487075

  17. Pharmacokinetics of piperacillin/tazobactam in cancer patients with hematological malignancies and febrile neutropenia after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, José C; Cuervo, Sonia I; Garzón, Javier R; Gómez, Julio C; Díaz, Jorge Augusto; Silva, Edelberto; Sánchez, Ricardo; Cortés, Jorge A

    2013-11-28

    Patients with febrile neutropenia (FN) exhibit changes in extracellular fluid that may alter the plasma concentrations of beta-lactams and result in therapeutic failure or toxicity. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin/tazobactam in patients with hematological malignancies and FN after receiving chemotherapy at a primary public cancer center. This was an open, nonrandomized, observational, descriptive, and prospective study. Samples from 15 patients with hematological malignancies and FN were evaluated after the administration of chemotherapy. Five blood samples were taken from each patient when the antibiotic level was at steady-state 10, 60, 120, 180, and 350 min after each dose. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using gel diffusion with Bacillus subtilis. All study participants provided written informed consent. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in 14 patients between the ages of 18 years and 59 years and with a mean absolute neutrophil count of 208 cells per mm³ (standard deviation (SD) ± 603.2). The following pharmacokinetic measurements were obtained: maximum concentration, 94.1-1133 mg/L; minimum concentration, 0.47-37.65 mg/L; volume of distribution, 0.08-0.65 L/kg (mean, 0.34 L/kg); drug clearance (CL), 4.42-27.25 L/h (mean, 9.93 L/h); half-life (t(1/2)), 0.55-2.65 h (mean, 1.38 h); and area under the curve, 115.12-827.16 mg · h/L. Patients with FN after receiving chemotherapy exhibited significant variations in the pharmacokinetic parameters of piperacillin compared with healthy individuals; specifically, FN patients demonstrated an increase in t1(/2) and decreased CL.

  18. Cost effectiveness of primary pegfilgrastim prophylaxis in patients with breast cancer at risk of febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Maureen J; Grutters, Janneke P; Peters, Frank P; Mandigers, Caroline M; Dercksen, M Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M; Nortier, Hans J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W; van Warmerdam, Laurence J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Jacobs, Esther M; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C; Smilde, Tineke J; van der Velden, Annette W; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W; van Gastel, Saskia M; Joore, Manuela A; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C

    2013-12-01

    Guidelines advise primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) prophylaxis during chemotherapy if risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) is more than 20%, but this comes with considerable costs. We investigated the incremental costs and effects between two treatment strategies of primary pegfilgrastim prophylaxis. Our economic evaluation used a health care perspective and was based on a randomized study in patients with breast cancer with increased risk of FN, comparing primary G-CSF prophylaxis throughout all chemotherapy cycles (G-CSF 1-6 cycles) with prophylaxis during the first two cycles only (G-CSF 1-2 cycles). Primary outcome was cost effectiveness expressed as costs per patient with episodes of FN prevented. The incidence of FN increased from 10% in the G-CSF 1 to 6 cycles study arm (eight of 84 patients) to 36% in the G-CSF 1 to 2 cycles study arm (30 of 83 patients), whereas the mean total costs decreased from € 20,658 (95% CI, € 20,049 to € 21,247) to € 17,168 (95% CI € 16,239 to € 18,029) per patient, respectively. Chemotherapy and G-CSF determined 80% of the total costs. As expected, FN-related costs were higher in the G-CSF 1 to 2 cycles arm. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for the G-CSF 1 to 6 cycles arm compared with the G-CSF 1 to 2 cycles arm was € 13,112 per patient with episodes of FN prevented. We conclude that G-CSF prophylaxis throughout all chemotherapy cycles is more effective, but more costly, compared with prophylaxis limited to the first two cycles. Whether G-CSF prophylaxis throughout all chemotherapy cycles is considered cost effective depends on the willingness to pay per patient with episodes of FN prevented.

  19. Easy and inexpensive molecular detection of dengue, chikungunya and zika viruses in febrile patients.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Eliana P; Sánchez-Quete, Fernando; Durán, Sandra; Sandoval, Isabel; Castellanos, Jaime E

    2016-11-01

    Dengue (DENV), chikungunya (CHIKV) and zika (ZIKV) are arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) sharing a common vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti. At initial stages, patients infected with these viruses have similar clinical manifestations, however, the outcomes and clinical management of these diseases are different, for this reason early and accurate identification of the causative virus is necessary. This paper reports the development of a rapid and specific nested-PCR for detection of DENV, CHIKV and ZIKV infection in the same sample. A set of six outer primers targeting the C-preM, E1, and E gene respectively was used in a multiplex one-step RT-PCR assay, followed by the second round of amplification with specific inner primers for each virus. The specificity of the present assay was validated with positive and negative serum samples for viruses and supernatants of infected cells. The assay was tested using clinical samples from febrile patients. In these samples, we detected mono and dual infections and a case of triple co-infection DENV-CHIKV-ZIKV. This assay might be a useful and an inexpensive tool for detection of these infections in regions where these arboviruses co-circulate.

  20. Safety of early discharge for low-risk patients with febrile neutropenia: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Talcott, James A; Yeap, Beow Y; Clark, Jack A; Siegel, Robert D; Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Lu, Charles; Godley, Paul A

    2011-10-20

    Febrile neutropenia commonly complicates cancer chemotherapy. Outpatient treatment may reduce costs and improve patient comfort but risk progression of undetected medical problems. By using our validated algorithm, we identified medically stable inpatients admitted for febrile neutropenia (neutrophils < 500/μL) after chemotherapy and randomly assigned them to continued inpatient antibiotic therapy or early discharge to receive identical antibiotic treatment at home. Our primary outcome was the occurrence of any serious medical complication, defined as evidence of medical instability requiring urgent medical attention. We enrolled 117 patients with 121 febrile neutropenia episodes before study termination for poor accrual. We excluded five episodes as ineligible and three because of inadequate documentation of the study outcome. Treatment groups were clinically similar, but sociodemographic imbalances occurred because of block randomization. The median presenting absolute neutrophil count was 100/μL. Hematopoietic growth factors were used in 38% of episodes. The median neutropenia duration was 4 days (range, 1 to 15 days). Five outpatients were readmitted to the hospital. Major medical complications occurred in five episodes (8%) in the hospital arm and four (9%) in the home arm (95% CI for the difference, -10% to 13%; P = .56). No study patient died. Patient-reported quality of life was similar on both arms. We found no evidence of adverse medical consequences from home care, despite a protocol designed to detect evidence of clinical deterioration. These results should reassure clinicians who elect to treat rigorously characterized low-risk patients with febrile neutropenia in suitable outpatient settings with appropriate surveillance for unexpected clinical deterioration.

  1. Evaluation of Spleen Glucose Metabolism Using (18)F-FDG PET/CT in Patients with Febrile Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Hwang, Sang Hyun; Jung, Seung Min; Lee, Sang-Won; Park, Yong-Beom; Yun, Mijin; Song, Jason Jungsik

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of (18)F-FDG uptake by the spleen in patients with autoimmune disease. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed Severance Hospital's electronic medical records of patients hospitalized for the evaluation of fever who underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT. We found 91 patients with autoimmune diseases and 101 patients with localized infection. (18)F-FDG uptake was assessed by measuring SUV in the spleen and liver. The spleen-to-liver ratio of the SUVmean (SLRmean) was calculated. Clinical and laboratory parameters were collected and evaluated for association with SLRmean In-hospital mortality was defined as all-cause mortality during hospital admission for fever. Results: SLRmean was significantly higher in autoimmune disease than in localized infectious disease (1.28 ± 0.43 vs. 0.91 ± 0.21, P < 0.001). In autoimmune disease, SLRmean was correlated with monocytes, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, albumin, and ferritin. Analysis of receiver-operating-characteristic curves revealed that in comparison with laboratory parameters, SLRmean had the highest performance in differentiating autoimmune from localized infectious disease. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that high SLRmean and low platelets were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in febrile autoimmune disease. Conclusion: These findings suggest that spleen glucose metabolism is increased in febrile autoimmune disease. Spleen (18)F-FDG uptake may provide information useful in differentiating febrile autoimmune disease from localized infectious disease and predicting clinical outcomes in febrile autoimmune disease. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  2. Could Neutrophil CD64 Expression Be Used as a Diagnostic Parameter of Bacteremia in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia?

    PubMed Central

    Efe İris, Nur; Yıldırmak, Taner; Gedik, Habip; Şimşek, Funda; Aydın, Demet; Demirel, Naciye; Yokuş, Osman

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate if neutrophil CD64 expression in febrile neutropenia patients could be used as an early indicator of bacteremia. Materials and Methods: All consecutive patients older than 18 years of age who had developed febrile neutropenia episodes due to hematological malignancies were included in the study. Those patients who had significant growth in their blood cultures constituted the case group, while those who had febrile neutropenia without any growth in their cultures and who did not have any documented infections formed the control group. Blood culture bottles were incubated in the Bact ALERT 3D system (bioMerieux, France), identification and susceptibility testing were performed using an automated broth microdilution method (VITEK 2, bioMerieux), and CD64 expression analysis was performed by the flow cytometry method. C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured by turbidimetric methods (Biosystems, Spain) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was measured by the Wintrobe method. Results: In total, we prospectively evaluated 31 febrile episodes. The case group consisted of 17 patients while the control group included 14 patients. CD64 was found on neutrophils of the case group patients with a mean count of 8006 molecules/cell and of control group with a mean count of 2786 molecules/cell. CD64 levels of the case group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p=0.005). In the differentiation of the case group from the control group, a 2500 cut-off value for CD64 had significant [AUC=0.792 (0.619-0.965)] predictive value (p=0.001). In the prediction of patients with a 2500 cut-off value for CD64, sensitivity was 94.1%, positive predictive value was 76.2%, specificity was 64.3%, and negative predictive value was 90.0%. CRP levels and ESR values did not differ significantly between the groups (p=0.005). Conclusion: Neutrophil CD64 expression could be a good predictor as an immune parameter with high

  3. Moxifloxacin is more effective than tosufloxacin in reducing chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Akihito; Yoshiki, Yumiko; Masamoto, Yosuke; Hangaishi, Akira; Nannya, Yasuhito; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies have shown the prophylactic efficacy of fluoroquinolones against infections in patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. However, little is known about the differences between fluoroquinolones, and there are some concerns about the emergence of resistant bacteria. In this retrospective study, we compared the prophylactic efficacy of moxifloxacin (MFLX) and tosufloxacin (TFLX) for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. The cumulative incidences of febrile neutropenia were 74.7% (59 of 79) in the MFLX group and 81.1% (219 of 270) in the TFLX group (log-rank test p = 0.044). Subgroup analysis revealed a more prominent prophylactic advantage of MFLX in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or long duration of neutropenia (p = 0.013 and 0.008, respectively). There were no significant differences in the incidences of adverse events and fluoroquinolone resistant bacteria in both groups. This study indicates that prophylaxis with MFLX is more beneficial to reduce febrile neutropenia episodes than TFLX, especially in patients with high-risk disease.

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency A- variant in febrile patients in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tamar E; Maloy, Halley; von Fricken, Michael; St Victor, Yves; Romain, Jean R; Okech, Bernard A; Mulligan, Connie J

    2014-08-01

    Haiti is one of two remaining malaria-endemic countries in the Caribbean. To decrease malaria transmission in Haiti, primaquine was recently added to the malaria treatment public health policy. One limitation of primaquine is that, at certain doses, primaquine can cause hemolytic anemia in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (G6PDd). In this study, we genotyped two mutations (A376G and G202A), which confer the most common G6PDd variant in West African populations, G6PDd A-. We estimated the frequency of G6PDd A- in a sample of febrile patients enrolled in an on-going malaria study who represent a potential target population for a primaquine mass drug administration. We found that 33 of 168 individuals carried the G6PDd A- allele (includes A- hemizygous males, A- homozygous or heterozygous females) and could experience toxicity if treated with primaquine. These data inform discussions on safe and effective primaquine dosing and future malaria elimination strategies for Haiti.

  5. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, HamidReza; Sajjadi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term “geriatric syndrome” is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed. PMID:26989409

  6. A nomogram for predicting complications in patients with solid tumours and seemingly stable febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paula Jiménez; Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; García, Ignacio Matos; Marcos, Rosana; Castañón, Eduardo; Antonio, Maite; Font, Carme; Biosca, Mercè; Blasco, Ana; Lozano, Rebeca; Ramchandani, Avinash; Beato, Carmen; de Castro, Eva Martínez; Espinosa, Javier; Martínez-García, Jerónimo; Ghanem, Ismael; Cubero, Jorge Hernando; Manrique, Isabel Aragón; Navalón, Francisco García; Sevillano, Elena; Manzano, Aránzazu; Virizuela, Juan; Garrido, Marcelo; Mondéjar, Rebeca; Arcusa, María Ángeles; Bonilla, Yaiza; Pérez, Quionia; Gallardo, Elena; del Carmen Soriano, Maria; Cardona, Mercè; Lasheras, Fernando Sánchez; Cruz, Juan Jesús; Ayala, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background: We sought to develop and externally validate a nomogram and web-based calculator to individually predict the development of serious complications in seemingly stable adult patients with solid tumours and episodes of febrile neutropenia (FN). Patients and methods: The data from the FINITE study (n=1133) and University of Salamanca Hospital (USH) FN registry (n=296) were used to develop and validate this tool. The main eligibility criterion was the presence of apparent clinical stability, defined as events without acute organ dysfunction, abnormal vital signs, or major infections. Discriminatory ability was measured as the concordance index and stratification into risk groups. Results: The rate of infection-related complications in the FINITE and USH series was 13.4% and 18.6%, respectively. The nomogram used the following covariates: Eastern Cooperative Group (ECOG) Performance Status ⩾2, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic cardiovascular disease, mucositis of grade ⩾2 (National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria), monocytes <200/mm3, and stress-induced hyperglycaemia. The nomogram predictions appeared to be well calibrated in both data sets (Hosmer–Lemeshow test, P>0.1). The concordance index was 0.855 and 0.831 in each series. Risk group stratification revealed a significant distinction in the proportion of complications. With a ⩾116-point cutoff, the nomogram yielded the following prognostic indices in the USH registry validation series: 66% sensitivity, 83% specificity, 3.88 positive likelihood ratio, 48% positive predictive value, and 91% negative predictive value. Conclusions: We have developed and externally validated a nomogram and web calculator to predict serious complications that can potentially impact decision-making in patients with seemingly stable FN. PMID:27187687

  7. Early discontinuation of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with persistent primary vesicoureteral reflux initially detected during infancy: outcome analysis and risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Kimihiko; Mitsui, Takahiko; Kitta, Takeya; Nakamura, Michiko; Kanno, Yukiko; Kon, Masafumi; Nishimura, Yoko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively assessed the incidence of and risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection in children during active surveillance after early discontinuation of antibiotic prophylaxis. We retrospectively evaluated 9 females and 61 uncircumcised males diagnosed with primary vesicoureteral reflux before age 1 year who had persistent reflux on followup voiding cystourethrogram and were subsequently followed under active surveillance without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis. Patients with secondary vesicoureteral reflux or associated urological abnormality were excluded. Clinical outcomes, including incidence of febrile urinary tract infection and new scar formation, were evaluated. Risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection were also analyzed. Mean age at stopping continuous antibiotic prophylaxis was 21 months, and mean followup was 61 months. During active surveillance 21 patients had febrile urinary tract infection, and the 5-year infection-free rate under active surveillance was 67.5%. One or 2 foci of minimal new scarring developed in 4 of 16 patients who underwent followup dimercapto-succinic acid scan after febrile urinary tract infection. On multivariate analysis dilated vesicoureteral reflux on followup voiding cystourethrogram was the only significant risk factor for febrile urinary tract infection. This study revealed that about two-thirds of patients with persistent vesicoureteral reflux were free of febrile urinary tract infection during 5 years of active surveillance. Those with dilated vesicoureteral reflux on followup voiding cystourethrogram are at significantly greater risk for febrile urinary tract infection. Accordingly active surveillance, especially in patients with nondilated vesicoureteral reflux on followup voiding cystourethrogram, seems to be a safe option even in children who have not yet been toilet trained. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Serologic Surveillance for West Nile Virus and Other Flaviviruses in Febrile Patients, Encephalitic Patients, and Asymptomatic Blood Donors in Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, María de Lourdes Garza; Rodríguez Rodriguez, Diana R.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; López, Miguel Á. Reyes; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Jimenez, Javier Ramos; Farfán-Ale, José A.; Tamez, Rogelio Cazares; Longoria, César Martinez; Aguilar, Maria I. Tavitas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A clinical and serological investigation was performed to determine the presence of West Nile virus (WNV) among febrile and encephalitic patients in northern Mexico. In addition, asymptomatic blood donors were serologically assayed for WNV to determine the seroprevalence of WNV in the general population. The study cohort consisted of 1432 individuals (588 febrile patients, 44 encephalitic patients, and 800 asymptomatic blood donors). All subjects were negative for WNV IgM. Sixty subjects were reactive for dengue virus (DENV) IgM (16 blood donors and 44 febrile patients). A subset (n = 425) of individuals was also screened by ELISA for flavivirus IgG. The prevalence of flavivirus IgG in febrile patients, encephalitic patients, and blood donors ranged from 40% to 59%. A subset (n = 147) of sera reactive for flavivirus IgG was further tested by plaque reduction neutralization test. Six individuals with no history of travel during the preceding 12 months were seropositive for WNV. Another 65 individuals were seropositive for DENV1 and 24 were seropositive for DENV2. The high prevalence of dengue antibodies in northern Mexico appears to limit the incidence of WNV infection in this region. Article Summary Line Antibodies to WNV, DENV-1, and DENV-2 were identified in humans in northern Mexico. PMID:19492946

  9. A nomogram for predicting complications in patients with solid tumours and seemingly stable febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Paula Jiménez; Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; García, Ignacio Matos; Marcos, Rosana; Castañón, Eduardo; Antonio, Maite; Font, Carme; Biosca, Mercè; Blasco, Ana; Lozano, Rebeca; Ramchandani, Avinash; Beato, Carmen; de Castro, Eva Martínez; Espinosa, Javier; Martínez-García, Jerónimo; Ghanem, Ismael; Cubero, Jorge Hernando; Manrique, Isabel Aragón; Navalón, Francisco García; Sevillano, Elena; Manzano, Aránzazu; Virizuela, Juan; Garrido, Marcelo; Mondéjar, Rebeca; Arcusa, María Ángeles; Bonilla, Yaiza; Pérez, Quionia; Gallardo, Elena; Del Carmen Soriano, Maria; Cardona, Mercè; Lasheras, Fernando Sánchez; Cruz, Juan Jesús; Ayala, Francisco

    2016-05-24

    We sought to develop and externally validate a nomogram and web-based calculator to individually predict the development of serious complications in seemingly stable adult patients with solid tumours and episodes of febrile neutropenia (FN). The data from the FINITE study (n=1133) and University of Salamanca Hospital (USH) FN registry (n=296) were used to develop and validate this tool. The main eligibility criterion was the presence of apparent clinical stability, defined as events without acute organ dysfunction, abnormal vital signs, or major infections. Discriminatory ability was measured as the concordance index and stratification into risk groups. The rate of infection-related complications in the FINITE and USH series was 13.4% and 18.6%, respectively. The nomogram used the following covariates: Eastern Cooperative Group (ECOG) Performance Status ⩾2, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic cardiovascular disease, mucositis of grade ⩾2 (National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria), monocytes <200/mm(3), and stress-induced hyperglycaemia. The nomogram predictions appeared to be well calibrated in both data sets (Hosmer-Lemeshow test, P>0.1). The concordance index was 0.855 and 0.831 in each series. Risk group stratification revealed a significant distinction in the proportion of complications. With a ⩾116-point cutoff, the nomogram yielded the following prognostic indices in the USH registry validation series: 66% sensitivity, 83% specificity, 3.88 positive likelihood ratio, 48% positive predictive value, and 91% negative predictive value. We have developed and externally validated a nomogram and web calculator to predict serious complications that can potentially impact decision-making in patients with seemingly stable FN.

  10. Effects of peripheral cold application on core body temperature and haemodynamic parameters in febrile patients.

    PubMed

    Asgar Pour, Hossein; Yavuz, Meryem

    2014-04-01

    This study designed to assess the effects of peripheral cold application (PCA) on core body temperature and haemodynamic parameters in febrile patients. This study was an experimental, repeated-measures performed in the neurosurgical intensive-care unit. The research sample included all patients with fever in postoperative period. PCA was performed for 20 min. During fever, systolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation (O2 Sat) decreased by 5.07 ± 7.89 mm Hg, 0.191 ± 6.00 mm Hg and 0.742% ± 0.97%, respectively, whereas the pulse rate and diastolic blood pressure increased by 8.528 ± 4.42 beats/ min and 1.842 ± 6.9 mmHg, respectively. Immediately after PCA, core body temperature and pulse rate decreased by 0.3°C, 3.3 beats/min, respectively, whereas systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and O2 Sat increased by, 1.40 mm Hg, 1.87 mm Hg, 0.98 mmHg and 0.27%, respectively. Thirty minutes after the end of PCA, core body temperature, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate decreased by 0.57°C, 0.34 mm Hg, 0.60 mm Hg and 4.5 beats/min, respectively, whereas systolic blood pressure and O2 Sat increased by 0.98 mm Hg and 0.04%, respectively. The present results showed that PCA increases systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and O2 Sat, and decreases core body temperature and pulse rate.

  11. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Micafungin (FK463) in Febrile Neutropenic Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seibel, Nita L.; Schwartz, Cindy; Arrieta, Antonio; Flynn, Patricia; Shad, Aziza; Albano, Edith; Keirns, James; Lau, Wendi M.; Facklam, David P.; Buell, Donald N.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Micafungin (FK463) is a new parenteral echinocandin. A multicenter, phase I, open-label, sequential-group dose escalation study was conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of micafungin in neutropenic pediatric patients. A total of 77 patients stratified by age (2 to 12 and 13 to 17 years) received micafungin. Therapy was initiated at 0.5 mg/kg per day and escalated to higher dose levels of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 mg/kg per day. Micafungin was administered within 24 h of initiating broad-spectrum antibacterial antibiotics for the new onset of fever and neutropenia. The most common overall adverse events in the study population were diarrhea (19.5%), epistaxis (18.2%), abdominal pain (16.9%), and headache (16.9%). Nine patients (12%) experienced adverse events considered by the investigator to be possibly related to the study drug. The most common related events were diarrhea, vomiting, and headache, all occurring in two patients each. There was no evidence of a dose-limiting toxicity as defined within the prespecified criteria of this clinical protocol. There was one death during the study due to septic shock. The pharmacokinetic profiles for micafungin over the 0.5- to 4.0-mg/kg dose range demonstrated dose linearity. Clearance, volume of distribution, and half-life remained relatively constant over the dose range and did not change with repeated administration. The overall plasma pharmacokinetic profile was similar to that observed in adults. However, there was an inverse relation between age and clearance. For patients 2 to 8 years old, clearance was approximately 1.35 times that of patients ≥9 years of age. In summary, micafungin over a dosage range between 0.5 and 4.0 mg/kg/day in 77 febrile neutropenic pediatric patients displayed linear pharmacokinetics and increased clearance as a function of decreasing age. PMID:16048942

  12. Pentraxin 3 predicts complicated course of febrile neutropenia in haematological patients, but the decision level depends on the underlying malignancy.

    PubMed

    Juutilainen, Auni; Vänskä, Matti; Pulkki, Kari; Hämäläinen, Sari; Nousiainen, Tapio; Jantunen, Esa; Koivula, Irma

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed at assessing the cut-off levels for pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in predicting complications of neutropenic fever (bacteraemia, septic shock) in haematological patients. A prospective study during 2006-2009 was performed at haematology ward in Kuopio University Hospital. A patient was eligible for the study if having neutropenic fever after intensive therapy for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (n = 32) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (n = 35). Blood cultures were taken, and maximal PTX3 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated during d0 to d3 from the beginning of fever onset. The level of PTX3 was associated with both the underlying malignancy and the presence of complications, with highest level in NHL patients with complicated course of febrile neutropenia and lowest in AML patients with non-complicated course. The cut-off level of PTX3 to predict complications was ten-fold in patients with NHL (115 μg/L) in comparison with patients with AML (11.5 μg/L). In combined analysis based on separate cut-offs, PTX3 predicted complications of febrile neutropenia with sensitivity of 0.86, specificity of 0.83, positive predictive value of 0.57 and negative predictive value of 0.96.   PTX3 was superior to CRP in predicting complicated course of febrile neutropenia, but only when the effect of the underlying malignancy had been taken into account. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Anaplasma phagocytophilum Isolated from Patients with Febrile Diseases of Unknown Etiology in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Long, Bo; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Zhilun; He, Jing; Qu, Zhangyi; Yu, Jiguang; Liu, Yuanni; Dong, Tuo; Yao, Na; Wang, Yong; Cheng, Xueqin; Xu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Although anaplasmosis cases have been nationally identified in China, no human isolates of A. phagocytophilum have been obtained, which limits the analysis of any molecular and genetic contributions to patients' severe clinical manifestations and the study of the bacteria's pathogeneses in China. Given this situation, a joint project was conducted in 2009–2010. A total of 421 febrile cases of unknown etiology were collected and the patients' blood samples were collected for laboratory diagnoses including serologic diagnosis based on the four-fold rise in the anti- A. phagocytophilum IgG titer by indirect micro-immunofluorescence assay (IFA), positive PCR assay and confirmation of A. phagocytophilum DNA and positive culture of A. phagocytophilum and confirmed by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and ank A genes of the A. phagocytophilum isolates. A total of 570 ticks were collected from the patients' domestic animals (456) and from wild fields (114) for culturing and amplifying and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene of A. phagocytophilum. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on the 16S rRNA and ank A gene sequences of the isolates and the ticks tested in the study. A total of 46 (10.9%) confirmed and 16 (3.8%) probable cases were diagnosed and severe clinical features and higher mortality rates were observed in these Chinese patients. Five isolates were obtained and the 16S rRNA genes of the 5 isolates were conserved but variety for ank A genes. Two human isolates and 1 tick isolate from Shandong Peninsula, where all patients exhibited severe clinical manifestations, were grouped as one clan based on the phylogenetic analyses, while 2 other human isolates were clustered in a second clan. 43.5% of H. longicornis were infected with A. phagocytophilum.The present study is the first to obtain clinical isolates of A. phagocytophilum in China. The diversity of the ank A genes of Chinese isolates will help us to further discern the relationship between the

  14. Rickettsia felis Infection in Febrile Patients, Western Kenya, 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Alice N.; Knobel, Darryn L.; Jiang, Ju; Halliday, Jo; Feikin, Daniel R.; Cleaveland, Sarah; Ng’ang’a, Zipporah; Junghae, Muthoni; Breiman, Robert F.; Richards, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    To determine previous exposure and incidence of rickettsial infections in western Kenya during 2007–2010, we conducted hospital-based surveillance. Antibodies against rickettsiae were detected in 57.4% of previously collected serum samples. In a 2008–2010 prospective study, Rickettsia felis DNA was 2.2× more likely to be detected in febrile than in afebrile persons. PMID:22304807

  15. Efficacy and safety of micafungin for febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients with hematological malignancies: a multicenter prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Makoto; Iizuka, Susumu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sano, Hirozumi; Kudoh, Tooru

    2013-10-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of infectious mortality in neutropenic patients receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, little is known about the efficacy and safety of micafungin (MCFG), an echinocandin antifungal agent, in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia (FN). This study was conducted as a prospective multicenter trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of MCFG for FN in pediatric patients with hematological diseases. Efficacy was assessed based on the response to the 5 composite endpoints established by Walsh and colleagues in addition to body temperature and C-reactive protein values. Thirty episodes of FN were enrolled in the study. The median dose and duration of MCFG treatment were 3.0 mg/kg/d and 13.5 days, respectively. Using the criteria of Walsh and colleagues, MCFG was effective in 56.7% of the patients. No breakthrough invasive fungal infection occurred during MCFG treatment. Body temperatures on the last day of neutropenia during administration of MCFG and on the last day of MCFG therapy and C-reactive protein values after administration of MCFG were significantly lower than on the day MCFG therapy was started. Adverse effects in the form of mild liver dysfunction were seen in only 2 patients. MCFG is a very effective and safe antifungal drug for FN in children. Physicians should administer MCFG early in febrile episode in patients in whom first-line antibiotics are not effective in treating FN.

  16. A randomized trial of cefozopran versus cefepime as empirical antibiotic treatment of febrile neutropenia in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sarashina, Takeo; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Yoshida, Makoto; Toriumi, Naohisa; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sano, Hirozumi; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a common and serious complication of cancer chemotherapy associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Cefozopran (CZOP) is a potential candidate for empirical monotherapy in FN. However, studies on the use of CZOP as empirical treatment for pediatric patients with FN are quite limited. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CZOP with cefepime (CFPM) empirical monotherapy in pediatric cancer patients with FN. A total of 64 patients with 224 episodes of FN were randomly assigned to receive antibiotic therapy with either CZOP (100 mg/kg/day) or CFPM (100 mg/kg/day). Of these episodes, 223 were considered eligible for the study. Success was defined as resolution of febrile episodes and clinical signs of infection within 120 hr following the start of antibiotic therapy. The success rate was not significantly different between the CZOP (64.0%) and CFPM (56.3%) groups (P = 0.275). Duration of fever, duration of antibiotic therapy, and the success rate in patients with blood stream infection did not differ between the two groups. There was no infection-related mortality in the study period. Both CZOP and CFPM as monotherapy appear to be effective and safe in pediatric patients. This study suggests that CZOP has satisfactory efficacy and is well tolerated as initial empirical therapy for pediatric cancer patients with FN. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pompe, E.; van der Bruggen, T.; van Rhenen, A.; Lammers, J. W. J.; Wessels, F.; Sprengers, R. W.; de Jong, P. A.; Minnema, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4%) had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197). Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose. PMID:28235014

  18. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, M G; Willemink, M J; Pompe, E; van der Bruggen, T; van Rhenen, A; Lammers, J W J; Wessels, F; Sprengers, R W; de Jong, P A; Minnema, M C

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4%) had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197). Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose.

  19. [A phase III study of the efficacy and safety of meropenem in patients with febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Imajo, Kenji; Ueda, Yasunori; Kawano, Fumio; Sao, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tomohiko; Ito, Yoshikazu; Mugitani, Atuko; Suzuki, Kenshi; Uike, Naokuni; Miyamura, Koichi; Uski, Kensuke; Morimatsu, Yoshitaka; Akiyama, Nobu; Nagai, Hirokazu; Ohara, Akira; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Takaki, Kazutaka; Chayama, Kosuke; Urabe, Masao; Nagatoshi, Yoshihisa; Tamura, Kazuo

    2012-08-01

    Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of meropenem (MEPM) were assessed when 1 g (40 mg/kg for some of the pediatric patients) t.i.d. was administered every 8hours to 101 adult and 6 pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia (FN) as diagnosed based on the Japanese guideline for FN treatment. The efficacy rate evaluated as antifebrile effect up to Day 4 of treatment was 40.0% (40/100) in adult and 66.7% (4/6) in pediatric patients. The antifebrile effect in adult patients was analyzed after stratifying them according to their neutrophil counts up to Day 4. Treatment with MEPM produced an antifebrile effect not only in patients with higher neutrophil counts (> or = 500/mm3) but also in those with lower counts (< 100/mm3), and the efficacy rate was comparable between the two groups: 38.2% in the < 100/mm3 group and 29.4 to 55.6% in the > or = 500/mm3 group. The bacteriological efficacy of MEPM evaluated as disappearance rate on Days 3 to 5 and Day 7 was both 100% (8/8 and 4/4, respectively). The time above minimal inhibitory concentration (% T > MIC) in the treatment interval was greater than 90% in 9 out of 10 patients for whom likely causative organism was isolated and identified after MEPM treatment or for whom causative organism emerging after treatment was isolated and identified. The incidence of adverse events was 93.1% in adult and 83.3% in pediatric patients. There were three deaths and one serious adverse event reported among the adult patients; however, all these cases were assessed as not related to the study medication. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 45.5% and 66.7%, respectively. All the observed adverse drug reactions were mild or moderate in severity and none of them was severe. Adverse drug reactions which were unknown from the previous MEPM clinical studies and investigation of the results of clinical experience include 'chest discomfort', 'blood uric acid decreased', 'lymphocyte deformation', 'blood uric acid increased', 'abnormal

  20. Hospital-Based Surveillance for Infectious Etiologies among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness in Georgia, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Mamuchishvili, Nana; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Gatserelia, Lana; Makhviladze, Manana; Kanashvili, Marine; Mikautadze, Teona; Nanuashvili, Alexander; Kiknavelidze, Khatuni; Kokaia, Nora; Makharadze, Manana; Clark, Danielle V.; Bautista, Christian T.; Farrell, Margaret; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Maksoud, Mohamed Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Rivard, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Information on the infectious causes of undifferentiated acute febrile illness (AFI) in Georgia is essential for effective treatment and prevention. In May 2008, a hospital-based AFI surveillance was initiated at six hospitals in Georgia. Patients aged ≥ 4 years with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours were eligible for surveillance. Blood culture and serologic testing were conducted for Leptospira spp., Brucella spp., West Nile virus (WNV), Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Coxiella burnetii, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), hantavirus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), and Rickettsia typhi. Of 537 subjects enrolled, 70% were outpatients, 54% were males, and the mean age was 37 years. Patients reported having fatigue (89%), rigors (87%), sweating (83%), pain in joints (49%), and sleep disturbances (42%). Thirty-nine (7%) patients were seropositive for R. typhi, 37 (7%) for Brucella spp., 36 (7%) for TBEV, 12 (2%) for Leptospira spp., 10 (2%) for C. burnetii, and three (0.6%) for S. Typhi. None of the febrile patients tested positive for WNV antibodies. Of the patients, 73% were negative for all pathogens. Our results indicate that most of the targeted pathogens are present in Georgia, and highlight the importance of enhancing laboratory capacity for these infectious diseases. PMID:26438032

  1. Association between hypocapnia and febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Kilicaslan, Buket; Erol, Ilknur; Ozkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra; Sariturk, Cagla

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation with subsequent hypocapnia is relevant to febrile seizures in children. This is only the second study to measure pCO2 and pH values in children with febrile seizures. This prospective case-control study enrolled 18 children who presented with febrile seizures and 18 children who presented with a febrile illness without seizures. Venous blood gas analyses were measured both from the febrile seizure and control group. There was no significant difference in mean blood pH between the febrile seizure and control groups but blood pCO2 was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group. Patients with complex febrile seizures exhibited significantly lower pCO2 levels within 1 hour of seizure onset than patients with simplex febrile seizures. These data indicate that febrile seizures may be associated with hyperventilation and that the ensuing hypocapnia may contribute to the development of febrile seizures.

  2. Multicentre, Prospective Observational Study of Pegfilgrastim Primary Prophylaxis in Patients at High Risk of Febrile Neutropenia in Poland: PROFIL Study

    PubMed Central

    Jurczak, Wojciech; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Chmielowska, Ewa; Duchnowska, Renata; Wojciechowska-Lampka, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study PROFIL was a prospective observational study conducted to investigate physicians’ evaluation of febrile neutropenia (FN) risk and reasons for giving pegfilgrastim primary prophylaxis (PP) in routine clinical practice in Poland. Material and methods Adult cancer patients treated with chemotherapy (CT), assessed by investigators as having high overall FN risk, and who received pegfilgrastim in cycle 1 were enrolled between 03/2009 and 09/2010. Investigators assessed FN risk of the CT regimen, individual risk factors, and overall FN risk, and were asked to provide the most important reasons for providing pegfilgrastim PP. Investigator-assessed CT FN risk was compared with guideline classification. Results Data were analysed from 1006 breast, ovarian, and lung cancer, and non-Hodgkin (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. The most important reasons for using pegfilgrastim PP were high CT FN risk and advanced disease; these were consistent across tumour types and treatment intent. The investigators generally assessed high CT FN risk in agreement with guideline classification. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 4% of patients, most commonly in HL, NHL, and patients with advanced disease. Conclusions High CT FN risk and advanced stage of disease were found to be the most important reasons for providing pegfilgrastim PP by physicians in Poland. PMID:26557762

  3. Multicentre, Prospective Observational Study of Pegfilgrastim Primary Prophylaxis in Patients at High Risk of Febrile Neutropenia in Poland: PROFIL Study.

    PubMed

    Jurczak, Wojciech; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Chmielowska, Ewa; Duchnowska, Renata; Wojciechowska-Lampka, Elzbieta; Wieruszewska, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    PROFIL was a prospective observational study conducted to investigate physicians' evaluation of febrile neutropenia (FN) risk and reasons for giving pegfilgrastim primary prophylaxis (PP) in routine clinical practice in Poland. Adult cancer patients treated with chemotherapy (CT), assessed by investigators as having high overall FN risk, and who received pegfilgrastim in cycle 1 were enrolled between 03/2009 and 09/2010. Investigators assessed FN risk of the CT regimen, individual risk factors, and overall FN risk, and were asked to provide the most important reasons for providing pegfilgrastim PP. Investigator-assessed CT FN risk was compared with guideline classification. Data were analysed from 1006 breast, ovarian, and lung cancer, and non-Hodgkin (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. The most important reasons for using pegfilgrastim PP were high CT FN risk and advanced disease; these were consistent across tumour types and treatment intent. The investigators generally assessed high CT FN risk in agreement with guideline classification. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 4% of patients, most commonly in HL, NHL, and patients with advanced disease. High CT FN risk and advanced stage of disease were found to be the most important reasons for providing pegfilgrastim PP by physicians in Poland.

  4. Prevalence of malaria among acute febrile patients clinically suspected of having malaria in the Zeway Health Center, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Sendeaw M; Animut, Abebe; Belay, Mulugeta

    2015-01-01

    Malaria diagnosis is a common challenge in developing countries with limited diagnostic services. Common febrile illnesses were assessed in 280 malaria-suspected patients, and each case was subjected to clinical and laboratory examinations for malaria, relapsing fever, typhoid fever, typhus, and brucellosis. Data were entered and analyzed using Epi Info version 3.1 software. Malaria accounted for 17% (CI, 12.6-21.4%) of febrile illnesses. The remaining cases were associated with typhoid fever (18.5%; CI, 13.95-23.05%), typhus (17.8%; CI, 13.32-22.28%), brucellosis (1%; CI, -0.17-2.17%), relapsing fever (2%; CI, 0.36-3.64%), and unknown causes (44%). Approximately 7% of patients had coinfections, and 2% of patients treated as monoinfections. Approximately 1.4% of the nonmalarial patients received antimalarial treatment. The sensitivity and specificity of the CareStart Pf/pan rapid diagnostic tests in comparison with those of microscopy were 100% and 91%, respectively, with positive- and negative-predictive values of 94% and 100%, respectively. Compared with microscopy, the positive-predictive value of each malaria symptom was much lower than that of the symptoms combined: fever, 17%; sweating, 30%; headache, 18%; general body ache, 22%; loss of appetite, 21%. The study findings revealed a high proportion of nonmalarial illnesses were clinically categorized as malaria. Parasite-based diagnosis is recommended for the management of malarial and nonmalarial cases.

  5. First febrile convulsions: inquiry about the knowledge, attitudes and concerns of the patients' mothers.

    PubMed

    Kolahi, Ali-Asghar; Tahmooreszadeh, Shahrokh

    2009-02-01

    In comparison with other diseases, febrile convulsion, despite its excellent prognosis, is a cause of high anxiety among mothers. The objective of our study was to evaluate the knowledge, concerns, attitudes and practices of the mothers of children with first febrile convulsion. A prospective questionnaire-based study was carried out at the Mofid Children's Hospital. One hundred and twenty-six mothers of consecutive children presenting with febrile convulsion were enrolled. Only 58 (46%) mothers recognised the convulsion. Forty-nine (39%) of them interpreted the seizure as death. Others interpreted it as other causes. Eighty-five (68%) parents did not carry out any intervention prior to getting the child to the hospital. The most common cause of concern among parents was the state of their child's health in the future (n=120, 95%), followed by the fear of recurrence (n=83, 66%), mental retardation (n=60, 48%), paralysis (n=39, 31%), physical disability (n=37, 30%) and learning dysfunction (n=28, 22%). In 41 (33%) mothers, there were other causes of concerns, including fear of visual defect, hearing loss, memory loss, brain defect, delay in walking, drug adverse effects, coma and death. Sixty-eight percent of mothers had acceptable information about the measures that should be taken to prevent recurrence. Awareness of preventive measures was higher in mothers with high educational level (P<0.01). Seventy-six percent of mothers did not know anything about the necessary measures in case of recurrence. From this study, we conclude that parental fear of febrile convulsion is a major problem, with serious negative consequences affecting daily familial life.

  6. Lack of association between TNF-α gene polymorphisms at position -308 A, -850T and risk of simple febrile convulsion in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel, Abolfazl; Kheiri, Soleman; Habibian, Roya; Nozari, Ahora; Baradaran, Azar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Febrile convulsions (FCs), occurring between 6 months and 6 years of age is the most common seizure disorder during childhood. The febrile response is thought to be mediated by the release of pyrogenic cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 (IL-1). There is a significant relationship between genetic components for susceptibility of FCs and different report mutation. We investigated association between two polymorphisms in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α promoter region (G-308A, C-850T) and FCs in the southwest area of Iran. Materials and Methods: In this matched case–control study, 100 patients with febrile convulsion as case group and 130 healthy children as control group were enrolled in the study. Peripheral blood samples were collected and DNA was extracted by standard phenol–chloroform method. The genotype and allele frequencies of TNF- α polymorphisms in case and control groups were determined by using PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism) method. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test. Results: The average age of case and control groups were 3.4 ± 1.4 and 3.4 ± 1.2 years, respectively. There was no significant difference between age and sex in both the groups (P > 0.05). A family history of febrile convulsion was detected in 44% of patients. Moreover, the simple febrile convulsion was detected in 85% of the case group. Conclusion: RFLP analysis of TNF- α promoter region polymorphisms, considering P = 0.146 and P = 0.084 for G-308A and C-850T, respectively, showed no correlation between TNF- α polymorphisms and predisposition to simple febrile, based on the kind of convulsion (atypical and simple febrile convulsion). We found a significant relation between genotype distribution of G-308A and atypical febrile convulsion in case group (P = 0.04). A significant correlation between genotype distribution of G-308A and atypical febrile convulsion in the case group was

  7. Assessment of the utility of a symptom-based algorithm for identifying febrile patients for malaria diagnostic testing in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Thwing, Julie; Ba, Fatou; Diaby, Alou; Diedhiou, Younouss; Sylla, Assane; Sall, Guelaye; Diouf, Mame Birame; Gueye, Alioune Badara; Gaye, Seynabou; Ndiop, Medoune; Cisse, Moustapha; Ndiaye, Daouda; Ba, Mady

    2017-03-01

    Malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) enable point-of-care testing to be nearly as sensitive and specific as reference microscopy. The Senegal National Malaria Control Programme introduced RDTs in 2007, along with a case management algorithm for uncomplicated febrile illness, in which the first step stipulates that if a febrile patient of any age has symptoms indicative of febrile illness other than malaria (e.g., cough or rash), they would not be tested for malaria, but treated for the apparent illness and receive an RDT for malaria only if they returned in 48 h without improvement. A year-long study in 16 health posts was conducted to determine the algorithm's capacity to identify patients with Plasmodium falciparum infection identifiable by RDT. Health post personnel enrolled patients of all ages with fever (≥37.5 °C) or history of fever in the previous 2 days. After clinical assessment, a nurse staffing the health post determined whether a patient should receive an RDT according to the diagnostic algorithm, but performed an RDT for all enrolled patients. Over 1 year, 6039 patients were enrolled and 58% (3483) were determined to require an RDT according to the algorithm. Overall, 23% (1373/6039) had a positive RDT, 34% (1130/3376) during rainy season and 9% (243/2661) during dry season. The first step of the algorithm identified only 78% of patients with a positive RDT, varying by transmission season (rainy 80%, dry 70%), malaria transmission zone (high 75%, low 95%), and age group (under 5 years 68%, 5 years and older 84%). In all but the lowest malaria transmission zone, use of the algorithm excludes an unacceptably large proportion of patients with malaria from receiving an RDT at their first visit, denying them timely diagnosis and treatment. While the algorithm was adopted within a context of malaria control and scarce resources, with the goal of treating patients with symptomatic malaria, Senegal has now adopted a policy of universal diagnosis of

  8. Evaluation of Bloodstream Infections During Chemotherapy-Induced Febrile Neutropenia in Patients with Malignant Hematological Diseases: Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Piukovics, Klára; Terhes, Gabriella; Lázár, Andrea; Tímár, Flóra; Borbényi, Zita; Urbán, Edit

    2015-01-01

    From year to year, it is important to get an overview of the occurrence of causative agents in febrile neutropenic patients to determine the empiric treatment. Thus our aims were to evaluate a four-year period regarding the prevalence of bloodstream infections and the most important causative agents. During this period, 1,361 patients were treated in our hematology ward because of various hematological disorders. 812 febrile episodes were recorded in 469 patients. At that time, 3,714 blood culture (BC) bottles were sent for microbiological investigations, 759 of them gave positive signal. From the majority of positive blood culture bottles (67.1%), Gram-positive bacteria, mainly coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), were grown. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 32.9% of the positive blood culture bottles, in these cases the leading pathogen was Escherichia coli. The high prevalence of CNS was attributed to mainly contamination, while lower positivity rate for Gram-negative bacteria was associated with the use of broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic treatment. PMID:26495130

  9. Clinical relevance of single administration of prophylactic antimicrobial agents against febrile events after removal of ureteral stents for patients with urinary diversion or reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Jiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Takeyama, Koh; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2010-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis when removing ureteral stents after urinary diversion or reconstruction and to establish the most appropriate prophylactic protocol to prevent febrile events. We retrospectively investigated the incidence of febrile events in the two studies. Study 1 consisted of 39 patients who received antimicrobial prophylaxis and 31 who did not. Study 2 included 48 patients who were given oral fluoroquinolone (FQ) and 27 who had intramuscular injection of an aminoglycoside (AG). In study 1, the incidence of febrile events was significantly lower in patients receiving antimicrobial prophylaxis (26.0%) than in those not receiving it (51.6%) (P = 0.025, chi(2) test). In study 2 there was a 13% incidence of febrile events, which was much lower than the incidence found in study 1. The incidence of these events was similar between the two study groups, being 13% for those receiving FQ and 15% for those receiving AG. Prophylactic administration of antimicrobials reduces the incidence of febrile events after removal of ureteral stents. Both FQ and the AG are equally effective in this setting.

  10. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Febrile morbidity and hospital stay in high-risk cesarian section patients at a non-teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Persad

    1998-07-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the incidence of postcesarian febrile morbidity and relate this to hospital stay in a high-risk indigent population treated at a private non-teaching hospital.Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of all patients done between January 1995 and December 1996. Discharge summaries, antepartums, progress notes, and labs were reviewed for each patient. Of 257 charts reviewed, 5 were inadequate for various reasons. Board-certified surgeons performed and assisted in the operations. Twenty-one patients had scant prenatal care and 6 had no prenatal care. All patients had the abdomen scrubbed with Betadine soap prior to painting. No shaving was done. Gloves were changed after closure of uterine incision. The pelvis was copiously irrigated with 3-4 L of saline. The subcutaneous layer was irrigated from a height of 6-12" with 12 to 1 L of fluid. After this step, this layer is not touched by anything from the operating field.Results: Of 162 patients with primary cesarian, 20 had postoperative fever, 18 with endometritis, 2 with wound infections. All but 5 of these patients had labor as ruptured membranes of 12 hours or more. Four had prolonged 2nd stage. Of 28 failed VBACs, 2 had fever vs none for 59 elective repeat cesarians. The average hospital stay for febrile patients was 4.4 days vs 2.7 for afebrile patients. The incidence of wound infection was 0.8%. The incidence of fever was 12.2% for primary cesarians and 8.8% in the total study group of 249 patients.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the adoption of simple measures presented in Methods can dramatically decrease the incidence and severity of postcesarian fever, especially wound infection, thereby allowing safe, early hospital discharge.

  12. Application of the MASCC and CISNE Risk-Stratification Scores to Identify Low-Risk Febrile Neutropenic Patients in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Christopher J; Le, Vivian; Brennan, Jesse J; Castillo, Edward M; Shatsky, Rebecca A; Ferran, Karen; Brodine, Stephanie; Vilke, Gary M

    2017-06-01

    Although validated risk-stratification tools have been used to send low-risk febrile neutropenic patients home from clinic and inpatient settings, there is a dearth of research evaluating these scores in the emergency department (ED). We compare the predictive accuracy of the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and Clinical Index of Stable Febrile Neutropenia (CISNE) scores for patients with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia and presenting to the ED. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate all patients with febrile neutropenia (temperature ≥38°C [100.4°F], absolute neutrophil count <1,000 cells/μL) who presented to 2 academic EDs from June 2012 through January 2015. MASCC and CISNE scores were calculated for all subjects, and each visit was evaluated for several outcome variables, including inpatient length of stay, upgrade in level of care, clinical deterioration, positive blood culture results, and death. Descriptive statistics are reported and continuous variables were analyzed with Wilcoxon rank sum. During our study period, 230 patients presented with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia. The CISNE score identified 53 (23%) of these patients as low risk and was highly specific in the identification of a low-risk cohort for all outcome variables (98.3% specific, 95% confidence interval [CI] 89.7% to 99.9%; positive predictive value 98.1%, 95% CI 88.6% to 99.9%). Median length of stay was shorter for low-risk versus high-risk CISNE patients (3-day difference; P<.001). The MASCC score was much less specific (54.2%; 95% CI 40.8% to 67.1%) in the identification of a low-risk cohort. Our results suggest that the CISNE score may be the most appropriate febrile neutropenia risk-stratification tool for use in the ED. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Discrete choice experiment produced estimates of acceptable risks of therapeutic options in cancer patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Alibhai, Shabbir M; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Teuffel, Oliver; Cheng, Sylvia; Fisman, David; Regier, Dean A

    2012-06-01

    To use a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to describe patient/proxy tolerance for the number of clinic visits, and chances of readmission, intensive care unit admission, and mortality to accept oral outpatient management of low-risk febrile neutropenia. Adults and children aged 12-18 years with cancer and parents of pediatric cancer patients were asked to choose between outpatient oral and inpatient intravenous management of low-risk febrile neutropenia. Using a DCE, we varied the attribute levels with the outpatient option and kept them constant for the inpatient option. Seventy-eight adults, 153 parents, and 43 children provided responses. All four attributes significantly affected choices. The mean tolerance (95% confidence interval) for the number of clinic visits per week was 3.6 (2.2-4.8), 2.1 (1.1-3.2), and 4.3 (2.5-6.0) to accept outpatient management among adults, parents, and children, respectively. With thrice weekly clinic visits and 7.5% chance of readmission, probabilities of accepting the outpatient strategy were 50% (44-54%) for adults, 43% (39-48%) for parents, and 53% (46-59%) for children. Using a DCE, we determined that a 7.5% chance of readmission and clinic visits more frequently than thrice weekly are unlikely to be acceptable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of PCR detectable malaria infection among febrile patients with a negative Plasmodium falciparum specific rapid diagnostic test in Zanzibar.

