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Sample records for feeding uncouples circadian

  1. Circadian Biology: Uncoupling Human Body Clocks by Food Timing.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Celine; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-07-10

    Synchrony of circadian rhythms between tissues/organs appears critical for health. A new study reports that meal timing, a modifiable temporal cue for the circadian system, can selectively uncouple circadian rhythms in metabolic physiology from the central circadian clock in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diet-Induced Obesity and Circadian Disruption of Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blancas-Velazquez, Aurea; Mendoza, Jorge; Garcia, Alexandra N.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2017-01-01

    Feeding behavior shows a rhythmic daily pattern, which in nocturnal rodents is observed mainly during the dark period. This rhythmicity is under the influence of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the main biological clock. Nevertheless, various studies have shown that in rodent models of obesity, using high-energy diets, the general locomotor activity and feeding rhythms can be disrupted. Here, we review the data on the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on locomotor activity and feeding patterns, as well as the effect on the brain sites within the neural circuitry involved in metabolic and rewarding feeding behavior. In general, DIO may alter locomotor activity by decreasing total activity. On the other hand, DIO largely alters eating patterns, producing increased overall ingestion and number of eating bouts that can extend to the resting period. Furthermore, within the hypothalamic areas, little effect has been reported on the molecular circadian mechanism in DIO animals with ad libitum hypercaloric diets and little or no data exist so far on its effects on the reward system areas. We further discuss the possibility of an uncoupling of metabolic and reward systems in DIO and highlight a gap of circadian and metabolic research that may help to better understand the implications of obesity. PMID:28223912

  3. Diet-Induced Obesity and Circadian Disruption of Feeding Behavior.

    PubMed

    Blancas-Velazquez, Aurea; Mendoza, Jorge; Garcia, Alexandra N; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2017-01-01

    Feeding behavior shows a rhythmic daily pattern, which in nocturnal rodents is observed mainly during the dark period. This rhythmicity is under the influence of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the main biological clock. Nevertheless, various studies have shown that in rodent models of obesity, using high-energy diets, the general locomotor activity and feeding rhythms can be disrupted. Here, we review the data on the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on locomotor activity and feeding patterns, as well as the effect on the brain sites within the neural circuitry involved in metabolic and rewarding feeding behavior. In general, DIO may alter locomotor activity by decreasing total activity. On the other hand, DIO largely alters eating patterns, producing increased overall ingestion and number of eating bouts that can extend to the resting period. Furthermore, within the hypothalamic areas, little effect has been reported on the molecular circadian mechanism in DIO animals with ad libitum hypercaloric diets and little or no data exist so far on its effects on the reward system areas. We further discuss the possibility of an uncoupling of metabolic and reward systems in DIO and highlight a gap of circadian and metabolic research that may help to better understand the implications of obesity.

  4. Endogenous circadian rhythm in human motor activity uncoupled from circadian influences on cardiac dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-12-26

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker influences key physiologic functions, such as body temperature and heart rate, and is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake cycle. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a 24-h pattern in adverse cardiovascular events with a peak at approximately 10 a.m. It is unknown whether this pattern in cardiac risk is caused by a day/night pattern of behaviors, including activity level and/or influences from the internal circadian pacemaker. We recently found that a scaling index of cardiac vulnerability has an endogenous circadian peak at the circadian phase corresponding to approximately 10 a.m., which conceivably could contribute to the morning peak in cardiac risk. Here, we test whether this endogenous circadian influence on cardiac dynamics is caused by circadian-mediated changes in motor activity or whether activity and heart rate dynamics are decoupled across the circadian cycle. We analyze high-frequency recordings of motion from young healthy subjects during two complementary protocols that decouple the sleep/wake cycle from the circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We find that static activity properties (mean and standard deviation) exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a peak at the circadian phase corresponding to 5-9 p.m. ( approximately 9 h later than the peak in the scale-invariant index of heartbeat fluctuations). In contrast, dynamic characteristics of the temporal scale-invariant organization of activity fluctuations (long-range correlations) do not exhibit a circadian rhythm. These findings suggest that endogenous circadian-mediated activity variations are not responsible for the endogenous circadian rhythm in the scale-invariant structure of heartbeat fluctuations and likely do not contribute to the increase in cardiac risk at approximately 10 a.m.

  5. Endogenous circadian rhythm in human motor activity uncoupled from circadian influences on cardiac dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F.; Shea, Steven A.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker influences key physiologic functions, such as body temperature and heart rate, and is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake cycle. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a 24-h pattern in adverse cardiovascular events with a peak at ≈10 a.m. It is unknown whether this pattern in cardiac risk is caused by a day/night pattern of behaviors, including activity level and/or influences from the internal circadian pacemaker. We recently found that a scaling index of cardiac vulnerability has an endogenous circadian peak at the circadian phase corresponding to ≈10 a.m., which conceivably could contribute to the morning peak in cardiac risk. Here, we test whether this endogenous circadian influence on cardiac dynamics is caused by circadian-mediated changes in motor activity or whether activity and heart rate dynamics are decoupled across the circadian cycle. We analyze high-frequency recordings of motion from young healthy subjects during two complementary protocols that decouple the sleep/wake cycle from the circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We find that static activity properties (mean and standard deviation) exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a peak at the circadian phase corresponding to 5–9 p.m. (≈9 h later than the peak in the scale-invariant index of heartbeat fluctuations). In contrast, dynamic characteristics of the temporal scale-invariant organization of activity fluctuations (long-range correlations) do not exhibit a circadian rhythm. These findings suggest that endogenous circadian-mediated activity variations are not responsible for the endogenous circadian rhythm in the scale-invariant structure of heartbeat fluctuations and likely do not contribute to the increase in cardiac risk at ≈10 a.m. PMID:18093917

  6. Regulation of Mammalian Physiology by Interconnected Circadian and Feeding Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Mauvoisin, Daniel; Weger, Benjamin; Gobet, Cédric; Gachon, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timekeeping systems that adapt in an anticipatory fashion the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. In mammals, the master pacemaker resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and entrains peripheral clocks using a wide range of signals that differentially schedule physiology and gene expression in a tissue-specific manner. The peripheral clocks, such as those found in the liver, are particularly sensitive to rhythmic external cues like feeding behavior, which modulate the phase and amplitude of rhythmic gene expression. Consequently, the liver clock temporally tunes the expression of many genes involved in metabolism and physiology. However, the circadian modulation of cellular functions also relies on multiple layers of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. Strikingly, these additional regulatory events may happen independently of any transcriptional oscillations, showing that complex regulatory networks ultimately drive circadian output functions. These rhythmic events also integrate feeding-related cues and adapt various metabolic processes to food availability schedules. The importance of such temporal regulation of metabolism is illustrated by metabolic dysfunctions and diseases resulting from circadian clock disruption or inappropriate feeding patterns. Therefore, the study of circadian clocks and rhythmic feeding behavior should be of interest to further advance our understanding of the prevention and therapy of metabolic diseases. PMID:28337174

  7. Entrainment of the master circadian clock by scheduled feeding.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Marina R; Hochstetler, Kelly J; Tavernier, Ronald J; Greene, Dana M; Bult-Ito, Abel

    2004-09-01

    The master circadian clock, located in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), generates and coordinates circadian rhythmicity, i.e., internal organization of physiological and behavioral rhythms that cycle with a near 24-h period. Light is the most powerful synchronizer of the SCN. Although other nonphotic cues also have the potential to influence the circadian clock, their effects can be masked by photic cues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of scheduled feeding to entrain the SCN in the absence of photic cues in four lines of house mouse (Mus domesticus). Mice were initially housed in 12:12-h light/dark cycle with ad libitum access to food for 6 h during the light period followed by 4-6 mo of constant dark under the same feeding schedule. Wheel running behavior suggested and circadian PER2 protein expression profiles in the SCN confirmed entrainment of the master circadian clock to the onset of food availability in 100% (49/49) of the line 2 mice in contrast to only 4% (1/24) in line 3 mice. Mice from line 1 and line 4 showed intermediate levels of entrainment, 57% (8/14) and 39% (7/18), respectively. The predictability of entrainment vs. nonentrainment in line 2 and line 3 and the novel entrainment process provide a powerful tool with which to further elucidate mechanisms involved in entrainment of the SCN by scheduled feeding.

  8. Circadian rhythms, time-restricted feeding, and healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Emily N C; Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-12-23

    Circadian rhythms optimize physiology and health by temporally coordinating cellular function, tissue function, and behavior. These endogenous rhythms dampen with age and thus compromise temporal coordination. Feeding-fasting patterns are an external cue that profoundly influence the robustness of daily biological rhythms. Erratic eating patterns can disrupt the temporal coordination of metabolism and physiology leading to chronic diseases that are also characteristic of aging. However, sustaining a robust feeding-fasting cycle, even without altering nutrition quality or quantity, can prevent or reverse these chronic diseases in experimental models. In humans, epidemiological studies have shown erratic eating patterns increase the risk of disease, whereas sustained feeding-fasting cycles, or prolonged overnight fasting, is correlated with protection from breast cancer. Therefore, optimizing the timing of external cues with defined eating patterns can sustain a robust circadian clock, which may prevent disease and improve prognosis.

  9. Circadian feeding patterns of 12-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Wee, Poh Hui; Loy, See Ling; Toh, Jia Ying; Tham, Elaine Kwang Hsia; Cheung, Yin Bun; Godfrey, Keith M; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang Mei; Chong, Yap-Seng; Lek, Ngee; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Goh, Daniel Yam Thiam; Chong, Mary Foong-Fong; Yap, Fabian

    2017-06-01

    Early life nutrition and feeding practices are important modifiable determinants of subsequent obesity, yet little is known about the circadian feeding pattern of 12-month-old infants. We aimed to describe the 24-h feeding patterns of 12-month-old infants and examine their associations with maternal and infant characteristics. Mothers from a prospective birth cohort study (n 431) reported dietary intakes of their 12-month-old infants and respective feeding times using 24-h dietary recall. Based on their feeding times, infants were classified into post-midnight (00.00-05.59 hours) and pre-midnight (06.00-23.59 hours) feeders. Mean daily energy intake was 3234 (sd 950) kJ (773 (sd 227) kcal), comprising 51·8 (sd 7·8) % carbohydrate, 33·9 (sd 7·2) % fat and 14·4 (sd 3·2) % protein. Mean hourly energy intake and proportion of infants fed were lower during post-midnight than pre-midnight hours. There were 251 (58·2 %) pre-midnight and 180 (41·8 %) post-midnight feeders. Post-midnight feeders consumed higher daily energy, carbohydrate, fat and protein intakes than pre-midnight feeders (all P<0·001). The difference in energy intake originated from energy content consumed during the post-midnight period. Majority (n 173) of post-midnight feeders consumed formula milk during the post-midnight period. Using multivariate logistic regression with confounder adjustment, exclusively breast-feeding during the first 6 months of life was negatively associated with post-midnight feeding at 12 months (adjusted OR 0·31; 95 % CI 0·11, 0·82). This study provides new insights into the circadian pattern of energy intake during infancy. Our findings indicated that the timing of feeding at 12 months was associated with daily energy and macronutrient intakes, and feeding mode during early infancy.

  10. Adult-specific electrical silencing of pacemaker neurons uncouples the molecular oscillator from circadian outputs

    PubMed Central

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Berni, Jimena; Aranovich, Ezequiel J.; Muraro, Nara I.; Beckwith, Esteban J.; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Circadian rhythms regulate physiology and behavior through transcriptional feedback loops of clock genes running within specific pacemaker cells. In Drosophila, molecular oscillations in the small ventral Lateral Neurons (sLNvs) command rhythmic behavior under free-running conditions releasing the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) in a circadian fashion. Electrical activity in the sLNvs is also required for behavioral rhythmicity. Yet, how temporal information is transduced into behavior remains unclear. Results Here we developed a new tool for temporal control of gene expression to obtain adult-restricted electrical silencing of the PDF circuit, which led to reversible behavioral arrhythmicity. Remarkably, PER oscillations during the silenced phase remained unaltered, indicating that arrhythmicity is a direct consequence of the silenced activity. Accordingly, circadian axonal remodeling and PDF accumulation were severely affected during the silenced phase. Conclusions Although electrical activity of the sLNvs is not a clock component it coordinates circuit outputs leading to rhythmic behavior. PMID:22018542

  11. Renal electrolyte circadian rhythms - Independence from feeding and activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six unanesthetized chair-acclimatized adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) weighing 600-900 g to determine whether internal synchronization is the result of simple passive dependence of renal excretory rhythms on endogenous rhythms of those variable that influence electrolyte excretion such as dietary intake and muscular activity. Independence of the urinary rhythms from diurnal variations in feeding, drinking, and activity was secured by depriving the animals of food, water, and training them to perform a two-hourly schedule of feeding, drinking, and activity throughout day and night. Results indicate that the internal synchronization which is normally observed between the behavioral and urinary rhythms cannot be explained by any direct dependence of renal function on behavioral patterns. The most probable mechanism for circadian internal synchronization is that the various behavioral and renal rhythms are controlled by potentially independent separate oscillators which are normally kept in synchrony with one another.

  12. Renal electrolyte circadian rhythms - Independence from feeding and activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six unanesthetized chair-acclimatized adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) weighing 600-900 g to determine whether internal synchronization is the result of simple passive dependence of renal excretory rhythms on endogenous rhythms of those variable that influence electrolyte excretion such as dietary intake and muscular activity. Independence of the urinary rhythms from diurnal variations in feeding, drinking, and activity was secured by depriving the animals of food, water, and training them to perform a two-hourly schedule of feeding, drinking, and activity throughout day and night. Results indicate that the internal synchronization which is normally observed between the behavioral and urinary rhythms cannot be explained by any direct dependence of renal function on behavioral patterns. The most probable mechanism for circadian internal synchronization is that the various behavioral and renal rhythms are controlled by potentially independent separate oscillators which are normally kept in synchrony with one another.

  13. Ultrasonic vocalizations in rats anticipating circadian feeding schedules.

    PubMed

    Opiol, Hanna; Pavlovski, Ilya; Michalik, Mateusz; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2015-05-01

    Rats readily learn to anticipate a reward signaled by an external stimulus. Anticipatory behaviors evoked by conditioned stimuli include 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), a proposed behavioral correlate of positive affect and activation of midbrain dopamine pathways. Rats can also anticipate a reward, such as food, provided once daily, without external cueing. Anticipation of a daily reward exhibits formal properties of a circadian rhythm. The neural circuits that regulate the timing and amplitude of these rhythms remain an open question, but evidence suggests a role for dopamine. To gain further insight into the neural and affective correlates of circadian food anticipatory rhythms, we made 2h and 24h USV recordings in rats fed 2h/day in the light period, a procedure that induces robust anticipation 2-3h before mealtime. Potential interactions between internal and external time cues in USV production were evaluated by inclusion of a 3 kHz tone 15 min before mealtime. Prior to scheduled feeding, spontaneous 50 kHz USVs were rare during the light period. During scheduled feeding, flat and frequency modulated (FM) 50kHz USVs occurred prior to and during mealtime. FM USVs were more closely related to anticipation, while flat USVs were more dependent on food access. USVs also occurred during spontaneous waking at other times of day. The tone did not evoke USVs but did modulate activity. Behavioral anticipation of a daily meal is accompanied by USVs consistent with a positive affective state and elevated dopamine transmission.

  14. Circadian fluctuations in circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 are independent of feeding cycles in mice.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Ohkura, Naoki; Yasumoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Saori

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the involvement of the day-night feeding cycle in the circadian regulation of circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) concentrations, mice were fed with a diet for eight hours during either daytime (DF) or nighttime (NF) for one week. The reversed feeding cycle did not affect the circadian phases of plasma PAI-1 levels as well as the nocturnal wheel-running activity, although the phase of Pai-1 mRNA expression was significantly advanced for 8.6 hours in the livers of DF, compared with NF mice. The day-night feeding cycle is not a critical Zeitgeber for circadian rhythm of circulating PAI-1.

  15. Modelling and analysis of the feeding regimen induced entrainment of hepatocyte circadian oscillators using petri nets.

    PubMed

    Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Ahmad, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are certain periodic behaviours exhibited by living organism at different levels, including cellular and system-wide scales. Recent studies have found that the circadian rhythms of several peripheral organs in mammals, such as the liver, are able to entrain their clocks to received signals independent of other system level clocks, in particular when responding to signals generated during feeding. These studies have found SIRT1, PARP1, and HSF1 proteins to be the major influencers of the core CLOCKBMAL1:PER-CRY circadian clock. These entities, along with abstracted feeding induced signals were modelled collectively in this study using Petri Nets. The properties of the model show that the circadian system itself is strongly robust, and is able to continually evolve. The modelled feeding regimens suggest that the usual 3 meals/day and 2 meals/day feeding regimens are beneficial with any more or less meals/day negatively affecting the system.

  16. Modelling and Analysis of the Feeding Regimen Induced Entrainment of Hepatocyte Circadian Oscillators Using Petri Nets

    PubMed Central

    Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Ahmad, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are certain periodic behaviours exhibited by living organism at different levels, including cellular and system-wide scales. Recent studies have found that the circadian rhythms of several peripheral organs in mammals, such as the liver, are able to entrain their clocks to received signals independent of other system level clocks, in particular when responding to signals generated during feeding. These studies have found SIRT1, PARP1, and HSF1 proteins to be the major influencers of the core CLOCKBMAL1:PER-CRY circadian clock. These entities, along with abstracted feeding induced signals were modelled collectively in this study using Petri Nets. The properties of the model show that the circadian system itself is strongly robust, and is able to continually evolve. The modelled feeding regimens suggest that the usual 3 meals/day and 2 meals/day feeding regimens are beneficial with any more or less meals/day negatively affecting the system. PMID:25789928

  17. Circadian intervention of obesity development via resting-stage feeding manipulation or oxytocin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo

    2011-01-01

    The obesity pandemic can be viewed as a result of an imbalanced reaction to changing environmental factors. Recent research has linked circadian arrhythmicity to obesity and related diseases; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we found that high-fat diet (HFD) feeding strikingly promoted daytime rather than nighttime caloric intake in mice, leading to feeding circadian arrhythmicity. Using scheduled feeding with a defined amount of daily HFD intake, we found that an increase in the ratio of daytime to nighttime feeding promoted weight gain, whereas a decrease of this ratio rebalanced energy expenditure to counteract obesity. In identifying the underlying mechanism, we found that hypothalamic release of anorexigenic neuropeptide oxytocin displayed a diurnal rhythm of daytime rise and nighttime decline, which negatively correlated with the diurnal feeding activities of normal chow-fed mice. In contrast, chronic HFD feeding abrogated oxytocin diurnal rhythmicity, primarily by suppressing daytime oxytocin rise. Using pharmacological experiments with hypothalamic injection of oxytocin or oxytocin antagonist, we showed that daytime manipulation of oxytocin can change feeding circadian patterns to reprogram energy expenditure, leading to attenuation or induction of obesity independently of 24-h caloric intake. Also importantly, we found that peripheral injection of oxytocin activated hypothalamic oxytocin neurons to release oxytocin, and exerted metabolic effects similar to central oxytocin injection, thus offering a practical clinical avenue to use oxytocin in obesity control. In conclusion, resting-stage oxytocin release and feeding activity represent a critical circadian mechanism and therapeutic target for obesity. PMID:21828335

  18. Circadian clocks and feeding time regulate the oscillations and levels of hepatic triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Yaarit; Rousso-Noori, Liat; Zwighaft, Ziv; Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Golik, Marina; Kraut-Cohen, Judith; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Asher, Gad

    2014-02-04

    Circadian clocks play a major role in orchestrating daily physiology, and their disruption can evoke metabolic diseases such as fatty liver and obesity. To study the role of circadian clocks in lipid homeostasis, we performed an extensive lipidomic analysis of liver tissues from wild-type and clock-disrupted mice either fed ad libitum or night fed. To our surprise, a similar fraction of lipids (∼17%) oscillated in both mouse strains, most notably triglycerides, but with completely different phases. Moreover, several master lipid regulators (e.g., PPARα) and enzymes involved in triglyceride metabolism retained their circadian expression in clock-disrupted mice. Nighttime restricted feeding shifted the phase of triglyceride accumulation and resulted in ∼50% decrease in hepatic triglyceride levels in wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that circadian clocks and feeding time dictate the phase and levels of hepatic triglyceride accumulation; however, oscillations in triglycerides can persist in the absence of a functional clock.

  19. Circadian and feeding cues integrate to drive rhythms of physiology in Drosophila insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Barber, Annika F; Erion, Renske; Holmes, Todd C; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-12-01

    Circadian clocks regulate much of behavior and physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so remain poorly understood. While cyclic gene expression is thought to underlie metabolic rhythms, little is known about cycles in cellular physiology. We found that Drosophila insulin-producing cells (IPCs), which are located in the pars intercerebralis and lack an autonomous circadian clock, are functionally connected to the central circadian clock circuit via DN1 neurons. Insulin mediates circadian output by regulating the rhythmic expression of a metabolic gene (sxe2) in the fat body. Patch clamp electrophysiology reveals that IPCs display circadian clock-regulated daily rhythms in firing event frequency and bursting proportion under light:dark conditions. The activity of IPCs and the rhythmic expression of sxe2 are additionally regulated by feeding, as demonstrated by night feeding-induced changes in IPC firing characteristics and sxe2 levels in the fat body. These findings indicate circuit-level regulation of metabolism by clock cells in Drosophila and support a role for the pars intercerebralis in integrating circadian control of behavior and physiology.

  20. Diminished leptin signaling can alter circadian rhythm of metabolic activity and feeding.

    PubMed

    Hsuchou, Hung; Wang, Yuping; Cornelissen-Guillaume, Germaine G; Kastin, Abba J; Jang, Eunjin; Halberg, Franz; Pan, Weihong

    2013-10-01

    Leptin, a hormone mainly produced by fat cells, shows cell-specific effects to regulate feeding and metabolic activities. We propose that an important feature of metabolic dysregulation resulting in obesity is the loss of the circadian rhythm of biopotentials. This was tested in the pan-leptin receptor knockout (POKO) mice newly generated in our laboratory. In the POKO mice, leptin no longer induced pSTAT-3 signaling after intracerebroventricular injection. Three basic phenotypes were observed: the heterozygotes had similar weight and adiposity as the wild-type (WT) mice (>60% of the mice); the homozygotes were either fatter (∼30%), or rarely leaner (<5%) than the WT mice. By early adulthood, the POKO mice had higher average body weight and adiposity than their respective same-sex WT littermate controls, and this was consistent among different batches. The homozygote fat POKO showed significant reduction of midline estimating statistic of rhythm of circadian parameters, and shifts of ultradian rhythms. The blunted circadian rhythm of these extremely obese POKO mice was also seen in their physical inactivity, longer feeding bouts, and higher food intake. The extent of obesity correlated with the blunted circadian amplitude, accumulative metabolic and locomotor activities, and the severity of hyperphagia. This contrasts with the heterozygote POKO mice which showed little obesity and metabolic disturbance, and only subtle changes of the circadian rhythm of metabolic activity without alterations in feeding behavior. The results provide a novel aspect of leptin resistance, almost manifesting as an "all or none" phenomenon.

  1. Time-Restricted Feeding Shifts the Skin Circadian Clock and Alters UVB-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; van Spyk, Elyse; Liu, Qiang; Geyfman, Mikhail; Salmans, Michael L; Kumar, Vivek; Ihler, Alexander; Li, Ning; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2017-08-01

    The epidermis is a highly regenerative barrier protecting organisms from environmental insults, including UV radiation, the main cause of skin cancer and skin aging. Here, we show that time-restricted feeding (RF) shifts the phase and alters the amplitude of the skin circadian clock and affects the expression of approximately 10% of the skin transcriptome. Furthermore, a large number of skin-expressed genes are acutely regulated by food intake. Although the circadian clock is required for daily rhythms in DNA synthesis in epidermal progenitor cells, RF-induced shifts in clock phase do not alter the phase of DNA synthesis. However, RF alters both diurnal sensitivity to UVB-induced DNA damage and expression of the key DNA repair gene, Xpa. Together, our findings indicate regulation of skin function by time of feeding and emphasize a link between circadian rhythm, food intake, and skin health. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-11-24

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light-dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5'-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5'-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5'-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5'-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation.

  3. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light–dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5′-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5′-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5′-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5′-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation. PMID:26554015

  4. Effects of restricted feeding schedules on circadian organization in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulos, Z.; Frim, D. M.; Dewey, L. K.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Free running circadian rhythms of motor activity, food-motivated lever-pressing, and either drinking (N = 7) or body temperature (N = 3) were recorded from 10 squirrel monkeys maintained in constant illumination with unlimited access to food. Food availability was then restricted to a single unsignaled 3-hour interval each day. The feeding schedule failed to entrain the activity rhythms of 8 monkeys, which continued to free-run. Drinking was almost completely synchronized by the schedule, while body temperature showed a feeding-induced rise superimposed on a free-running rhythm. Nonreinforced lever-pressing showed both a free-running component and a 24-hour component that anticipated the time of feeding. At the termination of the schedule, all recorded variables showed free-running rhythms, but in 3 animals the initial phase of the postschedule rhythms was advanced by several hours, suggesting relative coordination. Of the remaining 2 animals, one exhibited stable entrainment of all 3 recorded rhythms, while the other appeared to entrain temporarily to the feeding schedule. These results indicate that restricted feeding schedules are only a weak zeitgeber for the circadian pacemaker generating free-running rhythms in the squirrel monkey. Such schedules, however, may entrain a separate circadian system responsible for the timing of food-anticipatory changes in behavior and physiology.

  5. Effects of restricted feeding schedules on circadian organization in squirrel monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulos, Z.; Frim, D. M.; Dewey, L. K.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Free running circadian rhythms of motor activity, food-motivated lever-pressing, and either drinking (N = 7) or body temperature (N = 3) were recorded from 10 squirrel monkeys maintained in constant illumination with unlimited access to food. Food availability was then restricted to a single unsignaled 3-hour interval each day. The feeding schedule failed to entrain the activity rhythms of 8 monkeys, which continued to free-run. Drinking was almost completely synchronized by the schedule, while body temperature showed a feeding-induced rise superimposed on a free-running rhythm. Nonreinforced lever-pressing showed both a free-running component and a 24-hour component that anticipated the time of feeding. At the termination of the schedule, all recorded variables showed free-running rhythms, but in 3 animals the initial phase of the postschedule rhythms was advanced by several hours, suggesting relative coordination. Of the remaining 2 animals, one exhibited stable entrainment of all 3 recorded rhythms, while the other appeared to entrain temporarily to the feeding schedule. These results indicate that restricted feeding schedules are only a weak zeitgeber for the circadian pacemaker generating free-running rhythms in the squirrel monkey. Such schedules, however, may entrain a separate circadian system responsible for the timing of food-anticipatory changes in behavior and physiology.

  6. [Effects of feeding mode on biological clock and circadian expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in mice].

    PubMed

    Wen, Min; Dong, Zhe; Cui, Jie

    2014-09-01

    To explore the effects of feeding mode on biological clock and circadian expression of lipids metabolism-related genes in mice. Ninety healthy male ICR mice were divided into 3 groups with 30 in each: ad libitum-feeding, daytime-feeding and nighttime-feeding groups, in a 12 h to 12 h light-dark cycle. After two weeks of feeding the animals was sacrificed in batches (5 in each batch) at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h, the circadian expression of lipids metabolism-related genes in the liver and brain was detected by real time quantitative RT PCR at 6 time points. The circadian oscillator in the brain was more sensitive to alteration of feeding mode than that in the liver, nighttime feeding decreased peak mRNA levels of Cry2, Per1, and Per2 (5.5, 4.3 and 7.1 folds, respectively) in the brain. However, there was no difference in the expression rhythm of hepatic clock genes between nighttime-feeding and ad libitum group. In addition, changed feeding mode significantly decreased the peak value of Rev erbα (2 folds for daytime feeding, 3.4 folds for nighttime feeding) and Dbp (10.6 folds for daytime feeding, 2.8 folds for nighttime feeding), which two had opposite expression mode in different feeding modes. Different expression rhythm of lipid metabolism related genes SREBP1-c, PPARα, FAS, and CPT was shown with decreased mRNA expression levels of SREBP1-c and PPARα in daytime feeding (5.5 folds, 4 folds) and nighttime feeding (4.4 folds, 4.8 folds). Changing the feeding mode could entrain circadian oscillators both in the brain and liver. What is more, hepatic circadian oscillators couple with the feeding time.

  7. Fasting, circadian rhythms, and time restricted feeding in healthy lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Valter D.; Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-01-01

    Summary Feeding in most animals is confined to a defined period, leaving short periods of fasting that coincide with sleep. Fasting enables organisms to enter alternative metabolic phases, which rely less on glucose and more on ketone body-like carbon sources. Both intermittent and periodic fasting result in benefits ranging from prevention to the enhanced treatment of diseases. Similarly, time-restricted feeding (TRF), in which feeding time is restricted to certain hours of the day, allows the daily fasting period to last >12 h, thus imparting pleiotropic benefits in multiple organisms. Understanding the mechanistic link between nutrients and the fasting benefits is leading to the identification of fasting mimicking diets (FMDs) that achieve changes similar to those caused by fasting. Given the pleiotropic and sustained benefits of TRF and FMD, both basic science and translational research are warranted to develop fasting-associated interventions into effective and inexpensive treatments with the potential to improve healthspan. PMID:27304506

  8. Effect of intermittent fasting on circadian rhythms in mice depends on feeding time.

    PubMed

    Froy, Oren; Chapnik, Nava; Miskin, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) resets circadian rhythms and extends life span. Intermittent fasting (IF) also extends life span, but its affect on circadian rhythms has not been studied. To study the effect of IF alongside CR, we imposed IF in FVB/N mice or IF combined with CR using the transgenic FVB/N alphaMUPA mice that, when fed ad libitum, exhibit spontaneously reduced eating and extended life span. Our results show that when food was introduced during the light period, body temperature peak was not disrupted. In contrast, IF caused almost arrhythmicity in clock gene expression in the liver and advanced mPer2 and mClock expression. However, IF restored the amplitudes of clock gene expression under disruptive light condition regardless whether the animals were calorically restricted or not. Unlike daytime feeding, nighttime feeding yielded rhythms similar to those generated during ad libitum feeding. Taken together, our results show that IF can affect circadian rhythms differently depending on the timing of food availability, and suggest that this regimen induces a metabolic state that affects the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) clock.

  9. Central and peripheral regulation of feeding and nutrition by the mammalian circadian clock: implications for nutrition during manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassone, Vincent M.; Stephan, Friedrich K.

    2002-01-01

    Circadian clocks have evolved to predict and coordinate physiologic processes with the rhythmic environment on Earth. Space studies in non-human primates and humans have suggested that this clock persists in its rhythmicity in space but that its function is altered significantly in long-term space flight. Under normal circumstances, the clock is synchronized by the light-dark cycle via the retinohypothalamic tract and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. It is also entrained by restricted feeding regimes via a suprachiasmatic nucleus-independent circadian oscillator. The site of this suboscillator (or oscillators) is not known, but new evidence has suggested that peripheral tissues in the liver and viscera may express circadian clock function when forced to do so by restricted feeding schedules or other homeostatic disruptions. New research on the role of the circadian clock in the control of feeding on Earth and in space is warranted.

  10. Central and peripheral regulation of feeding and nutrition by the mammalian circadian clock: implications for nutrition during manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassone, Vincent M.; Stephan, Friedrich K.

    2002-01-01

    Circadian clocks have evolved to predict and coordinate physiologic processes with the rhythmic environment on Earth. Space studies in non-human primates and humans have suggested that this clock persists in its rhythmicity in space but that its function is altered significantly in long-term space flight. Under normal circumstances, the clock is synchronized by the light-dark cycle via the retinohypothalamic tract and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. It is also entrained by restricted feeding regimes via a suprachiasmatic nucleus-independent circadian oscillator. The site of this suboscillator (or oscillators) is not known, but new evidence has suggested that peripheral tissues in the liver and viscera may express circadian clock function when forced to do so by restricted feeding schedules or other homeostatic disruptions. New research on the role of the circadian clock in the control of feeding on Earth and in space is warranted.

  11. Rhythmic leptin is required for weight gain from circadian desynchronized feeding in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Arble, Deanna Marie; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred W

    2011-01-01

    The neuroendocrine and metabolic effects of leptin have been extensively researched since the discovery, and the later identification, of the leptin gene mutated within the ob/ob mouse. Leptin is required for optimal health in a number of physiological systems (e.g. fertility, bone density, body weight regulation). Despite the extensive leptin literature and many observations of leptin's cyclical pattern over the 24-hour day, few studies have specifically examined how the circadian rhythm of leptin may be essential to leptin signaling and health. Here we present data indicating that a rhythmic leptin profile (e.g. 1 peak every 24 hours) leads to excessive weight gain during desynchronized feeding whereas non-rhythmic leptin provided in a continuous manner does not lead to excessive body weight gain under similar feeding conditions. This study suggests that feeding time can interact with leptin's endogenous rhythm to influence metabolic signals, specifically leading to excessive body weight gains during 'wrongly' timed feeding.

  12. A Mathematical Model of the Liver Circadian Clock Linking Feeding and Fasting Cycles to Clock Function.

    PubMed

    Woller, Aurore; Duez, Hélène; Staels, Bart; Lefranc, Marc

    2016-10-18

    To maintain energy homeostasis despite variable energy supply and consumption along the diurnal cycle, the liver relies on a circadian clock synchronized to food timing. Perturbed feeding and fasting cycles have been associated with clock disruption and metabolic diseases; however, the mechanisms are unclear. To address this question, we have constructed a mathematical model of the mammalian circadian clock, incorporating the metabolic sensors SIRT1 and AMPK. The clock response to various temporal patterns of AMPK activation was simulated numerically, mimicking the effects of a normal diet, fasting, and a high-fat diet. The model reproduces the dampened clock gene expression and NAD(+) rhythms reported for mice on a high-fat diet and predicts that this effect may be pharmacologically rescued by timed REV-ERB agonist administration. Our model thus identifies altered AMPK signaling as a mechanism leading to clock disruption and its associated metabolic effects and suggests a pharmacological approach to resetting the clock in obesity.

  13. Differential effects of light and feeding on circadian organization of peripheral clocks in a forebrain Bmal1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Izumo, Mariko; Pejchal, Martina; Schook, Andrew C; Lange, Ryan P; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Sato, Takashi R; Wang, Xiaozhong; Bradfield, Christopher A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2014-12-19

    In order to assess the contribution of a central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) to circadian behavior and the organization of peripheral clocks, we generated forebrain/SCN-specific Bmal1 knockout mice by using floxed Bmal1 and pan-neuronal Cre lines. The forebrain knockout mice showed >90% deletion of BMAL1 in the SCN and exhibited an immediate and complete loss of circadian behavior in constant conditions. Circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues persisted but became desynchronized and damped in constant darkness. The loss of synchrony was rescued by light/dark cycles and partially by restricted feeding (only in the liver and kidney but not in the other tissues) in a distinct manner. These results suggest that the forebrain/SCN is essential for internal temporal order of robust circadian programs in peripheral clocks, and that individual peripheral clocks are affected differently by light and feeding in the absence of a functional oscillator in the forebrain.

  14. Effect of feeding and temperature on the circadian rhythms of cortisol, thyroxine and triiodothyronine in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.A.; Nienaber, J.A.; Ford, J.J.; Hahn, G.L.

    1986-03-05

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the circadian rhythms of cortisol, thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) in pigs under two temperature and feeding regimes. Twenty-eight barrows were randomly assigned to one of the following: 1) ad-libitum fed at 5/sup 0/C(AL-5); 2) ad-libitum fed at 20/sup 0/C(AL-20); 3) meal fed at 5/sup 0/C(M-5); and 4) meal fed at 20/sup 0/C(M-20). M-5 and M-20 animals were fed at 0730 and 1400 hrs. Lights were on from 0600 to 2000 hrs. After 5 wks, blood samples were collected for 27 hrs. Serum cortisol, T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ concentrations were determined by RIA. No significant differences were found in the mesors, amplitudes or acrophases for cortisol. The mesors for T/sub 4/ (p<.01) were 60.6 +/- 5.6, 40.2 +/- 5.6, 61.2 +/- 5.6 and 49.1 +/- 5.0 ng/ml for AL-5, AL-20, M-5, and M-20, respectively. The mesors for T/sub 3/ (p<.01) were .85 +/- .06, .69 +/- .06, .92 +/- .06 and .66 +/- .05 ng/ml for AL-5, AL-20, M-5, and M-20 respectively. No differences in the amplitudes or acrophases for T/sub 3/ or T/sub 4/ were found. These data show that temperature and feeding regimes do not entrain the circadian rhythm of cortisol in pigs. The circadian rhythms of T/sub 4/ and T/sub 3/ are also not altered by feeding regimes but are affected by temperature.

  15. Shift of circadian feeding pattern by high-fat diets is coincident with reward deficits in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Morales, Lidia; Del Olmo, Nuria; Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Fole, Alberto; Cano, Victoria; Merino, Beatriz; Stucchi, Paula; Ruggieri, Daniela; López, Laura; Alguacil, Luis Fernando; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that high-fat diets (HF) trigger both i) a deficit of reward responses linked to a decrease of mesolimbic dopaminergic activity, and ii) a disorganization of circadian feeding behavior that switch from a structured meal-based schedule to a continuous snacking, even during periods normally devoted to rest. This feeding pattern has been shown to be a cause of HF-induced overweight and obesity. Our hypothesis deals with the eventual link between the rewarding properties of food and the circadian distribution of meals. We have investigated the effect of circadian feeding pattern on reward circuits by means of the conditioned-place preference (CPP) paradigm and we have characterized the rewarding properties of natural (food) and artificial (cocaine) reinforcers both in free-feeding ad libitum HF mice and in HF animals submitted to a re-organized feeding schedule based on the standard feeding behavior displayed by mice feeding normal chow ("forced synchronization"). We demonstrate that i) ad libitum HF diet attenuates cocaine and food reward in the CPP protocol, and ii) forced synchronization of feeding prevents this reward deficit. Our study provides further evidence that the rewarding impact of food with low palatability is diminished in mice exposed to a high-fat diet and strongly suggest that the decreased sensitivity to chow as a positive reinforcer triggers a disorganized feeding pattern which might account for metabolic disorders leading to obesity.