    PubMed

    Baltzell, Kimberly A; Shakely, Deler; Hsiang, Michelle; Kemere, Jordan; Ali, Abdullah Suleiman; Björkman, Anders; Mårtensson, Andreas; Omar, Rahila; Elfving, Kristina; Msellem, Mwinyi; Aydin-Schmidt, Berit; Rosenthal, Philip J; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2013-02-01

    We screened for malaria in 594 blood samples from febrile patients who tested negative by a Plasmodium falciparum-specific histidine-rich protein-2-based rapid diagnostic test at 12 health facilities in Zanzibar districts North A and Micheweni, from May to August 2010. Screening was with microscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the cytochrome b gene (cytbPCR) of the four major human malaria species, and quantitative PCR (qPCR). The prevalence of cytbPCR-detectable malaria infection was 2% (12 of 594), including 8 P. falciparum, 3 Plasmodium malariae, and 1 Plasmodium vivax infections. Microscopy identified 4 of 8 P. falciparum infections. Parasite density as estimated by microscopy or qPCR was > 4,000 parasites/μL in 5 of 8 cytbPCR-detectable P. falciparum infections. The infections that were missed by the rapid diagnostic test represent a particular challenge in malaria elimination settings and highlight the need for more sensitive point-of-care diagnostic tools to improve case detection of all human malaria species in febrile patients.

  15. Prediction of serious complications in patients with seemingly stable febrile neutropenia: validation of the Clinical Index of Stable Febrile Neutropenia in a prospective cohort of patients from the FINITE study.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Virizuela Echaburu, Juan; Antonio, Maite; Font, Carme; Biosca, Mercè; Ramchandani, Avinash; Martínez, Jerónimo; Hernando Cubero, Jorge; Espinosa, Javier; Martínez de Castro, Eva; Ghanem, Ismael; Beato, Carmen; Blasco, Ana; Garrido, Marcelo; Bonilla, Yaiza; Mondéjar, Rebeca; Arcusa Lanza, María Ángeles; Aragón Manrique, Isabel; Manzano, Aránzazu; Sevillano, Elena; Castañón, Eduardo; Cardona, Mercé; Gallardo Martín, Elena; Pérez Armillas, Quionia; Sánchez Lasheras, Fernando; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco

    2015-02-10

    To validate a prognostic score predicting major complications in patients with solid tumors and seemingly stable episodes of febrile neutropenia (FN). The definition of clinical stability implies the absence of organ dysfunction, abnormalities in vital signs, and major infections. We developed the Clinical Index of Stable Febrile Neutropenia (CISNE), with six explanatory variables associated with serious complications: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥ 2 (2 points), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (1 point), chronic cardiovascular disease (1 point), mucositis of grade ≥ 2 (National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria; 1 point), monocytes < 200 per μL (1 point), and stress-induced hyperglycemia (2 points). We integrated these factors into a score ranging from 0 to 8, which classifies patients into three prognostic classes: low (0 points), intermediate (1 to 2 points), and high risk (≥ 3 points). We present a multicenter validation of CISNE. We prospectively recruited 1,133 patients with seemingly stable FN from 25 hospitals. Complication rates in the training and validation subsets, respectively, were 1.1% and 1.1% in low-, 6.1% and 6.2% in intermediate-, and 32.5% and 36% in high-risk patients; mortality rates within each class were 0% in low-, 1.6% and 0% in intermediate-, and 4.3% and 3.1% in high-risk patients. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves in the validation subset were 0.652 (95% CI, 0.598 to 0.703) for Talcott, 0.721 (95% CI, 0.669 to 0.768) for Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC), and 0.868 (95% CI, 0.827 to 0.903) for CISNE (P = .002 for comparison between CISNE and MASCC). CISNE is a valid model for accurately classifying patients with cancer with seemingly stable FN episodes. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. High incidence of co-infection with Malaria and Typhoid in febrile HIV infected and AIDS patients in Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agwu, E.; Ihongbe, J.C.; Okogun, G.R.A.; Inyang, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    This survey was designed to determine the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum and Salmonella Typhi among febrile HIV/AIDS patients in Ekpoma. Malaria and typhoid risk factors in Ekpoma included occupation, poor health facilities and poor sanitation. Malaria and typhoid are highly prevalent among Ekpoma HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:24031367

  17. Malnourishment and length of hospital stay among paediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropaenia: a developing country perspective.

    PubMed

    Conner, J Michael; Aviles-Robles, Martha J; Asdahl, Peter H; Zhang, Fang Fang; Ojha, Rohit P

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of malnourishment among paediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy in developing countries is poorly documented despite greater potential for malnourishment in such settings. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of malnourishment among paediatric cancer patients in Mexico City, and assess the association between malnourishment and length of hospital stay. Individuals eligible for this study were paediatric cancer patients (aged <18 years) admitted to Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez (Mexico City) with febrile neutropaenia. Our exposure of interest, malnourishment, was defined as an age-adjusted and sex-adjusted z-score<-2 (ie, 2 SDs below the expected mean of the WHO reference population). We estimated time ratios (TRs) and 95% confidence limits (CLs) for the association between malnourishment and length of hospital stay. Our study population comprised 111 paediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropaenia, of whom 71% were aged <10 years and 52% were males. The prevalence of malnourishment was 14%, equal to a 530% (standardised morbidity ratio=6.3; 95% CL 3.7, 10) excess of malnourishment compared with the world reference population. The median length of hospital stay for malnourished patients was 15 days, which corresponded with a 50% (TR=1.5, 95% CL 1.0, 2.3) relative increase in length of stay compared with patients who were not malnourished. Patients with body mass indices equal to the mean of the world reference population had the shortest length of stay. Future studies should explore potential interventions for malnourishment to reduce the length of hospital stay or other established adverse consequences of malnourishment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Outpatient versus inpatient IV antibiotic management for pediatric oncology patients with low risk febrile neutropenia: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Orme, Lisa M; Babl, Franz E; Barnes, Chris; Barnett, Peter; Donath, Susan; Ashley, David M

    2014-08-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a frequent, serious complication of intensive pediatric chemotherapy regimens. The aim of this trial was to compare quality of life (QOL) between inpatient and outpatient intravenous antibiotic management of children and adolescents with low risk febrile neutropenia (LRFN). In this randomised non-blinded trial, patients between 1 and 21 years old, receiving low/moderate intensity chemotherapy were pre-consented and, on presentation to emergency (ED) with FN satisfying low risk criteria, randomised to either outpatient or inpatient care with intravenous cefepime 50 mg/kg (12 hourly). All patients continued antibiotics for at least 48 hours, until afebrile for 24 hours and demonstrating a rising absolute neutrophil count ≥200/mm(3). Several domains of QOL were examined by daily questionnaire. Eighty-one patients presented to ED with 159 episodes of fever. Thirty-seven FN presentations involving 27 patients were randomised to inpatient (18) and outpatient (19) management. Combined QOL mean scores for parents were higher for the outpatient group and scores for three specific parent variables (keeping up with household tasks/time spent with partner/time spent with other children) were higher among outpatients. There was no difference in parent confidence/satisfaction in care between groups. Patients scored better in the outpatient group overall and for sleep and appetite. The mean length of fever was equivalent between groups and there were no serious adverse events attributable to cefepime or outpatient care. Outpatient cefepime management of LRFN provided significant benefit to parents and patients across several QOL domains and appeared both feasible and safe. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Prediction of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion in patients with febrile status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, Takaoki; Takeuchi, Takahito; Mukai, Jumpei; Akita, Yukihiro; Nagai, Kojiro; Obu, Keizo; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2016-02-01

    Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype of acute encephalopathy among children in Japan. The pathogenesis of AESD is mostly delayed cerebral edema caused by excitotoxic injury. It is difficult to discriminate AESD and complex febrile seizure in the early phase. Many cases have neurologic sequelae because early intervention is difficult. To establish an early diagnostic method, we assessed 213 hospitalized cases of febrile status epilepticus (FSE) between January 2004 and August 2014. We categorized FSE cases into an AESD group and a non-AESD group and compared their clinical courses, laboratory data and cranial computed tomography (CT) findings. Of 213 hospitalized FSE cases, 19 (9%) were AESD. Univariate analysis showed that the AESD group took a significantly longer time to wake after FSE, had a higher degree of respiratory acidemia, and higher levels of serum AST, ALT, LD, hyperglycemia and hyperammonemia than the non-AESD group. We developed a scoring model that predicts AESD based on multivariate analysis. Using cut-off points of 4 and more with this scoring model, we could identify the AESD cases with 93% sensitivity and 91% specificity. These scores also had a positive correlation with prognosis. Our scoring model enables early diagnosis of AESD. Patients with high scores should be observed carefully and early intervention should be considered. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of apolipoprotein E in febrile convulsion.

    PubMed

    Giray, Ozlem; Ulgenalp, Ayfer; Bora, Elçin; Uran, Nedret; Yilmaz, Ebru; Unalp, Aycan; Erçal, Derya

    2008-10-01

    Apolipoprotein E is consistently associated with the progression of some common human neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., epilepsy. We hypothesized that genetic variations in the apolipoprotein E gene have implications for susceptibility to, and prognoses in, febrile convulsion, which plays an apparent role in the development of epilepsy. We used the polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion to characterize variations of the apolipoprotein E gene. Sixty-nine patients with febrile convulsion (simple/complex) and a corresponding cohort of healthy patients (n = 75) were used. There was no significant difference in genotypic distribution and allelic frequencies of the apolipoprotein E gene between the febrile convulsion and control groups. Comparing subpopulations of the febrile convulsion group (patients with simple and complex febrile convulsion), we noted that no patients with the epsilon3/epsilon4 genotype had complex febrile convulsions. The apolipoprotein E epsilon3/epsilon4 genotype was more frequently seen in the simple febrile than in the complicated febrile convulsion group (9 versus 0 patients, respectively). The data indicate an association with the epsilon3/epsilon4 genotype of the apolipoprotein E gene with a milder phenotype. Although apolipoprotein E4 is not a vulnerability factor regarding febrile convulsions, it seems effective in regard to prognoses.

  1. Clinical characteristics of children with febrile seizure.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, D; Dhakal, A K; Shakya, H; Shakya, A; Shah, S C; Mehata, S

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizure is common in children below five years of age. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical profile of children presenting with febrile seizure in a teaching hospital. This was a descriptive retrospective study among children presenting with febrile seizure in a teaching hospital from July 2009 to June 2013. Children between six months to six years were included in the study while patients with prior episodes of afebrile seizures, abnormal neurodevelopment and not meeting the age criteria were excluded. Patient's demographic and clinical data were collected from the in-patients records and analyzed. This study included 103 children with febrile seizure. Out of which 67% were male. Simple febrile seizure and complex febrile seizure were observed in 76.7% and 23.3% of patients respectively. Majority of children (71.8%)had generalized tonic clonic seizure followed by tonic seizures. Most of children (72.8%) who developed first episode of seizure were below 24 months of age with the mean age of 20.7 (±12.1) months. Overall 33% of patients developed recurrence of febrile seizure and first episode of febrile seizure at age one year or below was associated with the seizure recurrence. Upper respiratory tract infections were the commonest cause of fever in these children. Febrile seizure was observed predominantly in children below age of two years and simple febrile seizure was the ommonest variety. Recurrence of febrile seizure was common and significantly associated with the first episode of febrile seizure at the age of one year or below.

  2. [Use of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein as infection markers in febrile neutropenic patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Yepes, Marina; Aznar-Oroval, Eduardo; Lorente-Alegre, Pablo; García-Lozano, Tomás; Picón-Roig, Isabel; Pérez-Ballestero, Pilar; Ortiz-Muñoz, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Neutropenia is a frequent sign in patients who are going to have a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Infection is an important complication in these patients, which is favoured by immunosuppression and the degree of neutropenia. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in onco-haematological patients undergoing chemotherapy and HSCT to determine the origin of the fever. PCT and CRP values were measured in 30 episodes of febrile neutropenia: before starting chemotherapy, appearance of neutropenia, onset of fever, days 1, 2, 3 and 6 after the onset of fever, and when the febrile episode ended. The episodes were classified as 5 bacteraemia, 3 microbiologically documented infections, 10 clinical infections, and 12 fevers of unknown origin. The highest PCT mean values corresponded to the group of patients with bacteraemia. Statistically significant differences (P=.04) were found on the second day after the onset of fever. The cut-off point of 0.5ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 75%. PCR results showed statistically significant differences on days 1, 2 and 3 after the onset of fever (P=.01, P=.003, and P=.002, respectively). The cut-off point of 7.5mg/L had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 58%. The combination of PCT and CRP is an insufficient method to detect bacterial infections and may not replace the proper clinical and microbiological diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Utility of adding Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA detection in nasopharyngeal aspirates in immunocompromised adult patients with febrile pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Guigue, Nicolas; Alanio, Alexandre; Menotti, Jean; Castro, Nathalie De; Hamane, Samia; Peyrony, Olivier; LeGoff, Jérôme; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Detection of viral and bacterial DNA in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) is now a routine practice in emergency cases of febrile pneumonia. We investigated whether Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA could also be detected in these cases by conducting retrospective screening of 324 consecutive NPAs from 324 adult patients (198 or 61% were immunocompromised) admitted with suspected pulmonary infections during the 2012 influenza epidemic season, using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay (PjqPCR), which targets the P. jirovecii mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA gene. These NPAs had already been tested for 22 respiratory pathogens (18 viruses and 4 bacteria), but we found that 16 NPAs (4.9%) were PjqPCR-positive, making P. jirovecii the fourth most prevalent of the 23 microorganisms in the screen. Eleven of the 16 PjqPCR-positive patients were immunocompromised, and five had underlying pulmonary conditions. Nine NPAs were also positive for another respiratory pathogen. Six had PjqPCR-positive induced sputa less than 3 days after the NPA procedure, and five were diagnosed with pneumocystis pneumonia (four with chronic lymphoproliferative disorders and one AIDS patient). In all six available pairs quantification of P. jirovecii DNA showed fewer copies in NPA than in induced sputum and three PjqPCR-negative NPAs corresponded to PjqPCR-positive bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, underscoring the fact that a negative PjqPCR screen does not exclude a diagnosis of pneumocystosis. Including P. jirovecii DNA detection to the panel of microorganisms included in screening tests used for febrile pneumonia may encourage additional investigations or support use of anti-pneumocystis pneumonia prophylaxis in immunocompromised patients.

  4. The diagnostic value of CRP, IL-8, PCT, and sTREM-1 in the detection of bacterial infections in pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Miedema, Karin G E; de Bont, Eveline S J M; Elferink, Rob F M Oude; van Vliet, Michel J; Nijhuis, Claudi S M Oude; Kamps, Willem A; Tissing, Wim J E

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-8, procalcitonin (PCT), and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) as predictors for bacterial infection in febrile neutropenia, plus their usefulness in febrile neutropenia during chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis. Plasma was obtained from pediatric oncology patients at presentation with febrile neutropenia (n = 43) and 24-48 h later (n = 17). The patients were classified as having or not having a bacterial infection. Plasma was also obtained of patients in the absence and in the presence of mucositis (n = 26). At presentation with febrile neutropenia, median IL-8 and PCT levels were significantly increased in patients with a bacterial infection, in contrast to CRP and sTREM-1. IL-8 was the most sensitive marker for the early detection of bacterial infection, in combination with clinical parameters or PCT the sensitivity reached 100%. After 24-48 h, only PCT was significantly elevated during bacterial infection. IL-8 levels were significantly increased during mucositis. Mucositis did not cause considerable changes in PCT levels. IL-8 is the most useful marker for the early detection of bacterial infections, compared with CRP, PCT, and sTREM-1. IL-8 in combination with clinical parameters or PCT might be even more useful. Gastrointestinal mucositis alone does not affect PCT levels, in contrast to IL-8 levels, and therefore, PCT might be more useful for the detection of bacterial infections during mucositis than IL-8.

  5. Spectrum of systemic bacterial infections during febrile neutropenia in pediatric oncology patients in tertiary care pediatric center.

    PubMed

    Siddaiahgari, Sirisharani; Manikyam, A; Kumar, K Anand; Rauthan, A; Ayyar, R

    2014-01-01

    Outcome of pediatric cancers has significantly improved with modern chemotherapy and good supportive care. However, febrile neutropenia remains one of the important limiting factors in these patients especially with the emergence of resistant organisms. Choosing appropriate antimicrobials is possible only if we understand the local microbial spectrum and their sensitivity pattern. To study the likely etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern among systemic infections in children with cancer. This is a prospective study. The study was conducted at a tertiary care center for pediatrics, in which culture samples representing blood stream infections and others like urinary tract infections sent from the Oncology services of the Hospital during the year of 2013 were analyzed. The microbiological profile and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of these isolates were studied. There were 89 isolates that represented blood and urinary tract infections in neutropenic patients with cancer.Out of 89 positive cultures 76 were gram negative isolates. The most common gram negative bacterial isolates were Escherichia coli 33 (37%), followed by Pseudomonas 21 (23.5%). Acinetobacter grew in 2 patients (2.2%). Extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL's), carbepenem resistant and pan-resistant organisms seen in 28 (31.4%), 5 (5.6%) and 2 cases (2.3%) respectively. Over all Gram-positive organisms were 13/89 (12.3%). Staphylococcus was the most common Gram-positive organism and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus seen in 5 each. Gram-negative organism is a common isolate in cancer children with febrile neutropenia, which is resistant to first-line antibiotic cefepime. Meropenem is most sensitive antibiotic and ESBL's are sensitive to piperacillin-tazobactam.

  6. Core temperature correlates with expression of selected stress and immunomodulatory genes in febrile patients with sepsis and noninfectious SIRS.

    PubMed

    Sonna, Larry A; Hawkins, Lauren; Lissauer, Matthew E; Maldeis, Pam; Towns, Michael; Johnson, Steven B; Moore, Richard; Singh, Ishwar S; Cowan, Mark J; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    Environmental hyperthermia and exercise produce extensive changes in gene expression in human blood cells, but it is unknown whether this also happens during febrile-range hyperthermia. We tested the hypothesis that heat shock protein (HSP) and immunomodulatory stress gene expression correlate with fever in intensive care unit patients. Whole blood messenger RNA was obtained over consecutive days from 100 hospitalized patients suffering from sepsis or noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) as defined by conventional criteria. The most abnormal body temperature in the preceding 24 h was recorded for each sample. Expression analysis was performed using the Affymetrix U133 chip. ANCOVA followed by correlation analysis was performed on a subset of 278 prospectively identified sequences of interest. Temperature affected expression of 60 sequences, either independently or as a function of clinical diagnosis. Forty-eight of these (representing 38 genes) were affected by temperature only, including several HSPs, transcription factors heat shock factor (HSF)-1 and HSF-4, cellular adhesion molecules such as ICAM1/CD54 and JAM3, toll receptors TLR-6 and TLR-7, ribosomal proteins, and a number of molecules involved in inflammatory pathways. Twelve sequences demonstrated temperature-dependent responses that differed significantly between patients with sepsis and noninfectious SIRS: CXCL-13; heat shock proteins DNAJB12 and DNAJC4; the F11 receptor; folate hydrolase 1; HSF-2; HSP 70 proteins HSPA1A, HSPA1B, and HSPA1L; interleukin 8; lipopolysaccharide binding protein; and prostaglandin E synthase. Febrile-range temperatures achieved during sepsis and noninfectious SIRS correlate with detectable changes in stress gene expression in vivo, suggesting that fever can activate HSP gene expression and modify innate immune responses. For some genes, it appears that clinical condition can alter temperature-sensitive gene expression. Collectively, these data

  7. A comparative study of Widal test with blood culture in the diagnosis of typhoid fever in febrile patients.

    PubMed

    Andualem, Gizachew; Abebe, Tamrat; Kebede, Nigatu; Gebre-Selassie, Solomon; Mihret, Adane; Alemayehu, Haile

    2014-09-17

    Typhoid fever is a major health problem in developing countries and its diagnosis on clinical ground is difficult. Diagnosis in developing countries including Ethiopia is mostly done by Widal test. However, the value of the test has been debated. Hence, evaluating the result of this test is necessary for correct interpretation of the result. The main aim of this study was to compare the result of Widal test and blood culture in the diagnosis of typhoid fever in febrile patients. Blood samples were collected from 270 febrile patients with symptoms clinically similar to typhoid fever and visiting St. Paul's General Specialized Hospitals from mid December 2010 to March 2011. Blood culture was used to isolate S.typhi and S.paratyphi. Slide agglutination test and tube agglutination tests were used for the determination of antibody titer. An antibody titer of ≥1:80 for anti TO and ≥1:160 for anti TH were taken as a cut of value to indicate recent infection of typhoid fever. One hundred and eighty six (68.9%) participants were females and eighty four (31.1%) were males. 7 (2.6%) cases of S. typhi and 4 (1.5%) cases of S. paratyphi were identified with the total prevalence of typhoid fever 4.1%. The total number of patients who have indicative of recent infection by either of O and H antigens Widal test is 88 (32.6%). The sensitivity, specificity, Positive predictive Value and Negative predictive Value of Widal test were 71.4%, 68.44%, 5.7% and 98.9% respectively. Widal test has a low sensitivity, specificity and PPV, but it has good NPV which indicates that negative Widal test result have a good indication for the absence of the disease.

  8. Increasing Prevalence of Plasmodium vivax among Febrile Patients in Nouakchott, Mauritania

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed Salem Ould Ahmedou; Lekweiry, Khadijetou Mint; Deida, Jemila Mint; Emouh, Ahmed Ould; Weddady, Mohamed Ould; Boukhary, Ali Ould Mohamed Salem; Basco, Leonardo K.

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of Plasmodium vivax malaria was reported in Nouakchott, Mauritania in the 1990s. Several studies have suggested the frequent occurrence of P. vivax malaria among Nouakchott residents, including those without recent travel history to the southern part of the country where malaria is known to be endemic. To further consolidate the evidence for P. vivax endemicity and the extent of malaria burden in one district in the city of Nouakchott, febrile illnesses were monitored in 2012–2013 in the Teyarett health center. The number of laboratory-confirmed P. vivax cases has attained more than 2,000 cases in 2013. Malaria transmission occurs locally, and P. vivax is diagnosed throughout the year. Plasmodium vivax malaria is endemic in Nouakchott and largely predominates over Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:25582695

  9. Serological evidence of rift valley fever virus among acute febrile patients in Southern Mozambique during and after the 2013 heavy rainfall and flooding: implication for the management of febrile illness.

    PubMed

    Gudo, Eduardo Samo; Pinto, Gabriela; Weyer, Jacqueline; le Roux, Chantel; Mandlaze, Arcildo; José, Américo Feriano; Muianga, Argentina; Paweska, Janusz Tadeusz

    2016-06-08

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) remains heavily neglected in humans in Mozambique, even though recent outbreaks were reported in neighboring countries in humans and several cases of RVFV in cattle were reported in several districts in Mozambique. We conducted a cross sectional study during and after severe flooding that occurred in 2013 in Mozambique. Paired acute and convalescent serum samples were tested from febrile patients attending a primary health care unit in a suburban area of Maputo city for the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Seroconversion of IgG anti-RVFV was observed in 5 % (10/200) of convalescent patients and specific IgM anti-RVFV was detected in one acute patient (0.5 %; 1/200). All sera from acute patient tested negative by real time PCR. In conclusion, our results suggest that RVF represent an important but neglected cause of febrile illness following periods of flooding in southern Mozambique.

  10. Preliminary survey of Leptospirosis and Lyme disease amongst febrile patients attending community hospital ambulatory care in Maputo, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Collares-Pereira, M; Gomes, A C; Prassad, M; Vaz, R G; Ferrinho, P; Stanek, G; Rosario, V E

    1997-08-01

    To evaluate the importance of the spirochetes Leptospira interrogans s.l. and Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., as causes of human diseases (leptospirosis and Lyme borreliosis), in order to guide the development of laboratory services and patient management and to identify the appropriateness of future epidemiological studies. Cross sectional serological survey. Maputo, the capital city of Mozambique. 160 adult patients (18 to 50 years of age) presenting, sequentially and for the first time, with a febrile illness at the outpatient's department of a community hospital. All sera were examined for L. interrogans s.l. antibodies by the standard microtiter technique (MAT), using as live culture antigens a battery of serovars representing 20 pathogenic serogroups. The IgM and IgG antibody response to B. burgdorferi s.l. was determined in all sera with an indirect IgG ELISA. In order to study potential serological cross-reactivity in malaria positive sera, all samples were further examined for antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum by indirect immunofluorescence. This was complemented with a standardised clinical history and physical examination. Presence of antibodies to Leptospira interrogans s.l. and to Borrelia burgdorferi s.l.. Although not conclusive, because of the inability to attempt rising serology and positive cultures, the results suggest that 10% of non-specific febrile illnesses could be attributed to leptospirosis. This study may thus form the background for a definitive Leptospira research in the same location. We confirm reports from other African countries that Lyme disease is an unlikely occurrence. We further suggest that some of the seropositivity observed for Lyme disease in Maputo could be attributed to serological cross reactivity with antibodies to P. falciparum malaria, leptospirosis or syphilis.

  11. Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Chemotherapy-Induced Myelosuppression and Febrile Neutropenia in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Huan; Qin, Wei; Wu, Wenjing; Guo, Pi; Lu, Yong; Liu, Pengxi; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi

    2015-01-01

    Title. Chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression lowers the quality of life in breast cancer patients and causes many complications. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a widely used complementary and alternative medicine therapies. Objective. To study whether TCM can reduce the incidence of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia, neutropenia, and febrile neutropenia (FN) in breast cancer patients. Methods. The data were analyzed retrospectively between patients who received TCM treatment (group 1, n = 453) and patients who did not receive TCM treatment (group 2, n = 359). Significant risk factors associated with the occurrence of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia, neutropenia, and FN were identified using multivariate analysis. Propensity score-matched patients were analyzed to adjust for any baseline differences. Results. Group 1 patients had a significantly lower rate of chemotherapy-induced severe leukopenia, neutropenia, and FN, compared with group 2 (43% versus 71%, P < 0.0001, 72% versus 78%, P = 0.005, 6% versus 24%, P < 0.0001, resp.). Multivariate analysis revealed that chemotherapy regimens containing anthracyclines combined with paclitaxel or docetaxel were the most significant predictor. Subgroup analysis indicated that TCM treatment showed benefit in relieving chemotherapy-induced leukopenia and FN in most chemotherapy regimens. Conclusions. TCM treatment could lower the risk of severe chemotherapy-induced leukopenia, neutropenia, and FN in breast cancer patients. PMID:26347793

  12. Validation of a predictive model that identifies patients at high risk of developing febrile neutropaenia following chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P; Scaife, J; Freeman, S

    2012-07-01

    We have previously developed a predictive model that identifies patients at increased risk of febrile neutropaenia (FN) following chemotherapy, based on pretreatment haematological indices. This study was designed to validate our earlier findings in a separate cohort of patients undergoing more myelosuppressive chemotherapy supported by growth factors. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 263 patients who had been treated with adjuvant docetaxel, adriamycin and cyclophosphamide (TAC) chemotherapy for breast cancer. All patients received prophylactic pegfilgrastim and the majority also received prophylactic antibiotics. Thirty-one patients (12%) developed FN. Using our previous model, patients in the highest risk group (pretreatment absolute neutrophil count≤3.1 10(9)/l and absolute lymphocyte count≤1.5 10(9)/l) comprised 8% of the total population and had a 33% risk of developing FN. Compared with the rest of the cohort, this group had a 3.4-fold increased risk of developing FN (P=0.001) and a 5.2-fold increased risk of cycle 1 FN (P<0.001). A simple model based on pretreatment differential white blood cell count can be applied to pegfilgrastim-supported patients to identify those who are at higher risk of FN.

  13. Incidence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infection in high-risk febrile neutropenic patients colonized with VRE.

    PubMed

    Bossaer, John B; Hall, Philip D; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2010-02-01

    This study seeks to determine the incidence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) infection in high-risk neutropenic fever patients colonized with VRE and to determine patient characteristics associated with VRE infection. We conducted a retrospective, single-center, unmatched case-control study. Fifty-three VRE-colonized, high-risk patients with neutropenic fever were identified between January 2006 and February 2009. The two most common diagnoses/conditions included acute myeloid leukemia and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Data collected included days of neutropenia, days of fever, demographic data, culture results, and antimicrobial therapy. Twenty of the 53 patients (38%) with VRE colonization developed a VRE infection. The most common VRE infections were bacteremias (26%). The presence of neutropenia lasting longer than 7 days was associated with the development of VRE infection in this high-risk population colonized with VRE. The timeframe to develop VRE infection varied from 1 day to 2 weeks. For patients colonized with VRE, approximately 38% of high-risk neutropenic patients developed a VRE infection. This is the first study to specifically evaluate the incidence of VRE infections in febrile neutropenic patients colonized with VRE. Future research into the use and efficacy of empiric VRE coverage is needed.

  14. Evaluation of Magnesium Levels in Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Febrile Convulsion Hospitalized in Bahrami Hospital in Tehran in 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Khosroshahi, Nahid; Ghadirian, Laleh; Kamrani, Kamyar

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of magnesium levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with febrile convulsion (FC) hospitalized in Bahrami hospital in Tehran in 2010-2011. In the past, decreased levels of magnesium in serum and CSF of patients with FC were reported. The purpose of this study was to identify the possible role of magnesium in febrile seizures in children. Identifying this condition, we may control seizures and also prevent subsequent convulsion. In this cross-sectional study, inclusion criteria were the existence of convulsion due to fever and exclusion criteria were having a known neurological disease which could induce a seizure, and children younger than one month. In each group (cases include children with febrile convulsion and controls include febrile children without convulsion), Mg was measured in blood, and cerebrospinal fluid of 90 children and then they were compared. The data were analyzed by SPSS (α=0.05). The mean serum and CSF levels of Mg in case and control groups were equal (P<0.87 and P<0.22 respectively). There was no difference between two groups in terms of sex, but mean age was significantly different (P<0.003). There was not an association between serum and CSF levels of magnesium and the presence of FC. Therefore, it's not suggested to measure the level of magnesium in serum or CSF in children with fever routinely.

  15. Using a urine dipstick to identify a positive urine culture in young febrile infants is as effective as in older patients.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Roberto; Benito, Helvia; Mozun, Rebeca; Trujillo, Juan E; Merino, Pedro A; de la Torre, Mercedes; Gomez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    There is limited evidence about the diagnostic value of urine dipsticks in young febrile infants. The aim of this study was to determine whether urine dipsticks would identify positive urine cultures in febrile infants of less than 90 days of age. This study was a subanalysis of a prospective multicentre study developed in 19 Spanish paediatric emergency departments belonging to the Spanish Paediatric Emergency Research Network. It focused on febrile infants of less than 90 days of age admitted between October 2011 and September 2013. A positive urine culture was defined as the growth of ≥ 50,000 cfu/mL of a single pathogen collected by a sterile method. We included 3401 patients, and 176 (12.8%) female patients and 473 (23.3%) males had a positive urine culture. The leucocyte esterase test showed a mean sensitivity of 82.1% and a mean specificity of 92.4%, with a greater mean negative predictive value for females than males (97.8 versus 94.1%) and a greater mean positive predictive value for males than females (79.4% versus 58%). The leucocyte esterase test showed the same accuracy in young febrile infants as previously reported findings for older children. It predicted positive urine cultures and also revealed important gender differences. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Diagnostic Algorithm in the Management of Acute Febrile Abdomen in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuville, Marie; Hustinx, Roland; Jacques, Jessica; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute febrile abdomen represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Although criteria have been proposed for cyst infection (CyI) and hemorrhage (CyH), there is a lack of comparative assessments. Furthermore, distinguishing cystic from non-cystic complications remains problematic. Design ADPKD patients presenting with abdominal pain and/or fever between 01/2005 and 06/2015 were retrospectively identified in a systematic computerized billing database. CyH was defined as spontaneous intracystic density above 50 Hounsfield units on computed tomography (CT). CyI was definite if confirmed by cyst puncture, and probable if 4 criteria were met: 3-day fever, loin/liver tenderness, C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels >50mg/L and no CT evidence for CyH. Other episodes were grouped as inflammation of unknown origin (IUO). Results Among a cohort of 173 ADPKD patients, 101 presented with 205 episodes of abdominal pain (n = 172) and/or fever (n = 33). 20 patients experienced 30 CyH, whereas 16 presented 23 episodes of definite (n = 11) or probable (n = 12) CyI. 35 IUO were observed in 31 patients. Clinically, fever was observed in 7% vs. 100% vs. 66% of CyH, CyI and IUO, respectively. Biologically, CRP cut-off at 70 mg/dl showed 92% sensitivity and 81% specificity in CyI diagnosis. Urine or blood cultures remained sterile in >90% of CyH, but were contributive in 53.4% of CyI and IUO, with a 74.2% prevalence for E. coli. Radiologically, ultrasounds, CT and magnetic resonance diagnosed CyI in 2.6%, 20% and 16.7% of cases, respectively. 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT was done within a median period of 7 days post antibiotics, and significantly changed patient management in 71.4%. Conclusions This retrospective single-center series underscores the usefulness of clinical–fever–and biological–CRP–parameters, but emphasizes the limitations of bacteriological and radiological investigations

  17. Single Nucleotide Variations in CLCN6 Identified in Patients with Benign Partial Epilepsies in Infancy and/or Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Sangu, Noriko; Komoike, Yuta; Ishii, Atsushi; Abe, Shinpei; Yamashita, Shintaro; Imai, Katsumi; Kubota, Tetsuo; Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Okanishi, Tohru; Enoki, Hideo; Tanabe, Takuya; Saito, Akira; Furukawa, Toru; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Milligan, Carol J.; Petrou, Steven; Heron, Sarah E.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Hirose, Shinichi; Okumura, Akihisa

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide alterations in the gene encoding proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) have been identified in most patients with benign partial epilepsies in infancy (BPEI)/benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE). However, not all patients harbor these PRRT2 mutations, indicating the involvement of genes other than PRRT2. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing analysis for a large family affected with PRRT2-unrelated BPEI. We identified a non-synonymous single nucleotide variation (SNV) in the voltage-sensitive chloride channel 6 gene (CLCN6). A cohort study of 48 BPEI patients without PRRT2 mutations revealed a different CLCN6 SNV in a patient, his sibling and his father who had a history of febrile seizures (FS) but not BPEI. Another study of 48 patients with FS identified an additional SNV in CLCN6. Chloride channels (CLCs) are involved in a multitude of physiologic processes and some members of the CLC family have been linked to inherited diseases. However, a phenotypic correlation has not been confirmed for CLCN6. Although we could not detect significant biological effects linked to the identified CLCN6 SNVs, further studies should investigate potential CLCN6 variants that may underlie the genetic susceptibility to convulsive disorders. PMID:25794116

  18. A multicenter phase 2 study of empirical low-dose liposomal amphotericin B in patients with refractory febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Miyao, Kotaro; Sawa, Masashi; Kurata, Mio; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Sakemura, Reona; Sakai, Toshiyasu; Kato, Tomonori; Sahashi, Satomi; Tsushita, Natsuko; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Tsuzuki, Motohiro; Kohno, Akio; Adachi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Keisuke; Ohbayashi, Kaneyuki; Inagaki, Yuichiro; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Emi, Nobuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is a major life-threatening problem encountered by patients with hematological malignancies receiving intensive chemotherapy. Empirical antifungal agents are therefore important. Despite the availability of antifungal agents for such situations, the optimal agents and administration methods remain unclear. We conducted a prospective phase 2 study of empirical 1 mg/kg/day liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB) in 80 patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for hematological malignancies. All enrolled patients were high-risk and had recurrent prolonged febrile neutropenia despite having received broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy for at least 72 hours. Fifty-three patients (66.3 %) achieved the primary endpoint of successful treatment, thus exceeding the predefined threshold success rate. No patients developed IFI. The treatment completion rate was 73.8 %, and only two cases ceased treatment because of adverse events. The most frequent events were reversible electrolyte abnormalities. We consider low-dose L-AMB to provide comparable efficacy and improved safety and cost-effectiveness when compared with other empirical antifungal therapies. Additional large-scale randomized studies are needed to determine the clinical usefulness of L-AMB relative to other empirical antifungal therapies.

  19. Prevalence and characteristics of dengue and chikungunya infections among acute febrile patients in Nong Khai Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lertanekawattana, Sujet; Anantapreecha, Surapee; Jiraphongsa, Chuleeporn; Duan-ngern, Pawinee; Potjalongsin, Sathit; Wiittayabamrung, Wisanu; Daroon, Pamol; Techolarn, Meta

    2013-09-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study at three hospitals of Nong Khai Province, Thailand to determine the prevalence and characteristics of dengue and chikungunya infection among patients who sought care. The study population was acute febrile patients who visited these hospitals during 1 August -31 October, 2010 who were aged 2-60 years and had clinical symptoms compatible with the case definition. Dengue and chikungunya cases were confirmed by an ELISA IgM titer or RT-PCR. We also reviewed surveillance data of dengue and chikungunya infections from 2003-2009. Of the 200 participants recruited into the study, 103 patients (51.5%) were confirmed to have acute dengue infection; dengue serotype 2 was the most prevalence serotype. The ages of confirmed dengue cases ranged from 2-37 years old. The distribution of cases showed that dengue morbidity tended to be clustered in adjacent areas, particularly in Mueang District. Only a small proportion of the patients uses mosquito repellant and had screens on their windows. One patient (0.5%) had laboratory confirmed chikungunya infection. She was from Rattanawapi District, an area where no chikungunya had been reported before. Since the disease varies by age and geographic location, increased awareness of health care workers and public health officers about the diseases in the area is needed for early detection of cases and to promote early prevention and control measures.

  20. Efficacy and safety of tazobactam/piperacillin as an empirical treatment for the patients of adult and child with febrile neutropenia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kazuo; Akiyama, Nobu; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Saito, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Tazobactam/piperacillin (4.5 g for adults and 90 mg/kg body weight for children, every 6 h) was administered to Japanese patients with febrile neutropenia to evaluate its defervescence and clinical efficacy and safety. The pharmacokinetics in children were also examined. Defervescence efficacy at day 4 of the treatment was achieved in 50.0% of 94 adult and 62.5% of 8 pediatric patients, respectively. The defervescence efficacy rate in relation to the neutrophil count in adults was 37.5% for the patients with a neutrophil count of less than 100/μL and 62.5% for that between 100 and 500/μL. The clinical efficacy rate at day 7 and at the end or discontinuation of the treatment was 79.6% and 59.1% in adult patients, respectively, and 57.1% and 75.0% in pediatric patients, respectively. Fifteen strains of causative bacteria were isolated in 13 adult patients at baseline. All strains were eradicated within 4 days of the treatment. The side effects that occurred in adult and pediatric patients during the treatment were all known and not specific to febrile neutropenia patients. The pharmacokinetics profiles of tazobactam/piperacillin in children with febrile neutropenia are unlikely to be different from those in children with a common bacterial infection and without any immunosuppressive conditions. The study results in Japanese patients with febrile neutropenia demonstrate that tazobactam/piperacillin treatment is efficacious and safe in adults. As for pediatric patients, given the limited number of cases studied, further investigation is needed (Clinical trial number: Japic CTI-121728). Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In-hospital mortality in febrile lupus patients based on 2016 EULAR/ACR/PRINTO classification criteria for macrophage activation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Yoo, Byung-Woo; Jung, Seung Min; Lee, Sang-Won; Park, Yong-Beom; Song, Jason Jungsik

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of the 2016 European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO) classification criteria for macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with febrile systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a retrospective analysis of SLE patients with fever, who were admitted to Severance Hospital between December 2005 and May 2016. Patients were evaluated for MAS using the 2016 classification criteria for MAS. Clinical features and laboratory findings were compared and overall survival rate was analyzed. Forward and backward stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the factors associated with in-hospital mortality. Among 157 patients with SLE, 54 (34.3%) were considered to have MAS on admission (n = 42) and during admission (n = 12). For patients who already have MAS on admission, their baseline laboratory findings demonstrated lower CRP, platelets, total protein, albumin, complement C3, fibrinogen and higher AST, ALT, total bilirubin, ferritin, and triglyceride. The overall survival rate was significantly lower in patients with MAS than without MAS (64.8% vs. 97.0%, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of MAS was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality in febrile SLE patients (OR = 64.5; 95% CI: 7.6-544.4; p < 0.001). The 2016 classification criteria for MAS is useful to identify febrile SLE patients at high risk for in-hospital mortality. Monitoring febrile SLE patients with the new 2016 classification criteria might aid in the early detection of MAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Aetiology of Bacteraemia as a Risk Factor for Septic Shock at the Onset of Febrile Neutropaenia in Adult Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Regis Goulart; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2014-01-01

    Septic shock (SS) at the onset of febrile neutropaenia (FN) is an emergency situation that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The impact of the specific aetiology of bloodstream infections (BSIs) in the development of SS at the time of FN is not well established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the aetiology of BSIs and SS at the time of FN in hospitalised adult cancer patients. This prospective cohort study was performed at a single tertiary hospital from October 2009 to August 2011. All adult cancer patients admitted consecutively to the haematology ward with FN were evaluated. A stepwise logistic regression was conducted to verify the association between the microbiological characteristics of BSIs and SS at the onset of FN. In total, 307 cases of FN in adult cancer patients were evaluated. There were 115 cases with documented BSI. A multivariate analysis showed that polymicrobial bacteraemia (P = 0.01) was associated with SS. The specific blood isolates independently associated with SS were viridans streptococci (P = 0.02) and Escherichia coli (P = 0.01). Neutropaenic cancer patients with polymicrobial bacteraemia or BSI by viridans streptococci or Escherichia coli are at increased risk for SS at the time of FN. PMID:24804223

  3. European guidelines for empirical antibacterial therapy for febrile neutropenic patients in the era of growing resistance: summary of the 2011 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Averbuch, Diana; Orasch, Christina; Cordonnier, Catherine; Livermore, David M; Mikulska, Malgorzata; Viscoli, Claudio; Gyssens, Inge C; Kern, Winfried V; Klyasova, Galina; Marchetti, Oscar; Engelhard, Dan; Akova, Murat

    2013-12-01

    Owing to increasing resistance and the limited arsenal of new antibiotics, especially against Gram-negative pathogens, carefully designed antibiotic regimens are obligatory for febrile neutropenic patients, along with effective infection control. The Expert Group of the 4(th) European Conference on Infections in Leukemia has developed guidelines for initial empirical therapy in febrile neutropenic patients, based on: i) the local resistance epidemiology; and ii) the patient's risk factors for resistant bacteria and for a complicated clinical course. An 'escalation' approach, avoiding empirical carbapenems and combinations, should be employed in patients without particular risk factors. A 'de-escalation' approach, with initial broad-spectrum antibiotics or combinations, should be used only in those patients with: i) known prior colonization or infection with resistant pathogens; or ii) complicated presentation; or iii) in centers where resistant pathogens are prevalent at the onset of febrile neutropenia. In the latter case, infection control and antibiotic stewardship also need urgent review. Modification of the initial regimen at 72-96 h should be based on the patient's clinical course and the microbiological results. Discontinuation of antibiotics after 72 h or later should be considered in neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin who are hemodynamically stable since presentation and afebrile for at least 48 h, irrespective of neutrophil count and expected duration of neutropenia. This strategy aims to minimize the collateral damage associated with antibiotic overuse, and the further selection of resistance.

  4. Evaluation of febrile, nonneutropenic pediatric oncology patients with central venous catheters who are not given empiric antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Frederick; Aftandilian, Catherine; Andrews, Jennifer; Gutierrez, Kathleen; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Jeng, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the practice of empiric antibiotics for febrile, nonneutropenic pediatric oncology patients with a central venous catheter (CVC) in place. Episodes of fever without neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count [ANC] ≥500 cells/mm(3)) were reviewed retrospectively in pediatric oncology patients with a CVC undergoing chemotherapy. Characteristics and symptoms were compared between patients with bacteremia and patients without bacteremia. A total of 392 episodes of nonneutropenic fever in 138 subjects (52 females; 38%) were reviewed. In this cohort, the median age at an episode was 7 years, and the majority of patients had a diagnosis of acute leukemia (54%). Median ANC was 3100 cells/mm(3) (IQR, 1570-5980 cells/mm(3)). Median temperature was 38.7°C (IQR, 38.3-39.2°C). Twenty-four infectious episodes (6%) occurred in 18 subjects, and 5 CVCs required removal; all patients requiring removal admitted and received antibiotics owing to chills. There were no significant difference in age, sex, or ANC between patients with bacteremia and those without bacteremia; however, mean temperature was higher in the patients with bacteremia (39.4°C vs 38.7°C; P = .003). No deaths due to sepsis occurred, and no CVCs were removed because antibiotics were not administered empirically. Our practice of observing pediatric oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy with CVCs who are not neutropenic does not appear to lead to increased serious adverse outcomes and avoids antibiotic exposure for >90% of patients without a bacterial infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Febrile neutropenia in adjuvant docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) with prophylactic pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Ngamphaiboon, Nuttapong; O'Connor, Tracey L; Advani, Pooja P; Levine, Ellis G; Kossoff, Ellen B

    2012-09-01

    US Oncology Research Trial 9735 reported that TC improved overall survival when compared to doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide in early-stage breast cancer. Despite 61% grades 3-4 neutropenia in the TC arm, only 5% of patients developed febrile neutropenia (FN) without primary prophylactic GCSF (ppGCSF). TC has risen in popularity, particularly in older patients or in those where an anthracycline is contraindicated. Other studies examining the toxicity of TC without ppGCSF reported a higher incidence of FN between 23 and 46%. We reviewed our institutional experience with ppGCSF and the TC regimen. Women treated with adjuvant TC and pegfilgrastim at Roswell Park Cancer Institute were identified from the pharmacy database between 8/2006 and 11/2010. Patient characteristics and comorbidities were abstracted. Endpoints included incidence of FN, hematologic toxicities, relative dose intensity (RDI), and other acute complications. Docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) were given every 21 day/cycle for a planned four cycles. All patients received pegfilgrastim 6 mg on day 3. One hundred and eleven women with median age of 56 years (27-79) were identified. Twenty-two percent of patients were ≥ 65 at diagnosis. Eight patients developed FN (7%). Ninety-five patients (86%) were able to complete four cycles. Completion rate was significantly lower in patients with age ≥ 65 (71% vs. 90%; P = 0.02). Incidence of hospitalization, delay, RDI <85%, and dose reduction were not significantly different between the age groups. The overall incidence of FN was 7%. Older patients were significantly less likely to complete four cycles of TC as planned. ppGCSF should be strongly considered in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant TC chemotherapy.

  6. Capecitabine pattern of usage, rate of febrile neutropaenia and treatment related death in asian cancer patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Phua, Vincent Chee Ee; Wong, Wei Quan; Tan, Pei Lin; Bustam, Anita Zarina; Saad, Marniza; Alip, Adlinda; Wan Ishak, Wan Zamaniah

    2015-01-01

    Oral capecitabine is increasingly replacing intravenous 5-fluorouracil in many chemotherapy regimens. However, data on the risk of febrile neutropaenia (FN) and treatment related death (TRD) with the drug remain sparse outside of clinical trial settings despite its widespread usage. This study aimed to determine these rates in a large cohort of patients treated in the University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). We reviewed the clinical notes of all patients prescribed with oral capecitabine chemotherapy for any tumour sites in University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) from 1st January 2009 till 31st June 2010. Information collected included patient demographics, histopathological features, treatment received including the different chemotherapy regimens and intent of treatment whether the chemotherapy was given for neoadjuvant, concurrent with radiation, adjuvant or palliative intent. The aim of this study is to establish the pattern of usage, FN and TRD rates with capecitabine in clinical practice outside of clinical trial setting. FN is defined as an oral temperature >38.5°or two consecutive readings of >38.0° for 2 hours and an absolute neutrophil count <0.5 x 109/L, or expected to fall below 0.5 x 109/L (de Naurois et al., 2010). Treatment related death was defined as death occurring during or within 30 days of last chemotherapy treatment. Between 1st January 2009 and 30th June 2010, 274 patients were treated with capecitabine chemotherapy in UMMC. The mean age was 58 years (range 22 to 82 years). Capecitabine was used in 14 different tumour sites with the colorectal site predominating with a total of 128 cases (46.7%), followed by breast cancer (35.8%). Capecitabine was most commonly used in the palliative setting accounting for 63.9% of the cases, followed by the adjuvant setting (19.7%). The most common regimen was single agent capecitabine with 129 cases (47.1%). The other common regimens were XELOX (21.5%) and ECX (10.2%). The main result of this study

  7. Immunoblot studies to analyze antibody to the Rickettsia typhi group antigen in sera from patients with acute febrile cerebrovasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hechemy, K E; Fox, J A; Gröschel, D H; Hayden, F G; Wenzel, R P

    1991-01-01

    In 1986, an unusual syndrome of acute febrile cerebrovasculitis in the Piedmont Region of Virginia was reported. All patients had encephalopathy and prior exposure to both a sylvan environment and flea-infested animals. The initial serological studies suggested a rickettsial origin, corroborating clinical, epidemiological, and histopathological findings. Sera from four of five patients were subsequently studied by immunoblotting. Unabsorbed and absorbed sera were tested with electrophoresed and electroblotted Rickettsia typhi, Legionella bozemanii, and Proteus vulgaris OX19 antigens. The unabsorbed sera reacted with all three antigens. The P. vulgaris- and L. bozemanii-absorbed sera reacted with R. typhi only and without significantly less intensity. In contrast, the reactivity of R. typhi-absorbed sera was significantly lower with all three antigens. These results indicate that these patients had specific antibodies to a typhus group antigen. Although our findings suggest that a rickettsia of the typhus group may have caused this syndrome, no definitive diagnosis could be achieved because a rickettsial organism was not isolated. Images PMID:1723073

  8. Potential of polymerase chain reaction and galactomannan for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Muge; Oz, Yasemin; Aksit, Filiz; Akay, Olga M

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of invasive aspergillosis (IA) has increased over the last years, especially in immuncompromised patients with high mortality rates. Because of difficulties about the diagnosis; serological methods [galactomannan (GM) antigen test] and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) developed in recent years. MycAssay Aspergillus PCR performance in the diagnosis of IA was evaluated and compared with the GM and in-house PCR. This study was conducted with 358 serum samples obtained from 99 patient with febrile neutropenic episodes who were followed in haematology and bone marrow transplantation units. Patients were classified by the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group criteria, 18 of them is proven and probable IA. GM antigen test and two different real-time PCR; one of them is fist commercial PCR for IA; Mycassay Aspergillus and the other one is in-house real-time PCR performed. Sensitivity values were Mycassay Aspergillus PCR, in-house PCR, and GM 65.38%, 11.53% and 23.07%, respectively. The high sensitivity obtained from Mycassay Aspergillus PCR and sensitivity is increased by using a combination of diagnostic methods. GM antigen test and real-time PCR could be beneficial for early diagnosis and treatment of IA. For routine usage of PCR as diagnostic assay more studies needed in future. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Comparing Two Approaches for Empirical Antifungal Therapy in Hematological Patients with Persistent Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Navarro, M. Victoria; Aguilar-Guisado, Manuela; Espigado, Ildefonso; de Pipaón, Maite Ruiz Pérez; Falantes, José; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    New approaches of empirical antifungal therapy (EAT) in selected hematological patients with persistent febrile neutropenia (PFN) have been proposed in recent years, but their cost-effectiveness has not been studied. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of two different approaches of EAT in hematological patients with PFN: the diagnosis-driven antifungal therapy (DDAT) approach versus the standard approach of EAT. A decision tree to assess the cost-effectiveness of both approaches was developed. Outcome probabilities and treatment pathways were extrapolated from two studies: a prospective cohort study following the DDAT approach and a randomized clinical trial following the standard approach. Uncertainty was undertaken through sensitivity analyses and Monte Carlo simulation. The average effectiveness and economic advantages in the DDAT approach compared to the standard approach were 2.6% and €5,879 (33%) per PFN episode, respectively. The DDAT was the dominant approach in the 99.5% of the simulations performed with average cost-effectiveness per PFN episode of €32,671 versus €52,479 in the EAT approach. The results were robust over a wide range of variables. The DDAT approach is more cost-effective than the EAT approach in the management of PFN in hematological patients. PMID:23856767

  10. The Utility of Preliminary Patient Evaluation in a Febrile Respiratory Infectious Disease Unit outside the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun Sik; Jhun, Byung Woo; Yoon, Hee; Lim, Seong Mi; Ko, Eunsil; Park, Joo Hyun; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Lee, Se Uk; Lee, Tae Rim; Cha, Won Chul; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon

    2017-09-01

    A febrile respiratory infectious disease unit (FRIDU) with a negative pressure ventilation system was constructed outside the emergency department (ED) of the Samsung Medical Center in 2015, to screen for patients with contagious diseases requiring isolation. We evaluated the utility of the FRIDU during 1 year of operation. We analyzed 1,562 patients who were hospitalized after FRIDU screening between August 2015 and July 2016. The level of isolation recommended during their screening at the FRIDU was compared with the level deemed appropriate given their final diagnosis. Of the 1,562 patients screened at the FRIDU, 198 (13%) were isolated, 194 (12%) were reverse isolated, and 1,170 (75%) were not isolated. While hospitalized, 97 patients (6%) were confirmed to have a contagious disease requiring isolation, such as tuberculosis; 207 patients (13%) were confirmed to be immunocompromised and to require reverse isolation, mainly due to neutropenia; and the remaining 1,258 patients (81%) did not require isolation. The correlation coefficient for isolation consistency was 0.565 (P < 0.001). The sensitivity and negative predictive value of FRIDU screening for diagnosing contagious disease requiring isolation are 76% and 98%, respectively. No serious nosocomial outbreaks of contagious diseases occurred. During FRIDU screening, 114 patients were admitted to the resuscitation zone due to clinical instability, and three of these patients died. The initial isolation levels resulting from FRIDU screening were moderately well correlated with the isolation levels required by the final diagnosis, demonstrating the utility of pre-hospitalization screening units. However, the risks of deterioration during the screening process remain challenges. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  11. European guidelines for empirical antibacterial therapy for febrile neutropenic patients in the era of growing resistance: summary of the 2011 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Averbuch, Diana; Orasch, Christina; Cordonnier, Catherine; Livermore, David M.; Mikulska, Małgorzata; Viscoli, Claudio; Gyssens, Inge C.; Kern, Winfried V.; Klyasova, Galina; Marchetti, Oscar; Engelhard, Dan; Akova, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Owing to increasing resistance and the limited arsenal of new antibiotics, especially against Gram-negative pathogens, carefully designed antibiotic regimens are obligatory for febrile neutropenic patients, along with effective infection control. The Expert Group of the 4th European Conference on Infections in Leukemia has developed guidelines for initial empirical therapy in febrile neutropenic patients, based on: i) the local resistance epidemiology; and ii) the patient’s risk factors for resistant bacteria and for a complicated clinical course. An ‘escalation’ approach, avoiding empirical carbapenems and combinations, should be employed in patients without particular risk factors. A ‘de-escalation’ approach, with initial broad-spectrum antibiotics or combinations, should be used only in those patients with: i) known prior colonization or infection with resistant pathogens; or ii) complicated presentation; or iii) in centers where resistant pathogens are prevalent at the onset of febrile neutropenia. In the latter case, infection control and antibiotic stewardship also need urgent review. Modification of the initial regimen at 72–96 h should be based on the patient’s clinical course and the microbiological results. Discontinuation of antibiotics after 72 h or later should be considered in neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin who are hemodynamically stable since presentation and afebrile for at least 48 h, irrespective of neutrophil count and expected duration of neutropenia. This strategy aims to minimize the collateral damage associated with antibiotic overuse, and the further selection of resistance. PMID:24323983

  12. Pegfilgrastim prophylaxis in patients at different levels of risk for chemotherapy-associated febrile neutropenia: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Fiegl, Michael; Steger, Günther G; Studnicka, Michael; Eisterer, Wolfgang; Jaeger, Christine; Willenbacher, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    Guidelines for using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients receiving chemotherapies with 10-20% (intermediate) risk for febrile neutropenia (FN) recommend additional assessment of patient-related FN risk factors. The current study evaluated adherence to guideline recommendations and analysed modalities of pegfilgrastim use. Adult cancer patients scheduled to receive a chemotherapy regimen assessed by the investigators as intermediate FN risk and who received pegfilgrastim were prospectively enrolled in this observational study from 2007-2010. Risk factors at study entry, treatment modalities and FN assessment were documented by investigators, whereas guideline adherence was centrally checked in a post-hoc analysis, according to guideline categorizations. Thirty-seven centres enrolled 335 evaluable patients with solid and hematologic neoplasias. Although physicians initially rated the FN risk of all chemotherapies as intermediate, after central re-assessment this applied only to 63.9% of regimens; 21.2% were reassessed as low risk and 14.9% as high risk. Pegfilgrastim was used as primary prophylaxis in 80.3% of all patients. The most frequent FN risk factors considered by physicians when deciding to use pegfilgrastim were female gender, advanced disease, age ≥ 65 years, and anaemia. FN incidence was higher in patients with ≥ 4 FN risk factors than those with <4 risk factors (10% vs. 4.3%; p = 0.055) and in patients with severe comorbidity than those without (13.6% vs. 4.5%; p = 0.014). Overall FN rate was 5.7%. Due to the observational design of the study, findings are descriptive in nature. Post-hoc assessment of chemotherapy FN risk was determined by author's opinion in some cases. Overall, there was good adherence of Austrian physicians to guideline recommendations; however, there are chemotherapy regimens and clinical settings in which FN risk assignment is unclear in the literature. FN incidence with pegfilgrastim prophylaxis was similar

  13. Assessing patients' risk of febrile neutropenia: is there a correlation between physician-assessed risk and model-predicted risk?

    PubMed

    Lyman, Gary H; Dale, David C; Legg, Jason C; Abella, Esteban; Morrow, Phuong Khanh; Whittaker, Sadie; Crawford, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the correlation between the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) estimated by physicians and the risk of severe neutropenia or FN predicted by a validated multivariate model in patients with nonmyeloid malignancies receiving chemotherapy. Before patient enrollment, physician and site characteristics were recorded, and physicians self-reported the FN risk at which they would typically consider granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis (FN risk intervention threshold). For each patient, physicians electronically recorded their estimated FN risk, orders for G-CSF primary prophylaxis (yes/no), and patient characteristics for model predictions. Correlations between physician-assessed FN risk and model-predicted risk (primary endpoints) and between physician-assessed FN risk and G-CSF orders were calculated. Overall, 124 community-based oncologists registered; 944 patients initiating chemotherapy with intermediate FN risk enrolled. Median physician-assessed FN risk over all chemotherapy cycles was 20.0%, and median model-predicted risk was 17.9%; the correlation was 0.249 (95% CI, 0.179-0.316). The correlation between physician-assessed FN risk and subsequent orders for G-CSF primary prophylaxis (n = 634) was 0.313 (95% CI, 0.135-0.472). Among patients with a physician-assessed FN risk ≥ 20%, 14% did not receive G-CSF orders. G-CSF was not ordered for 16% of patients at or above their physician's self-reported FN risk intervention threshold (median, 20.0%) and was ordered for 21% below the threshold. Physician-assessed FN risk and model-predicted risk correlated weakly; however, there was moderate correlation between physician-assessed FN risk and orders for G-CSF primary prophylaxis. Further research and education on FN risk factors and appropriate G-CSF use are needed.

  14. Serum procalcitonin measurement as diagnostic and prognostic marker in febrile adult patients presenting to the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Hausfater, Pierre; Juillien, Gaëlle; Madonna-Py, Beatrice; Haroche, Julien; Bernard, Maguy; Riou, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Identification of bacterial infections is crucial if treatment is to be initiated early and antibiotics used rationally. The primary objective of this study was to test the efficiency of procalcitonin (PCT) in identifying bacterial/parasitic episodes among febrile adult patients presenting to an emergency department. Secondary objectives were to identify clinical or biological variables associated with either bacterial/parasitic infection or critical illness. Methods This was a prospective, single centre, non-interventional study, conducted in the adult emergency department of an academic tertiary care hospital. We included patients with body temperature of 38.5°C or greater. A serum sample for measurement of PCT was collected in the emergency room. Patients were followed up until day 30. After reviewing the medical files, two independent experts, who were blind to the PCT results, classified each of the patients as having a bacterial/parasitic infection, viral infection, or another diagnosis. Results Among 243 patients included in the study, 167 had bacterial/parasitic infections, 35 had viral infections and 41 had other diagnoses. The PCT assay, with a 0.2 μg/l cutoff value, had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.59 in diagnosing bacterial/parasitic infection. Of the patients with PCT 5 μg/l or greater, 51% had critical illness (death or intensive care unit admission) as compared with 13% of patients with lower PCT values. Conclusion Bearing in mind the limitations of an observational study design, the judgements of the emergency department physicians were reasonably accurate in determining the pretest probability of bacterial/parasitic infection. PCT may provide additional, valuable information on the aetiology and prognosis of infection in the emergency department. PMID:17521430

  15. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  16. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  17. Emergence of Carbapenem resistant Gram negative and vancomycin resistant Gram positive organisms in bacteremic isolates of febrile neutropenic patients: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Irfan, Seema; Idrees, Faiza; Mehraj, Vikram; Habib, Faizah; Adil, Salman; Hasan, Rumina

    2008-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to evaluate drug resistance amongst bacteremic isolates of febrile neutropenic patients with particular emphasis on emergence of carbapenem resistant Gram negative bacteria and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus species. Methods A descriptive study was performed by reviewing the blood culture reports from febrile neutropenic patients during the two study periods i.e., 1999–00 and 2001–06. Blood cultures were performed using BACTEC 9240 automated system. Isolates were identified and antibiotic sensitivities were done using standard microbiological procedures. Results Seven twenty six febrile neutropenic patients were admitted during the study period. A total of 5840 blood cultures were received, off these 1048 (18%) were culture positive. Amongst these, 557 (53%) grew Gram positive bacteria, 442 (42%) grew Gram negative bacteria, 43 (4%) fungi and 6 (1%) anaerobes. Sixty (5.7%) out of 1048 positive blood cultures were polymicrobial. In the Gram negative bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae was the predominant group; E. coli was the most frequently isolated organism in both study periods. Amongst non- Enterobacteriaceae group, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest organism isolated during first study period followed by Acinetobacter spp. However, during the second period Acinetobacter species was the most frequent pathogen. Enterobacteriaceae group showed higher statistically significant resistance in the second study period against ceftriaxone, quinolone and piperacillin/tazobactam, whilst no resistance observed against imipenem/meropenem. The susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter species shifted from sensitive to highly resistant one with significant p values against ceftriaxone, quinolone, piperacillin/tazobactam and imipenem/meropenem. Amongst Gram positive bacteria, MRSA isolation rate remained static, vancomycin resistant Enterococcus species emerged in second study period while no Staphylococcus species resistant to

  18. Results of a multicenter, controlled, randomized clinical trial evaluating the combination of piperacillin/tazobactam and tigecycline in high-risk hematologic patients with cancer with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Bucaneve, Giampaolo; Micozzi, Alessandra; Picardi, Marco; Ballanti, Stelvio; Cascavilla, Nicola; Salutari, Prassede; Specchia, Giorgina; Fanci, Rosa; Luppi, Mario; Cudillo, Laura; Cantaffa, Renato; Milone, Giuseppe; Bocchia, Monica; Martinelli, Giovanni; Offidani, Massimo; Chierichini, Anna; Fabbiano, Francesco; Quarta, Giovanni; Primon, Valeria; Martino, Bruno; Manna, Annunziata; Zuffa, Eliana; Ferrari, Antonella; Gentile, Giuseppe; Foà, Robin; Del Favero, Albano

    2014-05-10

    Empiric antibiotic monotherapy is considered the standard of treatment for febrile neutropenic patients with cancer, but this approach may be inadequate because of the increasing prevalence of infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. In this multicenter, open-label, randomized, superiority trial, adult, febrile, high-risk neutropenic patients (FhrNPs) with hematologic malignancies were randomly assigned to receive piperacillin/tazobactam (4.5 g intravenously every 8 hours) with or without tigecycline (50 mg intravenously every 12 hours; loading dose 100 mg). The primary end point was resolution of febrile episode without modifications of the initial allocated treatment. Three hundred ninety FhrNPs were enrolled (combination/monotherapy, 187/203) and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis (ITTA). The ITTA revealed a successful outcome in 67.9% v 44.3% of patients who had received combination therapy and monotherapy, respectively (127/187 v 90/203; absolute difference in risk (adr), 23.6%; 95% CI, 14% to 33%; P < .001). The combination regimen proved better than monotherapy in bacteremias (adr, 32.8%; 95% CI, 19% to 46%; P < .001) and in clinically documented infections (adr, 36%; 95% CI, 9% to 64%; P < .01). Mortality and number of adverse effects were limited and similar in the two groups. The combination of piperacillin/tazobactam and tigecycline is safe, well tolerated, and more effective than piperacillin/tazobactam alone in febrile, high-risk, neutropenic hematologic patients with cancer. In epidemiologic settings characterized by a high prevalence of infections because of MDR microorganisms, this combination could be considered as one of the first-line empiric antibiotic therapies.

  19. Risk of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in cancer patients receiving pegfilgrastim prophylaxis: does timing of administration matter?

    PubMed

    Weycker, Derek; Li, Xiaoyan; Figueredo, Jacqueline; Barron, Rich; Tzivelekis, Spiros; Hagiwara, May

    2016-05-01

    Contrary to the approved indication for pegfilgrastim prophylaxis, some patients receive it on the same day as the last administration of chemotherapy in clinical practice, which could adversely impact risk of febrile neutropenia (FN). An evaluation of the timing of pegfilgrastim prophylaxis and FN risk was undertaken. A retrospective cohort design and data from two US private health care claims repositories were employed. Study population comprised adults who received intermediate/high-risk chemotherapy regimens for solid tumors or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and received pegfilgrastim prophylaxis in ≥1 cycle; all cycles with pegfilgrastim were pooled for analyses. Odds ratios (OR) for FN during the cycle were estimated for patients who received pegfilgrastim on the same day (day 1) as the last administration of chemotherapy versus days 2-4 from chemotherapy completion. The study population included 45,592 patients who received pegfilgrastim in 179,152 cycles (n = 37,095 in cycle 1); in 12 % of cycles, patients received pegfilgrastim on the same day as chemotherapy. Odds of FN were higher for patients receiving pegfilgrastim prophylaxis on the same day as chemotherapy versus days 2-4 from chemotherapy in cycle 1 (OR = 1.6, 95 % CI = 1.3-1.9, p < 0.001) and all cycles (OR = 1.5, 95 % CI = 1.3-1.6, p < 0.001). In this large-scale evaluation of adults who received intermediate/high-risk regimens for solid tumors or NHL in US clinical practice, FN incidence was found to be significantly higher among those who received pegfilgrastim prophylaxis on the same day as chemotherapy completion versus days 2-4 from chemotherapy completion, underscoring the importance of adhering to the indicated administration schedule.

  20. Identification of a Novel Human Papillomavirus by Metagenomic Analysis of Samples from Patients with Febrile Respiratory Illness

    PubMed Central

    Mokili, John L.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Lim, Yan Wei; Schneider, Bradley S.; Taylor, Travis; Haynes, Matthew R.; Metzgar, David; Myers, Christopher A.; Blair, Patrick J.; Nosrat, Bahador; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and the L1 gene reveals that the new HPV identified in this study clusters with previously described gamma papillomaviruses, sharing only 61.1% (whole genome) and 63.1% (L1) sequence identity with its closest relative in the Papillomavirus episteme (PAVE) database. This new virus was named HPV_SD2 pending official classification. The complete genome of HPV-SD2 is 7,299 bp long (36.3% G/C) and contains 7 open reading frames (L2, L1, E6, E7, E1, E2 and E4) and a non-coding long control region (LCR) between L1 and E6. The metagenomic procedures, coupled with the bioinformatic methods described herein are well suited to detect small circular genomes such as those of human papillomaviruses. PMID:23554892

  1. Association of ABCB1 and SLC22A16 Gene Polymorphisms with Incidence of Doxorubicin-Induced Febrile Neutropenia: A Survey of Iranian Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Doxorubicin-based chemotherapy is used to treat breast cancer patients; however, neutropenia is a common hematologic side effect and can be life-threatening. The ABCB1 and SLC22A16 genes encode proteins that are essential for doxorubicin transport. In this study, we explored the effect of 2 common polymorphisms in ABCB1 (rs10276036 C/T) and SLC22A16 (rs12210538 A/G) on the development of grade 3/4 febrile neutropenia in Iranian breast cancer patients. Our results showed no significant association between these polymorphisms and grade 3/4 febrile neutropenia; however, allele C of ABCB1 (rs10276036 C/T) (p = 0.315, OR = 1.500, 95% CI = 0.679–3.312) and allele A of SLC22A16 (rs12210538 A/G) (p = 0.110, OR = 2.984, 95% CI = 0.743–11.988) tended to have a greater association with grade 3/4 febrile neutropenia, whereas allele T of ABCB1 (rs10276036) (p = 0.130, OR = 0.515, 95% CI = 0.217–1.223) and allele G of SLC22A16 (rs12210538) (p = 0.548, OR = 0.786, 95% CI = 0.358–1.726) tended to protect against this condition. In addition to breast cancer, a statistically significant association was also observed between the development of grade 3/4 febrile neutropenia and other clinical manifestations such as stage IIIC cancer (p = 0.037) and other diseases (p = 0.026). Our results indicate that evaluation of the risk of grade 3/4 neutropenia development and consideration of molecular and clinical findings may be of value when screening for high-risk breast cancer patients. PMID:28036387

  2. Accuracy of malaria diagnosis by microscopy, rapid diagnostic test, and PCR methods and evidence of antimalarial overprescription in non-severe febrile patients in two Tanzanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Emanuele; Bevilacqua, Nazario; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Paglia, Maria G; Meschi, Silvia; Ame, Shaali M; Mohamed, Jape A; Mangi, Sabina; Fumakule, Robert; Di Caro, Antonino; Capobianchi, Maria R; Kitua, Andrew; Molteni, Fabrizio; Racalbuto, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2009-05-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the malaria over/underdiagnosis and over/underprescription of antimalarial drugs. Between February and March 2007 blood samples were collected from 336 non-severe febrile outpatients attended in two peripheral Tanzanian hospitals. Microscopy and a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) were done locally and the accuracy evaluated by qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Plasmodium spp. The testing was performed at National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani (INMI), Rome, Italy. As a result of PCR, we identified 26 malaria cases out of 336 (7.7%) patients. Microscopy and RDT accuracies were 93.5% and 97.6%, respectively. Overprescription and underdiagnosis rates were 29.3% and 30.8%, respectively. On-field training, clinical management of febrile illness, and malaria microscopy in remote settings should be considered.

  3. Prevalence of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Bloodstream Infection in Febrile Neutropenia Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Fan, Xing; Tang, Wei; Hu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the causative bacteria and identify risk factors for BSI associated mortality in febrile neutropenia patients undergoing HSCT, we collected the clinical and microbiological data from patients underwent HSCT between 2008 and 2014 and performed a retrospective analysis. Throughout the study period, among 348 episodes of neutropenic fever in patients underwent HSCT, 89 episodes in 85 patients had microbiological defined BSI with a total of 108 isolates. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were the most common isolates (76, 70.3%) followed by gram-positive bacteria (GPB, 29, 26.9%) and fungus (3, 2.8%). As to the drug resistance, 26 multiple drug resistance (MDR) isolates were identified. Resistant isolates (n = 23) were more common documented in GNB, mostly Escherichia coli (9/36, 25%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6/24, 25%). A total of 12 isolated were resistant to carbapenem including 4 K pneumoniae (4/24, 16.7%), 3 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other 4 GNB isolates (Citrobacter freumdii, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Acinetobacter baumanii, and Chryseobacterium indologenes). As to the GPB, only 3 resistant isolates were documented including 2 methicillin-resistant isolates (Staphylococcus hominis and Arcanobacterium hemolysis) and 1 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Among these 85 patients with documented BSI, 11 patients died of BSI as primary or associated cause with a BSI-related mortality of 13.1 ± 3.7% and 90-day overall survival after transplantation at 80.0 ± 4.3%. Patients with high-risk disease undergoing allo-HSCT, prolonged neutropenia (≥15 days) and infection with carbapenem-resistant GNB were associated with BSI associated mortality in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our report revealed a prevalence of GNB in BSI of neutropenic patients

  4. Prevalence and clinical presentation of Rickettsia, Coxiella, Leptospira, Bartonella and chikungunya virus infections among hospital-based febrile patients from December 2008 to November 2009 in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Labib Imran; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Gurley, Emily S; Massung, Robert F; Alamgir, A S M; Galloway, Renee L; Powers, Ann M; Bai, Ying; Kosoy, Michael; Nicholson, William L; Rahman, Mahmudur; Luby, Stephen P

    2017-02-13

    We conducted a study to identify Rickettsia, Coxiella, Leptospira, Bartonella, and Chikungunya virus infections among febrile patients presenting at hospitals in Bangladesh. We collected blood samples from patients at six tertiary hospitals from December 2008 to November 2009 and performed laboratory tests at the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Out of 720 enrolled patients, 263 (37%) were infected with Rickettsia; 132 patients had immunofluorescence antibody titer >64 against spotted fever, 63 patients against scrub typhus fever and 10 patients against typhus fever. Ten patients were identified with Coxiella. We isolated Leptospira from two patients and Bartonella from one patient. Ten patients had antibodies against Chikungunya virus. The proportion of patients who died was higher with rickettsial fever (5%) compared to those without a diagnosis of rickettsial infection (2%). None of the patients were initially diagnosed with rickettsial fever. Rickettsial infections are frequent yet under-recognized cause of febrile illness in Bangladesh. Clinical guidelines should be revised so that local clinicians can diagnose rickettsial infections and provide appropriate drug treatment.

  5. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether they could increase the risk of developing epilepsy later. Febrile seizures are defined as seizures that ... brains of patients who underwent surgery for severe epilepsy. 3 The children with FSE were com- pared ...

  6. Febrile seizures: risks, evaluation, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Reese C; Oehler, Karen; Tingle, Leslie E

    2012-01-15

    Febrile seizures are common in the first five years of life, and many factors that increase seizure risk have been identified. Initial evaluation should determine whether features of a complex seizure are present and identify the source of fever. Routine blood tests, neuroimaging, and electroencephalography are not recommended, and lumbar puncture is no longer recommended in patients with uncomplicated febrile seizures. In the unusual case of febrile status epilepticus, intravenous lorazepam and buccal midazolam are first-line agents. After an initial febrile seizure, physicians should reassure parents about the low risk of long-term effects, including neurologic sequelae, epilepsy, and death. However, there is a 15 to 70 percent risk of recurrence in the first two years after an initial febrile seizure. This risk is increased in patients younger than 18 months and those with a lower fever, short duration of fever before seizure onset, or a family history of febrile seizures. Continuous or intermittent antiepileptic or antipyretic medication is not recommended for the prevention of recurrent febrile seizures.

  7. Prevalence and clinical course of dengue infection in elderly patients with acute febrile illness in a tertiary care hospital in Cali, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Fernando; Vanegas, Sara; Rodríguez, Sarita; Pacheco, Robinson

    2016-05-03

    Little is known about the prevalence and clinical course of dengue infection in elderly patients living in endemic areas; it is presumed that there is a lower prevalence but higher severity, complications and mortality.  To describe the prevalence and clinical course of dengue infection in elderly patients who were admitted to a referral care center for infectious diseases in an endemic region.  We conducted an observational and descriptive study between 2011 and 2014, using a cohort of elderly patients with serological diagnosis of dengue.  A total of 235 febrile elderly patients were assessed, of which 43 patients (18.3%) were found to have dengue. The median age was 71 years; 48.7% were female, and 89% of patients had at least one comorbid condition. According to the serological tests, 51.4% of cases were positive for NS1 Ag, 27% for IgM and 54.1% for IgG, while 64.8% were secondary infections. Dengue was diagnosed in 13 patients (35%), dengue with warning signs in 16 cases (43%), and severe dengue in 8 cases (22%). Nearly 56.7% of patients were admitted to hospital and 21.6%, to the intensive care unit. None died.  We found dengue infection to be more frequent than expected in this sample of elderly patients, due to acute febrile syndrome. Elderly patients also required higher rate of hospitalization and had more complications, however there were no deaths due to good management.

  8. Identification by PCR of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica Serovars Associated with Invasive Infections among Febrile Patients in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Sharon M.; Diallo, Souleymane; Levy, Haim; Livio, Sofie; Sow, Samba O.; Tapia, Milagritos; Fields, Patricia I.; Mikoleit, Matthew; Tamboura, Boubou; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    2010-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are emerging as a prominent cause of invasive disease (bacteremia and focal infections such as meningitis) in infants and young children. Importantly, including data from Mali, three serovars, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin, account for the majority of non-typhoidal Salmonella isolated from these patients. Methods We have extended a previously developed series of polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) based on O serogrouping and H typing to identify Salmonella Typhimurium and variants (mostly I 4,[5],12:i:-), Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Dublin. We also designed primers to detect Salmonella Stanleyville, a serovar found in West Africa. Another PCR was used to differentiate diphasic Salmonella Typhimurium and monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium from other O serogroup B, H:i serovars. We used these PCRs to blind-test 327 Salmonella serogroup B and D isolates that were obtained from the blood cultures of febrile patients in Bamako, Mali. Principal Findings We have shown that when used in conjunction with our previously described O-serogrouping PCR, our PCRs are 100% sensitive and specific in identifying Salmonella Typhimurium and variants, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Dublin and Salmonella Stanleyville. When we attempted to differentiate 171 Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[ 5],12:i:1,2) strains from 52 monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium (I 4,[5],12:i:-) strains, we were able to correctly identify 170 of the Salmonella Typhimurium and 51 of the Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- strains. Conclusion We have described a simple yet effective PCR method to support surveillance of the incidence of invasive disease caused by NTS in developing countries. PMID:20231882

  9. Micro-organisms Associated with Febrile Neutropenia in Patients with Haematological Malignancies in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Prakas Kumar; Maji, Suman Kumar; Dolai, Tuphan Kanti; De, Rajib; Dutta, Shyamali; Saha, Sandeep; Bhattacharyya, Maitreyee

    2015-03-01

    There is paucity of information from eastern India with regard to observed dominant micro-organisms causing febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with haematological malignancies. To identify the prevalence of pathogenic microorganisms associated with FN. A total number of 268 episodes of FN were analysed from September'2010 to October'2013. The blood samples were inoculated into brain heart infusion broth, glucose broth, Hicombi dual performance media (Himedia, LQ-12) at 37° C for 168 h and Bactec method was also performed for these samples. Blood agar, chocolate agar, MacConkey's agar and cystine lactose electrolyte deficient agar were used for isolation of the microorganisms. A total number of 78 (29.10 %) episodes revealed positive growths. Gram negative bacilli and Gram positive cocci were isolated in 61.53 and 34.61 % cases respectively. The eight commonest isolates were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14.10 %), methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA-12.82 %), Acinetobacter sps (11.53 %), coagulase negative Staphylococcus (10.25 %), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.97 %), Escherichia coli (8.97 %), ESBL E. coli (6.41 %), methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA-6.41 %). Amongst other less common isolates were Citrobacter kosseri (3.84 %), Citrobacter freundii (2.56 %), Ralstonia paucula (2.56 %), Cedecia neteri (1.28 %), methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus (2.56 %). Candida spp. including two cases of Candida non-albicans was isolated in 3.84 % of cases. P. aeruginosa was the commonest pathogenic isolates in FN patients associated with haematological malignancies in this study. Gram negative bacteria were the commonest isolates in FN including significant numbers of rare opportunistic micro-organisms.

  10. Human Brucellosis in Febrile Patients Seeking Treatment at Remote Hospitals, Northeastern Kenya, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Njeru, John; Melzer, Falk; Wareth, Gamal; El-Adawy, Hosny; Henning, Klaus; Pletz, Mathias W; Heller, Regine; Kariuki, Samuel; Fèvre, Eric; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2016-12-01

    During 2014-2015, patients in northeastern Kenya were assessed for brucellosis and characteristics that might help clinicians identify brucellosis. Among 146 confirmed brucellosis patients, 29 (20%) had negative serologic tests. No clinical feature was a good indicator of infection, which was associated with animal contact and drinking raw milk.

  11. Human Brucellosis in Febrile Patients Seeking Treatment at Remote Hospitals, Northeastern Kenya, 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Falk; Wareth, Gamal; El-Adawy, Hosny; Henning, Klaus; Pletz, Mathias W.; Heller, Regine; Kariuki, Samuel; Fèvre, Eric; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    During 2014–2015, patients in northeastern Kenya were assessed for brucellosis and characteristics that might help clinicians identify brucellosis. Among 146 confirmed brucellosis patients, 29 (20%) had negative serologic tests. No clinical feature was a good indicator of infection, which was associated with animal contact and drinking raw milk. PMID:27662463

  12. Leucocyte scintigraphy or computed tomography for the febrile post-operative patient?

    PubMed

    Bearcroft, P W; Miles, K A

    1996-09-01

    The optimal initial investigation for the post-operative patient with suspected occult intra-abdominal sepsis is controversial, although the diagnostic accuracy of a variety of techniques is known. Our objective is to determine which investigation has the greatest positive effect on patient management. We reviewed 67 consecutive post-operative patients investigated for suspected occult sepsis retrospectively and analysed the sequence of investigations required to achieve the diagnosis depending on the choice of initial investigation, and the interval between between initiating investigations and performing definitive percutaneous drainage. Forty patients had scintigraphy as the initial investigation and 21 of these went on to require CT. None of the 27 patients who had CT as the initial investigation required any other imaging (chi 2 = 20.6, P < 0.0001) and appropriate percutaneous drainage was offered immediately. Conversely, the average interval to drainage in those who had scintigraphy first was 3.1 days. Fourteen out of 20 patients (70%) who had scintigraphy as the initial investigation following recent surgery, and 7 of 20 (35%) following old surgery, needed subsequent CT. None of the 20 and 7 patients in the recent and old surgery groups respectively who had CT initially required further imaging. Our results suggest recommending CT as the initial investigation in the early post-operative period as this will reduce the total number of investigations required to achieve the diagnosis and the time to definitive drainage. In the late post-operative period, scintigraphy will resolve the majority of problems.

  13. Forum report: issues in clinical trials of empirical antifungal therapy in treating febrile neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Bennett, John E; Powers, John; Walsh, Thomas; Viscoli, Claudio; de Pauw, Ben; Dismukes, William; Galgiani, John; Glauser, Michel; Herbrecht, Raoul; Kauffman, Carol; Lee, Jeannette; Pappas, Peter; Rex, John; Verweij, Paul

    2003-04-15

    There is inferential evidence that some patients with prolonged neutropenia and fever not responding to antibacterial agents are at sufficient risk of deep mycoses to warrant empirical therapy, although superiority of an antifungal agent over placebo has not been conclusively demonstrated. Amphotericin B deoxycholate, liposomal amphotericin B, and intravenous itraconazole followed by oral itraconazole solution are licensed in the United States for this indication. Fluconazole and voriconazole have given favorable results in clinical trials of patients with low and high risk of deep mold infections, respectively. Design features that can profoundly influence outcome of empirical trials are (1) inclusion of low-risk patients, (2) failure to blind the study, (3) obscuration of antifungal effects by changing antibacterial antibiotics, (4) failure to balance both arms of the study in terms of patients with prior antifungal prophylaxis or with severe comorbidities, (5) the merging of end points evaluating safety with those of efficacy, and (6) choice of different criteria for resolution of fever.

  14. The Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Early Diagnosis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Çiledağ, Nazan; Arda, Kemal; Arıbaş, Bilgin Kadri; Tekgündüz, Ali Irfan Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate vessel involvement and the role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the earlydiagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with febrile neutropenia and antibiotic-resistant feverundergoing autologous bone morrow transplantation. Material and Methods: In all, 74 pulmonary MDCT examinations in 37 consecutive hematopoietic stem celltransplantation patients with febrile neutropenia and clinically suspected IPA were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Diagnosis of IPA was based on Fungal Infections Cooperative Group, and National Institute of Allergy andInfectious Diseases Mycoses Study Consensus Group criteria. In all, 0, 14, and 11 patients were diagnosed as proven,probable, and possible IPA, respectively. Among the 25 patients accepted as probable and possible IPA, all had pulmonaryMDCT findings consistent with IPA. The remaining 12 patients were accepted as having fever of unknown origin (FUO)and had patent vessels based on MDCT findings.In the patients with probable and possible IPA, 72 focal pulmonary lesions were observed; in 41 of the 72 (57%) lesionsvascular occlusion was noted and the CT halo sign was observed in 25 of these 41 (61%) lesions. Resolution of feveroccurred following antifungal therapy in 19 (76%) of the 25 patients with probable and possible IPA. In all, 6 (25%)of the patients diagnosed as IPA died during follow-up. Transplant-related mortality 100 d post transplant in patientswith IPA and FUO was 24% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, MDCT has a potential role in the early diagnosis of IPA via detection of vessel occlusion. PMID:24744620

  15. Evaluation of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 & serum amyloid A as diagnostic biomarkers of bacterial infection in febrile patients

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Junyan; Lü, Xiaoju; Liu, Yanbin; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Early identification of bacterial infection in patients with fever is important for prompt treatment. However, the available parameters such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and leukocyte counts are not very specific. This study was aimed to assess the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT), CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and serum amyloid A (SAA) for bacterial infection in febrile patients. Methods: Serum samples were collected from febrile patients between January and December 2012 and processed for blood cultures. PCT, IL-6, CRP and SAA levels were measured. The patients were divided into three groups according to the final diagnosis: bacteraemia group (group1), bacterial infection with negative blood culture (group 2) and non-bacterial infection group (group 3). Results: There were significant (P<0.05) difference in the levels of PCT, CRP, IL-6 and SAA among the three groups. The PCT levels of patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections were lower than Gram-negative bacterial infections (0.53 vs 2.13, P < 0.01). The best cut-off value to detect bacterial infections was 0.26 ng/ml for PCT. PCT, CRP, IL-6 and SAA had areas under the curve of 0.804, 0.693, 0.658 and 0.687, respectively. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed PCT as a valuable marker of bacterial infections in febrile patients. PCT was superior to CRP, IL-6 or SAA in the early identification of bacterial infection. More prospective and large scale studies are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:25963492

  16. Detection of Legionella Pneumophila in Urine and Serum Specimens of Neutropenic Febrile Patients with Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Farzi, Nastaran; Abrehdari-Tafreshi, Zahra; Zarei, Omid; Chamani-Tabriz, Leili

    2017-01-01

    Background: Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila) is a gram-negative bacterium which causes ‎Legionnaires’ disease as well as Pontiac fever. The Legionella infections in patients suffering from ‎neutropenia- as a common complication of cancer chemotherapy- can distribute rapidly. We ‎aimed to detect of L. pneumophila in haematological malignancy suffering patients with ‎neutropenic fever by targeting the (macrophage infectivity potentiator) mip gene. Subjects and Methods: Serum and ‎urine specimens were obtained from 80 patients and presence of mip gene of L. pneumophila in ‎specimens was investigated by PCR. Results: The L. pneumophila infection was detected in 21 (26.2%) and 38 ‎‎(47.5%) of urine and serum specimens, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that the relative high ‎prevalence of L. pneumophila in the studied patients group which show the necessity of ‎considering this microorganism in future studies from detection and treatment point of view in ‎cancer patients. PMID:28286615

  17. Molecular and Clinical Evidence of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Infection in Cameroonian Patients with Undifferentiated Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    Ndip, Lucy M.; Labruna, Marcelo; Ndip, Roland N.; Walker, David H.; McBride, Jere W.

    2010-01-01

    Human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME) is an emerging tick-transmitted zoonosis in the United States caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis. Ehrlichia canis, E, chaffeensis and E. ewingii have recently been detected in dogs and Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks from Cameroon; thus the potential exists for human infections. The objective of this study was to determine if Ehrlichia species were associated with acute fevers of unknown etiology in patients from the coastal region of Cameroon. E. chaffeensis was detected in peripheral blood from 12 (10%) of 118 patients using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the genus-specific disulfide bond (dsb) formation protein gene. Furthermore, DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons revealed that the dsb gene sequence was identical to E. chaffeensis (Arkansas strain). Patients with detectable E. chaffeensis DNA had clinical manifestations that included fever, headache, myalgia, arthralgia, pulmonary involvement, and diffuse rash. PMID:20030996

  18. [Procalcitonin as a predictor of bacteremia in pediatric patients with malignancies and febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Aliyev, D A; Vezirova, Z Sh; Geyusheva, T F

    2015-02-01

    Dynamics of procalcitonin level was studied in 75 pediatric patients, in whom on back- ground of polychemotherapy conduction for oncological disease bacteremia and neutropenia have occurred. Determination of procalcitonin level as a rapidly reacting biomarker of generalized infectious process permits to establish its progression, to con- duct early diagnosis, to perform timely and adequate treatment measures.

  19. Bacterial isolates from neutropenic febrile pediatric patients and their sensitivity patterns to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, F N; Burney, I A; Moid, M I; Siddiqui, T

    1998-09-01

    Patients on cytotoxic therapy often develop neutropenia and fever. Our interest was to identify the common pathogens isolated from such patients and to study the sensitivity patterns of these organisms to the antibiotics used in their treatment. Thus, guidelines can be established by hospitals to identify which antibiotics can be used in the treatment of these patients when the results of cultures and sensitivities are not available. We conducted a retrospective study of neutropenic pediatrics presenting to AKUH from July, 1990 to June, 1996. A total of 153 isolates in 35 different patients were studied. Samples for culture were taken from the sites at risk. The majority of samples consisted of blood, stool, pus and urine. Twenty stool samples were also sent for microscopy. Malignancies were both hematological and non-hematological. Gram negatives were isolated in 52.9%, gram positives in 33.9% and parasites in 13.2%. Salmonella paratyphi B was the most commonly isolated organism, followed by Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Giardia lamblia was the most common parasite. Sensitivity patterns of these organisms to antibiotics studied showed that Escheria coli had the lowest sensitivity rate being only 40% sensitive to Aztreonam and 64% sensitive to Ofloxacillin. A comparison was made between our findings and those reported in literature, as well as the risk factors for developing neutropenia. A guide to management is also discussed.

  20. Validation of a case definition for leptospirosis diagnosis in patients with acute severe febrile disease admitted in reference hospitals at the State of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque Filho, Alfredo Pereira Leite de; Araújo, Jéssica Guido de; Souza, Inacelli Queiroz de; Martins, Luciana Cardoso; Oliveira, Marta Iglis de; Silva, Maria Jesuíta Bezerra da; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; Miranda Filho, Demócrito de Barros

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is often mistaken for other acute febrile illnesses because of its nonspecific presentation. Bacteriologic, serologic, and molecular methods have several limitations for early diagnosis: technical complexity, low availability, low sensitivity in early disease, or high cost. This study aimed to validate a case definition, based on simple clinical and laboratory tests, that is intended for bedside diagnosis of leptospirosis among hospitalized patients. Adult patients, admitted to two reference hospitals in Recife, Brazil, with a febrile illness of less than 21 days and with a clinical suspicion of leptospirosis, were included to test a case definition comprising ten clinical and laboratory criteria. Leptospirosis was confirmed or excluded by a composite reference standard (microscopic agglutination test, ELISA, and blood culture). Test properties were determined for each cutoff number of the criteria from the case definition. Ninety seven patients were included; 75 had confirmed leptospirosis and 22 did not. Mean number of criteria from the case definition that were fulfilled was 7.8±1.2 for confirmed leptospirosis and 5.9±1.5 for non-leptospirosis patients (p<0.0001). Best sensitivity (85.3%) and specificity (68.2%) combination was found with a cutoff of 7 or more criteria, reaching positive and negative predictive values of 90.1% and 57.7%, respectively; accuracy was 81.4%. The case definition, for a cutoff of at least 7 criteria, reached average sensitivity and specificity, but with a high positive predictive value. Its simplicity and low cost make it useful for rapid bedside leptospirosis diagnosis in Brazilian hospitalized patients with acute severe febrile disease.

  1. A survey of malaria and some arboviral infections among suspected febrile patients visiting a health centre in Simawa, Ogun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ayorinde, Adenola F; Oyeyiga, Ayorinde M; Nosegbe, Nwakaego O; Folarin, Onikepe A

    2016-01-01

    Most febrile patients are often misdiagnosed with malaria due to similar symptoms, such as fever shared by malaria and certain arboviral infections. This study surveyed the incidence of malaria, chikungunya and dengue infections among a number of suspected febrile patients visiting Simawa Health Centre, Ogun State, Nigeria. Venous blood samples were obtained from 60 febrile patients (age 3-70 years) visiting the centre between April and May 2014. The rapid diagnostic test (RDT) was used to detect the presence of chikungunya (CHK) antibodies (IgM), dengue (DEN) virus and antibodies (NS1, IgM and IgG) and malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax). Malarial confirmatory tests were by microscopy and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the polymorphic region of Glutamate-Rich Protein (GLURP) gene. The complexity of P. falciparum infection in the community also determined by the use of nested PCR. These three mosquito-borne infections were observed in 63% (38) of the patients. The prevalence of CHK, DEN and malarial infections singularly were 11%, 0% and 63%, respectively, whereas malaria with either CHK or DEN infections were 24% (9) and 3% (1), respectively. No subjects were positive for CHK and DEN co-infection. Malarial microscopic confirmation was in 94% (32) of the malaria RDT-positive samples, 50% (17) were successfully analysed by nested PCR and the mean multiplicity of infection was 1.6 (1-3 clones). One patient sample harboured both P. falciparum and P. vivax. The study reports the presence of some arboviral infections having similar symptoms with malaria at Simawa, Ogun State. The proper diagnosis of infectious diseases is important for controlling them.

  2. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Patients Presenting to a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India: Clinical Spectrum and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, Kundavaram Paul Prabhakar; Jeevan, Jonathan Arul; Mitra, Shubhanker; Paul, Nirvin; Murugan, Thimiri Palani; Rangaraj, Ajay; David, Sandeep; Hansdak, Samuel George; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Abraham, Asha Mary; Ramasami, Prakash; Sathyendra, Sowmya; Sudarsanam, Thambu David; Varghese, George M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) may have similar clinical presentation, and the etiology is varied and region specific. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary hospital in South India. All adult patients presenting with AUFI of 3–14 days duration were evaluated for etiology, and the differences in presentation and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 1258 patients. A microbiological cause was identified in 82.5% of our patients. Scrub typhus was the most common cause of AUFI (35.9%) followed by dengue (30.6%), malaria (10.4%), enteric fever (3.7%), and leptospirosis (0.6%). Both scrub typhus and dengue fever peaked during the monsoon season and the cooler months, whereas no seasonality was observed with enteric fever and malaria. The mean time to presentation was longer in enteric fever (9.9 [4.7] days) and scrub typhus (8.2 [3.2] days). Bleeding manifestations were seen in 7.7% of patients, mostly associated with dengue (14%), scrub typhus (4.2%), and malaria (4.6%). The requirement of supplemental oxygen, invasive ventilation, and inotropes was higher in scrub typhus, leptospirosis, and malaria. The overall mortality rate was 3.3% and was highest with scrub typhus (4.6%) followed by dengue fever (2.3%). Significant clinical predictors of scrub typhus were breathlessness (odds ratio [OR]: 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.38–7.3), total whole blood cell count >10,000 cells/mm3 (OR: 2.31; 95% CI: 1.64–3.24), serum albumin <3.5 g % (OR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.68–3.2). Overt bleeding manifestations (OR: 2.98; 95% CI: 1.84–4.84), and a platelet count of <150,000 cells/mm3 (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.47–2.98) were independent predictors of dengue fever. Conclusion: The similarity in clinical presentation and diversity of etiological agents demonstrates the complexity of diagnosis and treatment of AUFI in South India. The etiological profile will be of use in the development

  3. Febrile Ulceronecrotic Mucha Habermann Disease: Case Report of a Dark-Skinned Patient

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Lucas Moreira; de Seixas Rocha, Mário; Patriota, Gyoguevara Sol; Cunha, Gabrielli Tigre; Paiva, Geise Rezende; Souza, Angelo Sérgio Campos; Fauth, Airton Campos; Guerreiro de Moura, Carlos Geraldo; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2013-01-01

    A male dark-skinned patient, 33 years old, complaining of a 1-month history of skin lesions in the abdominal region and high fever was admitted to the clinical ward. There were ulcerated and coalescent skin lesions all over the body but sparing the palmar region. The culture of material obtained from the penile lesions was positive for Staphylococcus aureus. He was treated with oxacillin and prednisone. The patient persisted with high fever and skin lesions. After histopathological diagnosis of Mucha Habermann's disease, treatment was started with tetracycline with rapid improvement of the lesions. He was reexamined by the dermatologic service with no recurrences during the 12 months of follow-up. At this time, there was a great number of keloid scars from the skin lesions. PMID:23466681

  4. Demographics and outcomes of patients with pediatric febrile convulsive status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiro; Nagase, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Tsukasa; Fujita, Kyoko; Maruyama, Azusa; Toyoshima, Daisaku; Nakagawa, Taku; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Morioka, Ichiro; Morisada, Naoya; Takada, Satoshi; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2015-05-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus with fever is common and may be related to neurological sequela in children. However, there are limited data on the demographics and risk factors of this phenomenon. Thus, we aimed to describe the demographics and risk factors of neurological sequela among children with convulsive status epilepticus with fever. We reviewed convulsive status epilepticus with fever cases in the pediatric intensive care unit at Kobe Children's Hospital between 2002 and 2013. We included patients with intrinsic neurological disease, and excluded those with obvious central nervous system infection. Cases of neurological worsening were categorized as poor outcome using the pediatric cerebral performance category scale. Possible risk factors for poor outcome included age, sex, neurological medical history, seizure duration, body temperature, and level of consciousness. A total of 253 patients (128 males), aged 1 month to 15 years (mean 45 ± 40 months), were enrolled. Three patients (1.2%) died during hospitalization, and 32 (12.6%) patients had a poor outcome. A univariate analysis identified male sex, absence of epilepsy history, body temperature above 40°C on admission, seizure duration longer than 120 minutes, impaired consciousness at 12 hours after onset, and presence of nonconvulsive seizure as potential predictors of poor outcome. A multivariate analysis, revealed that an absence of epilepsy history (odds ratio = 11.18), body temperature above 40°C on admission (odds ratio = 3.39), or impaired consciousness at 12 hours after onset (odds ratio = 41.85) was associated with poor outcome. Our study indicated that absence of epilepsy history, high temperature, and/or prolonged impaired consciousness were associated with brain injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Serological diagnosis of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in a febrile patient in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Salim; Garzon, Denisse; Tadeu, Luis; Faccini-Martínez, Alvaro A; Mills, James N

    2014-08-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is an often fatal rodent-borne zoonosis caused by any of at least 20 hantavirus genotypes distributed throughout the Americas. Although HPS has been documented in several bordering countries, it has not been reported in Colombia. Here we report seroconversion to a hantavirus in paired samples from a hospitalized patient with symptoms compatible with HPS from Montería, Córdoba Department, north-western Colombia. Tests for regionally endemic agents including Plasmodium, Leptospira, Salmonella, dengue virus, Brucella, Rickettsia, human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis viruses were negative. Because the patient was enrolled in a clinical trial for hemorrhagic fevers conducted by the University of Córdoba, serum samples were collected on admission and at discharge. Testing using Sin Nombre virus ELISA showed IgG and IgM seroconversion between samples. The eventual finding of this first clinical case of hantavirus infection in Colombia is consistent with the high prevalence of hantavirus antibodies in humans in the region and the likely exposure of the patient to rodents. The clinical presentation was similar to that found in neighbouring Panama.