  16. Circadian Rhythms in Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    The biological clocks of the circadian timing system coordinate cellular and physiological processes and synchronizes these with daily cycles, feeding patterns also regulates circadian clocks. The clock genes and adipocytokines show circadian rhythmicity. Dysfunction of these genes are involved in the alteration of these adipokines during the development of obesity. Food availability promotes the stimuli associated with food intake which is a circadian oscillator outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Its circadian rhythm is arranged with the predictable daily mealtimes. Food anticipatory activity is mediated by a self-sustained circadian timing and its principal component is food entrained oscillator. However, the hypothalamus has a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance rather than food intake. Fatty acids or their metabolites can modulate neuronal activity by brain nutrient-sensing neurons involved in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. The timing of three-meal schedules indicates close association with the plasma levels of insulin and preceding food availability. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by altered timing of food intake and diet composition can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and to the development of metabolic disorders. Metabolic dysfunction is associated with circadian disturbances at both central and peripheral levels and, eventual disruption of circadian clock functioning can lead to obesity. While CLOCK expression levels are increased with high fat diet-induced obesity, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha increases the transcriptional level of brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) in obese subjects. Consequently, disruption of clock genes results in dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and obesity. Modifying the time of feeding alone can greatly affect body weight. Changes in the circadian clock are associated with temporal alterations in

  17. The role of the endocrine system in feeding-induced tissue-specific circadian entrainment.

    PubMed

    Sato, Miho; Murakami, Mariko; Node, Koichi; Matsumura, Ritsuko; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-07-24

    The circadian clock is entrained to environmental cycles by external cue-mediated phase adjustment. Although the light input pathway has been well defined, the mechanism of feeding-induced phase resetting remains unclear. The tissue-specific sensitivity of peripheral entrainment to feeding suggests the involvement of multiple pathways, including humoral and neuronal signals. Previous in vitro studies with cultured cells indicate that endocrine factors may function as entrainment cues for peripheral clocks. However, blood-borne factors that are well characterized in actual feeding-induced resetting have yet to be identified. Here, we report that insulin may be involved in feeding-induced tissue-type-dependent entrainment in vivo. In ex vivo culture experiments, insulin-induced phase shift in peripheral clocks was dependent on tissue type, which was consistent with tissue-specific insulin sensitivity, and peripheral entrainment in insulin-sensitive tissues involved PI3K- and MAPK-mediated signaling pathways. These results suggest that insulin may be an immediate early factor in feeding-mediated tissue-specific entrainment. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Scheduled Feeding Alters the Timing of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Circadian Clock in Dexras 1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard-Cannon, Pascale; Cheng, Hai-Ying M.

    2013-01-01

    Restricted feeding (RF) schedules are potent zeitgebers capable of entraining metabolic and hormonal rhythms in peripheral oscillators in anticipation of food. Behaviorally, this manifests in the form of food anticipatory activity (FAA) in the hours preceding food availability. Circadian rhythms of FAA are thought to be controlled by a food-entrainable oscillator (FEO) outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the central circadian pacemaker in mammals. Although evidence suggests that the FEO and the SCN are capable of interacting functionally under RF conditions, the genetic basis of these interactions remains to be defined. In this study, using dexras1-deficient (dexras1−/−) mice, the authors examined whether Dexras1, a modulator of multiple inputs to the SCN, plays a role in regulating the effects of RF on activity rhythms and gene expression in the SCN. Daytime RF under 12L:12D or constant darkness (DD) resulted in potentiated (but less stable) FAA expression in dexras1−/− mice compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Under these conditions, the magnitude and phase of the SCN-driven activity component were greatly perturbed in the mutants. Restoration to ad libitum (AL) feeding revealed a stable phase displacement of the SCN-driven activity component of dexras1−/− mice by ~2 h in advance of the expected time. RF in the late night/early morning induced a long-lasting increase in the period of the SCN-driven activity component in the mutants but not the WT. At the molecular level, daytime RF advanced the rhythm of PER1, PER2, and pERK expression in the mutant SCN without having any effect in the WT. Collectively, these results indicate that the absence of Dexras1 sensitizes the SCN to perturbations resulting from restricted feeding. PMID:22928915

  19. Rhythmic Leptin Is Required for Weight Gain from Circadian Desynchronized Feeding in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna Marie; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred W.

    2011-01-01

    The neuroendocrine and metabolic effects of leptin have been extensively researched since the discovery, and the later identification, of the leptin gene mutated within the ob/ob mouse. Leptin is required for optimal health in a number of physiological systems (e.g. fertility, bone density, body weight regulation). Despite the extensive leptin literature and many observations of leptin’s cyclical pattern over the 24-hour day, few studies have specifically examined how the circadian rhythm of leptin may be essential to leptin signaling and health. Here we present data indicating that a rhythmic leptin profile (e.g. 1 peak every 24 hours) leads to excessive weight gain during desynchronized feeding whereas non-rhythmic leptin provided in a continuous manner does not lead to excessive body weight gain under similar feeding conditions. This study suggests that feeding time can interact with leptin’s endogenous rhythm to influence metabolic signals, specifically leading to excessive body weight gains during ‘wrongly’ timed feeding. PMID:21949859

  20. Impairment of Circadian Rhythms in Peripheral Clocks by Constant Light Is Partially Reversed by Scheduled Feeding or Exercise.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Tahara, Yu; Hitosugi, Masashi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-12-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms in peripheral organs are impaired when animals are maintained in abnormal environmental light-dark cycles such as constant light (LL). This conclusion is based on averaged data from groups of experimental animals sacrificed at each time point. To investigate the effect of LL housing on the peripheral clocks of individual mice, an in vivo imaging system was used to observe the circadian bioluminescence rhythm in peripheral tissues of the liver, kidney, and submandibular salivary gland in PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the majority of individual peripheral tissues still had rhythmic oscillations of their circadian clocks in LL conditions. However, LL housing caused decreased amplitudes and a broad distribution of peak phases in PER2::LUCIFERASE oscillations irrespective of the state of the animals' behavioral rhythmicity. Because both scheduled feeding and scheduled exercise are effective recovery stimuli for circadian clock deficits, we examined whether scheduled feeding or scheduled exercise could reverse this impairment. The results showed that scheduled feeding or exercise could not restore the amplitude of peripheral clocks in LL. On the other hand, the LL-induced broad phase distribution was reversed, and peak phases were entrained to a specific time point by scheduled feeding but only slightly by scheduled exercise. The present results demonstrate that LL housing impairs peripheral circadian clock oscillations by altering both amplitude and phase in individual mice. The broad distribution of clock phases was clearly reversed by scheduled feeding, suggesting the importance of scheduled feeding as an entraining stimulus for impaired peripheral clocks.

  1. The Comparison between Circadian Oscillators in Mouse Liver and Pituitary Gland Reveals Different Integration of Feeding and Light Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Bur, Isabelle M.; Zouaoui, Sonia; Fontanaud, Pierre; Coutry, Nathalie; Molino, François; Martin, Agnès O.; Mollard, Patrice; Bonnefont, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is composed of multiple peripheral clocks that are synchronized by a central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. This system keeps track of the external world rhythms through entrainment by various time cues, such as the light-dark cycle and the feeding schedule. Alterations of photoperiod and meal time modulate the phase coupling between central and peripheral oscillators. In this study, we used real-time quantitative PCR to assess circadian clock gene expression in the liver and pituitary gland from mice raised under various photoperiods, or under a temporal restricted feeding protocol. Our results revealed unexpected differences between both organs. Whereas the liver oscillator always tracked meal time, the pituitary circadian clockwork showed an intermediate response, in between entrainment by the light regimen and the feeding-fasting rhythm. The same composite response was also observed in the pituitary gland from adrenalectomized mice under daytime restricted feeding, suggesting that circulating glucocorticoids do not inhibit full entrainment of the pituitary clockwork by meal time. Altogether our results reveal further aspects in the complexity of phase entrainment in the circadian system, and suggest that the pituitary may host oscillators able to integrate multiple time cues. PMID:21179516

  2. Burn after feeding. An old uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation is redesigned for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fromenty, B

    2014-10-01

    Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in brown adipose tissue can be used by hibernating animals to produce heat at the expense of their fat mass. In a recent work, Dr Shulman et al. generated a liver-targeted derivative of the prototypical OXPHOS uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol that alleviated steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance in several models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes.

  3. Effects of diurnal variation of gut microbes and high fat feeding on host circadian clock function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Vanessa; Gibbons, Sean M.; Martinez, Kristina; Hutchison, Alan L.; Huang, Edmond Y.; Cham, Candace M.; Pierre, Joseph F.; Heneghan, Aaron F.; Nadimpalli, Anuradha; Hubert, Nathaniel; Zale, Elizabeth; Wang, Yunwei; Huang, Yong; Theriault, Betty; Dinner, Aaron R.; Musch, Mark W.; Kudsk, Kenneth A.; Prendergast, Brian J.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Chang, Eugene B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Circadian clocks and metabolism are inextricably intertwined, where central and hepatic circadian clocks coordinate metabolic events in response to light-dark and sleep-wake cycles. We reveal an additional key element involved in maintaining host circadian rhythms, the gut microbiome. Despite persistence of light-dark signals, germ-free mice fed low or high fat diets exhibit markedly impaired central and hepatic circadian clock gene expression and do not gain weight compared to conventionally-raised counterparts. Examination of gut microbiota in conventionally-raised mice showed differential diurnal variation in microbial structure and function dependent upon dietary composition. Additionally, specific microbial metabolites induced under low or high fat feeding, particularly short chain fatty acids, but not hydrogen sulfide, directly modulate circadian clock gene expression within hepatocytes. These results underscore the ability of microbially-derived metabolites to regulate or modify central and hepatic circadian rhythm and host metabolic function, the latter following intake of a Westernized diet. PMID:25891358

  4. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, S.; Li, A.-J.; Dinh, T. T.; Rooney, E. M.; Simasko, S. M.; Ritter, S.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function. PMID:21880863

  5. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Wiater, M F; Mukherjee, S; Li, A-J; Dinh, T T; Rooney, E M; Simasko, S M; Ritter, S

    2011-11-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function.

  6. The oscillating miRNA 959-964 cluster impacts Drosophila feeding time and other circadian outputs

    PubMed Central

    Vodala, Sadanand; Pescatore, Stefan; Rodriguez, Joseph; Buescher, Marita; Chen, Ya-Wen; Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M; Rosbash, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced Drosophila head RNA to identify a small set of miRNAs that undergo robust circadian cycling. We concentrated on a cluster of six miRNAs, mir-959-964, all of which peak at about ZT12 or lights-off. The cluster pri-miRNA is transcribed under bona fide circadian transcriptional control, and all 6 mature miRNAs have short half-lives, a requirement for cycling. A viable Gal4 knock-in strain localizes prominent cluster miRNA expression to the adult head fat body. Analysis of cluster knock-out and over-expression strains indicates that innate immunity, metabolism, and feeding behavior are under cluster miRNA regulation. Manipulation of food intake also affects the levels and timing of cluster miRNA transcription with no more than minor effects on the core circadian oscillator. These observations indicate a feedback circuit between feeding time and cluster miRNA expression-function as well as a surprising role of post-transcriptional regulation in the circadian control of these phenotypes. PMID:23122660

  7. Differential effects of light and feeding on circadian organization of peripheral clocks in a forebrain Bmal1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Izumo, Mariko; Pejchal, Martina; Schook, Andrew C; Lange, Ryan P; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Sato, Takashi R; Wang, Xiaozhong; Bradfield, Christopher A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the contribution of a central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) to circadian behavior and the organization of peripheral clocks, we generated forebrain/SCN-specific Bmal1 knockout mice by using floxed Bmal1 and pan-neuronal Cre lines. The forebrain knockout mice showed >90% deletion of BMAL1 in the SCN and exhibited an immediate and complete loss of circadian behavior in constant conditions. Circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues persisted but became desynchronized and damped in constant darkness. The loss of synchrony was rescued by light/dark cycles and partially by restricted feeding (only in the liver and kidney but not in the other tissues) in a distinct manner. These results suggest that the forebrain/SCN is essential for internal temporal order of robust circadian programs in peripheral clocks, and that individual peripheral clocks are affected differently by light and feeding in the absence of a functional oscillator in the forebrain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04617.001 PMID:25525750

  8. Feeding conditions and breed affect the level of DNA methylation of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 gene in chicken breast muscle.

    PubMed

    Gao, G L; Wang, H W; Zhao, X Z; Li, Qin; Li, J; Li, Q R; Wang, Q G

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effects of feed condition and breed on the level of DNA methylation for the uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) gene, which is an important candidate gene for regulating intramuscular fat (IMF) content in chicken breast muscle, breast muscle of Daninghe (DNH) and Qingjiaoma (QJM) chickens under scatter-feed and captivity-feed conditions was analyzed. Using RNA sequencing, 47 and 113 candidate genes were determined to be related to feed conditions and breed, respectively, and 7 differentially expressed genes were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR, including UCP3. The mRNA levels of UCP3 were significantly different between the 2 feed conditions. The DNA region from bp +1700 to +2459 of the UCP3 gene was studied using the bisulfite sequencing method and contained 46 methylation sites and 3 CpG islands. The results showed that the methylation level of this UCP3 region was lower in DNH chickens (0.77% to 0.88%, P = 0.012) and QJM chickens (0.88% to 0.91%, P = 0.20) under scatter-feed conditions than under captivity-feed conditions. The mean methylation level of UCP3 in DNH chickens was lower than that in QJM chickens under scatter-feed conditions (DNH to QJM, 0.77% to 0.88%, P = 0.007), which suggests that breed affects the mean methylation level of UCP3 under scatter-feed conditions. In summary, our findings suggest that feed condition and breed affect the methylation of UCP3 in chicken breast muscle.

  9. Metabolic response to feeding in Tupinambis merianae: circadian rhythm and a possible respiratory constraint.

    PubMed

    Klein, Wilfried; Perry, Steven F; Abe, Augusto S; Andrade, Denis V

    2006-01-01

    The diurnal tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae exhibits a marked circadian variation in metabolism that is characterized by the significant increase in metabolism during part of the day. These increases in metabolic rate, found in the fasting animal, are absent during the first 2 d after meal ingestion but reappear subsequently, and the daily increase in metabolic rate is added to the increase in metabolic rate caused by digestion. During the first 2 d after feeding, priority is given to digestion, while on the third and following days, the metabolic demands are clearly added to each other. This response seems to be a regulated response of the animal, which becomes less active after food ingestion, rather than an inability of the respiratory system to support simultaneous demands at the beginning of digestion. The body cavity of Tupinambis is divided into two compartments by a posthepatic septum (PHS). Animals that had their PHS surgically removed showed no significant alteration in the postprandial metabolic response compared to tegus with intact PHS. The maximal metabolic increment during digestion, the relative cost of meal digestion, and the duration of the process were virtually unaffected by the removal of the PHS.

  10. Genetic ablation of calcium-independent phospholipase A2gamma prevents obesity and insulin resistance during high fat feeding by mitochondrial uncoupling and increased adipocyte fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, David J; Sims, Harold F; Yang, Kui; Kiebish, Michael A; Su, Xiong; Jenkins, Christopher M; Guan, Shaoping; Moon, Sung Ho; Pietka, Terri; Nassir, Fatiha; Schappe, Timothy; Moore, Kristin; Han, Xianlin; Abumrad, Nada A; Gross, Richard W

    2010-11-19

    Phospholipases are critical enzyme mediators participating in many aspects of cellular function through modulating the generation of lipid 2nd messengers, membrane physical properties, and cellular bioenergetics. Here, we demonstrate that mice null for calcium-independent phospholipase A(2)γ (iPLA(2)γ(-/-)) are completely resistant to high fat diet-induced weight gain, adipocyte hypertrophy, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance, which occur in iPLA(2)γ(+/+) mice after high fat feeding. Notably, iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mice were lean, demonstrated abdominal lipodystrophy, and remained insulin-sensitive despite having a marked impairment in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion after high fat feeding. Respirometry of adipocyte explants from iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mice identified increased rates of oxidation of multiple different substrates in comparison with adipocyte explants from wild-type littermates. Shotgun lipidomics of adipose tissue from wild-type mice demonstrated the anticipated 2-fold increase in triglyceride content after high fat feeding. In sharp contrast, the adipocyte triglyceride content was identical in iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mice fed either a standard diet or a high fat diet. Respirometry of skeletal muscle mitochondria from iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mice demonstrated marked decreases in state 3 respiration using multiple substrates whose metabolism was uncoupled from ATP production. Shotgun lipidomics of skeletal muscle revealed a decreased content of cardiolipin with an altered molecular species composition thereby identifying the mechanism underlying mitochondrial uncoupling in the iPLA(2)γ(-/-) mouse. Collectively, these results identify iPLA(2)γ as an obligatory upstream enzyme that is necessary for efficient electron transport chain coupling and energy production through its participation in the alterations of cellular bioenergetics that promote the development of the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Conditional postnatal deletion of the neonatal murine hepatic circadian gene, Npas2, alters the gut microbiome following restricted feeding.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Derek S; Stewart, Christopher J; Chu, Derrick M; Goodspeed, Danielle M; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Pablo J; Shope, Cynthia D; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2017-08-01

    We have recently shown in both non-human primates and in rodents that fetal and neonatal hepatic expression of the circadian transcription factor, Npas2, is modulated by a high fat maternal diet and plays a critical role in establishing life-long metabolic homeostasis. Similarly, we and others have also established the importance of the maternal and early postnatal diet on establishment of the early gut microbiome. We hypothesized that altered circadian gene expression solely in the neonatal liver would result in gut microbiome dysbiosis, especially with diet-induced metabolic stress (ie, restricted feeding). Using a murine model in which we conditionally knock out Npas2 in the neonatal liver, we aimed to determine the role of the circadian machinery in gut dysbiosis with restricted feeding. We collected fecal samples from liver Npas2 conditional knockout (n = 11) and wild-type (n = 13) reproductive-aged mice before (study day 0) and after the restricted feeding study (study day 17). Extracted DNA was sequenced using the MiSeq Illumina platform using primers specific for the V4 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene. The resulting sequences were quality filtered, aligned, and assigned taxonomy. Principal coordinate analysis was performed on unweighted and weighted UniFrac distances between samples with a permutation analysis of variance to assess clustering significance between groups. Microbial taxa that significantly differ between groups of interest was determined using linear discriminate analysis effect size and randomForrest. Principal coordinate analysis performed on weighted UniFrac distances between male conditional knockout and wild-type cohorts revealed that the gut microbiome of the mice did not differ by genotype at the start of the restricted feeding study but did differ by virtue of genotype at the end of the study (P = .001). Moreover, these differences could be at least partially attributed to restricted feeding-associated alterations in relative

  12. Impact of nutrients on circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Johanneke E; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E; Belsham, Denise D

    2015-03-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the mammalian hypothalamus functions as an endogenous pacemaker that generates and maintains circadian rhythms throughout the body. Next to this central clock, peripheral oscillators exist in almost all mammalian tissues. Whereas the SCN is mainly entrained to the environment by light, peripheral clocks are entrained by various factors, of which feeding/fasting is the most important. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by, for instance, altered timing of food intake can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and is, in humans, related to the development of metabolic disorders, including obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Diets high in fat or sugar have been shown to alter circadian clock function. This review discusses the recent findings concerning the influence of nutrients, in particular fatty acids and glucose, on behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms and will summarize critical studies describing putative mechanisms by which these nutrients are able to alter normal circadian rhythmicity, in the SCN, in non-SCN brain areas, as well as in peripheral organs. As the effects of fat and sugar on the clock could be through alterations in energy status, the role of specific nutrient sensors will be outlined, as well as the molecular studies linking these components to metabolism. Understanding the impact of specific macronutrients on the circadian clock will allow for guidance toward the composition and timing of meals optimal for physiological health, as well as putative therapeutic targets to regulate the molecular clock.

  13. Impact of nutrients on circadian rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Oosterman, Johanneke E.; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the mammalian hypothalamus functions as an endogenous pacemaker that generates and maintains circadian rhythms throughout the body. Next to this central clock, peripheral oscillators exist in almost all mammalian tissues. Whereas the SCN is mainly entrained to the environment by light, peripheral clocks are entrained by various factors, of which feeding/fasting is the most important. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by, for instance, altered timing of food intake can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and is, in humans, related to the development of metabolic disorders, including obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Diets high in fat or sugar have been shown to alter circadian clock function. This review discusses the recent findings concerning the influence of nutrients, in particular fatty acids and glucose, on behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms and will summarize critical studies describing putative mechanisms by which these nutrients are able to alter normal circadian rhythmicity, in the SCN, in non-SCN brain areas, as well as in peripheral organs. As the effects of fat and sugar on the clock could be through alterations in energy status, the role of specific nutrient sensors will be outlined, as well as the molecular studies linking these components to metabolism. Understanding the impact of specific macronutrients on the circadian clock will allow for guidance toward the composition and timing of meals optimal for physiological health, as well as putative therapeutic targets to regulate the molecular clock. PMID:25519730

  14. Ghrelin receptor-knockout mice display alterations in circadian rhythms of activity and feeding under constant lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Lamont, E Waddington; Bruton, J; Blum, I D; Abizaid, A

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach. Ghrelin, however, may also be a modulator of the circadian system given that ghrelin receptors are expressed in the master clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and several outputs of this region. To investigate this, we performed analyses of running wheel activity and neuronal activation in wild type (WT) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor-knockout (GHSR-KO) mice under various lighting conditions. GHSR-KO and WT mice were maintained under constant dark (DD) or constant light (LL) with ad libitum access to food before being placed on a schedule of temporally restricted access to food (4 h/day) for 2 weeks. There were no differences between KO and WT mice in free-running period under DD, but GHSR-KO mice required more days to develop a high level of food anticipatory activity, and this was lower than that observed in WT mice. Under LL, GHSR-KO mice showed greater activity overall, lengthening of their circadian period, and more resistance to the disorganisational effects of LL. Furthermore, GHSR-KO mice showed greater activity overall, and greater activity in anticipation of a scheduled meal under LL. These behavioral effects were not correlated with changes in the circadian expression of the Fos, Per1 or Per2 proteins under any lighting conditions. These results suggest that the ghrelin receptor plays a role in modulating the activity of the circadian system under normal conditions and under restricted feeding schedules, but does so through mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  15. Phase shifts in circadian peripheral clocks caused by exercise are dependent on the feeding schedule in PER2::LUC mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Yuta; Ikeda, Yuko; Kamagata, Mayo; Iwami, Shiho; Yasuda, Shinnosuke; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) clock, which is the main oscillator and peripheral clock. SCN clock can be entrained by both photic and non-photic stimuli, and an interaction exists between photic and non-photic entrainment. Moreover, peripheral circadian clocks can be entrained not only by scheduled restricted feeding, but also by scheduled exercise. Thus, the entrainment of peripheral circadian clocks may be the result of an interaction between the entrainment caused by feeding and exercise. In this study, we examined the effect of wheel-running exercise on the phase of the peripheral clocks (kidney, liver and submandibular gland) in PER2::LUC mice under various feeding schedules. Phase and waveforms of the peripheral clocks were not affected by voluntary wheel-running exercise. Exercise for a period of 4 h during the early dark period (morning) delayed the peripheral clocks, while exercise for the same duration during the late dark period (evening) advanced the peripheral clocks. The feeding phase was advanced and delayed by evening and morning exercise, respectively, suggesting that the feeding pattern elicited by the scheduled exercise may entrain the peripheral clocks. Exercise did not affect the phase of the peripheral clock under the 1 meal per day schedule. When the phase of the peripheral clocks was advanced by the feeding schedule of 2 or 4 meals per day during light and/or dark periods, wheel-running exercise during the morning period significantly and equally shifted the phase of all organs back to the original positions observed in mice maintained under free-feeding conditions and with no exercise. When the schedule of 2 meals per day during the dark period failed to affect the phase of peripheral clock, morning exercise did not affect the phase. Wheel-running exercise increased the levels of serum corticosterone, and the injection of dexamethasone/corticosterone instead of exercise shifted a phase that had

  16. Diverse development and higher sensitivity of the circadian clocks to changes in maternal-feeding regime in a rat model of cardio-metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Olejníková, Lucie; Polidarová, Lenka; Paušlyová, Lucia; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2015-05-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) develop cardiovascular and metabolic pathology in adulthood when their circadian system exhibits significant aberrances compared with healthy control rats. This study was aimed to elucidate how the SHR circadian system develops during ontogenesis and to assess its sensitivity to changes in maternal-feeding regime. Analysis of ontogenesis of clock gene expression rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, liver and colon revealed significant differences in SHR compared with Wistar rats. In the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN) and liver, the development of a high-amplitude expression rhythm selectively for Bmal1 was delayed compared with Wistar rat. The atypical development of the SHR circadian clocks during postnatal ontogenesis might arise from differences in maternal behavior between SHR and Wistar rats that were detected soon after delivery. It may also arise from higher sensitivity of the circadian clocks in the SHR SCN, liver and colon to maternal behavior related to changes in the feeding regime because in contrast to Wistar rat, the SHR SCN and peripheral clocks during the prenatal period and the hepatic clock during the early postnatal period were phase shifted due to exposure of mothers to a restricted feeding regime. The maternal restricted feeding regime shifted the clocks despite the fact that the mothers were maintained under the light/dark cycle. Our findings of the diverse development and higher sensitivity of the developing circadian system of SHR to maternal cues might result from previously demonstrated differences in the SHR circadian genotype and may potentially contribute to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, which the animal model spontaneously develops.

  17. Effects of feeding schedule changes on the circadian phase of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and serum lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Takahiro; Tada, Yuki; Hida, Azumi; Sunami, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Yuri; Yasuda, Jun; Nakai, Ayumi; Togo, Fumiharu; Kawano, Yukari

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether scheduling meals earlier in the day affects the circadian phase of the cardiac autonomic nervous system as assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) and serum lipid levels. Healthy men aged 21.4 ± 0.5 years (n = 14) with a habit of regularly skipping breakfast participated in this parallel trial involving altered feeding schedules. Participants in the early mealtime group (EM group, n = 8) were asked to eat three meals at 8:00, 13:00, and 18:00, and the control group (n = 6) ate at 13:00, 18:00, and 23:00 for 2 weeks. On the measurement day before and after intervention, fasting blood samples and 24-h electrocardiograph recordings were collected. Spectral analysis was used for approximate 10-min HRV segments. Low frequency (LF) power, high frequency (HF) power, and the ratio of HF to total power (%HF) were calculated to assess sympathovagal balance. Acrophases of the circadian rhythm of HRV variables were obtained by nonlinear least squares regression. Triglyceride and total and LDL cholesterol levels were significantly decreased in the EM group when compared with the control group (p = 0.035, 0.008, and 0.004, respectively). Acrophases for HRV variables were advanced in the EM group and their difference between before and after the intervention in LF power (-3.2 ± 1.2 h) and %HF (-1.2 ± 0.5 h) reached significant level, respectively (p < 0.05). Timing of meals was a key factor in regulating circadian phases of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and lipid metabolism.

  18. Vitamin Concentrations in Human Milk Vary with Time within Feed, Circadian Rhythm, and Single-Dose Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Islam, M Munirul; Peerson, Janet M; Allen, Lindsay H

    2017-04-01

    Background: Human milk is the subject of many studies, but procedures for representative sample collection have not been established. Our improved methods for milk micronutrient analysis now enable systematic study of factors that affect its concentrations.Objective: We evaluated the effects of sample collection protocols, variations in circadian rhythms, subject variability, and acute maternal micronutrient supplementation on milk vitamin concentrations.Methods: In the BMQ (Breast-Milk-Quality) study, we recruited 18 healthy women (aged 18-26 y) in Dhaka, Bangladesh, at 2-4 mo of lactation for a 3-d supplementation study. On day 1, no supplements were given; on days 2 and 3, participants consumed ∼1 time and 2 times, respectively, the US-Canadian Recommended Dietary Allowances for vitamins at breakfast (0800-0859). Milk was collected during every feeding from the same breast over 24 h. Milk expressed in the first 2 min (aliquot I) was collected separately from the remainder (aliquot II); a third aliquot (aliquot III) was saved by combining aliquots I and II. Thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamins B-6, B-12, A, and E and fat were measured in each sample.Results: Significant but small differences (14-18%) between aliquots were found for all vitamins except for vitamins B-6 and B-12. Circadian variance was significant except for fat-adjusted vitamins A and E, with a higher contribution to total variance with supplementation. Between-subject variability accounted for most of the total variance. Afternoon and evening samples best reflected daily vitamin concentrations for all study days. Acute supplementation effects were found for thiamin, riboflavin, and vitamins B-6 and A at 2-4 h postdosing, with 0.1-6.17% passing into milk. Supplementation was reflected in fasting, 24-h postdose samples for riboflavin and vitamin B-6. Maximum amounts of dose-responding vitamins in 1 feeding ranged from 4.7% to 21.8% (day 2) and 8.2% to 35.0% (day 3) of Adequate Intake

  19. Vitamin Concentrations in Human Milk Vary with Time within Feed, Circadian Rhythm, and Single-Dose Supplementation1234

    PubMed Central

    Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Peerson, Janet M; Allen, Lindsay H

    2017-01-01

    Background: Human milk is the subject of many studies, but procedures for representative sample collection have not been established. Our improved methods for milk micronutrient analysis now enable systematic study of factors that affect its concentrations. Objective: We evaluated the effects of sample collection protocols, variations in circadian rhythms, subject variability, and acute maternal micronutrient supplementation on milk vitamin concentrations. Methods: In the BMQ (Breast-Milk-Quality) study, we recruited 18 healthy women (aged 18–26 y) in Dhaka, Bangladesh, at 2–4 mo of lactation for a 3-d supplementation study. On day 1, no supplements were given; on days 2 and 3, participants consumed ∼1 time and 2 times, respectively, the US-Canadian Recommended Dietary Allowances for vitamins at breakfast (0800–0859). Milk was collected during every feeding from the same breast over 24 h. Milk expressed in the first 2 min (aliquot I) was collected separately from the remainder (aliquot II); a third aliquot (aliquot III) was saved by combining aliquots I and II. Thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamins B-6, B-12, A, and E and fat were measured in each sample. Results: Significant but small differences (14–18%) between aliquots were found for all vitamins except for vitamins B-6 and B-12. Circadian variance was significant except for fat-adjusted vitamins A and E, with a higher contribution to total variance with supplementation. Between-subject variability accounted for most of the total variance. Afternoon and evening samples best reflected daily vitamin concentrations for all study days. Acute supplementation effects were found for thiamin, riboflavin, and vitamins B-6 and A at 2–4 h postdosing, with 0.1–6.17% passing into milk. Supplementation was reflected in fasting, 24-h postdose samples for riboflavin and vitamin B-6. Maximum amounts of dose-responding vitamins in 1 feeding ranged from 4.7% to 21.8% (day 2) and 8.2% to 35.0% (day 3) of Adequate

  20. Circadian feeding entrains anticipatory metabolic activity in piriform cortex and olfactory tubercle, but not in suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Diana; Caba, Mario; Gonzalez-Lima, F; Vázquez, Araceli; Corona-Morales, Aleph

    2014-12-10

    Animals maintained under conditions of food-availability restricted to a specific period of the day show molecular and physiological circadian rhythms and increase their locomotor activity 2-3h prior to the next scheduled feeding, called food anticipatory activity (FAA). Although the anatomical substrates and underlying mechanisms of the food-entrainable oscillator are not well understood, experimental evidence indicates that it involves multiple structures and systems. Using rabbit pups entrained to circadian nursing as a natural model of food restriction, we hypothesized that the anterior piriform cortex (APCx) and the olfactory tubercle (OTu) are activated during nursing-associated FAA. Two groups of litters were entrained to one of two different nursing times. At postnatal day 7, when litters showed clear FAA, pups from each litter were euthanized at nursing time, or 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 or 20h later. Neural metabolic activities of the APCx, OTu, olfactory bulb (OB) and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) were assessed by cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Additionally, two fasted groups were nurse-deprived for two cycles before being euthanized at postnatal day 9. In nursed pups, metabolic activity of APCx, OTu and OB increased during FAA and after feeding, independently of the geographical time. Metabolic activity in SCN was not affected by nursing schedule. Given that APCx and OTu are in a key network position to integrate temporal odor signals with body energetic state, brain arousal and reward mechanisms, we suggest that these structures could be an important part of the conditioned oscillatory mechanism that leads to food entrainment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Circadian variation in the effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on body temperature, feeding and activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kamerman, Peter; Mitchell, Duncan; Laburn, Helen

    2002-02-01

    We have investigated whether there is circadian variation in the effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on body temperature, physical activity and feeding. We used nocturnally active Sprague-Dawley rats, housed at approximately 24 degrees C with a 12:12 h light:dark cycle (lights on 07:00 hours) and provided with food and water ad libitum. Nitric oxide synthesis was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of the unspecific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N-nitro- L-arginine methyl ester ( L-NAME, 100, 50, 25, 10 mg/kg), or the relatively selective inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine (100, 50 mg/kg), during the day ( approximately 09:00 hours) or night ( approximately 21:00 hours). Body temperature and physical activity were measured using radiotelemetry, while food intake was calculated by weighing each animal's food before as well as 12 and 24 h after each injection. We found that daytime injection of L-NAME and aminoguanidine had no effect on daytime body temperature. However, daytime injection of both drugs did decrease nocturnal food intake ( P<0.05) and activity ( P<0.05). When injected at night, L-NAME reduced night-time body temperature ( P<0.01), activity ( P<0.05) and food intake ( P<0.05) in a dose-dependent manner, but night-time injection of aminoguanidine inhibited only night-time activity ( P<0.05). The effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on body temperature, feeding and activity therefore are primarily a consequence of inhibiting constitutively expressed nitric oxide synthase, and are subject to circadian variation.

  2. Differential responses of circadian Per2 expression rhythms in discrete brain areas to daily injection of methamphetamine and restricted feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Natsubori, Akiyo; Honma, Ken-ichi; Honma, Sato

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral rhythms induced by methamphetamine (MAP) and daily restricted feeding (RF) in rats are independent of the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and have been regarded to share a common oscillatory mechanism. In the present study, in order to examine the responses of brain oscillatory systems to MAP and RF, circadian rhythms in clock gene, Period2, expression were measured in several brain areas in rats. Transgenic rats carrying a bioluminescence reporter of Period2-dLuciferase were subjected to either daily injection of MAP or RF of 2 h at a fixed time of day for 14 days. As a result, spontaneous movement and wheel-running activity were greatly enhanced following MAP injection and prior to daily meal under RF. Circadian Per2 rhythms were measured in the cultured brain tissues containing one of the following structures: the olfactory bulb; caudate-putamen; parietal cortex; substantia nigra; and SCN. Except for the SCN, the circadian Per2 rhythms in the brain tissues were significantly phase-delayed by 1.9 h on average in MAP-injected rats as compared with the saline-controls. On the other hand, the circadian rhythms outside the SCN were significantly phase-advanced by 6.3 h on average in rats under RF as compared with those under ad libitum feeding. These findings indicate that the circadian rhythms in specific brain areas of the central dopaminergic system respond differentially to MAP injection and RF, suggesting that different oscillatory mechanisms in the brain underlie the MAP-induced behavior and pre-feeding activity under RF.

  3. A Circadian Clock in the Olfactory Bulb Anticipates Feeding during Food Anticipatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nolasco, Nahum; Juárez, Claudia; Morgado, Elvira; Meza, Enrique; Caba, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit pups ingest food, in this case milk, once a day with circadian periodicity and are a natural model of food anticipatory activity. During nursing, several sensory systems receive information about properties of the food, one of them being the olfactory system, which has received little attention in relation to synchronization by food. In addition, the olfactory bulb has a circadian pacemaker that exhibits rhythms independently of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, but the biological functions of these rhythms are largely unknown. In the present contribution, we hypothesized that circadian suckling of milk synchronizes rhythms in the olfactory bulb. To this aim we explored by immunohistochemistry, rhythms of FOS and PER1 proteins, as indicators of activation and reporter of oscillations, respectively, through a complete 24-h cycle in periglomerular, mitral and granular cell layers of both the main and the accessory olfactory bulb. Subjects were 7-day-old rabbit pups scheduled to nurse during the night (02∶00 h) or day (10∶00 h), and also fasted subjects, to explore the possible persistence of oscillations. In the three layers of the main olfactory bulb, FOS was high at time of nursing, then further increased 1.5 h afterward, and then decreased to increase again in advance of the next nursing bout. This pattern persisted, without the postprandial increase, in fasted subjects with a shift in subjects nursed at 02∶00. PER1 was increased 2–8 h after nursing and this increase persisted in most cell layers, with a shift, in fasted subjects. In the accessory olfactory bulb we only observed a consistent pattern of FOS expression in the mitral cell layer of nursed subjects, similar to that of the main olfactory bulb. We conclude that the main olfactory bulb is synchronized during milk ingestion, but during fasting its oscillations perhaps are modulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, as proposed for rodents. PMID:23094084

  4. A circadian clock in the olfactory bulb anticipates feeding during food anticipatory activity.

    PubMed

    Nolasco, Nahum; Juárez, Claudia; Morgado, Elvira; Meza, Enrique; Caba, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit pups ingest food, in this case milk, once a day with circadian periodicity and are a natural model of food anticipatory activity. During nursing, several sensory systems receive information about properties of the food, one of them being the olfactory system, which has received little attention in relation to synchronization by food. In addition, the olfactory bulb has a circadian pacemaker that exhibits rhythms independently of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, but the biological functions of these rhythms are largely unknown. In the present contribution, we hypothesized that circadian suckling of milk synchronizes rhythms in the olfactory bulb. To this aim we explored by immunohistochemistry, rhythms of FOS and PER1 proteins, as indicators of activation and reporter of oscillations, respectively, through a complete 24-h cycle in periglomerular, mitral and granular cell layers of both the main and the accessory olfactory bulb. Subjects were 7-day-old rabbit pups scheduled to nurse during the night (02:00 h) or day (10:00 h), and also fasted subjects, to explore the possible persistence of oscillations. In the three layers of the main olfactory bulb, FOS was high at time of nursing, then further increased 1.5 h afterward, and then decreased to increase again in advance of the next nursing bout. This pattern persisted, without the postprandial increase, in fasted subjects with a shift in subjects nursed at 02:00. PER1 was increased 2-8 h after nursing and this increase persisted in most cell layers, with a shift, in fasted subjects. In the accessory olfactory bulb we only observed a consistent pattern of FOS expression in the mitral cell layer of nursed subjects, similar to that of the main olfactory bulb. We conclude that the main olfactory bulb is synchronized during milk ingestion, but during fasting its oscillations perhaps are modulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, as proposed for rodents.

  5. Transcriptional repressor E4-binding protein 4 (E4BP4) regulates metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) during circadian cycles and feeding.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Muchnik, Marina; Chen, Zheng; Patel, Manish; Wu, Nan; Joshi, Shree; Rui, Liangyou; Lazar, Mitchell A; Yin, Lei

    2010-11-19

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a potent antidiabetic and triglyceride-lowering hormone whose hepatic expression is highly responsive to food intake. FGF21 induction in the adaptive response to fasting has been well studied, but the molecular mechanism responsible for feeding-induced repression remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate a novel link between FGF21 and a key circadian output protein, E4BP4. Expression of Fgf21 displays a circadian rhythm, which peaks during the fasting phase and is anti-phase to E4bp4, which is elevated during feeding periods. E4BP4 strongly suppresses Fgf21 transcription by binding to a D-box element in the distal promoter region. Depletion of E4BP4 in synchronized Hepa1c1c-7 liver cells augments the amplitude of Fgf21 expression, and overexpression of E4BP4 represses FGF21 secretion from primary mouse hepatocytes. Mimicking feeding effects, insulin significantly increases E4BP4 expression and binding to the Fgf21 promoter through AKT activation. Thus, E4BP4 is a novel insulin-responsive repressor of FGF21 expression during circadian cycles and feeding.

  6. Entrainment of mouse peripheral circadian clocks to <24 h feeding/fasting cycles under 24 h light/dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Tahara, Yu; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-09-23

    The circadian clock system in peripheral tissues can endogenously oscillate and is entrained by the light-dark and fasting-feeding cycles in mammals. Although the system's range of entrainment to light-dark cycles with a non-24 h (<24 h) interval has been studied, the range of entrainment to fasting-feeding cycles with shorter periods (<24 h) has not been investigated in peripheral molecular clocks. In the present study, we measured this range by monitoring the mouse peripheral PER2::LUCIFERASE rhythm in vivo at different periods under each feeding cycle (Tau (T) = 15-24 h) under normal light-dark conditions. Peripheral clocks could be entrained to the feeding cycle with T = 22-24 h, but not to that with T = 15-21 h. Under the feeding cycle with T = 15-18 h, the peripheral clocks oscillated at near the 24-h period, suggesting that they were entrained to the light-dark cycle. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrated the range of entrainment to the non-24 h feeding cycle, and that the circadian range (T = 22-24 h) of feeding stimulus is necessary for peripheral molecular clock entrainment under light-dark cycles.

  7. Entrainment of mouse peripheral circadian clocks to <24 h feeding/fasting cycles under 24 h light/dark conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hamaguchi, Yutaro; Tahara, Yu; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock system in peripheral tissues can endogenously oscillate and is entrained by the light-dark and fasting-feeding cycles in mammals. Although the system’s range of entrainment to light-dark cycles with a non-24 h (<24 h) interval has been studied, the range of entrainment to fasting-feeding cycles with shorter periods (<24 h) has not been investigated in peripheral molecular clocks. In the present study, we measured this range by monitoring the mouse peripheral PER2::LUCIFERASE rhythm in vivo at different periods under each feeding cycle (Tau (T) = 15–24 h) under normal light-dark conditions. Peripheral clocks could be entrained to the feeding cycle with T = 22–24 h, but not to that with T = 15–21 h. Under the feeding cycle with T = 15–18 h, the peripheral clocks oscillated at near the 24-h period, suggesting that they were entrained to the light-dark cycle. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrated the range of entrainment to the non-24 h feeding cycle, and that the circadian range (T = 22–24 h) of feeding stimulus is necessary for peripheral molecular clock entrainment under light-dark cycles. PMID:26395309

  8. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  9. Circadian serum concentrations of tylosin in broilers after feed or water medication.

    PubMed

    Lilia, G; Aguilera, R; Cortés-Cuevas, A; Rosario, C; Sumano, H

    2008-09-01

    1. Because tylosin is a time-dependent antibacterial agent, and because feeding and drinking of broilers decreases in late afternoon and ceases in the dark, it was hypothesised that serum concentrations of this drug are greatly reduced during the dark period. 2. The trial was carried out in a commercial poultry house, under standard broiler husbandry conditions, with food and water withdrawn from 22:00 until 07:00 h next morning and exposed to a natural light cycle of 13L:11D. 3. Broilers were given tylosin tartrate, in either feed or water, for 5 d as follows: 100, 200 and 300 ppm in feed, equivalent to 12.6, 25.2 and 37.8 mg/kg/d, respectively; and 200 and 400 mg/l in drinking water, equivalent to 51 to 102 mg/kg/d, respectively. 4. At 07:00 h on d 4, and for the next 40 h, hourly serum samples were obtained and analysed for tylosin by means of a microbiological assay. 5. Day vs night concentrations of tylosin expressed as area under the curve (AUC) in all groups revealed greater values during the day. The highest AUC and AUC(24)/minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratio were obtained in the group medicated with 400 mg/l and the corresponding lowest values were found in the group medicated with 100 ppm in feed. 6. In conclusion, tylosin did not reach therapeutic serum concentrations during the dark period, at all dose rates tested when administered in feed or water. A sustained release form of this drug is needed to solve this inadequacy of tylosin medication in broilers.

  10. Synchronization to light and mealtime of the circadian rhythms of self-feeding behavior and locomotor activity of white shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    PubMed

    Santos, Aline Dos Anjos; López-Olmeda, José Fernando; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Fortes-Silva, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    The role of light and feeding cycles in synchronizing self-feeding and locomotor activity rhythms was studied in white shrimps using a new self-feeding system activated by photocell trigger. In experiment 1, shrimps maintained under a 12:12h light/dark (LD) photoperiod were allowed to self-feed using feeders connected to a photoelectric cell, while locomotor activity was recorded with a second photocell. On day 30, animals were subjected to constant darkness (DD) for 12days to check the existence of endogenous circadian rhythms. In the experiment 2, shrimps were exposed to both a 12:12h LD photoperiod and a fixed meal schedule in the middle of the dark period (MD, 01:00h). On day 20, shrimps were exposed to DD conditions and the same fixed feeding. On day 30, they were maintained under DD and fasted for 7days. The results revealed that under LD, shrimps showed a clear nocturnal feeding pattern and locomotor activity (81.9% and 67.7% of total daily food-demands and locomotor activity, respectively, at nighttime). Both feeding and locomotor rhythms were endogenously driven and persisted under DD with an average period length (τ) close to 24h (circadian) (τ=24.18±0.13 and 23.87±0.14h for locomotor and feeding, respectively). Moreover, Shrimp showed a daily food intake under LD condition (1.1±0.2gday(-1) in the night phase vs. 0.2±0.1gday(-1) in the light phase). Our findings might be relevant for some important shrimp aquaculture aspects, such as developing suitable feeding management on shrimp farms.

  11. Synchronizing an aging brain: can entraining circadian clocks by food slow Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Kent, Brianne A

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a global epidemic. Unfortunately, we are still without effective treatments or a cure for this disease, which is having devastating consequences for patients, their families, and societies around the world. Until effective treatments are developed, promoting overall health may hold potential for delaying the onset or preventing neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. In particular, chronobiological concepts may provide a useful framework for identifying the earliest signs of age-related disease as well as inexpensive and noninvasive methods for promoting health. It is well reported that AD is associated with disrupted circadian functioning to a greater extent than normal aging. However, it is unclear if the central circadian clock (i.e., the suprachiasmatic nucleus) is dysfunctioning, or whether the synchrony between the central and peripheral clocks that control behavior and metabolic processes are becoming uncoupled. Desynchrony of rhythms can negatively affect health, increasing morbidity and mortality in both animal models and humans. If the uncoupling of rhythms is contributing to AD progression or exacerbating symptoms, then it may be possible to draw from the food-entrainment literature to identify mechanisms for re-synchronizing rhythms to improve overall health and reduce the severity of symptoms. The following review will briefly summarize the circadian system, its potential role in AD, and propose using a feeding-related neuropeptide, such as ghrelin, to synchronize uncoupled rhythms. Synchronizing rhythms may be an inexpensive way to promote healthy aging and delay the onset of neurodegenerative disease such as AD.

  12. Fasting, Circadian Rhythms, and Time-Restricted Feeding in Healthy Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Longo, Valter D; Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-06-14

    Most animals alternate periods of feeding with periods of fasting often coinciding with sleep. Upon >24 hr of fasting, humans, rodents, and other mammals enter alternative metabolic phases, which rely less on glucose and more on ketone body-like carbon sources. Both intermittent and periodic fasting result in benefits ranging from the prevention to the enhanced treatment of diseases. Similarly, time-restricted feeding (TRF), in which food consumption is restricted to certain hours of the day, allows the daily fasting period to last >12 hr, thus imparting pleiotropic benefits. Understanding the mechanistic link between nutrients and the fasting benefits is leading to the identification of fasting-mimicking diets (FMDs) that achieve changes similar to those caused by fasting. Given the pleiotropic and sustained benefits of TRF and FMDs, both basic science and translational research are warranted to develop fasting-associated interventions into feasible, effective, and inexpensive treatments with the potential to improve healthspan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. mTORC1 signaling in Agrp neurons mediates circadian expression of Agrp and NPY but is dispensable for regulation of feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Albert, Verena; Cornu, Marion; Hall, Michael N

    2015-08-21

    Orexigenic agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y (Agrp/NPY) neurons and an orexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of the hypothalamus regulate feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. An understanding of the molecular signaling pathways that regulate Agrp/NPY and POMC function could lead to novel treatments for metabolic disorders. Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1) is a nutrient-activated protein kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism. We therefore investigated the role of mammalian TORC1 (mTORC1) in Agrp neurons. We generated and characterized Agrp neuron-specific raptor knockout (Agrp-raptor KO) mice. Agrp-raptor KO mice displayed reduced, non-circadian expression of Agrp and NPY but normal feeding behavior and energy homeostasis on both normal and high fat diet. Thus, mTORC1 in Agrp neurons controls circadian expression of orexigenic neuropeptides but is dispensable for the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermoregulation in the cold changes depending on the time of day and feeding condition: physiological and anatomical analyses of involved circadian mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tokizawa, K; Uchida, Y; Nagashima, K

    2009-12-15

    The circadian rhythm of body temperature (T(b)) is a well-known phenomenon. However, it is unknown how the circadian system including the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and clock genes affects thermoregulation. Food deprivation in mice induces a greater reduction of T(b) particularly in the light phase. We examined the role of Clock, one of key clock genes and the SCN during induced hypothermia. At 20 degrees C with fasting, mice increased their metabolic heat production in the dark phase and maintained T(b), whereas in the light phase, heat production was less, resulting in hypothermia. Under these conditions, neuronal activity in the SCN, assessed by cFos expression, increased only in the light phase. However, such differences in thermoregulatory and neural responses between the phases in Clock mutant mice were less marked. The neural network between the SCN and paraventricular nucleus appeared to be important in hypothermia. These findings suggest that the circadian system per se is influenced by both the feeding condition and environmental temperature and that it modulates thermoregulation.

  15. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  16. Circadian Misalignment and Health

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Reid, Kathryn J

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are near 24-hour patterns of physiology and behavior that are present independent of external cues including hormones, body temperature, mood, and sleep propensity. The term “circadian misalignment” describes a variety of circumstances, such as inappropriately timed sleep and wake, misalignment of sleep/wake with feeding rhythms, or misaligned central and peripheral rhythms. The predominance of early research focused on misalignment of sleep to the biological night. However, discovery of clock genes and the presence of peripheral circadian oscillators have expanded the definitions of misalignment. Experimental studies conducted in animal models and humans have provided evidence of potential mechanisms that link misalignment to negative outcomes. These include dysregulation of feeding behaviors, changes in appetite stimulating hormones, glucose metabolism and mood. This review has two foci: 1. To describe how circadian misalignment has been defined and evaluated in laboratory and field experiments, 2. To describe evidence linking different types of circadian misalignment to increased risk for physical (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer) and psychiatric (depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, attention deficit) disorders. This review will describe the role of circadian misalignment as a risk factor for disease in the general population and in clinical populations, including circadian rhythm sleep disorders and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24892891

  17. [Circadian rhythms in body temperature and sleep].

    PubMed

    Honma, Ken-ichi

    2013-12-01

    A 24 hour variation of core body temperature in humans is primarily regulated by the endogenous circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. And the expression of circadian rhythm is modified by the thermoregulatory mechanism controlling heat production and heat loss, which also show circadian rhythms. On the other hand, circadian rhythms in sleep-wakefulness are expressed by two independent but mutually coupled oscillators, the circadian pacemaker and the oscillator specific to sleep-wakefulness. However, neither the mechanism nor the site of oscillation of the latter is known. The time cues for these two oscillators are different. They are usually but frequently uncoupled under free-running conditions. Body temperature and sleep-wakefulness influence the counterpart in various extents, exerting masking effects on either circadian rhythm.

  18. Feeding and adrenal entrainment stimuli are both necessary for normal circadian oscillation of peripheral clocks in mice housed under different photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ohtsu, Teiji; Shiraishi, Takuya; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian circadian rhythm is entrained by multiple factors, including the light-dark cycle, the organism's feeding pattern and endocrine hormones such as glucocorticoids. Both a central clock (the suprachiasmatic nucleus, or SCN) and peripheral clocks (i.e. in the liver and lungs) in mice are entrained by photoperiod. However, the factors underlying entrainment signals from the SCN to peripheral clocks are not well known. To elucidate the role of entrainment factors such as corticosterone and feeding, we examined whether peripheral clock rhythms were impaired by adrenalectomy (ADX) and/or feeding of 6 meals per day at equal intervals under short-day, medium-day and long-day photoperiods (SP, MP and LP, respectively). We evaluated the waveform and phase of circadian rhythms in the liver, kidney and salivary gland by in vivo imaging of PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice. In intact mice, the waveforms of the peripheral clocks were similar among all photoperiods. The phases of peripheral clocks were well adjusted by the timing of the "lights-off"-operated evening (E) oscillator but not the "lights-on"-operated morning (M) oscillator. ADX had almost no effect on the rhythmicity and phase of peripheral clocks, regardless of photoperiod. To reduce the feeding-induced signal, we placed mice on a restricted feeding regimen with 6 meals per day (6 meals RF). This caused advances of the peripheral clock phase in LP-housed mice (2-5 h) and MP-housed mice (1-2 h) but not SP-housed mice. Thus, feeding pattern may affect the phase of peripheral clocks, depending on photoperiod. More specifically, ADX + 6 meals RF mice showed impairment of circadian rhythms in the kidney and liver but not in the salivary gland, regardless of photoperiod. However, the impairment of peripheral clocks observed in ADX + 6 meals RF mice was reversed by administration of dexamethasone for 3 days. The phase differences in the salivary gland clock among SP-, MP- and LP-housed mice became very

  19. Circadian feeding drive of metabolic activity in adipose tissue and not hyperphagia triggers overweight in mice: is there a role of the pentose-phosphate pathway?

    PubMed

    Stucchi, Paula; Gil-Ortega, Marta; Merino, Beatriz; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Cano, Victoria; Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Somoza, Beatriz; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Argente, Jesús; Valet, Philippe; Chowen, Julie Ann; Fernández-Alfonso, Marisol; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano

    2012-02-01

    High-fat (HF) diets trigger an increase in adipose tissue and body weight (BW) and disordered eating behavior. Our study deals with the hypothesis that circadian distribution of energy intake is more relevant for BW dynamics than diet composition. Four-week-old mice were exposed for 8 wk to a HF diet and compared with animals receiving control chow. HF mice progressively increased BW, decreased the amount of nocturnal (1800-0900 h) calories (energy or food intake) (30%) and increased diurnal (0900-1800 h) caloric intake (energy or food intake), although total daily intake was identical between groups. Animals were killed at 3-h intervals and plasma insulin, leptin, corticosterone, glucose, and fatty acid levels quantified. Adipose tissue was weighed, and enzymatic activities integral to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) assayed in lumbar adipose tissue. Phosphorylated AMP-dependent protein kinase and fatty acid synthase were quantified by Western blotting. In HF mice, there was a shift in the circadian oscillations of plasma parameters together with an inhibition of PPP activity and a decrease in phosphorylated AMP-dependent protein kinase and fatty acid synthase. In a second experiment, HF mice were forced to adhere to a circadian pattern of food intake similar to that in control animals. In this case, BW, adipose tissue, morning plasma parameters and PPP activity appeared to be normal. These data indicate that disordered feeding behavior can trigger BW gain independently of food composition and daily energy intake. Because PPP is the main source of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, we suggest that PPP inhibition might be an early marker of adipose dysfunction in diet-induced obesity.

  20. The relationship between feed efficiency and the circadian profile of blood plasma analytes measured in beef heifers at different physiological stages.

    PubMed

    Gonano, C V; Montanholi, Y R; Schenkel, F S; Smith, B A; Cant, J P; Miller, S P

    2014-10-01

    The characterization of blood metabolite concentrations over the circadian period and across physiological stages is important for understanding the biological basis of feed efficiency, and may culminate in indirect methods for assessing feed efficiency. Hematological analyses for albumin, urea, creatine kinase, glutamate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, carbon dioxide, and acetate were carried out in growing and gestating heifers. These measures were carried out in a sample of 36 Bos taurus crossed beef heifers held under the same husbandry conditions. Hourly blood samples were collected over a 24-h period on three separate sampling occasions, corresponding approximately to the yearling (and open), early-gestation and late-gestation stages. This design was used to determine variation throughout the day, effects due to physiological status and any associations with feed efficiency, as measured by residual feed intake. Blood analyte levels varied with time of day, with the most variation occurring between 0800 and 1600 h. There were also considerable differences in analyte levels across the three physiological stages; for example, creatine kinase was higher (P<0.05) in open heifers, followed by early- and late-gestation heifers. Feed efficiency was also associated with analyte abundance. In more feed-efficient open heifers, there were higher activities of creatine kinase (P<0.05) and aspartate aminotransferase (P<0.05), and lower concentrations of carbon dioxide (P<0.05). Furthermore, in late gestation, more efficient heifers had lower urea concentrations (P<0.05) and lower creatine kinase levels (P<0.05). Over the whole experimental period, carbon dioxide concentrations were numerically lower in more feed efficient heifers (P=0.079). Differences were also observed across physiological stages. For instance, open heifers had increased levels (P<0.05) of creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, carbon dioxide than early and late pregnancy heifers. In

  1. Shifting the feeding of mice to the rest phase creates metabolic alterations, which, on their own, shift the peripheral circadian clocks by 12 hours.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Atish; Kobiita, Ahmad; Chambon, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the events through which alterations in diurnal activities impinge on peripheral circadian clocks (PCCs), and reciprocally how the PCCs affect metabolism, thereby generating pathologies, are still poorly understood. Here, we deciphered how switching the diurnal feeding from the active to the rest phase, i.e., restricted feeding (RF), immediately creates a hypoinsulinemia during the active phase, which initiates a metabolic reprogramming by increasing FFA and glucagon levels. In turn, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activation by free fatty acid (FFA), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation by glucagon, lead to further metabolic alterations during the circadian active phase, as well as to aberrant activation of expression of the PCC components nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (Nr1d1/RevErbα), Period (Per1 and Per2). Moreover, hypoinsulinemia leads to an increase in glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity that, through phosphorylation, stabilizes and increases the level of the RevErbα protein during the active phase. This increase then leads to an untimely repression of expression of the genes containing a RORE DNA binding sequence (DBS), including the Bmal1 gene, thereby initiating in RF mice a 12-h PCC shift to which the CREB-mediated activation of Per1, Per2 by glucagon modestly contributes. We also show that the reported corticosterone extraproduction during the RF active phase reflects an adrenal aberrant activation of CREB signaling, which selectively delays the activation of the PPARα-RevErbα axis in muscle and heart and accounts for the retarded shift of their PCCs.

  2. Combination of starvation interval and food volume determines the phase of liver circadian rhythm in Per2::Luc knock-in mice under two meals per day feeding.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Akiko; Nagahama, Hiroki; Tsuboi, Takuma; Hirao, Mizuho; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2010-11-01

    Although the circadian liver clock is entrained by the feeding cycle, factors such as food volume and starvation interval are poorly understood. Per2::Luc knock-in mice were given two meals per day with different food volume sizes and/or with different intervals of starvation between two mealtimes with the total food volume per day fixed at 3.6 g (80 food pellets, ∼75% of free feeding) per mouse. The bioluminescence rhythm in the liver produced a unimodal peak but not bimodal peak under the regimen of two meals per day over 14-15 days. Peak Per2 expression occurred concurrently with the mealtime of the larger food volume, when the first and second meal were given as different food volume ratios under a 12 h feeding interval. When an equal volume of food was given under different starvation interval (8 h:16 h), the peak of the Per2 rhythm was close to peak by mealtime after long starvation (16 h). When food volumes for each mealtime were changed under 8 h:16 h, the peak rhythm was influenced by combined factors of food volume and starvation interval. Food intake after the 16-h starvation caused a significant increase in liver Per2, Dec1, and Bmal1 gene expression compared with food intake after the 8-h starvation with 8 h:16 h feeding intervals. In conclusion, the present results clearly demonstrate that food-induced entrainment of the liver clock is dependent on both food volume and the starvation interval between two meals. Therefore, normal feeding habits may help to maintain normal clock function in the liver organ.

  3. Irisin in goldfish (Carassius auratus): Effects of irisin injections on feeding behavior and expression of appetite regulators, uncoupling proteins and lipoprotein lipase, and fasting-induced changes in FNDC5 expression.

    PubMed

    Butt, Zahndra Diann; Hackett, Jessica Dalton; Volkoff, Hélène

    2017-04-01

    Irisin is a peptide cleaved from the fibronectin type III domain containing protein 5 (FNDC5) gene that is secreted predominantly by muscle cells but also by other tissues including brain and intestine. In mammals, irisin has been shown to have thermogenic actions via the modulation of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and to affect feeding and energy homeostasis via actions in brain, adipose tissue, liver, muscle and gastrointestinal tract. To examine the role of irisin on feeding and metabolism in fish, the effects of peripheral (intraperitoneal) injections of irisin on feeding behavior, glucose levels and the mRNA expressions of appetite regulators (cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript CART, agouti related protein AgRP, orexin), UCPs and lipoprotein lipase LPL and brain factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor , BDNF and tyrosine hydroxylase TH) were assessed in brain, white muscle and intestine. Irisin injections (100ng/g) induced a decrease in food intake and increases in brain orexin, CART1 and CART2, UCP2, BDNF, muscle UCP2 and intestine LPL mRNA expressions but did not affect blood glucose levels, brain AgRP, TH, UCP1, UCP3 and LPL or muscle UCP1, UCP3 and LPL expressions. A partial goldfish FNDC5 cDNA was isolated and the expressions of FDNC5, UCPs, LPL and BDNF were also compared between fed and fasted fish. Fasting induced decreases FNDC5 mRNA expression in the brain and intestine, but not in muscle. Fasting also induced increases in brain BDNF and LPL expressions and increases in UCP1, UCP2, UCP3 and LPL expressions in muscle. Our result suggest that irisin is an anorexigenic factor in fish and its actions might be in part mediated by appetite-regulating factors such as CART and orexins as well as UCP2 and brain factors such as BDNF.

  4. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  5. Diurnal regulation of RNA polymerase III transcription is under the control of both the feeding-fasting response and the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Mange, François; Praz, Viviane; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Willis, Ian M; Schütz, Frédéric; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-03-24

    RNA polymerase III (pol III) synthesizes short non-coding RNAs, many of which are essential for translation. Accordingly, pol III activity is tightly regulated with cell growth and proliferation by factors such as MYC, RB1, TRP53, and MAF1. MAF1 is a repressor of pol III transcription whose activity is controlled by phosphorylation; in particular, it is inactivated through phosphorylation by the TORC1 kinase complex, a sensor of nutrient availability. Pol III regulation is thus sensitive to environmental cues, yet a diurnal profile of pol III transcription activity is so far lacking. Here we first use gene expression arrays to measure mRNA accumulation during the diurnal cycle in the livers of (i) wild-type mice, (ii) arrhythmic Arntl knockout mice, (iii) mice fed at regular intervals during both night and day, and (iv) mice lacking the Maf1 gene, and so provide a comprehensive view of the changes in cyclic mRNA accumulation occurring in these different systems. We then show that pol III occupancy of its target genes rises before the onset of the night, stays high during the night, when mice normally ingest food and when translation is known to be increased, and decreases in daytime. Whereas higher pol III occupancy during the night reflects a MAF1-dependent response to feeding, the rise of pol III occupancy before the onset of the night reflects a circadian clock-dependent response. Thus, pol III transcription during the diurnal cycle is regulated both in response to nutrients and by the circadian clock, which allows anticipatory pol III transcription.

  6. Circadian regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-11-01

    The circadian system temporally coordinates daily rhythms in feeding behaviour and energy metabolism. The objective of the present paper is to review the mechanisms that underlie circadian regulation of lipid metabolic pathways. Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are generated by master clock neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN and its efferent targets in the hypothalamus integrate light and feeding signals to entrain behavioural rhythms as well as clock cells located in peripheral tissues, including the liver, adipose tissue and muscle. Circadian rhythms in gene expression are regulated at the cellular level by a molecular clock comprising a core set of clock genes/proteins. In peripheral tissues, hundreds of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by clock proteins, hence providing a direct mechanism for circadian regulation of lipids. Disruption of clock gene function results in abnormal metabolic phenotypes and impaired lipid absorption, demonstrating that the circadian system is essential for normal energy metabolism. The composition and timing of meals influence diurnal regulation of metabolic pathways, with food intake during the usual rest phase associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. Recent studies using metabolomics and lipidomics platforms have shown that hundreds of lipid species are circadian-regulated in human plasma, including but not limited to fatty acids, TAG, glycerophospholipids, sterol lipids and sphingolipids. In future work, these lipid profiling approaches can be used to understand better the interaction between diet, mealtimes and circadian rhythms on lipid metabolism and risk for obesity and metabolic diseases.

  7. The intrinsic circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Hotze, Margaret A; Tomlin, Tara M; Egbejimi, Oluwaseun; Graveleau, Christophe; Abel, E Dale; Shaw, Chad A; Bray, Molly S; Hardin, Paul E; Young, Martin E

    2005-10-01

    Circadian clocks are intracellular molecular mechanisms that allow the cell to anticipate the time of day. We have previously reported that the intact rat heart expresses the major components of the circadian clock, of which its rhythmic expression in vivo is consistent with the operation of a fully functional clock mechanism. The present study exposes oscillations of circadian clock genes [brain and arylhydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein 1 (bmal1), reverse strand of the c-erbaalpha gene (rev-erbaalpha), period 2 (per2), albumin D-element binding protein (dbp)] for isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes in culture. Acute (2 h) and/or chronic (continuous) treatment of cardiomyocytes with FCS (50% and 2.5%, respectively) results in rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes with periodicities of 20-24 h. In contrast, cardiomyocytes cultured in the absence of serum exhibit dramatically dampened oscillations in bmal1 and dbp only. Zeitgebers (timekeepers) are factors that influence the timing of the circadian clock. Glucose, which has been previously shown to reactivate circadian clock gene oscillations in fibroblasts, has no effect on the expression of circadian clock genes in adult rat cardiomyocytes, either in the absence or presence of serum. Exposure of adult rat cardiomyocytes to the sympathetic neurotransmitter norephinephrine (10 microM) for 2 h reinitiates rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes in a serum-independent manner. Oscillations in circadian clock genes were associated with 24-h oscillations in the metabolic genes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (pdk4) and uncoupling protein 3 (ucp3). In conclusion, these data suggest that the circadian clock operates within the myocytes of the heart and that this molecular mechanism persists under standard cell culture conditions (i.e., 2.5% serum). Furthermore, our data suggest that norepinephrine, unlike glucose, influences the timing of the circadian clock within the heart and that the

  8. Circadian light

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The present paper reflects a work in progress toward a definition of circadian light, one that should be informed by the thoughtful, century-old evolution of our present definition of light as a stimulus for the human visual system. This work in progress is based upon the functional relationship between optical radiation and its effects on nocturnal melatonin suppression, in large part because the basic data are available in the literature. Discussed here are the fundamental differences between responses by the visual and circadian systems to optical radiation. Brief reviews of photometry, colorimetry, and brightness perception are presented as a foundation for the discussion of circadian light. Finally, circadian light (CLA) and circadian stimulus (CS) calculation procedures based on a published mathematical model of human circadian phototransduction are presented with an example. PMID:20377841

  9. Nutrition and the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partitions incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24-h day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation, and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. 'High-fat diets' (HFD) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFD in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases.

  10. Nutrition and the Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partition incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24 hour day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. ‘High-fat diets’ (HFDs) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFDs in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:27221157

  11. Circadian Rhythm and the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Voigt, R M; Forsyth, C B; Green, S J; Engen, P A; Keshavarzian, A

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-h patterns regulating behavior, organs, and cells in living organisms. These rhythms align biological functions with regular and predictable environmental patterns to optimize function and health. Disruption of these rhythms can be detrimental resulting in metabolic syndrome, cancer, or cardiovascular disease, just to name a few. It is now becoming clear that the intestinal microbiome is also regulated by circadian rhythms via intrinsic circadian clocks as well as via the host organism. Microbiota rhythms are regulated by diet and time of feeding which can alter both microbial community structure and metabolic activity which can significantly impact host immune and metabolic function. In this review, we will cover how host circadian rhythms are generated and maintained, how host circadian rhythms can be disrupted, as well as the consequences of circadian rhythm disruption. We will further highlight the newly emerging literature indicating the importance of circadian rhythms of the intestinal microbiota. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Energy conservation and uncoupling in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hatefi, Y

    1975-01-01

    Energy conservation and uncoupling in mitochondria are examined in the light of three important new findings: (a) Studies with the photoaffinity-labeling uncoupler 2-azido-4-nitrophenol have shown that mitochondria contain a specific uncoupler binding site (apparently a polypeptide of Mr = 30,000 +/- 10%). (b) This site fractionates into an enzyme complex (complex V), which is capable of oligomycin- and uncoupler-sensitive ATP-Pi exchange. It is absent from electron transfer complexes I, III, and IV, which represent segments of the respiratory chain containing coupling sites 1, 2, and 3, respectively. (c) Trinitrophenol is a membrane-impermeable uncoupler (uncouples submitochondrial particles, but not mitochondria) and a poor protonophore. There is an excellent correlation between the uncoupling potencies and the affinities of uncouplers for the mitochondrial uncoupler-binding site. There is no correlation between uncoupling potency and protonophoric activity of uncouplers when a membrane-permeable uncoupler is compared with a membrane-impermeable one.

  13. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of 24 hr, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the "central pacemaker" of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hr as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark or "free-running" conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free-running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their homecage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are presented here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free-running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (e.g., jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-24-hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of environmental surroundings.

  14. Circadian Regulation of Cellular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Peek, C.B; Ramsey, K.M; Levine, D.C; Marcheva, B; Perelis, M; Bass, J

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock synchronizes behavioral and physiological processes on a daily basis in anticipation of the light–dark cycle. In mammals, molecular clocks are present in both the central pacemaker neurons and in nearly all peripheral tissues. Clock transcription factors in metabolic tissues coordinate metabolic fuel utilization and storage with alternating periods of feeding and fasting corresponding to the rest–activity cycle. In vitro and in vivo biochemical approaches have led to the discovery of mechanisms underlying the interplay between the molecular clock and the metabolic networks. For example, recent studies have demonstrated that the circadian clock controls rhythmic synthesis of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and activity of NAD+-dependent sirtuin deacetylase enzymes to regulate mitochondrial function across the circadian cycle. In this chapter, we review current state-of-the-art methods to analyze circadian cycles in mitochondrial bioenergetics, glycolysis, and nucleotide metabolism in both cell-based and animal models. PMID:25707277

  15. Endocrine (plasma cortisol and glucose) and behavioral (locomotor and self-feeding activity) circadian rhythms in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup 1858) exposed to light/dark cycles or constant light.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Catarina C V; Aparício, Rocio; Blanco-Vives, Borja; Chereguini, Olvido; Martín, Ignacio; Javier Sánchez-Vazquez, F

    2013-06-01

    The existence of daily rhythms under light/dark (LD) cycles in plasma cortisol, blood glucose and locomotor and self-feeding activities, as well as their persistence (circadian nature) under constant light (LL), was investigated in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis). For the cortisol and glucose rhythms study, 48 soles were equally distributed in 8 tanks and exposed to a 12:12 LD cycle and natural water temperature (experiment 1). After an acclimation period, blood was sampled every 3 h until a 24-h cycle was completed. Blood glucose levels were measured immediately after sampling, while plasma cortisol was measured later by ELISA. In experiment 2, the fish were exposed to LL for 11 days, and after this period, the same sampling procedure was repeated. For the study of locomotor and self-feeding rhythms (experiment 3), two groups of sole were used: one exposed to LD and the other to LL. Each group was distributed within 3 tanks equipped with infrared photocells for the record of locomotor activity, and self-feeders for feeding behavior characterization. The results revealed a marked oscillation in cortisol concentrations during the daily cycle under LD, with a peak (35.65 ± 3.14 ng/ml) in the afternoon (15:00 h) and very low levels during the night (5.30 ± 1.09 ng/ml). This cortisol rhythm persisted under LL conditions, with lower values (mean cortisol concentration = 7.12 ± 1.11 ng/ml) and with the peak shifted by 3 h. Both rhythms were confirmed by COSINOR analysis (p < 0.05). The synchronizing role of temperature and feeding schedule, in addition to light, is also discussed. Diel rhythms of glucose were not evident in LD or LL. As to locomotor and self-feeding activity, a very marked rhythm was observed under LD, with higher activity observed during the night, with acrophases located at 2:14 and 3:37 h, respectively. The statistical significance of daily rhythms was confirmed by COSINOR analysis. Under LL, both feeding and locomotor

  16. Ablation of the Id2 Gene Results in Altered Circadian Feeding Behavior, and Sex-Specific Enhancement of Insulin Sensitivity and Elevated Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle and Brown Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Deepa; Zhou, Peng; Pywell, Cameron M.; van der Veen, Daan R.; Shao, Jinping; Xi, Yang; Bonar, Nicolle A.; Hummel, Alyssa D.; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, W. Matthew; Duffield, Giles E.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our earlier studies have demonstrated a role for ID2 in the input pathway, core clock function and output pathways of the mouse circadian system. We have also reported that Id2 null (Id2−/−) mice are lean with low gonadal white adipose tissue deposits and lower lipid content in the liver. These results coincided with altered or disrupted circadian expression profiles of liver genes including those involved in lipid metabolism. In the present phenotypic study we intended to decipher, on a sex-specific basis, the role of ID2 in glucose metabolism and in the circadian regulation of activity, important components of energy balance. We find that Id2−/− mice exhibited altered daily and circadian rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity; activity profiles extended further into the late night/dark phase of the 24-hr cycle, despite mice showing reduced total locomotor activity. Also, male Id2−/− mice consumed a greater amount of food relative to body mass, and displayed less weight gain. Id2−/− females had smaller adipocytes, suggesting sexual-dimorphic programing of adipogenesis. We observed increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in male Id2−/− mice, which was exacerbated in older animals. FDG-PET analysis revealed increased glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue of male Id2−/− mice, suggesting increased glucose metabolism and thermogenesis in these tissues. Reductions in intramuscular triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol were detected in male Id2−/− mice, highlighting its possible mechanistic role in enhanced insulin sensitivity in these mice. Our findings indicate a role for ID2 as a regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, and in the circadian control of feeding/locomotor behavior; and contribute to the understanding of the development of obesity and diabetes, particularly in shift

  17. CIRCADIAN REGULATION OF METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Shannon M.; Udoh, Uduak S.; Young, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    In association with sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles, organisms experience dramatic oscillations in energetic demands and nutrient supply. It is therefore not surprising that various metabolic parameters, ranging from the activity status of molecular energy sensors to circulating nutrient levels, oscillate in time-of-day-dependent manners. It has become increasingly clear that rhythms in metabolic processes are not simply in response to daily environmental/behavioral influences, but are driven in part by cell autonomous circadian clocks. By synchronizing the cell with its environment, clocks modulate a host of metabolic processes in a temporally appropriate manner. The purpose of this article is to review current understanding of the interplay between circadian clocks and metabolism, in addition to the pathophysiologic consequences of disruption of this molecular mechanism, in terms of cardiometabolic disease development. PMID:24928941

  18. Transient circadian internal desynchronization after light-dark phase shift in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Kass, D. A.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    In four conscious chair-acclimatized squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) studied with lights on (600 lx) from 0800 to 2000 hr daily, prominent 24-hr rhythms in feeding, drinking, activity, body temperature, and urinary potassium, sodium, and water excretion were seen. When the monkeys were subjected to 36 hr of darkness followed by 36 hr of light, each variable demonstrated a circadian rhythm which was not passively dependent on the light-dark cycle. After the 24-hr light-dark cycle was abruptly phase-delayed by 8 hr, all the rhythms resynchronized with the new light-dark cycle phase, demonstrating that light-dark cycles are an effective zeitgeber. However, the resynchronization of the rhythms of feeding, drinking, activity, and body temperature was 90% complete within approximately 2 days while the 90% resynchronization of the urinary rhythms took approximately 5 days. These results suggest that the circadian timing system in S. sciureus may consist of several spontaneously oscillating units which can become transiently uncoupled during perturbations of environmental time cues.

  19. Neuroendocrine-immune correlates of circadian physiology: studies in experimental models of arthritis, ethanol feeding, aging, social isolation, and calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Esquifino, Ana I; Cano, Pilar; Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Fernández-Mateos, Pilar; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2007-08-01

    Virtually all neuroendocrine and immunological variables investigated in animals and humans display biological periodicity. Circadian rhythmicity is revealed for every hormone in circulation as well as for circulating immune cells, lymphocyte metabolism and transformability, cytokines, receptors, and adhesion molecules. Clock genes, notably the three Period (Per1/Per2/Per3) genes and two Cryptochrome (Cry1/Cry2) genes, are present in immune and endocrine cells and are expressed in a circadian manner in human cells. This review discusses the circadian disruption of hormone release and immune-related mechanisms in several animal models in which circulating cytokines are modified including rat adjuvant arthritis, social isolation in rats and rabbits and alcoholism, the aging process and calorie restriction in rats. In every case the experimental manipulation used perturbed the temporal organization by affecting the shape and amplitude of a rhythm or by modifying the intrinsic oscillatory mechanism itself.