  6. [Strategies of treatment for febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Terui, Yasuhito

    2013-06-01

    The guideline on febrile neutropenia(FN)was published by the Japanese Society of Medical Oncology(JSMO)in 2012. Based on this guideline, the treatment strategy for febrile neutropenia that is discussed in this paper includes empiric treatment strategies, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus antibiotics in the initial treatment, treatment for severe FN, treatment for outpatients, duration of FN treatment, treatment after recovery from fever associated with neutropenia, and empiric treatment with anti-fungal drugs in patients with prolonged FN.

  7. Antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin on alternate days reduces rate of viridans sepsis and febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Boztug, Heidrun; Mühlegger, Nora; Pötschger, Ulrike; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Peters, Christina; Mann, Georg; Dworzak, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Intensive chemotherapy directed against acute myeloid leukemia of childhood is followed by profound neutropenia and high risk for bacterial and fungal infections, including viridans group streptococci as a common cause for gram-positive septicemia. Few retrospective studies have shown the efficacy of various antibiotic prophylactic regimens in children. We retrospectively studied 50 pediatric patients treated on the AML-BFM 2004 protocol between 2005 and 2015 at St. Anna Children's Hospital and assessed the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the frequency of febrile neutropenia and bacterial sepsis. Fifty pediatric patients underwent 199 evaluable chemotherapy cycles. Viridans sepsis occurred after none of 98 cycles with prophylactic administration of teicoplanin/vancomycin in comparison to 12 cases of viridans sepsis among 79 cycles without systemic antibacterial prophylaxis (0 vs. 15 %, p < 0.0001). In addition, there were significantly fewer episodes of febrile neutropenia in the teicoplanin/vancomycin group (44 % vs. no prophylaxis 82 %, p < 0.0001). Severity of infection seemed to be worse when no antibiotic prophylaxis had been administered with a higher rate of intensive care unit treatment (0/98, 0 %, vs. 4/79, 5 %, p = 0.038). So far, no increase of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus isolates in surveillance cultures was noticed. Antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin (or vancomycin) appears safe and feasible and resulted in eradication of viridans sepsis and decreased incidence of febrile neutropenia in pediatric AML patients. The possibility to administer teicoplanin on alternate days on an outpatient basis or at home could contribute to patient's quality of life and decrease health care costs.

  8. Malaria Parasitemia Among Febrile Patients Seeking Clinical Care at an Outpatient Health Facility in an Urban Informal Settlement Area in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Njuguna, Henry N; Montgomery, Joel M; Cosmas, Leonard; Wamola, Newton; Oundo, Joseph O; Desai, Meghna; Buff, Ann M; Breiman, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Nairobi is considered a low-risk area for malaria transmission, but travel can influence transmission of malaria. We investigated the demographic characteristics and travel history of patients with documented fever and malaria in a study clinic in a population-based surveillance system over a 5-year period, January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. During the study period, 11,480 (68%) febrile patients had a microscopy test performed for malaria, of which 2,553 (22%) were positive. Malaria was detected year-round with peaks in January, May, and September. Children aged 5-14 years had the highest proportion (28%) of positive results followed by children aged 1-4 years (23%). Almost two-thirds of patients with malaria reported traveling outside Nairobi; 79% of these traveled to three counties in western Kenya. History of recent travel (i.e., in past month) was associated with malaria parasitemia (odds ratio: 10.0, 95% confidence interval: 9.0-11.0). Malaria parasitemia was frequently observed among febrile patients at a health facility in the urban slum of Kibera, Nairobi. The majority of patients had traveled to western Kenya. However, 34% reported no travel history, which raises the possibility of local malaria transmission in this densely populated, urban setting. These findings have important implications for malaria control in large Nairobi settlements.

  9. Malaria Parasitemia among Febrile Patients Seeking Clinical Care at an Outpatient Health Facility in an Urban Informal Settlement Area in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Njuguna, Henry N.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Cosmas, Leonard; Wamola, Newton; Oundo, Joseph O.; Desai, Meghna; Buff, Ann M.; Breiman, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Nairobi is considered a low-risk area for malaria transmission, but travel can influence transmission of malaria. We investigated the demographic characteristics and travel history of patients with documented fever and malaria in a study clinic in a population-based surveillance system over a 5-year period, January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. During the study period, 11,480 (68%) febrile patients had a microscopy test performed for malaria, of which 2,553 (22%) were positive. Malaria was detected year-round with peaks in January, May, and September. Children aged 5–14 years had the highest proportion (28%) of positive results followed by children aged 1–4 years (23%). Almost two-thirds of patients with malaria reported traveling outside Nairobi; 79% of these traveled to three counties in western Kenya. History of recent travel (i.e., in past month) was associated with malaria parasitemia (odds ratio: 10.0, 95% confidence interval: 9.0–11.0). Malaria parasitemia was frequently observed among febrile patients at a health facility in the urban slum of Kibera, Nairobi. The majority of patients had traveled to western Kenya. However, 34% reported no travel history, which raises the possibility of local malaria transmission in this densely populated, urban setting. These findings have important implications for malaria control in large Nairobi settlements. PMID:26598567

  10. The predictive value of soluble biomarkers (CD14 subtype, interleukin-2 receptor, human leucocyte antigen-G) and procalcitonin in the detection of bacteremia and sepsis in pediatric oncology patients with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Urbonas, Vincas; Eidukaitė, Audronė; Tamulienė, Indrė

    2013-04-01

    Prediction of bacteremia/sepsis in childhood oncology patients with febrile neutropenia still remains a challenge for the medical community due to the lack of reliable biomarkers, especially at the beginning of infectious process. The objective of this study was to evaluate diagnostic value of soluble biomarkers (CD14 subtype, interleukin-2 receptor, HLA-G) and procalcitonin (PCT) in the identification of infectious process at the beginning of a febrile episode in pediatric oncology patients. A total of 62 episodes of febrile neutropenia in 37 childhood oncology patients were enrolled in this study. Serum samples were collected at presentation after confirmation of febrile neutropenia and analyzed according to recommendations of manufacturers. Patients were classified into bacteremia/sepsis and fever of unknown origin groups. Median of PCT and sIL-2R were considerably higher in bacteremia/sepsis group compared to fever of unknown origin group, whereas median of sHLA-G and presepsin levels between investigated groups did not differ sufficiently. PCT and sIL-2R determination might be used as an additional diagnostic tool for the detection of bacteremia/sepsis in childhood oncology patients with febrile neutropenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of antibodies against spotted fever group Rickettsia (SFGR), typhus group Rickettsia (TGR), and Coxiella burnetii in human febrile patients in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Camer, Gerry Amor; Alejandria, Marissa; Amor, Miguel; Satoh, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Yasukazu; Ueno, Hiroshi; Morita, Chiharu

    2003-02-01

    A total of 157 sera from febrile patients in the Philippine General Hospital in Manila, Luzon, and the Northern Samar Provincial Hospital, the Philippines, were used. Serum antibodies against spotted fever group Rickettsia (SFGR) and typhus group Rickettsia (TGR) were detected by indirect immunofluorescence test. Antibody positive rates were 1.3% for SFGR (Rickettsia japonica) and 2.5% for TGR (R. typhus), respectively. Rickettsial antibodies in humans in the Philippines were found for the first time. These results underscore the need for further epidemiological study of clinical rickettsioses in the Philippines.

  12. Antimicrobial agent prescription patterns for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with hematological malignancies at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman.

    PubMed

    Al Balushi, K A; Balkhair, A; Ali, B H; Al Rawas, N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the antimicrobial prescription patterns of patients with hematological malignancies who developed febrile neutropenia (FN) at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Oman. This was a retrospective observational study covering a period of 3 years (January 2007-February 2010). FN episodes were studied in patients with hematological malignancies in three different wards at SQUH. A total of 176 FN episodes were analyzed. Overall, 64% of the 107 patients studied experienced at least 2 episodes during the analysis period. Approximately, 69% of the febrile neutropenia episodes had severe neutropenia. The duration of neutropenia was less than 1 week in the majority of the episodes (57%). The mean duration of treatment was approximately 7 days, with no significant difference between specialties or different types of malignancies. Only 34 (19%) episodes had positive cultures, and most of these were from blood samples (30 episodes, 88%). The majority of isolates were gram-negative organisms (63%). The initial empirical treatment included monotherapy (37%), dual therapy (60%) and triple therapy (3%). This study demonstrates that there is a large variation in the antimicrobial treatment of FN episodes in patients with hematological malignancies at SQUH. All chosen drugs were within international guideline recommendations. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of infections in patients with hematological malignancies and persistent febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Paul, Mical; Bernstine, Hanna; Vidal, Liat; Ram, Ron; Raanani, Pia; Yeshurun, Moshe; Tadmor, Boaz; Leibovici, Leonard; Shpilberg, Ofer; Groshar, David

    2013-09-01

    We assessed the performance of PET/CT for diagnosis and management of infections in high-risk hematological cancer patients with persistent febrile neutropenia in a prospective study. (18)F-FDG PET/CT with contrast-enhanced CT was performed on day 5-7 of persistent fever. Between 2008 and 2011, 91 PET/CT examinations were performed for different episodes in 79 patients, resulting in 117 diagnoses. The sensitivity of the PET/CT was 79.8% (71/89) compared to 51.7% (46/89) with chest/sinus CT alone. Specificities were 32.14% (9/28) vs. 42.85% (12/28), respectively. PET/CT resulted in a change from the pre-test diagnosis in 63/91 (69%) of episodes and in modification of patients' management in 46/91 (55%). PET/CT was beneficial in diagnosing abdominal infections. PET/CT has a potential role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with persistent febrile neutropenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [The incidence of oral candidiasis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from Yunnan, China].

    PubMed

    Wen, Yan; Li, Chengwen; Pei, Junhaoxiang; Bai, Jinsong; Yang, Xianghong; Duan, Kaiwen

    2014-08-01

    To assess the incidence of oral candidiasis and its influencing factors in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). An oral examination was conducted in the 1 566 HIV/AIDS patients in the Third Hospital of Kunming from March 2008 to September 2012 (M/F: 1 062/504, age range: 0.2 to 84.0 years old). The HIV viral load (HIV- RNA) and peripheral blood CD4 count were respectively analyzed by Bayer Q340 fluorescence signal surveying instrument (bDNA method) and flow cytometry analysis. The information on usage of highly active anti-retroviral (HAART) drugs and transmission of HIV were obtained through questionnaires. The incidence of oral candidiasis in patients with different HIV-RNA levels and CD4 count and the use of HAART was analyzed and compared. The total incidence of oral candidosis was 31.0% (486/1 566) and there was no difference in sex. The oral lesions were presented by three types, psudomembranous candidosis (PC), erythematous candidosis (EC) and angular cheilitis (AC), and the morbidity was 13.9% (217/1 566), 17.0% (267/1 566) and 4.9% (77/1 566), respectively. The average level of CD4 count in psudomembranous candidosis, erythematous candidosis and angular cheilitis [81.0 (146.0), 74.0 (152.0) and 69.0 (121.5) cell/µl] showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). The incidence of oral candidiasis in non-HAART and HAART subjects were 36.3% (402/1 107) and 18.3% (84/459), respectively (P = 0.000). The CD4 count and absolute counts of HIV viral load in oral candidiasis patients and non-oral candidiasis patients had significant difference (Z = -10.261, P = 0.000 and Z = -4.762, P = 0.000). The morbidity of oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients in Yunnan Province was high, including PC, EC and AC and hyperplastic candidosis was not detected. The incidence was related to the degree of immune suppression and HIV viral load.

  15. Seroepidemiology of Selected Arboviruses in Febrile Patients Visiting Selected Health Facilities in the Lake/River Basin Areas of Lake Baringo, Lake Naivasha, and Tana River, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Lwande, Olivia; Orindi, Benedict; Irura, Zephania; Ongus, Juliette; Sang, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Arboviruses cause emerging and re-emerging infections affecting humans and animals. They are spread primarily by blood-sucking insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, midges, and sandflies. Changes in climate, ecology, demographic, land-use patterns, and increasing global travel have been linked to an upsurge in arboviral disease. Outbreaks occur periodically followed by persistent low-level circulation. Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the seroepidemiology of selected arboviruses among febrile patients in selected lake/river basins of Kenya. Methods: Using a hospital-based cross-sectional descriptive survey, febrile patients were recruited and their serum samples tested for exposure to immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies against Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), West Nile virus (WNV), and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Samples positive for CHIKV and WNV were further confirmed by the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). Results: Of the 379 samples examined, 176 were IgG positive for at least one of these arboviruses (46.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 41.4–51.5%). Virus-specific prevalence for CCHF, RVF, WN, and CHIK was 25.6%, 19.5%, 12.4%, and 2.6%, respectively. These prevalences varied significantly with geographical site (p<0.001), with Tana recording the highest overall arboviral seropositivity. PRNT results for Alphaviruses confirmed that the actual viruses circulating in Baringo were Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and CHIKV, o'nyong nyong virus (ONNV) in Naivasha, and SFV and Sindbis virus (SINDV) in Tana delta. Among the flaviviruses tested, WNV was circulating in all the three sites. Conclusion: There is a high burden of febrile illness in humans due to CCHFV, RVFV, WNV, and CHIKV infection in the river/lake basin regions of Kenya. PMID:25700043

  16. Inheritance of Febrile Seizures in Sudden Unexplained Death in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Ingrid A.; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Krous, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians. PMID:22490769

  17. Effects of teicoplanin and those of vancomycin in initial empirical antibiotic regimen for febrile, neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. Gimema Infection Program.

    PubMed

    Menichetti, F; Martino, P; Bucaneve, G; Gentile, G; D'Antonio, D; Liso, V; Ricci, P; Nosari, A M; Buelli, M; Carotenuto, M

    1994-09-01

    The efficacy and toxicity of teicoplanin and vancomycin in the initial empirical antibiotic regimen in febrile, neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies were compared in a prospective, randomized, unblinded, multicenter trial in the setting of 29 hematologic units in tertiary-care or university hospitals. A total of 635 consecutive febrile patients with hematologic malignancies and chemotherapy-induced neutropenia were randomly assigned to receive intravenously amikacin plus ceftazidime plus either teicoplanin at 6 mg/kg of body weight once daily or vancomycin at 1 g twice daily. An efficacy analysis was done for 527 evaluable patients: 275 treated with teicoplanin and 252 treated with vancomycin. Overall, successful outcomes were recorded for 78% of patients who received teicoplanin and 75% of those who were randomized to vancomycin (difference, 3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -10 to 4%; P = 0.33). A total of 102 patients presented with primary, single-agent, gram-positive bacteremia. Coagulase-negative staphylococci accounted for 42%, Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 27%, and streptococci accounted for 21% of all gram-positive blood isolates. The overall responses to therapy of gram-positive bacteremias were 92 and 87% for teicoplanin and vancomycin, respectively (difference, 5%; CI, -17 to 6%; P = 0.22). Side effects, mainly represented by skin rash, occurred in 3.2 and 8% of teicoplanin- and vancomycin-treated patients, respectively (difference, -4.8%; CI, 0.7 to 8%; P = 0.03); the rate of nephrotoxicity was 1.4 and 0.8% for the teicoplanin and vancomycin groups, respectively (difference, 0.6%; CI, -2 to 1%; P = 0.68). Further infections were caused by gram-positive organisms in two patients (0.7%) treated with teicoplanin and one patient (0.4%) who received vancomycin (difference, 0.3%; CI, -0.9 to 1.0%; P = 0.53). Overall mortalities were 8.5 and 11% for teicoplanin- and vancomycin-treated patients, respectively (difference, -2.5%; CI, - 2 to 7

  18. [Simple febrile seizure, complex seizure, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus, FIRES and new syndromes].

    PubMed

    Moreno de Flagge, Noris

    2013-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common seizures in childhood. They have been observed in 2-5% of children before the age of 5, but in some populations this figure may increase to 15%. It is a common cause of pediatric hospital admissions and cause of anxiety for parents. Febrile seizures could be the first manifestation of epilepsy. About 13% of epileptic patients have a history of febrile seizure, and 30% have had recurrent febrile seizures. Their phenotypic characteristics allow, in the majority of cases, a classification of the seizure, an elaboration of a prognosis and to assume a specific therapeutic attitude. It is possible to describe a spectrum according to their severity, from the benign simple seizure to the more complex, febrile seizure plus, Dravet'syndrome, and FIRES. During the past decade, molecular genetic studies have contributed to the identification of genetic factors involved in febrile seizure and related disorders, making the necessity of a careful follow up of these patients in order to detect risk factors earlier. We have reviewed the medical literature to update current knowledge of febrile seizures, their prognosis and their relation to new epileptic syndromes.

  19. Detection of bacteria and fungi in blood of patients with febrile neutropenia by real-time PCR with universal primers and probes.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Hideto; Ohzono, Nanae; Inamura, Norikazu; Kato, Atsushi; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Akaike, Hiroto; Terada, Kihei; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2015-03-01

    Febrile neutropenia is the main treatment-related cause of mortality in cancer patients. During June 2012 to April 2014, 97 blood culture samples were collected from patients receiving chemotherapy for hematological malignancy and cancer with febrile neutropenia episodes (FNEs). The samples were examined for the presence of bacteria and fungi using real-time PCR amplification and sequencing of 16S and 18S rRNA genes. Bacteria were identified in 20 of 97 samples (20.6%) by the real-time PCR assay and in 10 of 97 (10.3%) samples by blood culture. In 6 blood culture-positive samples, the real-time PCR assay detected the same type of bacteria. No fungi were detected by the real-time PCR assay or blood culture. During antibiotic therapy, all samples were negative by blood culture, but the real-time PCR assay yielded a positive result in 2 cases of 2 (100%). The bacterial DNA copy number was not well correlated with the serum C-reactive protein titer of patients with FNEs. We conclude that a real-time PCR assay could provide better detection of causative microbes' in a shorter time, and with a smaller blood sample than blood culture. Using a real-time PCR assay in combination with blood culture could improve microbiological documentation of FNEs.

  20. Malaria, Typhoid Fever, and Their Coinfection among Febrile Patients at a Rural Health Center in Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Birhanie, Meseret; Tessema, Belay; Ferede, Getachew; Endris, Mengistu; Enawgaw, Bamlaku

    2014-01-01

    Background. Malaria and typhoid fever are major public health problems in tropical and subtropical countries. People in endemic areas are at risk of contracting both infections concurrently. Objectives. The study was aimed at determining the prevalence and associated risk factors of malaria, typhoid, and their coinfection among febrile patients. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 febrile patients suspected for malaria and/or typhoid fever from April to May, 2013, at Ayinba Health Center, Northwest Ethiopia. Blood samples were collected for blood culture, Widal test, and blood film preparation. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical software. Results. The prevalence of malaria was 36.5% (n = 73). Among these 32 (43.8%), 30 (41.1%) and 11 (15.1%) were positive for P. falciparum, P. vivax, and mixed infections, respectively. The seroprevalence of typhoid fever was 38 (19%), but 1 (0.5%) with blood culture. Malaria typhoid fever coinfection was 13 (6.5%). 2-5-year-old children and poor hand washing habit were significantly associated with malaria and typhoid infection, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The prevalence of malaria and typhoid fever was found high. Further studies should be done on the other determinants of malaria and typhoid fever coinfection in different seasons and different study areas.

  1. Malaria, Typhoid Fever, and Their Coinfection among Febrile Patients at a Rural Health Center in Northwest Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Belay; Ferede, Getachew; Enawgaw, Bamlaku

    2014-01-01

    Background. Malaria and typhoid fever are major public health problems in tropical and subtropical countries. People in endemic areas are at risk of contracting both infections concurrently. Objectives. The study was aimed at determining the prevalence and associated risk factors of malaria, typhoid, and their coinfection among febrile patients. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 febrile patients suspected for malaria and/or typhoid fever from April to May, 2013, at Ayinba Health Center, Northwest Ethiopia. Blood samples were collected for blood culture, Widal test, and blood film preparation. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical software. Results. The prevalence of malaria was 36.5% (n = 73). Among these 32 (43.8%), 30 (41.1%) and 11 (15.1%) were positive for P. falciparum, P. vivax, and mixed infections, respectively. The seroprevalence of typhoid fever was 38 (19%), but 1 (0.5%) with blood culture. Malaria typhoid fever coinfection was 13 (6.5%). 2–5-year-old children and poor hand washing habit were significantly associated with malaria and typhoid infection, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The prevalence of malaria and typhoid fever was found high. Further studies should be done on the other determinants of malaria and typhoid fever coinfection in different seasons and different study areas. PMID:26556415

  2. Prospective Evaluation of Procalcitonin, Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 and C-Reactive Protein in Febrile Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chou-Han; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Keng, Li-Ta; Lee, Ho-Sheng; Chang, Hou-Tai; Liao, Wei-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Both procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) have been investigated separately as indicators of infection in patients with autoimmune diseases. Our study simultaneously evaluated both PCT and sTREM-1 along with C-reactive protein (CRP) in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. Methods Fifty-nine patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were categorized into the infection group (n = 24) or the disease flare group (n = 35). sTREM-1, PCT and CRP concentrations at fever onset were compared between the two groups of patients. Results sTREM-1 and CRP did not differ between the two groups. PCT [median (range), ng/ml] was higher in the infection group than in the disease flare group [0.53 (0.02–12.85) vs. 0.12 (0.02–19.23), p = 0.001]. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) for diagnosis of infection was 0.75 for PCT (p = 0.001), 0.63 for CRP (p = 0.09) and 0.52 for sTREM-1 (p = 0.79). Using 0.2 ng/ml as the cutoff value for PCT, sensitivity was 0.75 and specificity was 0.77. Negative predictive values for PCT were 92%, 87% and 82% for a prevalence of infection of 20%, 30%, and 40%, respectively. Neither immunosuppressants nor biomodulators affected the level of the three biomarkers. However, in patients treated with corticosteroids, the levels of sTREM-1 and CRP were significantly decreased compared with the untreated patients. Conclusions Setting PCT at a lower cutoff value could provide useful information on excluding infection in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. The possible effect of corticosteroids on the level of sTREM-1 as an infection marker deserves further study. PMID:27096761

  3. Clinical analysis of HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Ye; Jin, Yong-Mei; He, Li-Ping; Bai, Jin-Song; Liu, Jun; Yu, Min; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wen, Jing; Kuang, Yi-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Drug eruption is the most common clinical presentation in patients with HIV/AIDS. The systemic clinical and risk factors associated with drug eruption remain unknown. A retrospective analysis in HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption was carried out with demographic data, epidemiological data, clinical characteristics, laboratory data and follow-up data. The risk factors correlated with prognosis were assessed by case control analysis. A total of 134 out of 1817 HIV/AIDS patients (7.4%) presented drug eruptions. The major class of sensitizing drug was HAART drugs (47.7%), followed by antibiotics (47.0%). Nevirapine (39.6%) was the most common sensitizing drug in the HAART regimens. The patients received HAART or had allergic history were prone to develop drug eruption. The alanine aminotransferase, albumin, globulin, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), lymphocytes, red blood cells (RBC) and eosinophils of the drug eruption patients were significantly different the control patients. The allergic history, opportunistic infection, viral load, CD4 cell count, high globulin and low albumin were the risk factors correlated with death in HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption. It is proposed that patients with higher viral loads, higher globulin levels and lower white blood cells (WBC) should be given special attention for the prevention of complications and death. PMID:27796328

  4. Seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines in febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomoyuki; Sakaue, Yuko; Sokoda, Tatsuyuki; Sawai, Chihiro; Akabori, Shie; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Taga, Takashi; Ohno, Masaki; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures. The study population comprised 14 patients with simple febrile seizures and 35 patients with complex febrile seizures. Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamine. The time from fever detection to the seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than that in nonantihistamine group. Interleukin-1beta is thought to be associated with causing febrile seizures via its dual role as a pyrogen and convulsant substance. Moreover, interleukin-1beta may activate the turnover of hypothalamic neural histamine. These considerations, along with the present results, suggest that the depletion of hypothalamic neuronal histamine induced by antihistamines may increase neuronal excitability, thereby increasing seizure susceptibility in patients with febrile seizures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitochondrial DNAs decreased and correlated with clinical features in HCV patients from Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A-Mei; Ma, Ke; Song, Yuzhu; Feng, Yue; Duan, Haiping; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Binghui; Xu, Gang; Li, Zheng; Xia, Xueshan

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C was the most popular chronic infectious liver disease worldwide. It was identified that Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection could lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, though the mechanism was not fully understood. To investigate whether mtDNA copy number could be affected by HCV infection and be associated with clinical features of HCV patients, mtDNA copy numbers were analyzed in 242 patients with HCV infection and 226 matched control samples. The results suggested that mtDNA copy numbers significantly decreased in HCV patients (68.80 ± 3.33) than in control samples (81.54 ± 4.50) (p = 0.022). When males/females were separated from total patients to compare mtDNA copy numbers with gender matched controls, mtDNA copy numbers still significantly decreased in male HCV patients (p = 0.002). Further analysis indicated that level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was negatively correlated with mtDNA copy numbers in total HCV patients (r = -0.128, p = 0.047), and this correlation was more significant in male HCV patients (r = -0.266, p = 0.030). Intriguingly, aspartate amino-transferase (AST) showed positive correlation with mtDNA copy numbers (r = 0.260, p = 0.034) in male HCV patients. Our results indicated that mtDNA copy numbers depleted and correlated with clinical features in male HCV patients.

  6. Serum Endocan Levels in Children with Febrile Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kiral, Eylem; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Bozkurt-Turhan, Ayse; Bor, Ozcan; Akgun, Yurdanur; Akgun, Necat Akdeniz

    2016-03-17

    Endocan is an endotelial cell specific molecule; previous studies have shown that serum endocan levels increased in cancer and sepsis and are also related to the severity of sepsis. There are no clinical study about serum endocan levels in children with febrile neutropenia. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum endocan levels in pediatric leukemia patients with febrile neutropenia (n=33) and compare them with children with leukemia without fever (n=33) and also with healthy children (n=24). The median serum endocan level in the first group (children with febrile neutropenia) was statistically significantly higher compared to the leukemic children without febrile neutropenia and also control group (P<0.01 for both). No difference was determined between the serum endocan levels of the leukaemia patients without febrile neutropenia and the healthy control group (P>0.05). Serum endocan levels were also similar with febrile neutropenia due to bacterial causes comparing with the idiopathic febril neutropenia. The results of this study showed increased serum endocan in children with leukemia during the febrile neutropenia episode, and no changes of serum endocan levels in children without leukemia without infection/fever. The monitoring of a series of serum endocan levels would be helpful for the course of febrile neutropenia.

  7. Serum Endocan Levels in Children with Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Kiral, Eylem; Bozkurt-Turhan, Ayse; Bor, Ozcan; Akgun, Yurdanur; Akgun, Necat Akdeniz

    2016-01-01

    Endocan is an endotelial cell specific molecule; previous studies have shown that serum endocan levels increased in cancer and sepsis and are also related to the severity of sepsis. There are no clinical study about serum endocan levels in children with febrile neutropenia. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum endocan levels in pediatric leukemia patients with febrile neutropenia (n=33) and compare them with children with leukemia without fever (n=33) and also with healthy children (n=24). The median serum endocan level in the first group (children with febrile neutropenia) was statistically significantly higher compared to the leukemic children without febrile neutropenia and also control group (P<0.01 for both). No difference was determined between the serum endocan levels of the leukaemia patients without febrile neutropenia and the healthy control group (P>0.05). Serum endocan levels were also similar with febrile neutropenia due to bacterial causes comparing with the idiopathic febril neutropenia. The results of this study showed increased serum endocan in children with leukemia during the febrile neutropenia episode, and no changes of serum endocan levels in children without leukemia without infection/fever. The monitoring of a series of serum endocan levels would be helpful for the course of febrile neutropenia. PMID:27103976

  8. Stroke-Like Presentation Following Febrile Seizure in a Patient with 1q43q44 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J. Elliott; Wolfe, Stephanie M.; Kaiser-Rogers, Kathleen; Greenwood, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Hemiconvulsion–hemiplegia–epilepsy syndrome (HHE) is a rare outcome of prolonged hemiconvulsion that is followed by diffuse unilateral hemispheric edema, hemiplegia, and ultimately hemiatrophy of the affected hemisphere and epilepsy. Here, we describe the case of a 3-year-old male with a 1;3 translocation leading to a terminal 1q43q44 deletion and a terminal 3p26.1p26.3 duplication that developed HHE after a prolonged febrile seizure and discuss the pathogenesis of HHE in the context of the patient’s complex genetic background. PMID:27199890

  9. Making Improvements in the ED: Does ED Busyness Affect Time to Antibiotics in Febrile Pediatric Oncology Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department?

    PubMed

    Benner, Christopher A; Mora, Erika; Mueller, Emily; Seagull, F Jacob; Walkovich, Kelly; Johnson, Kaleena; Halverson, Schuyler; Rothman, Ed; Hucks, George; Younger, John G; Nypaver, Michele M

    2016-10-04

    Febrile neutropenic pediatric patients are at heightened risk for serious bacterial infections, and rapid antibiotic administration (in <60 minutes) improves survival. Our objectives were to reduce the time-to-antibiotic (TTA) administration and to evaluate the effect of overall emergency department (ED) busyness on TTA. This study was a quality improvement initiative with retrospective chart review to reduce TTA in febrile children with underlying diagnosis of cancer or hematologic immunodeficiency who visited the pediatric ED. A multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline (CPG) was implemented to improve TTA. The CPG's main focus was delivery of antibiotics before availability of laboratory data. We collected data on TTA during baseline and intervention periods. Concurrent patient arrivals to the ED per hour served as a proxy of busyness. Time to antibiotic was compared with the number of concurrent arrivals per hour. Analyses included scatter plot and regression analysis. There were 253 visits from October 1, 2010 to March 30, 2012. Median TTA administration dropped from 207 to 89 minutes (P < 0.001). Eight months after completing all intervention periods, the median had dropped again to 44 minutes with 70% of patients receiving antibiotics within 60 minutes of ED arrival. There was no correlation between concurrent patient arrivals and TTA administration during the historical or intervention periods. Implementation of a CPG and process improvements significantly reduced median TTA administration. Total patient arrivals per hour as a proxy of ED crowding did not affect TTA administration. Our data suggest that positive improvements in clinical care can be successful despite fluctuations in ED patient volume.

  10. Primary prophylactic colony-stimulating factors for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Renner, Peter; Milazzo, Stefania; Liu, Jian Ping; Zwahlen, Marcel; Birkmann, Josef; Horneber, Markus

    2012-10-17

    High-dose or dose-intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy often causes myelosuppression and severe neutropenia among cancer patients. Severe neutropenia accompanied by fever, named febrile neutropenia (FN), is the most serious manifestation of neutropenia usually requiring hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics. FN and neutropenia can lead to chemotherapy treatment delays or dose reductions, which potentially compromises the effectiveness of cancer treatment and prospects for a cure. Granulocyte-macrophage (GM) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) are administered during chemotherapy in order to prevent or reduce the incidence or the duration of FN and neutropenia. To assess the effect of prophylactic colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) in reducing the incidence and duration of FN, and all-cause and infection-related mortality during chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, HEALTHSTAR, International Health Technology Assessment, SOMED, AMED and BIOSIS up to 8 August 2011. We also searched three Chinese databases (VIP, CNKI, CBM), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and OpenGrey.eu up to August 2011. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CSFs (any dose) with placebo or no treatment in patients with breast cancer at any stage, at risk of developing FN while undergoing any type of chemotherapy. We used pooled risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for binary outcomes. At least two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Trial authors were contacted for further details when information was unclear. We included eight RCTs involving 2156 participants with different stages of breast cancer and chemotherapy regimens. The trials were carried out between 1995 and 2008 and judged

  11. Pediatric antifungal therapy. Part I: focus on febrile neutropenia, invasive aspergillosis, combination antifungal therapy and invasive candidiasis in immunocompromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Allen, U; Bow, E; Doyle, J; Richardson, S; Robinson, J; Rotstein, C; Davies, D; Hui, C; Le Saux, N; Laverdiere, M; Read, S

    2010-02-01

    The number of available antifungal agents has significantly increased in recent years. These agents are starting to take over niches that were previously occupied by conventional amphotericin B. For many of these agents, pediatric data from randomized trials are generally lacking and clinicians are faced with extrapolating from data generated in adult patients. This notwithstanding, this report summarizes recommendations that define the roles of newer antifungal agents in the treatment of selected scenarios among immunocompromised pediatric patients. The report includes the outcome of a Canadian conference on the use of antifungal agents in children, supplemented by literature reviews and incorporating information from existing national or international guidelines, where appropriate. The focus of the report is on febrile neutropenia, invasive aspergillosis, combination antifungal therapy and selected aspects of the management of invasive candidiasis.

  12. De-novo mutations and genetic variation in the SCN1A gene in Malaysian patients with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+).

    PubMed

    Tan, Emmilia Husni; Razak, Salmi Abdul; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2012-12-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) comprises a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous epilepsy syndrome. Here, we provide the first report of clinical presentation and mutational analysis of SCN1A gene in 36 Malaysian GEFS+ patients. Mutational analysis of SCN1A gene revealed twenty seven sequence variants (missense mutation and silent polymorphism also intronic polymorphism), as well as 2 novel de-novo mutations were found in our patients at coding regions, c.5197A>G (N1733D) and c.4748A>G (H1583R). Our findings provide potential genetic insights into the pathogenesis of GEFS+ in Malaysian populations concerning the SCN1A gene mutations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Utility of the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) Risk Index Score as a Criterion for Nonadmission in Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study was initiated in febrile neutropenic inpatients with solid tumors in 4 community hospitals, to discover how the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) risk index score (RIS) of 21 or greater correlated with complications occurring in 198 episodes: whether it could help determine which patients not to admit, the savings of not admitting patients without complications, and whether an algorithm could facilitate management of those not admitted. Methods: Febrile neutropenic episodes in patients with solid tumors were identified electronically between October 1, 2008, and November 15, 2010. Electronic charts were reviewed manually for inclusion criteria and data extraction. Episodes were stratified by an MASCC RIS below 21 or 21 or greater. Complications were correlated with the index. Results: Inclusion criteria were met in 198 episodes. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the MASCC RIS vs complications were 94%, 29.6%, 57.7%, and 82.9%, respectively. In episodes with an RIS 21 or greater, 42.3% had complications, misclassifying to low risk 69 episodes with complications. “Unable to eat” correlated with complications in 84% of episodes. In 3 patients stratified to no complication, a complication developed 24 hours after admission. Conclusions: An MASCC RIS of 21 or greater could not be used as a criterion for “no complication/do not admit.” Inability to eat should be an admission criterion. Savings of approximately $1 million per 100 uncomplicated admissions could be realized if appropriate criteria for nonadmission could be devised. An algorithm to facilitate outpatient management is suggested. PMID:26176568

  14. TLR4/CD14 Variants-Related Serologic and Immunologic Dys-Regulations Predict Severe Sepsis in Febrile De-Compensated Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wen-Chien; Liu, Chih-Wei; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Huang, Chia-Chang; Li, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Yang, Ying-Ying; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants and dysfunctional monocyte had been reported to be associated with infection susceptibility in advanced cirrhotic patients. This study aims to explore genetic predictive markers and relevant immune dysfunction that contributed to severe sepsis in febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patents. Polymorphism analysis of candidate genes was undergone in 108 febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patients and 121 healthy volunteers. Various plasma inflammatory/regulatory cytokines, proportion of classical (CD 16-, phagocytic) and non-classical (CD16+, inflammatory) monocytes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and intracellular/extracellular cytokines on cultured non-classical monocytes, mCD14/HLA-DR expression and phagocytosis of classical monocytes were measured. For TLR4+896A/G variant allele carriers with severe sepsis, high plasma endotoxin/IL-10 inhibits HLA-DR expression and impaired phagocytosis were noted in their classical monocyte. In the same group, increased non-classical monocyte subset, enhanced LPS-stimulated TLR4 expression and TNFα/nitrite production, and systemic inflammation [high plasma soluble CD14 (sCD14) and total nitric oxide (NOx) levels] were noted. For CD14-159C/T variant allele carriers with severe sepsis, persist endotoxemia inhibited mCD14/HLA-DR expression and impaired phagocytosis of their classical monocyte. In the same group, increased non-classical monocyte subset up-regulated TLR4-NFκB-iNOS and p38MAPK pathway, stimulated TNFα/nitrite production and elicited systemic inflammation. In febrile acute de-compensated cirrhotic patients, TLR4+896A/G and CD14-159C/T polymorphisms-related non-classical and classical monocytes dysfunction resulted in increased severe sepsis risk. Malnutrition, high plasma endotoxin and sCD14 levels, single TLR4+896A/G or CD14-159C/T variant allele carriers and double variant allele carriers are significant predictive factors for the development of severe

  15. A prospective study of the importance of enteric fever as a cause of non-malarial febrile illness in patients admitted to Chittagong Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Maude, Rapeephan R; Ghose, Aniruddha; Samad, Rasheda; de Jong, Hanna K; Fukushima, Masako; Wijedoru, Lalith; Hassan, Mahtab Uddin; Hossain, Md Amir; Karim, Md Rezaul; Sayeed, Abdullah Abu; van den Ende, Stannie; Pal, Sujat; Zahed, A S M; Rahman, Wahid; Karnain, Rifat; Islam, Rezina; Tran, Dung Thi Ngoc; Ha, Tuyen Thanh; Pham, Anh Hong; Campbell, James I; van Doorn, H Rogier; Maude, Richard J; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W Joost; Day, Nicholas P J; Baker, Stephen; Dondorp, Arjen M; Parry, Christopher M; Faiz, Md Abul

    2016-10-13

    Fever is a common cause of hospital admission in Bangladesh but causative agents, other than malaria, are not routinely investigated. Enteric fever is thought to be common. Adults and children admitted to Chittagong Medical College Hospital with a temperature of ≥38.0 °C were investigated using a blood smear for malaria, a blood culture, real-time PCR to detect Salmonella Typhi, S. Paratyphi A and other pathogens in blood and CSF and an NS1 antigen dengue ELISA. We enrolled 300 febrile patients with a negative malaria smear between January and June 2012: 156 children (aged ≤15 years) and 144 adults with a median (interquartile range) age of 13 (5-31) years and median (IQR) illness duration before admission of five (2-8) days. Clinical enteric fever was diagnosed in 52 patients (17.3 %), lower respiratory tract infection in 48 (16.0 %), non-specific febrile illness in 48 (16.0 %), a CNS infection in 37 patients (12.3 %), urinary sepsis in 23 patients (7.7 %), an upper respiratory tract infection in 21 patients (7.0 %), and diarrhea or dysentery in 21 patients (7.0 %). Malaria was still suspected in seven patients despite a negative microscopy test. S. Typhi was detected in blood by culture or PCR in 34 (11.3 %) of patients. Of note Rickettsia typhi and Orientia tsutsugamushi were detected by PCR in two and one patient respectively. Twenty-nine (9 %) patients died during their hospital admission (15/160 (9.4 %) of children and 14/144 (9.7 %) adults). Two of 52 (3.8 %) patients with enteric fever, 5/48 (10.4 %) patients with lower respiratory tract infections, and 12/37 (32.4 %) patients with CNS infection died. Enteric fever was confirmed in 11.3 % of patients admitted to this hospital in Bangladesh with non-malaria fever. Lower respiratory tract and CNS infections were also common. CNS infections in this location merit more detailed study due to the high mortality.

  16. Elaboration of a clinical and paraclinical score to estimate the probability of herpes simplex virus encephalitis in patients with febrile, acute neurologic impairment.

    PubMed

    Gennai, S; Rallo, A; Keil, D; Seigneurin, A; Germi, R; Epaulard, O

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis is associated with a high risk of mortality and sequelae, and early diagnosis and treatment in the emergency department are necessary. However, most patients present with non-specific febrile, acute neurologic impairment; this may lead clinicians to overlook the diagnosis of HSV encephalitis. We aimed to identify which data collected in the first hours in a medical setting were associated with the diagnosis of HSV encephalitis. We conducted a multicenter retrospective case-control study in four French public hospitals from 2007 to 2013. The cases were the adult patients who received a confirmed diagnosis of HSV encephalitis. The controls were all the patients who attended the emergency department of Grenoble hospital with a febrile acute neurologic impairment, without HSV detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in 2012 and 2013. A multivariable logistic model was elaborated to estimate factors significantly associated with HSV encephalitis. Finally, an HSV probability score was derived from the logistic model. We identified 36 cases and 103 controls. Factors independently associated with HSV encephalitis were the absence of past neurological history (odds ratio [OR] 6.25 [95 % confidence interval (CI): 2.22-16.7]), the occurrence of seizure (OR 8.09 [95 % CI: 2.73-23.94]), a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg (OR 5.11 [95 % CI: 1.77-14.77]), and a C-reactive protein <10 mg/L (OR 9.27 [95 % CI: 2.98-28.88]). An HSV probability score was calculated summing the value attributed to each independent factor. HSV encephalitis diagnosis may benefit from the use of this score based upon some easily accessible data. However, diagnostic evocation and probabilistic treatment must remain the rule.

  17. Epilepsy in children with a history of febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun Ha; Eun, Baik-Lin; Eun, So-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Febrile seizure, the most common type of pediatric convulsive disorder, is a benign seizure syndrome distinct from epilepsy. However, as epilepsy is also common during childhood, we aimed to identify the prognostic factors that can predict epilepsy in children with febrile seizures. The study comprised 249 children at the Korea University Ansan Hospital who presented with febrile seizures. The relationship between the subsequent occurrence of epilepsy and clinical factors including seizure and fever-related variables were analyzed by multivariate analysis. Twenty-five patients (10.0%) had additional afebrile seizures later and were diagnosed with epilepsy. The subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in patients with a history of febrile seizures was associated with a seizure frequency of more than 10 times during the first 2 years after seizure onset (P<0.001). Factors that were associated with subsequent occurrence of epilepsy were developmental delay (P<0.001), preterm birth (P=0.001), multiple seizures during a febrile seizure attack (P=0.005), and epileptiform discharges on electroencephalography (EEG) (P=0.008). Other factors such as the age at onset of first seizure, seizure duration, and family history of epilepsy were not associated with subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in this study. Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. However, careful observation is needed, particularly for prediction of subsequent epileptic episodes in patients with frequent febrile seizures with known risk factors, such as developmental delay, history of preterm birth, several attacks during a febrile episode, and epileptiform discharges on EEG.

  18. Predictive factors for poor prognosis febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Yoon-Seon

    2012-07-01

    Most patients with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia recover rapidly without serious complications. However, it still remains a life-threatening treatment-related toxicity, and is associated with dose reductions and delays of chemotherapeutic agents that may compromise treatment outcomes. Recent developments of risk stratification enabled early discharge with oral antibiotics for low-risk patients. However, even in low-risk patients, medical complications including bacteremia could happen. The authors reviewed recent literature to provide an update on research regarding predictive factors for poor prognosis in patients with febrile neutropenia. Various prognostic factors have been suggested with controversies. Hematological parameters, prophylactic measurements and patient-specific risk factors showed inconsistent results. MASCC risk-index score, which was originally developed to identify low-risk patients, in turn showed that the lower the MASCC score, the poorer the prognosis of febrile neutropenia, with very low levels (<15), the rate of complications was high. Patients with severe sepsis and septic shock commonly had procalcitonin concentration above 2.0 ng/ml, and this level should be considered at high risk of poor prognosis. Lower MASCC score and higher procalcitonin concentration can predict poor outcomes in febrile neutropenia. More research is required with regard to the other factors showing controversies.

  19. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea.

  20. Characterization of a novel Rochalimaea species, R. henselae sp. nov., isolated from blood of a febrile, human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient.

    PubMed Central

    Regnery, R L; Anderson, B E; Clarridge, J E; Rodriguez-Barradas, M C; Jones, D C; Carr, J H

    1992-01-01

    Isolation of a Rochalimaea-like organism from a febrile patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus was confirmed. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, together with polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease length polymorphism analysis of a portion of the citrate synthase gene, demonstrated that the agent is closely related to members of the genus Rochalimaea and that the isolate is genotypically identical to the presumptive etiologic agent of bacillary angiomatosis. However, the same genotypic analyses readily differentiated the new isolate from isolates of other recognized Rochalimaea species as well as other genera of bacteria previously suggested as putative etiologic agents of bacillary angiomatosis and related syndromes. We propose that the novel species be referred to as Rochalimaea henselae sp. now. Images PMID:1371515

  1. Multisite external validation of a risk prediction model for the diagnosis of blood stream infections in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Esbenshade, Adam J; Zhao, Zhiguo; Aftandilian, Catherine; Saab, Raya; Wattier, Rachel L; Beauchemin, Melissa; Miller, Tamara P; Wilkes, Jennifer J; Kelly, Michael J; Fernbach, Alison; Jeng, Michael; Schwartz, Cindy L; Dvorak, Christopher C; Shyr, Yu; Moons, Karl G M; Sulis, Maria-Luisa; Friedman, Debra L

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric oncology patients are at an increased risk of invasive bacterial infection due to immunosuppression. The risk of such infection in the absence of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count ≥ 500/μL) is not well established and a validated prediction model for blood stream infection (BSI) risk offers clinical usefulness. A 6-site retrospective external validation was conducted using a previously published risk prediction model for BSI in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia: the Esbenshade/Vanderbilt (EsVan) model. A reduced model (EsVan2) excluding 2 less clinically reliable variables also was created using the initial EsVan model derivative cohort, and was validated using all 5 external validation cohorts. One data set was used only in sensitivity analyses due to missing some variables. From the 5 primary data sets, there were a total of 1197 febrile episodes and 76 episodes of bacteremia. The overall C statistic for predicting bacteremia was 0.695, with a calibration slope of 0.50 for the original model and a calibration slope of 1.0 when recalibration was applied to the model. The model performed better in predicting high-risk bacteremia (gram-negative or Staphylococcus aureus infection) versus BSI alone, with a C statistic of 0.801 and a calibration slope of 0.65. The EsVan2 model outperformed the EsVan model across data sets with a C statistic of 0.733 for predicting BSI and a C statistic of 0.841 for high-risk BSI. The results of this external validation demonstrated that the EsVan and EsVan2 models are able to predict BSI across multiple performance sites and, once validated and implemented prospectively, could assist in decision making in clinical practice. Cancer 2017;123:3781-3790. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. Neutropenia in the Febrile Child.

    PubMed

    Ku, Brandon C; Bailey, Charles; Balamuth, Fran

    2016-05-01

    Fever in the pediatric population is a common chief complaint presenting to the emergency department and may be one of the first indications of a life-threatening infection, especially in patients with neutropenia. Given that pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia frequently present to emergency departments for emergent care, it is critical for emergency medicine physicians and pediatricians and family physicians working in the emergency department to know the key aspects of the clinical approach to these patients. This review of the clinical evaluation and treatment of the pediatric patient presenting with fever and confirmed or suspected neutropenia will provide health care providers with the necessary tools to effectively care for this patient population.