  20. Light phase-restricted feeding slows basal heart rate to exaggerate the type-3 long QT syndrome phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Schroder, Elizabeth A; Burgess, Don E; Manning, Cody L; Zhao, Yihua; Moss, Arthur J; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Elayi, Claude S; Esser, Karyn A; Delisle, Brian P

    2014-12-15

    Long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) is caused by mutations in the SCN5A-encoded Nav1.5 channel. LQT3 patients exhibit time of day-associated abnormal increases in their heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals and risk for life-threatening episodes. This study determines the effects of uncoupling environmental time cues that entrain circadian rhythms (time of light and time of feeding) on heart rate and ventricular repolarization in wild-type (WT) or transgenic LQT3 mice (Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ)). We used an established light phase-restricted feeding paradigm that disrupts the alignment among the circadian rhythms in the central pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues including heart. Circadian analysis of the RR and QT intervals showed the Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice had QT rhythms with larger amplitudes and 24-h midline means and a more pronounced slowing of the heart rate. For both WT and Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice, light phase-restricted feeding shifted the RR and QT rhythms ~12 h, increased their amplitudes greater than twofold, and raised the 24-h midline mean by ~10%. In contrast to WT mice, the QTc interval in Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice exhibited time-of-day prolongation that was flipped after light phase-restricted feeding. The time-of-day changes in the QTc intervals of Scn5a(+/ΔKPQ) mice were secondary to a steeper power relation between their QT and RR intervals. We conclude that uncoupling time of feeding from normal light cues can dramatically slow heart rate to unmask genotype-specific differences in the QT intervals and aggravate the LQT3-related phenotype.

  1. Uncoupled Cardiac Nitric Oxide Synthase Mediates Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Gad A.; Fan, Tai-Hwang M.; Liu, Hong; Jiao, Zhe; Xiao, Hong D.; Lovelock, Joshua D.; Boulden, Beth M.; Widder, Julian; Fredd, Scott; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Wolska, Beata M.; Dikalov, Sergey; Harrison, David G.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is one consequence of hypertension and caused by impaired cardiac diastolic relaxation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a known modulator of cardiac relaxation. Hypertension can lead to a reduction in vascular NO, in part because nitric oxide synthase (NOS) becomes uncoupled when oxidative depletion of its co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) occurs.Similar events may occur in the heart leading to uncoupled NOS and diastolic dysfunction. Methods and Results In a hypertensive mouse model, diastolic dysfunction was accompanied by cardiac oxidation, a reduction in cardiac BH4, and uncoupled NOS. Compared to sham-operated animals, male mice with unilateral nephrectomy, with subcutaneous implantation of a controlled release deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) pellet, and given 1% saline to drink were mildly hypertensive and had diastolic dysfunction in the absence of systolic dysfunction or cardiac hypertrophy. The hypertensive mouse hearts showed increased oxidized biopterins, NOS-dependent superoxide production, reduced NO production, and phosphorylated phospholamban. Feeding hypertensive mice BH4 (5 mg/day), but not treating with hydralazine or tetrahydroneopterin, improved cardiac BH4 stores, phosphorylated phospholamban levels, and diastolic dysfunction. Isolated cardiomyocyte experiments revealed impaired relaxation that was normalized with acute BH4 treatment. Targeted cardiac overexpression of angiotensin converting enzyme also resulted in cardiac oxidation, NOS uncoupling, and diastolic dysfunction in the absence of hypertension. Conclusions Cardiac oxidation, independent of vascular changes, can lead to uncoupled cardiac NOS and diastolic dysfunction. BH4 may represent a possible treatment for diastolic dysfunction. PMID:20083682

  2. Uncoupled cardiac nitric oxide synthase mediates diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Gad A; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Liu, Hong; Jiao, Zhe; Xiao, Hong D; Lovelock, Joshua D; Boulden, Beth M; Widder, Julian; Fredd, Scott; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Wolska, Beata M; Dikalov, Sergey; Harrison, David G; Dudley, Samuel C

    2010-02-02

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is 1 consequence of hypertension and is caused by impaired cardiac diastolic relaxation. Nitric oxide (NO) is a known modulator of cardiac relaxation. Hypertension can lead to a reduction in vascular NO, in part because NO synthase (NOS) becomes uncoupled when oxidative depletion of its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) occurs. Similar events may occur in the heart that lead to uncoupled NOS and diastolic dysfunction. In a hypertensive mouse model, diastolic dysfunction was accompanied by cardiac oxidation, a reduction in cardiac BH(4), and uncoupled NOS. Compared with sham-operated animals, male mice with unilateral nephrectomy, with subcutaneous implantation of a controlled-release deoxycorticosterone acetate pellet, and given 1% saline to drink were mildly hypertensive and had diastolic dysfunction in the absence of systolic dysfunction or cardiac hypertrophy. The hypertensive mouse hearts showed increased oxidized biopterins, NOS-dependent superoxide production, reduced NO production, and dephosphorylated phospholamban. Feeding hypertensive mice BH(4) (5 mg/d), but not treating with hydralazine or tetrahydroneopterin, improved cardiac BH(4) stores, phosphorylated phospholamban levels, and diastolic dysfunction. Isolated cardiomyocyte experiments revealed impaired relaxation that was normalized with short-term BH(4) treatment. Targeted cardiac overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme also resulted in cardiac oxidation, NOS uncoupling, and diastolic dysfunction in the absence of hypertension. Cardiac oxidation, independently of vascular changes, can lead to uncoupled cardiac NOS and diastolic dysfunction. BH(4) may represent a possible treatment for diastolic dysfunction.

  3. Central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system of mammals is composed of a hierarchy of oscillators that function at the cellular, tissue, and systems levels. A common molecular mechanism underlies the cell-autonomous circadian oscillator throughout the body, yet this clock system is adapted to different functional contexts. In the central suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, a coupled population of neuronal circadian oscillators acts as a master pacemaker for the organism to drive rhythms in activity and rest, feeding, body temperature, and hormones. Coupling within the SCN network confers robustness to the SCN pacemaker, which in turn provides stability to the overall temporal architecture of the organism. Throughout the majority of the cells in the body, cell-autonomous circadian clocks are intimately enmeshed within metabolic pathways. Thus, an emerging view for the adaptive significance of circadian clocks is their fundamental role in orchestrating metabolism.

  4. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  5. Circadian regulation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Firsov, Dmitri; Bonny, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Urinary excretion of water and all major electrolytes exhibit robust circadian oscillations. The 24-h periodicity has been well documented for several important determinants of urine formation, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption, and tubular secretion. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids that are entrained by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, numerous studies have shown that most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock made of a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have been found in all tissues studied, including the kidney. Here, we present a review of the growing evidence showing the involvement of the molecular clock in the generation of renal excretory rhythms.

  6. Uncoupling Mitochondrial Respiration for Diabesity.

    PubMed

    Larrick, James W; Larrick, Jasmine W; Mendelsohn, Andrew R

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, the mechanism of adaptive thermogenesis was ascribed to the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown and beige adipocytes. UCP1 is known to catalyze a proton leak of the inner mitochondrial membrane, resulting in uncoupled oxidative metabolism with no production of adenosine triphosphate and increased energy expenditure. Thus increasing brown and beige adipose tissue with augmented UCP1 expression is a viable target for obesity-related disorders. Recent work demonstrates an UCP1-independent pathway to uncouple mitochondrial respiration. A secreted enzyme, PM20D1, enriched in UCP1+ adipocytes, exhibits catalytic and hydrolytic activity to reversibly form N-acyl amino acids. N-acyl amino acids act as endogenous uncouplers of mitochondrial respiration at physiological concentrations. Administration of PM20D1 or its products, N-acyl amino acids, to diet-induced obese mice improves glucose tolerance by increasing energy expenditure. In short-term studies, treated animals exhibit no toxicity while experiencing 10% weight loss primarily of adipose tissue. Further study of this metabolic pathway may identify novel therapies for diabesity, the disease state associated with diabetes and obesity.

  7. Cooperative roles of the suprachiasmatic nucleus central clock and the adrenal clock in controlling circadian glucocorticoid rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sooyoung; Lee, Eun Jeong; Cha, Hyo Kyeong; Kim, Jeongah; Kim, Doyeon; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of the central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subsidiary peripheral clocks in other tissues. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are adrenal steroid hormones with widespread physiological effects that undergo daily oscillations. We previously demonstrated that the adrenal peripheral clock plays a pivotal role in circadian GC rhythm by driving cyclic GC biosynthesis. Here, we show that the daily rhythm in circulating GC levels is controlled by bimodal actions of central and adrenal clockwork. When mice were subjected to daytime restricted feeding to uncouple central and peripheral rhythms, adrenal GC contents and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression peaked around zeitgeber time 00 (ZT00), consistent with shifted adrenal clock gene expression. However, restricted feeding produced two distinct peaks in plasma GC levels: one related to adrenal GC content and the other around ZT12, which required an intact SCN. Light pulse-evoked activation of the SCN increased circulating GC levels in both wild-type and adrenal clock-disrupted mutant mice without marked induction of GC biosynthesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adrenal clock-dependent steroidogenesis and a SCN-driven central mechanism regulating GC release cooperate to produce daily circulatory GC rhythm. PMID:28401917

  8. Synchronizing noisy nonidentical oscillators by transient uncoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Aditya Mannattil, Manu; Schröder, Malte; Timme, Marc; Chakraborty, Sagar

    2016-09-15

    Synchronization is the process of achieving identical dynamics among coupled identical units. If the units are different from each other, their dynamics cannot become identical; yet, after transients, there may emerge a functional relationship between them—a phenomenon termed “generalized synchronization.” Here, we show that the concept of transient uncoupling, recently introduced for synchronizing identical units, also supports generalized synchronization among nonidentical chaotic units. Generalized synchronization can be achieved by transient uncoupling even when it is impossible by regular coupling. We furthermore demonstrate that transient uncoupling stabilizes synchronization in the presence of common noise. Transient uncoupling works best if the units stay uncoupled whenever the driven orbit visits regions that are locally diverging in its phase space. Thus, to select a favorable uncoupling region, we propose an intuitive method that measures the local divergence at the phase points of the driven unit's trajectory by linearizing the flow and subsequently suppresses the divergence by uncoupling.

  9. Achromatic and uncoupled medical gantry

    DOEpatents

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos [Center Moriches, NY; Kayran, Dmitry [Rocky Point, NY; Litvinenko, Vladimir [Mt. Sinai, NY; MacKay, William W [Wading River, NY

    2011-11-22

    A medical gantry that focus the beam from the beginning of the gantry to the exit of the gantry independent of the rotation angle of the gantry by keeping the beam achromatic and uncoupled, thus, avoiding the use of collimators or rotators, or additional equipment to control the beam divergence, which may cause beam intensity loss or additional time in irradiation of the patient, or disadvantageously increase the overall gantry size inapplicable for the use in the medical treatment facility.

  10. Circadian control of β-cell function and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Liu, R; de Jesus, D; Kim, B S; Ma, K; Moulik, M; Yechoor, V

    2015-09-01

    Circadian disruption is the bane of modern existence and its deleterious effects on health; in particular, diabetes and metabolic syndrome have been well recognized in shift workers. Recent human studies strongly implicate a 'dose-dependent' relationship between circadian disruption and diabetes. Genetic and environmental disruption of the circadian clock in rodents leads to diabetes secondary to β-cell failure. Deletion of Bmal1, a non-redundant core clock gene, leads to defects in β-cell stimulus-secretion coupling, decreased glucose-stimulated ATP production, uncoupling of OXPHOS and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Both genetic and environmental circadian disruptions are sufficient to induce oxidative stress and this is mediated by a disruption of the direct transcriptional control of the core molecular clock and Bmal1 on Nrf2, the master antioxidant transcription factor in the β-cell. In addition, circadian disruption also leads to a dysregulation of the unfolded protein response and leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress in β-cells. Both the oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contribute to an impairment of mitochondrial function and β-cell failure. Understanding the basis of the circadian control of these adaptive stress responses offers hope to target them for pharmacological modulation to prevent and mitigate the deleterious metabolic consequences of circadian disruption.

  11. Circadian clocks and mood-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are present in nearly all tissues of an organism, including the brain. The brain is not only the site of the master coordinator of circadian rhythms located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) but also contains SCN-independent oscillators that regulate various functions such as feeding and mood-related behavior. Understanding how clocks receive and integrate environmental information and in turn control physiology under normal conditions is of importance because chronic disturbance of circadian rhythmicity can lead to serious health problems. Genetic modifications leading to disruption of normal circadian gene functions have been linked to a variety of psychiatric conditions including depression, seasonal affective disorder, eating disorders, alcohol dependence, and addiction. It appears that clock genes play an important role in limbic regions of the brain and influence the development of drug addiction. Furthermore, analyses of clock gene polymorphisms in diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) suggest a direct or indirect influence of circadian clock genes on brain function. In this chapter, I will present evidence for a circadian basis of mood disorders and then discuss the involvement of clock genes in such disorders. The relationship between metabolism and mood disorders is highlighted followed by a discussion of how mood disorders may be treated by changing the circadian cycle.

  12. Mitochondrial uncouplers with an extraordinary dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Phing-How; Hansen, Birgit S.; Olsen, Preben H.; Tullin, Søren; Murphy, Michael P.; Brand, Martin D.

    2007-01-01

    We have discovered that some weak uncouplers (typified by butylated hydroxytoluene) have a dynamic range of more than 106 in vitro: the concentration giving measurable uncoupling is less than one millionth of the concentration causing full uncoupling. They achieve this through a high-affinity interaction with the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase that causes significant but limited uncoupling at extremely low uncoupler concentrations, together with more conventional uncoupling at much higher concentrations. Uncoupling at the translocase is not by a conventional weak acid/anion cycling mechanism since it is also caused by substituted triphenylphosphonium molecules, which are not anionic and cannot protonate. Covalent attachment of the uncoupler to a mitochondrially targeted hydrophobic cation sensitizes it to membrane potential, giving a small additional effect. The wide dynamic range of these uncouplers in isolated mitochondria and intact cells reveals a novel allosteric activation of proton transport through the adenine nucleotide translocase and provides a promising starting point for designing safer uncouplers for obesity therapy. PMID:17608618

  13. Endogenous circadian system and circadian misalignment impact glucose tolerance via separate mechanisms in humans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Yang, Jessica N.; Garcia, Joanna I.; Myers, Samantha; Bozzi, Isadora; Wang, Wei; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Shea, Steven A.; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose tolerance is lower in the evening and at night than in the morning. However, the relative contribution of the circadian system vs. the behavioral cycle (including the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles) is unclear. Furthermore, although shift work is a diabetes risk factor, the separate impact on glucose tolerance of the behavioral cycle, circadian phase, and circadian disruption (i.e., misalignment between the central circadian pacemaker and the behavioral cycle) has not been systematically studied. Here we show—by using two 8-d laboratory protocols—in healthy adults that the circadian system and circadian misalignment have distinct influences on glucose tolerance, both separate from the behavioral cycle. First, postprandial glucose was 17% higher (i.e., lower glucose tolerance) in the biological evening (8:00 PM) than morning (8:00 AM; i.e., a circadian phase effect), independent of the behavioral cycle effect. Second, circadian misalignment itself (12-h behavioral cycle inversion) increased postprandial glucose by 6%. Third, these variations in glucose tolerance appeared to be explained, at least in part, by different mechanisms: during the biological evening by decreased pancreatic β-cell function (27% lower early-phase insulin) and during circadian misalignment presumably by decreased insulin sensitivity (elevated postprandial glucose despite 14% higher late-phase insulin) without change in early-phase insulin. We explored possible contributing factors, including changes in polysomnographic sleep and 24-h hormonal profiles. We demonstrate that the circadian system importantly contributes to the reduced glucose tolerance observed in the evening compared with the morning. Separately, circadian misalignment reduces glucose tolerance, providing a mechanism to help explain the increased diabetes risk in shift workers. PMID:25870289

  14. Endogenous circadian system and circadian misalignment impact glucose tolerance via separate mechanisms in humans.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Yang, Jessica N; Garcia, Joanna I; Myers, Samantha; Bozzi, Isadora; Wang, Wei; Buxton, Orfeu M; Shea, Steven A; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2015-04-28

    Glucose tolerance is lower in the evening and at night than in the morning. However, the relative contribution of the circadian system vs. the behavioral cycle (including the sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles) is unclear. Furthermore, although shift work is a diabetes risk factor, the separate impact on glucose tolerance of the behavioral cycle, circadian phase, and circadian disruption (i.e., misalignment between the central circadian pacemaker and the behavioral cycle) has not been systematically studied. Here we show--by using two 8-d laboratory protocols--in healthy adults that the circadian system and circadian misalignment have distinct influences on glucose tolerance, both separate from the behavioral cycle. First, postprandial glucose was 17% higher (i.e., lower glucose tolerance) in the biological evening (8:00 PM) than morning (8:00 AM; i.e., a circadian phase effect), independent of the behavioral cycle effect. Second, circadian misalignment itself (12-h behavioral cycle inversion) increased postprandial glucose by 6%. Third, these variations in glucose tolerance appeared to be explained, at least in part, by different mechanisms: during the biological evening by decreased pancreatic β-cell function (27% lower early-phase insulin) and during circadian misalignment presumably by decreased insulin sensitivity (elevated postprandial glucose despite 14% higher late-phase insulin) without change in early-phase insulin. We explored possible contributing factors, including changes in polysomnographic sleep and 24-h hormonal profiles. We demonstrate that the circadian system importantly contributes to the reduced glucose tolerance observed in the evening compared with the morning. Separately, circadian misalignment reduces glucose tolerance, providing a mechanism to help explain the increased diabetes risk in shift workers.

  15. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2012-01-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, as well as the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian time-keeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. In this section, we provide a review of circadian biology and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice. PMID:23099133

  16. Uncouple my heart: the benefits of inefficiency.

    PubMed

    Modrianský, Martin; Gabrielová, Eva

    2009-04-01

    Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury leads to structural changes in the heart muscle later followed by functional decline due to progressive fibrous replacement. Hence approaches to minimize IR injury are devised, including ischemic pre-and postconditioning. Mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation is one of the mechanisms suggested to be cardioprotective as chemical uncoupling mimics ischemic preconditioning. Uncoupling protein 2 is proposed to be the physiological counterpart of chemical uncouplers and is thought to be a part of the protective machinery of cardiomyocytes. Morphological changes in the mitochondrial network likely accompany the uncoupling with mitochondrial fission dampening the signals leading to cardiomyocyte death. Here we review recent data on the role of uncoupling in cardioprotection and propose that low concentrations of dietary polyphenols may elicit the same cardioprotective effect as dinitrophenol and FCCP, perhaps accounting for the famed "French paradox".

  17. Circadian rhythms of hedonic drinking behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Bainier, Claire; Mateo, Maria; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule; Mendoza, Jorge

    2017-05-04

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the main circadian clock, synchronized by the light-dark cycle, which generates behavioral rhythms like feeding, drinking and activity. Notwithstanding, the main role of the SCN clock on the control of all circadian rhythms has been questioned due to the presence of clock activity in many brain areas, including those implicated in the regulation of feeding and reward. Moreover, whether circadian rhythms of particular motivated behaviors exist is unknown. Here, we evaluated the spontaneous daily and circadian behavior of consumption of a sweet caloric solution (5-10% sucrose), and the effects of sucrose intake on the expression of clock genes in the mouse brain. Mice showed a daily (in a light-dark cycle) and a circadian (in constant darkness conditions) rhythm in the intake and sucrose preference with a rise for both parameters at night (or subjective night). In addition, we observed changes in the circadian day-night expression of the clock gene Per2 in the SCN, cortex and striatum of animals ingesting sucrose compared to control mice on pure water. Finally, daily rhythms of sucrose intake and preference were abolished in Per2(Brdm1)- and double Per1(-/-)Per2(Brdm1)-mutant animals. These data indicate that the expression of circadian rhythms of hedonic feeding behaviors may be controlled by brain circadian clocks and Per gene expression. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  19. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Rbin M.; Burgess, Helen J.; Swanson, Garth R.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20–30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyper-permeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in ClockΔ19 mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  20. Regulation of alternative splicing by the circadian clock and food related cues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The circadian clock orchestrates daily rhythms in metabolism, physiology and behaviour that allow organisms to anticipate regular changes in their environment, increasing their adaptation. Such circadian phenotypes are underpinned by daily rhythms in gene expression. Little is known, however, about the contribution of post-transcriptional processes, particularly alternative splicing. Results Using Affymetrix mouse exon-arrays, we identified exons with circadian alternative splicing in the liver. Validated circadian exons were regulated in a tissue-dependent manner and were present in genes with circadian transcript abundance. Furthermore, an analysis of circadian mutant Vipr2-/- mice revealed the existence of distinct physiological pathways controlling circadian alternative splicing and RNA binding protein expression, with contrasting dependence on Vipr2-mediated physiological signals. This view was corroborated by the analysis of the effect of fasting on circadian alternative splicing. Feeding is an important circadian stimulus, and we found that fasting both modulates hepatic circadian alternative splicing in an exon-dependent manner and changes the temporal relationship with transcript-level expression. Conclusions The circadian clock regulates alternative splicing in a manner that is both tissue-dependent and concurrent with circadian transcript abundance. This adds a novel temporal dimension to the regulation of mammalian alternative splicing. Moreover, our results demonstrate that circadian alternative splicing is regulated by the interaction between distinct physiological cues, and illustrates the capability of single genes to integrate circadian signals at different levels of regulation. PMID:22721557

  1. Regulation of alternative splicing by the circadian clock and food related cues.

    PubMed

    McGlincy, Nicholas J; Valomon, Amandine; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Hastings, Michael H; Ule, Jernej

    2012-06-21

    The circadian clock orchestrates daily rhythms in metabolism, physiology and behaviour that allow organisms to anticipate regular changes in their environment, increasing their adaptation. Such circadian phenotypes are underpinned by daily rhythms in gene expression. Little is known, however, about the contribution of post-transcriptional processes, particularly alternative splicing. Using Affymetrix mouse exon-arrays, we identified exons with circadian alternative splicing in the liver. Validated circadian exons were regulated in a tissue-dependent manner and were present in genes with circadian transcript abundance. Furthermore, an analysis of circadian mutant Vipr2-/- mice revealed the existence of distinct physiological pathways controlling circadian alternative splicing and RNA binding protein expression, with contrasting dependence on Vipr2-mediated physiological signals. This view was corroborated by the analysis of the effect of fasting on circadian alternative splicing. Feeding is an important circadian stimulus, and we found that fasting both modulates hepatic circadian alternative splicing in an exon-dependent manner and changes the temporal relationship with transcript-level expression. The circadian clock regulates alternative splicing in a manner that is both tissue-dependent and concurrent with circadian transcript abundance. This adds a novel temporal dimension to the regulation of mammalian alternative splicing. Moreover, our results demonstrate that circadian alternative splicing is regulated by the interaction between distinct physiological cues, and illustrates the capability of single genes to integrate circadian signals at different levels of regulation.

  2. Neurobiology of food anticipatory circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2011-09-26

    Circadian rhythms in mammals can be entrained by daily schedules of light or food availability. A master light-entrainable circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is comprised of a population of cell autonomous, transcriptionally based circadian oscillators with defined retinal inputs, circadian clock genes and neural outputs. By contrast, the neurobiology of food-entrainable circadian rhythmicity remains poorly understood at the systems and cellular levels. Induction of food-anticipatory activity rhythms by daily feeding schedules does not require the SCN, but these rhythms do exhibit defining properties of circadian clock control. Clock gene rhythms expressed in other brain regions and in peripheral organs are preferentially reset by mealtime, but lesions of specific hypothalamic, corticolimbic and brainstem structures do not eliminate all food anticipatory rhythms, suggesting control by a distributed, decentralized system of oscillators, or the existence of a critical oscillator at an unknown location. The melanocortin system and dorsomedial hypothalamus may play modulatory roles setting the level of anticipatory activity. The metabolic hormones ghrelin and leptin are not required to induce behavioral food anticipatory rhythms, but may also participate in gain setting. Clock gene mutations that disrupt light-entrainable rhythms generally do not eliminate food anticipatory rhythms, suggesting a novel timing mechanism. Recent evidence for non-transcriptional and network based circadian rhythmicity provides precedence, but any such mechanisms are likely to interact closely with known circadian clock genes, and some important double and triple clock gene knockouts remain to be phenotyped for food entrainment. Given the dominant role of food as an entraining stimulus for metabolic rhythms, the timing of daily food intake and the fidelity of food entrainment mechanisms are likely to have clinical relevance.

  3. Short-term feeding at the wrong time is sufficient to desynchronize peripheral clocks and induce obesity with hyperphagia, physical inactivity and metabolic disorders in mice.

    PubMed

    Yasumoto, Yuki; Hashimoto, Chiaki; Nakao, Reiko; Yamazaki, Haruka; Hiroyama, Hanako; Nemoto, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Saori; Sakurai, Mutsumi; Oike, Hideaki; Wada, Naoyuki; Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2016-05-01

    and cholesterol accumulated in the livers of DF, than NF mice, which resulted from the increased expression of lipogenic genes such as Scd1, Acaca, and Fasn. Temporal expression of circadian clock genes became synchronized to RF in the liver but not in skeletal muscle, suggesting that uncoupling metabolic rhythms between the liver and skeletal muscle also contribute to DF-induced adiposity. Feeding at an unusual time of day (inactive phase) desynchronizes peripheral clocks and causes obesity and metabolic disorders by inducing leptin resistance, hyperphagia, physical inactivity, hepatic fat accumulation and adiposity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [The kidney and circadian rhythms: a whole new world?].

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Roberto; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Pala, Marco; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Fabbian, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Chronobiology is a branch of biomedical sciences devoted to the study of biological rhythms. Biological rhythms exist at any level of living organisms and, according to their cycle length, may be divided into three main types: circadian, ultradian, and infradian rhythms. Circadian rhythms are the most commonly and widely studied. The principal circadian clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and is supposed to regulate peripheral clocks via neurohumoral modulation. Circadian clocks have been identified within almost all mammalian cell types, and circadian clock genes seem to be essential for cardiovascular health. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids regulated by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock, comprising a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have also been found in the kidney.

  5. [Circadian regulation of sleep-wake cycles and food anticipation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Wataru

    2012-06-01

    The circadian clock is crucial for efficient physiological function and drives the temporal regulation of the sleep-wake state, metabolism, and behavior. The timing of food intake and the accompanying behavior are both controlled by the internal clock, which is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN is considered as the master clock because the circadian rhythms for most physiological and behavioral processes are terminated after SCN ablation. The molecular framework of circadian oscillations can be best studied in the SCN. A "core" set of circadian clock genes form autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loops that are believed to drive daily rhythms in individual cells. These clock genes are expressed in a circadian manner not only in the SCN but also in other parts of the brain and many peripheral tissues. Mammals can anticipate a predictable daily mealtime through entrainment of circadian oscillators. Because the restriction of food availability to a specific time of the day elicits anticipatory behavior even after ablation of the SCN, such behaviour is assumed to be controlled by another circadian oscillator. In this paper, we have (1) reviewed studies involving the identification of the circadian clock and (2) aimed to elucidate the complex mechanism underlying feeding-associated rhythms by achieving a deep understanding of the circadian phenotypes of the SCN.

  6. Lactating performance, water and feed consumption of rabbit does reared under a Mediterranean summer circadian cycle of temperature v. comfort temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Bakr, M H; Tusell, L; Rafel, O; Terré, M; Sánchez, J P; Piles, M

    2015-07-01

    The general aim of this research was to study the effect of high ambient temperature on the performance of does during lactation, specifically the following factors: average daily feed (ADFI) and water (ADWI) intakes, daily milk yield (DMY); milk composition: dry matter (DM), CP and gross energy (GE); doe BW (DW); individual kit weaning weight (IWW) and litter survival rate during lactation (SR). The study was undertaken comparing the performance of two groups of contemporary does reared under the same management, feeding regime and environmental conditions, except the environmental temperature and humidity. A total of 80 females were randomly allocated, at 60 days of age, into two identical and continuous rooms. In one room, the temperature was maintained permanently within the thermo-neutral zone (between 18°C to 22°C); thus, environmental conditions in this room were considered as comfort conditions. In the second room, the environmental temperature pattern simulated the daily temperature cycles that were characteristic of the summer in Mediterranean countries (24°C at 0800 h, increasing up to 29°C until 1100 h; maintenance at 29°C to 31°C for 4 h and decreasing to about 24°C to 26°C around 1700 h until 0800 h of the following day), which were considered as thermal stress conditions. Females followed a semi-intensive reproductive rhythm, first artificial insemination at 4.5 months of age, with subsequent 42-day reproductive cycles. Traits were recorded from a total of 138 lactations. Does were controlled up to the 5th lactation. Data were analyzed using linear and linear mixed models. High ambient temperature led to a lower ADFI (-9.4%), DW (-6.2%) and IWW (-8%), but it did not affect ADWI. No significant difference was found either for DMY, milk composition (DM, CP and GE) and SR during the lactation period. Heat stress was moderate, and does were able to adapt to it behaviorally by decreasing feed intake (to reduce heat production), but also live

  7. Uncoupling protein-2 regulates lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Zane B.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term effects of uncoupled mitochondrial respiration by uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) in mammalian physiology remain controversial. Here we show that increased mitochondrial uncoupling activity of different tissues predicts longer lifespan of rats compared with mice. UCP2 reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress throughout the aging process in different tissues in mice. The absence of UCP2 shortens lifespan in wild-type mice, and the level of UCP2 positively correlates with the postnatal survival of superoxide dismutase-2 mutant animals. Thus UCP2 has a beneficial influence on cell and tissue function leading to increased lifespan. PMID:19141680

  8. Circadian clock control of endocrine factors.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Karen L; Berry, Ryan; Frank, Stuart J; Young, Martin E

    2014-08-01

    Organisms experience dramatic fluctuations in demands and stresses over the course of the day. In order to maintain biological processes within physiological boundaries, mechanisms have evolved for anticipation of, and adaptation to, these daily fluctuations. Endocrine factors have an integral role in homeostasis. Not only do circulating levels of various endocrine factors oscillate over the 24 h period, but so too does responsiveness of target tissues to these signals or stimuli. Emerging evidence suggests that these daily endocrine oscillations do not occur solely in response to behavioural fluctuations associated with sleep-wake and feeding-fasting cycles, but are orchestrated by an intrinsic timekeeping mechanism known as the circadian clock. Disruption of circadian clocks by genetic and/or environmental factors seems to precipitate numerous common disorders, including the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Collectively, these observations suggest that strategies designed to realign normal circadian rhythmicities hold potential for the treatment of various endocrine-related disorders.

  9. Klf15 orchestrates circadian nitrogen homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaraj, Darwin; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Ripperger, Jürgen A.; Haldar, Saptarsi M.; Lu, Yuan; Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; Eapen, Sam J.; Eapen, Betty L.; Cui, Yingjie; Mahabeleshwar, Ganapathi H.; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Smith, Mark A.; Casadesus, Gemma; Mintz, Eric M.; Sun, Haipeng; Wang, Yibin; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Bass, Joseph; Shea, Steven A.; Albrecht, Urs; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Diurnal variation in nitrogen homeostasis is observed across phylogeny. But whether these are endogenous rhythms, and if so, molecular mechanisms that link nitrogen homeostasis to the circadian clock remain unknown. Here, we provide evidence that a clock-dependent peripheral oscillator, Krüppel-like factor15 transcriptionally coordinates rhythmic expression of multiple enzymes involved in mammalian nitrogen homeostasis. In particular, Krüppel-like factor15-deficient mice exhibit no discernable amino acid rhythm, and the rhythmicity of ammonia to urea detoxification is impaired. Of the external cues, feeding plays a dominant role in modulating Krüppel-like factor15 rhythm and nitrogen homeostasis. Further, when all behavioral, environmental and dietary cues were controlled in humans, nitrogen homeostasis still expressed endogenous circadian rhythmicity. Thus, in mammals, nitrogen homeostasis exhibits circadian rhythmicity, and is orchestrated by Krüppel-like factor15. PMID:22405069

  10. Circadian rhythms: mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Levi, Francis; Schibler, Ueli

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is organized in a hierarchical manner in that a central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain's hypothalamus synchronizes cellular circadian oscillators in most peripheral body cells. Fasting-feeding cycles accompanying rest-activity rhythms are the major timing cues in the synchronization of many, if not most, peripheral clocks, suggesting that the temporal coordination of metabolism and proliferation is a major task of the mammalian timing system. The inactivation of noxious food components by hepatic, intestinal, and renal detoxification systems is among the metabolic processes regulated in a circadian manner, with the understanding of the involved clock output pathways emerging. The rhythmic control of xenobiotic detoxification provides the molecular basis for the dosing time-dependence of drug toxicities and efficacy. This knowledge can in turn be used in improving or designing chronotherapeutics for the patients who suffer from many of the major human diseases.

  11. Aging and Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Zitting, Kirsi-Marja; Chinoy, Evan D.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with numerous changes, including changes in sleep timing, duration, and quality. The circadian timing system interacts with a sleep-wake homeostatic system to regulate human sleep, including sleep timing and structure. Here, we review key features of the human circadian timing system, age-related changes in the circadian timing system, and how those changes may contribute to the observed alterations in sleep. PMID:26568120

  12. Depression uncouples brain hate circuit

    PubMed Central

    Tao, H; Guo, S; Ge, T; Kendrick, K M; Xue, Z; Liu, Z; Feng, J

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that we need a better understanding of how mental disorders such as depression alter the brain's functional connections to improve both early diagnosis and therapy. A new holistic approach has been used to investigate functional connectivity changes in the brains of patients suffering from major depression using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. A canonical template of connectivity in 90 different brain regions was constructed from healthy control subjects and this identified a six-community structure with each network corresponding to a different functional system. This template was compared with functional networks derived from fMRI scans of both first-episode and longer-term, drug resistant, patients suffering from severe depression. The greatest change in both groups of depressed patients was uncoupling of the so-called ‘hate circuit' involving the superior frontal gyrus, insula and putamen. Other major changes occurred in circuits related to risk and action responses, reward and emotion, attention and memory processing. A voxel-based morphometry analysis was also carried out but this revealed no evidence in the depressed patients for altered gray or white matter densities in the regions showing altered functional connectivity. This is the first evidence for the involvement of the ‘hate circuit' in depression and suggests a potential reappraisal of the key neural circuitry involved. We have hypothesized that this may reflect reduced cognitive control over negative feelings toward both self and others. PMID:21968929

  13. Circadian Disruption Leads to Loss of Homeostasis and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Carolina; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto; Gonzalez-Guerra, Eduardo; Tapia Osorio, Araceli; Angeles-Castellanos, Manuel; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of a synchronized temporal order for adaptation and homeostasis is discussed in this review. We present evidence suggesting that an altered temporal order between the biological clock and external temporal signals leads to disease. Evidence mainly based on a rodent model of “night work” using forced activity during the sleep phase suggests that altered activity and feeding schedules, out of phase from the light/dark cycle, may be the main cause for the loss of circadian synchrony and disease. It is proposed that by avoiding food intake during sleep hours the circadian misalignment and adverse consequences can be prevented. This review does not attempt to present a thorough revision of the literature, but instead it aims to highlight the association between circadian disruption and disease with special emphasis on the contribution of feeding schedules in circadian synchrony. PMID:23471148

  14. Circadian Clocks and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Peek, Clara B.; Affinati, Alison; Maury, Eleonore; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks maintain periodicity in internal cycles of behavior, physiology, and metabolism, enabling organisms to anticipate the 24-h rotation of the Earth. In mammals, circadian integration of metabolic systems optimizes energy harvesting and utilization across the light/dark cycle. Disruption of clock genes has recently been linked to sleep disorders and to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Conversely, aberrant nutrient signaling affects circadian rhythms of behavior. This chapter reviews the emerging relationship between the molecular clock and metabolic systems and examines evidence that circadian disruption exerts deleterious consequences on human health. PMID:23604478

  15. Diurnal regulation of lipid metabolism and applications of circadian lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin

    2014-05-20

    The circadian timing system plays a key role in orchestrating lipid metabolism. In concert with the solar cycle, the circadian system ensures that daily rhythms in lipid absorption, storage, and transport are temporally coordinated with rest-activity and feeding cycles. At the cellular level, genes involved in lipid synthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by core clock proteins in a tissue-specific manner. Consequently, loss of clock gene function or misalignment of circadian rhythms with feeding cycles (e.g., in shift work) results in impaired lipid homeostasis. Herein, we review recent progress in circadian rhythms research using lipidomics, i.e., large-scale profiling of lipid metabolites, to characterize circadian-regulated lipid pathways in mammals. In mice, novel regulatory circuits involved in fatty acid metabolism have been identified in adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. Extensive diversity in circadian regulation of plasma lipids has also been revealed in humans using lipidomics and other metabolomics approaches. In future studies, lipidomics platforms will be increasingly used to better understand the effects of genetic variation, shift work, food intake, and drugs on circadian-regulated lipid pathways and metabolic health.

  16. Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery in Mouse Models of Circadian Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Turek, Fred W.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Mounting evidence supports a link between circadian disruption and metabolic disease. Humans with circadian disruption (e.g., night-shift workers) have an increased risk of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases compared to the non-disrupted population. However, it is unclear if the obesity and obesity-related disorders associated with circadian disruption respond to therapeutic treatments as well as individuals with other types of obesity. Subjects/Methods Here, we test the effectiveness of the commonly used bariatric surgical procedure, Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (VSG) in mouse models of genetic and environmental circadian disruption. Results VSG led to a reduction in body weight and fat mass in both ClockΔ19 mutant and constant-light mouse models (P < .05), resulting in an overall metabolic improvement independent of circadian disruption. Interestingly, the decrease in body weight occurred without altering diurnal feeding or activity patterns (P > .05). Within circadian-disrupted models, VSG also led to improved glucose tolerance and lipid handling (P < .05). Conclusions Together these data demonstrate that VSG is an effective treatment for the obesity associated with circadian disruption, and that the potent effects of bariatric surgery are orthogonal to circadian biology. However, since the effects of bariatric surgery are independent of circadian disruption, VSG cannot be considered a cure for circadian disruption. These data have important implications for circadian-disrupted obese patients. Moreover, these results reveal new information about the metabolic pathways governing the effects of bariatric surgery as well as of circadian disruption. PMID:25869599

  17. Circadian rhythms of gastrointestinal function are regulated by both central and peripheral oscillators.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Jaclyn N; Paulose, Jiffin K; Li, Ye; Cassone, Vincent M

    2012-08-15

    Circadian clocks are responsible for daily rhythms in a wide array of processes, including gastrointestinal (GI) function. These are vital for normal digestive rhythms and overall health. Previous studies demonstrated circadian clocks within the cells of GI tissue. The present study examines the roles played by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), master circadian pacemaker for overt circadian rhythms, and the sympathetic nervous system in regulation of circadian GI rhythms in the mouse Mus musculus. Surgical ablation of the SCN abolishes circadian locomotor, feeding, and stool output rhythms when animals are presented with food ad libitum, while restricted feeding reestablishes these rhythms temporarily. In intact mice, chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine has no effect on feeding and locomotor rhythmicity in light-dark cycles or constant darkness but attenuates stool weight and stool number rhythms. Again, however, restricted feeding reestablishes rhythms in locomotor activity, feeding, and stool output rhythms. Ex vivo, intestinal tissue from PER2::LUC transgenic mice expresses circadian rhythms of luciferase bioluminescence. Chemical sympathectomy has little effect on these rhythms, but timed administration of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol causes a phase-dependent shift in PERIOD2 expression rhythms. Collectively, the data suggest that the SCN are required to maintain feeding, locomotor, and stool output rhythms during ad libitum conditions, acting at least in part through daily activation of sympathetic activity. Even so, this input is not necessary for entrainment to timed feeding, which may be the province of oscillators within the intestines themselves or other components of the GI system.

  18. Circadian rhythms of gastrointestinal function are regulated by both central and peripheral oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Jaclyn N.; Paulose, Jiffin K.; Li, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks are responsible for daily rhythms in a wide array of processes, including gastrointestinal (GI) function. These are vital for normal digestive rhythms and overall health. Previous studies demonstrated circadian clocks within the cells of GI tissue. The present study examines the roles played by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), master circadian pacemaker for overt circadian rhythms, and the sympathetic nervous system in regulation of circadian GI rhythms in the mouse Mus musculus. Surgical ablation of the SCN abolishes circadian locomotor, feeding, and stool output rhythms when animals are presented with food ad libitum, while restricted feeding reestablishes these rhythms temporarily. In intact mice, chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine has no effect on feeding and locomotor rhythmicity in light-dark cycles or constant darkness but attenuates stool weight and stool number rhythms. Again, however, restricted feeding reestablishes rhythms in locomotor activity, feeding, and stool output rhythms. Ex vivo, intestinal tissue from PER2::LUC transgenic mice expresses circadian rhythms of luciferase bioluminescence. Chemical sympathectomy has little effect on these rhythms, but timed administration of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol causes a phase-dependent shift in PERIOD2 expression rhythms. Collectively, the data suggest that the SCN are required to maintain feeding, locomotor, and stool output rhythms during ad libitum conditions, acting at least in part through daily activation of sympathetic activity. Even so, this input is not necessary for entrainment to timed feeding, which may be the province of oscillators within the intestines themselves or other components of the GI system. PMID:22723262

  19. Characterization of peripheral circadian clocks in adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Zvonic, Sanjin; Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Conrad, Steven A; Scott, L Keith; Floyd, Z Elizabeth; Kilroy, Gail; Wu, Xiying; Goh, Brian C; Mynatt, Randall L; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2006-04-01

    First described in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, circadian clocks have since been found in several peripheral tissues. Although obesity has been associated with dysregulated circadian expression profiles of leptin, adiponectin, and other fat-derived cytokines, there have been no comprehensive analyses of the circadian clock machinery in adipose depots. In this study, we show robust and coordinated expression of circadian oscillator genes (Npas2, Bmal1, Per1-3, and Cry1-2) and clock-controlled downstream genes (Rev-erb alpha, Rev-erb beta, Dbp, E4bp4, Stra13, and Id2) in murine brown, inguinal, and epididymal (BAT, iWAT, and eWAT) adipose tissues. These results correlated with respective gene expression in liver and the serum markers of circadian function. Through Affymetrix microarray analysis, we identified 650 genes that shared circadian expression profiles in BAT, iWAT, and liver. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that temporally restricted feeding causes a coordinated phase-shift in circadian expression of the major oscillator genes and their downstream targets in adipose tissues. The presence of circadian oscillator genes in fat has significant metabolic implications, and their characterization may have potential therapeutic relevance with respect to the pathogenesis and treatment of diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Nutrition and the circadian timing system.

    PubMed

    Stenvers, Dirk Jan; Jonkers, Cora F; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H L T; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2012-01-01

    Life on earth has evolved under the daily rhythm of light and dark. Consequently, most creatures experience a daily rhythm in food availability. In this review, we first introduce the mammalian circadian timing system, consisting of a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks in various metabolic tissues including liver, pancreas, and intestine. We describe how peripheral clocks are synchronized by the SCN and metabolic signals. Second, we review the influence of the circadian timing system on food intake behavior, activity of the gastrointestinal system, and several aspects of glucose and lipid metabolism. Third, the circadian control of digestion and metabolism may have important implications for several aspects of food intake in humans. Therefore, we review the human literature on health aspects of meal timing, meal frequency, and breakfast consumption, and we describe the potential implications of the clock system for the timing of enteral tube feeding and parenteral nutrition. Finally, we explore the connection between type 2 diabetes and the circadian timing system. Although the past decade has provided exciting knowledge about the reciprocal relation between biological clocks and feeding/energy metabolism, future research is necessary to further elucidate this fascinating relationship in order to improve human health.

  1. [Circadian rhythm and stroke].

    PubMed

    Terayama, Yasuo

    2013-12-01

    Studies on the relationship between stroke incidence and alterations of circadian rhythm are scarce, while pathologically reduced or abolished circadian variation has been described to cause stroke since a long time ago. Although ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are different entities and are characterized by different pathophysiological mechanisms, they share an identical pattern. A constellation of endogenous circadian rhythms and exogenous cyclic factors are involved. The staging of the circadian rhythms in vascular tone, coagulation balance including platelet function, and blood pressure plus temporal patterns in posture, physical activity, emotional stress, autonomic function, and medication effects play central and/or triggering roles. Features of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, in terms of their chronic and acute effects on cerebral vessels, and of coagulation are especially important.

  2. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  3. Circadian rhythm abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Zee, Phyllis C; Attarian, Hrayr; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2013-02-01

    This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of the fundamental properties of circadian rhythms and discusses the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). Recent evidence strongly points to the ubiquitous influence of circadian timing in nearly all physiologic functions. Thus, in addition to the prominent sleep and wake disturbances, circadian rhythm disorders are associated with cognitive impairment, mood disturbances, and increased risk of cardiometabolic disorders. The recent availability of biomarkers of circadian timing in clinical practice has improved our ability to identify and treat these CRSDs. Circadian rhythms are endogenous rhythms with a periodicity of approximately 24 hours. These rhythms are synchronized to the physical environment by social and work schedules by various photic and nonphotic stimuli. CRSDs result from a misalignment between the timing of the circadian rhythm and the external environment (eg, jet lag and shift work) or a dysfunction of the circadian clock or its afferent and efferent pathways (eg, delayed sleep-phase, advanced sleep-phase, non-24-hour, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorders). The most common symptoms of these disorders are difficulties with sleep onset and/or sleep maintenance and excessive sleepiness that are associated with impaired social and occupational functioning. Effective treatment for most of the CRSDs requires a multimodal approach to accelerate circadian realignment with timed exposure to light, avoidance of bright light at inappropriate times, and adherence to scheduled sleep and wake times. In addition, pharmacologic agents are recommended for some of the CRSDs. For delayed sleep-phase, non-24-hour, and shift work disorders, timed low-dose melatonin can help advance or entrain circadian rhythms; and for shift work disorder, wake-enhancing agents such as caffeine, modafinil, and armodafinil are options for the management of excessive

  4. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins--facts and fantasies.

    PubMed

    Jezek, P; Zácková, M; Růzicka, M; Skobisová, E; Jabůrek, M

    2004-01-01

    Instead of a comprehensive review, we describe the basic undisputed facts and a modest contribution of our group to the fascinating area of the research on mitochondrial uncoupling proteins. After defining the terms uncoupling, leak, protein-mediated uncoupling, we discuss the assumption that due to their low abundance the novel mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCP2 to UCP5) can provide only a mild uncoupling, i.e. can decrease the proton motive force by several mV only. Contrary to this, the highly thermogenic role of UCP1 in brown adipose tissue is not given only by its high content (approximately 5 % of mitochondrial proteins) but also by the low ATP synthase content and high capacity respiratory chain. Fatty acid cycling mechanism as a plausible explanation for the protonophoretic function of all UCPs and some other mitochondrial carriers is described together with the experiments supporting it. The phylogenesis of all UCPs, estimated UCP2 content in several tissues, and details of UCP2 activation are described on the basis of our experiments. Functional activation of UCP2 is proposed to decrease reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, reaction products of lipoperoxidation such as cleaved hydroperoxy-fatty acids and hydroxy-fatty acid can activate UCP2 and promote feedback down-regulation of mitochondrial ROS production.

  5. Small heterodimer partner (NROB2) coordinates nutrient signaling and the circadian clock in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circadian rhythm regulates multiple metabolic processes and in turn is readily entrained by feeding-fasting cycles. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the peripheral clock senses nutrition availability remain largely unknown. Bile acids are under circadian control and also increase postprand...

  6. A mitochondrial uncoupling artifact can be caused by expression of uncoupling protein 1 in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J A; Harper, J A; Brindle, K M; Jekabsons, M B; Brand, M D

    2001-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) from mouse was expressed in yeast and the specific (GDP-inhibitable) and artifactual (GDP-insensitive) effects on mitochondrial uncoupling were assessed. UCP1 provides a GDP-inhibitable model system to help interpret the uncoupling effects of high expression in yeast of other members of the mitochondrial carrier protein family, such as the UCP1 homologues UCP2 and UCP3. Yeast expressing UCP1 at modest levels (approx. 1 microg/mg of mitochondrial protein) showed no growth defect, normal rates of chemically uncoupled respiration and an increased non-phosphorylating proton conductance that was completely GDP-sensitive. The catalytic-centre activity of UCP1 in these yeast mitochondria was similar to that in mammalian brown-adipose-tissue mitochondria. However, yeast expressing UCP1 at higher levels (approx. 11 microg/mg of mitochondrial protein) showed a growth defect. Their mitochondria had depressed chemically uncoupled respiration rates and an increased proton conductance that was partly GDP-insensitive. Thus, although UCP1 shows native behaviour at modest levels of expression in yeast, higher levels (or rates) of expression can lead to an uncoupling that is not a physiological property of the native protein and is therefore artifactual. This observation might be important in the interpretation of results from experiments in which the functions of UCP1 homologues are verified by their ability to uncouple yeast mitochondria. PMID:11389685

  7. DNA Replication Is Required for Circadian Clock Function by Regulating Rhythmic Nucleosome Composition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Dang, Yunkun; Matsu-Ura, Toru; He, Yubo; He, Qun; Hong, Christian I; Liu, Yi

    2017-07-20

    Although the coupling between circadian and cell cycles allows circadian clocks to gate cell division and DNA replication in many organisms, circadian clocks were thought to function independently of cell cycle. Here, we show that DNA replication is required for circadian clock function in Neurospora. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of DNA replication abolished both overt and molecular rhythmicities by repressing frequency (frq) gene transcription. DNA replication is essential for the rhythmic changes of nucleosome composition at the frq promoter. The FACT complex, known to be involved in histone disassembly/reassembly, is required for clock function and is recruited to the frq promoter in a replication-dependent manner to promote replacement of histone H2A.Z by H2A. Finally, deletion of H2A.Z uncoupled the dependence of the circadian clock on DNA replication. Together, these results establish circadian clock and cell cycle as interdependent coupled oscillators and identify DNA replication as a critical process in the circadian mechanism. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Circadian clock proteins and immunity.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne M; Bellet, Marina M; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2014-02-20

    Immune parameters change with time of day and disruption of circadian rhythms has been linked to inflammatory pathologies. A circadian-clock-controlled immune system might allow an organism to anticipate daily changes in activity and feeding and the associated risk of infection or tissue damage to the host. Responses to bacteria have been shown to vary depending on time of infection, with mice being more at risk of sepsis when challenged ahead of their activity phase. Studies highlight the extent to which the molecular clock, most notably the core clock proteins BMAL1, CLOCK, and REV-ERBα, control fundamental aspects of the immune response. Examples include the BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer regulating toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression and repressing expression of the inflammatory monocyte chemokine ligand (CCL2) as well as REV-ERBα suppressing the induction of interleukin-6. Understanding the daily rhythm of the immune system could have implications for vaccinations and how we manage infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  9. Interplay between the endocrine and circadian systems in fishes.

    PubMed

    Isorna, Esther; de Pedro, Nuria; Valenciano, Ana I; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L; Delgado, María J

    2017-03-01

    The circadian system is responsible for the temporal organisation of physiological functions which, in part, involves daily cycles of hormonal activity. In this review, we analyse the interplay between the circadian and endocrine systems in fishes. We first describe the current model of fish circadian system organisation and the basis of the molecular clockwork that enables different tissues to act as internal pacemakers. This system consists of a net of central and peripherally located oscillators and can be synchronised by the light-darkness and feeding-fasting cycles. We then focus on two central neuroendocrine transducers (melatonin and orexin) and three peripheral hormones (leptin, ghrelin and cortisol), which are involved in the synchronisation of the circadian system in mammals and/or energy status signalling. We review the role of each of these as overt rhythms (i.e. outputs of the circadian system) and, for the first time, as key internal temporal messengers that act as inputs for other endogenous oscillators. Based on acute changes in clock gene expression, we describe the currently accepted model of endogenous oscillator entrainment by the light-darkness cycle and propose a new model for non-photic (endocrine) entrainment, highlighting the importance of the bidirectional cross-talking between the endocrine and circadian systems in fishes. The flexibility of the fish circadian system combined with the absence of a master clock makes these vertebrates a very attractive model for studying communication among oscillators to drive functionally coordinated outputs.

  10. Circadian Rhythms in Urinary Functions: Possible Roles of Circadian Clocks?

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jong-Yun; Han, Dong-Hee; Yoon, Ji-Ae; Kim, Mi-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Khae-Hawn; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that harmonize a variety of physiological processes within the body. Although many urinary functions exhibit clear daily or circadian variation in diurnal humans and nocturnal rodents, the precise mechanisms of these variations are as yet unclear. In this review, we briefly introduce circadian clocks and their organization in mammals. We then summarize known daily or circadian variations in urinary function. Importantly, recent findings by others as well as results obtained by us suggest an active role of circadian clock genes in various urinary functions. Finally, we discuss possible research avenues for the circadian control of urinary function. PMID:21811695

  11. Circadian rhythm and menopause.

    PubMed

    Pines, A

    2016-12-01

    Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock which initiates and monitors various physiological processes with a fixed time-related schedule. The master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian clock undergoes significant changes throughout the life span, at both the physiological and molecular levels. This cyclical physiological process, which is very complex and multifactorial, may be associated with metabolic alterations, atherosclerosis, impaired cognition, mood disturbances and even development of cancer. Sex differences do exist, and the well-known sleep disturbances associated with menopause are a good example. Circadian rhythm was detected in the daily pattern of hot flushes, with a peak in the afternoons. Endogenous secretion of melatonin decreases with aging across genders, and, among women, menopause is associated with a significant reduction of melatonin levels, affecting sleep. Although it might seem that hot flushes and melatonin secretion are likely related, there are not enough data to support such a hypothesis.

  12. Modulation of circadian clocks by nutrients and food factors.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    Daily activity rhythms that are dominated by internal clocks are called circadian rhythms. A central clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and peripheral clocks are located in most mammalian peripheral cells. The central clock is entrained by light/dark cycles, whereas peripheral clocks are entrained by feeding cycles. The effects of nutrients on the central and peripheral clocks have been investigated during the past decade and much interaction between them has come to light. For example, a high-fat diet prolongs the period of circadian behavior, a ketogenic diet advances the onset of locomotor activity rhythms, and a high-salt diet advances the phase of peripheral molecular clocks. Moreover, some food factors such as caffeine, nobiletin, and resveratrol, alter molecular and/or behavioral circadian rhythms. Here, we review nutrients and food factors that modulate mammalian circadian clocks from the cellular to the behavioral level.

  13. Harmonics of circadian gene transcription in mammals.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael E; DiTacchio, Luciano; Hayes, Kevin R; Vollmers, Christopher; Pulivarthy, S; Baggs, Julie E; Panda, Satchidananda; Hogenesch, John B

    2009-04-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular and cellular oscillator found in most mammalian tissues that regulates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Numerous investigations have addressed the contribution of circadian rhythmicity to cellular, organ, and organismal physiology. We recently developed a method to look at transcriptional oscillations with unprecedented precision and accuracy using high-density time sampling. Here, we report a comparison of oscillating transcription from mouse liver, NIH3T3, and U2OS cells. Several surprising observations resulted from this study, including a 100-fold difference in the number of cycling transcripts in autonomous cellular models of the oscillator versus tissues harvested from intact mice. Strikingly, we found two clusters of genes that cycle at the second and third harmonic of circadian rhythmicity in liver, but not cultured cells. Validation experiments show that 12-hour oscillatory transcripts occur in several other peripheral tissues as well including heart, kidney, and lungs. These harmonics are lost ex vivo, as well as under restricted feeding conditions. Taken in sum, these studies illustrate the importance of time sampling with respect to multiple testing, suggest caution in use of autonomous cellular models to study clock output, and demonstrate the existence of harmonics of circadian gene expression in the mouse.

  14. Harmonics of Circadian Gene Transcription in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Kevin R.; Vollmers, Christopher; Pulivarthy, S.; Baggs, Julie E.; Panda, Satchidananda; Hogenesch, John B.

    2009-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular and cellular oscillator found in most mammalian tissues that regulates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Numerous investigations have addressed the contribution of circadian rhythmicity to cellular, organ, and organismal physiology. We recently developed a method to look at transcriptional oscillations with unprecedented precision and accuracy using high-density time sampling. Here, we report a comparison of oscillating transcription from mouse liver, NIH3T3, and U2OS cells. Several surprising observations resulted from this study, including a 100-fold difference in the number of cycling transcripts in autonomous cellular models of the oscillator versus tissues harvested from intact mice. Strikingly, we found two clusters of genes that cycle at the second and third harmonic of circadian rhythmicity in liver, but not cultured cells. Validation experiments show that 12-hour oscillatory transcripts occur in several other peripheral tissues as well including heart, kidney, and lungs. These harmonics are lost ex vivo, as well as under restricted feeding conditions. Taken in sum, these studies illustrate the importance of time sampling with respect to multiple testing, suggest caution in use of autonomous cellular models to study clock output, and demonstrate the existence of harmonics of circadian gene expression in the mouse. PMID:19343201

  15. Circadian rhythms in insect disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Meireles-Filho, Antonio Carlos Alves; Kyriacou, Charalambos Panayiotis

    2013-01-01

    Organisms from bacteria to humans have evolved under predictable daily environmental cycles owing to the Earth’s rotation. This strong selection pressure has generated endogenous circadian clocks that regulate many aspects of behaviour, physiology and metabolism, anticipating and synchronising internal time-keeping to changes in the cyclical environment. In haematophagous insect vectors the circadian clock coordinates feeding activity, which is important for the dynamics of pathogen transmission. We have recently witnessed a substantial advance in molecular studies of circadian clocks in insect vector species that has consolidated behavioural data collected over many years, which provided insights into the regulation of the clock in the wild. Next generation sequencing technologies will facilitate the study of vector genomes/transcriptomes both among and within species and illuminate some of the species-specific patterns of adaptive circadian phenotypes that are observed in the field and in the laboratory. In this review we will explore these recent findings and attempt to identify potential areas for further investigation. PMID:24473802

  16. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  17. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  18. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  19. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  20. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  1. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  2. 30 CFR 56.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 56.14215 Section... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and then moved at...

  3. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  4. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  5. 30 CFR 57.14215 - Coupling or uncoupling cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coupling or uncoupling cars. 57.14215 Section... and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14215 Coupling or uncoupling cars. Prior to coupling or uncoupling cars manually, trains shall be brought to a complete stop, and...

  6. Circadian Rhythm of Intestinal Sucrase Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Mark A.; Korsmo, Helen A.; Olsen, Ward A.

    1980-01-01

    Past investigation has revealed that the circadian rhythm of intestinal sucrase activity in rats is primarily cued by the time of feeding. We examined the mechanism of the circadian rhythm by methods involving quantitative immunoprecipitation of sucrase-isomaltase protein and study of decay of radioactively labeled protein. Rats were placed on a controlled feeding regimen (1000-1500 h) and then sacrificed at 3-h intervals over a 24-h period. Immunotitration experiments indicated that the circadian rhythm was the result of changes in the absolute amount of sucrase-isomaltase protein present and not of changes in the enzyme's catalytic efficiency. To study the mechanism of this circadian variation in sucrase-isomaltase mass, [14C]sodium carbonate was injected and, after maximum incorporation into brush border protein, the rats were sacrified at 3-h intervals. Sucrase-isomaltase protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation, and the decrease in total disintegrations per minute over time was used to study degradation of the protein. Enzyme degradation was not constant but exhibited a clear circadian rhythm. The period of increasing enzyme mass was characterized by virtual cessation of enzyme degradation (t½ of 38 h), and the period of declining enzyme mass by rapid degradation (t½ of 6 h or less). We found similar changes in enzyme degradation in fasted animals, demonstrating that the changes were not the result of decreased isotope reutilization during feeding. We found no evidence of a circadian rhythm in [14C]leucine incorporation into the protein, suggesting that enzyme synthesis was constant. These results indicate that the circadian rhythm of sucrase activity represents changes in the total amount of enzyme protein that are, at least in large part, secondary to changes in the enzyme's degradation rate. PMID:7364944

  7. Metabolic regulation of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Haydon, Michael J; Hearn, Timothy J; Bell, Laura J; Hannah, Matthew A; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-05-01

    Circadian clocks are 24-h timekeeping mechanisms, which have evolved in plants, animals, fungi and bacteria to anticipate changes in light and temperature associated with the rotation of the Earth. The current paradigm to explain how biological clocks provide timing information is based on multiple interlocking transcription-translation negative feedback loops (TTFL), which drive rhythmic gene expression and circadian behaviour of growth and physiology. Metabolism is an important circadian output, which in plants includes photosynthesis, starch metabolism, nutrient assimilation and redox homeostasis. There is increasing evidence in a range of organisms that these metabolic outputs can also contribute to circadian timing and might also comprise independent circadian oscillators. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms of circadian regulation of metabolism by TTFL and consider increasing evidence that rhythmic metabolism contributes to the circadian network. We highlight how this might be relevant to plant circadian clock function.

  8. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  9. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D; Levine, Joel D; Schwartz, William J

    2013-08-22

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian 'clock'). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day-night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the 'group' level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature.

  10. Effect of high-fat diet, surrounding temperature, and enterostatin on uncoupling protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rippe, C; Berger, K; Böiers, C; Ricquier, D; Erlanson-Albertsson, C

    2000-08-01

    Nonshivering thermogenesis induced in brown adipose tissue (BAT) during high-fat feeding is mediated through uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). UCP2 is a recently identified homologue found in many tissues. To determine the role of UCP1 and UCP2 in thermoregulation and energy balance, we investigated the long-term effect of high-fat feeding on mRNA levels in mice at two different ambient temperatures. We also treated mice with the anorectic peptide enterostatin and compared mRNA levels in BAT, white adipose tissue (WAT), stomach, and duodenum. Here, we report that high-fat feeding at 23 degrees C increased UCP1 and UCP2 levels in BAT four- and threefold, respectively, and increased UCP2 levels fourfold in WAT. However, at 29 degrees C, UCP1 decreased, whereas UCP2 remained unchanged in BAT and increased twofold in WAT. Enterostatin increased UCP1 and decreased UCP2 mRNA in BAT. In stomach and duodenum, high-fat feeding decreased UCP2 mRNA, whereas enterostatin increased it. Our results suggest that the regulation of uncoupling protein mRNA levels by high-fat feeding is dependent on ambient temperature and that enterostatin is able to modulate it.

  11. Neuronal circadian clock protein oscillations are similar in behaviourally rhythmic forager honeybees and in arrhythmic nurses

    PubMed Central

    Beer, K.; Ben-David, R.; Kotowoy, A.; Tsang, V. W. K.; Warman, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    Internal clocks driving rhythms of about a day (circadian) are ubiquitous in animals, allowing them to anticipate environmental changes. Genetic or environmental disturbances to circadian clocks or the rhythms they produce are commonly associated with illness, compromised performance or reduced survival. Nevertheless, some animals including Arctic mammals, open sea fish and social insects such as honeybees are active around-the-clock with no apparent ill effects. The mechanisms allowing this remarkable natural plasticity are unknown. We generated and validated a new and specific antibody against the clock protein PERIOD of the honeybee Apis mellifera (amPER) and used it to characterize the circadian network in the honeybee brain. We found many similarities to Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, suggesting common anatomical organization principles in the insect clock that have not been appreciated before. Time course analyses revealed strong daily oscillations in amPER levels in foragers, which show circadian rhythms, and also in nurses that do not, although the latter have attenuated oscillations in brain mRNA clock gene levels. The oscillations in nurses show that activity can be uncoupled from the circadian network and support the hypothesis that a ticking circadian clock is essential even in around-the-clock active animals in a constant physical environment. PMID:28615472

  12. Entrainment of circadian clocks in mammals by arousal and food.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Ralph E; Antle, Michael C

    2011-06-30

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are regulated by a system of endogenous circadian oscillators (clock cells) in the brain and in most peripheral organs and tissues. One group of clock cells in the hypothalamic SCN (suprachiasmatic nuclei) functions as a pacemaker for co-ordinating the timing of oscillators elsewhere in the brain and body. This master clock can be reset and entrained by daily LD (light-dark) cycles and thereby also serves to interface internal with external time, ensuring an appropriate alignment of behavioural and physiological rhythms with the solar day. Two features of the mammalian circadian system provide flexibility in circadian programming to exploit temporal regularities of social stimuli or food availability. One feature is the sensitivity of the SCN pacemaker to behavioural arousal stimulated during the usual sleep period, which can reset its phase and modulate its response to LD stimuli. Neural pathways from the brainstem and thalamus mediate these effects by releasing neurochemicals that inhibit retinal inputs to the SCN clock or that alter clock-gene expression in SCN clock cells. A second feature is the sensitivity of circadian oscillators outside of the SCN to stimuli associated with food intake, which enables animals to uncouple rhythms of behaviour and physiology from LD cycles and align these with predictable daily mealtimes. The location of oscillators necessary for food-entrained behavioural rhythms is not yet certain. Persistence of these rhythms in mice with clock-gene mutations that disable the SCN pacemaker suggests diversity in the molecular basis of light- and food-entrainable clocks.

  13. Phase resetting of the mammalian circadian clock by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Oklejewicz, Małgorzata; Destici, Eugin; Tamanini, Filippo; Hut, Roelof A; Janssens, Roel; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J

    2008-02-26

    To anticipate the momentum of the day, most organisms have developed an internal clock that drives circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior [1]. Recent studies indicate that cell-cycle progression and DNA-damage-response pathways are under circadian control [2-4]. Because circadian output processes can feed back into the clock, we investigated whether DNA damage affects the mammalian circadian clock. By using Rat-1 fibroblasts expressing an mPer2 promoter-driven luciferase reporter, we show that ionizing radiation exclusively phase advances circadian rhythms in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Notably, this in vitro finding translates to the living animal, because ionizing radiation also phase advanced behavioral rhythms in mice. The underlying mechanism involves ATM-mediated damage signaling as radiation-induced phase shifting was suppressed in fibroblasts from cancer-predisposed ataxia telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome patients. Ionizing radiation-induced phase shifting depends on neither upregulation or downregulation of clock gene expression nor on de novo protein synthesis and, thus, differs mechanistically from dexamethasone- and forskolin-provoked clock resetting [5]. Interestingly, ultraviolet light and tert-butyl hydroperoxide also elicited a phase-advancing effect. Taken together, our data provide evidence that the mammalian circadian clock, like that of the lower eukaryote Neurospora[6], responds to DNA damage and suggest that clock resetting is a universal property of DNA damage.

  14. Circadian neurons in the lateral habenula: Clocking motivated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Jorge

    2017-06-28

    The main circadian clock in mammals is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), however, central timing mechanisms are also present in other brain structures beyond the SCN. The lateral habenula (LHb), known for its important role in the regulation of the monoaminergic system, contains such a circadian clock whose molecular and cellular mechanisms as well as functional role are not well known. However, since monoaminergic systems show circadian activity, it is possible that the LHb-clock's role is to modulate the rhythmic activity of the dopamine, serotonin and norephinephrine systems, and associated behaviors. Moreover, the LHb is involved in different pathological states such as depression, addiction and schizophrenia, states in which sleep and circadian alterations have been reported. Thus, perturbations of circadian activity in the LHb might, in part, be a cause of these rhythmic alterations in psychiatric ailments. In this review the current state of the LHb clock and its possible implications in the control of monoaminergic systems rhythms, motivated behaviors (e.g., feeding, drug intake) and depression (with circadian disruptions and altered motivation) will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  16. Measuring stem cell circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William; Rich, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms that occur within a 24-h time cycle. Sleep is a prime example of a circadian rhythm and with it melatonin production. Stem cell systems also demonstrate circadian rhythms. This is particularly the case for the proliferating cells within the system. In fact, all proliferating cell populations exhibit their own circadian rhythm, which has important implications for disease and the treatment of disease. Stem cell chronobiology is particularly important because the treatment of cancer can be significantly affected by the time of day a drug is administered. This protocol provides a basis for measuring hematopoietic stem cell circadian rhythm for future stem cell chronotherapeutic applications.

  17. Influence of weeks of circadian misalignment on leptin levels

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, June; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of circadian, wakefulness–sleep, and feeding systems interact to influence energy homeostasis. Sleep and circadian disruptions are reported to be associated with increased risk of diabetes and obesity, yet the roles of energy balance hormones in these associations are largely unknown. Therefore, in the current study we aimed to assess the influence of several weeks of circadian misalignment (sleep and wakefulness occurring at an inappropriate biological time) on the anorexigenic adipocyte hormone leptin. We utilized data from a previous study designed to assess physiological and cognitive consequences of changes in day length and light exposure as may occur during space flight, including exploration class space missions and exposure to the Martian Sol (day length). We hypothesized that circadian misalignment during an exploration class spaceflight simulation would reduce leptin levels. Following a three-week ~8 hours per night home sleep schedule, 14 healthy participants lived in the laboratory for more than one month. After baseline data collection, participants were scheduled to either 24.0 or 24.6 hours of wakefulness–sleep schedules for 25 days. Changes in the phase of the circadian melatonin rhythm, sleep, and leptin levels were assessed. Half of participants analyzed exhibited circadian misalignment with an average change in phase angle from baseline of ~4 hours and these participants showed reduced leptin levels, sleep latency, stage 2 and total sleep time (7.3 to 6.6 hours) and increased wakefulness after sleep onset (all P < 0.05). The control group remained synchronized and showed significant increases in sleep latency and leptin levels. Our findings indicate that weeks of circadian misalignment, such as that which occurs in circadian sleep disorders, alters leptin levels and therefore may have implications for appetite and energy balance. PMID:23524972

  18. Influence of weeks of circadian misalignment on leptin levels

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, June; Wright, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of circadian, wakefulness-sleep, and feeding systems interact to influence energy homeostasis. Sleep and circadian disruptions are reported to be associated with increased risk of diabetes and obesity, yet the roles of energy balance hormones in these associations are largely unknown. Therefore, in the current study we aimed to assess the influence of several weeks of circadian misalignment (sleep and wakefulness occurring at an inappropriate biological time) on the anorexigenic adipocyte hormone leptin. We utilized data from a previous study designed to assess physiological and cognitive consequences of changes in day length and light exposure as may occur during space fight, including exploration class space missions and exposure to the Martian Sol (day length). We hypothesized that circadian misalignment during an exploration class spaceflight simulation would reduce leptin levels. Following a three-week ~8 hours per night home sleep schedule, 14 healthy participants lived in the laboratory for more than one month. After baseline data collection, participants were scheduled to either 24.0 or 24.6 hours of wakefulness-sleep schedules for 25 days. Changes in the phase of the circadian melatonin rhythm, sleep, and leptin levels were assessed. Half of participants analyzed exhibited circadian misalignment with an average change in phase angle from baseline of ~4 hours and these participants showed reduced leptin levels, sleep latency, stage 2 and total sleep time (7.3 to 6.6 hours) and increased wakefulness after sleep onset (all P< 0.05). The control group remained synchronized and showed significant increases in sleep latency and leptin levels. Our findings indicate that weeks of circadian misalignment, such as that which occurs in circadian sleep disorders, alters leptin levels and therefore may have implications for appetite and energy balance. PMID:23616693

  19. Circadian and homeostatic variation in sustained attention.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Pablo; Ramírez, Candelaria; García, Aída; Talamantes, Javier; Cortez, Juventino

    2010-01-01

    Human performance is modulated by circadian rhythms and homeostatic changes. Changes in efficiency in the performance of many tasks might be produced by variation in a basic cognitive process, such as sustained attention. This cognitive process is the capacity to respond efficiently to the environment during prolonged periods (from minutes to hours). There are three indices of sustained attention: general stability of efficiency, time on task stability, and short-term stability. The objective of this work was to analyze circadian and homeostatic influences on the indices of sustained attention. Participants were nine undergraduate female student volunteers (mean age 17.67 yrs, SD = 1.00, range 16-19 yrs) who attended school from 07:00-13:30 h, Monday to Friday. They were assessed while adhering to a modified 28 h constant-routine protocol during which feeding, room temperature, motor activity, and room illumination were controlled. Rectal temperature was recorded each minute, and indices of sustained attention were assessed hourly through a continuous performance task (CPT). General stability was measured as standard deviation of correct responses and reaction time, time on task stability was measured as the linear regression of correct responses and reaction time throughout the task, and short-term stability was measured as hit runs and error runs. Rectal temperature showed circadian variation; subjective somnolence and tiredness increased, while general performance and all indices of sustained attention declined throughout the 28 h recording session. General stability exhibited circadian variation, whereas time on task did not. Short-term stability showed circadian variations in short-error runs, long-error runs, and short-hit runs, but long-hit runs did not. There was a 26 sec short interval at the beginning of the task, characterized by a very high efficiency level of performance. Execution during this safe period was not affected by time awake and did not show

  20. Neurobiology of circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V

    1997-09-01

    Adaptation in the temporal environment is key to survival. This is achieved by the manifestation of periodicity in occurrence of vital behavioural and physiological processes at regular intervals--the biological rhythms. Biological rhythms (= biological clocks) are ubiquitous, can be demonstrated persisting at any level of organization in the living world, and are generated and controlled by some central pacemaker(s), mostly located in the brain. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus is the principal site of the endogenous circadian pacemaker, regulating many daily physiological and behavioural functions, although other neural structures could also be contributing to the circadian timekeeping system. In other vertebrates, the neural site(s) of the circadian pacemaker is(are) still unclear. An organism without brain can have the biological clock, as well, for fully functional 24-hour temporal organization has been identified in several invertebrates, including unicellular Paramecium and Gonyaulax as well as filamentous fungus, Neurospora. This article attempts to provide an update of the informations which have accumulated over the past decade about understanding of the neurophysiological and molecular bases of circadian rhythms in animals.

  1. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  2. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  3. Amplitude metrics for cellular circadian bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    St John, Peter C; Taylor, Stephanie R; Abel, John H; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-12-02

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  4. Amplitude Metrics for Cellular Circadian Bioluminescence Reporters

    PubMed Central

    St. John, Peter C.; Taylor, Stephanie R.; Abel, John H.; Doyle, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  5. Circadian Clock Control of Endocrine Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Karen L.; Berry, Ryan; Frank, Stuart J.; Young, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms experience dramatic fluctuations in demands/stresses over the course of the day. In order to maintain biological processes within physiologic boundaries, it is imperative that mechanisms have evolved for anticipation of, and adaptation to, these daily fluctuations. Endocrine factors undoubtedly play an integral role in homeostasis. Not only do circulating levels of various endocrine factors oscillate over the 24 period, but so too does responsiveness of target tissues to these signals/stimuli. Emerging evidence suggests that these daily oscillations do not occur solely in response to behavioral fluctuations associated with sleep/wake and feeding/fasting cycles, but are orchestrated in part by an intrinsic timekeeping mechanism known as the circadian clock. Disruption of circadian clocks, through genetic and/or environmental means, appears to precipitate numerous common disorders, including cardiometabolic diseases and cancer. Collectively, these observations, which are reviewed within the current article, have led to suggestion that strategies designed to realign normal circadian rhythmicities hold a therapeutic potential for the treatment of various endocrine-related disorders. PMID:24863387

  6. Circadian Rhythms in Adipose Tissue Physiology.

    PubMed

    Kiehn, Jana-Thabea; Tsang, Anthony H; Heyde, Isabel; Leinweber, Brinja; Kolbe, Isa; Leliavski, Alexei; Oster, Henrik

    2017-03-16

    The different types of adipose tissues fulfill a wide range of biological functions-from energy storage to hormone secretion and thermogenesis-many of which show pronounced variations over the course of the day. Such 24-h rhythms in physiology and behavior are coordinated by endogenous circadian clocks found in all tissues and cells, including adipocytes. At the molecular level, these clocks are based on interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of a set of clock genes/proteins. Tissue-specific clock-controlled transcriptional programs translate time-of-day information into physiologically relevant signals. In adipose tissues, clock gene control has been documented for adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, lipid metabolism as well as endocrine function and other adipose oscillations are under control of systemic signals tied to endocrine, neuronal, or behavioral rhythms. Circadian rhythm disruption, for example, by night shift work or through genetic alterations, is associated with changes in adipocyte metabolism and hormone secretion. At the same time, adipose metabolic state feeds back to central and peripheral clocks, adjusting behavioral and physiological rhythms. In this overview article, we summarize our current knowledge about the crosstalk between circadian clocks and energy metabolism with a focus on adipose physiology. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:383-427, 2017.

  7. The regulation and turnover of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Azzu, Vian; Jastroch, Martin; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Brand, Martin D

    2010-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3) are important in regulating cellular fuel metabolism and as attenuators of reactive oxygen species production, through strong or mild uncoupling. The generic function and broad tissue distribution of the uncoupling protein family means that they are increasingly implicated in a range of pathophysiological processes including obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease, immunity and cancer. The significant recent progress describing the turnover of novel uncoupling proteins, as well as current views on the physiological roles and regulation of UCPs, is outlined. PMID:20211596

  8. Optimal parameters uncoupling vibration modes of oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, K. C.; Pieper, A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel optimization concept for an oscillator with two degrees of freedom. By using specially defined motion ratios, we control the action of springs to each degree of freedom of the oscillator. We aim at showing that, if the potential action of the springs in one period of vibration, used as the payoff function for the conservative oscillator, is maximized among all admissible parameters and motions satisfying Lagrange's equations, then the optimal motion ratios uncouple vibration modes. A similar result holds true for the dissipative oscillator having dampers. The application to optimal design of vehicle suspension is discussed.