  3. Indices of anti-Dengue immunoglobulin G subclasses in adult Mexican patients with febrile and hemorrhagic dengue in the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Posadas-Mondragón, Araceli; Aguilar-Faisal, José Leopoldo; Chávez-Negrete, Adolfo; Guillén-Salomón, Edith; Alcántara-Farfán, Verónica; Luna-Rojas, Lucero; Ávila-Trejo, Amanda Marineth; Del Carmen Pacheco-Yépez, Judith

    2017-09-07

    Heterologous secondary infections are at increased risk of developing dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) due to antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses can fix and activate complement and bind to Fcɣ receptors. These factors may also play an important role in the development of ADE and thus in the pathogenesis of DHF. The aim of this study was to analyze the indices of anti-dengue IgG subclasses in adult patients with febrile and hemorrhagic dengue in the acute phase. In 2013, we recruited129 patients with dengue fever (DF) and 57 with DHF in Veracruz, Mexico. Anti-dengue IgM and IgG were determined by capture ELISA. The anti-Dengue IgG subclasses were detected by indirect ELISA. We observed that the anti-Dengue IgG2 and IgG3 subclasses were detected in dengue patients. IgG1 increased significantly in the serum of DHF patients with primary and secondary infections, but was higher in patients with secondary infection. The IgG4 subclass index was significantly higher in the serum of patients with DHF compared to those with DF who were in the early and late acute phase both in primary and secondary infection. In conclusions, the index of subclasses IgG1 and IgG4 were higher in patients with DHF. © 2017 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Simple Prognostic Criteria can Definitively Identify Patients who Develop Severe Versus Non-Severe Dengue Disease, or Have Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Falconar, Andrew K.I.; Romero-Vivas, Claudia M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe dengue disease (SDD) (DHF/DSS: dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome) results from either primary or secondary dengue virus (DENV) infections, which occur 4 - 6 days after the onset of fever. As yet, there are no definitive clinical or hematological criteria that can specifically identify SDD patients during the early acute febrile-phase of disease (day 0 - 3: < 72 hours). This study was performed during a SDD (DHF/DSS) epidemic to: 1) identify the DENV serotypes that caused SDD during primary or secondary DENV infections; 2) identify simple clinical and hematological criteria that could significantly discriminate between patients who subsequently developed SDD versus non-SDD (N-SDD), or had a non-DENV fever of unknown origin (FUO) during day 0 - 3 of fever; 3) assess whether DENV serotype co-infections resulted in SDD. Methods First serum samples, with clinical and hematological criteria, were collected from 100 patients during the early acute febrile-phase (day 0 - 3: < 72 hours), assessed for DENV or FUO infections by IgM- and IgG-capture ELISAs on paired serum samples and by DENV isolations, and subsequently graded as SDD, N-SDD or FUO patients. Results In this study: 1) Thirty-three patients had DENV infections, predominantly secondary DENV-2 infections, including each SDD (DHF/DSS) case; 2) Secondary DENV-2/-3 and DENV-2/-4 serotype co-infections however resulted in N-SDD; 3) Each patient who subsequently developed SDD, but none of the others, displayed three clinical criteria: abdominal pain, conjunctival injection and veni-puncture bleeding, therefore each of these criteria provided definitively significant prognostic (P < 0.001) values; 4) Petechia, positive tourniquet tests and hepatomegaly, and neutrophilia or leukopenia also significantly identified those who: a) subsequently developed SDD versus N-SDD, or had a FUO; b) subsequently developed SDD versus N-SDD; c) subsequently developed N-SDD versus FUOs, respectively

  5. Simple Prognostic Criteria can Definitively Identify Patients who Develop Severe Versus Non-Severe Dengue Disease, or Have Other Febrile Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Falconar, Andrew K I; Romero-Vivas, Claudia M E

    2012-02-01

    SEVERE DENGUE DISEASE (SDD) (DHF/DSS: dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome) results from either primary or secondary dengue virus (DENV) infections, which occur 4 - 6 days after the onset of fever. As yet, there are no definitive clinical or hematological criteria that can specifically identify SDD patients during the early acute febrile-phase of disease (day 0 - 3: < 72 hours). This study was performed during a SDD (DHF/DSS) epidemic to: 1) identify the DENV serotypes that caused SDD during primary or secondary DENV infections; 2) identify simple clinical and hematological criteria that could significantly discriminate between patients who subsequently developed SDD versus non-SDD (N-SDD), or had a non-DENV fever of unknown origin (FUO) during day 0 - 3 of fever; 3) assess whether DENV serotype co-infections resulted in SDD. First serum samples, with clinical and hematological criteria, were collected from 100 patients during the early acute febrile-phase (day 0 - 3: < 72 hours), assessed for DENV or FUO infections by IgM- and IgG-capture ELISAs on paired serum samples and by DENV isolations, and subsequently graded as SDD, N-SDD or FUO patients. IN THIS STUDY: 1) Thirty-three patients had DENV infections, predominantly secondary DENV-2 infections, including each SDD (DHF/DSS) case; 2) Secondary DENV-2/-3 and DENV-2/-4 serotype co-infections however resulted in N-SDD; 3) Each patient who subsequently developed SDD, but none of the others, displayed three clinical criteria: abdominal pain, conjunctival injection and veni-puncture bleeding, therefore each of these criteria provided definitively significant prognostic (P < 0.001) values; 4) Petechia, positive tourniquet tests and hepatomegaly, and neutrophilia or leukopenia also significantly identified those who: a) subsequently developed SDD versus N-SDD, or had a FUO; b) subsequently developed SDD versus N-SDD; c) subsequently developed N-SDD versus FUOs, respectively. This is the first report of simple

  6. Immediate versus deferred empirical antifungal (IDEA) therapy in high-risk patients with febrile neutropenia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, G; Heinz, W J; Hertenstein, B; Horst, H-A; Requadt, C; Wagner, T; Cornely, O A; Löffler, J; Ruhnke, M

    2013-05-01

    Empirical antifungal therapy is widely used in high-risk neutropenic hematology patients with fever persisting for more than 4 days. This clinical trial assessed whether immediate empirical therapy with voriconazole could lower the rates of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) compared with this approach. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study, patients with acute leukemia undergoing chemotherapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients were randomized to broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy plus voriconazole (immediate) or placebo (deferred) after the onset of neutropenic fever. If fever persisted for 96 h, patients were switched to open-label intravenous voriconazole; oral treatment was permitted after 96 h. The primary endpoint was the rate of proven/probable IFIs between Days 2 and 28 after fever onset in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) complete-case population. One hundred and forty-seven patients were randomized to immediate (n = 81) or deferred (n = 66) voriconazole. In the mITT population, six patients in the immediate group and nine in the deferred group developed proven/probable IFI between Days 2 and 28 (p = 0.258). The safety profiles were similar in both groups. While immediate empirical therapy with voriconazole appears to be safe in febrile neutropenic high-risk patients, it was not associated with a significant reduction in IFIs compared with therapy deferred for 96 h after fever onset.

  7. Management of febrile neutropenia in solid organ malignancies following chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lakshmaiah, Kuntegowdanahalli C; Abhayakumar, S M; Shetty, Rachan; Loknath, D; Jayashree, R S; Govindbabu, K

    2014-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a medical emergency and it requires immediate hospitalization for evaluation and administration of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics. The present study was undertaken to analyze the infectious agents, choice of empiric antibiotics, and outcome in high-risk febrile neutropenia in the solid organ malignancies. In this study, 92 high risk febrile neutropenic episodes were analyzed in 72 patients with solid organ malignancies. We used cefoperazone-sulbactum as an initial empiric antibiotic. Piperacillin/tazobactum or carbapenems were added to the patients who did not respond to initial antibiotic. Among the 92 episodes treated, most patients received first-line chemotherapy for locally advanced disease. Microbes were isolated in 25% of febrile neutropenic episodes. Gram-negative organism (61.70%) constituted the most common isolates. The most common microbes identified were E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus in blood, Klebsiella pneumonia in sputum and E. coli in urine culture. Patients who had been treated with cefoperazone-sulbactum improved clinically in 70.6% of febrile neutropenic episodes. Second- line antibiotics (piperacillin-tazobactum with amikacin) were required in 24% episodes, while another 5.4% episodes required third-line antibiotics (carbapenems). In this study, mortality was seen in 12% of febrile neutropenic episodes. Staphylococcus aureus was 100% sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and vancomycin, whereas Gram-negative organisms were 100% sensitive to imepenem and meropenem. Cephaperazone-sulbactum is a reasonable initial choice for empirical therapy in high risk febrile neutropenic patients in solid organ malignancies.

  8. Association between adherence to an antimicrobial stewardship program and mortality among hospitalised cancer patients with febrile neutropaenia: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Regis G; Goldani, Luciano Z; dos Santos, Rodrigo P

    2014-05-23

    Initial management of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropaenia (FN) comprises empirical therapy with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial. Currently, there is sufficient evidence to indicate which antibiotic regimen should be administered initially. However, no randomized trial has evaluated whether adherence to an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) results in lower rates of mortality in this setting. The present study sought to assess the association between adherence to an ASP and mortality among hospitalised cancer patients with FN. We conducted a prospective cohort study in a single tertiary hospital from October 2009 to August 2011. All adult patients who were admitted to the haematology ward with cancer and FN were followed up for 28 days. ASP adherence to the initial antimicrobial prescription was determined. The mortality rates of patients who were treated with antibiotics according to the ASP protocol were compared with those of patients treated with other antibiotic regimens. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model and propensity score were used to estimate 28-day mortality risk. A total of 307 FN episodes in 169 subjects were evaluated. The rate of adherence to the ASP was 53%. In a Cox regression analysis, adjusted for propensity scores and other potential confounding factors, ASP adherence was independently associated with lower mortality (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.92). Antimicrobial selection is important for the initial management of patients with FN, and adherence to the ASP, which calls for the rational use of antibiotics, was associated with lower mortality rates in this setting.

  9. [Clinical and laboratory evolution of the febrile neutropenia episodes in pediatric patients hospitalized in a Colombian hospital in 2007-2009].

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Isabel C; Sánchez, Diana P; Espinal, David A; Garcés, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    Neutropenia is one of the most common complications in children with cancer, and it's the most important parameter to determine infection risk. In neutropenic patients the signs and symptoms could be scarce and in occasions fever could be the only symptom. For these reasons all patients with febrile neutropenia (FN) should be considered as if they had a possibly severe disease. To describe the clinical characteristics and laboratory parameters observed in cancer patients with FN attended at our hospital to perform a more rational management of this complication in the future. The clinical files accumulated during 36 months, belonging to patients aged 0 to 15 years that were hospitalized because of cancer and FN were reviewed. In this series the source of fever was found in 48.6% of 105 NF episodes, and bacteria were isolated from blood or urine culture in 38%. The most frequent bacterial species recovered were methicillin susceptible S. aureus (20.8%) and ESBL negative E. coli (20.8%). Piperacillin/tazobactam was the most used first line antibiotic prescribed (87.6%) and meropenem was the second choice (18%). Granulocyte colony stimulating factor was used in 61.9% of the cases and episodes mortality rate was 6.7%. Clinical characteristics and bacteriological findings in our institution do not differ significantly from what has been described for pediatric cancer patients in other series.

  10. Phase III placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial of pegfilgrastim to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Yoshimasa; Rai, Yoshiaki; Masuda, Norikazu; Takano, Toshimi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Seigo; Shimazaki, Ryutaro; Ito, Yoshinori; Tokuda, Yutaka; Tamura, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    Pegfilgrastim is a pegylated form of filgrastim, a recombinant protein of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, that is used to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN). Here, we report the results of a phase III trial of pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) chemotherapy. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial to determine the efficacy of pegfilgrastim in reducing the risk of FN in early-stage breast cancer patients. A total of 351 women (177 in the pegfilgrastim group and 174 in the placebo group) between 20 and 69 years of age with stage I-III invasive breast carcinoma who were to receive TC chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) as either neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy were enrolled; 346 of these patients were treated with either pegfilgrastim (n = 173) or placebo (n = 173). The incidence of FN was significantly lower in the pegfilgrastim group than in the placebo group (1.2 vs. 68.8 %, respectively; P < 0.001). In addition, patients in the pegfilgrastim group required less hospitalization and antibiotics for FN. Most adverse events were consistent with those expected for breast cancer subjects receiving TC chemotherapy. Pegfilgrastim is safe and significantly reduces the incidence of FN in breast cancer patients.

  11. Risk-stratification management of febrile neutropenia in pediatric hematology-oncology patients: Results of a French nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Delebarre, Mathilde; Tiphaine, Aude; Martinot, Alain; Dubos, François

    2016-12-01

    In 2012, new international guidelines for children with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) were issued, recommending reduced-intensity management strategy based on stratification of infectious risks. Some studies have highlighted practice disparities in different countries and within the same country. Our aim was to assess the current management strategies for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced FN in children in France. This survey of all French pediatric oncology-hematology reference centers (n = 30) in late 2012 and early 2013 sent a standardized questionnaire to each center inquiring about their definition of an FN episode, its initial empiric treatment and ongoing management, use of management stratified by risk, and any criteria used for the risk assessment. Each center's management protocol was also analyzed. All French reference centers participated in this survey, completing 88% of the questionnaire items. Definitions of both fever and neutropenia varied between centers. Ten centers used a risk-stratification strategy for initial management. In all, 42 probabilistic first-line antibiotic treatments were identified. After 48 hr of apyrexia, 17 units applied different forms of step-down therapy. Most French centers already offered some form of reduced-intensity or step-down therapy, although they differed substantially in their management of FN episodes. Risk stratification with validated tools is essential to facilitate the implementation of the international recommendations, which would ultimately help to standardize practices in France. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Quantitative and volume, conductivity and scatter changes in leucocytes of patients with acute undifferentiated febrile illness: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Varun; Ahmad, Sohaib; Shrivastava, Vikas; Mittal, Garima

    2016-05-01

    A single diagnostic test for acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFI) is elusive. This pilot study was undertaken on the premise that leucocytes, being the main cells of defence, undergo quantitative, structural and functional changes in AUFI. We evaluated the potential of volume, conductivity and scatter (VCS) parameters of leucocytes, generated with the haemogram report by the Coulter auto-analyzer, in differentiating the common etiologies of AUFI. The haematological and VCS data obtained from 800 controls and 200 cases of AUFI (50 cases each of acute malaria, dengue, scrub typhus and enteric fever) were retrieved for analysis. The cases and controls differed significantly with respect to relative numbers and the VCS parameters of neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes (p<0.05). The neutrophil and lymphocyte were significantly voluminous in acute malaria and scrub typhus as compared to dengue and enteric fevers (p<0.05). Enteric fever significantly enhanced the conductivity of neutrophils as compared to other subgroups while lymphocyte conductivity significantly differed from dengue and scrub typhus. Lymphocyte and neutrophil scatter values in malaria and scrub typhus were comparable but differed significantly from that in enteric fever. Etiology-specific changes occur in leucocytes, both in numbers and their VCS properties which can be identified without additional cost. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A study of febrile versus afebrile patients after percutaneous nephrolithotomy regarding bacterial etiologic factors through blood and urine cultures and 16S rRNA detection in serum.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Seyed Amirmohsen; Kazemi, Bahram; Moghaddam, Seyed Mohammadmehdi Hosseini; Arianpoor, Arian; Abdi, Hamidreza; Pakmanesh, Hamid; Iran Pour, Elham

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the types of bacteria raising body temperature after a percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We conducted a prospective study of 120 patients who underwent PCNL at Labbafinejad Medical Center between March and July 2006. Each patient had proven negative urine cultures preoperatively and received prophylactic antibiotics at the time of the procedure. Fever was defined as an oral temperature higher than 37.8 degrees C, and those patients with a body temperature lower than 37.8 degrees C were designated as the control group. The feverish patients were divided into two groups: The first group with a temperature below 38.5 degrees C, and the second group with a temperature of 38.5 degrees C or higher. Clinical and operative charts were reviewed to detect fever during the hospital stay. Three simultaneous laboratory tests, including postoperative urine cultures and blood cultures, plus postoperative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were carried out to determine the causative agents. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the PCR results. Also, this study demonstrated that positive PCR results (pathogen and nonpathogen species) were the same in febrile and afebrile groups. Considering our findings, we may conclude that the effects of the bacterial etiologies in post-PCNL fever are insignificant.

  14. High pentraxin 3 level predicts septic shock and bacteremia at the onset of febrile neutropenia after intensive chemotherapy of hematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Vänskä, Matti; Koivula, Irma; Hämäläinen, Sari; Pulkki, Kari; Nousiainen, Tapio; Jantunen, Esa; Juutilainen, Auni

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated pentraxin 3 as a marker for complications of neutropenic fever in 100 hematologic patients receiving intensive chemotherapy. Pentraxin 3 and C-reactive protein were measured at fever onset and then daily to day 3. Bacteremia was observed in 19 patients and septic shock in 5 patients (three deaths). In comparison to C-reactive protein, pentraxin 3 achieved its maximum more rapidly. Pentraxin 3 correlated not only with the same day C-reactive protein but also with the next day C-reactive protein. High pentraxin 3 on day 0 was associated with the development of septic shock (P=0.009) and bacteremia (P=0.046). The non-survivors had constantly high pentraxin 3 levels. To conclude, pentraxin 3 is an early predictor of complications in hematologic patients with neutropenic fever. High level of pentraxin 3 predicts septic shock and bacteremia already at the onset of febrile neutropenia. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00781040.) PMID:21880642

  15. Results of a prospective dose intensity and neutropenia prophylaxis evaluation programme (DIEPP) in cancer patients at risk of febrile neutropenia due to myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mądry, Radosław; Popławska, Lidia; Haslbauer, Ferdinand; Šafanda, Martin; Ghizdavescu, Doru; Benkovicova, Jana; Csőszi, Tibor; Mihaylov, Georgi; Niepel, Daniela; Jaeger, Christine; Frkanova, Iveta; Macovei, Alina; Staudigl, Christine

    2016-04-01

    To describe the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and use of pegfilgrastim in cancer patients with high overall risk of FN and to investigate the relationship between granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) guideline adherence and chemotherapy delivery in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and Austria. Dose Intensity Evaluation Program and Prophylaxis (DIEPP) was a multicentre, prospective, and observational study of adult patients with breast cancer, lymphoma, lung cancer, gastric cancer, and ovarian cancer, who received chemotherapy with pegfilgrastim support and who had an overall risk of FN ≥ 20 %. Physicians assessed patient risk factors and reported their reasons for administering pegfilgrastim. Patients were enrolled from 113 centres in CEE and Austria between August 2010 and July 2013, and data were analysed from 1072 patients. The most common tumour types were breast cancer (50 %) and lymphoma (24 %). FN incidence was 5 % overall. FN occurred in 3 % of patients (28/875) who received pegfilgrastim as primary prophylaxis (PP) and 13 % of patients (19/142) who received it as secondary prophylaxis (SP); 79 % of FN events in SP patients occurred in the first cycle before pegfilgrastim was administered. The three most frequently chosen reasons for using pegfilgrastim were planned chemotherapy with high FN risk, female gender, and advanced disease. Overall, 40 % of patients received > 90 % of their planned chemotherapy dose within 3 days of the planned schedule. FN incidence was relatively low with pegfilgrastim PP in patients with a physician-assessed overall FN risk of ≥ 20 %. The most important reasons for pegfilgrastim use were consistent with the investigators' risk assessment and international guidelines.

  16. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase ii study evaluating the reduction of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with colorectal cancer receiving pegfilgrastim with every-2-week chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hecht, J Randolph; Pillai, Madhavan; Gollard, Russell; Heim, William; Swan, Forrest; Patel, Ravi; Dreiling, Lyndah; Mo, May; Malik, Imtiaz

    2010-04-01

    Adding irinotecan and/or oxaliplatin to every-2-week 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (LV) prolongs survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) but increases neutropenia frequency. Pegfilgrastim is indicated to decrease infection as manifested by febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients receiving chemotherapy at > 14-day intervals. This randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study examined pegfilgrastim efficacy and safety in patients with CRC receiving every-2-week chemotherapy. Patients with CRC were randomized 1:1 to pegfilgrastim 6 mg or placebo administered per-cycle on day 4. Randomization was stratified by chemotherapy regimen (patients received every-2-week FOLFOX4 [5-FU/LV/oxaliplatin], FOLFIRI [5-FU/LV/irinotecan], or FOIL [5-FU/LV/oxaliplatin/irinotecan] at physician discretion). The primary endpoint was incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia. Secondary endpoints included incidence of grade 3/4 FN and adverse events. After 4 cycles of study treatment, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were followed for patients analyzed, 118 were in the placebo and 123 in the pegfilgrastim group. In the treatment period, the odds ratio for grade 3/4 neutropenia for pegfilgrastim versus placebo was 0.19 (95% CI, 0.10-0.37; P < .001); grade 3/4 FN incidence was also significantly lower in pegfilgrastim-treated patients (2%) compared with placebo-treated patients (8%; P = .04). Pegfilgrastim was well tolerated, with leukocyte counts remaining stable during cycles 2-4. In long-term follow-up, both treatment groups had similar PFS and OS. Pegfilgrastim was well tolerated in patients with CRC receiving every-2-week chemotherapy and significantly reduced neutropenia and FN compared with placebo, though FN was uncommon in both treatment groups. Results suggest that pegfilgrastim administration is feasible in CRC patients receiving every-2-week chemotherapy.

  17. Febrile Illness with Skin Rashes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Skin rashes that appear during febrile illnesses are in fact caused by various infectious diseases. Since infectious exanthematous diseases range from mild infections that disappear naturally to severe infectious diseases, focus on and basic knowledge of these diseases is very important. But, these include non-infectious diseases, so that comprehensive knowledge of these other diseases is required. Usually, early diagnostic testing for a febrile illness with a rash is inefficient. For clinical diagnosis of diseases accompanied by skin rash and fever, a complete history must be taken, including recent travel, contact with animals, medications, and exposure to forests and other natural environments. In addition, time of onset of symptoms and the characteristics of the rash itself (morphology, location, distribution) could be helpful in the clinical diagnosis. It is also critical to understand the patient's history of specific underlying diseases. However, diagnostic basic tests could be helpful in diagnosis if they are repeated and the clinical course is monitored. Generally, skin rashes are nonspecific and self-limited. Therefore, it could be clinically meaningful as a characteristic diagnostic finding in a very small subset of specific diseases. PMID:26483989

  18. Attitudes of physicians toward assessing risk and using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as primary prophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy associated with an intermediate risk of febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Freyer, Gilles; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Marinca, Mihai; Tonini, Giuseppe; Ng, Say Liang; Wong, Zee Wan; Salar, Antonio; Steger, Guenther; Abdelsalam, Mahmoud; DeCosta, Lucy; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-10-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) is a potentially fatal complication of chemotherapy. This prospective, observational study describes physicians' approaches toward assessing FN risk in patients receiving chemotherapy regimens with an intermediate (10-20 %) FN risk. In the baseline investigator assessment, physicians selected factors considered important when assessing overall FN risk and deciding on granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) primary prophylaxis (PP). Physicians then completed patient assessments using the same lists of factors. The final FN risk scores and whether G-CSF PP was planned were reported. The final analysis included 165 physicians and 944 patients. The most frequently considered factor in both assessments was chemotherapy agents in the backbone (88 % of investigator and 93 % of patient assessments). History of FN (83 %), baseline laboratory values (76 %) and age (73 %) were commonly selected at baseline, whereas tumor type (72 %), guidelines (62 %) and tumor stage (43 %) were selected most during patient assessments. Median investigator-reported FN risk threshold for G-CSF PP was 20 % (range 10-85 %). G-CSF PP was planned in 82 % of patients with an FN risk at or above this threshold; therefore, almost one-fifth of qualifying patients would not receive G-CSF PP. Physicians generally follow guidelines, but also consider individual patient characteristics when assessing FN risk and deciding on G-CSF PP. A standardized FN risk assessment may optimize the use of G-CSF PP, which may minimize the incidence of FN in patients undergoing chemotherapy with an intermediate FN risk. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01813721.

  19. Treatment of febrile geriatric patients with suspected urinary tract infections in a hospital with high rates of ESBL producing bacteria: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, Zvi; Cohen, Regev; Avdiaev, Ruslan; Froom, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the consequences of treating febrile geriatric patients with a suspected urinary tract infection (UTI) with antibiotics that have high resistance rates due primarily to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria. Methods In this cohort study, we selected 257 consecutive hospitalised patients aged ≥70 years with a chief symptom of fever, possibly due to a UTI and initially treated with antibiotics with rates in our hospital of urinary culture resistance >20%. Patients with severe sepsis were excluded. The main outcomes measures were in vitro bacterial resistance to initial antibiotic therapy (BRIAT), response to therapy, hospitalisation days and mortality. Results Urine cultures were positive in 64.2% (165 of 257) of the patients and BRIAT occurred in 28.0% (72 of 257). Response rates were 100% (93 of 93) in those with bacteria sensitive to initial antibiotic therapy, 95.7% (88 of 92) in the culture negative patients, and 66.7% (48 of 72) in those with BRIAT (p<0.001). There were no deaths due to deterioration during the initial treatment period because of BRIAT. In the patients with BRIAT, the median length of hospitalisation was 3 days longer than that in the other patients (7 and 4 days, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusions We conclude that initial broad spectrum antibiotic treatment could potentially lower the median length of hospitalisation by 3 days in many hospitalised geriatric patients without an extra-urinary tract source for their fever. This benefit needs to be balanced against the risk to the individual patient and to the general public of increasing bacterial resistance rates to broader spectrum antibiotics often held in reserve. PMID:27986743

  20. Zinc status in febrile seizure: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Mahzari, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    Febrile seizure is the most common type of seizure in children. Their incidence is 2-5%. There are different hypotheses about relationship between neurotransmitters and trace elements (such as zinc) and febrile seizure. Zinc, as a major element of some enzymes, plays an important role in the central nervous system (CNS) and can affect some inhibitory mechanisms of CNS. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there were any changes in serum zinc level in children with febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. This case-control study was performed on 100 patients aged 6 months to 6 years. This study was conducted between January and August 2012, on 50 children with febrile seizures (case) and 50 febrile children without seizures (control), that were referred to Amirkola Children Hospital (a referral hospital in the north of Iran). Two groups were matched for age and sex. The serum zinc levels in the both groups were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. The mean serum zinc level was 0.585±0.166 mg/L and 0.704±0.179 mg/L in the case group and the control group, respectively (p=0.001). The mean serum zinc level was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group compared to the control groups. Our findings revealed that serum zinc level was significantly lower in children with simple febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. It can emphasize the hypothesis that there is a relation between serum zinc level and febrile seizure in children.

  1. Febrile neutropenia and related complications in breast cancer patients receiving pegfilgrastim primary prophylaxis versus current practice neutropaenia management: results from an integrated analysis.

    PubMed

    von Minckwitz, G; Schwenkglenks, M; Skacel, T; Lyman, G H; Pousa, A Lopez; Bacon, P; Easton, V; Aapro, M S

    2009-03-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) reduce febrile neutropaenia (FN) incidence but may be used inconsistently in current practice (CP). This study compared the efficacy of pegfilgrastim primary prophylaxis (PPP) with CP neutropaenia management in breast cancer. Individual patient data (N=2282) from 11 clinical trials and observational studies using chemotherapy regimens with > or =15% FN risk and PPP (6 mg, all cycles) or CP (no G-CSF or any cycle G-CSF/pegfilgrastim) were included in an integrated analysis. Most patients received docetaxel-containing regimens. A generalised linear mixed model was fitted (N=2210). Neutropaenia prophylaxis (PPP versus CP), age and disease stage influenced the incidence of FN. Overall, FN was less frequent with PPP than with CP (odds ratio [OR]: 0.124; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.08, 0.194; P<0.0001). Odds for cycle 1 FN, dose reductions > or =15% and FN-related hospitalisation were also significantly lower with PPP. These data support PPP in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with moderately high/high FN risk.

  2. The cost of the inpatient management of febrile neutropenia in cancer patients--a micro-costing study in the Irish healthcare setting.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, C; Fogarty, E; Walsh, C; Dempsey, O; Barry, M; Kennedy, M J; McCullagh, L

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the resource use and cost of hospitalisation for febrile neutropenia (FN) from the health-payer's perspective. This was a single centre study. Adults undergoing chemotherapy, who were admitted for FN, were identified prospectively. Patient medical records were reviewed retrospectively. Demographics and resource utilisation data were obtained from a cohort of 32 patients (69% female, mean age = 58.8 years). Twenty-five per cent of patients had more than one FN episode. In total, 42 FN episodes were captured; 60% of episodes had occurred within the first two cycles of chemotherapy. The bootstrap estimation was used to determine mean hospital length of stay (LOS) with standard deviation (±SD) and mean costs ± SD. The mean LOS was 7.3 ± 0.5 days. The mean cost per FN episode was €8915 ± 718. The major cost driver was hospital bed-stay (mean cost of €6851 ± 549). Other cost drivers included antibacterial treatment at €760 ± 156, laboratory investigations at €538 ± 47 and the requirement for blood bank products at €525 ± 189. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation of the cost of chemotherapy induced FN within the context of the Irish healthcare setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of dengue and other etiologic agents among patients with acute febrile illness, Puerto Rico, 2012–2015

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Olga D.; Andújar-Pérez, Doris A.; Torres-Velásquez, Brenda C.; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge Luis; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Rivera, Aidsa; Gonzalez-Zeno, Gladys E.; Sharp, Tyler M.; Galloway, Renee L.; Glass Elrod, Mindy; Mathis, Demetrius L.; Oberste, M. Steven; Nix, W. Allan; Henderson, Elizabeth; McQuiston, Jennifer; Singleton, Joseph; Kato, Cecilia; García Gubern, Carlos; Santiago-Rivera, William; Cruz-Correa, Jesús; Muns-Sosa, Robert; Ortiz-Rivera, Juan D.; Jiménez, Gerson; Galarza, Ivonne E.; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Margolis, Harold S.; Alvarado, Luisa I.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying etiologies of acute febrile illnesses (AFI) is challenging due to non-specific presentation and limited availability of diagnostics. Prospective AFI studies provide a methodology to describe the syndrome by age and etiology, findings that can be used to develop case definitions and multiplexed diagnostics to optimize management. We conducted a 3-year prospective AFI study in Puerto Rico. Patients with fever ≤7 days were offered enrollment, and clinical data and specimens were collected at enrollment and upon discharge or follow-up. Blood and oro-nasopharyngeal specimens were tested by RT-PCR and immunodiagnostic methods for infection with dengue viruses (DENV) 1–4, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), influenza A and B viruses (FLU A/B), 12 other respiratory viruses (ORV), enterovirus, Leptospira spp., and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Clinical presentation and laboratory findings of participants infected with DENV were compared to those infected with CHIKV, FLU A/B, and ORV. Clinical predictors of laboratory-positive dengue compared to all other AFI etiologies were determined by age and day post-illness onset (DPO) at presentation. Of 8,996 participants enrolled from May 7, 2012 through May 6, 2015, more than half (54.8%, 4,930) had a pathogen detected. Pathogens most frequently detected were CHIKV (1,635, 18.2%), FLU A/B (1,074, 11.9%), DENV 1–4 (970, 10.8%), and ORV (904, 10.3%). Participants with DENV infection presented later and a higher proportion were hospitalized than those with other diagnoses (46.7% versus 27.3% with ORV, 18.8% with FLU A/B, and 11.2% with CHIKV). Predictors of dengue in participants presenting <3 DPO included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, headache, eye pain, nausea, and dizziness, while negative predictors were irritability and rhinorrhea. Predictors of dengue in participants presenting 3–5 DPO were leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, facial/neck erythema, nausea, eye pain, signs of poor circulation, and diarrhea; presence of

  4. Bloodstream infections in febrile neutropenic patients at a tertiary cancer institute in South India: A timeline of clinical and microbial trends through the years

    PubMed Central

    Babu, K Govind; Lokanatha, D.; Lakshmaiah, K. C.; Suresh Babu, M. C.; Jacob, Linu A.; Bhat, Gita R.; Vardhana, Harsha; Sinha, Mahua; Vijaykumar, B. R.; Sumati, B. G.; Jayshree, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Febrile neutropenia (FN) is an oncological emergency. The choice of empiric therapy depends on the locally prevalent pathogens and their sensitivities, the sites of infection, and cost. The Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines are being followed for the management of FN in India. Methods: This is a prospective observational study conducted at a tertiary care cancer centre from September 2012 to September 2014. Objectives: The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) To review the pattern of microbial flora, susceptibility pattern, and important clinical variables among bloodstream infections in febrile neutropenic patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies. (2) As per the institutional protocol to periodically review the antibiotic policy and susceptibility pattern, and compare the findings with an earlier study done in our institute in 2010. This was a prospective study conducted from September 2012 to September 2014. Results: About 379 episodes of FN were documented among 300 patients. About 887 blood cultures were drawn. Of these, 137 (15%) isolates were cultured. Isolates having identical antibiograms obtained from a single patient during the same hospitalization were considered as one. Hence, 128 isolates were analyzed. About 74 (58%) cultures yielded Gram-negative bacilli, 51 (40%) were positive for Gram-positive cocci, and 3 (2%) grew fungi. Among Gram-negative organisms, Escherichia coli followed by Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae accounted for 78% of the isolates. Among Gram-positive cocci, Staphylococcus species accounted for 84% of the isolates. We have noted a changing trend in the antibiotic sensitivity pattern over the years. Following the switch in empirical antibiotics, based on the results of the study done in 2010 (when the empirical antibiotics were ceftazidime + amikacin), the sensitivity to cefoperazone-sulbactam has plunged from about 80% to 60%%. Similar reduction in

  5. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of dengue and other etiologic agents among patients with acute febrile illness, Puerto Rico, 2012-2015.

    PubMed

    Tomashek, Kay M; Lorenzi, Olga D; Andújar-Pérez, Doris A; Torres-Velásquez, Brenda C; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge Luis; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Rivera, Aidsa; Gonzalez-Zeno, Gladys E; Sharp, Tyler M; Galloway, Renee L; Glass Elrod, Mindy; Mathis, Demetrius L; Oberste, M Steven; Nix, W Allan; Henderson, Elizabeth; McQuiston, Jennifer; Singleton, Joseph; Kato, Cecilia; García Gubern, Carlos; Santiago-Rivera, William; Cruz-Correa, Jesús; Muns-Sosa, Robert; Ortiz-Rivera, Juan D; Jiménez, Gerson; Galarza, Ivonne E; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Margolis, Harold S; Alvarado, Luisa I

    2017-09-01

    Identifying etiologies of acute febrile illnesses (AFI) is challenging due to non-specific presentation and limited availability of diagnostics. Prospective AFI studies provide a methodology to describe the syndrome by age and etiology, findings that can be used to develop case definitions and multiplexed diagnostics to optimize management. We conducted a 3-year prospective AFI study in Puerto Rico. Patients with fever ≤7 days were offered enrollment, and clinical data and specimens were collected at enrollment and upon discharge or follow-up. Blood and oro-nasopharyngeal specimens were tested by RT-PCR and immunodiagnostic methods for infection with dengue viruses (DENV) 1-4, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), influenza A and B viruses (FLU A/B), 12 other respiratory viruses (ORV), enterovirus, Leptospira spp., and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Clinical presentation and laboratory findings of participants infected with DENV were compared to those infected with CHIKV, FLU A/B, and ORV. Clinical predictors of laboratory-positive dengue compared to all other AFI etiologies were determined by age and day post-illness onset (DPO) at presentation. Of 8,996 participants enrolled from May 7, 2012 through May 6, 2015, more than half (54.8%, 4,930) had a pathogen detected. Pathogens most frequently detected were CHIKV (1,635, 18.2%), FLU A/B (1,074, 11.9%), DENV 1-4 (970, 10.8%), and ORV (904, 10.3%). Participants with DENV infection presented later and a higher proportion were hospitalized than those with other diagnoses (46.7% versus 27.3% with ORV, 18.8% with FLU A/B, and 11.2% with CHIKV). Predictors of dengue in participants presenting <3 DPO included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, headache, eye pain, nausea, and dizziness, while negative predictors were irritability and rhinorrhea. Predictors of dengue in participants presenting 3-5 DPO were leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, facial/neck erythema, nausea, eye pain, signs of poor circulation, and diarrhea; presence of rhinorrhea

  6. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Céline M; Brewster, Amy L; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Baram, Tallie Z

    2007-10-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This review builds on recent advances derived from animal models and summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying febrile seizures and of changes in neuronal gene expression and function that facilitate the enduring effects of prolonged febrile seizures on neuronal and network excitability. The review also discusses the relevance of these findings to the general mechanisms of epileptogenesis during development and points out gaps in our knowledge, including the relationship of animal models to human febrile seizures and epilepsy.

  7. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Céline M.; Brewster, Amy L.; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2009-01-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This review builds on recent advances derived from animal models and summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying febrile seizures and of changes in neuronal gene expression and function that facilitate the enduring effects of prolonged febrile seizures on neuronal and network excitability. The review also discusses the relevance of these findings to the general mechanisms of epileptogenesis during development and points out gaps in our knowledge, including the relationship of animal models to human febrile seizures and epilepsy. PMID:17897728

  8. Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000223.htm Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor To use the ... enable JavaScript. Your child has had a febrile seizure. A simple febrile seizure stops by itself within ...

  9. Early Changes of Mannose-Binding Lectin, H-Ficolin, and Procalcitonin in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Işlak Mutcalı, Sibel; Saltoğlu, Neşe; Balkan, İlker İnanç; Özaras, Reşat; Yemişen, Mücahit; Tabak, Fehmi; Mert, Ali; Öztürk, Recep; Öngören, Şeniz; Başlar, Zafer; Aydın, Yıldız; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-12-01

    The significance of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and H-ficolin deficiency in febrile neutropenic (FN) patients and the correlation of these markers along with consecutive C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels during the infectious process are investigated. Patients with any hematological malignancies who were defined to have "microbiologically confirmed infection", "clinically documented infection", or "fever of unknown origin" were included in this single-center prospective observational study. Serum levels of CRP, PCT, MBL, and H-ficolin were determined on 3 separate occasions: at baseline (between hospital admission and chemotherapy), at the onset of fever, and at the 72nd hour of fever. Forty-six patients (54% male, mean age 41.7 years) with 61 separate episodes of FN were evaluated. Eleven patients (23.9%) had "microbiologically confirmed infection", 17 (37%) had "clinically documented infection", and 18 (39.1%) had "fever of unknown origin". Fourteen (30.4%) patients had low (<500 ng/mL) initial MBL levels and 7 (15.21%) had low (<12,000 ng/mL) H-ficolin levels. Baseline MBL and H-ficolin levels did not significantly change on the first and third days of fever (p=0.076). Gram-negative bacteremia more frequently occurred in those with low initial MBL levels (p=0.006). PCT levels were significantly higher in those with microbiologically documented infections. Mean and median PCT levels were significantly higher in cases with bacteremia. There was no significant difference between hemoculture-positive and-negative patients in terms of CRP levels. Monitoring serum H-ficolin levels was shown to be of no benefit in terms of predicting severe infection. Low baseline MBL levels were correlated with high risk of gram-negative bacteremia; however, no significant correlation was shown in the follow-up. Close monitoring of PCT levels is warranted to provide more accurate and specific data while monitoring cases of bacteremia.

  10. Association between adherence to an antimicrobial stewardship program and mortality among hospitalised cancer patients with febrile neutropaenia: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Initial management of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropaenia (FN) comprises empirical therapy with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial. Currently, there is sufficient evidence to indicate which antibiotic regimen should be administered initially. However, no randomized trial has evaluated whether adherence to an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) results in lower rates of mortality in this setting. The present study sought to assess the association between adherence to an ASP and mortality among hospitalised cancer patients with FN. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in a single tertiary hospital from October 2009 to August 2011. All adult patients who were admitted to the haematology ward with cancer and FN were followed up for 28 days. ASP adherence to the initial antimicrobial prescription was determined. The mortality rates of patients who were treated with antibiotics according to the ASP protocol were compared with those of patients treated with other antibiotic regimens. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model and propensity score were used to estimate 28-day mortality risk. Results A total of 307 FN episodes in 169 subjects were evaluated. The rate of adherence to the ASP was 53%. In a Cox regression analysis, adjusted for propensity scores and other potential confounding factors, ASP adherence was independently associated with lower mortality (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.14–0.92). Conclusions Antimicrobial selection is important for the initial management of patients with FN, and adherence to the ASP, which calls for the rational use of antibiotics, was associated with lower mortality rates in this setting. PMID:24884397

  11. Management of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in pediatric oncology patients: A North American survey of pediatric hematology/oncology and pediatric infectious disease physicians.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Rochelle R; Egan-Sherry, Dana; Gill, Jonathan B; Roth, Michael E

    2017-07-27

    Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) is traditionally managed with hospital admission for parenteral antibiotics until neutropenia resolves. Recent studies have explored risk stratification and the safety of managing "low-risk" patients as outpatients. Few studies have directly assessed pediatric provider preferences for managing FN. We conducted a survey of practicing US and Canadian pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) and pediatric infectious disease (PID) physicians to assess their FN management preferences using case scenarios with varying risk profiles. Twenty-one percent (n = 186) of PHO and 32% (n = 123) of PID physicians completed the survey. Overall, both groups of providers agreed regarding which patients with FN could be managed outpatient. For a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving maintenance chemotherapy with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 400 cells/μl, 35% (n = 66) of PHO and 49% (n = 60) of PID physicians would consider outpatient management (P = 0.02). Of those physicians selecting inpatient management, 41% (n = 49) of PHO and 52% (n = 33) of PID physicians would be willing to discharge the patient without an increase in ANC, if afebrile with a negative blood culture (P = 0.16). For a similar patient with an ANC of 100 cells/μl, only 23% (n = 35) of PHO and 42% (n = 39) of PID physicians would consider discharge without an increase in ANC (P = 0.002). Despite the lack of established guidelines for low-risk pediatric FN, a significant proportion of North American physicians report willingness to modify traditional management. This reinforces the need for evidence-based low-risk criteria and outpatient management guidelines to optimize consistency of care for these patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Primary granulocyte colony-stimulating factor prophylaxis during the first two cycles only or throughout all chemotherapy cycles in patients with breast cancer at risk for febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Maureen J; Peters, Frank P; Mandigers, Caroline M; Dercksen, M Wouter; Stouthard, Jacqueline M; Nortier, Hans J; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W; van Warmerdam, Laurence J; van de Wouw, Agnes J; Jacobs, Esther M; Mattijssen, Vera; van der Rijt, Carin C; Smilde, Tineke J; van der Velden, Annette W; Temizkan, Mehmet; Batman, Erdogan; Muller, Erik W; van Gastel, Saskia M; Borm, George F; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2013-12-01

    Early breast cancer is commonly treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. However, combining these drugs increases the risk of myelotoxicity and may require granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support. The highest incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and largest benefit of G-CSF during the first cycles of chemotherapy lead to questions about the effectiveness of continued use of G-CSF throughout later cycles of chemotherapy. In a multicenter study, patients with breast cancer who were considered fit enough to receive 3-weekly polychemotherapy, but also had > 20% risk for FN, were randomly assigned to primary G-CSF prophylaxis during the first two chemotherapy cycles only (experimental arm) or to primary G-CSF prophylaxis throughout all chemotherapy cycles (standard arm). The noninferiority hypothesis was that the incidence of FN would be maximally 7.5% higher in the experimental compared with the standard arm. After inclusion of 167 eligible patients, the independent data monitoring committee advised premature study closure. Of 84 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF throughout all chemotherapy cycles, eight (10%) experienced an episode of FN. In contrast, of 83 patients randomly assigned to G-CSF during the first two cycles only, 30 (36%) had an FN episode (95% CI, 0.13 to 0.54), with a peak incidence of 24% in the third cycle (ie, first cycle without G-CSF prophylaxis). In patients with early breast cancer at high risk for FN, continued use of primary G-CSF prophylaxis during all chemotherapy cycles is of clinical relevance and thus cannot be abandoned.

  13. Retrospective survey and evaluation of first-line antibiotics for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mukoyama, Naoki; Nakashima, Marie; Miyamura, Koichi; Yoshimi, Akira; Noda, Yukihiro; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients with acute leukemia are susceptible to chemotherapy-induced severe myelosuppression, and therefore are at a high risk for febrile neutropenia (FN). In such cases, the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics such as fourth-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems is recommended as first-line antimicrobial treatment; however, the effectiveness of these agents in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been investigated in detail. We retrospectively examined and evaluated the effectiveness of first-line antibiotic treatment regimens for chemotherapy-induced FN in patients with AML in Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital. The evaluated first-line treatment regimens were as follows: cefozopran (CZOP) + amikacin (AMK) in 38 cases, cefepime (CFPM) alone in 2 cases, CFPM + AMK in 2 cases, piperacillin (PIPC) + AMK in 2 cases, and CZOP alone in 1 case. Additionally, prophylactic antifungal agents were administered in all cases. Markedly effective, effective, moderately effective, and ineffective responses occurred in 31.1%, 8.9%, 8.9%, and 51.1%, respectively, of the treated cases. The response rate, defined as the combination of markedly effective and effective outcomes, was 40.0%. In 11 cases, impairment of renal functions were observed, and they were associated with combination treatments including AMK; nine of these were associated with a glycopeptide. The combination of CZOP with AMK (84.4%) was the most commonly used first-line treatment for FN in patients with AML; carbapenem or tazobactam/PIPC has never been used for treatment of such cases. Our findings demonstrate that fourth-generation cephems will be an effective first-line treatment for FN in patients with AML in our hospital. PMID:28303057

  14. Association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Valia; Vargiami, Euthymia; Kontopoulos, Eleutherios; Kardaras, Panagiotis; Economou, Marina; Athanassiou-Mataxa, Miranta; Kirkham, Fenella; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between iron status and febrile seizures has been examined in various settings, mainly in the Developing World, with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to investigate any association between iron deficiency and febrile seizures (FS) in European children aged 6-60 months. Prospective, case-control study. Greek population in Thessaloniki. 50 patients with febrile seizures (cases) and 50 controls (children presenting with fever, without seizures). None. Haematologic parameters (haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, red cell distribution width), plasma iron, total iron-binding capacity, plasma ferritin, transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptors were compared in cases and controls. Plasma ferritin was lower (median [range]: 42.8 (3-285.7) vs 58.3 (21.4-195.3 ng/ml; p = 0.02) and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) higher (mean [Standard Deviation] 267 [58.9] vs 243 [58.45] μg/dl, p = 0.04) in cases than in controls. Results were similar for 12 complex FS cases (ferritin 30 (3-121 vs 89 (41.8-141.5ng/lL; TIBC 292.92 [68.0] vs 232.08 [36.27] μg/dL). Iron deficiency, defined as ferritin <30 ng/ml, was more frequent in cases (24%) than controls (4%; p = 0.004). Ferritin was lower and TIBC higher in 18 with previous seizures than in 32 with a first seizure although haemoglobin and mean cell haemoglobin concentration were higher. European children with febrile seizures have lower Ferritin than those with fever alone, and iron deficiency, but not anaemia, is associated with recurrence. Iron status screening should be considered as routine for children presenting with or at high risk for febrile seizures. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Febrile neutropenia in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal; Tüysüz, Gülen; Çelik, Nigar; Yantri, Leman; Erginöz, Ethem; Apak, Hilmi; Özkan, Alp; Yıldız, İnci; Celkan, Tiraje

    2016-01-01

    Aim: An important life-threatening complication of intensive chemotherapy administered in children with leukemia is febrile neutropenia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and consequences of febrile neutropenia attacks in children who were treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Material and Methods: Nighty-six children who received chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in our center between January 1995 and December 2010 were included in the study. The data related to demographic characteristics, treatment features, relapse and febrile neutropenia incidences, risk factors, culture results and prognosis were retrospectively evaluated from the patients’ files. Results: A total of two hundred-ninety nine febrile neutropenia attacks observed in the patients during initial treatment and relapse treatment were evaluated. When the incidence of febrile neutropenia was evaluated by years, it was observed that the patients treated after year 2000 had statistically significantly more febrile neutopenia attacks compared to the patients treated before year 2000. When the incidences of febrile neutropenia during initial treatment and during relapse treatment were compared, it was observed that more febrile neutropenia attacks occured during relapse treatment. Fifty-nine percent of all febrile neutropenia attacks were fever of unknown origin. Eighty microorganisms grew in cultures during febrile neutropenia throughout treatment in 75 patients; 86% were bacterial infections (50% gram positive and 50% gram negative), 8% were viral infections and 6% were fungal infections. Coagulase negative staphylococcus (n=17) was the most frequent gram positive pathogen; E. Coli (n=17) was the most commonly grown gram negative pathogen. Conclusions: In this study, it was found that an increase in the incidence of febrile neutropenia occured in years. Increments in treatment intensities increase the incidence of febrile neutropenia while improving

  16. Hodgkin's disease presenting as a cholestatic febrile illness: incidence and main characteristics in a series of 421 patients.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, F; Briones, J; Bruguera, M; Font, C; Grau, J M; Rozman, C; Montserrat, E

    1996-06-01

    In order to determine the frequency and characteristics of patients with liver abnormalities as the presenting manifestation of Hodgkin's disease (HD), 421 consecutive HD patients were studied. Six patients in the series (1.4%) presented with liver abnormalities that led to of a liver biopsy and the subsequent diagnosis of HD. All had fever prior to HD diagnosis, four frank jaundice, and one hepatic failure. No patient had pruritus. Moderate hepatomegaly was present in four patients. Cholestasis was observed in all cases; in most patients a moderate increase in the transaminase activity was also seen. Two patients had a mild rise in the serum LDH, four had leukopenia, and one eosinophilia. At liver histologic study, Reed-Sternberg cells were demonstrated in four patients; in the remaining two, the presence of atypical histiocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils was highly suggestive of HD, the latter diagnosis being confirmed by subsequent study of bone marrow and/or retroperitoneal lymphadenopathies. In three of the six patients, HD was not demonstrated in sites other than the liver. Three patients older than 60 years died shortly after HD diagnosis. By contrast, three patients younger than 40 years showed a dramatic response to chemotherapy: two of them had a further relapse, and one is considered cured after 14 years of continuous remission. Liver disease constitutes an infrequent form of HD presentation which must be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient with fever of unknown origin.

  17. HIV/AIDS Patients’ Medical and Psychosocial Needs in the Era of HAART: A Cross-sectional Study among HIV/AIDS Patients Receiving HAART in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Shi, Yun; Jiang, Chengqin; Detels, Roger; Wu, Di

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the launch of China’s Free Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Program in 2002, more than 100,000 HIV/AIDS patients have been treated with highly actively antiretroviral therapy (HAART). However, the current evaluation system for this program mainly focused on its medical outcomes. This study aims to evaluate the medical and psychosocial needs of HIV/AIDS patients after initiating HAART. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 499 HIV/AIDS patients who were currently being treated with HAART in three designated hospitals in Luxi City, Yunnan Province. A questionnaire was used to collect information about participants’ demographic characteristics, perceived HIV-related stigma, physician-patient relationship, quality of life, family functioning, etc. Patients’ medical records in the National HIV Information System were linked with their questionnaire by their ART identification number. Results Patients on HAART who were infected with HIV through injection drug use and were current smokers typically had poorer physical health than other participants on HAART. Better financial status and better physician-patient relationship were associated with both physical and psychological well-being. Family awareness of the patient’s HIV status was negatively associated with the patient’s psychological well-being. Higher levels of perceived HIV-related stigma were associated with poorer psychological health and poorer family functioning. Conclusion This study emphasizes the importance of assuring a caring environment in China’s AIDS treatment program and re-enforces the need to combat the stigma encountered with health providers and the public. PMID:23061980

  18. Epilepsy in children with a history of febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun Ha; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Febrile seizure, the most common type of pediatric convulsive disorder, is a benign seizure syndrome distinct from epilepsy. However, as epilepsy is also common during childhood, we aimed to identify the prognostic factors that can predict epilepsy in children with febrile seizures Methods The study comprised 249 children at the Korea University Ansan Hospital who presented with febrile seizures. The relationship between the subsequent occurrence of epilepsy and clinical factors including seizure and fever-related variables were analyzed by multivariate analysis. Results Twenty-five patients (10.0%) had additional afebrile seizures later and were diagnosed with epilepsy. The subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in patients with a history of febrile seizures was associated with a seizure frequency of more than 10 times during the first 2 years after seizure onset (P<0.001). Factors that were associated with subsequent occurrence of epilepsy were developmental delay (P<0.001), preterm birth (P=0.001), multiple seizures during a febrile seizure attack (P=0.005), and epileptiform discharges on electroencephalography (EEG) (P=0.008). Other factors such as the age at onset of first seizure, seizure duration, and family history of epilepsy were not associated with subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in this study. Conclusion Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. However, careful observation is needed, particularly for prediction of subsequent epileptic episodes in patients with frequent febrile seizures with known risk factors, such as developmental delay, history of preterm birth, several attacks during a febrile episode, and epileptiform discharges on EEG. PMID:26958066

  19. [An unusual cause of febrile neutropenia: brucellosis].

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Soner; Asma, Süheyl; Ozdoğu, Hakan; Yeral, Mahmut; Turunç, Tuba

    2014-10-01

    Febrile neutropenia which is a common complication of cancer treatment, is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Several gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria are responsible for infections in neutropenic patients, however the most common microorganisms are Escherichia coli and coagulase-negative staphylococci, in decreasing order. Although Brucella spp. infections are endemic in Turkey, brucellosis-related febrile neutropenia has only rarely been reported. In this report, a case of brucellosis-related febrile neutropenia in a patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was presented. A 56-year-old male patient presenting with fever, petechiae/purpura, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and anemia was admitted to our hospital. Laboratory studies revealed a hemoglobin level of 8.27 g/dl, leukocyte count of 77.100 k/ml, absolute neutrophil count of 200 k/ml, and platelets at 94.200 k/ml. The patient was diagnosed as AML-M1 and piperacillin/tazobactam was started as the first-line antibiotic therapy due to the febrile neutropenia. On admission, blood and urine cultures were negative. Once the fever was controlled, remission/induction chemotherapy was initiated. However, fever developed again on the eight day, and vancomycin was added to the therapy. Since the fever persisted, the antibiotic therapy was gradually replaced with meropenem and linezolid. However, fever continued and the patient's general condition deteriorated. Subsequently performed Brucella tube agglutination test revealed positivity at 1/320 titer and the microorganism grown in blood culture (Bactec 9050; BD, USA) was identified as B.melitensis by conventional methods. Rifampicin and doxycycline therapy was started immediately, however, the patient died due to septic shock. If the tests for brucellosis were performed earlier when response to second step antibiotic therapy lacked in this patient, it was assumed that mortality could be prevented by the prompt initiation of the

  20. Pegfilgrastim in primary prophylaxis of febrile neutropenia following frontline bendamustine plus rituximab treatment in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a single center, real-life experience.

    PubMed

    Cerchione, Claudio; De Renzo, Amalia; Di Perna, Maria; Della Pepa, Roberta; Pugliese, Novella; Catalano, Lucio; Pane, Fabrizio; Picardi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    In this prospective study, the impact of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-2 CSF) administered during induction treatment with bendamustine plus rituximab for indolent non- Hodgkin Llymphoma (NHL) was evaluated by comparing patients who received secondary prophylaxis with filgrastim (control group) versus. patients who received pegfilgrastim as primary prophylaxis (peg-group). The primary endpoint was the incidence rate of febrile neutropenia (FN)- related chemotherapy disruptions (regarding dose-dense and/or dose-intensity of schedule). The Ssecondary endpoint included days of hospitalization due to FN, and G-CSF-related side effects (grade ≥3 WHO toxicity criteria) in each group. One hundred twenty-two: 122 consecutive patients, with untreated indolent NHL, were referred to our outpatient unit for remission induction immuno-chemotherapy with bendamustine-rituximab. During the first period, 61 patients received secondary prophylaxis with filgrastim, given "on demand" if ANC was <1000/mm3. During the second period, 61 patients received primary prophylaxis with pegfilgrastim in a single administration. Pegfilgrastim was significantly associated with fewer incidence rate of FN-related chemotherapy disruptions (11.4% in the control group vs. 1.6% in the peg-group, p = 0.04) and fewer days of hospitalization due to FN (median number 18 days in the control group vs. 6 in the peg-group, p = 0.04). In terms of G-CSF-related extra-hematological grade III side effects, no significant difference has been found in the two groups (9.8% in the control group vs. 11.5% in the peg-group, p = 0.77). Only one patient stopped the treatment in the peg-group due to intolerance. In patients with indolent NHL, in front-line treatment with bendamustine plus rituximab, primary prophylaxis with pegfilgrastim seems to reduce the incidence of chemotherapy disruptions due to FN, and the days of hospitalization. Moreover, it is well- tolerated and may increase the opportunity to

  1. Comparative field performance and adherence to test results of four malaria rapid diagnostic tests among febrile patients more than five years of age in Blantyre, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Malaria rapid diagnostics tests (RDTs) can increase availability of laboratory-based diagnosis and improve the overall management of febrile patients in malaria endemic areas. In preparation to scale-up RDTs in health facilities in Malawi, an evaluation of four RDTs to help guide national-level decision-making was conducted. Methods A cross sectional study of four histidine rich-protein-type-2- (HRP2) based RDTs at four health centres in Blantyre, Malawi, was undertaken to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of RDTs, assess prescriber adherence to RDT test results and explore operational issues regarding RDT implementation. Three RDTs were evaluated in only one health centre each and one RDT was evaluated in two health centres. Light microscopy in a reference laboratory was used as the gold standard. Results A total of 2,576 patients were included in the analysis. All of the RDTs tested had relatively high sensitivity for detecting any parasitaemia [Bioline SD (97%), First response malaria (92%), Paracheck (91%), ICT diagnostics (90%)], but low specificity [Bioline SD (39%), First response malaria (42%), Paracheck (68%), ICT diagnostics (54%)]. Specificity was significantly lower in patients who self-treated with an anti-malarial in the previous two weeks (odds ratio (OR) 0.5; p-value < 0.001), patients 5-15 years old versus patients > 15 years old (OR 0.4, p-value < 0.001) and when the RDT was performed by a community health worker versus a laboratory technician (OR 0.4; p-value < 0.001). Health workers correctly prescribed anti-malarials for patients with positive RDT results, but ignored negative RDT results with 58% of patients with a negative RDT result treated with an anti-malarial. Conclusions The results of this evaluation, combined with other published data and global recommendations, have been used to select RDTs for national scale-up. In addition, the study identified some key issues that need to be further delineated: the low field

  2. Febrile urinary tract infections: pyelonephritis and urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Holleman, Frits; Geerlings, Suzanne E

    2016-02-01

    Complicated infections of the urinary tract (UTI) including pyelonephritis and urosepsis are also called febrile UTI. This review describes insights from the literature on this topic since July 2014. Recent studies regarding risk factors and consequences of febrile UTI confirmed existing knowledge. It remains difficult to obtain insight into the epidemiology of febrile UTI because urine and blood cultures are frequently missing. The relationship between host and virulence factors of Escherichia coli was further explored showing that less virulent strains can cause infection in immunocompromised patients. In contrast to obstructive uropathy, diabetes, and being older, neutropenia was not a risk factor for lower UTI or urosepsis. A randomized controlled trial revealed that ceftolozane-tazobactam was marginally superior to levofloxacin as treatment for complicated UTI. Case series supported the notion that xanthogranulomatous and emphysematous pyelonephritis are more common in diabetic patients and that drainage or surgery is often required. Neutropenia was not a risk factor for lower UTI or urosepsis. When local resistance percentages to the frequently prescribed fluoroquinolones are high, the combination of ceftolozane-tazobactam may be an alternative as treatment for complicated UTI. Xanthogranulomatous and emphysematous pyelonephritis need to be considered in diabetic patients presenting with UTI symptoms.

  3. Comparative levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor, procalcitonin, osteoprotegerin, interleukin-8, hs-C reactive protein, D-dimer in febrile neutropenia, newly diagnosed cancer patients, and infectious fever.

    PubMed

    Bilgir, Oktay; Bilgir, Ferda; Kebapcilar, Levent; Bozkaya, Giray; Çalan, Mehmet; Kırbıyık, Halil; Avci, Meltem; Sari, İsmail; Yuksel, Arif; Isikyakar, Tolgay

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the levels of procalcitonin (PCT), IL-8 (interleukin-8), MIF (macrophage migration inhibitory factor), osteoprotegerin (OPG), hs-CRP and D-dimer during fever above 38.3°C due to various causes. Blood samples taken from a total of consecutive 65 hospitalized patients during fever were prospectively tested for hsCRP, PCT, IL-8, OPG, MIF and D-dimer. Of these patients, there were 26 patients presenting with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia who had no infectious agents found; 23 patients, who had a malignancy with a febrile episode which was neither a microbiologically documented infection nor a chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, and 16 patients who did not have a malignancy and were considered to have a clinically and microbiologically documented infection. IL-8 and D-dimer levels were higher in patients with febrile neutropenia than in the other two groups. Although MIF and OPG were higher in patients with newly diagnosed cancers, there were no differences among the three groups regarding PCT and hs-CRP values. High serum IL-8 and D-dimer levels can be useful markers to identify hospitalized chemotherapy-induced neutropenia patients. MIF and OPG were found to be higher in patients with newly diagnosed cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral versus intravenous antibiotics in treatment of paediatric febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Vedi, Aditi; Cohn, Richard

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether, in low-risk febrile neutropenic paediatric populations, oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous antibiotics in obtaining resolution of the febrile neutropenic episode. A comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL identified prospective, randomised controlled trials comparing oral antibiotics with intravenous antibiotics in the treatment of febrile neutropenic episodes in low-risk paediatric oncology patients. Outcomes assessed were mortality, rate of treatment failure, length of the febrile neutropenic episode and adverse events. The random effects model was used to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data and mean difference with standard deviation for continuous data. Seven trials were included in the overall analysis, which included 934 episodes of febrile neutropenia in 676 patients aged between 9 months and 20 years. The overall treatment failure rates were not significantly different between oral and intravenous antibiotics (RR: 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.78-1.32, P= 0.91). In carefully selected low-risk febrile neutropenic children, empiric treatment with oral antibiotics is a safe and effective alternative to intravenous antibiotics as they lower the cost of treatment as well as psychosocial burden on these children and their families. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. "Simple febrile seizures plus (SFS+)": more than one febrile seizure within 24 hours is usually okay.

    PubMed

    Grill, Marie F; Ng, Yu-Tze

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether children with recurrent febrile seizures within a 24-hour period need to be worked up differently from children with simple febrile seizures. Inclusion criteria included the following: (i) children with first seizure cluster between 4 months and 3 years of age, (ii) children who had more than one febrile seizure within 24 hours, and (iii) children who returned to baseline between and after each event. Thirty-two patients met the inclusion criteria over a 3-year period. All patients underwent brain CT and/or MRI and EEG. All head CTs were normal. Two children had abnormal MRI findings - both benign: one is thought to represent postictal changes, and the other one is an incidental arachnoid cyst. Of the 4 abnormal EEGs, one showed epileptiform discharges, while the others showed generalized ictal or postictal features. We propose the term "simple febrile seizures plus (SFS+)" to describe children who have more than one seizure within 24 hours but who are otherwise not different in presentation from children with SFS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. History of chronic comorbidity and risk of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in cancer patients not receiving G-CSF prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Chao, C; Page, J H; Yang, S-J; Rodriguez, R; Huynh, J; Chia, V M

    2014-09-01

    Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) is a clinically important complication that affects patient outcome by delaying chemotherapy doses or reducing dose intensity. Risk of FN depends on chemotherapy- and patient-level factors. We sought to determine the effects of chronic comorbidities on risk of FN. We conducted a cohort study to examine the association between a variety of chronic comorbidities and risk of FN in patients diagnosed with six types of cancer (non-Hodgkin lymphoma and breast, colorectal, lung, ovary, and gastric cancer) from 2000 to 2009 who were treated with chemotherapy at Kaiser Permanente Southern California, a large managed care organization. We excluded those patients who received primary prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. History of comorbidities and FN events were identified using electronic medical records. Cox models adjusting for propensity score, stratified by cancer type, were used to determine the association between comorbid conditions and FN. Models that additionally adjusted for cancer stage, baseline neutrophil count, chemotherapy regimen, and dose reduction were also evaluated. A total of 19 160 patients with mean age of 60 years were included; 963 (5.0%) developed FN in the first chemotherapy cycle. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.30 (1.07-1.57)], congestive heart failure [HR = 1.43 (1.00-1.98)], HIV infection [HR = 3.40 (1.90-5.63)], autoimmune disease [HR = 2.01 (1.10-3.33)], peptic ulcer disease [HR = 1.57 (1.05-2.26)], renal disease [HR = 1.60 (1.21-2.09)], and thyroid disorder [HR = 1.32 (1.06-1.64)] were all associated with a significantly increased FN risk. These results provide evidence that history of several chronic comorbidities increases risk of FN, which should be considered when managing patients during chemotherapy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For

  7. Early Changes of Mannose-Binding Lectin, H-Ficolin, and Procalcitonin in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Işlak Mutcal, Sibel; Saltoğlu, Neşe; Balkan, İlker İnanç; Özaras, Reşat; Yemişen, Mücahit; Mete, Bilgül; Tabak, Fehmi; Mert, Ali; Öztürk, Recep; Öngören, Şeniz; Başlar, Zafer; Aydın, Yıldız; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The significance of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and H-ficolin deficiency in febrile neutropenic (FN) patients and the correlation of these markers along with consecutive C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels during the infectious process are investigated. Materials and Methods: Patients with any hematological malignancies who were defined to have “microbiologically confirmed infection”, “clinically documented infection”, or “fever of unknown origin” were included in this single-center prospective observational study. Serum levels of CRP, PCT, MBL, and H-ficolin were determined on 3 separate occasions: at baseline (between hospital admission and chemotherapy), at the onset of fever, and at the 72nd hour of fever. Results: Forty-six patients (54% male, mean age 41.7 years) with 61 separate episodes of FN were evaluated. Eleven patients (23.9%) had “microbiologically confirmed infection”, 17 (37%) had “clinically documented infection”, and 18 (39.1%) had “fever of unknown origin”. Fourteen (30.4%) patients had low (<500 ng/mL) initial MBL levels and 7 (15.21%) had low (<12,000 ng/mL) H-ficolin levels. Baseline MBL and H-ficolin levels did not significantly change on the first and third days of fever (p=0.076). Gram-negative bacteremia more frequently occurred in those with low initial MBL levels (p=0.006). PCT levels were significantly higher in those with microbiologically documented infections. Mean and median PCT levels were significantly higher in cases with bacteremia. There was no significant difference between hemoculture-positive and-negative patients in terms of CRP levels. Conclusion: Monitoring serum H-ficolin levels was shown to be of no benefit in terms of predicting severe infection. Low baseline MBL levels were correlated with high risk of gram-negative bacteremia; however, no significant correlation was shown in the follow-up. Close monitoring of PCT levels is warranted to provide more accurate and

  8. Antibiotics in 30 minutes or less for febrile neutropenic patients: a quality control measure in a new hospital.

    PubMed

    Corey, Amy L; Snyder, Stacy

    2008-01-01

    Infections are the most common complication in patients receiving treatment for cancer with neutropenia being the primary risk factor for the development of an infection. In the neutropenic patient, bacteremia remains a significant cause of mortality. Although the literature reports that prompt empiric antibiotic therapy to prevent death caused by virulent organisms is the standard of care, the literature fails to identify what prompt antibiotic administration means. Door/fever-to-patient antibiotic delivery was evaluated as a quality control measure in a new children's hospital. Initially, door/fever-to-patient time was significantly delayed. Collaboration between pharmacy, hospital bed control, medical, and nursing staff resulted in many changes in practice by all groups. As a result, the goal for prompt antibiotic delivery of thirty minutes or less is now achievable.

  9. Role of Biomarkers as Predictors of Infection and Death in Neutropenic Febrile Patients after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Massaro, Karin; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2015-01-01

    An ideal marker in the neutropenic population after HSCT is the one which positivetes at the onset of fever, or at most up to 24 hours after its onset, the patients at potential risk for infection due to bacterial and fungi and mortality. Several biomarkers have been used in HSCT patients in the last decade. However, it seems that C-RP and Il-6 are the most useful markers to early detected infection and risk for death PMID:26543528

  10. Antimicrobial-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in febrile neutropenic patients with cancer: current epidemiology and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Trecarichi, Enrico M; Tumbarello, Mario

    2014-04-01

    In the recent years, several studies involving cancer patients have demonstrated a clear trend in the epidemiology of bacterial infections showing a shift in the prevalence from Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria and the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains among Gram-negatives isolated from the blood. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the recent trends in epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negatives recovered from neutropenic cancer patients, with particular emphasis on the impact of antimicrobial resistance on the clinical outcome of severe infections caused by such microorganisms. Overall, from 2007 to date, the rate of Gram-negative bacteria recovery ranged from 24.7 to 75.8% (mean 51.3%) in cancer patient cohorts. Escherichia coli represented the most common species (mean frequency of isolation 32.1%) among the Gram-negatives, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mean frequency of isolation 20.1%). An increasing frequency of Acinetobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was also reported. Increased rates of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative strains have been highlighted among Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenting Gram-negative rods, despite discontinuation of fluoroquinolone-based antibacterial prophylaxis for neutropenic patients. In addition, antimicrobial resistance and/or the inadequacy of empirical antibiotic treatment have been frequently linked to a worse outcome in cancer patients with bloodstream infections caused by Gram-negative isolates. Sound knowledge of the local distribution of pathogens and their susceptibility patterns and prompt initiation of effective antimicrobial treatment for severe infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria are essential in cancer patients.

  11. Multiplex PCR assay underreports true bloodstream infections with coagulase-negative staphylococci in hematological patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Reers, Yvonne; Idelevich, Evgeny A; Pätkau, Hanna; Sauerland, Maria Cristina; Tafelski, Sascha; Nachtigall, Irit; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Peters, Georg; Silling, Gerda; Becker, Karsten

    2016-08-01

    SeptiFast multiplex PCR assay was evaluated for detecting true bloodstream infections (BSIs) with coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in neutropenic hematological patients. Sensitivity for samples representing true CoNS-BSIs was 23.3% with an integrated cutoff and increased to 83.3% if the cutoff was neglected. Hence, the cutoff may prohibit timely targeted antimicrobial therapy.

  12. Primary vs secondary prophylaxis with pegfilgrastim for the reduction of febrile neutropenia risk in patients receiving chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: cost-effectiveness analyses.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gregory; Barron, Richard; Fust, Kelly; Skornicki, Michelle E; Taylor, Douglas C A; Weinstein, Milton C; Lyman, Gary H

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate the cost-effectiveness of primary vs secondary prophylaxis (PP vs SP) with pegfilgrastim to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy from a US payer perspective. A Markov model was used to compare PP vs SP with pegfilgrastim in a cohort of patients receiving six cycles of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisone (CHOP) or CHOP plus rituximab (CHOP-R) chemotherapy. Model inputs, including efficacy of pegfilgrastim in reducing risk of FN and costs, were estimated from publicly available sources and peer-reviewed publications. Incremental cost-effectiveness was evaluated in terms of net cost per life-year saved (LYS), per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained, and per FN event avoided over a lifetime horizon. Deterministic and probabilistic analyses were performed to assess sensitivity and robustness of results. Lifetime costs for PP were $5000 greater than for SP; however, PP was associated with fewer FN events and more LYs and QALYs gained vs SP. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for PP vs SP for CHOP were $13,400 per FN event avoided, $29,500 per QALY gained, and $25,800 per LYS. CHOP-R results were similar ($15,000 per FN event avoided, $33,000 per QALY gained, and $28,900 per LYS). Results were most sensitive to baseline FN risk, cost per FN episode, and odds ratio for reduced relative dose intensity due to prior FN event. PP was cost-effective vs SP in 85% of simulations at a $50,000 per QALY threshold. In the absence of NHL-specific data, estimates for pegfilgrastim efficacy and relative risk reduction of FN were based on available data for neoadjuvant TAC in patients with breast cancer. Baseline risks of FN for CHOP and CHOP-R were assumed to be equivalent. PP with pegfilgrastim is cost-effective compared to SP with pegfilgrastim in NHL patients receiving CHOP or CHOP-R.

  13. Multi-method assessment of patients with febrile illness reveals over-diagnosis of malaria in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Ria R; Thurber, Mary I; El Bakry, Azza; Chapman, Colin A; Goldberg, Tony L

    2016-09-07

    Health clinics in rural Africa are typically resource-limited. As a result, many patients presenting with fever are treated with anti-malarial drugs based only on clinical presentation. This is a considerable issue in Uganda, where malaria is routinely over-diagnosed and over-treated, constituting a wastage of resources and an elevated risk of mortality in wrongly diagnosed patients. However, rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria are increasingly being used in health facilities. Being fast, easy and inexpensive, RDTs offer the opportunity for feasible diagnostic capacity in resource-limited areas. This study evaluated the rate of malaria misdiagnosis and the accuracy of RDTs in rural Uganda, where presumptive diagnosis still predominates. Specifically, the diagnostic accuracy of "gold standard" methods, microscopy and PCR, were compared to the most feasible method, RDTs. Patients presenting with fever at one of two health clinics in the Kabarole District of Uganda were enrolled in this study. Blood was collected by finger prick and used to administer RDTs, make blood smears for microscopy, and blot Whatman FTA cards for DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, and sequencing. The accuracy of RDTs and microscopy were assessed relative to PCR, considered the new standard of malaria diagnosis. A total of 78 patients were enrolled, and 31 were diagnosed with Plasmodium infection by at least one method. Comparing diagnostic pairs determined that RDTs and microscopy performed similarly, being 92.6 and 92.0 % sensitive and 95.5 and 94.4 % specific, respectively. Combining both methods resulted in a sensitivity of 96.0 % and specificity of 100 %. However, both RDTs and microscopy missed one case of non-falciparum malaria (Plasmodium malariae) that was identified and characterized by PCR and sequencing. In total, based on PCR, 62.0 % of patients would have been misdiagnosed with malaria if symptomatic diagnosis was used. Results suggest that

  14. Molecular Characterization and Viral Origin of the 2015 Dengue Outbreak in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujiao; Li, Lihua; Ma, Dehong; Luo, Jia; Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaodan; Pan, Yue; Chen, Junying; Xi, Juemin; Yang, Jiajia; Qiu, Lijuan; Bai, Chunhai; Jiang, Liming; Shan, Xiyun; Sun, Qiangming

    2016-01-01

    A total of 1067 serum samples were collected from febrile patients in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, 2015. Of these, 852 cases were confirmed to be dengue NS1-positive. 76 structural protein genes were sequenced through RT-PCR based on the viral RNAs extracted from serum samples. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all strains were classified as cosmopolitan genotype of DENV-2. After comparing with the DENV-2SS, 173 base substitutions were found in 76 sequences, resulting in 43 nonsynonymous mutations, of which 22 mutations existed among all samples. According to secondary structure prediction, 8 new possible nucelotide/protein binding sites were found and another 4 sites were lost among the 775 amino acids of DENV structural proteins as compared with DENV-2SS. Meanwhile, 6 distinct amino acid changes were found in the helix and strand regions, and the distribution of the exposed and buried regions was slightly altered. The results indicated that the epidemic dengue strains of Xishuangbanna in 2015 are most similar to the Indian strain in 2001 and the Sri Lankan strain in 2004. Moreover, it also show a very strong similarity to the epidemic strains of Fujian province in 1999 and 2010, which show that there is an internal recycling epidemic trend of DENV in China. PMID:27681163

  15. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Prophylaxis Treatment Strategies to Reduce the Incidence of Febrile Neutropenia in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fust, Kelly; Li, Xiaoyan; Maschio, Michael; Villa, Guillermo; Parthan, Anju; Barron, Richard; Weinstein, Milton C; Somers, Luc; Hoefkens, Caroline; Lyman, Gary H

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of no prophylaxis, primary prophylaxis (PP), or secondary prophylaxis (SP) with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs), i.e., pegfilgrastim, lipegfilgrastim, filgrastim (6- and 11-day), or lenograstim (6- and 11-day), to reduce the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with stage II breast cancer receiving TC (docetaxel, cyclophosphamide) and in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) receiving R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) over a lifetime horizon from a Belgian payer perspective. A Markov cycle tree tracked FN events during chemotherapy (3-week cycles) and long-term survival (1-year cycles). Model inputs, including the efficacy of each strategy, risk of reduced relative dose intensity (RDI), and the impact of RDI on mortality, utilities, and costs (in €; 2014 values) were estimated from public sources and the published literature. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were assessed for each strategy for costs per FN event avoided, life-year (LY) saved, and quality-adjusted LY (QALY) saved. LYs and QALYs saved were discounted at 1.5% annually. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (DSAs and PSAs) were conducted. Base-case ICERs for PP with pegfilgrastim relative to SP with pegfilgrastim were €15,500 per QALY and €14,800 per LY saved for stage II breast cancer and €7800 per QALY and €6900 per LY saved for NHL; other comparators were either more expensive and less effective than PP or SP with pegfilgrastim or had lower costs but higher ICERs (relative to SP with pegfilgrastim) than PP with pegfilgrastim. Results of the DSA for breast cancer and NHL comparing PP and SP with pegfilgrastim indicate that the model results were most sensitive to the cycle 1 risk of FN, the proportion of FN events requiring hospitalization, the relative risk of FN in cycles ≥2 versus cycle 1, no history of FN, and the

  16. Febrile illness in healthcare workers caring for Ebola virus disease patients in a high-resource setting.

    PubMed

    Fink, Douglas; Cropley, Ian; Jacobs, Michael; Mepham, Stephen

    2017-01-26

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) patients treated in high-resource facilities are cared for by large numbers of healthcare staff. Monitoring these healthcare workers (HCWs) for any illness that may represent transmission of Ebola virus is important both for the individuals and to minimise the community risk. International policies for monitoring HCWs vary considerably and their effectiveness is unknown. Here we describe the United Kingdom (UK) experience of illness in HCWs who cared for three patients who acquired EVD in West Africa. Five of these 93 high-level isolation unit (HLIU) HCWs presented with fever within 21 days of working on the unit; one of these five presented outside of the UK. This article discusses different approaches to monitoring of HCW symptom reporting. The potential impact of these approaches on HLIU staff recruitment, including travel restrictions, is also considered. An international surveillance system enhancing collaboration between national public health authorities may assist HLIU HCW monitoring in case they travel. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  17. Febrile Seizures: Four Steps Algorithmic Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common form of convulsive phenomena in human being and affect 2% to 14% of children. It is the most common type of seizures that every pediatrician is dealing with. It is the most benign type of all seizures occurring in childhood. There are many debates on how to approach to febrile seizures in pediatric neurology and there are many possible malpractices in this field. Some of the most common frequent queries areHow could we differentiate FS from seizures and fever associated with serious infections involving the central nervous system?When should we refer the affected child for further investigations such as lumbar puncture, EEG, neuroimaging, and routine biochemical studies?How should we treat FS in its acute phase?How could we assess the risk for further recurrences as well as other risks threatening the child's health in future?How could we select the patients for treatment or prophylaxis?Which medication(s) should be selected for treatment or prophylaxis? Trying to answer the above-mentioned questions, this review article will present a four steps algorithmic clinical approach model to a child with febrile seizures based on the current medical literature. PMID:23056677

  18. Performance of Serum Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Invasive Aspergillosis in Febrile, Neutropenic Patients: A Multi-State Model

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzinger, Michaël; Sagaon-Teyssier, Luis; Cabaret, Odile; Bretagne, Stéphane; Cordonnier, Catherine; Pautas, Cécile; Maury, Sébastien; Hicheri, Yosr; Botterel, Françoise; Foulet, Francoise; Vekhoff, Anne; Chaoui, Driss; Cornet, Muriel; Agnamey, Patrice; Farhat, Hassan; Castaigne, Sylvie; Eloy, Odile; Suarez, Felipe; Buzyn, Agnès; Delarue, Richard; Challier, Svetlana; Dhedin, Nathalie; Aljijakli, Ahmad; Delabesse, Emmanuelle; Datry, Annick; Isnard, Françoise; Fouillard, Loic; Poirot, Jean-Yves; Meliani, Leila; Adès, Lionel; Bouges-Michel, Claire; Deniau, Michèle; Kuhnowski, Frédérique; Dreyfus, François; Paugam, André; Baixench, Marie-Thérèse; Leclercq, Roland; Reman, Oumady; Duhamel, Chantal; Bourrhis, Jean-Henri; Chehata, Sami; Chachati, Isabelle; Foissaud, Vincent; Macnab, Christine; Tilly, Hervé; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Gray, Christian; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Lacroix, Claire; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Bendavid, Eran; Farley, Brandon J

    2013-01-01

    Background The performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis expectedly depends on the timing of test results relative to the empirical administration of antifungal therapy during neutropenia, although a dynamic evaluation framework is lacking. Methods We developed a multi-state model describing simultaneously the likelihood of empirical antifungal therapy and the risk of invasive aspergillosis during neutropenia. We evaluated whether the first positive test result with a biomarker is an independent predictor of invasive aspergillosis when both diagnostic information used to treat and risk factors of developing invasive aspergillosis are taken into account over time. We applied the multi-state model to a homogeneous cohort of 185 high-risk patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Patients were prospectively screened for galactomannan antigenemia twice a week for immediate treatment decision; 2,214 serum samples were collected on the same days and blindly assessed for (1->3)- β-D-glucan antigenemia and a quantitative PCR assay targeting a mitochondrial locus. Results The usual evaluation framework of biomarker performance was unable to distinguish clinical benefits of β-glucan or PCR assays. The multi-state model evidenced that the risk of invasive aspergillosis is a complex time function of neutropenia duration and risk management. The quantitative PCR assay accelerated the early detection of invasive aspergillosis (P = .010), independently of other diagnostic information used to treat, while β-glucan assay did not (P = .53). Conclusions The performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis is better apprehended by the evaluation of time-varying predictors in a multi-state model. Our results provide strong rationale for prospective studies testing a preemptive antifungal therapy, guided by clinical, radiological, and bi-weekly blood screening with galactomannan antigenemia and a

  19. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Moghnieh, Rima; Estaitieh, Nour; Mugharbil, Anas; Jisr, Tamima; Abdallah, Dania I; Ziade, Fouad; Sinno, Loubna; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO)-associated bacteremia. This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012. It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR) and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP), and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN). GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias). Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms) and Klebsiella pneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms) were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS) bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p < 0.05). Our findings have major

  20. Association between iron deficiency anemia and febrile seizure in children.

    PubMed

    Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Abaskhanian, Ali; Alimohammadi, Hosein; ModanlooKordi, Mona

    2012-08-01

    Febrile convulsion (FC) is a common cause of seizure in young children, with an excellent prognosis. In addition to genetic predisposition, FCs are generally thought to be induced by elemental changes such as iron deficiency. Regarding the high prevalence of febrile seizure and iron deficiency anemia in children, the aim was to investigate the role of iron deficiency anemia in FC patients. This case-control study was performed in 500 children with febrile seizures (case) and 500 febrile children without seizures (control), referred to Mofid hospital in Tehran during one year (Nov 2009-Nov 2010). All children were aged between 6-60 months. The groups were matched in age and gender and use of supplemental iron. Laboratory tests consisted of Complete Blood Count (CBC). Serum iron, plasma ferritin and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) analyses were done in each patient. The patients and controls were 26.49+12.65 and 26.84+11.70 months of mean age, respectively. The amount of Hb, Hct, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RBC count, serum iron and plasma ferritin were significantly higher and TIBC was significantly lower among the cases with febrile convulsion than the controls. The incidence of iron deficiency anemia was significantly higher in controls compared with the cases (p less than 0.016). The mean of temperature peak on admission was significantly higher in the febrile convulsion group than controls. The results of this study suggest that the risk of febrile seizure occurrence in anemic children is less common as compared to non-anemic ones.

  1. A clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety of cefepime monotherapy versus piperacillin-tazobactam in patients of paediatric age group with febrile neutropenia in a tertiary care centre of north India.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Mohammad; Abrol, Pankaj; Sharma, Deepak; Punia, Harish

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate clinically the efficacy and safety in northern India of cefepime monotherapy versus piperacillin-tazobactam in patients of paediatric age group with febrile neutropenia. Children aged ≤18 years admitted febrile with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia were randomised into two groups comprising 20 cases in each group viz. CEF (receiving cefepime only) and PIP-TAZO (receiving piperacillin-tazobactam). Based on clinical and laboratory tests, patients were classified into: microbiologically documented infections (MDI); clinically documented infections (CDI); and unexplained fever (UF). They were assessed for clinical signs and symptoms as well as laboratory parameters at the time of enrolment and subsequently on days 3 and 7. Incidence of MDI, CDI and UF were 22.5%, 47.5% and 30%, respectively. The mean duration of neutropenia (in days) was 5.45 ± 2.1 in the PIP-TAZO group and 5.5 ± 1.5 in the CEF group (P = 0.305). The success rate defined as clearing infection effectively and improvement of neutropenia was comparable (P = 0.705). There was a mortality rate of 20% in the PIP-TAZO group as compared to 10% in the CEF group. We conclude that cefepime monotherapy and piperacillin-tazobactam are equally efficacious and safe in treating patients with febrile neutropenia. Empirical monotherapy with cefepime would prevent an unnecessary extra economic burden as well as avoiding the serious adverse or toxic effects of multi-drug regimes, especially in low- and middle-income countries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Mass screening of suspected febrile patients with remote-sensing infrared thermography: alarm temperature and optimal distance.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Fu; Lin, Po-Wei; Lin, Li-Fong; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chien, Ching-Wen; Chu, Shu-Fen; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2008-12-01

    Detection of fever has become an essential step in identifying patients who may have severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or avian influenza. This study evaluated infrared thermography (IRT) and compared the influence of different imagers, ambient temperature discrepancy, and the distance between the subject and imager. IRT-digital infrared thermal imaging (IRT-DITI), thermoguard, and ear drum IRT were used for visitors to Municipal Wang Fang Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. The McNemar and Chi-squared test, standard Pearson correlation, ANOVA, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis were used to calculate the alarm temperature for each imager. A total of 1032 subjects were recruited. Different distances and ambient temperature discrepancy had a significant influence on thermoguard, and lateral and frontal view DITI. By ICC analysis, a significant difference was found at 10 m distance between ear drum IRT and thermoguard (r = 0.45), lateral view DITI (r = 0.37), and frontal view DITI (r = 0.44). With ROC analysis, the optimal preset cut-off temperatures for the different imagers were: 36.05 degrees C for thermoguard (area under the curve [AUC], 0.716), 36.25 degrees C for lateral view DITI (AUC, 0.801), and 36.25 degrees C for frontal view DITI (AUC, 0.812). The temperature readings obtained by IRT may be used as a proxy for core temperature. An effective IRT system with a strict operating protocol can be rapidly implemented at the entrance of a hospital during SARS or avian influenza epidemics.

  3. The assessment of risk factors for febrile seizures in children.

    PubMed

    Gontko-Romanowska, Krystyna; Żaba, Zbigniew; Panieński, Paweł; Steinborn, Barbara; Szemień, Michał; Łukasik-Głębocka, Magdalena; Ratajczak, Krystian; Chrobak, Adrian; Mitkowska, Joanna; Górny, Jacek

    2017-07-31

    The aim of the paper was to assess the risk factors of febrile seizures in children. The paper presents an analysis of a group of 176 children aged 6 months to 5 years who were admitted to A&E because of febrile seizures. The analysed group of 176 children comprised 61.96% boys and 38.07% girls, and the average age equalled 23 months. Family history was significant in 9.66% of patients. A statistically significant difference was noticed between insignificant family history and the incidence of febrile seizures. In all the studied groups of children the factor that determined the incidence of febrile seizures was a sudden increase in the body temperature with an infection of the upper respiratory tract of several day's duration as another cause. Febrile seizure incident was most frequently associated with a sudden increase in the body temperature in 53.40% children. A statistically significant difference was observed between persisting fever and an increase thereof during the day. Yet another factor predisposing for febrile seizures incidence was an infection of the upper respiratory system that could be observed in 32.95% patients. The mean body temperature when the seizures occurred was 38.9°C. A sudden increase in the body temperature within the first day of pyrexia predisposes for the incidence of febrile seizures and it was proved that it depends on how long fever persists during the day. The other factor triggering the seizures was an infection of the upper respiratory tract of several days' duration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  4. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    PubMed Central

    ESMAILI GOURABI, Hamed; BIDABADI, Elham; CHERAGHALIPOUR, Fatemeh; AARABI, Yasaman; SALAMAT, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Because of geographical and periodical variation, we prompted to determine the demographic features and causative factors for febrile seizure in Rasht. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all 6–month- to 6-year-old children with the diagnosis of febrile seizure admitted to 17 Shahrivar hospital in Rasht, from August, 2009 to August, 2010 were studied. Age, sex, family history of the disease, seizure types, body temperature upon admission and infectious causes of the fever were recorded. All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software, version 16. Results Of the 214 children (mean age, 25.24±15.40 months), 124 were boys and 109 had a positive family history. Complex seizures were seen in 39 cases. In patients with a complex febrile seizure, 59% had the repetitive type, 20.5% had the focal type and 20.5% had more than 15 minutes duration of seizures. Most of the repetitive seizures (78.3%) occurred in patients under 2 years old; the difference between under and over 2-year-old patients was statistically significant. Study results did not show significant differences between the two genders for simple or complex seizures. The mean body temperature upon admission was 38.2±1.32◦C (38.31±0.82 degrees in boys and 38.04±1.78 in girls). Upper respiratory infections were seen in most patients (74.29%). All cases of lower respiratory infections were boys. There was a statistically significant difference between boys and girls in causes of fever. Conclusion Most of the children had a positive family history and the most common causative factor was upper respiratory infection. PMID:24665278

  5. Treatment of Febrile Neutropenia and Prophylaxis in Hematologic Malignancies: A Critical Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Villafuerte-Gutierrez, Paola; Villalon, Lucia; Losa, Juan E.; Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is one of the most serious complications in patients with haematological malignancies and chemotherapy. A prompt identification of infection and empirical antibiotic therapy can prolong survival. This paper reviews the guidelines about febrile neutropenia in the setting of hematologic malignancies, providing an overview of the definition of fever and neutropenia, and categories of risk assessment, management of infections, and prophylaxis. PMID:25525436

  6. Treatment of febrile neutropenia and prophylaxis in hematologic malignancies: a critical review and update.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte-Gutierrez, Paola; Villalon, Lucia; Losa, Juan E; Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is one of the most serious complications in patients with haematological malignancies and chemotherapy. A prompt identification of infection and empirical antibiotic therapy can prolong survival. This paper reviews the guidelines about febrile neutropenia in the setting of hematologic malignancies, providing an overview of the definition of fever and neutropenia, and categories of risk assessment, management of infections, and prophylaxis.

  7. Febrile status epilepticus due to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Uda, Kazuhiro; Kitazawa, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Febrile status epilepticus can have neurological sequelae. The type of sequelae, however, depend on the etiology, including infection due to viral agents such as the influenza virus. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in childhood may also contribute to this. The aim of this study was therefore to characterize febrile status epilepticus associated with RSV infection, and to determine whether this type of infection is a risk factor for neurological sequelae in febrile status epilepticus. We reviewed the medical records of children aged ≤3 years with febrile status epilepticus who were admitted to a tertiary hospital between January 2007 and December 2011. The differences between the RSV-positive and RSV-negative groups were evaluated according to the demographic and clinical data. A total of 99 patients with febrile status epilepticus who had been tested for RSV infection were identified. Three patients in the RSV-positive group (n = 19) and four in the RSV-negative group (n = 80) presented with bronchiolitis. The incidence of intubation and anti-seizure drug treatment in the RSV-positive group was significantly higher than in the -negative group. While all of the patients in the RSV-negative group recovered completely, six patients in the RSV-positive group developed encephalopathy and profound neurological sequelae. In five of the six patients, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed subcortical white matter lesions. RSV infection in the absence of bronchiolitis can initially present as febrile status epilepticus and subsequently develop into acute encephalopathy with profound neurological sequelae. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Cerebral Abscess Presenting as a Complex Febrile Seizure.

    PubMed

    Anand, Anjoli; Salas, Alicia; Mahl, Evan; Levine, Marla C

    2015-07-01

    Currently, there is no standardized approach to the management of complex febrile seizures in children and there are no published practice guidelines for the procurement of neuroimaging. Presented is a 2-year-old female patient who experienced a 3- to 5-minute episode of staring and unilateral mouth twitching associated with high fever. On initial presentation, the patient appeared well and had a normal neurological examination. No focus of infection was identified, and she was diagnosed with complex febrile seizure. The patient was discharged home with close neurology and primary care follow-up but returned the following day with altered mental status, toxic appearance, and right lower extremity weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed left-sided cranial empyema and the patient was managed with antibiotics and surgical drainage. A literature review to answer the question "Do children with complex febrile seizures require emergent neuroimaging?" yielded a small number of retrospective reviews describing the utility of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture in the work-up of febrile seizures. Current evidence indicates that neuroimaging is not indicated in an otherwise healthy child who presents with complex febrile seizure if the patient is well appearing and has no evidence of focal neurological deficit on examination. As this case demonstrates, however, serious conditions such as meningitis and brain abscess (though rare) should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complex febrile seizure and physicians should remain aware that the need for neuroimaging and/or lumbar puncture may arise in the appropriate clinical setting.

  9. Tick-borne febrile illnesses lacking specific symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stoecker, William V; Calcara, David A; Malters, Joseph M; Clonts, Monica; Everett, E Dale

    2009-01-01

    We report here one case of tularemia, one case of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, and one case of febrile illness most consistent with tularemia with titers suggestive of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in residents of three south-central Missouri counties. All three cases had with nonspecific symptoms of a febrile illness. All three patients had a history of a tick bite, common in south-central Missouri, but only two patients reported the tick bite when first seen. In these three cases, the severity of the illness provided a clue that led to a diagnosis of tick-borne febrile illnesses by confirmatory serology in two cases. It is very important that physicians be aware of these diseases in the spring and summer months.

  10. Utility of Procalcitonin (PCT) and Mid regional pro-Adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) in risk stratification of critically ill febrile patients in Emergency Department (ED). A comparison with APACHE II score

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value of MR-proADM and PCT levels in febrile patients in the ED in comparison with a disease severity index score, the APACHE II score. We also evaluated the ability of MR-proADM and PCT to predict hospitalization. Methods This was an observational, multicentric study. We enrolled 128 patients referred to the ED with high fever and a suspicion of severe infection such as sepsis, lower respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, soft tissue infections, central nervous system infections, or osteomyelitis. The APACHE II score was calculated for each patient. Results MR-proADM median values in controls were 0.5 nmol/l as compared with 0.85 nmol/l in patients (P < 0.0001), while PCT values in controls were 0.06 ng/ml versus 0.56 ng/ml in patients (P < 0.0001). In all patients there was a statistically significant stepwise increase in MR-proADM levels in accordance with PCT values (P < 0.0001). MR-proADM and PCT levels were significantly increased in accordance with the Apache II quartiles (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0012 respectively). In the respiratory infections, urinary infections, and sepsis-septic shock groups we found a correlation between the Apache II and MR-proADM respectively and MR-proADM and PCT respectively. We evaluated the ability of MR-proADM and PCT to predict hospitalization in patients admitted to our emergency departments complaining of fever. MR-proADM alone had an AUC of 0.694, while PCT alone had an AUC of 0.763. The combined use of PCT and MR-proADM instead showed an AUC of 0.79. Conclusions The present study highlights the way in which MR-proADM and PCT may be helpful to the febrile patient’s care in the ED. Our data support the prognostic role of MR-proADM and PCT in that setting, as demonstrated by the correlation with the APACHE II score. The combined use of the two biomarkers can predict a subsequent

  11. Recent Research on Febrile Seizures: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Syndi Seinfeld, DO; Pellock, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. They are the most common cause of seizures in children less than five years of age. There are two categories of febrile seizures, simple and complex. Both the International League against Epilepsy and the National Institute of Health has published definitions on the classification of febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizures are mostly benign, but a prolonged (complex) febrile seizure can have long term consequences. Most children who have a febrile seizure have normal health and development after the event, but there is recent evidence that suggests a small subset of children that present with seizures and fever may have recurrent seizure or develop epilepsy. This review will give an overview of the definition of febrile seizures, epidemiology, evaluation, treatment, outcomes and recent research. PMID:25383238

  12. Recognition memory is impaired in children after prolonged febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal injury may be evident in human children after prolonged febrile seizures. The current study addressed this question by investigating memory abilities in 26 children soon after a prolonged febrile seizure (median: 37.5 days) and compared their results to those of 37 normally developing children. Fifteen patients were reassessed at a mean of 12.5 months after their first assessment to determine the transiency of any observed effects. We used the visual paired comparison task to test memory abilities in our group, as this task does not depend on verbal abilities and also because successful performance on the task has been proven to depend on the presence of functional hippocampi. Our findings show that patients perform as well as controls in the absence of a delay between the learning phase and the memory test, suggesting that both groups are able to form representations of the presented stimulus. However, after a 5-min delay, patients’ recognition memory is not different from chance, and comparison of patients and controls points to an accelerated forgetting rate in the prolonged febrile seizure group. The patients’ performance was not related to the time elapsed from the acute event or the duration of the prolonged febrile seizure, suggesting that the observed effect is not a by-product of the seizure itself or a delayed effect of medication administered to terminate the seizure. By contrast, performance was related to hippocampal size; participants with the smallest mean hippocampal volumes revealed the biggest drop in performance from the immediate to the delayed paradigm. At follow-up, children were still showing

  13. [Febrile neutropenia at the emergency department of a cancer hospital].

    PubMed

    Debey, C; Meert, A-P; Berghmans, T; Thomas, J M; Sculier, J P

    2011-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is an important cause of fever in the cancer patient. When he/she is undergoing chemotherapy, the priority is to exclude that complication because it requires rapid administration of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics. We have studied the rate and characteristics of febrile neutropenia in cancer patients consulting in a emergency department. We have conducted a retrospective study in the emergency department of a cancer hospital over the year 2008. Every patient with cancer and fever > or = 38 degrees C was included. Over 2.130 consultations, 408 were selected (313 patients) including 21.6% (88) for febrile neutropenia. A focal symptom or physical sign was present in the majority of the cases. 88% were assessed as low risk for severe complications and about half of them received oral antibiotics. There were only a few patients with a nude fever for which it was difficult to make a hypothetical diagnosis in order to administer a probabilistic treatment. The majority of the consultations lead to hospital admission. Over the 80 hospitalisations, 6 deaths occurred. There was no death among the patients who remained ambulatory. In conclusion, our study shows that febrile neutropenia is frequent in ambulatory cancer patients presenting with fever and that in the majority of the cases, it is associated with a low risk. In such a situation, ambulatory management is more and more often considered or, at least, a rapid discharge after a short admission in case of low risk febrile neutropenia. In that context, the role of the general practioner has to be emphasised and to facilitate the outpatient management, we propose an algorithm that requires validation.

  14. Serum vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine levels in children with febrile seizure.

    PubMed

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Kılıçarslan, Buket; Özkale, Murat; Saygı, Semra; Sarıtürk, Çağla; Sezgin, Nurzen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the associations between febrile seizure and serum levels of vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine. One hundred and four children who presented with febrile seizure and 75 controls who presented with febrile illness unaccompanied by seizure were enrolled into the study. Mean levels of vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine were compared between two groups. Mean vitamin B12 level in the febrile seizure group was significantly lower than the control group. The febrile seizure patients with 3 or more had significantly lower serum folic acid than the subgroups with two or one episode only. Serum concentrations of folic acid were significantly lower in the febrile seizure subgroup with body temperature 37.5-39.0˚C at time of convulsion. Low serum vitamin B12 may reduce a child's threshold for seizure and may be a risk factor for febrile seizure. Low serum folic acid level may be predisposed to recurrent febrile seizure.

  15. Increased levels of HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in children with febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jieun; Min, Hyun Jin; Shin, Jeon-Soo

    2011-10-11

    Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures. Fever is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines during infection, and pro-inflammatory cytokines may trigger the development of febrile seizures. In order to determine whether active inflammation, including high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, occurs in children with febrile seizures or epilepsy, we analyzed cytokine profiles of patients with febrile seizures or epilepsy. Forty-one febrile seizure patients who visited the emergency department of Seoul National University Boramae Hospital from June 2008 to May 2009 were included in this study. Blood was obtained from the febrile seizure child patients within 30 minutes of the time of the seizure; subsequently, serum cytokine assays were performed. Control samples were collected from children with febrile illness without convulsion (N = 41) and similarly analyzed. Serum samples from afebrile status epilepticus attacks in intractable epilepsy children (N = 12), afebrile seizure attacks in generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFSP) children (N = 6), and afebrile non-epileptic controls (N = 7) were also analyzed. Serum HMGB1 and IL-1β levels were significantly higher in febrile seizure patients than in fever only controls (p < 0.05). Serum IL-6 levels were significantly higher in typical febrile seizures than in fever only controls (p < 0.05). Serum IL-1β levels were significantly higher in status epilepticus attacks in intractable epilepsy patients than in fever only controls (p < 0.05). Serum levels of IL-1β were significantly correlated with levels of HMGB1, IL-6, and TNF-α (p < 0.05). HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in febrile seizure children. Although it is not possible to infer causality from descriptive human studies, our data suggest that HMGB1 and the cytokine network may contribute to the generation of febrile seizures in children. There may be a potential role for anti

  16. Increased levels of HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in children with febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures. Fever is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines during infection, and pro-inflammatory cytokines may trigger the development of febrile seizures. In order to determine whether active inflammation, including high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, occurs in children with febrile seizures or epilepsy, we analyzed cytokine profiles of patients with febrile seizures or epilepsy. Methods Forty-one febrile seizure patients who visited the emergency department of Seoul National University Boramae Hospital from June 2008 to May 2009 were included in this study. Blood was obtained from the febrile seizure child patients within 30 minutes of the time of the seizure; subsequently, serum cytokine assays were performed. Control samples were collected from children with febrile illness without convulsion (N = 41) and similarly analyzed. Serum samples from afebrile status epilepticus attacks in intractable epilepsy children (N = 12), afebrile seizure attacks in generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFSP) children (N = 6), and afebrile non-epileptic controls (N = 7) were also analyzed. Results Serum HMGB1 and IL-1β levels were significantly higher in febrile seizure patients than in fever only controls (p < 0.05). Serum IL-6 levels were significantly higher in typical febrile seizures than in fever only controls (p < 0.05). Serum IL-1β levels were significantly higher in status epilepticus attacks in intractable epilepsy patients than in fever only controls (p < 0.05). Serum levels of IL-1β were significantly correlated with levels of HMGB1, IL-6, and TNF-α (p < 0.05). Conclusions HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly higher in febrile seizure children. Although it is not possible to infer causality from descriptive human studies, our data suggest that HMGB1 and the cytokine network may contribute to the generation of febrile seizures in children

  17. Effects of Mannose-Binding Lectin Polymorphisms on Irinotecan-Induced Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Floris A.; van Schaik, Ron H.; Sparreboom, Alex; van Fessem, Marianne A.; van de Geijn, Fleur E.; van Daele, Paul L.; Verweij, Jaap; Sleijfer, Stefan; Mathijssen, Ron H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is important in the innate immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms affect MBL expression, and genotypes yielding low MBL levels have been associated with an elevated risk for infections in hematological cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, these reported associations are inconsistent, and data on patients with solid tumors are lacking. Here, we investigated the effects of MBL2 genotypes on irinotecan-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with solid tumors. Patients and Methods. Irinotecan-treated patients were genotyped for the MBL2 gene. Two promoter (−550 H/L and −221 X/Y) and three exon polymorphisms (52 A/D, 54 A/B, and 57 A/C) were determined, together with known risk factors for irinotecan-induced toxicity. Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were recorded during the first course. Results. Of the 133 patients, 28% experienced severe neutropenia and 10% experienced febrile neutropenia. No associations were found between exon polymorphisms and febrile neutropenia. However, patients with the H/H promoter genotype, associated with high MBL levels, experienced significantly more febrile neutropenia than patients with the H/L and L/L genotypes (20% versus 13% versus 5%). Moreover, patients with the HYA haplotype encountered significantly more febrile neutropenia than patients without this high MBL-producing haplotype (16% versus 4%). In the subgroup with wild-type exon polymorphisms (A/A), patients with the high MBL promoter phenotype had the highest incidence of febrile neutropenia, regardless of known risk factors. Conclusion. Patients with high MBL2 promoter genotypes and haplotypes seem more at risk for developing febrile neutropenia. If confirmed, these preliminary findings may contribute to more individualized approaches of irinotecan treatment. PMID:20930093

  18. A predictive model to differentiate dengue from other febrile illness.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Eduardo; Smieja, Marek; Walter, Stephen D; Loeb, Mark

    2016-11-22

    Dengue is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries and has a presentation similar to other febrile illnesses. Since laboratory confirmation is frequently delayed, the majority of dengue cases are diagnosed based on symptoms. The objective of this study was to identify clinical, hematological and demographical parameters that could be used as predictors of dengue fever among patients with febrile illness. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 548 patients presenting with febrile syndrome to the largest public hospitals in Honduras. Patients' clinical, laboratory, and demographic data as well as dengue laboratory detection by either serology or viral isolation were used to build a predictive statistical model to identify dengue cases. Of 548 patients, 390 were confirmed with dengue infection while 158 had negative results. Univariable analysis revealed seven variables associated with dengue: male sex, petechiae, skin rash, myalgia, retro-ocular pain, positive tourniquet test, and gingival bleeding. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, retro-ocular pain petechiae and gingival bleeding were associated with increased risk, while epistaxis and paleness of skin were associated with reduced risk of dengue. Using a value of 0.6 (i.e., 60% probability for a case to be positive based on the equation values), our model had a sensitivity of 86.2%, a specificity of 27.2%, and an overall accuracy of 69.2%; allowing for the diagnosis of dengue to be ruled out and for other febrile conditions to be investigated. Among Honduran patients presenting with febrile illness, our analysis identified key symptoms associated with dengue fever, however the overall accuracy of our model was still low and specificity remains a concern. Our model requires validation in other populations with a similar pattern of dengue transmission.