  9. Crosstalk between components of circadian and metabolic cycles in mammals.

    PubMed

    Asher, Gad; Schibler, Ueli

    2011-02-02

    In mammals, most metabolic processes are influenced by biological clocks and feeding rhythms. The mechanisms that couple metabolism to circadian oscillators are just emerging. NAD-dependent enzymes (e.g., Sirtuins and poly[ADP-ribose] polymerases), redox- and/or temperature-dependent transcription factors (e.g., CLOCK, NPAS2, and HSF1), nutrient-sensing transcriptional regulatory proteins (e.g., CREB-CBP-CRCT2, FOXO-p300, nuclear receptors, PGC-1, and SP1 family members) and protein kinases (e.g., AMPK), are plausible candidates for conveying a cell's metabolic state to the core clock circuitry. The intertwining between these acute regulators and circadian clock components is so tight that the discrimination between metabolic and circadian oscillations may be somewhat arbitrary.

  10. Aging signaling pathways and circadian clock-dependent metabolic derangements

    PubMed Central

    Tevy, Maria Florencia; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga; Pincus, Zachary; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock machinery orchestrates organism metabolism in order to ensure that development, survival and reproduction are attuned to diurnal environmental variations. For unknown reasons, there is a decline in circadian rhythms with age, concomitant with declines in the overall metabolic tissues homeostasis and changes in the feeding behavior of aged organisms. This disruption of the relationship between the clock and the nutrient sensing networks might underlie age-related diseases; overall, greater knowledge of the molecular mediators of and variations in clock networks during lifespan may shed light on the aging process and how it may be delayed. In this review we address the complex links between the circadian clock, metabolic (dys)functions and aging in different model organisms. PMID:23299029

  11. Circadian Rhythms and Psychiatric Illness

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Lauren D.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review provides a conceptual introduction to sleep and circadian research in psychiatric illness, and discusses recent experimental and intervention findings in this area. Recent Findings In this review, studies published since January 2011 on circadian disturbance and psychiatric illness have been summarized. Summary Exciting new results have increasingly utilized objective and validated instruments to measure the circadian system in experimental studies. Since 2011, treatment research has still predominantly utilized self-report measures as outcome variables. However, research in the treatment domain for sleep/circadian disturbances comorbid with psychiatric illness has advanced the field in its work to broaden the validation of existing sleep treatments to additional patient populations with comorbid sleep/circadian disruptions, address how to increase access to and affordability of treatment for sleep and circadian dysfunction for patients with psychiatric disorders, and how to combine psychosocial treatments with psychopharmacology to optimize treatment outcomes. PMID:24060916

  12. Genetic and Environmental Models of Circadian Disruption Link SRC-2 Function to Hepatic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Tiffany; Stashi, Erin; Zhu, Bokai; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Kettner, Nicole M; Gorman, Blythe K; Coarfa, Cristian; Fu, Loning; O'Malley, Bert W; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is a fundamental process that synchronizes behavioral cues with metabolic homeostasis. Disruption of daily cycles due to jet lag or shift work results in severe physiological consequences including advanced aging, metabolic syndrome, and even cancer. Our understanding of the molecular clock, which is regulated by intricate positive feedforward and negative feedback loops, has expanded to include an important metabolic transcriptional coregulator, Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 (SRC-2), that regulates both the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks including the liver. We hypothesized that an environmental uncoupling of the light-dark phases, termed chronic circadian disruption (CCD), would lead to pathology similar to the genetic circadian disruption observed with loss of SRC-2 We found that CCD and ablation of SRC-2 in mice led to a common comorbidity of metabolic syndrome also found in humans with circadian disruption, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The combination of SRC-2(-/-) and CCD results in a more robust phenotype that correlates with human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene signatures. Either CCD or SRC-2 ablation produces an advanced aging phenotype leading to increased mortality consistent with other circadian mutant mouse models. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that SRC-2 provides an essential link between the behavioral activities influenced by light cues and the metabolic homeostasis maintained by the liver.

  13. CIRCADIAN TIMING OF REM SLEEP IS COUPLED TO AN OSCILLATOR WITHIN THE DORSOMEDIAL SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael L.; Swanson, Beryl E.; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In near all animals, sleep is consistently concentrated to a specific time of the day. The timing and consolidation of sleep and wake bouts depend on the interplay between a homeostatic and a circadian processes of sleep regulation [1–3]. Sleep propensity rises as a homeostatic response to increasing wake time while a circadian clock determines the specific time when sleep will likely occur. This two-process regulation of sleep also determines which specific sleep stage will be manifested and specifically, the circadian process governs tightly the manifestation of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) [1, 4]. The role of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the circadian gating of sleep and wakefulness has been unequivocally established by lesion studies [5] but its role in the timing of specific sleep stages has remained unknown. Using a forced desynchrony paradigm that induces the stable uncoupling of the ventrolateral (vl) and dorsomedial (dm) SCN, and a jetlag paradigm that induces a transient desynchronization between these SCN subregions we provide evidence that the SCN can time the occurrence of specific sleep stages. Specifically, the circadian regulation of REMS is associated with rhythmic clock gene expression within the dmSCN. Our results also provide the first neurophysiological model for the disruptions of sleep architecture that may result from temporal challenges such as rotational shift-work and transmeridional flights. PMID:19375313

  14. Alterations of the circadian clock in the heart by streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Young, Martin E; Wilson, Christopher R; Razeghi, Peter; Guthrie, Patrick H; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2002-02-01

    The heart, like other organs, possesses an internal circadian clock. These clocks provide the selective advantage of anticipation, enabling the organ to prepare for a given stimulus, thereby optimizing the appropriate response. The heart in diabetes is associated with alterations in morphology, gene expression, metabolism and contractile performance. The present study investigated whether diabetes also alters the circadian clock in the heart. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by treatment with streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg). STZ increased humoral (glucose and non-esterified fatty acids) and heart gene expression (myosin heavy chain beta, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and uncoupling protein 3) markers of diabetes. The circadian patterns of gene expression of seven components of the mammalian clock (bmal1, clock, cry1, cry2, per1, per2 and per3), as well as three clock output genes (dbp, hlf and tef), were compared in hearts isolated from control and STZ-induced diabetic rats. All components of the clock investigated possessed circadian rhythms of gene expression. In the hearts isolated from STZ-induced diabetic rats, the phases of these circadian rhythms were altered (approximately 3 h early) compared to those observed for control hearts. The clock in the heart has therefore lost normal synchronization with its environment during diabetes. Whether this loss of synchronization plays a role in the development of contractile dysfunction of the heart in diabetes remains to be determined. Copyright 2002 Academic Press.

  15. Disrupted circadian rhythmicity of the intestinal glucose transporter SGLT1 in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Hina Y; Deelman, Tara E; Ashley, Stanley W; Rhoads, David B; Tavakkoli, Ali

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal absorptive capacity shows a circadian rhythm synchronized with eating patterns. Disrupting these coordinated rhythms, e.g., with shift work, may contribute to metabolic disease. Circadian expression of nutrient transporters has not been studied in metabolic disease. We studied the circadian rhythm of intestinal transporter sodium glucose co-transporter type 1 (SGLT1) in an obese diabetic rat. We compared obese Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats to lean ZDF littermates. Temporal feeding patterns were assessed, then rats were harvested at Zeitgeber (ZT, ZT0 = 7:00 a.m.) 3, 9, or 15 to measure insulin resistance, SGLT1 expression and intestinal glucose absorption capacity. Regulators of SGLT1 (sweet taste receptor T1R2/3; clock genes) were measured to elucidate underlying mechanisms. Both groups exhibited altered circadian food intake. Obese ZDF rats lost circadian rhythmicity of SGLT1 mRNA expression and functional activity. Lean ZDF rats maintained rhythmicity of SGLT1 mRNA expression but that of functional glucose absorption was blunted. Circadian rhythms of intestinal clock genes were maintained in both groups. Neither group had discernible rhythms of intestinal GLUT2 (glucose transporter) or T1R2 (sweet taste receptor component) mRNA expression. In summary, lean and obese ZDF rats exhibited similar disruptions in circadian feeding. Glucose intolerance was evident in lean rats, but only obese rats further developed diabetes and exhibited disrupted circadian rhythmicity of both SGLT1 mRNA expression and function. Our findings suggest that disrupted circadian feeding rhythms contribute to glucose intolerance, but additional factors (genetics, changes in nutrient sensing/transport) are needed to lead to full diabetes.

  16. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  17. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marcos G.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity. PMID:27420105

  18. The Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sollars, Patricia J; Pickard, Gary E

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing recognition that the coordinated timing of behavioral, physiologic, and metabolic circadian rhythms is a requirement for a healthy body and mind. In mammals, the primary circadian oscillator is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is responsible for circadian coordination throughout the organism. Temporal homeostasis is recognized as a complex interplay between rhythmic clock gene expression in brain regions outside the SCN and in peripheral organs. Abnormalities in this intricate circadian orchestration may alter sleep patterns and contribute to the pathophysiology of affective disorders.

  19. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos G

    2016-07-13

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity.

  20. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice.

    PubMed

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-19

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness.

  1. Emerging Models for the Molecular Basis of Mammalian Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian timekeeping arises from a transcription-based feedback loop driven by a set of dedicated clock proteins. At its core, the heterodimeric transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 activates expression of Period, Cryptochrome, and Rev-Erb genes, which feed back to repress transcription and create oscillations in gene expression that confer circadian timing cues to cellular processes. The formation of different clock protein complexes throughout this transcriptional cycle helps to establish the intrinsic ∼24 h periodicity of the clock; however, current models of circadian timekeeping lack the explanatory power to fully describe this process. Recent studies confirm the presence of at least three distinct regulatory complexes: a transcriptionally active state comprising the CLOCK:BMAL1 heterodimer with its coactivator CBP/p300, an early repressive state containing PER:CRY complexes, and a late repressive state marked by a poised but inactive, DNA-bound CLOCK:BMAL1:CRY1 complex. In this review, we analyze high-resolution structures of core circadian transcriptional regulators and integrate biochemical data to suggest how remodeling of clock protein complexes may be achieved throughout the 24 h cycle. Defining these detailed mechanisms will provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of circadian timing and help to establish new platforms for the discovery of therapeutics to manipulate the clock. PMID:25303119

  2. Metabolism as an Integral Cog in the Mammalian Circadian Clockwork

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Karen L.; Young, Martin E.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are an integral part of life. These rhythms are apparent in virtually all biological processes studies to date, ranging from the individual cell (e.g., DNA synthesis) to the whole organism (e.g., behaviors such as physical activity). Oscillations in metabolism have been characterized extensively in various organisms, including mammals. These metabolic rhythms often parallel behaviors such as sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles that occur on a daily basis. What has become increasingly clear over the past several decades is that many metabolic oscillations are driven by cell autonomous circadian clocks, which orchestrate metabolic processes in a temporally appropriate manner. During the process of identifying the mechanisms by which clocks influence metabolism, molecular-based studies have revealed that metabolism should be considered an integral circadian clock component. The implications of such an interrelationship include the establishment of a vicious cycle during cardiometabolic disease states, wherein metabolism-induced perturbations in the circadian clock exacerbate metabolic dysfunction. The purpose of this review is therefore to highlight recent insights gained regarding links between cell autonomous circadian clocks and metabolism, and the implications of clock dysfunction in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:23594144

  3. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S. I.; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light–dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive (“circadian resonance hypothesis”). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness. PMID:26715747

  4. Metabolism as an integral cog in the mammalian circadian clockwork.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Karen L; Young, Martin E

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are an integral part of life. These rhythms are apparent in virtually all biological processes studies to date, ranging from the individual cell (e.g. DNA synthesis) to the whole organism (e.g. behaviors such as physical activity). Oscillations in metabolism have been characterized extensively in various organisms, including mammals. These metabolic rhythms often parallel behaviors such as sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles that occur on a daily basis. What has become increasingly clear over the past several decades is that many metabolic oscillations are driven by cell-autonomous circadian clocks, which orchestrate metabolic processes in a temporally appropriate manner. During the process of identifying the mechanisms by which clocks influence metabolism, molecular-based studies have revealed that metabolism should be considered an integral circadian clock component. The implications of such an interrelationship include the establishment of a vicious cycle during cardiometabolic disease states, wherein metabolism-induced perturbations in the circadian clock exacerbate metabolic dysfunction. The purpose of this review is therefore to highlight recent insights gained regarding links between cell-autonomous circadian clocks and metabolism and the implications of clock dysfunction in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases.

  5. Emergence of Noise-Induced Oscillations in the Central Circadian Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Buhr, Ethan D.; Liu, Andrew C.; Zhang, Eric E.; Ralph, Martin R.; Kay, Steve A.; Forger, Daniel B.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Bmal1 is an essential transcriptional activator within the mammalian circadian clock. We report here that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of Bmal1-null mutant mice, unexpectedly, generates stochastic oscillations with periods that overlap the circadian range. Dissociated SCN neurons expressed fluctuating levels of PER2 detected by bioluminescence imaging but could not generate circadian oscillations intrinsically. Inhibition of intercellular communication or cyclic-AMP signaling in SCN slices, which provide a positive feed-forward signal to drive the intracellular negative feedback loop, abolished the stochastic oscillations. Propagation of this feed-forward signal between SCN neurons then promotes quasi-circadian oscillations that arise as an emergent property of the SCN network. Experimental analysis and mathematical modeling argue that both intercellular coupling and molecular noise are required for the stochastic rhythms, providing a novel biological example of noise-induced oscillations. The emergence of stochastic circadian oscillations from the SCN network in the absence of cell-autonomous circadian oscillatory function highlights a previously unrecognized level of circadian organization. PMID:20967239

  6. Circadian rhythms of temperature and activity in obese and lean Zucker rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Fuller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The circadian timing system is important in the regulation of feeding and metabolism, both of which are aberrant in the obese Zucker rat. This study tested the hypothesis that these abnormalities involve a deficit in circadian regulation by examining the circadian rhythms of body temperature and activity in lean and obese Zucker rats exposed to normal light-dark cycles, constant light, and constant dark. Significant deficits in both daily mean and circadian amplitude of temperature and activity were found in obese Zucker female rats relative to lean controls in all lighting conditions. However, the circadian period of obese Zucker rats did not exhibit differences relative to lean controls in either of the constant lighting conditions. These results indicate that although the circadian regulation of temperature and activity in obese Zucker female rats is in fact depressed, obese rats do exhibit normal entrainment and pacemaker functions in the circadian timing system. The results suggest a deficit in the process that generates the amplitude of the circadian rhythm.

  7. Circadian rhythms of temperature and activity in obese and lean Zucker rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Fuller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The circadian timing system is important in the regulation of feeding and metabolism, both of which are aberrant in the obese Zucker rat. This study tested the hypothesis that these abnormalities involve a deficit in circadian regulation by examining the circadian rhythms of body temperature and activity in lean and obese Zucker rats exposed to normal light-dark cycles, constant light, and constant dark. Significant deficits in both daily mean and circadian amplitude of temperature and activity were found in obese Zucker female rats relative to lean controls in all lighting conditions. However, the circadian period of obese Zucker rats did not exhibit differences relative to lean controls in either of the constant lighting conditions. These results indicate that although the circadian regulation of temperature and activity in obese Zucker female rats is in fact depressed, obese rats do exhibit normal entrainment and pacemaker functions in the circadian timing system. The results suggest a deficit in the process that generates the amplitude of the circadian rhythm.

  8. [Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (circadian rhythm sleep disorder)].

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Hirokuni; Murayama, Norio; Fukase, Yuko

    2015-06-01

    The role of the circadian system is forecasting the daily and yearly change of environment. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (CRSWD) is defined as physical and social impairment caused by misalignment between circadian rhythm and desirable social schedule. CRSWDs are induced by medical or environmental factors as well as dysfunctions of circadian system. Clinicians should be aware that sleep-inducing medications, restless legs syndrome, delirium and less obedience to social schedule are frequent cause of CRSWD among elderly. Bright light therapy and orally administered small dose of melatonin or melatonin agonist at proper circadian phase are recommended treatments. Sleep-inducing medications should not be considered as CRSWD treatments, especially to elderly.

  9. Uncoupling proteins of invertebrates: A review.

    PubMed

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Barylski, Jakub; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-09-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) mediate inducible proton conductance in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Herein, we summarize our knowledge regarding UCPs in invertebrates. Since 2001, the presence of UCPs has been demonstrated in nematodes, mollusks, amphioxi, and insects. We discuss the following important issues concerning invertebrate UCPs: their evolutionary relationships, molecular and functional properties, and physiological impact. Evolutionary analysis indicates that the branch of vertebrate and invertebrate UCP4-5 diverged early in the evolutionary process prior to the divergence of the animal groups. Several proposed physiological roles of invertebrate UCPs are energy control, metabolic balance, and preventive action against oxidative stress. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(9):691-699, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Ageing, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Harper, M-E; Bevilacqua, L; Hagopian, K; Weindruch, R; Ramsey, J J

    2004-12-01

    Mitochondria are a cell's single greatest source of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are important for many life sustaining processes of cells and tissues, but they can also induce cell damage and death. If their production and levels within cells is not effectively controlled, then the detrimental effects of oxidative stress can accumulate. Oxidative stress is widely thought to underpin many ageing processes, and the oxidative stress theory of ageing is one of the most widely acknowledged theories of ageing. As well as being the major source of reactive oxygen species, mitochondria are also a major site of oxidative damage. The purpose of this review is a concise and current review of the effects of oxidative stress and ageing on mitochondrial function. Emphasis is placed upon the roles of mitochondrial proton leak, the uncoupling proteins, and the anti-ageing effects of caloric restriction.

  11. Seismic coupling and uncoupling at subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the correlations concerning the properties of subduction zones are reviewed. A quantitative global comparison of many subduction zones reveals that the largest earthquakes occur in zones with young lithosphere and fast convergence rates. Maximum earthquake size is directly related to the asperity distribution on the fault plane. This observation can be translated into a simple model of seismic coupling where the horizontal compressive stress between two plates is proportional to the ratio of the summed asperity area to the total area of the contact surface. Plate age and rate can control asperity distribution directly through the horizontal compressive stress associated with the vertical and horizontal velocities of subducting slabs. The basalt to eclogite phase change in the down-going oceanic crust may be largely responsible for the uncoupling of subduction zones below a depth of about 40 km.

  12. Bone Morphogenic Protein 4 Mediates NOX1-Dependent eNOS Uncoupling, Endothelial Dysfunction, and COX2 Induction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Youn, Ji-Youn; Zhou, Jun; Cai, Hua

    2015-08-01

    We have recently shown that angiotensin II-mediated uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) contributes to endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, it has remained unclear whether and how eNOS uncoupling occurs in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the consequences of such in regulating vascular function. Here we investigated a role of bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-4 in mediating eNOS uncoupling, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation in db/db mice. Circulating levels of BMP4 were markedly elevated in db/db mice but not in mice with type 1 diabetes mellitus, in which angiotensin II levels were significantly increased. Infusion of BMP4 antagonist noggin into db/db mice (15 μg/kg/day, 4 weeks) abolished eNOS uncoupling activity while restoring tetrahydrobiopterin (H(4)B) bioavailability. The impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in db/db aortas was significantly improved by noggin infusion. Exposure of aortic endothelial cells to BMP4 (50 ng/mL, 24 hours) resulted in eNOS uncoupling, which was attenuated by H(4)B precursor sepiapterin or small interfering RNA silencing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase isoform 1 (NOX1). Interestingly, BMP4-dependent NOX1 up-regulation was abrogated by sepiapterin, implicating a NOX1-uncoupled eNOS-NOX1 feed-forward loop. BMP4 induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression and vascular cell adhesion protein 1 was found in db/db mice. Consistently, COX2 was up-regulated by BMP4 in endothelial cells, which was attenuated by sepiapterin, implicating an upstream role of eNOS uncoupling in COX2-mediated inflammatory activation. Taken together, our data for the first time reveal a novel role of BMP4 in inducing NOX1-dependent eNOS uncoupling in T2DM, which may promote development of novel therapeutics restoring endothelial function in T2DM.

  13. Pig has no uncoupling protein 1.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lianjie; Shi, Jia; Cao, Lingbo; Xu, Guli; Hu, Chingyuan; Wang, Chong

    2017-06-10

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is critical for mammal's survival in the cold environment. Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is responsible for the non-shivering thermogenesis in the BAT. Pig is important economically as a meat-producing livestock. However, whether BAT or more precisely UCP1 protein exists in pig remains a controversy. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether pig has UCP1 protein. In this study, we used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique to obtain the UCP1 mRNA 3' end sequence, confirmed only exons 1 and 2 of the UCP1 gene are transcribed in the pig. Then we cloned the pig UCP1 gene exons 1 and 2, and expressed the UCP1 protein from the truncated pig gene using E. coli BL21. We used the expressed pig UCP1 protein as antigen for antibody production in a rabbit. We could not detect any UCP1 protein expression in different pig adipose tissues by the specific pig UCP1 antibody, while our antibody can detect the cloned pig UCP1 as well as the mice adipose UCP1 protein. This result shows although exons 1 and 2 of the pig UCP1 gene were transcribed but not translated in the pig adipose tissue. Furthermore, we detected no uncoupled respiration in the isolated pig adipocytes. Thus, these results unequivocally demonstrate that pig has no UCP1 protein. Our results have resolved the controversy of whether pigs have the brown adipose tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostas...

  15. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  16. Circadian systems biology in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-11-01

    Systems biology, which can be defined as integrative biology, comprises multistage processes that can be used to understand components of complex biological systems of living organisms and provides hierarchical information to decoding life. Using systems biology approaches such as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, it is now possible to delineate more complicated interactions between circadian control systems and diseases. The circadian rhythm is a multiscale phenomenon existing within the body that influences numerous physiological activities such as changes in gene expression, protein turnover, metabolism and human behavior. In this review, we describe the relationships between the circadian control system and its related genes or proteins, and circadian rhythm disorders in systems biology studies. To maintain and modulate circadian oscillation, cells possess elaborative feedback loops composed of circadian core proteins that regulate the expression of other genes through their transcriptional activities. The disruption of these rhythms has been reported to be associated with diseases such as arrhythmia, obesity, insulin resistance, carcinogenesis and disruptions in natural oscillations in the control of cell growth. This review demonstrates that lifestyle is considered as a fundamental factor that modifies circadian rhythm, and the development of dysfunctions and diseases could be regulated by an underlying expression network with multiple circadian-associated signals.

  17. Misaligned feeding impairs memories

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Dawn H; Jami, Shekib A; Flores, Richard E; Truong, Danny; Ghiani, Cristina A; O’Dell, Thomas J; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    Robust sleep/wake rhythms are important for health and cognitive function. Unfortunately, many people are living in an environment where their circadian system is challenged by inappropriate meal- or work-times. Here we scheduled food access to the sleep time and examined the impact on learning and memory in mice. Under these conditions, we demonstrate that the molecular clock in the master pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is unaltered while the molecular clock in the hippocampus is synchronized by the timing of food availability. This chronic circadian misalignment causes reduced hippocampal long term potentiation and total CREB expression. Importantly this mis-timed feeding resulted in dramatic deficits in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. Our findings suggest that the timing of meals have far-reaching effects on hippocampal physiology and learned behaviour. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09460.001 PMID:26652002

  18. Circadian temperature variation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to summarize current knowledge concerning the daily body temperature rhythm and its age-dependent alterations. Homeostatic and circadian control mechanisms are considered. Special attention is paid to the circadian system, as the mechanisms of autonomic control are the topic of another contribution to this special issue. Also, the interactions of the core body temperature rhythm with other circadian functions are discussed in detail as they constitute an essential part of the internal temporal order of living systems and thus guarantee their optimal functioning. In the second part of the paper, age-dependent changes in the circadian body temperature rhythm and their putative causes, considering circadian and homeostatic components, are described. Consequences for health and fitness and some possibilities to prevent adverse effect are mentioned in the final section.

  19. Melatonin, Circadian Rhythms, and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Irina V.; Tucci, Valter

    2003-05-01

    Experimental data show a close relationship among melatonin, circadian rhythms, and sleep. Low-dose melatonin treatment, increasing circulating melatonin levels to those normally observed at night, promotes sleep onset and sleep maintenance without changing sleep architecture. Melatonin treatment can also advance or delay the phase of the circadian clock if administered in the evening or in the morning, respectively. If used in physiologic doses and at appropriate times, melatonin can be helpful for those suffering from insomnia or circadian rhythm disorders. This may be especially beneficial for individuals with low melatonin production, which is established by measuring individual blood or saliva melatonin levels. However, high melatonin doses (over 0.3 mg) may cause side effects and disrupt the delicate mechanism of the circadian system, dissociating mutually dependent circadian body rhythms. A misleading labeling of the hormone melatonin as a "food supplement" and lack of quality control over melatonin preparations on the market continue to be of serious concern.

  20. Photoaffinity labeling of uncoupler binding sites on mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Kurup, C K; Sanadi, D R

    1977-02-01

    3H 2-azido-4-nitrophenol, a photoactive uncoupler, has been synthesized, and its uncoupling action on oxidative phosphorylation and its binding to the mitochondrial membrane have been studied. The uncoupler bound covalently to the mitochondrial membrane on photoirradiation was 3-4 times that bound reversibly in the absence of light. When irradiation was carried out in the presence of serum albumin, covalent binding was significantly depressed. The pattern of loss of ATP-Pi exchange activity with increasing amounts of the uncoupler suggests that serum albumin prevents the binding of the uncoupler to the functional sites as well. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photoaffinity labeled submitochondrial particles in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed that a 9000 dalton peptide bound high levels of uncoupler. Other proteins in the molecular weight range of 20,000-40,000 and 55,000 were also labeled. Photolysis in the presence of serum albumin or ATP decreased the covalent binding of the uncoupler to all the proteins, but particularly to the 20,000 dalton component. Soluble ATPase and the mitochondrial proteolipid purified from labeled mitochondria showed the presence of label.

  1. Circadian rhythms and cognition.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Like all circadian (near-24-h) rhythms, those of cognition have endogenous and exogenous components. The origins of these components, together with effects of time awake upon cognitive performance, are described in subjects living conventionally (sleeping at night and active during the daytime). Based on these considerations, predictions can be made about changes that might be expected in the days after a time-zone transition and during night work. The relevant literature on these circumstances is then reviewed. The last section of the chapter deals with sleep-wake schedules where both regular and irregular sleeps are taken (anchor sleep). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Time-restricted feeding of a high-fat diet reduces adiposity and inflammatory cytokine production in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Disruption of the circadian rhythms contributes to obesity. Restricting feeding to particular times of the day may reset the circadian rhythms and reduce obesity and resulting complications. The present study investigated the effects of time-restricted feeding (TRF) of a high-fat diet on adiposity...

  3. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harfmann, Brianna D; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Esser, Karyn A

    2015-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle.

  4. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Harfmann, Brianna D.; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle. PMID:25512305

  5. Circadian rhythms and molecular noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, Didier; Goldbeter, Albert

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms, characterized by a period of about 24h, are the most widespread biological rhythms generated autonomously at the molecular level. The core molecular mechanism responsible for circadian oscillations relies on the negative regulation exerted by a protein on the expression of its own gene. Deterministic models account for the occurrence of autonomous circadian oscillations, for their entrainment by light-dark cycles, and for their phase shifting by light pulses. Stochastic versions of these models take into consideration the molecular fluctuations that arise when the number of molecules involved in the regulatory mechanism is low. Numerical simulations of the stochastic models show that robust circadian oscillations can already occur with a limited number of mRNA and protein molecules, in the range of a few tens and hundreds, respectively. Various factors affect the robustness of circadian oscillations with respect to molecular noise. Besides an increase in the number of molecules, entrainment by light-dark cycles, and cooperativity in repression enhance robustness, whereas the proximity of a bifurcation point leads to less robust oscillations. Another parameter that appears to be crucial for the coherence of circadian rhythms is the binding/unbinding rate of the inhibitory protein to the promoter of the clock gene. Intercellular coupling further increases the robustness of circadian oscillations.

  6. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Katchy, Chinenye A.; Fu, Loning

    2014-01-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  7. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Ablates Gastric Vagal Afferent Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Vincent, Andrew D; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2016-03-16

    Rats with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity increase daytime eating, suggesting an alteration in circadian food intake mechanisms. Gastric vagal afferents (GVAs) respond to mechanical stimuli to initiate satiety. These signals are dampened in HFD mice and exhibit circadian variations inversely with food intake in lean mice. Furthermore, leptin shows circadian variation in its circulating level and is able to modulate GVA mechanosensitivity. However, whether leptin's ability to modulate GVAs occurs in a circadian manner is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether changes in the circadian intake of food in HFD-induced obesity is associated with a disruption in GVA circadian rhythms. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or a HFD for 12 weeks. A subgroup of SLD and HFD mice were housed in metabolic cages. After 12 weeks, ex vivo GVA recordings were taken at 3 h intervals starting at zeitgeber time 0 (ZT0) and stomach content was measured. After 12 weeks, HFD mice consumed more food during the light phase through larger and more frequent meals compared with SLD mice. SLD mice exhibited circadian fluctuation in stomach content, which peaked at ZT18 and reached a nadir at ZT9. At these time points, both tension and mucosal receptor mechanosensitivity were the lowest and highest, respectively. HFD mice exhibited little circadian variation in stomach content or GVA mechanosensitivity. Leptin potentiated mucosal receptor mechanosensitivity only in SLD mice and with reduced potency during the dark phase. In conclusion, loss of circadian variation in GVA signaling may underpin changes in eating behavior in HFD-induced obesity. Appropriate circadian control of food intake is vital for maintaining metabolic health. Diet-induced obesity is associated with strong circadian changes in food intake, but the contributing mechanisms have yet to be determined. Vagal afferents are involved in regulation of feeding behavior, particularly meal

  8. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems.

  9. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  10. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Tae; Kim, Kyung Do

    2016-01-01

    Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology. PMID:27195315

  11. Food Anticipatory Activity Behavior of Mice across a Wide Range of Circadian and Non-Circadian Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Luby, Matthew D.; Hsu, Cynthia T.; Shuster, Scott A.; Gallardo, Christian M.; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; King, Oliver D.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    When rodents are fed in a limited amount during the daytime, they rapidly redistribute some of their nocturnal activity to the time preceding the delivery of food. In rats, anticipation of a daily meal has been interpreted as a circadian rhythm controlled by a food-entrained oscillator (FEO) with circadian limits to entrainment. Lesion experiments place this FEO outside of the light-entrainable circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Mice also anticipate a fixed daily meal, but circadian limits to entrainment and anticipation of more than 2 daily meals, have not been assessed. We used a video-based behavior recognition system to quantify food anticipatory activity in mice receiving 2, 3, or 6 daily meals at intervals of 12, 8, or 4-hours (h). Individual mice were able to anticipate as many as 4 of 6 daily meals, and anticipation persisted during meal omission tests. On the 6 meal schedule, pre-prandial activity and body temperature were poorly correlated, suggesting independent regulation. Mice showed a limited ability to anticipate an 18 h feeding schedule. Finally, mice showed concurrent circadian and sub-hourly anticipation when provided with 6 small meals, at 30 minute intervals, at a fixed time of day. These results indicate that mice can anticipate feeding opportunities at a fixed time of day across a wide range of intervals not previously associated with anticipatory behavior in studies of rats. The methods described here can be exploited to determine the extent to which timing of different intervals in mice relies on common or distinct neural and molecular mechanisms. PMID:22662260

  12. Molecular studies of the uncoupling protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ricquier, D.; Casteilla, L.; Bouillaud, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The uncoupling protein (UCP) is a proton/anion transporter found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of brown adipocyte. Although UCP has nor been detected in mitochondria from any other tissue, it shares structural and catalytic properties with several other mitochondrial carrier proteins. Although UCP was discovered only recently it is one of the most extensively studied mitochondrial carrier proteins.More recently, the mouse, rat, and human genes encoding for UCP have been isolated and sequenced. The availability of these various tools has led to several significant observations. UCP gene expression is strongly controlled at the level of transcription by signals that are activated after the stimulation of brown adipocytes by norepinephrine. The comparison of UCP gene with the genes encoding the adenine nucleotide translocator revealed the existence of structural and evolutionary homologies. Moreover, in humans the UCP gene and one form of adenine nucleotide translocator gene are located on the same chromosome. Recently, the expression of functional UCp in various heterologous systems was achieved (Xenopus oocytes, CHO cells, yeasts). These data will facilitate studies of the structure/function relationship in UCP (identification of residues involved in H{sup +} transport, Cl{sup {minus}} transport, nucleotide binding, mitochondrial targeting). Another aspect of the present research on UCP is the understanding of mechanisms that control UCP gene and the differentiated commitment of adipose precursor cells to thermogenic brown adipocytes.

  13. Rapid turnover of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3

    PubMed Central

    Azzu, Vian; Mookerjee, Shona A.; Brand, Martin D.

    2013-01-01

    UCP3 (uncoupling protein 3) and its homologues UCP2 and UCP1 are regulators of mitochondrial function. UCP2 is known to have a short half-life of approx. 1 h, owing to its rapid degradation by the cytosolic 26S proteasome, whereas UCP1 is turned over much more slowly by mitochondrial autophagy. In the present study we investigate whether UCP3 also has a short half-life, and whether the proteasome is involved inUCP3 degradation. UCP3 half-life was examined in the mouse C2C12 myoblast cell line by inhibiting protein synthesis with cycloheximide and monitoring UCP3 protein levels by immunoblot analysis. We show that UCP3 has a short half-life of 0.5–4 h. Rapid degradation was prevented by a cocktail of proteasome inhibitors, supporting a proteasomal mechanism for turnover. In addition, this phenotype is recapitulated in vitro: UCP3 was degraded in mitochondria isolated from rat skeletal muscle or brown adipose tissue with a half-life of 0.5–4 h, but only in the presence of a purified 26S proteasomal fraction. This in vitro proteolysis was also sensitive to proteasome inhibition. This phenotype is in direct contrast with the related proteins UCP1 and the adenine nucleotide translocase, which have long half-lives. Therefore UCP3 is turned over rapidly in multiple cell types in a proteasome-dependent manner. PMID:19954423

  14. Airway-parenchyma uncoupling in nocturnal asthma.

    PubMed

    Irvin, C G; Pak, J; Martin, R J

    2000-01-01

    Airway flow resistance is well known to be dependent upon lung volume. The rise in lung volume that occurs in asthma is therefore thought to be an important mechanism that defends airway patency. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the interdependence or mechanical coupling between airways and lung parenchyma during the inflammatory processes that occur in the patient with nocturnal asthma. Five patients with documented nocturnal asthma were studied in both a vertical and a horizontal body plethysmograph. Lung volume was altered with continuous negative pressure as applied to the chest wall with a poncho cuirass in different postures and during sleep. We found during the awake phase that an increase in lung volume decreased lower pulmonary resistance (Rlp); however, within 30 min of sleep onset, functional residual capacity (FRC) fell and Rlp rose more than would be expected for the fall in FRC. Restoring FRC to presleep values either at an early (half-hour) or a late (3-h) time point did not cause Rlp to significantly fall. A second phase of the study showed that the loss of Rlp dependence on lung volume was not due to the assumption of the supine posture. Indirect measurements of lung compliance were consistent with a stiffening of the lung. We conclude that with sleep there is an immediate uncoupling of the parenchyma to the airway, resulting in a loss of interdependence that persists throughout sleep and may contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with nocturnal asthma.

  15. Inhibition of photosynthetic oxygen evolution by protonophoric uncouplers.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, V D; Renger, G; Paschenko, V Z; Oleskin, A V; Gusev, M V; Gubanova, O N; Vasil'ev, S S; Barsky, E L

    1995-01-01

    The protonophoric uncouplers carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 2,3,4,5,6-pentachlorophenol (PCP) and 4,5,6,7-tetrachloro-2-trifluoromethylbenzimidazole (TTFB) inhibited the Hill reaction with K3[Fe(CN)6] (but not with SiMo) in chloroplast and cyanobacterial membranes (the I50 values were approx. 1-2, 4-6 and 0.04-0.10 μM, respectively). The inhibition is due to oxidation of the uncouplers on the Photosystem II donor side (ADRY effect) and their subsequent reduction on the acceptor side, ie. to the formation of a cyclic electron transfer chain around Photosystem II involving the uncouplers as redox carriers. The relative amplitude of nanosecond chlorophyll fluorescence in chloroplasts was increased by DCMU or HQNO and did not change upon addition of uncouplers, DBMIB or DNP-INT; the HQNO effect was not removed by the uncouplers. The uncouplers did not inhibit the electron transfer from reduced TMPD or duroquinol to methylviologen which is driven by Photosystem I. These data show that CCCP, PCP and TTFB oxidized on the Photosystem II donor side are reduced by the membrane pool of plastoquinone (Qp) which is also the electron donor for K3 [Fe(CN)6] in the Hill reaction as deduced from the data obtained in the presence of inhibitors. Inhibition of the Hill reaction by the uncouplers was maximum at the pH values corresponding to the pK of these compounds. It is suggested that the tested uncouplers serve as proton donors, and not merely as electron donors on the oxidizing side of Photosystem II.

  16. Effects of exercise on circadian rhythms and mobility in aging Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Kuntol; Wambua, Rebecca; Giebultowicz, Tomasz M; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2013-11-01

    Daily life functions such as sleep and feeding oscillate with circa 24 h period due to endogenous circadian rhythms generated by circadian clocks. Genetic or environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is associated with various aging-related phenotypes. Circadian rhythms decay during normal aging, and there is a need to explore strategies that could avert age-related changes in the circadian system. Exercise was reported to delay aging in mammals. Here, we investigated whether daily exercise via stimulation of upward climbing movement could improve circadian rest/activity rhythms in aging Drosophila melanogaster. We found that repeated exercise regimen did not strengthen circadian locomotor activity rhythms in aging flies and had no effect on their lifespan. We also tested the effects of exercise on mobility and determined that regular exercise lowered age-specific climbing ability in both wild type and clock mutant flies. Interestingly, the climbing ability was most significantly reduced in flies carrying a null mutation in the core clock gene period, while rescue of this gene significantly improved climbing to wild type levels. Our work highlights the importance of period in sustaining endurance in aging flies exposed to physical challenge.