  19. Febrile seizures in children with familial Mediterranean fever: Coincidence or association?

    PubMed

    Çomak, Elif; Tüfekçi, Özlem; Kılıçbay, Fatih; Isıyel, Emel; Sever, Ali Haydar; Aslanger, Ayça; Ekici, Barış

    2015-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited disease characterized by recurrent bouts of fever and polyserositis and caused by MEditerranean FeVer gene (MEFV) mutations. Given the febrile characteristics of the disease one would expect higher frequency of febrile seizure in this group of pediatric patients. To evaluate the frequency of febrile seizure and related factors in patients with FMF. The children with the diagnosis of FMF were enrolled in the study. Information including clinical features, type of mutation and the history of febrile seizure were all noted. A total of 97 patients, 43 (44.3%) girls with a median age of 7.93 ± 4.05 years (2-16) and a median follow-up period of 20.65 ± 24.33 months (6-135) were included in the study. The frequency of febrile seizure in children with FMF was found as 13.4%, which is higher than the general population [p = 0.04, OR: 2.9 (95% CI: 1.0-8.5)]. The allele frequency of exon 2 mutations in MEFV genes was higher in the patients with febrile seizure (p = 0.03). Frequency of FMF related clinical findings (fever, abdominal pain, arthralgia/myalgia, arthritis, chest pain and erysipelas-like erythema) was similar between the two groups. However, frequency of headache was higher in the patients with febrile seizure (p = 0.014). The frequency of febrile seizure in children with FMF was found to be higher than the general population. Although this finding may be related to high fever during FMF attacks in individuals with genetic propensity of febrile seizure, it may also be a neurologic complication of FMF. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms on irinotecan-induced febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    van der Bol, Jessica M; de Jong, Floris A; van Schaik, Ron H; Sparreboom, Alex; van Fessem, Marianne A; van de Geijn, Fleur E; van Daele, Paul L; Verweij, Jaap; Sleijfer, Stefan; Mathijssen, Ron H

    2010-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is important in the innate immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms affect MBL expression, and genotypes yielding low MBL levels have been associated with an elevated risk for infections in hematological cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, these reported associations are inconsistent, and data on patients with solid tumors are lacking. Here, we investigated the effects of MBL2 genotypes on irinotecan-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with solid tumors. Irinotecan-treated patients were genotyped for the MBL2 gene. Two promoter (-550 H/L and -221 X/Y) and three exon polymorphisms (52 A/D, 54 A/B, and 57 A/C) were determined, together with known risk factors for irinotecan-induced toxicity. Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were recorded during the first course. Of the 133 patients, 28% experienced severe neutropenia and 10% experienced febrile neutropenia. No associations were found between exon polymorphisms and febrile neutropenia. However, patients with the H/H promoter genotype, associated with high MBL levels, experienced significantly more febrile neutropenia than patients with the H/L and L/L genotypes (20% versus 13% versus 5%). Moreover, patients with the HYA haplotype encountered significantly more febrile neutropenia than patients without this high MBL-producing haplotype (16% versus 4%). In the subgroup with wild-type exon polymorphisms (A/A), patients with the high MBL promoter phenotype had the highest incidence of febrile neutropenia, regardless of known risk factors. Patients with high MBL2 promoter genotypes and haplotypes seem more at risk for developing febrile neutropenia. If confirmed, these preliminary findings may contribute to more individualized approaches of irinotecan treatment.

  1. Incidence, treatment, and consequences of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in the inpatient and outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Weycker, Derek; Barron, Richard; Kartashov, Alex; Legg, Jason; Lyman, Gary H

    2014-06-01

    To examine the incidence, treatment, and consequences of febrile neutropenia across inpatient and outpatient care settings. Data were obtained from Humedica's National Electronic Health Record-Derived Longitudinal Patient-Level Database (2007-2010). The study population included adult patients who received myelosuppressive chemotherapy for a solid tumor or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. For each patient, each chemotherapy regimen course and each cycle within each regimen course was characterized. Febrile neutropenia episodes were identified on a cycle-specific basis based on any of the following: (1) absolute neutrophil count <1.0 × 10(9)/L and evidence of infection or fever; (2) inpatient diagnosis of neutropenia, fever, or infection; (3) outpatient diagnosis of neutropenia and non-prophylactic antimicrobial use; or (4) mention of febrile neutropenia in physician notes. Febrile neutropenia episodes were categorized as inpatient or outpatient based on the initial setting of care (i.e. acute-care inpatient facility vs. ambulatory care facility). Febrile neutropenia consequences included hospital length of stay and mortality (inpatient cases only), as well as number of febrile neutropenia-related outpatient encounters. Among the 2131 patients in this study, 401 experienced a total of 458 febrile neutropenia episodes. Risk of febrile neutropenia during the chemotherapy regimen course was 16.8% (95% CI: 15.3, 18.4). In cycle 1 alone, risk of febrile neutropenia was 8.1% (7.1, 9.3). Most febrile neutropenia episodes (83.2%) were initially treated in the inpatient setting; the hospital mortality rate was 8.1% (5.8, 11.1), and mean hospital length of stay was 8.4 days (7.7, 9.1). Among febrile neutropenia episodes initially treated in the outpatient setting (16.8%), the mean number of outpatient management encounters was 2.6 (2.1, 3.1), most of which were in the physician's office (69.2%) or emergency department (26.9%). Febrile neutropenia remains a common occurrence among

  2. Are febrile seizures an indication for intermittent benzodiazepine treatment, and if so, in which cases?

    PubMed

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2014-10-09

    Febrile seizures occur in ∼4% of children. After a first febrile seizure, the risk of recurrence is ∼40%, but excellent studies document that febrile seizures do not cause brain damage or deficits in cognition or behaviour. The risk of subsequent epilepsy is 2-4%. Prolonged febrile seizures are of concern because a child may later develop mesial temporal sclerosis and intractable epilepsy in rare cases. Most prolonged febrile seizures represent the first febrile seizure and cannot be anticipated. A first prolonged febrile seizure does not increase the risk of recurrence, but if there is a recurrence, it is more likely to be prolonged. Prevention of recurrent febrile seizures is difficult. Antipyretics are ineffective. Daily AED treatment is not often justified. Intermittent oral diazepam at the time of illness is not very successful and has significant side effects. The most optimistic study found that the number of subjects required to treat in order to prevent one recurrence was 14. Intermittent clobazam has fewer side effects than diazepam and may be somewhat effective. Rescue benzodiazepines given outside health care facilities may be effective in selected patients to prevent prolonged recurrences, although this has not been proven with rectal diazepam which has been more extensively studied than buccal or nasal midazolam. Currently, we suggest that, for children with febrile seizures, candidates for consideration for rescue benzodiazepines are those with a prolonged febrile seizure or poor access to medical care. It is possible that the use of a rescue benzodiazepine may alleviate severe parental anxiety, but this remains to be established.

  3. Advances in management of low-risk febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Teuffel, Oliver; Sung, Lillian

    2012-02-01

    To describe and discuss the most recent advances in the management of low-risk febrile neutropenia in children with cancer. Several risk stratification tools for children with febrile neutropenia have been developed, although none of these tools have been directly compared and few have been validated in independent populations. However, there is good evidence that, for pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia at low risk for severe infection, outpatient management is a well tolerated and efficacious alternative to inpatient care. Moreover, major progress has been made in obtaining and understanding perceived quality of life and preferences for outpatient management in pediatric cancer patients. Many parents prefer inpatient management although child quality of life is, in general, anticipated to be higher with outpatient intravenous therapy. Finally, outpatient strategies are more cost-effective as compared with traditional management in hospital. Outpatient management is a well tolerated and cost-effective strategy for low-risk febrile neutropenia in children with cancer, although parental preferences are highly variable for outpatient versus inpatient management. Future research should examine the effectiveness of outpatient strategies through conduct of large cohort studies. Other future work could focus on development of decision aids and other tools to facilitate ambulatory approaches.

  4. Prevalence of recent immunisation in children with febrile convulsions

    PubMed Central

    Motala, Leya; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the prevalence of recent immunisation amongst children under 7 years of age presenting for febrile convulsions. METHODS This is a retrospective study of all children under the age of seven presenting with febrile convulsions to a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. A total of 78 cases occurred in the period January 2011 to July 2012 and were included in the study. Data was extracted from medical records to provide a retrospective review of the convulsions. RESULTS Of the 78 total cases, there were five medical records which contained information on whether or not immunisation had been administered in the preceding 48 h to presentation to the emergency department. Of these five patients only one patient (1.28% of the study population) was confirmed to have received a vaccination with Infanrix, Prevnar and Rotavirus. The majority of cases reported a current infection as a likely precipitant to the febrile convulsion. CONCLUSION This study found a very low prevalence of recent immunisation amongst children with febrile convulsions presenting to an emergency department at a tertiary referral hospital in Sydney. This finding, however, may have been distorted by underreporting of vaccination history. PMID:27610346

  5. [Acute febrile state].

    PubMed

    Frigg, C; Stepanek, J; Suter, J

    1999-11-18

    A 34 year old airline pilot, who had spent nine days in Cameroon (Westafrica) presented for his yearly physical examination two weeks later. The physical examination and routine laboratory tests were within normal limits. The patient complained about mild pain of joints and extremities and about not feeling quite well. The same evening (a few hours after the physical examination) he experienced chills and fever (up to 39.5 degrees Celsius). He was seen subsequently by a tropical medicine specialist, who diagnosed Plasmodium falciparum on blood smears. The patient was immediately placed on Riamet, fever and symptoms disappeared completely within a few days.

  6. [Significance of the antimicrobial drug used to prevent febrile infection following prostate needle biopsy].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoshi; Maki, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Hamaguchi, Masumitsu; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Naotaka; Iguchi, Atushi

    2014-05-01

    The rate of incidence of febrile infection and the antimicrobial drug used at the time of prostate needle biopsy was examined retrospectively. SPFX (sparfloxacin) 400 mg (January 2007 to March 2010) and LVFX (levofloxacin) 500 mg (April 2010, onward) were administered prophylactically in 1,034 patients undergoing transrectal or transperineal prostate biopsy. One febrile infection occurred and resolved in each group. A single dose of LVFX 500 mg before the procedure effectively prevented febrile infection in both transrectal and transperineal prostate needle biopsy.

  7. Hippocampal Malrotation Is Associated With Prolonged Febrile Seizures: Results of the FEBSTAT Study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephen; Bello, Jacqueline A; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Lewis, Darrell V; MacFall, James; Shinnar, Ruth C; Gomes, William; Litherland, Claire; Xu, Yuan; Nordli, Douglas R; Pellock, John M; Frank, L Matthew; Moshé, Solomon L; Sun, Shumei

    2015-11-01

    Hippocampal malrotation is characterized by incomplete hippocampal inversion with a rounded shape and blurred internal architecture. There is still debate about whether hippocampal malrotation has pathologic significance. We present findings from the Consequences of Prolonged Febrile Seizures in Childhood (FEBSTAT) study on the frequency of and risk factors for hippocampal malrotation. FEBSTAT is a prospective multicenter study investigating the consequences of febrile status epilepticus in childhood. MRI studies of 226 patients with febrile status epilepticus were analyzed visually by two board-certified neuroradiologists blinded to clinical details and were compared with MRI studies of 96 subjects with first simple febrile seizure. Quantitative analysis of hippocampal volume was performed by two independent observers. Hippocampal malrotation was present in 20 of 226 (8.8%) patients with febrile status epilepticus compared with two of 96 (2.1%) control subjects (odds ratio [OR], 4.56; 95% CI, 1.05-19.92). Hippocampal malrotation was exclusively left-sided in 18 of 22 (81.8%) patients and bilateral in the remaining four patients (18.2%). There was no case of exclusively right-sided hippocampal malrotation. Hippocampal malrotation was more common in boys than in girls (OR, 6.1; 95% CI, 1.7-21.5). On quantitative volumetric MRI analysis, the left hippocampal volume was smaller in patients with hippocampal malrotation than in control subjects with simple febrile seizure (p = 0.004), and the right-to-left hippocampal volume ratio was higher in the hippocampal malrotation group than in the simple febrile seizure group (p < 0.001). Hippocampal malrotation is a developmental malformation that predominantly affects the left hippocampus in male patients and is more frequently found in children with prolonged febrile status epilepticus than in control subjects. These data provide further evidence that hippocampal malrotation represents a pathologic error in brain development

  8. Current use and potential role of procalcitonin in the diagnostic work up and follow up of febrile neutropenia in hematological patients.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Benedetto; Busca, Alessandro; Vallero, Stefano; Raviolo, Stefania; Mordini, Nicola; Nassi, Luca; Cignetti, Alessandro; Audisio, Ernesta; Festuccia, Moreno; Corsetti, Alessandra; Depaoli, Lorella; Faraci, Maura; Micalizzi, Concetta; Corcione, Silvia; Berger, Massimo; Saglio, Francesco; Caropreso, Paola; Mengozzi, Giulio; Squadrone, Vincenzo; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe; Giaccone, Luisa

    2017-06-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) represents a life-threatening complication in hematological malignancies. Its etiology is most often due to infections even though FN of other origins, such as tumor-related fever and non-infectious inflammation, should rapidly be ruled out. Initially, C-reactive protein and, more recently, procalcitonin (PCT) have been proposed as useful biomarkers for differential diagnosis. PCT was shown to be a good biomarker of bacterial infections and their clinical outcomes. Definition of standard cut-offs and design of PCT-guided treatment protocols remain however to be defined. Areas covered: In this review, highlights on the current clinical use of PCT and its potential role as a diagnostic tool have been discussed by a panel of physicians from different areas of expertise. We provide current clinical evidence that PCT has been shown to be a reliable biomarker to differentiate fever of bacterial origin from other causes. Moreover, the Authors convened to a round-table to discuss their 'real-life experience' and offer their recommendations by a Delphi survey. Expert commentary: PCT has an important clinical role in FN. Issues such as the validation of a specific decision algorithm that includes PCT to monitor antibiotic choice and treatment duration will be addressed in prospective studies.

  9. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology.

  10. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with First Episode Febrile Seizure.

    PubMed

    Sharawat, Indar Kumar; Singh, Jitender; Dawman, Lesa; Singh, Amitabh

    2016-05-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the single most common type of seizure seen in children between 6 months to 5 years of age. The purpose of our study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures, which would help in the better management and preventive measures in children at risk for FS episodes. To evaluate the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures in Indian children. This was a hospital based, case control study. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first FS episode in children. Seventy (70) children between age 6 months to 5 years with their first episode of FS were compared with 70 children with fever but without seizures based on various risk factors. The mean age was 24.90±16.11 months in cases and 26.34±16.93 months in controls. Male: female ratio was 2:1. A positive family history was found in 31.4% of first degree and 11.4% in second degree relatives. Mean maximum temperature was 102.06±1.1°F and URI (upper respiratory infection) was most common cause of fever. Antenatal complication was significantly higher in the case group. RBC (Red Blood Cells) indices like lower mean haemoglobin, MCV (Mean Corpuscular Volume), MCH (Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin concentration) and higher RDW (Red Cell Distribution Width) values were seen in patients. Serum sodium, Serum calcium and random blood sugar values of the cases were significantly lower than those of controls (p<0.05). Our study shows that male gender, family history of febrile seizures, peak body temperature, underlying cause of fever, antenatal complications, low serum calcium, sodium, blood sugar and microcytic hypochromic anaemia are the risk factors associated with the occurrence of first episode of febrile seizure and, thus, preventive measures in removing these risk factors could lead to a decrease in incidence of FS.

  11. Childhood Febrile Seizures: Overview and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tonia; Jacobsen, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the latest knowledge and understanding of childhood febrile seizures. This review also discusses childhood febrile seizure occurrence, health services utilization and treatment costs. Parental reactions associated with its occurrence and how healthcare providers can assist parents with dealing effectively with this potentially frightening and anxiety-producing event are also discussed. PMID:17479160

  12. Management of febrile convulsion in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Rogers, Eleanor; Wilkinson, Rachel; Paul, Biswajit

    2015-05-01

    The causes of febrile convulsions are usually benign. Such convulsions are common in children and their long-term consequences are rare. However, other causes of seizures, such as intracranial infections, must be excluded before diagnosis, especially in infants and younger children. Diagnosis is based mainly on history taking, and further investigations into the condition are not generally needed in fully immunised children presenting with simple febrile convulsions. Treatment involves symptom control and treating the cause of the fever. Nevertheless, febrile convulsions in children can be distressing for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced emergency department (ED) nurses. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with febrile convulsion, and best practice for care in EDs. It also includes a reflective case study to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals who manage children who present with febrile convulsion.

  13. Human Febrile Illness Caused by Encephalomyocarditis Virus Infection, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Blair, Patrick; Nix, W. Allan; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Comer, James A.; Rollin, Pierre; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Olson, James; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Etiologic studies of acute febrile disease were conducted in sites across South America, including Cusco and Iquitos, Peru. Patients’ clinical signs and symptoms were recorded, and acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples were obtained for serologic examination and virus isolation in Vero E6 and C6/36 cells. Virus isolated in Vero E6 cells was identified as encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) by electron microscopy and by subsequent molecular diagnostic testing of samples from 2 febrile patients with nausea, headache, and dyspnea. The virus was recovered from acute-phase serum samples from both case-patients and identified with cardiovirus-specific reverse transcription–PCR and sequencing. Serum samples from case-patient 1 showed cardiovirus antibody by immunoglobulin M ELISA (acute phase <8, convalescent phase >1,024) and by neutralization assay (acute phase <10, convalescent phase >1,280). Serum samples from case-patient 2 did not contain antibodies detectable by either assay. Detection of virus in serum strongly supports a role for EMCV in human infection and febrile illness. PMID:19331761

  14. Towards Improving Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Non-malaria Febrile Illness: A Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Decuypere, Saskia; Maltha, Jessica; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Issa, Guiraud; Bérenger, Kaboré; Lompo, Palpouguini; Tahita, Marc C.; Ruspasinghe, Thusitha; McConville, Malcolm; Goodacre, Royston; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan; Carapetis, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-malaria febrile illnesses such as bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) are a leading cause of disease and mortality in the tropics. However, there are no reliable, simple diagnostic tests for identifying BSI or other severe non-malaria febrile illnesses. We hypothesized that different infectious agents responsible for severe febrile illness would impact on the host metabololome in different ways, and investigated the potential of plasma metabolites for diagnosis of non-malaria febrile illness. Methodology We conducted a comprehensive mass-spectrometry based metabolomics analysis of the plasma of 61 children with severe febrile illness from a malaria-endemic rural African setting. Metabolite features characteristic for non-malaria febrile illness, BSI, severe anemia and poor clinical outcome were identified by receiver operating curve analysis. Principal Findings The plasma metabolome profile of malaria and non-malaria patients revealed fundamental differences in host response, including a differential activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. A simple corticosteroid signature was a good classifier of severe malaria and non-malaria febrile patients (AUC 0.82, 95% CI: 0.70–0.93). Patients with BSI were characterized by upregulated plasma bile metabolites; a signature of two bile metabolites was estimated to have a sensitivity of 98.1% (95% CI: 80.2–100) and a specificity of 82.9% (95% CI: 54.7–99.9) to detect BSI in children younger than 5 years. This BSI signature demonstrates that host metabolites can have a superior diagnostic sensitivity compared to pathogen-detecting tests to identify infections characterized by low pathogen load such as BSI. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential use of plasma metabolites to identify causality in children with severe febrile illness in malaria-endemic settings. PMID:26943791

  15. Serum interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in febrile seizures: is there a link?

    PubMed

    Mahyar, Abolfazl; Ayazi, Parviz; Orangpour, Reza; Daneshi-Kohan, Mohammad Mahdi; Sarokhani, Mohammad Reza; Javadi, Amir; Habibi, Morteza; Talebi-Bakhshayesh, Mousa

    2014-10-01

    Febrile seizures are induced by fever and are the most common type of seizures in children. Although numerous studies have been performed on febrile seizures, their pathophysiology remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that cytokines may play a role in the pathogenesis of febrile seizures. The present study was conducted to identify potential links between serum interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and febrile seizures. Ninety-two patients with simple or complex febrile seizures (46 patients per seizure type), and 46 controls with comparable age, sex, and severity of temperature were enrolled. The median concentrations of serum IL-1β in the simple, complex febrile seizure, and control groups were 0.05, 0.1, and 0.67 pg/mL, respectively (P=0.001). Moreover, the median concentrations of TNF-α in the simple, complex febrile seizure, and control groups were 2.5, 1, and 61.5 pg/mL, respectively (P=0.001). Furthermore, there were significant differences between the case groups in serum IL-1β and TNF-α levels (P<0.05). Unlike previous studies, our study does not support the hypothesis that increased IL-1β and TNF-α production is involved in the pathogenesis of febrile seizures.

  16. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizure.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, A A; Nei, M; Rostami, C; Sperling, M R

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the demographic and clinical manifestations of patients with mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy (MTS-TLE) with childhood febrile seizure (FS) and establishing the potential differences as compared to those without FS. We also investigated the surgery outcome in these two groups of patients. In this retrospective study, all patients with a clinical diagnosis of drug-resistant TLE due to mesial temporal sclerosis, who underwent epilepsy surgery at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, were recruited. Patients were prospectively registered in a database from 1986 through 2014. Postsurgical outcome was classified into two groups; seizure-free or relapsed. Clinical manifestations and outcome were compared between patients with MTS-TLE with FS and those without FS. Two hundred and sixty-two patients were eligible for this study. One hundred and seventy patients (64.9%) did not have FS in their childhood, while 92 patients (35.1%) reported experiencing FS in their childhood. Demographic and clinical characteristics of these two groups of patients were not different. Postoperative seizure outcome was not statistically different between these two groups of patients (P = 0.19). When MTS is the pathological substrate of TLE, clinical manifestations and response to surgical treatment of patients are very similar in patients with history of febrile seizure in their childhood compared to those without such an experience. In other words, when the subgroup of patients with MTS-TLE and drug-resistant seizures is examined history of childhood febrile seizure loses its value as a distinguishing factor in characteristics or predictive factor for surgery outcome. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Towards Developing a Scoring System for Febrile Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Prasita; Chauhan, Shaylika; Samel, Dinesh

    2016-02-01

    The authors wished to develop a scoring system for evaluating patients presenting with febrile thrombocytopenia for risk stratification, predicting patient outcome and optimization of care especially in resource poor countries. 1. To decide a protocol in the management of patients with fever and thrombocytopenia. 2. To develop screening or therapeutic guidelines (early warning score-EWS) in febrile thrombocytopenic patients and decide about therapeutic interventions. 1. To decide a protocol in the management of patients with fever and thrombocytopenia. 2. To develop screening or therapeutic guidelines (early warning score-EWS) in febrile thrombocytopenic patients and decide about therapeutic interventions. Retrospective study and development of a bedside scoring system based on Platelet Count, Temperature, Respiratory Rate, Blood Pressure. Pulse, CNS, Respiratory, Hematological, Hepatic and Renal complications in a central civic hospital and teaching institute in India. All patients > 18 years presenting with fever and thrombocytopenia with platelet count of < 150 × 109/L. Number of patients requiring platelet transfusions decreases when total risk score is used for risk stratification and for transfusing platelets as against the platelet count at admission. Patients who died in our study had a platelet count at presentation between 20,000- 1,00,000 though their total risk score was 17 and 18 respectively; hence platelet count alone should not be relied upon for platelet transfusion. Irrespective of the number of platelets transfused the prognosis is poor as the total risk score increases. The platelet count is not the only indicator of transfusion. When we use total risk score instead of platelet count for classifying patients who need transfusions, number of patients who fall in severe risk category needing immediate transfusion reduces and haphazard use of platelets can be avoided. Patient outcome (death/survival), occurrence of complications and hematological

  18. Recurrence Risk of Febrile Seizures in Children.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, J; Poudel, P; Shah, G S; Yadav, S; Chaudhary, S; Kafle, S

    2016-09-01

    Identifying children with febrile seizure who are at risk for recurrence is important so that special attention can be given to them. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for recurrence of febrile seizures in children. This prospective hospital based study was conducted from July 2013 to August 2014 'among children of 6 months to 6 years of age at Bishweshwar Prasad Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), Nepal. Children meeting the selection criteria were enrolled in study. Clinical, investigation, treatment and outcome parameters were analyzed. A total of 92 children with febrile seizure were enrolled in study. Males accounted for 70% and females 30%. Simple febrile seizure was present in 48% and complex febrile seizures were seen in 52%. Recurrence of seizure was seen in one third of cases. Loss of consciousness was most common post-ictal phenomenon followed by confusion and lethargy. Upper respiratory infection was the most common precipitating factor. Generalized Tonic Clonic Seizure was the most common seizure type present in 79% of cases. Significant risk factors for recurrence occurred in males (p=0.088), age less than 1 year (p=0.003). Most of the recurrence occurred within one year of first seizure. Febrile Seizure is common in males. Almost one third of children with febrile seizure are at risk for recurrence. The significant risk factors for recurrences are male gender and age <1year.

  19. Relationship between common viral upper respiratory tract infections and febrile seizures in children from Suzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jihong; Yan, Wenhua; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bingbing; Gu, Qing

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the potential predisposing factors for the development of febrile seizures among children with upper respiratory tract infection in the eastern Chinese region. Participants were individuals aged 6 months and 6 years (n = 189) who were diagnosed with febrile seizure, complicated with upper respiratory tract infection, and 174 age-matched children who had upper respiratory tract infection without seizures as controls. The viral antigens including influenza A and B, parainfluenza, adenovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were detected from nasopharyngeal aspirates. The incidence of influenza A infection was much higher in patients with febrile seizure than controls, especially those children aged >36 months. Patients with influenza A infection had higher body temperatures at seizure occurrence, shorter seizure duration, and shorter fever duration before seizure onset. Influenza A infections are frequently associated with febrile seizure in children with upper respiratory tract infection. During an influenza epidemic, effective vaccination of children, especially those with a past history of febrile seizure, may minimize the development of febrile seizure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. [Febrile convulsions and other occasional convulsions in children].

    PubMed

    Vallée, L; Cuisset, J M; Cuvellier, J C; de Sèze, C

    1999-09-15

    Febrile convulsions are the main etiology of the occasional convulsions. They occur between 6 months and 5 years. They are short, bilateral, clonic or tonico-clonic. Febrile convulsions are classified in 2 groups: benign febrile convulsions and complicated febrile convulsions. When it exists, the genetic predisposition is a significant factor recurrent of febrile convulsions, but their prognosis remains good. Treatment depends on the diagnosis of simple or complicated febrile convulsions. The treatment of febrile convulsions is intra-rectal diazepam (0.5 mg/kg). The risks of recurrence of convulsions are inversely proportional to the intensity and duration of the fever episode before the convulsion.

  1. Comparison of effectiveness of biosimilar filgrastim (Nivestim™), reference Amgen filgrastim and pegfilgrastim in febrile neutropenia primary prevention in breast cancer patients treated with neo(adjuvant) TAC: a non-interventional cohort study.

    PubMed

    Brito, M; Esteves, S; André, R; Isidoro, M; Moreira, A

    2016-02-01

    Biosimilars are supported by limited clinical data at the time of approval. Recently, Nivestim™, a biosimilar of reference of filgrastim, was approved for prevention of chemotherapy-related febrile neutropenia (FN). To add clinical experience to this new biosimilar, we performed a study to compare the effectiveness of Nivestim™ with reference filgrastim and pegfilgrastim in FN prevention in patients receiving high-risk FN chemotherapy. This is a comparative cohort study, with retrospective data collection. Three cohorts were identified according to the type of primary prophylaxis employed over different time periods: reference filgrastim (2004-2006), pegfilgrastim (2007-2008) and biosimilar filgrastim (2011-2012). The study included female patients with early breast cancer that received FN primary prophylaxis during (neo)adjuvant docetaxel/doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide (TAC). Reference filgrastim cohort included 147 patients and pegfilgrastim and biosimilar filgrastim cohorts 139 and 134 patients, respectively. FN rates per patient/cycle were 16 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 10.2-22.5 %)/3 % (95 % CI 2.1-4.7 %) in the reference filgrastim group, 9 % (95 % CI 4.5-14.6 %)/2 % (95 % CI 1.3-3.6 %) in the pegfilgrastim group and 16 % (95 % CI 10.0-22.9 %)/4 % (95 % CI 2.5-5.3 %) in the biosimilar filgrastim cohort. The median absolute neutrophil count (ANC) at FN presentation was lower in the biosimilar group in comparison with reference filgrastim. FN episodes with ANC < 100 cells/μL were more frequent in the biosimilar group (50 %) when compared with reference filgrastim (4 %) and pegfilgrastim (6 %). No differences concerning FN complications were seen, with the exception of more chemotherapy delays in the biosimilar group when compared with pegfilgrastim. No differences in biosimilar effectiveness were detected. The clinical relevance of the profound neutropenia found in the biosimilar cohort needs further attention.

  2. Febrile seizure recurrence reduced by intermittent oral levetiracetam

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lin-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping; Zhong, Jian-Min; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Jian-Bo; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Meng; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Liu, Yu-Jie; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Wei-Na; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Kwan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objective Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common form of childhood seizure disorders. FS is perhaps one of the most frequent causes of admittance to pediatric emergency wards worldwide. We aimed to identify a new, safe, and effective therapy for preventing FS recurrence. Methods A total of 115 children with a history of two or more episodes of FS were randomly assigned to levetiracetam (LEV) and control (LEV/control ratio = 2:1) groups. At the onset of fever, LEV group was orally administered with a dose of 15–30 mg/kg per day twice daily for 1 week. Thereafter, the dosage was gradually reduced until totally discontinued in the second week. The primary efficacy variable was seizure frequency associated with febrile events and FS recurrence rate (RR) during 48-week follow-up. The second outcome was the cost effectiveness of the two groups. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed that 78 children in LEV group experienced 148 febrile episodes. Among these 78 children, 11 experienced 15 FS recurrences. In control group, 37 children experienced 64 febrile episodes; among these 37 children, 19 experienced 32 FS recurrences. A significant difference was observed between two groups in FS RR and FS recurrence/fever episode. The cost of LEV group for the prevention of FS recurrence is lower than control group. During 48-week follow-up period, one patient in LEV group exhibited severe drowsiness. No other side effects were observed in the same patient and in other children. Interpretation Intermittent oral LEV can effectively prevent FS recurrence and reduce wastage of medical resources. PMID:25356397

  3. Is temperature regulation different in children susceptible to febrile seizures?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Kevin E; Dooley, Joseph M; Wood, Ellen P; Bethune, Peggy

    2009-03-01

    To examine the relationship between the presence and magnitude of fever and susceptibility to febrile seizures, defined as a known family history of febrile seizures. Reanalysis of a case-control study dataset (Am J Dis Child. 1993; 147: 35-39). The magnitude of presenting fever was examined between the incident febrile seizure group (N = 75) and febrile control group (N = 150) for a family history of febrile seizures. The presence of fever was examined between the febrile control group (N = 150) and the afebrile control group (N = 150) for a family history of febrile seizures. Children with incident febrile seizures had a higher temperature in the emergency department than febrile controls (39.3 degrees C vs 39.0 degrees C, p = .004). Febrile control children with a known family history of febrile seizures had higher temperatures than those without a known family history (39.5 degrees C vs 38.9 degrees C, p = .04). A model of fever magnitude within the febrile group (seizures and controls) suggested that most of this relationship was on the basis of family history of febrile seizures rather than seizure or control status, with a possibility of interaction. Within the control children (febrile and afebrile), a known family history of febrile seizures was associated with fever (OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.1,10.7). Children susceptible to febrile seizures through a known family history of febrile seizures appear more likely to present to emergency departments with fever, and when compared to their febrile counterparts, a fever of higher magnitude. This data supports Rantala's assertion "It may be that regulation of temperature is different in children susceptible to febrile seizures".

  4. Febrile seizures: Mechanisms and relationship to epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Céline M.; Brewster, Amy L.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of febrile seizures have been driven by two major enigmas: first, how these most common of human seizures are generated by fever has not been known. Second, epidemiological studies have linked prolonged febrile seizures with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy, yet whether long or recurrent febrile seizures cause temporal lobe epilepsy has remained unresolved. To investigate these questions, a model of prolonged (complex) febrile seizures was developed in immature rats and mice, permitting mechanistic examination of the potential causal relationships of fever and seizures, and of febrile seizures and limbic epilepsy. Although the model relied on hyperthermia, it was discovered that the hyperthermia-induced secretion of endogenous fever mediators including interleukin-1β, which contributed to the generation of these ‘febrile’ seizures. In addition, prolonged experimental febrile seizures provoked epilepsy in a third of the animals. Investigations of the mechanisms of this epileptogenesis demonstrated that expression of specific ion (HCN) channels and of endocannabinoid signaling, may be involved. These may provide novel drug targets for intervention in the epileptogenic process. PMID:19232478

  5. Intermittent prophylaxis of recurrent febrile seizures with clobazam versus diazepam.

    PubMed

    Sattar, S; Saha, S K; Parveen, F; Banu, L A; Momen, A; Ahmed, A U; Quddush, M R; Karim, M M; Begum, S A; Haque, M A; Hoque, M R

    2014-10-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common type of seizure among children that can be prevented by using prophylactic drugs like Clobazam and Diazepam. The present prospective study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital and Community Based Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh over a period of 1 year from July 2012 to June 2013 to compare the effectiveness of intermittent Clobazam versus Diazepam therapy in preventing the recurrence of febrile seizures and assessed adverse effects of each drug. A total of 65 patients (32 children administered Clobazam and rest 33 children received Diazepam) of simple and complex febrile seizures aged 6 months to 5 years of both sexes were the study population. Data were collected by interview of the patients, clinical examination and laboratory investigations using the research instrument. Data were analyzed by using Chi-square (χ2) Test, Student's 't' Test and Fisher's Exact Test. For all analytical tests, the level of significance was set at 0.05 and p<0.05 was considered significant. The proportion of patients was higher between age 12-36 months and male was predominant in the both Clobazam and Diazepam groups. Over 31% of patients in Clobazam group who experienced episode of fever within 3 months, 40.6% within 6 months and 9.4% within 9 months compared to 36.4% in Diazepam group within 3 months, 45.5% within 6 months & 12.1% within 9 months after discharge from the hospital. Three (9.4%) patients in Clobazam group and 7(21.3%) in Diazepam group who experienced febrile convulsion during the follow up period. From the data adverse effects within 3 and 6 months experienced by the patient's drowsiness, sedation and ataxia were higher in Diazepam group than those in Clobazam group. However, within 9 months lethargy and irritability were somewhat higher in Clobazam group than those in Diazepam group. The mean duration of hospitalization was significantly higher in Diazepam group compared to

  6. Comparison of plasma/serum levels of procalcitonin between infection and febrile disease flare in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Na; Wang, Peng; Guan, Shi-Yang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Li, Bao-Zhu; Leng, Rui-Xue; Pan, Hai-Feng

    2017-10-03

    Currently published data regarding the potential role of procalcitonin (PCT) for the discrimination between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flare and infection are contradictory. To derive a more precise evaluation, a meta-analysis was performed. Published literatures from PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were obtained. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the study quality. Pooled standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated by random-effect model analysis. Heterogeneity test was performed by the Q statistic and quantified using I (2). Eight studies including 205 SLE flare patients and 198 SLE patients with infection were finally incorporated in the meta-analysis after examining title, type, abstracts, and full text. No significant differences in plasma/serum PCT levels were found between SLE patients with flare and SLE patients with infection when all studies were pooled into the meta-analysis (pooled SMD = - 0.45, 95% CI = - 0.96 to 0.06). However, subgroup analysis showed that Asian SLE patients with infection had higher plasma/serum PCT levels when compared with SLE patients with flare (p < 0.001). Overall, there is no significant difference in plasma/serum PCT levels between SLE patients with flare and SLE patients with infection. However, plasma/serum PCT levels are significantly higher in Asian SLE patients with infection.

  7. Routine Primary Prophylaxis for Febrile Neutropenia with Biosimilar Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (Nivestim) or Pegfilgrastim Is Cost Effective in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients undergoing Curative-Intent R-CHOP Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Jun; Tang, Tiffany; Farid, Mohamad; Quek, Richard; Tao, Miriam; Lim, Soon Thye; Wee, Hwee Lin; Chan, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to compare the cost-effectiveness of various strategies of myeloid growth factor prophylaxis for reducing the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Singapore who are undergoing R-CHOP chemotherapy with curative intent. A Markov model was created to compare seven prophylaxis strategies: 1) primary prophylaxis (PP) with nivestim (biosimilar filgrastim) throughout all cycles of chemotherapy; 2) PP with nivestim during the first two cycles of chemotherapy; 3) secondary prophylaxis (SP) with nivestim; 4) PP with pegfilgrastim throughout all cycles of chemotherapy; 5) PP with pegfilgrastim during the first two cycles of chemotherapy; 6) SP with pegfilgrastim; and 7) no prophylaxis (NP). The perspective of a hospital was taken and cost-effectiveness was expressed as the cost per episode of FN avoided over six cycles of chemotherapy. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted. Strategies 3, 6, and 7 were dominated in the base case analysis by strategy 5. The costs associated with strategies 2, 5, 1, and 4 were US$3,813, US$4,056, US$4,545, and US$5,331, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for strategy 5 vs. strategy 2, strategy 1 vs. strategy 5, and strategy 4 vs. strategy 1 were US$13,532, US$22,565, and US$30,452, respectively, per episode of FN avoided. Strategy 2 has the highest probability to be cost-effective (ranged from 48% to 60%) when the willingness to pay (WTP) threshold is lower than US$10,000 per FN episode prevented. In Singapore, routine PP with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (nivestim or pegfilgrastim) is cost-effective for reducing the risk of FN in patients receiving R-CHOP.

  8. Routine Primary Prophylaxis for Febrile Neutropenia with Biosimilar Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (Nivestim) or Pegfilgrastim Is Cost Effective in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients undergoing Curative-Intent R-CHOP Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Jun; Tang, Tiffany; Farid, Mohamad; Quek, Richard; Tao, Miriam; Lim, Soon Thye; Wee, Hwee Lin; Chan, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to compare the cost-effectiveness of various strategies of myeloid growth factor prophylaxis for reducing the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Singapore who are undergoing R-CHOP chemotherapy with curative intent. Methods A Markov model was created to compare seven prophylaxis strategies: 1) primary prophylaxis (PP) with nivestim (biosimilar filgrastim) throughout all cycles of chemotherapy; 2) PP with nivestim during the first two cycles of chemotherapy; 3) secondary prophylaxis (SP) with nivestim; 4) PP with pegfilgrastim throughout all cycles of chemotherapy; 5) PP with pegfilgrastim during the first two cycles of chemotherapy; 6) SP with pegfilgrastim; and 7) no prophylaxis (NP). The perspective of a hospital was taken and cost-effectiveness was expressed as the cost per episode of FN avoided over six cycles of chemotherapy. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted. Results Strategies 3, 6, and 7 were dominated in the base case analysis by strategy 5. The costs associated with strategies 2, 5, 1, and 4 were US$3,813, US$4,056, US$4,545, and US$5,331, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for strategy 5 vs. strategy 2, strategy 1 vs. strategy 5, and strategy 4 vs. strategy 1 were US$13,532, US$22,565, and US$30,452, respectively, per episode of FN avoided. Strategy 2 has the highest probability to be cost-effective (ranged from 48% to 60%) when the willingness to pay (WTP) threshold is lower than US$10,000 per FN episode prevented. Conclusion In Singapore, routine PP with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (nivestim or pegfilgrastim) is cost-effective for reducing the risk of FN in patients receiving R-CHOP. PMID:26871584

  9. Effect of an education program on knowledge, self-care behavior and handwashing competence on prevention of febrile neutropenia among breast cancer patients receiving Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Chemotherapy Day Centre

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Wai Chi; Yin Ching, Shirley Siu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of an education program on the prevention of febrile neutropenia (FN) among breast cancer patients receiving AC regimen. Methods: Randomized controlled trial with the repeated-measures design was conducted in a Chemotherapy Day Centre of an acute hospital in Hong Kong. Twenty-five subjects in the intervention group received an individual education session followed by three follow-up sessions and routine care. Twenty-four subjects in the control group received routine care. Primary outcomes included the incidence of admission due to FN, the self-care behavior adherence, the knowledge level on prevention of FN and the self-efficacy in self-management, handwashing competence were assessed by self-designed questionnaires, Chinese version of patient activation measure, and handwashing competence checklist. Results: No statistically significant difference between the intervention group and the control group on the incidence of admission due to FN, the self-efficacy in self-management, and the knowledge on prevention of FN. The self-care behavior adherence was significant at cycle 4 of AC regimen in favor of the intervention group (P = 0.036). Handwashing competence improved more significantly among subjects in the intervention group than the control group (P = 0.009). Conclusions: The education program on the prevention of FN had significantly favorable effects on self-care behavior adherence and handwashing competence across time. However, the intervention did not lead to statistically significant improvement on the incidence of admission due to FN, the self-efficacy in self-management and the knowledge level on prevention of FN. PMID:27981125

  10. Hot tots: current approach to the young febrile infant.

    PubMed

    Chinnock, R; Butto, J; Fernando, N

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic approach to the young febrile infant is a common dilemma for anyone caring for children. While historically these patients have been considered for automatic admission to the hospital, it seems prudent, because of the iatrogenic risks of hospitalization and in the interest of cost management, to identify those infants who can be safely, and effectively treated as outpatients. A clinical and laboratory process has been described to assist the clinician in this process. A thorough clinical examination accompanied by screening laboratory data will result in excellent results even in the youngest of our patients.

  11. Comparison of piperacillin tazobactam and cefoperazone sulbactam monotherapy in treatment of febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Serap; Vural, Sema; Yildirmak, Yildiz; Emecen, Merve; Erdem, Ela; Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-04-01

    Monotherapy has tended to replace the combination therapy in emprical treatment of febrile neutropenia. There is no reported trial which compares the efficacy of cefoperazone-sulbactam (CS) and piperacillin-tazobactam (PIP/TAZO) monotherapies in the treatment of febrile neutropenia. In this prospective randomized study, we aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of CS versus PIP/TAZO as empirical monotherapies in febrile neutropenic children with cancer. The study included febrile, neutropenic children hospitalized at our center for cancer. They were randomly selected to receive CS 100 mg/kg/day or PIP/TAZO 360 mg/kg/day. Duration of fever and neutropenia, absolute neutrophil count, modification, and success rate were compared between the two groups. Resolution of fever without antibiotic change was defined as success and resolution of fever with antibiotic change or death of a patient was defined as failure. Modification was defined as changing the empirical antimicrobial agent during a febrile episode. One hundred and two febrile neutropenic episodes were documented in 55 patients with a median age of 4 years. In 50 episodes CS and in 52 episodes PIP/TAZO was used. Duration of fever and neutropenia, neutrophil count, age, sex, and primary disease were not different between two groups. Success rates in the CS and PIP/TAZO groups were respectively 56 and 62% (P > 0.05). Modification rate between two groups showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). No serious adverse effect occurred in either of the groups. CS and PIP/TAZO monotherapy are both safe and effective in the initial treatment of febrile neutropenia in children with cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Clinical factors predicting bacteremia in low-risk febrile neutropenia after anti-cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ha, Young Eun; Song, Jae-Hoon; Kang, Won Ki; Peck, Kyong Ran; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Kang, Cheol-In; Joung, Mi-Kyong; Joo, Eun-Jeong; Shon, Kyung Mok

    2011-11-01

    Bacteremia is an important clinical condition in febrile neutropenia that can cause clinical failure of antimicrobial therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical factors predictive of bacteremia in low-risk febrile neutropenia at initial patient evaluation. We performed a retrospective cohort study in a university hospital in Seoul, Korea, between May 1995 and May 2007. Patients who met the criteria of low-risk febrile neutropenia at the time of visit to emergency department after anti-cancer chemotherapy were included in the analysis. During the study period, 102 episodes of bacteremia were documented among the 993 episodes of low-risk febrile neutropenia. Single gram-negative bacteremia was most frequent. In multivariate regression analysis, initial body temperature ≥39°C, initial hypotension, presence of clinical sites of infection, presence of central venous catheter, initial absolute neutrophil count <50/mm(3), and the CRP ≥10 mg/dL were statistically significant predictors for bacteremia. A scoring system using these variables was derived and the likelihood of bacteremia was well correlated with the score points with AUC under ROC curve of 0.785. Patients with low score points had low rate of bacteremia, thus, would be candidates for outpatient-based or oral antibiotic therapy. We identified major clinical factors that can predict bacteremia in low-risk febrile neutropenia.

  13. Utility of initial EEG in first complex febrile seizure.

    PubMed

    Harini, Chellamani; Nagarajan, Elanagan; Kimia, Amir A; de Carvalho, Rachel Marin; An, Sookee; Bergin, Ann M; Takeoka, Masanori; Pearl, Phillip L; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    The risk of developing epilepsy following febrile seizures (FS) varies between 2% and 10%, with complex febrile seizures (CFS) having a higher risk. We examined the utility of detected epileptiform abnormalities on the initial EEG following a first CFS in predicting subsequent epilepsy. This was a retrospective study of consecutive patients (ages 6-60 months) who were neurologically healthy or mildly delayed, seen in the ED following a first CFS and had both an EEG and minimum of 2-year follow-up. Data regarding clinical characteristics, EEG report, development of subsequent epilepsy, and type of epilepsy were collected. Established clinical predictors for subsequent epilepsy in children with FS and EEG status were evaluated for potential correlation with the development of subsequent epilepsy. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an abnormal EEG (epileptiform EEG) were calculated. A group of 154 children met our inclusion criteria. Overall, 20 (13%) children developed epilepsy. The prevalence of epilepsy was 13% (CI 8.3-19.6%). Epileptiform abnormalities were noted in 21 patients (13.6%), EEG slowing in 23 patients (14.9%), and focal asymmetry in six (3.8%). Epileptiform EEGs were noted in 20% (4/20) of patients with epilepsy and 13% (17/134) of patients without epilepsy (p=0.48). At an estimated risk of subsequent epilepsy of 10% (from population-based studies of children with FS), we determined that the PPV of an epileptiform EEG for subsequent epilepsy was 15%. None of the clinical variables (presence of more than 1 complex feature, family history of epilepsy, or status epilepticus) predicted epilepsy. An epileptiform EEG was not a sensitive measure and had a poor positive predictive value for the development of epilepsy among neurologically healthy or mildly delayed children with a first complex febrile seizure. The practice of obtaining routine EEG for predicting epilepsy after the first CFS needs clarification by well

  14. Epilepsy After Febrile Seizures: Twins Suggest Genetic Influence.

    PubMed

    Seinfeld, Syndi A; Pellock, John M; Kjeldsen, Marianne J; Nakken, Karl Otto; Corey, Linda A

    2016-02-01

    A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin pairs in the Mid-Atlantic, Danish, and Norwegian Twin Registries. The information was verified using medical records and detailed clinical and family interviews. The initial study evaluated the genetic epidemiology of febrile seizures in this population. Further information was analyzed and used to evaluate genetic associations of different febrile seizure subtypes. Histories of febrile seizures were validated in 1051 twins in 900 pairs. The febrile seizure type was classified as simple, complex, or febrile status epilepticus. There were 61% simple, 12% complex, and 7% febrile status epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures gave the highest risk for the unaffected twin to develop seizures or other neurological issues. These results are consistent with previous findings. There is a subgroup of febrile seizures that can be associated with long-term consequences. This subgroup can be associated with a significant financial and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Study on the prevalence of loss to follow-up and risk factors among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients in Baoshan city, Yunnan province].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongsheng; Zheng, Weibin; Yang, Jiafang; Li, Yanping; Hu, Anyan; Xu, Zhengcui

    2014-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of loss to follow-up (PLF) and risk factors among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients from 1989 to 2012 in Baoshan city, Yunnan province. The epidemic and follow-up databases of HIV/AIDS patients by the end of 2012 were downloaded from "the history card downloading site" of HIV/AIDS database in China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention and obtained the related data of patients from 1989 to 2012 who had local residence in Baoshan city. These data included demographic characteristics (genders, age at the time of HIV testing positive, and occupation, marital status, and education levels, et al), transmission routes, and disease staging, antiretroviral therapy (ART), and sources of samples, the first CD4(+)T cell counts, and status of follow-up, et al. Descriptive epidemiological study was used to describe the general characteristics of loss to follow-up. Multivariable Cox regression was used for determining risk factors associated with loss to follow-up. A total of 3 295 eligible HIV/AIDS patients from 1989 to 2012 were included. The accumulative study person-year was 11 416.59 years, 222 HIV/AIDS patients were lost to follow-up, and the PLF was 0.019 4/ person years (py). The highest PLF was 0.052 8/py in 2008, the lowest was 0.006 2/py in 2012. The lost patients included 56.76% (126/222) males and 43.24% (96/222) females, the PLFs were 0.020 4/py, 0.018 3/py, respectively. Baoshan city, other cities in Yunnan province, and other provinces, foreign nationality as the family register reached 53.60% (119/222) , 28.83% (64/222) , and 5.86% (13/222) , 11.71% (26/222) , respectively, and their PLFs were 0.012 5/py, 0.046 3/py, and 0.053 6/py, 0.095 6/py, respectively. Receiving ART and not receiving ART occupied 6.76% (15/222) , 93.24% (207/222) , respectively, and the PLFs were 0.001 9/py, 0.0588/py. AIDS and HIV staging standed at 8.11% (18/222) , 91.89% (204

  16. Management of febrile neutropenia in the era of bacterial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Sehnaz

    2013-01-01

    Managing cancer patients with fever and neutropenia must be considered as a medical emergency since any delay in initiating appropriate empirical antibacterial therapy may result in high rates of mortality and morbidity. Emerging antibacterial resistance in bacterial pathogens infecting febrile neutropenic patients complicates management, and choosing the type of empirical antimicrobial therapy has become a challenge. To further complicate the decision process, not all neutropenic patients are in same category of susceptibility to develop severe infection. While low-risk patients may be treated with oral antibiotics in the outpatient setting, high-risk patients usually need to be admitted to hospital and receive parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics until the neutrophil levels recover. These strategies have recently been addressed in two international guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL). This review gives a brief overview of current antimicrobial resistance problems and their effects in febrile neutropenic cancer patients by summarizing the suggestions from the IDSA and ECIL guidelines. PMID:25165543

  17. Prevalence of Bacterial Febrile Illnesses in Children in Kilosa District, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Chipwaza, Beatrice; Mhamphi, Ginethon G.; Ngatunga, Steve D.; Selemani, Majige; Amuri, Mbaraka; Mugasa, Joseph P.; Gwakisa, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial etiologies of non-malaria febrile illnesses have significantly become important due to high mortality and morbidity, particularly in children. Despite their importance, there are few reports on the epidemiology of these diseases in Tanzania, and the true burden of such illnesses remains unknown. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of leptospirosis, brucellosis, typhoid fever and urinary tract infections and their rate of co-infections with malaria. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Kilosa district hospital in Tanzania for 6 months. Febrile children aged from 2–13 years were recruited from the outpatient department. Patients were screened by serological tests such as IgM and IgG ELISA, and microscopic agglutination test. Results A total of 370 patients were enrolled; of these 85 (23.0%) had malaria parasites, 43 (11.6%) had presumptive acute leptospirosis and 26/200 (13%) had confirmed leptospirosis. Presumptive acute brucellosis due to B. abortus was identified among 26 (7.0%) of patients while B. melitensis was detected in 57 (15.4%) of the enrolled patients. Presumptive typhoid fever due to S. Typhi was identified in thirty eight (10.3%) of the participants and 69 (18.6%) had urinary tract infections. Patients presented with similar symptoms; therefore, the identification of these diseases could not be done based on clinical ground alone. Co-infections between malaria and bacterial febrile illnesses were observed in 146 patients (39.5%). Although antibacterials and/or anti-malarials were prescribed in most patients, some patients did not receive the appropriate treatment. Conclusion The study has underscored the importance of febrile bacterial diseases including zoonoses such as leptospirosis and brucellosis in febrile children, and thus such illnesses should be considered by clinicians in the differential diagnoses of febrile diseases. However, access to diagnostic tests for discrimination of febrile illnesses is

  18. LH750 hematology analyzers to identify malaria and dengue and distinguish them from other febrile illnesses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Bhargava, M; Sukhachev, D; Datta, S; Wattal, C

    2014-02-01

    Tropical febrile illnesses such as malaria and dengue are challenging to differentiate clinically. Automated cellular indices from hematology analyzers may afford a preliminary rapid distinction. Blood count and VCS parameters from 114 malaria patients, 105 dengue patients, and 105 febrile controls without dengue or malaria were analyzed. Statistical discriminant functions were generated, and their diagnostic performances were assessed by ROC curve analysis. Three statistical functions were generated: (i) malaria-vs.-controls factor incorporating platelet count and standard deviations of lymphocyte volume and conductivity that identified malaria with 90.4% sensitivity, 88.6% specificity; (ii) dengue-vs.-controls factor incorporating platelet count, lymphocyte percentage and standard deviation of lymphocyte conductivity that identified dengue with 81.0% sensitivity and 77.1% specificity; and (iii) febrile-controls-vs.-malaria/dengue factor incorporating mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, neutrophil percentage, mean lymphocyte and monocyte volumes, and standard deviation of monocyte volume that distinguished malaria and dengue from other febrile illnesses with 85.1% sensitivity and 91.4% specificity. Leukocyte abnormalities quantitated by automated analyzers successfully identified malaria and dengue and distinguished them from other fevers. These economic discriminant functions can be rapidly calculated by analyzer software programs to generate electronic flags to trigger-specific testing. They could potentially transform diagnostic approaches to tropical febrile illnesses in cost-constrained settings. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Iron-deficiency Anemia in Children with Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    GHASEMI, Fateme; VALIZADEH, Fateme; TAEE, Nadere

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering the recurrence of febrile seizure and costs for families, many studies have attempted to identify its risk factors. Some recent studies have reported that anemia is more common in children with febrile convulsion, whereas others have reported that iron deficiency raises the seizure threshold. This study was done to compare iron-deficiency anemia in children with first FS with children having febrile illness alone and with healthy children. Materials & Methods This case-control study evaluated 300 children in three groups (first FS, febrile without convulsion, and healthy) in Khoramabad Madani Hospital from September 2009 to September 2010. Body temperature on admission was measured using the tympanic method. CBC diff, MCV, MCH, MCHC, serum iron, plasma ferritin and TIBC tests were performed for all participants. Data were analyzed by frequency, mean, standard deviation, ANOVA, and chi-square statistical tests. Odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression at a confidence level of 95%. Results Forty percent of the cases with FS had iron-deficiency anemia, compared to 26% of children with febrile illness without seizure and 12% of healthy children. The Odds ratio for iron-deficiency anemia in the patients with FS was 1.89 (95% CI, 1.04-5.17) compared to the febrile children without convulsion and 2.21 (95% CI, 1.54-3.46) compared to the healthy group. Conclusion Children with FS are more likely to be iron-deficient than those with febrile illness alone and healthy children. Thus, iron-deficiency anemia could be a risk factor for FS. PMID:24949050

  20. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Khair, Abdulhafeez M.; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes. PMID:26697219

  1. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Khair, Abdulhafeez M; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes.

  2. Chikungunya Virus in Febrile Humans and Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes, Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cigarroa-Toledo, Nohemi; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa C.; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G.; Baak-Baak, Carlos M.; Torres-Chablé, Oswaldo M.; Hamid, Md-Nafiz; Friedberg, Iddo; González-Martinez, Pedro; Alonzo-Salomon, Gabriela; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy P.; Rivero-Cárdenas, Nubia; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe C.; Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) was isolated from 12 febrile humans in Yucatan, Mexico, in 2015. One patient was co-infected with dengue virus type 1. Two additional CHIKV isolates were obtained from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes collected in the homes of patients. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the CHIKV isolates belong to the Asian lineage. PMID:27347760

  3. Febrile seizrues: demographic, clinical and etiological profile of children admitted with febrile seizures in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shabbir; Tarar, Saba Haider

    2015-09-01

    The hospital-based prospective study was conducted in Combined Military Hospital, Kharian, Pakistan, from January 2012 to December 2013, to determine the demographic, clinical and aetiological profile of paediatric patients admitted with febrile seizures. Patients clinically diagnosed as a case of febrile seizure were included in study. Patient's information was collected using a predesigned proforma. Out of total enrolled 100 children, 68(68%) were male and 32(32%) female. Mean age of the sample was22.58±12.50 months. Mean time interval between onset of fever and occurrence of seizures was17.68±12.09 hours. Overall, 78(78%) patients had simple seizures. Only 30(30%) patients had positive family history and 35(35%) had recurrence of seizures during the same episode of illness. Acute respiratory infection was the commonest cause for FS in 72(72%).Besides, 64(64%) patients were malnourished, 77(77%) had anaemia and 51(51%) had raised total leukocyte count.

  4. Neurogenic pulmonary edema combined with febrile seizures in early childhood-A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Keiji; Matsubara, Kousaku; Hori, Masayuki; Nigami, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Aya; Isome, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Yu; Nagai, Sadayuki

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical entity that can occur following central nervous system disorders. However, NPE occurs quite rarely in early childhood, and there has only been one report about pediatric NPE associated with febrile seizures. Two cases are reported here. One case involved a 2-year-old girl who presented with febrile seizures, which rapidly progressed to severe NPE. Since the NPE occurred in the emergency department room, the patient was able to be resuscitated via immediate endotracheal intubation. The other case involved an 11-month-old boy who developed respiratory distress following a 50-min episode of febrile status epilepticus. Both patients required respiratory management in the intensive care unit. However their conditions were dramatically improved within several days and fully recovered without any sequelae.

  5. A prospectively validated nomogram for predicting the risk of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Bozcuk, H; Yıldız, M; Artaç, M; Kocer, M; Kaya, Ç; Ulukal, E; Ay, S; Kılıç, M P; Şimşek, E H; Kılıçkaya, P; Uçar, S; Coskun, H S; Savas, B

    2015-06-01

    There is clinical need to predict risk of febrile neutropenia before a specific cycle of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Data on 3882 chemotherapy cycles in 1089 consecutive patients with lung, breast, and colon cancer from four teaching hospitals were used to construct a predictive model for febrile neutropenia. A final nomogram derived from the multivariate predictive model was prospectively confirmed in a second cohort of 960 consecutive cases and 1444 cycles. The following factors were used to construct the nomogram: previous history of febrile neutropenia, pre-cycle lymphocyte count, type of cancer, cycle of current chemotherapy, and patient age. The predictive model had a concordance index of 0.95 (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.91-0.99) in the derivation cohort and 0.85 (95 % CI = 0.80-0.91) in the external validation cohort. A threshold of 15 % for the risk of febrile neutropenia in the derivation cohort was associated with a sensitivity of 0.76 and specificity of 0.98. These figures were 1.00 and 0.49 in the validation cohort if a risk threshold of 50 % was chosen. This nomogram is helpful in the prediction of febrile neutropenia after chemotherapy in patients with lung, breast, and colon cancer. Usage of this nomogram may help decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with febrile neutropenia and deserves further validation.

  6. Effect of meropenem with or without immunoglobulin as second-line therapy for pediatric febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sano, Hirozumi; Kishimoto, Kenji; Yasuda, Kazue; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2014-08-01

    Meropenem (MEPM) is widely used for treatment of febrile neutropenia. There have been many reports on MEPM for pediatric febrile neutropenia showing success rates of approximately 50-75%. Although i.v. immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used for treatment of infection with antibiotics, there has been no report on the efficacy of IVIG for pediatric febrile neutropenia. This prospective randomized study was therefore carried out to clarify the usefulness of MEPM with or without IVIG as second line-therapy for pediatric febrile neutropenia. A total of 61 pediatric patients with 146 episodes were judged to have failure of first-line therapy (August 2008-April 2010: cefozopran vs cefepime; April 2010-April 2012: cefepime vs piperacillin/tazobactam) for febrile neutropenia, and were randomized to MEPM and MEPM + IVIG groups. MEPM with or without IVIG as second-line therapy was effective in 68.1% of a total of 144 episodes. Success rates in the MEPM and MEPM + IVIG groups were 66.3% and 70.5%, respectively. Furthermore, success rates for patients with IgG <500 mg/dL were 62.5% in the MEPM group and 81.3% in the MEPM + IVIG group. This result, however, was not statistically significant, possibly because of the small sample size. MEPM is effective and safe for second-line treatment of febrile episodes in neutropenic pediatric patients. Moreover, IVIG is effective for patients with low serum IgG. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. A comparative study of febrile and afebrile seizures associated with mild gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Hye; Chung, Sajun

    2013-08-01

    Seizures associated with mild gastroenteritis have been increasingly reported. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of febrile and afebrile seizures associated with mild gastroenteritis, and attempted to determine the influence of fever in these two groups. We reviewed the medical records of 59 children presenting with seizures during a mild gastroenteritis episode. They were classified into an afebrile group (n=27) and a febrile group (n=32). We compared the age of onset, sex, seizure semiology, frequency, duration, family history, and prior history of seizures between the two groups. The mean age, family history, seizure semiology, and frequency of seizures were not significantly different between the two groups. However, more patients in the afebrile group experienced ≥ 2 seizures/day than in the febrile group (63% vs. 38%, p=0.051). The febrile patients had a tendency of experiencing prolonged seizures lasting ≥ 5 min compared with the afebrile group (34% vs. 11%, p=0.063). Prior febrile seizures were noted in 5 of the 32 patients (15.6%) in the febrile group, while none of the 27 patients in the afebrile group had a history of prior seizures (p=0.056). It seems that the presence of fever may influence the clinical characteristics of seizures associated with mild gastroenteritis. We suggest that afebrile seizures associated with gastroenteritis may be regarded as a distinct condition from those associated with fever, and it needs to be clarified by a further large sample study. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Febrile Convulsions: Their Significance for Later Intellectual Development and Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that intellectual and behavioral outcomes in children who have had febrile convulsions are dependent on preseizure status, unilaterality of the initial fit, recurrent febrile seizures, continued neurological abnormalities, the advent of fits when afebrile, and socioeconomic status. Suggests that a febrile convulsion should be followed up…

  9. Risk of epilepsy after febrile convulsions: a national cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Verity, C M; Golding, J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To identify children with febrile convulsions, classify their febrile convulsions into simple and complex, and determine the number and type of subsequent afebrile seizures in those children. DESIGN--National population based study. SETTING--United Kingdom. SUBJECTS--16,004 neonatal survivors born during one week in April 1970. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Information about febrile and afebrile seizures obtained from questionnaires at 5 and 10 years of age and from hospital records. RESULTS--Information was available for 14,676 of the cohort children. 398 (2.7%) of them had had at least one febrile convulsion. 16 children were known to be neurologically or developmentally abnormal before the first attack. Of the remaining 382 children, 305 had had a simple first febrile convulsion and 77 a complex first febrile convulsion. Thirteen of the 382 had had one or more afebrile seizures, nine of whom had developed epilepsy (recurrent afebrile seizures). A higher proportion of children with complex febrile convulsions (6/95) rather than simple febrile convulsions (3/287) developed epilepsy, the risk being highest for those who had had focal febrile convulsions (5/17; chi 2 = 39.9, p less than 0.001). Three of the 32 children who had prolonged febrile convulsions developed afebrile complex partial seizures. CONCLUSIONS--The risk of epilepsy after febrile convulsions is much less than reported in many hospital studies, and if febrile convulsions cause brain damage that leads to later epilepsy this is a rare occurrence. PMID:1760604

  10. Febrile Convulsions: Their Significance for Later Intellectual Development and Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that intellectual and behavioral outcomes in children who have had febrile convulsions are dependent on preseizure status, unilaterality of the initial fit, recurrent febrile seizures, continued neurological abnormalities, the advent of fits when afebrile, and socioeconomic status. Suggests that a febrile convulsion should be followed up…

  11. Malaria, a difficult diagnosis in a febrile patient with sub-microscopic parasitaemia and polyclonal lymphocyte activation outside the endemic region, in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A case of autochthonous Plasmodium vivax malaria with sub-microscopic parasitaemia and polyclonal B-cell activation (PBA) (as reflected by positive IgM and IgG serology for toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, and antinuclear and rheumatoid factors) was diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after consecutive negative rapid diagnostic test results and blood films. The patient, a 44-year-old man from Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, had visited the Atlantic Forest, a tourist, non-malaria-endemic area where no autochthonous cases of ’bromeliad malaria‘ has ever been described. The characteristic pattern of fever, associated with PBA, was the clue to malaria diagnosis, despite consecutive negative thick blood smears. The study highlights a need for changes in clinical and laboratory diagnostic approaches, namely the incorporation of PCR as part of the current routine malaria diagnostic methods in non-endemic areas. PMID:24200365

  12. Clinical malaria along the China-Myanmar border, Yunnan Province, China, January 2011-August 2012.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guofa; Sun, Ling; Xia, Rongji; Duan, Yizhong; Xu, Jianwei; Yang, Henglin; Wang, Ying; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Xiang, Zheng; Yan, Guiyun; Cui, Liwang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2014-04-01

    Passive surveillance for malaria cases was conducted in Yunnan Province, China, along the China-Myanmar border. Infection with Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum protozoa accounted for 69% and 28% of the cases, respectively. Most patients were adult men. Cross-border travel into Myanmar was a key risk factor for P. falciparum malaria in China.

  13. Febrile illnesses of different etiology among outpatients in four health centers in Northwestern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Animut, Abebe; Mekonnen, Yalemtsehay; Shimelis, Damte; Ephraim, Eden

    2009-03-01

    Fever of different etiology is common in tropical and subtropical countries of the world. Etiological agents of febrile illnesses were assessed in 653 acute febrile patients aged 3 to 17 years who attended the outpatient departments of Dembecha Health Center, Jiga Health Center, Quarit Health Center, and Finoteselam Hospital in western Gojjam zone, northwestern Ethiopia. Malaria was the most prevalent illness, infecting 62% of all cases. Its prevalence varied significantly from 52% (Dembecha) to 72.7% (Quarit) (chi(2)=15.02, P=0.000). Plasmodium falciparum was the first cause of malaria (47.3%) followed by P. vivax (23%). Mixed infection of both P. falciparum and P. vivax was found in 7.2% of the cases. The other febrile infections were pneumonia (7%), typhoid (5.8%), typhus (5.1%), and brucellosis (2.6%). The availability of diagnostic facilities and the awareness of the community regarding the prevalence of non-malaria febrile illnesses are very low, and these illnesses are diagnosed clinically. As these illnesses are nonspecific, especially during the early stages of onset, misdiagnosis and mistreatment can occur. Therefore, it is recommended that the necessary diagnostic materials and awareness should be in place for prompt treatment of febrile cases in these districts.

  14. [Epidemiological surveillance of febrile rash illness].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Gabriela Fidela; Rojas-Mendoza, Teresita; Cabrera-Gaytán, David Alejandro; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción; Maldonado-Burgos, Martha Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Three imported cases of measles were detected in 2011, so the issue of surveillance with epidemiological alerts intensified. The aim of this article is to describe the phenomenon of intensified surveillance of febrile rash illness before the import of confirmed measles in the country at the Mexican Institute of Social Security cases. The cases of epidemiological surveillance system 2011 were obtained was compared with the prior year It was determined t-Student mean difference and Wilson test for proportions, both with an alpha value of 0.05. 2786 cases of febrile rash illness were reported, 51.2 % more cases than the previous year were reported in 2011, the number of reported cases in relation to the expected increase in 29 of the 35 Delegations, an increase in the average number of cases reported from week 26. 67.4 % of reported cases are concentrated in children under 5 years of age. The average days to collect laboratory sample improved after issuing alerts from 3.4 to 2.6 days (p < 0.000000559). A significant increase in reported cases of febrile rash illness compared with the prior year was appreciated. The Institute has a surveillance system for robust and febrile rash illness, which has identified risks to the population.

  15. Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease (pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta fulminans) associated with parvovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti; Alshalfan, Faisal; Al-Otaibi, Mohammad; Al-Sabah, Humoud; Rajy, Jihan M

    2013-06-01

    Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease is a rare fulminant variant of pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta, characterized by a rapidly progressive course with predominant ulceronecrotic lesions associated with fever and systemic manifestations. It carries a great morbidity and is potentially fatal. The exact pathogenesis is not clear, and it has been proposed to be the result of hypersensitivity reaction to an infection. We report a patient with febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease in a 12-year-old boy in whom the condition was most likely precipitated by parvovirus infection, and he showed a favorable response to a combination of prednisolone with narrow band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) phototherapy.

  16. Therapeutic burst-suppression coma in pediatric febrile refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chou, Cheng-Che; Lan, Shih-Yun; Hsiao, Hsiang-Ju; Wang, Yu; Chan, Oi-Wa; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Lin, Kuang-Lin

    2017-09-01

    Evidence for the beneficial effect of therapeutic burst-suppression coma in pediatric patients with febrile refractory status epilepticus is limited, and the clinical outcomes of this treatment strategy are largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the outcomes of therapeutic burst-suppression coma in a series of children with febrile refractory status epilepticus. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive pediatric patients with febrile refractory status epilepticus admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit between January 2000 and December 2013. The clinical characteristics were analyzed. Thirty-five patients (23 boys; age range: 1-18years) were enrolled, of whom 28 (80%) developed super-refractory status epilepticus. All of the patients received the continuous administration of intravenous antiepileptic drugs for febrile refractory status epilepticus, and 26 (74.3%) achieved therapeutic burst-suppression coma. All of the patients received mechanical ventilatory support, and 26 (74.3%) received inotropic agents. Eight (22.9%) patients died within 1month. The neurologically functional outcomes at 6months were good in six (27.3%) of the 22 survivors, of whom two returned to clinical baseline. The patients with therapeutic burst-suppression coma were significantly associated with hemodynamic support than the patients with electrographic seizures control (p=0.03), and had a trend of higher 1-month mortality rate, worse 6months outcomes, and a longer duration of hospitalization. Our results suggest that therapeutic burst-suppression coma to treat febrile refractory status epilepticus may lead to an increased risk of hemodynamic instability and a trend of worse outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk Adapted Management of Febrile Neutrepenia and Early Cessation of Empirical Antibiotherapy in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Ali Hakan; Tekgündüz, Emre; Duygu, Fazilet; Koca, Dicle; Bekdemir, Filiz; Batgi, Hikmetullah; Ulu Uncu, Bahar; Yiğenoğlu, Tuğçe Nur; Dal, Mehmet Sinan; Çakar Kızıl, Merih; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative treatment option for many haematological disorders. Infection following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is one of the major causes of mortality. Aims: To investigate the outcomes of early cessation of empirical antibiotic treatment per protocol in febrile neutropenia patients who have undergone haematopoietic stem cell transplantation at our clinic. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: The present study retrospectively evaluated febrile neutropenia attacks in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients during the period June 2014 - January 2015 at our haematopoietic stem cell transplantation clinic. Results: A total of 72 febrile neutropenia attacks were evaluated in 53 patients. In 46 febrile neutropenia attacks, microbiologic cultures revealed positive results. In culture-positive febrile neutropenia episodes a single bacterium was isolated in 32 cases and multiple strains were isolated in 14. In 15 patients, empirical antibiotic therapy was discontinued after 72 hours. These patients were clinically stable, without evident focus of infection and had negative culture results. Only 4 recurrent episodes were observed (27%) after cessation of antibiotherapy. No patient died as a result of recurrent infection. The 30-day and 100-day post-transplantation mortality rates of patients with febrile neutropenia episodes were 11.3% (6/53) and 3.8% (2/53), respectively. Infection-related 30-day and 100-day mortality rates were 7.5% (4/53) and 0% (0/53), respectively. Conclusion: The main message of our study is that early cessation of empirical antibiotherapy seems to be feasible in eligible patients without increasing febrile neutropenia mortality rates. PMID:28418340

  18. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in rural Cambodia: a 3-year prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Tara C; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects.

  19. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Rural Cambodia: A 3-Year Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C.; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J.; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects. PMID:24755844

  20. Community Knowledge and Attitudes and Health Workers' Practices regarding Non-malaria Febrile Illnesses in Eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Chipwaza, Beatrice; Mugasa, Joseph P.; Mayumana, Iddy; Amuri, Mbaraka; Makungu, Christina; Gwakisa, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although malaria has been the leading cause of fever for many years, with improved control regimes malaria transmission, morbidity and mortality have decreased. Recent studies have increasingly demonstrated the importance of non-malaria fevers, which have significantly improved our understanding of etiologies of febrile illnesses. A number of non-malaria febrile illnesses including Rift Valley Fever, dengue fever, Chikungunya virus infection, leptospirosis, tick-borne relapsing fever and Q-fever have been reported in Tanzania. This study aimed at assessing the awareness of communities and practices of health workers on non-malaria febrile illnesses. Methods Twelve focus group discussions with members of communities and 14 in-depth interviews with health workers were conducted in Kilosa district, Tanzania. Transcripts were coded into different groups using MaxQDA software and analyzed through thematic content analysis. Results The study revealed that the awareness of the study participants on non-malaria febrile illnesses was low and many community members believed that most instances of fever are due to malaria. In addition, the majority had inappropriate beliefs about the possible causes of fever. In most cases, non-malaria febrile illnesses were considered following a negative Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test (mRDT) result or persistent fevers after completion of anti-malaria dosage. Therefore, in the absence of mRDTs, there is over diagnosis of malaria and under diagnosis of non-malaria illnesses. Shortages of diagnostic facilities for febrile illnesses including mRDTs were repeatedly reported as a major barrier to proper diagnosis and treatment of febrile patients. Conclusion Our results emphasize the need for creating community awareness on other causes of fever apart from malaria. Based on our study, appropriate treatment of febrile patients will require inputs geared towards strengthening of diagnostic facilities, drugs availability and optimal

  1. Diagnosis and Management of Borrelia turicatae Infection in Febrile Soldier, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anna M; Pietralczyk, Elizabeth; Lopez, Job E; Brooks, Christopher; Schriefer, Martin E; Wozniak, Edward; Stermole, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    In August 2015, a soldier returned from field exercises in Texas, USA, with nonspecific febrile illness. Culture and sequencing of spirochetes from peripheral blood diagnosed Borrelia turicatae infection. The patient recovered after receiving doxycycline. No illness occurred in asymptomatic soldiers potentially exposed to the vector tick and prophylactically given treatment.

  2. Febrile morbidity in severe and critical ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Y; Elchalal, U; Schenker, J G

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this study was to define the incidence of febrile morbidity and its causes in severe and critical ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). For this purpose, we reviewed the medical records of all OHSS patients hospitalized in 16 out of 19 tertiary medical centres in Israel between January 1987 and December 1996. Febrile morbidity was defined as at least one episode of temperature rise above 38 degrees C lasting > or =24 h. A total of 2902 patients (3305 hospitalizations) with OHSS was identified, of whom 196 had severe, and 13 critical, OHSS. Among the 209 patients investigated the incidence of febrile morbidity was 82.3%, of which 20.5% was attributed to urinary tract infection, 3.8% to pneumonia, 3.3% to upper respiratory tract infection, 2.0% to intravenous line phlebitis, 1.0% to cellulitis at an abdominal puncture site, 1.0% to postoperative wound infections and 0.5 % to gluteal abscess at the site of progesterone injection. Non-typical organisms were frequently isolated, such as Pseudomonas, Proteus, Klebsiella and Enterobacter species. No infectious aetiology was found in 105 patients (50.2%). Hypoglobulinaemia was recorded in most patients, while ascitic and pleural fluids aspirated from these patients contained high globulin concentrations. We conclude that infection-related febrile morbidity in severe and critical OHSS is high, and may be attributed to some degree of immunodeficiency associated with loss of plasma globulins to the third space. However, non-infection-related febrile morbidity is even higher and may be attributed to endogenous pyrogenic mechanisms.

  3. Distal Ureteral Diameter Ratio is Predictive of Breakthrough Febrile Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Arlen, Angela M; Leong, Traci; Guidos, Paul J; Alexander, Siobhan E; Cooper, Christopher S

    2017-07-08

    Distal ureteral diameter ratio is an objective measure that is prognostic of spontaneous resolution of vesicoureteral reflux. Along with likelihood of resolution, improved identification of children at risk for recurrent febrile urinary tract infections may impact management decisions. We evaluated the usefulness of ureteral diameter ratio as a predictive factor for breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections. Children with primary vesicoureteral reflux and detailed voiding cystourethrogram were identified. Ureteral diameter ratio was computed by measuring largest ureteral diameter within the pelvis and dividing by the distance between L1 and L3 vertebral bodies. Demographics, vesicoureteral reflux grade, laterality, presence/absence of bladder-bowel dysfunction, and ureteral diameter ratio were tested in univariate and multivariable analyses. Primary outcome was breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections. We analyzed 112 girls and 28 boys with a mean ± SD age of 2.5 ± 2.3 years at diagnosis. Vesicoureteral reflux was grade 1 to 2 in 64 patients (45.7%), grade 3 in 50 (35.7%), grade 4 in 16 (11.4%) and grade 5 in 10 (7.2%). Mean ± SD followup was 3.2 ± 2.7 years. A total of 40 children (28.6%) experienced breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections. Ureteral diameter ratio was significantly greater in children with (0.36) vs without (0.25) breakthrough febrile infections (p = 0.004). Controlling for vesicoureteral reflux grade, every 0.1 U increase in ureteral diameter ratio resulted in 1.7 times increased odds of breakthrough infection (95% CI 1.24 to 2.26, p <0.0001). Children with increased distal ureteral diameter ratio are at greater risk for breakthrough febrile urinary tract infections independent of reflux grade. Ureteral diameter ratio provides valuable prognostic information about risk of recurrent pyelonephritis and may assist with clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  4. Evaluation of empiric antibiotic de-escalation in febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Amanda L; Corrigan, Patricia A; Patel, Shejal; Hawks, Kelly G

    2016-10-01

    Up until 2010, the recommended duration of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics for febrile neutropenia was until absolute neutrophil count (ANC) recovery. An updated guideline on the use of antimicrobial agents in neutropenic patients with cancer indicates that patients who have completed an appropriate treatment course of broad-spectrum antibiotics, with resolution of signs and symptoms of infection but persistent neutropenia, can be de-escalated to oral fluoroquinolone prophylaxis until ANC recovery. The primary objective of this retrospective investigation was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of de-escalating broad-spectrum antibiotics in patients remaining neutropenic after at least 14 days of empiric broadspectrum antibiotics for febrile neutropenia compared to patients continuing broad-spectrum antibiotics until ANC recovery. There were 16 patients (61.5%) in the comparator group who met the primary endpoint of remaining afebrile and without escalation of antibiotics for at least 72 hours after 14 days of broad-spectrum antibiotics and 21 patients (80.7%) in the de-escalation group who met the primary endpoint of remaining afebrile and without reinitiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics for at least 72 hours after de-escalation to levofloxacin therapy (p = 0.11). Mean total duration of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was 23.5 ± 1.5 days in the comparator group versus 22.2 ± 1.43 days in the de-escalation group (p = 0.39). Results of this investigation indicate that broad-spectrum antibiotics can be safely de-escalated to levofloxacin prophylaxis prior to ANC recovery in select patients. This practice may decrease the duration of broad-spectrum antibiotic exposure and associated complications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Risk Factors for Febrile Neutropenia during Chemotherapy for HIV-Related Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinyong; Kim, Tae Min; Hwang, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Nak-Hyun; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Song, Kyoung-ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Park, Sang-Won; Kim, Hong Bin; Kim, Nam Joong; Oh, Myoung-don

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated risk factors for neutropenic fever and febrile prolonged neutropenia during vincristine-including chemotherapy to treat HIV-related lymphoma to investigate whether protease inhibitor (PI) treatment is associated with infectious complications due to drug interactions with chemotherapeutic agents. We included all HIV patients who received chemotherapy including vincristine for lymphoma at a single referral center in 1999-2010. Neutropenic fever was defined as absolute neutrophil count < 500 cells/µL with body temperature over 38℃; and prolonged neutropenia was defined if it persisted over 7 days. CODOX-M/IVAC and Stanford regimens were considered high-risk regimens for prolonged neutropenia. We analyzed 48 cycles of chemotherapy in 17 HIV patients with lymphoma. There were 22 neutropenic fever and 12 febrile prolonged neutropenia events. In multivariate analysis, neutropenic fever was associated with old age and low CD4 cell count, but not with PI use or ritonavir-boosted PI use. Low CD4 cell count and high-risk regimens were associated with febrile prolonged neutropenia. Neutropenic fever and febrile prolonged neutropenia is associated with old age, low CD4 cell count, and high-risk regimens, but not PI use, in HIV patients undergoing chemotherapy including vincristine for lymphoma. PMID:23255844

  6. Risk factors for febrile neutropenia during chemotherapy for HIV-related lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinyong; Kim, Tae Min; Hwang, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Nak-Hyun; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Song, Kyoung-ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Park, Sang-Won; Kim, Hong Bin; Kim, Nam Joong; Park, Wan Beom; Oh, Myoung-don

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated risk factors for neutropenic fever and febrile prolonged neutropenia during vincristine-including chemotherapy to treat HIV-related lymphoma to investigate whether protease inhibitor (PI) treatment is associated with infectious complications due to drug interactions with chemotherapeutic agents. We included all HIV patients who received chemotherapy including vincristine for lymphoma at a single referral center in 1999-2010. Neutropenic fever was defined as absolute neutrophil count < 500 cells/µL with body temperature over 38℃; and prolonged neutropenia was defined if it persisted over 7 days. CODOX-M/IVAC and Stanford regimens were considered high-risk regimens for prolonged neutropenia. We analyzed 48 cycles of chemotherapy in 17 HIV patients with lymphoma. There were 22 neutropenic fever and 12 febrile prolonged neutropenia events. In multivariate analysis, neutropenic fever was associated with old age and low CD4 cell count, but not with PI use or ritonavir-boosted PI use. Low CD4 cell count and high-risk regimens were associated with febrile prolonged neutropenia. Neutropenic fever and febrile prolonged neutropenia is associated with old age, low CD4 cell count, and high-risk regimens, but not PI use, in HIV patients undergoing chemotherapy including vincristine for lymphoma.

  7. Pediatric Oncology Discharges With Febrile Neutropenia: Variation in Location of Care.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Elysia; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Aftandilian, Catherine; Saynina, Olga; Wise, Paul

    2017-01-01

    We examined the use of Pediatric Cancer Specialty Centers (PCSCs) over time and the length of stay (LOS) in pediatric oncology patients with a diagnosis of febrile neutropenia. PCSCs were defined as Children's Oncology Group and California Children's Services designated centers. We performed a retrospective analysis on all discharges of pediatric (0 to 18) oncology patients with febrile neutropenia in California (1983 to 2011) using the private Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database. We examined influence of age, sex, race/ethnicity, payer, income, distance, tumor type, and complications on utilization of PCSCs and LOS (SAS 9.2). Analysis of 24,559 pediatric oncology febrile neutropenia discharges showed hospitalizations in PCSCs increasing from 48% in 1983 to 94% in 2011. The adjusted regression analysis showed decreased PCSC utilization for ages 15 to 18, Hispanic patients, and those living >40 miles away. The median PCSC LOS was 9 days compared with 7 days at a non-PCSC (P<0.0001). Discharge from a PCSC was associated with a LOS >8 days after controlling for complications. Inpatient PCSC care for febrile neutropenia in California has increased since 1983. Receiving care at a PCSC is influenced by age, tumor type, ethnicity, geography, and complications.

  8. Urinary Biomarkers for Screening for Renal Scarring in Children with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Tetsuya; Kimata, Takahisa; Yamanouchi, Sohsaku; Kato, Shogo; Tsuji, Shoji; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent febrile urinary tract infections during infancy cause renal scarring, which is characterized by progressive focal interstitial fibrosis and may lead to renal failure. Renal scarring can be diagnosed through scintigraphy, although it seems impractical to perform renal scintigraphy for all infants with febrile urinary tract infections. Therefore, it is important to search for a biomarker to identify the presence of renal scarring. We hypothesized that urinary biomarkers of nephropathy may increase in infants with renal scarring following febrile urinary tract infections. A total of 49 infants who underwent renal scintigraphy for febrile urinary tract infections were enrolled in the study. Several measurements were performed using urine samples, including total proteins, beta2-microglobulins, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin, liver-type fatty acid binding protein and angiotensinogen. Values were corrected by creatinine and compared between patients with and without renal scarring. Among urinary biomarkers only angiotensinogen in patients with scarring (median 14.6 μg/gm creatinine) demonstrated significantly higher levels than in patients without scarring (3.6 μg/gm creatinine, p <0.001). Urinary angiotensinogen may be useful for diagnosing the presence of renal scarring. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Frequency of recurrent convulsions after a first febrile seizure: two-year observation results].

    PubMed

    Mustafić, Nevzeta; Tahirović, Husref; Trnovcević, Jasmina

    2010-01-01

    Febrile convulsions are the most frequent neurological disorder of early childhood. One third of children with febrile convulsions will have a recurrence, and only a small number will develop afebrile convulsions with epilepsy variation. The aim of the work was to establish the frequency of convulsion recurrence through the retrospective study with regard to age, type of recurrence, and applied prophylaxis in children in Tuzla Canton in a two-year period after the first febrile convulsion. Amongst 716 patients, 21.9% had a recurrence. Recurrence of simple febrile convulsions occurred in 124 (78.9%), complex in 18 (11.5%), and 14 (9.8%) patients had afebrile convulsions. There was no statistically significant difference in recurrence appearance between patients who received continuous and intermittent prophylaxis or different type of continuous prophylaxis. Knowledge of recurrence frequency according to age groups opens the possibility of recurrence prevention with adequate therapeutic measures, especially in home care conditions. Good parent education would represent the first step in recurrence prevention.

  10. [Complex febrile seizures: study of the associated pathology and practical use of complementary tests].

    PubMed

    Berzosa López, R; Ramos Fernández, J M; Martínez Antón, J; Espinosa Fernández, M G; Urda Cardona, A

    2014-06-01

    Although one third of febrile seizures are complex, a consensus has still not been reached on how to manage them, as is the case with simple febrile seizures. The objective of this study is to estimate the usefulness of complementary examinations and the risk of associated serious intracranial pathology. A retrospective review was conducted from 2003 until 2011 on patients from 6 months to 6 years presenting with a complex febrile seizure admitted to a tertiary care hospital, excluding the cases with previous neurological disease. Epidemiological and clinic variables were collected, as well as complementary tests and complications. We found 65 patients (31 females and 34 males), of whom 44 had repeated seizures in the first 24 hours, with 15 having focal seizures. The vast majority (90%) of the recurrences occurred before 15 hours. The mean age was 20.7 months and temperature was 39.1 ± 0.12°C. None of the patients had severe intracranial pathology. The electroencephalogram gave no helpful information for the diagnosis. Neuroimaging was normal in all studied cases. The incidence of complications in complex febrile seizure in our series did not justify the systematic admission or the systematic study with complementary tests when the neurological examination was normal. The routine electroencephalogram does not appear to be justified. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Causative Pathogens of Febrile Neutropaenia in Children Treated for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lam, Joyce Cm; Chai, Jie Yang; Wong, Yi Ling; Tan, Natalie Wh; Ha, Christina Tt; Chan, Mei Yoke; Tan, Ah Moy

    2015-11-01

    Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) using intensive chemotherapy has resulted in high cure rates but also substantial morbidity. Infective complications represent a significant proportion of treatment-related toxicity. The objective of this study was to describe the microbiological aetiology and clinical outcome of episodes of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropaenia in a cohort of children treated for ALL at our institution. Patients with ALL were treated with either the HKSGALL93 or the Malaysia-Singapore (Ma-Spore) 2003 chemotherapy protocols. The records of 197 patients who completed the intensive phase of treatment, defined as the period of treatment from induction, central nervous system (CNS)-directed therapy to reinduction from June 2000 to January 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. There were a total of 587 episodes of febrile neutropaenia in 197 patients, translating to an overall rate of 2.98 episodes per patient. A causative pathogen was isolated in 22.7% of episodes. An equal proportion of Gram-positive bacteria (36.4%) and Gram-negative bacteria (36.4%) were most frequently isolated followed by viral pathogens (17.4%), fungal pathogens (8.4%) and other bacteria (1.2%). Fungal organisms accounted for a higher proportion of clinically severe episodes of febrile neutropaenia requiring admission to the high-dependency or intensive care unit (23.1%). The overall mortality rate from all episodes was 1.5%. Febrile neutropaenia continues to be of concern in ALL patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy. The majority of episodes will not have an identifiable causative organism. Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria were the most common causative pathogens identified. With appropriate antimicrobial therapy and supportive management, the overall risk of mortality from febrile neutropaenia is extremely low.

  12. Recognition and management of febrile convulsion in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Kirkham, Emily Natasha; Shirt, Bethany

    2015-08-26

    Febrile convulsion is characterised by convulsion associated with fever in an infant or child aged between six months and six years. The febrile illness causing the convulsion should not be secondary to an intracranial infection (meningitis or encephalitis) or acute electrolyte imbalance. Most cases of febrile convulsion are short lived and self-terminating. However, a few cases of prolonged febrile convulsion may need anticonvulsant medication to stop the seizure. Management is mainly symptomatic, although anticonvulsants may have a role in a small number of children with complex or recurrent febrile convulsion. Referral to paediatric neurologists may be necessary in cases of complex or recurrent febrile convulsion, or in those where a pre-existing neurological disorder exists. One third of children will develop a further febrile convulsion during subsequent febrile illness. Nurses have a vital role in managing children with febrile convulsion, educating parents about the condition and dispelling myths. This article outlines the presentation, management, investigations and prognosis for febrile convulsion, indicating how nurses working in different clinical areas can help to manage this common childhood condition.

  13. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis as a novel indicator of oxidative stress in children with simple febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Bahri; Erel, Özcan; Ersavaş, Dilek; Yürümez, Yusuf

    2017-08-14

    Simple febrile seizures are generally benign, but during the seizure, elevated levels of glutamate and high levels of oxygen use due to the high metabolic brain activity result in oxidative stress. However, the relationship between febrile seizures and oxidative stress remains unclear. In this study, we investigated thiol/disulfide homeostasis as a new oxidative stress parameter in patients with simple febrile seizures. This study was performed between February 2016 and May 2016 at the Pediatric Emergency Unit. The study population consisted of 40 patients with a diagnosis of simple febrile seizure and 30 control participants aged 8-59 months. Total thiol, native thiol and disulfide levels, disulfide/native thiol, disulfide/total thiol, and native thiol/total thiol ratios were used as thiol/disulfide homeostasis parameters and were quantified in patient and control groups. Furthermore, correlations with seizure duration were investigated. In the patient group, native and total thiol levels and native thiol/total thiol ratios were low, and disulfide levels, disulfide/native thiol, and disulfide/total thiol ratios were significantly higher than in the control group. Negative correlations were observed between seizure duration, total and native thiol levels, and native thiol/total thiol ratio, whereas positive correlations were observed between seizure duration and disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol ratio. The sensitivities of both disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol ratios were high for simple febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizures may cause impairment in favor of disulfide bonds in thiol/disulfide homeostasis. Overall, these changes may contribute to neuronal cell damage after simple febrile seizures.

  14. Urinary tract infection in febrile convulsions.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P; Verrier Jones, K

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective review of the casenotes of 403 children admitted to hospital with febrile convulsions was performed to estimate the frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection and examine medical practice in making this diagnosis. A total of 228 (56%) children had urine cultured: 150 bag specimens, 76 clean voided samples, and two suprapubic aspirates. There were 13 'probable' and six 'possible' infected urine samples together representing 5% of the whole study population (n = 403), 8% of those having urine cultured (n = 228), and 12% of those providing uncontaminated urine samples (n = 155). Those with first febrile convulsions and those aged under 18 months were more likely to have urine examined. Practices varied significantly between different hospitals. These results suggest that there has indeed been a need for practice guidelines, and that further audit of practice is required to assess their impact. PMID:1755639

  15. Frequent Respiratory Viral Infections in Children with Febrile Neutropenia - A Prospective Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Söderman, Martina; Rhedin, Samuel; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Rotzén-Östlund, Maria; Albert, Jan; Broliden, Kristina; Lindblom, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is common in children undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of malignancies. In the majority of cases, the cause of the fever is unknown. Although respiratory viruses are commonly associated with this condition, the etiologic significance of this finding remains unclear and is therefore the subject of this study. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected during 87 episodes of febrile neutropenia in children age 0-18 years, being treated at a children's oncology unit between January 2013 and June 2014. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the presence of 16 respiratory viruses. Follow-up samples were collected from children who tested positive for one or more respiratory viruses. Rhinoviruses were genotyped by VP4/VP2 sequencing. Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for group comparisons. At least one respiratory virus was detected in samples from 39 of 87 episodes of febrile neutropenia (45%), with rhinoviruses the most frequently detected. Follow-up samples were collected after a median of 28 days (range, 9-74 days) in 32 of the 39 virus-positive episodes. The respiratory viral infection had resolved in 25 episodes (78%). The same virus was detected at follow-up in one coronavirus and six rhinovirus episodes. Genotyping revealed a different rhinovirus species in two of the six rhinovirus infections. The frequency of respiratory viral infections in this group of patients suggests an etiologic role in febrile neutropenia. However, these findings must be confirmed in larger patient cohorts.

  16. Serum and CSF levels of cytokines in acute encephalopathy following prolonged febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Takashi; Suenaga, Naoko; Kajimoto, Madoka; Tohyama, Jun; Isumi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Masaya; Mori, Masato; Furukawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that an acute encephalopathy occasionally follows prolonged febrile seizures. We measured the concentrations of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1) in serum and CSF during the acute stage in 13 children with acute encephalopathy following prolonged febrile seizures (AEPFS) and 23 with prolonged febrile seizures without encephalopathy (PFS) to investigate the pathogenesis of AEPFS. Serum IL-6, IL-10, sTNFR1, and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly higher in AEPFS and PFS compared with control subjects. CSF IL-6 levels in AEPFS were significantly higher than those in PFS, but not serum IL-6, IL-10, or sTNFR1. The CSF IL-6 levels were significantly higher than the serum levels in AEPFS, but not PFS. The serum levels of sTNFR1 and IL-10 were significantly higher than those in the CSF in AEPFS and PFS. The serum IL-10 and sTNFR1 levels in patients who did not experience a second seizure were significantly higher than those in patients who experienced a second seizure, which was characterized by clusters of complex partial seizures several days after the initial prolonged febrile seizure. Our results suggest that serum IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and CSF IL-6 are part of the regulatory system of cytokines in AEPFS.

  17. Iron Status and Febrile Seizure- A Case Control Study in Children Less Than 3 Years

    PubMed Central

    SADEGHZADEH, Mansour; KHOSHNEVIS ASL, Parisa; MAHBOUBI, Esrafil

    2012-01-01

    Objective Febrile seizure is one of the most common neurological conditions of childhood. Several theories, such as iron deficiency anemia have been proposed as the pathogenesis of this condition. The aim of this study was to find the association between iron deficiency anemia and febrile seizures in children aged 6 months to 3 years admitted in Valie Asr hospital in Zanjan. Materials &Methods Hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and SI/TIBC ratio were assessed in one hundred children with febrile seizures and compared to the values of one hundred healthy children presenting in a heath care center in the same period as the control group. Results A total of 6% of cases had iron deficiency anemia which was similar to the control group. In the case group SI/TIBC ratio below 12% was seen in 58% of children which was significantly higher than that of the control group (29%). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that although anemia was not common among febrile seizure patients, iron deficiency was more frequent in these patients. PMID:24665277

  18. Study of viremic profile in febrile specimens of chikungunya in Bandung, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Riswari, S F; Ma'roef, C N; Djauhari, H; Kosasih, H; Perkasa, A; Yudhaputri, F A; Artika, I M; Williams, M; van der Ven, A; Myint, K S; Alisjahbana, B; Ledermann, J P; Powers, A M; Jaya, U A

    2016-01-01

    Data regarding the viremia profile of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infected patients especially during the pre-febrile period is limited. To obtain virological kinetic data on CHIKV infections. A two-week community observation for dengue transmission was conducted in Bandung, Indonesia, from 2005 to 2009. Acute specimens from non-dengue febrile patients were screened by pan-alphavirus conventional RT-PCR. The positives were confirmed for CHIKV RNA by a specific RT-PCR followed by sequencing. Simultaneously these specimens were also cultured in Vero cells and tested for anti-CHIK IgM MAC-ELISA. All the available serial specimens,including the pre-febrile specimens, from confirmed CHIK cases, were tested by virus isolation, RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, and CHIK IgM ELISA. There were five laboratory confirmed CHIK cases identified and studied. Among these, viremia was determined to extend from as early as 6 days prior to until 13 days post fever onset. Quantitative RT-PCR showed viremia peaked at or near onset of illness. In this study, individuals were identified with viremia prior to fever onset and extending beyond the febrile phase. This extended viremic phase has the potential to impact transmission dynamics and thus the public health response to CHIK outbreaks. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Simple febrile convulsions in children: explain and reassure the parents.

    PubMed

    2002-02-01

    (1) Simple febrile convulsions (brief and generalised) in children carry a high risk of recurrence during new febrile episodes (30-50%), especially while the child is under the age of 3 years. These relapses are rarely severe and only occur during a minority of febrile episodes. Later onset of epilepsy is rare. (2) Long term treatment with phenobarbital and valproi