  17. Circadian Forced Desynchrony of the Master Clock Leads to Phenotypic Manifestation of Depression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Carl

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, a master circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus maintains the phase coherence among a wide array of behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms. Affective disorders are typically associated with disruption of this fine-tuned “internal synchronization,” but whether this internal misalignment is part of the physiopathology of mood disorders is not clear. To date, depressive-like behavior in animal models has been induced by methods that fail to specifically target the SCN regulation of internal synchronization as the mode to generate depression. In the rat, exposure to a 22-h light-dark cycle (LD22) leads to the uncoupling of two distinct populations of neuronal oscillators within the SCN. This genetically, neurally, and pharmacologically intact animal model represents a unique opportunity to assess the effect of a systematic challenge to the central circadian pacemaker on phenotypic manifestations of mood disorders. We show that LD22 circadian forced desynchrony in rats induces depressive-like phenotypes including anhedonia, sexual dysfunction, and increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST), as well as changes in the levels and turnover rates of monoamines within the prefrontal cortex. Desynchronized rats show increased FST immobility during the dark (active) phase but decreased immobility during the light (rest) phase, suggesting a decrease in the amplitude of the normal daily oscillation in this behavioral manifestation of depression. Our results support the notion that the prolonged internal misalignment of circadian rhythms induced by environmental challenge to the central circadian pacemaker may constitute part of the etiology of depression. PMID:28090585

  18. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  19. Circadian preference in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Giglio, Larriany Maria Falsin; Magalhães, Pedro V S; Andersen, Mônica Levy; Walz, Julio Cesar; Jakobson, Lourenço; Kapczinski, Flávio

    2010-06-01

    A role for circadian rhythm abnormalities in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder (BD) has been suggested. The present study assessed circadian preference, a subjective preference for activities in the morning or evening related to chronotype. The sample was comprised of 81 outpatients with BD in remission and 79 control subjects. Circadian preference was derived from an interview evaluating biological rhythms and sleep pattern from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Patients were significantly more likely to have an evening preference than control subjects. Circadian preference was also associated with sleep latency. The association of evening preference and longer sleep latency may be related to the frequent clinical observation of a sleep/wake cycle reversal in bipolar disorder.

  20. The circadian clock goes genomic.

    PubMed

    Staiger, Dorothee; Shin, Jieun; Johansson, Mikael; Davis, Seth J

    2013-06-24

    Large-scale biology among plant species, as well as comparative genomics of circadian clock architecture and clock-regulated output processes, have greatly advanced our understanding of the endogenous timing system in plants.

  1. The Impact of Sleep and Circadian Disturbance on Hormones and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Won; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The levels of several hormones fluctuate according to the light and dark cycle and are also affected by sleep, feeding, and general behavior. The regulation and metabolism of several hormones are influenced by interactions between the effects of sleep and the intrinsic circadian system; growth hormone, melatonin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin levels are highly correlated with sleep and circadian rhythmicity. There are also endogenous circadian mechanisms that serve to regulate glucose metabolism and similar rhythms pertaining to lipid metabolism, regulated through the actions of various clock genes. Sleep disturbance, which negatively impacts hormonal rhythms and metabolism, is also associated with obesity, insulin insensitivity, diabetes, hormonal imbalance, and appetite dysregulation. Circadian disruption, typically induced by shift work, may negatively impact health due to impaired glucose and lipid homeostasis, reversed melatonin and cortisol rhythms, and loss of clock gene rhythmicity. PMID:25861266

  2. Circadian control of jasmonates and salicylates: the clock role in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Goodspeed, Danielle; Chehab, E Wassim; Covington, Michael F; Braam, Janet

    2013-02-01

    Plants have evolved robust mechanisms to perceive and respond to diverse environmental stimuli.  The plant phytohormones jasmonates and salicylates play key roles in activating biotic stress response pathways. Recent findings demonstrate that basal levels of both jasmonates and salicylates in Arabidopsis are under the control of the circadian clock and that clock-controlled jasmonate accumulation may underlie clock- and jasmonate-dependent enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper), a generalist herbivore. Here we summarize these findings and provide further evidence that a functional plant circadian clock is required for optimal herbivore defense in Arabidopsis.  When given a choice to feed on wild-type plants or arrhythmic transgenics, T. ni prefer plants lacking robust circadian rhythms. Altogether these data provide strong evidence for circadian clock enabling anticipation of herbivore attack and thus contributing to overall plant fitness.

  3. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Hepatic gene therapy rescues high-fat diet responses in circadian Clock mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Kovac, Judit; Kolbe, Isa; Ehrhardt, Lea; Leliavski, Alexei; Husse, Jana; Salinas, Gabriela; Lingner, Thomas; Tsang, Anthony H; Barclay, Johanna L; Oster, Henrik

    2017-06-01

    Circadian Clock gene mutant mice show dampened 24-h feeding rhythms and an increased sensitivity to high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. Restricting HFD access to the dark phase counteracts its obesogenic effect in wild-type mice. The extent to which altered feeding rhythms are causative for the obesogenic phenotype of Clock mutant mice, however, remains unknown. Metabolic parameters of wild-type (WT) and Clock(Δ19) mutant mice (MT) were investigated under ad libitum and nighttime restricted HFD feeding. Liver circadian clock function was partially rescued by hydrodynamic tail vein delivery of WT-Clock DNA vectors in mutant mice and transcriptional, metabolic, endocrine and behavioral rhythms studied. Nighttime-restricted feeding restored food intake, but not body weight regulation in MT mice under HFD, suggesting Clock-dependent metabolic dysregulation downstream of circadian appetite control. Liver-directed Clock gene therapy partially restored liver circadian oscillator function and transcriptome regulation without affecting centrally controlled circadian behaviors. Under HFD, MT mice with partially restored liver clock function (MT-LR) showed normalized body weight gain, rescued 24-h food intake rhythms, and WT-like energy expenditure. This was associated with decreased nighttime leptin and daytime ghrelin levels, reduced hepatic lipid accumulation, and improved glucose tolerance. Transcriptome analysis revealed that hepatic Clock rescue in MT mice affected a range of metabolic pathways. Liver Clock gene therapy improves resistance against HFD-induced metabolic impairments in mice with circadian clock disruption. Restoring or stabilizing liver clock function might be a promising target for therapeutic interventions in obesity and metabolic disorders.

  5. Aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graeber, R. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    Recent statistical and experimental studies on the role of circadian rhythms in aircrew fatigue and aviation accidents are reviewed from a human-factors perspective, and typical data are presented in extensive graphs. Consideration is given to the biological clock and the limits of endurance, circadian desynchronization, sleep and sleepiness, short-haul and long-haul operational studies, and the potential advantages of cockpit automation.

  6. Effect of hypergravity on the circadian rhythms of white rats.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafferty, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of artificial gravity on the circadian rhythm of white rats was observed by comparing feeding activity at 1.0 and 1.75 g. The feeding cycle data were obtained by observing the number of feeding switch responses, as well as the amount of food obtained, as a function of time. One of the three subjects clearly established a free-running cycle with a period of 24.742 hr. During a 40-day exposure to the 1.75 g environment, the subjects maintained the same feeding cycle period which was established at 1.0 g. While the results of this study indicate that the activity rhythms of rats are insensitive to gravity levels between 1.0 and 1.75 g, the effects of gravity levels below 1.0 g are yet to be determined.

  7. Effect of hypergravity on the circadian rhythms of white rats.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafferty, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of artificial gravity on the circadian rhythm of white rats was observed by comparing feeding activity at 1.0 and 1.75 g. The feeding cycle data were obtained by observing the number of feeding switch responses, as well as the amount of food obtained, as a function of time. One of the three subjects clearly established a free-running cycle with a period of 24.742 hr. During a 40-day exposure to the 1.75 g environment, the subjects maintained the same feeding cycle period which was established at 1.0 g. While the results of this study indicate that the activity rhythms of rats are insensitive to gravity levels between 1.0 and 1.75 g, the effects of gravity levels below 1.0 g are yet to be determined.

  8. The circadian visual system, 2005.

    PubMed

    Morin, L P; Allen, C N

    2006-06-01

    The primary mammalian circadian clock resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a recipient of dense retinohypothalamic innervation. In its most basic form, the circadian rhythm system is part of the greater visual system. A secondary component of the circadian visual system is the retinorecipient intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) which has connections to many parts of the brain, including efferents converging on targets of the SCN. The IGL also provides a major input to the SCN, with a third major SCN afferent projection arriving from the median raphe nucleus. The last decade has seen a blossoming of research into the anatomy and function of the visual, geniculohypothalamic and midbrain serotonergic systems modulating circadian rhythmicity in a variety of species. There has also been a substantial and simultaneous elaboration of knowledge about the intrinsic structure of the SCN. Many of the developments have been driven by molecular biological investigation of the circadian clock and the molecular tools are enabling novel understanding of regional function within the SCN. The present discussion is an extension of the material covered by the 1994 review, "The Circadian Visual System."

  9. Caffeine alters circadian rhythms and expression of disease and metabolic markers.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Hadas; Gutman, Roee; Chapnik, Nava; Meylan, Jenny; le Coutre, Johannes; Froy, Oren

    2011-05-01

    The circadian clock regulates many aspects of physiology, energy metabolism, and sleep. Restricted feeding (RF), a regimen that restricts the duration of food availability entrains the circadian clock. Caffeine has been shown to affect both metabolism and sleep. However, its effect on clock gene and clock-controlled gene expression has not been studied. Here, we tested the effect of caffeine on circadian rhythms and the expression of disease and metabolic markers in the serum, liver, and jejunum of mice supplemented with caffeine under ad libitum (AL) feeding or RF for 16 weeks. Caffeine significantly affected circadian oscillation and the daily levels of disease and metabolic markers. Under AL, caffeine reduced the average daily mRNA levels of certain disease and inflammatory markers, such as liver alpha fetoprotein (Afp), C-reactive protein (Crp), jejunum alanine aminotransferase (Alt), growth arrest and DNA damage 45β (Gadd45β), Interleukin 1α (Il-1α), Il-1β mRNA and serum plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). Under RF, caffeine reduced the average daily levels of Alt, Gadd45β, Il-1α and Il-1β mRNA in the jejunum, but not in the liver. In addition, caffeine supplementation led to decreased expression of catabolic factors under RF. In conclusion, caffeine affects circadian gene expression and metabolism possibly leading to beneficial effects mainly under AL feeding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Phyllis C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiological homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ–system and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults exhibit circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also impact their progression. Emerging evidence suggest that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurological disorders. In this review, we discuss the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26568123

  11. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health.

    PubMed

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiologic homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ-system, and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults shows circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system, is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also affect their progression. Emerging evidence suggests that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurologic disorders. This article discusses the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Uncoupled thermoelasticity solutions applied on beam dumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzia, A.; Antonakakis, T.

    2016-06-01

    In particle accelerators the process of beam absorption is vital. At CERN particle beams are accelerated at energies of the order of TeV. In the event of a system failure or following collisions, the beam needs to be safely absorbed by dedicated protecting blocks. The thermal shock caused by the rapid energy deposition within the absorbing block causes thermal stresses that may rise above critical levels. The present paper provides a convenient expression of such stresses under hypotheses described hereafter. The temperature field caused by the beam energy deposition is assumed to be Gaussian. Such a field models a non-diffusive heat deposition. These effects are described as thermoelastic as long as the stresses remain below the proportional limit and can be analytically modeled by the coupled equations of thermoelasticity. The analytical solution to the uncoupled thermoelastic problem in an infinite domain is presented herein and matched with a finite unit radius sphere. The assumption of zero diffusion as well as the validity of the match with a finite geometry is quantified such that the obtained solutions can be rigorously applied to real problems. Furthermore, truncated series solutions, which are not novel, are used for comparison purposes. All quantities are nondimensional and the problem reduces to a dependence of five dimensionless parameters. The equations of elasticity are presented in the potential formulation where the shear potential is assumed to be nil due to the source being a gradient and the absence of boundaries. Nevertheless equivalent three-dimensional stresses are computed using the compressive potential and optimized using standard analytical optimization methods. An alternative algorithm for finding the critical points of the three-dimensional stress function is presented. Finally, a case study concerning the proton synchrotron booster dump is presented where the aforementioned analytical solutions are used and the preceding assumptions

  13. Uncoupling protein-1 is not leaky.

    PubMed

    Shabalina, Irina G; Ost, Mario; Petrovic, Natasa; Vrbacky, Marek; Nedergaard, Jan; Cannon, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The activity of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) is rate-limiting for nonshivering thermogenesis and diet-induced thermogenesis. Characteristically, this activity is inhibited by GDP experimentally and presumably mainly by cytosolic ATP within brown-fat cells. The issue as to whether UCP1 has a residual proton conductance even when fully saturated with GDP/ATP (as has recently been suggested) has not only scientific but also applied interest, since a residual proton conductance would make overexpressed UCP1 weight-reducing even without physiological/pharmacological activation. To examine this question, we have here established optimal conditions for studying the bioenergetics of wild-type and UCP1-/- brown-fat mitochondria, analysing UCP1-mediated differences in parallel preparations of brown-fat mitochondria from both genotypes. Comparing different substrates, we find that pyruvate (or palmitoyl-L-carnitine) shows the largest relative coupling by GDP. Comparing albumin concentrations, we find the range 0.1-0.6% optimal; higher concentrations are inhibitory. Comparing basic medium composition, we find 125 mM sucrose optimal; an ionic medium (50-100 mM KCl) functions for wild-type but is detrimental for UCP1-/- mitochondria. Using optimal conditions, we find no evidence for a residual proton conductance (not a higher post-GDP respiration, a lower membrane potential or an altered proton leak at highest common potential) with either pyruvate or glycerol-3-phosphate as substrates, nor by a 3-4-fold alteration of the amount of UCP1. We could demonstrate that certain experimental conditions, due to respiratoty inhibition, could lead to the suggestion that UCP1 possesses a residual proton conductance but find that under optimal conditions our experiments concur with implications from physiological observations that in the presence of inhibitory nucleotides, UCP1 is not leaky.

  14. Circadian Rhythm Neuropeptides in Drosophila: Signals for Normal Circadian Function and Circadian Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiankun; Wu, Binbin; Price, Jeffrey L.; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many organisms ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. During more than four decades, the intrinsic and exogenous regulations of circadian rhythm have been studied. This review summarizes the core endogenous oscillation in Drosophila and then focuses on the neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and hormones that mediate its outputs and integration in Drosophila and the links between several of these (pigment dispersing factor (PDF) and insulin-like peptides) and neurodegenerative disease. These signaling molecules convey important network connectivity and signaling information for normal circadian function, but PDF and insulin-like peptides can also convey signals that lead to apoptosis, enhanced neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in flies carrying circadian mutations or in a senescent state. PMID:28430154

  15. Circadian Rhythm Neuropeptides in Drosophila: Signals for Normal Circadian Function and Circadian Neurodegenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    He, Qiankun; Wu, Binbin; Price, Jeffrey L; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2017-04-21

    Circadian rhythm is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many organisms ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. During more than four decades, the intrinsic and exogenous regulations of circadian rhythm have been studied. This review summarizes the core endogenous oscillation in Drosophila and then focuses on the neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and hormones that mediate its outputs and integration in Drosophila and the links between several of these (pigment dispersing factor (PDF) and insulin-like peptides) and neurodegenerative disease. These signaling molecules convey important network connectivity and signaling information for normal circadian function, but PDF and insulin-like peptides can also convey signals that lead to apoptosis, enhanced neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in flies carrying circadian mutations or in a senescent state.

  16. Dim light at night disrupts molecular circadian rhythms and increases body weight.

    PubMed

    Fonken, Laura K; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Meléndez-Fernández, O Hecmarie; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-08-01

    With the exception of high latitudes, life has evolved under bright days and dark nights. Most organisms have developed endogenously driven circadian rhythms that are synchronized to this daily light/dark cycle. In recent years, humans have shifted away from the naturally occurring solar light cycle in favor of artificial and sometimes irregular light schedules produced by electric lighting. Exposure to unnatural light cycles is increasingly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, the means by which environmental lighting alters metabolism are poorly understood. Thus, we exposed mice to dim light at night and investigated changes in the circadian system and metabolism. Here we report that exposure to ecologically relevant levels of dim (5 lux) light at night altered core circadian clock rhythms in the hypothalamus at both the gene and protein level. Circadian rhythms in clock expression persisted during light at night; however, the amplitude of Per1 and Per2 rhythms was attenuated in the hypothalamus. Circadian oscillations were also altered in peripheral tissues critical for metabolic regulation. Exposure to dimly illuminated, as compared to dark, nights decreased the rhythmic expression in all but one of the core circadian clock genes assessed in the liver. Additionally, mice exposed to dim light at night attenuated Rev-Erb expression in the liver and adipose tissue. Changes in the circadian clock were associated with temporal alterations in feeding behavior and increased weight gain. These results are significant because they provide evidence that mild changes in environmental lighting can alter circadian and metabolic function. Detailed analysis of temporal changes induced by nighttime light exposure may provide insight into the onset and progression of obesity and metabolic syndrome, as well as other disorders involving sleep and circadian rhythm disruption.

  17. The Role of Circadian Rhythms in Muscular and Osseous Physiology and Their Regulation by Nutrition and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shinya; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock regulates the day and night cycles of various physiological functions. The circadian clock system consists of a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks in peripheral tissues. According to the results of circadian transcriptomic studies in several tissues, the majority of rhythmic genes are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and are influenced by tissue-specific circadian rhythms. Here we review the diurnal variations of musculoskeletal functions and discuss the impact of the circadian clock on homeostasis in skeletal muscle and bone. Peripheral clocks are controlled by not only photic stimulation from the central clock in the SCN but also by external cues, such as feeding and exercise. In this review, we discuss the effects of feeding and exercise on the circadian clock and diurnal variation of musculoskeletal functions. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of chrono-nutrition and chrono-exercise on circadian disturbances and the failure of homeostasis in skeletal muscle and bone.

  18. The Role of Circadian Rhythms in Muscular and Osseous Physiology and Their Regulation by Nutrition and Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Shinya; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock regulates the day and night cycles of various physiological functions. The circadian clock system consists of a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks in peripheral tissues. According to the results of circadian transcriptomic studies in several tissues, the majority of rhythmic genes are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and are influenced by tissue-specific circadian rhythms. Here we review the diurnal variations of musculoskeletal functions and discuss the impact of the circadian clock on homeostasis in skeletal muscle and bone. Peripheral clocks are controlled by not only photic stimulation from the central clock in the SCN but also by external cues, such as feeding and exercise. In this review, we discuss the effects of feeding and exercise on the circadian clock and diurnal variation of musculoskeletal functions. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of chrono-nutrition and chrono-exercise on circadian disturbances and the failure of homeostasis in skeletal muscle and bone. PMID:28261043

  19. Circadian molecular clocks and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; Rao, Aparna; Maguire, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and hormone secretion are controlled by a circadian rhythm adapted to 24h day-night periodicity. This circadian synchronisation is in part controlled by ambient light decreasing melatonin secretion by the pineal gland and co-ordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Peripheral cell autonomous circadian clocks controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master regulator, exist within every cell of the body and are comprised of at least twelve genes. These include the basic helix-loop-helix/PAS domain containing transcription factors; Clock, BMal1 and Npas2 which activate transcription of the periodic genes (Per1 and Per2) and cryptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2). Points of coupling exist between the cellular clock and the cell cycle. Cell cycle genes which are affected by the molecular circadian clock include c-Myc, Wee1, cyclin D and p21. Therefore the rhythm of the circadian clock and cancer are interlinked. Molecular examples exist including activation of Per2 leads to c-myc overexpression and an increased tumor incidence. Mice with mutations in Cryptochrome 1 and 2 are arrhythmic (lack a circadian rhythm) and arrhythmic mice have a faster rate of growth of implanted tumors. Epidemiological finding of relevance include 'The Nurses' Health Study' where it was established that women working rotational night shifts have an increased incidence of breast cancer. Compounds that affect circadian rhythm exist with attendant future therapeutic possibilities. These include casein kinase I inhibitors and a candidate small molecule KL001 that affects the degradation of cryptochrome. Theoretically the cell cycle and malignant disease may be targeted vicariously by selective alteration of the cellular molecular clock.

  20. Circadian Rhythm Dysregulation in Bipolar Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Alloy, Lauren B; Ng, Tommy H; Titone, Madison K; Boland, Elaine M

    2017-04-01

    We review recent evidence for circadian rhythm dysregulation in bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs). We examine evidence for endogenous abnormalities in the biological clock and disruptions in the external entrainment of circadian rhythms in BSDs. We also address whether circadian dysregulation provides vulnerability to onset of BSD and evidence for a new integration of reward and circadian dysregulation in BSD. Relative circadian phase delay (e.g., later melatonin peak, evening chronotype) is associated with BSD, particularly in the depressive phase. More consistent evidence supports irregularity of social rhythms, sleep/wake and activity patterns, and disruptions of social rhythms by life events, as stable trait markers of BSD and potential vulnerabilities for BSD onset. Growing research supports an integrative reward/circadian model. Both endogenous abnormalities in the biological clock pacemaking function and disruptions in the external entrainment of circadian rhythms by physical and social cues are involved in BSDs. Circadian dysregulation may provide vulnerability to BSD onset.

  1. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock mechanism found in most, if not all, cell types including skeletal muscle. The mammalian molecular clock is a complex of multiple oscillating networks that are regulated through transcriptional mechanisms, timed protein turnover, and input from small molecules. At this time, very little is known about circadian aspects of skeletal muscle function/metabolism but some progress has been made on understanding the molecular clock in skeletal muscle. The goal of this chapter is to provide the basic terminology and concepts of circadian rhythms with a more detailed review of the current state of knowledge of the molecular clock, with reference to what is known in skeletal muscle. Research has demonstrated that the molecular clock is active in skeletal muscles and that the muscle-specific transcription factor, MyoD, is a direct target of the molecular clock. Skeletal muscle of clock-compromised mice, Bmal1−/− and ClockΔ19 mice, are weak and exhibit significant disruptions in expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. We suggest that the interaction between the molecular clock, MyoD, and metabolic factors, such as PGC-1, provide a potential system of feedback loops that may be critical for both maintenance and adaptation of skeletal muscle. PMID:21621073

  2. Triclosan is a mitochondrial uncoupler in live zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shim, Juyoung; Weatherly, Lisa M; Luc, Richard H; Dorman, Maxwell T; Neilson, Andy; Ng, Ryan; Kim, Carol H; Millard, Paul J; Gosse, Julie A

    2016-12-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a synthetic antimicrobial agent used in many consumer goods at millimolar concentrations. As a result of exposure, TCS has been detected widely in humans. We have recently discovered that TCS is a proton ionophore mitochondrial uncoupler in multiple types of living cells. Here, we present novel data indicating that TCS is also a mitochondrial uncoupler in a living organism: 24-hour post-fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos. These experiments were conducted using a Seahorse Bioscience XF(e) 96 Extracellular Flux Analyzer modified for bidirectional temperature control, using the XF96 spheroid plate to position and measure one zebrafish embryo per well. Using this method, after acute exposure to TCS, the basal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) increases, without a decrease in survival or heartbeat rate. TCS also decreases ATP-linked respiration and spare respiratory capacity and increases proton leak: all indicators of mitochondrial uncoupling. Our data indicate, that TCS is a mitochondrial uncoupler in vivo, which should be taken into consideration when assessing the toxicity and/or pharmaceutical uses of TCS. This is the first example of usage of a Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer to measure bioenergetic flux of a single zebrafish embryo per well in a 96-well assay format. The method developed in this study provides a high-throughput tool to identify previously unknown mitochondrial uncouplers in a living organism. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. eNOS-uncoupling in age-related erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, JM; Bivalacqua, TJ; Lagoda, GA; Burnett, AL; Musicki, B

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with ED. Although age-related ED is attributed largely to increased oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the penis, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not fully defined. We evaluated whether endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling in the aged rat penis is a contributing mechanism. Correlatively, we evaluated the effect of replacement with eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on erectile function in the aged rats. Male Fischer 344 ‘young’ (4-month-old) and ‘aged’ (19-month-old) rats were treated with a BH4 precursor sepiapterin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle for 4 days. After 1-day washout, erectile function was assessed in response to electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Endothelial dysfunction (eNOS uncoupling) and oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) were measured by conducting western blot in penes samples. Erectile response was significantly reduced in aged rats, whereas eNOS uncoupling and TBARS production were significantly increased in the aged rat penis compared with young rats. Sepiapterin significantly improved erectile response in aged rats and prevented increase in TBARS production, but did not affect eNOS uncoupling in the penis of aged rats. These findings suggest that aging induces eNOS uncoupling in the penis, resulting in increased oxidative stress and ED. PMID:21289638

  4. Glucocorticosteroid injection is a circadian zeitgeber in the laboratory rat

    SciTech Connect

    Horseman, N.D.; Ehret, C.F.

    1982-09-01

    Intraperitoneal temperatures were monitored by radiotelemetry to observe the thermoregulatory rhythm of male laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus). Rats received single injections of dexamethasone (as dexamethasone sodium phosphate) during constant darkness (0.1 lx) with food freely available or no food available. No phase shifts occurred following saline injection or dexamethasone at 1 mg/kg body wt. Depending on the phase of injection relative to the circadian cycle, dexamethasone at 10 mg/kg caused thermoregulatory peaks to be either delayed or advanced on the 4th and 5th days after injection. There was an insensitive interval which corresponded to subjective day. Phase shifts induced by dexamethasone during ad libitum feeding were of less magnitude than those induced during starvation. The determination of phase-shifting parameters (i.e., a phase-response curve) for hormonal substances represents a rigorous and broadly applicable technique for determining endogenous mechanisms for circadian phase control and entrainment.

  5. Circadian regulation of metabolic homeostasis: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    McGinnis, Graham R; Young, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Robust circadian rhythms in metabolic processes have been described in both humans and animal models, at the whole body, individual organ, and even cellular level. Classically, these time-of-day-dependent rhythms have been considered secondary to fluctuations in energy/nutrient supply/demand associated with feeding/fasting and wake/sleep cycles. Renewed interest in this field has been fueled by studies revealing that these rhythms are driven, at least in part, by intrinsic mechanisms and that disruption of metabolic synchrony invariably increases the risk of cardiometabolic disease. The objectives of this paper are to provide a comprehensive review regarding rhythms in glucose, lipid, and protein/amino acid metabolism, the relative influence of extrinsic (eg, neurohumoral factors) versus intrinsic (eg, cell autonomous circadian clocks) mediators, the physiologic roles of these rhythms in terms of daily fluctuations in nutrient availability and activity status, as well as the pathologic consequences of dyssynchrony. PMID:27313482

  6. Sludge reduction by uncoupling metabolism: SBR tests with para-nitrophenol and a commercial uncoupler.

    PubMed

    Zuriaga-Agustí, E; Mendoza-Roca, J A; Bes-Piá, A; Alonso-Molina, J L; Amorós-Muñoz, I

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays cost reduction is a very important issue in wastewater treatment plants. One way, is to minimize the sludge production. Microorganisms break down the organic matter into inorganic compounds through catabolism. Uncoupling metabolism is a method which promote catabolism reactions instead of anabolism ones, where adenosine triphosphate synthesis is inhibited. In this work, the influence of the addition of para-nitrophenol and a commercial reagent to a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on sludge production and process performance has been analyzed. Three laboratory SBRs were operated in parallel to compare the effect of the addition of both reagents with a control reactor. SBRs were fed with synthetic wastewater and were operated with the same conditions. Results showed that sludge production was slightly reduced for the tested para-nitrophenol concentrations (20 and 25 mg/L) and for a LODOred dose of 1 mL/day. Biological process performance was not influenced and high COD removals were achieved.

  7. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    W81XWH-08-2-0171 TITLE: Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ann Hsing, Ph.D...COVERED (From - To) 1 September 2008-31 October 2012 October22012012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Circadian Genes and Risk for...genetic susceptibility to prostate cancer may be in part due to variations in the core circadian genes that regulate circadian rhythms and that serum sex

  8. Making circadian cancer therapy practical.

    PubMed

    Block, Keith I; Block, Penny B; Fox, Susan Reynolds; Birris, Jamie Stouffer; Feng, April Y; de la Torre, Michael; Nathan, Deva; Tothy, Peter; Maki, Amanda K; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    Practical circadian therapy for the cancer patient involves 3 spheres of intervention-improving lifestyle, optimizing internal biochemical milieu, and adjusting treatment times. The potential value of improving overall circadian functioning is shown in the work of Mormont et al in which pronounced rest-activity rhythms were associated with better survival in colorectal cancer patients receiving chronomodulated chemotherapy. Lifestyle interventions that may improve circadian functioning involve diet, physical activity, and mind-body therapies. A diet that is anti-inflammatory and has appropriate carbohydrate intake, as well as regular meal timing, encourages normal circadian cycles. Adequate daytime physical activity encourages restful sleep, and morning light exposure during exercise may entrain melatonin rhythms. Meditation and other mind-body therapies can reduce anxiety and depression that may disrupt sleep. Aspects of the biochemical milieu that specifically disrupt circadian functioning are inflammation and stress hormones. Inflammation and cytokine disruption can be addressed with diet, herbs, and other natural substances. Chronomodulation of chemotherapy in a US clinical setting will be discussed. A series of 12 cases will be presented of patients who experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicities with various chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer. When rechallenged with the same regimens administered chronotherapeutically, none of the patients experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicity. Integrating all the above treatment modalities has the potential to improve both the quality of life and disease outcomes in cancer patients.

  9. Smith-Magenis syndrome results in disruption of CLOCK gene transcription and reveals an integral role for RAI1 in the maintenance of circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephen R; Zies, Deborah; Mullegama, Sureni V; Grotewiel, Michael S; Elsea, Sarah H

    2012-06-08

    Haploinsufficiency of RAI1 results in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), a disorder characterized by intellectual disability, multiple congenital anomalies, obesity, neurobehavioral abnormalities, and a disrupted circadian sleep-wake pattern. An inverted melatonin rhythm (i.e., melatonin peaks during the day instead of at night) and associated sleep-phase disturbances in individuals with SMS, as well as a short-period circadian rhythm in mice with a chromosomal deletion of Rai1, support SMS as a circadian-rhythm-dysfunction disorder. However, the molecular cause of the circadian defect in SMS has not been described. The circadian oscillator temporally orchestrates metabolism, physiology, and behavior largely through transcriptional modulation. Data support RAI1 as a transcriptional regulator, but the genes it might regulate are largely unknown. Investigation into the role that RAI1 plays in the regulation of gene transcription and circadian maintenance revealed that RAI1 regulates the transcription of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a key component of the mammalian circadian oscillator that transcriptionally regulates many critical circadian genes. Data further show that haploinsufficiency of RAI1 and Rai1 in SMS fibroblasts and the mouse hypothalamus, respectively, results in the transcriptional dysregulation of the circadian clock and causes altered expression and regulation of multiple circadian genes, including PER2, PER3, CRY1, BMAL1, and others. These data suggest that heterozygous mutation of RAI1 and Rai1 leads to a disrupted circadian rhythm and thus results in an abnormal sleep-wake cycle, which can contribute to an abnormal feeding pattern and dependent cognitive performance. Finally, we conclude that RAI1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CLOCK, pinpointing a novel and important role for this gene in the circadian oscillator.

  10. Coupled and uncoupled dipole models of nonlinear scattering.

    PubMed

    Balla, Naveen K; Yew, Elijah Y S; Sheppard, Colin J R; So, Peter T C

    2012-11-05

    Dipole models are one of the simplest numerical models to understand nonlinear scattering. Existing dipole model for second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering assume that the dipoles which make up a scatterer do not interact with one another. Thus, this dipole model can be called the uncoupled dipole model. This dipole model is not sufficient to describe the effects of refractive index of a scatterer or to describe scattering at the edges of a scatterer. Taking into account the interaction between dipoles overcomes these short comings of the uncoupled dipole model. Coupled dipole model has been primarily used for linear scattering studies but it can be extended to predict nonlinear scattering. The coupled and uncoupled dipole models have been compared to highlight their differences. Results of nonlinear scattering predicted by coupled dipole model agree well with previously reported experimental results.

  11. Molecular cloning of amphioxus uncoupling protein and assessment of its uncoupling activity using a yeast heterologous expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kun; Sun, Guoxun; Lv, Zhiyuan; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xueyuan; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Chenyu

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Invertebrates, for example amphioxus, do express uncoupling proteins. {yields} Both the sequence and the uncoupling activity of amphioxus UCP resemble UCP2. {yields} UCP1 is the only UCP that can form dimer on yeast mitochondria. -- Abstract: The present study describes the molecular cloning of a novel cDNA fragment from amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) encoding a 343-amino acid protein that is highly homologous to human uncoupling proteins (UCP), this protein is therefore named amphioxus UCP. This amphioxus UCP shares more homology with and is phylogenetically more related to mammalian UCP2 as compared with UCP1. To further assess the functional similarity of amphioxus UCP to mammalian UCP1 and -2, the amphioxus UCP, rat UCP1, and human UCP2 were separately expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the recombinant yeast mitochondria were isolated and assayed for the state 4 respiration rate and proton leak, using pYES2 empty vector as the control. UCP1 increased the state 4 respiration rate by 2.8-fold, and the uncoupling activity was strongly inhibited by GDP, while UCP2 and amphioxus UCP only increased the state 4 respiration rate by 1.5-fold and 1.7-fold in a GDP-insensitive manner, moreover, the proton leak kinetics of amphioxus UCP was very similar to UCP2, but much different from UCP1. In conclusion, the amphioxus UCP has a mild, unregulated uncoupling activity in the yeast system, which resembles mammalian UCP2, but not UCP1.

  12. Mitochondrial Uncoupling and the Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling is a physiological process that has direct and indirect consequences on glucose homeostasis. Non-shivering thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, which is the most well-recognized biological process related to the physiological uncoupling of mitochondria, is caused by uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1), which mediates a regulated permeabilization of the mitochondrial inner membrane to protons. The uncoupled brown fat mitochondria are specialized to produce heat by oxidizing large amounts of substrates, making brown fat a sink that can actively drain glucose from circulation. This has been confirmed in human studies in which active brown fat was detected by glucose-derivative-based positron emission tomography scans. Thus, UCP1-mediated activation of brown fat appears to be a likely mechanism through which hyperglycemia could be ameliorated. In other tissues, mitochondria are reported to be mildly uncoupled by the UCP1-like proteins, UCP2 and UCP3. The primary role of these other UCPs does not appear to be the oxidation of a metabolic substrate (e.g., glucose) for heat production; instead, they participate in other processes, such as regulating the production of reactive oxygen species and transporting certain metabolites across the mitochondrial membrane. UCP2 activity influences glucose homeostasis by fine tuning intracellular events related to the cellular energy status, thereby controlling insulin secretion, food intake behavior and adiponectin secretion in pancreatic .- cells, brain and white adipose tissue, respectively. UCP3 appears to be more specifically involved in promoting fatty acid oxidation in muscle, and is thus likely to influence glucose metabolism indirectly. Several genetic association studies have related polymorphisms in the genes encoding UCPs with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes phenotypes. In this review, we will focus on what is known about the specific role of mitochondrial uncoupling in glucose metabolism, and its

  13. Forward Genetic Analysis of the Circadian Clock Separates the Multiple Functions of ZEITLUPE1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kevei, Éva; Gyula, Péter; Hall, Anthony; Kozma-Bognár, László; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Eriksson, Maria E.; Tóth, Réka; Hanano, Shigeru; Fehér, Balázs; Southern, Megan M.; Bastow, Ruth M.; Viczián, András; Hibberd, Victoria; Davis, Seth J.; Somers, David E.; Nagy, Ferenc; Millar, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The circadian system of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) includes feedback loops of gene regulation that generate 24-h oscillations. Components of these loops remain to be identified; none of the known components is completely understood, including ZEITLUPE (ZTL), a gene implicated in regulated protein degradation. ztl mutations affect both circadian and developmental responses to red light, possibly through ZTL interaction with PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB). We conducted a large-scale genetic screen that identified additional clock-affecting loci. Other mutants recovered include 11 new ztl alleles encompassing mutations in each of the ZTL protein domains. Each mutation lengthened the circadian period, even in dark-grown seedlings entrained to temperature cycles. A mutation of the LIGHT, OXYGEN, VOLTAGE (LOV)/Period-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domain was unique in retaining wild-type responses to red light both for the circadian period and for control of hypocotyl elongation. This uncoupling of ztl phenotypes indicates that interactions of ZTL protein with multiple factors must be disrupted to generate the full ztl mutant phenotype. Protein interaction assays showed that the ztl mutant phenotypes were not fully explained by impaired interactions with previously described partner proteins Arabidopsis S-phase kinase-related protein 1, TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1, and PHYB. Interaction with PHYB was unaffected by mutation of any ZTL domain. Mutation of the kelch repeat domain affected protein binding at both the LOV/PAS and the F-box domains, indicating that interaction among ZTL domains leads to the strong phenotypes of kelch mutations. Forward genetics continues to provide insight regarding both known and newly discovered components of the circadian system, although current approaches have saturated mutations at some loci. PMID:16428597

  14. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenyu; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    The discovery of the genetic basis for circadian rhythms has expanded our knowledge of the temporal organization of behavior and physiology. The observations that the circadian gene network is present in most living organisms from eubacteria to humans, that most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks, and that disruption of clock genes results in metabolic dysregulation have revealed interactions between metabolism and circadian rhythms at neural, molecular, and cellular levels. A major challenge remains in understanding the interplay between brain and peripheral clocks and in determining how these interactions promote energy homeostasis across the sleep-wake cycle. In this Review, we evaluate how investigation of molecular timing may create new opportunities to understand and develop therapies for obesity and diabetes.

  15. Circadian Clock, Cancer, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a global regulatory system that interfaces with most other regulatory systems and pathways in mammalian organisms. Investigations of the circadian clock–DNA damage response connections have revealed that nucleotide excision repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis are appreciably influenced by the clock. Although several epidemiological studies in humans and a limited number of genetic studies in mouse model systems have indicated that clock disruption may predispose mammals to cancer, well-controlled genetic studies in mice have not supported the commonly held view that circadian clock disruption is a cancer risk factor. In fact, in the appropriate genetic background, clock disruption may instead aid in cancer regression by promoting intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the clock may affect the efficacy of cancer treatment (chronochemotherapy) by modulating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as the activity of the DNA repair enzymes that repair the DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs. PMID:25302769

  16. [Circadian rhythm in myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Enciso, R; Ramos, M A; Badui, E; Hurtado, R

    1988-01-01

    In order to determine if the beginning of the Myocardial Infarction (MI) is at random along the day or if it follows a circadian rhythm, we analyzed the clinical charts of 819 patients admitted to the Coronary Care Unite. Among them, 645 were male and 174 female. It was established that the beginning of the MI follows a circadian rhythm with maximal frequency between 8 and 9 a.m. and minimal at 0 hours (p greater than 0.01). This rhythm is sex independent. In patients younger than 45 years as well as those who received beta-block agents in less than 24 hours previous the MI no circadian rhythm was observed.

  17. Assignment of an essential role for the Neurospora frequency gene in circadian entrainment to temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Pregueiro, Antonio M; Price-Lloyd, Nathan; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Heintzen, Christian; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2005-02-08

    Circadian systems include slave oscillators and central pacemakers, and the cores of eukaryotic circadian clocks described to date are composed of transcription and translation feedback loops (TTFLs). In the model system Neurospora, normal circadian rhythmicity requires a TTFL in which a White Collar complex (WCC) activates expression of the frequency (frq) gene, and the FRQ protein feeds back to attenuate that activation. To further test the centrality of this TTFL to the circadian mechanism in Neurospora, we used low-amplitude temperature cycles to compare WT and frq-null strains under conditions in which a banding rhythm was elicited. WT cultures were entrained to these temperature cycles. Unlike those normal strains, however, frq-null mutants did not truly entrain to the same cycles. Their peaks and troughs always occurred in the cold and warm periods, respectively, strongly suggesting that the rhythm in Neurospora lacking frq function simply is driven by the temperature cycles. Previous reports suggested that a FRQ-less oscillator (FLO) could be entrained to temperature cycles, rather than being driven, and speculated that the FLO was the underlying circadian-rhythm generator. These inferences appear to derive from the use of a phase reference point affected by both the changing waveform and the phase of the oscillation. Examination of several other phase markers as well as results of additional experimental tests indicate that the FLO is, at best, a slave oscillator to the TTFL, which underlies circadian rhythm generation in Neurospora.

  18. Cycling of CRYPTOCHROME Proteins Is Not Necessary for Circadian-Clock Function in Mammalian Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yunzhen; Hida, Akiko; Anderson, Daniel A.; Izumo, Mariko; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background An interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loop (TTFL) is thought to generate the mammalian circadian clockwork in both the central pacemaker residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei and in peripheral tissues. The core circadian genes, including Period1 and Period2 (Per1 and Per2), Cryptochrome1 and Cryptochrome2 (Cry1 and Cry2), Bmal1, and Clock are indispensable components of this biological clockwork. The cycling of the PER and CRY clock proteins has been thought to be necessary to keep the mammalian clock ticking. Results We provide a novel cell-permeant protein approach for manipulating cryptochrome protein levels to evaluate the current transcription and translation feedback model of the circadian clockwork. Cell-permeant cryptochrome proteins appear to be functional on the basis of several criteria, including the abilities to (1) rescue circadian properties in Cry1−/−Cry2−/− mouse fibroblasts, (2) act as transcriptional repressors, and (3) phase shift the circadian oscillator in Rat-1 fibroblasts. By using cell-permeant cryptochrome proteins, we demonstrate that cycling of CRY1, CRY2, and BMAL1 is not necessary for circadian-clock function in fibroblasts. Conclusions These results are not supportive of the current version of the transcription and translation feed-back-loop model of the mammalian clock mechanism, in which cycling of the essential clock proteins CRY1 and CRY2 is thought to be necessary. PMID:17583506

  19. The islet circadian clock: entrainment mechanisms, function and role in glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, K; Qian, J; Colwell, C S; Matveyenko, A V

    2015-09-01

    Circadian regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion has long been appreciated as an important feature of metabolic control in humans. Circadian disruption is becoming increasingly prevalent in today's society and is likely responsible in part for the considerable rise in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome worldwide. Thus, understanding molecular mechanisms driving the inter-relationship between circadian disruption and T2DM is important in context of disease prevention and therapeutics. In this regard, the goal of this article is to highlight the role of the circadian system, and islet circadian clocks in particular, as potential regulators of β-cell function and survival. To date, studies have shown that islet clocks respond to changes in feeding patterns, and regulate a multitude of critical cellular processes in insulin secreting β-cells (e.g. insulin exocytosis, mitochondrial function and response to oxidative stress). Subsequently, either genetic or environmental disruption of normal islet clock performance compromises β-cell function and leads to loss of glycaemic control. Future work is warranted to further unravel the role of circadian clocks in human islet function in health and contributions to pathogenesis of T2DM.

  20. Circadian Clocks in the Cnidaria: Environmental Entrainment, Molecular Regulation, and Organismal Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Reitzel, Adam M.; Tarrant, Ann M.; Levy, Oren

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular network that translates predictable environmental signals, such as light levels, into organismal responses, including behavior and physiology. Regular oscillations of the molecular components of the clock enable individuals to anticipate regularly fluctuating environmental conditions. Cnidarians play important roles in benthic and pelagic marine environments and also occupy a key evolutionary position as the likely sister group to the bilaterians. Together, these attributes make members of this phylum attractive as models for testing hypotheses on roles for circadian clocks in regulating behavior, physiology, and reproduction as well as those regarding the deep evolutionary conservation of circadian regulatory pathways in animal evolution. Here, we review and synthesize the field of cnidarian circadian biology by discussing the diverse effects of daily light cycles on cnidarians, summarizing the molecular evidence for the conservation of a bilaterian-like circadian clock in anthozoan cnidarians, and presenting new empirical data supporting the presence of a conserved feed-forward loop in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis. Furthermore, we discuss critical gaps in our current knowledge about the cnidarian clock, including the functions directly regulated by the clock and the precise molecular interactions that drive the oscillating gene-expression patterns. We conclude that the field of cnidarian circadian biology is moving rapidly toward linking molecular mechanisms with physiology and behavior. PMID:23620252

  1. Circadian clocks in the cnidaria: environmental entrainment, molecular regulation, and organismal outputs.

    PubMed

    Reitzel, Adam M; Tarrant, Ann M; Levy, Oren

    2013-07-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular network that translates predictable environmental signals, such as light levels, into organismal responses, including behavior and physiology. Regular oscillations of the molecular components of the clock enable individuals to anticipate regularly fluctuating environmental conditions. Cnidarians play important roles in benthic and pelagic marine environments and also occupy a key evolutionary position as the likely sister group to the bilaterians. Together, these attributes make members of this phylum attractive as models for testing hypotheses on roles for circadian clocks in regulating behavior, physiology, and reproduction as well as those regarding the deep evolutionary conservation of circadian regulatory pathways in animal evolution. Here, we review and synthesize the field of cnidarian circadian biology by discussing the diverse effects of daily light cycles on cnidarians, summarizing the molecular evidence for the conservation of a bilaterian-like circadian clock in anthozoan cnidarians, and presenting new empirical data supporting the presence of a conserved feed-forward loop in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis. Furthermore, we discuss critical gaps in our current knowledge about the cnidarian clock, including the functions directly regulated by the clock and the precise molecular interactions that drive the oscillating gene-expression patterns. We conclude that the field of cnidarian circadian biology is moving rapidly toward linking molecular mechanisms with physiology and behavior.

  2. Fractal Regulation in Temporal Activity Fluctuations: A Biomarker for Circadian Control and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; To, Tommy; Chiang, Wei-Yin; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M; Hu, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Motor activity in humans and other animals possesses fractal temporal fluctuations that co-exists with circadian or daily activity rhythms. The perturbations in fractal activity patterns are often accompanied by altered circadian/daily rhythms. The goal of this study is to test whether fractal regulation in motor activity provides physiological information independent from 24-h/circadian rhythmicity. To achieve the goal, we studied locomotor activity recordings of rats with the lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that are known to have diminished circadian/daily activity rhythms and perturbed fractal regulation. By restricting feeding time (i.e., food was only availability in the dark period of the 12h: 12h light-dark cycles), we found that mean activity levels in these animals displayed significant 24-h rhythms. In contrast, the restricted feeding had no influences on the perturbed fractal regulation in these SCN-lesioned animals, i.e., activity fluctuations in these animals remained random over a wide range of time scales from 2-20h. Our results indicate that 24-h rhythm of food availability can restore/improve circadian/daily rhythms in the SCN-lesioned animals but not necessarily improve the disrupted fractal activity regulation in these animals. This study provides clear and direct evidence that fractal activity patterns offer complementary information about motor activity regulation at multiple time scales that is beyond 24-h rhythm control.

  3. Fractal Regulation in Temporal Activity Fluctuations: A Biomarker for Circadian Control and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; To, Tommy; Chiang, Wei-Yin; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M; Hu, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Motor activity in humans and other animals possesses fractal temporal fluctuations that co-exists with circadian or daily activity rhythms. The perturbations in fractal activity patterns are often accompanied by altered circadian/daily rhythms. The goal of this study is to test whether fractal regulation in motor activity provides physiological information independent from 24-h/circadian rhythmicity. To achieve the goal, we studied locomotor activity recordings of rats with the lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that are known to have diminished circadian/daily activity rhythms and perturbed fractal regulation. By restricting feeding time (i.e., food was only availability in the dark period of the 12h: 12h light-dark cycles), we found that mean activity levels in these animals displayed significant 24-h rhythms. In contrast, the restricted feeding had no influences on the perturbed fractal regulation in these SCN-lesioned animals, i.e., activity fluctuations in these animals remained random over a wide range of time scales from 2–20h. Our results indicate that 24-h rhythm of food availability can restore/improve circadian/daily rhythms in the SCN-lesioned animals but not necessarily improve the disrupted fractal activity regulation in these animals. This study provides clear and direct evidence that fractal activity patterns offer complementary information about motor activity regulation at multiple time scales that is beyond 24-h rhythm control. PMID:28553673

  4. Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    sleep, wakefulness and circadian rhythms and the psychological correlates including performance relevant to personnel in.olved in skilld activity. The...HEALTHY ADULTS par A.Reinbeig I CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS OF HUMAN PERFORMANCE AND RESISTANCE: OPERATIONAL ASPECTS by K.E.Klein and H-M.Wegmann 2 SLEEP STAGE...ISOLATION FROM TIME CUES by E.D.Weitzman. C.A.Czeiser and M.C.Moore Ede 7 SLEEP DISTURBANCE AND PERFORMANCE by L.C.Iohnson 8 TOLERANCE DU TRAVAIL POSTE

  5. Tissue-specific circadian clocks in plants.

    PubMed

    Endo, Motomu

    2016-02-01

    Circadian clocks affect a large proportion of differentially expressed genes in many organisms. Tissue-specific hierarchies in circadian networks in mammals have been contentiously debated, whereas little attention has been devoted to the concept in plants, owing to technical difficulties. Recently, several studies have demonstrated tissue-specific circadian clocks and their coupling in plants, suggesting that plants possess a hierarchical network of circadian clocks. The following review summarizes recent studies describing the tissue-specific functions and properties of these circadian clocks and discusses the network structure and potential messengers that might share temporal information on such a network.

  6. Does the core circadian clock in the moss Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) comprise a single loop?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The endogenous circadian clock allows the organism to synchronize processes both to daily and seasonal changes. In plants, many metabolic processes such as photosynthesis, as well as photoperiodic responses, are under the control of a circadian clock. Comparative studies with the moss Physcomitrella patens provide the opportunity to study many aspects of land plant evolution. Here we present a comparative overview of clock-associated components and the circadian network in the moss P. patens. Results The moss P. patens has a set of conserved circadian core components that share genetic relationship and gene expression patterns with clock genes of vascular plants. These genes include Myb-like transcription factors PpCCA1a and PpCCA1b, pseudo-response regulators PpPRR1-4, and regulatory elements PpELF3, PpLUX and possibly PpELF4. However, the moss lacks homologs of AtTOC1, AtGI and the AtZTL-family of genes, which can be found in all vascular plants studied here. These three genes constitute essential components of two of the three integrated feed-back loops in the current model of the Arabidopsis circadian clock mechanism. Consequently, our results suggest instead a single loop circadian clock in the moss. Possibly as a result of this, temperature compensation of core clock gene expression appears to be decreased in P. patens. Conclusions This study is the first comparative overview of the circadian clock mechanism in a basal land plant, the moss P. patens. Our results indicate that the moss clock mechanism may represent an ancestral state in contrast to the more complex and partly duplicated structure of subsequent land plants. These findings may provide insights into the understanding of the evolution of circadian network topology. PMID:20550695

  7. Does the core circadian clock in the moss Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta) comprise a single loop?

    PubMed

    Holm, Karl; Källman, Thomas; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Hedman, Harald; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2010-06-15

    The endogenous circadian clock allows the organism to synchronize processes both to daily and seasonal changes. In plants, many metabolic processes such as photosynthesis, as well as photoperiodic responses, are under the control of a circadian clock. Comparative studies with the moss Physcomitrella patens provide the opportunity to study many aspects of land plant evolution. Here we present a comparative overview of clock-associated components and the circadian network in the moss P. patens. The moss P. patens has a set of conserved circadian core components that share genetic relationship and gene expression patterns with clock genes of vascular plants. These genes include Myb-like transcription factors PpCCA1a and PpCCA1b, pseudo-response regulators PpPRR1-4, and regulatory elements PpELF3, PpLUX and possibly PpELF4. However, the moss lacks homologs of AtTOC1, AtGI and the AtZTL-family of genes, which can be found in all vascular plants studied here. These three genes constitute essential components of two of the three integrated feed-back loops in the current model of the Arabidopsis circadian clock mechanism. Consequently, our results suggest instead a single loop circadian clock in the moss. Possibly as a result of this, temperature compensation of core clock gene expression appears to be decreased in P. patens. This study is the first comparative overview of the circadian clock mechanism in a basal land plant, the moss P. patens. Our results indicate that the moss clock mechanism may represent an ancestral state in contrast to the more complex and partly duplicated structure of subsequent land plants. These findings may provide insights into the understanding of the evolution of circadian network topology.

  8. Metabolism and the Circadian Clock Converge

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms occur in almost all species and control vital aspects of our physiology, from sleeping and waking to neurotransmitter secretion and cellular metabolism. Epidemiological studies from recent decades have supported a unique role for circadian rhythm in metabolism. As evidenced by individuals working night or rotating shifts, but also by rodent models of circadian arrhythmia, disruption of the circadian cycle is strongly associated with metabolic imbalance. Some genetically engineered mouse models of circadian rhythmicity are obese and show hallmark signs of the metabolic syndrome. Whether these phenotypes are due to the loss of distinct circadian clock genes within a specific tissue versus the disruption of rhythmic physiological activities (such as eating and sleeping) remains a cynosure within the fields of chronobiology and metabolism. Becoming more apparent is that from metabolites to transcription factors, the circadian clock interfaces with metabolism in numerous ways that are essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:23303907

  9. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-09

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression.

  10. Loss of circadian rhythm of circulating insulin concentration induced by high-fat diet intake is associated with disrupted rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes in the liver.

    PubMed

    Honma, Kazue; Hikosaka, Maki; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral clock genes show a circadian rhythm is correlated with the timing of feeding in peripheral tissues. It was reported that these clock genes are strongly regulated by insulin action and that a high-fat diet (HFD) intake in C57BL/6J mice for 21days induced insulin secretion during the dark phase and reduced the circadian rhythm of clock genes. In this study, we examined the circadian expression patterns of these clock genes in insulin-resistant animal models with excess secretion of insulin during the day. We examined whether insulin resistance induced by a HFD intake for 80days altered blood parameters (glucose and insulin concentrations) and expression of mRNA and proteins encoded by clock and functional genes in the liver using male ICR mice. Serum insulin concentrations were continuously higher during the day in mice fed a HFD than control mice. Expression of lipogenesis-related genes (Fas and Accβ) and the transcription factor Chrebp peaked at zeitgeber time (ZT)24 in the liver of control mice. A HFD intake reduced the expression of these genes at ZT24 and disrupted the circadian rhythm. Expression of Bmal1 and Clock, transcription factors that compose the core feedback loop, showed circadian variation and were synchronously associated with Fas gene expression in control mice, but not in those fed a HFD. These results indicate that the disruption of the circadian rhythm of insulin secretion by HFD intake is closely associated with the disappearance of circadian expression of lipogenic and clock genes in the liver of mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Disrupted circadian rhythmicity of the intestinal glucose transporter SGLT1 in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Hina Y.; Deelman, Tara E.; Ashley, Stanley W.; Rhoads, David B.; Tavakkoli, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal nutrient absorptive capacity shows a circadian rhythm synchronized with eating patterns. Studies have shown that disrupting these normally coordinated rhythms, e.g. with shift work, may contribute to metabolic disease. While circadian expression of many nutrient transporters has been studied in health, their rhythms in obesity and metabolic disorders is not known. We studied the circadian expression and function of intestinal glucose transporter SGLT1, a major glucose transporter, in a rodent model of obesity and diabetes. Methods We compared obese Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats to lean ZDF littermates. Temporal feeding patterns were assessed, then rats were harvested at Zeitgeber (ZT, ZT0=7am) 3, 9, or 15 to measure insulin resistance, SGLT1 (Sodium glucose co-transporter type 1) mRNA expression and intestinal glucose absorption capacity. Known regulators of SGLT1 expression (intestinal sweet taste receptor T1R2/3; clock genes) were also measured to elucidate underlying mechanisms. Results Both ZDF groups exhibited altered circadian food intake. Obese ZDF rats lost circadian rhythmicity of SGLT1 mRNA expression and functional activity. Lean ZDF rats had glucose levels less than half of the obese rats but were still hyperglycemic. Rhythmicity of mRNA expression was maintained but that of functional glucose uptake was blunted. Circadian rhythms of intestinal clock genes were maintained in both groups while there was no discernible rhythm of intestinal glucose transporter gene GLUT2 expression or of the T1R2 component of the sweet taste receptor in either group. In summary, lean and obese ZDF rats exhibited similar disruptions in circadian feeding pattern. Glucose intolerance was evident in lean rats, but only obese ZDF rats further developed diabetes and exhibited disrupted circadian rhythmicity of both SGLT1 mRNA expression and functional activity. Conclusions Our findings suggest that disrupted circadian feeding rhythms contribute to

  12. 49 CFR 215.125 - Defective uncoupling device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Defective uncoupling device. 215.125 Section 215.125 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components...

  13. 49 CFR 215.125 - Defective uncoupling device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Defective uncoupling device. 215.125 Section 215.125 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components...

  14. 49 CFR 215.125 - Defective uncoupling device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defective uncoupling device. 215.125 Section 215.125 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components...

  15. 49 CFR 215.125 - Defective uncoupling device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Defective uncoupling device. 215.125 Section 215.125 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components...

  16. 49 CFR 215.125 - Defective uncoupling device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defective uncoupling device. 215.125 Section 215.125 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components...

  17. Circadian System, Sleep and Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Aeschbach, Daniel; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of numerous hormones vary across the day and night. Such fluctuations are not only attributable to changes in sleep/wakefulness and other behaviors but also to a biological timing system governed by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Sleep has a strong effect on levels of some hormones such as growth hormone but little effect on others which are more strongly regulated by the biological timing system (e.g., melatonin). Whereas the exact mechanisms through which sleep affects circulating hormonal levels are poorly understood, more is known about how the biological timing system influences the secretion of hormones. The suprachiasmatic nucleus exerts its influence on hormones via neuronal and humoral signals but it is also now apparent that peripheral cells can rhythmically secrete hormones independent of signals from the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Under normal circumstances, behaviors and the biological timing system are synchronized and consequently hormonal systems are exquisitely regulated. However, many individuals (e.g., shift-workers) frequently undergo circadian misalignment by desynchronizing their sleep/wake cycle from the biological timing system. Recent experiments indicate that circadian misalignment has an adverse effect on metabolic and hormonal factors such as glucose and insulin. Further research is needed to determine the underlying mechanisms that cause the negative effects induced by circadian misalignment. Such research could aid the development of countermeasures for circadian misalignment. PMID:21939733

  18. Melatonin, Light and Circadian Cycles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-25

    bifida occulta, and sarcoidosis, all show loss of the melatonin circadian rhythm, with psoriasis vulgaris, spina bifida occulta, and sarcoidosis...autonomic neuro- pathy show decreased nocturnal melatonin (Checkley and Palazidou, 1988). Klinefelter’s syndrome, Turners syndrome, psoriasis vulgaris, spina

  19. Interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian clock system: Importance for metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Latre, Aleix; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    While additional research is needed, a number of large epidemiological studies show an association between circadian disruption and metabolic disorders. Specifically, obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and other signs of metabolic syndrome all have been linked to circadian disruption in humans. Studies in other species support this association and generally reveal that feeding that is not in phase with the external light/dark cycle, as often occurs with night or rotating shift workers, is disadvantageous in terms of energy balance. As food is a strong driver of circadian rhythms in the periphery, understanding how nutrient metabolism drives clocks across the body is important for dissecting out why circadian misalignment may produce such metabolic effects. A number of circadian clock proteins as well as their accessory proteins (such as nuclear receptors) are highly sensitive to nutrient metabolism. Macronutrients and micronutrients can function as zeitgebers for the clock in a tissue-specific way and can thus impair synchrony between clocks across the body, or potentially restore synchrony in the case of circadian misalignment. Circadian nuclear receptors are particularly sensitive to nutrient metabolism and can alter tissue-specific rhythms in response to changes in the diet. Finally, SNPs in human clock genes appear to be correlated with diet-specific responses and along with chronotype eventually may provide valuable information from a clinical perspective on how to use diet and nutrition to treat metabolic disorders. This article presents a background of the circadian clock components and their interrelated metabolic and transcriptional feedback loops, followed by a review of some recent studies in humans and rodents that address the effects of nutrient metabolism on the circadian clock and vice versa. We focus on studies in which results suggest that nutrients provide an opportunity to restore or, alternatively, can destroy synchrony between

  20. Interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian clock system: Importance for metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Ribas-Latre, Aleix; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Background While additional research is needed, a number of large epidemiological studies show an association between circadian disruption and metabolic disorders. Specifically, obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and other signs of metabolic syndrome all have been linked to circadian disruption in humans. Studies in other species support this association and generally reveal that feeding that is not in phase with the external light/dark cycle, as often occurs with night or rotating shift workers, is disadvantageous in terms of energy balance. As food is a strong driver of circadian rhythms in the periphery, understanding how nutrient metabolism drives clocks across the body is important for dissecting out why circadian misalignment may produce such metabolic effects. A number of circadian clock proteins as well as their accessory proteins (such as nuclear receptors) are highly sensitive to nutrient metabolism. Macronutrients and micronutrients can function as zeitgebers for the clock in a tissue-specific way and can thus impair synchrony between clocks across the body, or potentially restore synchrony in the case of circadian misalignment. Circadian nuclear receptors are particularly sensitive to nutrient metabolism and can alter tissue-specific rhythms in response to changes in the diet. Finally, SNPs in human clock genes appear to be correlated with diet-specific responses and along with chronotype eventually may provide valuable information from a clinical perspective on how to use diet and nutrition to treat metabolic disorders. Scope of review This article presents a background of the circadian clock components and their interrelated metabolic and transcriptional feedback loops, followed by a review of some recent studies in humans and rodents that address the effects of nutrient metabolism on the circadian clock and vice versa. We focus on studies in which results suggest that nutrients provide an opportunity to restore or, alternatively

  1. Low resistance junctions in crayfish. Structural changes with functional uncoupling

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Electrical uncoupling of crayfish septate lateral giant axons is paralleled by structural changes in the gap junctions. The changes are characterized by a tighter aggregation of the intramembrane particles and a decrease in the overall width of the junction and the thickness of the gap. Preliminary measurements indicate also a decrease in particle diameter. The uncoupling is produced by in vitro treatment of crayfish abdominal cords either with a Ca++, Mg++-free solution containing EDTA, followed by return to normal saline (Van Harreveld's solution), or with VAn Harreveld's solution containing dinitrophenol (DNP). The uncoupling is monitored by the intracellular recording of the electrical resistance at a septum between lateral giant axons. The junctions of the same septum are examined in thin sections; those of other ganglia of the same chain used for the electrical measurements are studied by freeze-fracture. In controls, most junctions contain a more or less regular array of particles repeating at a center to center distance of approximately 200 A. The overall width of the junctions is approximately 200 A and the gap thickness is 40-50 A. Vesicles (400-700 A in diameter) are closely apposed to the junctional membranes. In uncoupled axons, most junctions contain a hexagonal array of particles repeating at a center to center distance of 150-155 A. The overall width of the junctions is approximately 180 A and the gap thickness is 20-30 A. These junctions are usually curved and are rarely associated with vesicles. Isolated, PTA-stained junctions, also believed to be uncoupled, display similar structural features. There are reasons to believe that the changes in structure and permeability are triggered by an increase in the intracellular free Ca++ concentration. Most likely, the changes in permeability are caused by conformational changes in some components of the intramembrane particles at the gap junctions. PMID:820701

  2. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases Are Conserved Regulators of Circadian Function*

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; O'Neill, John S.; Dobrzycki, Tomasz; Calvert, Shaun; Lord, Emma C.; McIntosh, Rebecca L. L.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Hastings, Michael H.; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the activity of many transcription factors to influence liver gluconeogenesis and the development of specialized cells, including muscle, neurons, and lymphocytes. Here, we describe a conserved role for class IIa HDACs in sustaining robust circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila and cellular rhythms in mammalian cells. In mouse fibroblasts, overexpression of HDAC5 severely disrupts transcriptional rhythms of core clock genes. HDAC5 overexpression decreases BMAL1 acetylation on Lys-537 and pharmacological inhibition of class IIa HDACs increases BMAL1 acetylation. Furthermore, we observe cyclical nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5 in mouse fibroblasts that is characteristically circadian. Mutation of the Drosophila homolog HDAC4 impairs locomotor activity rhythms of flies and decreases period mRNA levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC4 in Drosophila clock cells also dampens circadian function. Given that the localization of class IIa HDACs is signal-regulated and influenced by Ca2+ and cAMP signals, our findings offer a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli that generate these signals can feed into the molecular clock machinery. PMID:25271152

  3. Temporal partitioning of cardiac metabolism by the cardiomyocyte circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Young, Martin E

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights temporal partitioning of cardiac metabolism by the cardiomyocyte circadian clock. What advances does it highlight? Advances include: 1) cardiac glucose utilization peaks during the active period to meet increased energetic demands at this time; 2) synthesis of glycogen and triglyceride peak in the heart during the latter half of the active period, likely in anticipation of the upcoming sleep/fasting period; and 3) protein turnover increases in the heart at the beginning of the sleep phase, probably to promote growth and repair at this time. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks have emerged as crucial mediators of 24 h rhythms in cellular processes. In doing so, these molecular timekeepers confer the selective advantage of anticipation, allowing cells and organs to prepare for stimuli and stresses before their onset. The heart is subjected to dramatic fluctuations in energetic demand and nutrient supply in association with sleep-wake and fasting-feeding cycles. Recent studies suggest that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock orchestrates daily rhythms in both oxidative and non-oxidative glucose and fatty acid metabolism, as well as protein turnover. Here, I review this evidence and discuss whether disruption of these rhythms can contribute to cardiovascular disease. © 2016 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  4. Rhythmic Oxygen Levels Reset Circadian Clocks through HIF1α.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Yaarit; Ladeuix, Benjamin; Golik, Marina; Koeners, Maarten P; Asher, Gad

    2017-01-10

    The mammalian circadian system consists of a master clock in the brain that synchronizes subsidiary oscillators in peripheral tissues. The master clock maintains phase coherence in peripheral cells through systemic cues such as feeding-fasting and temperature cycles. Here, we examined the role of oxygen as a resetting cue for circadian clocks. We continuously measured oxygen levels in living animals and detected daily rhythms in tissue oxygenation. Oxygen cycles, within the physiological range, were sufficient to synchronize cellular clocks in a HIF1α-dependent manner. Furthermore, several clock genes responded to changes in oxygen levels through HIF1α. Finally, we found that a moderate reduction in oxygen levels for a short period accelerates the adaptation of wild-type but not of HIF1α-deficient mice to the new time in a jet lag protocol. We conclude that oxygen, via HIF1α activation, is a resetting cue for circadian clocks and propose oxygen modulation as therapy for jet lag.

  5. Serotonin, a possible intermediate between disturbed circadian rhythms and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Versteeg, R I; Serlie, M J; Kalsbeek, A; la Fleur, S E

    2015-08-20

    It is evident that eating in misalignment with the biological clock (such as in shift work, eating late at night and skipping breakfast) is associated with increased risk for obesity and diabetes. The biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus dictates energy balance including feeding behavior and glucose metabolism. Besides eating and sleeping patterns, glucose metabolism also exhibits clear diurnal variations with higher blood glucose concentrations, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity prior to waking up. The daily variation in plasma glucose concentrations in rats, is independent of the rhythm in feeding behavior. On the other hand, feeding itself has profound effects on glucose metabolism, but differential effects occur depending on the time of the day. We here review data showing that a disturbed diurnal eating pattern results in alterations in glucose metabolism induced by a disrupted circadian clock. We first describe the role of central serotonin on feeding behavior and glucose metabolism and subsequently describe the effects of central serotonin on the circadian system. We next explore the interaction between the serotonergic system and the circadian clock in conditions of disrupted diurnal rhythms in feeding and how this might be involved in the metabolic dysregulation that occurs with chronodisruption. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutics for Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Ehren R.; Zee, Phyllis C

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The sleep-wake cycle is regulated by the interaction of endogenous circadian and homeostatic processes. The circadian system provides timing information for most physiological rhythms, including the sleep and wake cycle. In addition, the central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus has been shown to promote alertness during the day. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders arise when there is a misalignment between the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythms and the external environment or when there is dysfunction of the circadian clock or its entrainment pathways. The primary synchronizing agents of the circadian system are light and melatonin. Light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms and timed exposure to bright light is often used in the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders. In addition, timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has been shown to be useful in the treatment of the following circadian rhythm sleep disorders: delayed sleep phase, advanced sleep phase, free-running, irregular sleep wake, jet lag and shift work. PMID:21243069

  7. Regulation of gustatory physiology and appetitive behavior by the Drosophila circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Tanoue, Shintaro; Houl, Jerry H; Hardin, Paul E

    2010-02-23

    Circadian regulation of chemosensory processes is common in animals, but little is known about how circadian clocks control chemosensory systems or the consequences of rhythms in chemosensory system function. Taste is a major chemosensory gate used to decide whether or not an animal will eat, and the main taste organ in Drosophila, the proboscis, harbors autonomous circadian oscillators. Here we examine gustatory physiology, tastant-evoked appetitive behavior, and food ingestion to understand clock-dependent regulation of the Drosophila gustatory system. Here we report that single-unit responses from labellar gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) to attractive and aversive tastants show diurnal and circadian rhythms in spike amplitude, frequency, and duration across different classes of gustatory sensilla. Rhythms in electrophysiological responses parallel behavioral rhythms in proboscis extension reflex. Molecular oscillators in GRNs are necessary and sufficient for rhythms in gustatory responses and drive rhythms in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GPRK2) expression that mediate rhythms in taste sensitivity. Eliminating clock function in certain GRNs increases feeding and locomotor activity, mimicking a starvation response. Circadian clocks in GRNs control neuronal output and drive behavioral rhythms in taste responses that peak at a time of day when feeding is maximal in flies. Our results argue that oscillations in GPRK2 levels drive rhythms in gustatory physiology and behavior and that GRN clocks repress feeding. The similarity in gustatory system organization and feeding behavior in flies and mammals, as well as diurnal changes in taste sensitivity in humans, suggest that our results are relevant to the situation in humans. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Circadian cycles of gene expression in the coral, Acropora millepora.

    PubMed

    Brady, Aisling K; Snyder, Kevin A; Vize, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate many physiological, behavioral and reproductive processes. These rhythms are often controlled by light, and daily cycles of solar illumination entrain many clock regulated processes. In scleractinian corals a number of different processes and behaviors are associated with specific periods of solar illumination or non-illumination--for example, skeletal deposition, feeding and both brooding and broadcast spawning. We have undertaken an analysis of diurnal expression of the whole transcriptome and more focused studies on a number of candidate circadian genes in the coral Acropora millepora using deep RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR. Many examples of diurnal cycles of RNA abundance were identified, some of which are light responsive and damped quickly under constant darkness, for example, cryptochrome 1 and timeless, but others that continue to cycle in a robust manner when kept in constant darkness, for example, clock, cryptochrome 2, cycle and eyes absent, indicating that their transcription is regulated by an endogenous clock entrained to the light-dark cycle. Many other biological processes that varied between day and night were also identified by a clustering analysis of gene ontology annotations. Corals exhibit diurnal patterns of gene expression that may participate in the regulation of circadian biological processes. Rhythmic cycles of gene expression occur under constant darkness in both populations of coral larvae that lack zooxanthellae and in individual adult tissue containing zooxanthellae, indicating that transcription is under the control of a biological clock. In addition to genes potentially involved in regulating circadian processes, many other pathways were found to display diel cycles of transcription.

  9. Neurovestibular modulation of circadian and homeostatic regulation: vestibulohypothalamic connection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Patrick M.; Jones, Timothy A.; Jones, Sherri M.; Fuller, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic exposure to increased force environments (+G) has pronounced effects on the circadian and homeostatic regulation of body temperature (T(b)), ambulatory activity (Act), heart rate, feeding, and adiposity. By using the Brn 3.1 knockout mouse, which lacks vestibular hair cells, we recently described a major role of the vestibular system in mediating some of these adaptive responses. The present study used the C57BL6JEi-het mouse strain (het), which lacks macular otoconia, to elucidate the contribution of specific vestibular receptors. In this study, eight het and eight WT mice were exposed to 2G for 8 weeks by means of chronic centrifugation. In addition, eight het and eight WT mice were maintained as 1G controls in similar conditions. Upon 2G exposure, the WT exhibited a decrease in T(b) and an attenuated T(b) circadian rhythm. Act means and rhythms also were attenuated. Body mass and food intake were significantly lower than the 1G controls. After 8 weeks, percent body fat was significantly lower in the WT mice (P < 0.0001). In contrast, the het mice did not exhibit a decrease in mean T(b) and only a slight decrease in T(b) circadian amplitude. het Act levels were attenuated similarly to the WT mice. Body mass and food intake were only slightly attenuated in the het mice, and percent body fat, after 8 weeks, was not different in the 2G het group. These results link the vestibular macular receptors with specific alterations in homeostatic and circadian regulation.

  10. Neurovestibular modulation of circadian and homeostatic regulation: vestibulohypothalamic connection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Patrick M.; Jones, Timothy A.; Jones, Sherri M.; Fuller, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic exposure to increased force environments (+G) has pronounced effects on the circadian and homeostatic regulation of body temperature (T(b)), ambulatory activity (Act), heart rate, feeding, and adiposity. By using the Brn 3.1 knockout mouse, which lacks vestibular hair cells, we recently described a major role of the vestibular system in mediating some of these adaptive responses. The present study used the C57BL6JEi-het mouse strain (het), which lacks macular otoconia, to elucidate the contribution of specific vestibular receptors. In this study, eight het and eight WT mice were exposed to 2G for 8 weeks by means of chronic centrifugation. In addition, eight het and eight WT mice were maintained as 1G controls in similar conditions. Upon 2G exposure, the WT exhibited a decrease in T(b) and an attenuated T(b) circadian rhythm. Act means and rhythms also were attenuated. Body mass and food intake were significantly lower than the 1G controls. After 8 weeks, percent body fat was significantly lower in the WT mice (P < 0.0001). In contrast, the het mice did not exhibit a decrease in mean T(b) and only a slight decrease in T(b) circadian amplitude. het Act levels were attenuated similarly to the WT mice. Body mass and food intake were only slightly attenuated in the het mice, and percent body fat, after 8 weeks, was not different in the 2G het group. These results link the vestibular macular receptors with specific alterations in homeostatic and circadian regulation.

  11. The plant circadian clock looks like a traditional Japanese clock rather than a modern Western clock.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takeshi; Yamashino, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle adaptation to seasonal changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature is a major determinant of the ecological success behind the widespread domestication of flowering plants. The circadian clock plays a role in the underlying mechanism for adaptation through generating endogenous rhythms that allow plants to adapt and adjust to both the 24 h diurnal rotation and 365 d seasonal revolution. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the circadian clock tracks seasonal changes in photoperiod and temperature is a longstanding subject in the field. Recently, we have begun to understand the question of how the light and ambient temperature signals feed into the circadian clock transcriptional circuitry in day-night cycles in order to track seasonal changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature. (1-4) Our results collectively indicate that the evening complex (EC) nighttime repressor consisting of LUX-ELF3-ELF4 plays a crucial role in this respect. Here, we discuss about these recent studies to add further implications.

  12. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: the role of nuclear receptors and circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude; Tarquini, Roberto; De Cosmo, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the accumulation of triglycerides in the hepatocytes in the absence of excess alcohol intake, and is caused by an imbalance between hepatic synthesis and breakdown of fats, as well as fatty acid storage and disposal. Liver metabolic pathways are driven by circadian biological clocks, and hepatic health is maintained by proper timing of circadian patterns of metabolic gene expression with the alternation of anabolic processes corresponding to feeding/activity during wake times, and catabolic processes characterizing fasting/resting during sleep. A number of nuclear receptors in the liver are expressed rhythmically, bind hormones and metabolites, sense energy flux and expenditure, and connect the metabolic pathways to the molecular clockwork throughout the 24-h day. In this review, we describe the role played by the nuclear receptors in the genesis of NAFLD in relationship with the circadian clock circuitry. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Digital Signal Processing Reveals Circadian Baseline Oscillation in Majority of Mammalian Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Zvonic, Sanjin; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, circadian periodicity has been described for gene expression in the hypothalamus and multiple peripheral tissues. It is accepted that 10%–15% of all genes oscillate in a daily rhythm, regulated by an intrinsic molecular clock. Statistical analyses of periodicity are limited by the small size of datasets and high levels of stochastic noise. Here, we propose a new approach applying digital signal processing algorithms separately to each group of genes oscillating in the same phase. Combined with the statistical tests for periodicity, this method identifies circadian baseline oscillation in almost 100% of all expressed genes. Consequently, circadian oscillation in gene expression should be evaluated in any study related to biological pathways. Changes in gene expression caused by mutations or regulation of environmental factors (such as photic stimuli or feeding) should be considered in the context of changes in the amplitude and phase of genetic oscillations. PMID:17571920

  14. Role of Circadian Rhythms in Potassium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gumz, Michelle L.; Rabinowitz, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for decades that urinary potassium excretion varies with a circadian pattern. In this review, we consider the historical evidence for this phenomenon and present an overview of recent developments in the field. Extensive evidence from the latter part of the last century clearly demonstrates that circadian potassium excretion does not depend on endogenous aldosterone. Of note is the recent discovery that the expression of several renal potassium transporters varies with a circadian pattern that appears to be consistent with substantial clinical data regarding daily fluctuations in urinary potassium levels. We propose the circadian clock mechanism as a key regulator of renal potassium transporters, and consequently renal potassium excretion. Further investigation into the mechanism of regulation of renal potassium transport by the circadian clock is warranted in order to increase our understanding of the clinical relevance of circadian rhythms to potassium homeostasis. PMID:23953800

  15. The Circadian Nature of Mitochondrial Biology.

    PubMed

    Manella, Gal; Asher, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate the daily changes in physiology and behavior of light-sensitive organisms. These clocks measure about 24 h and tick in a self-sustained and cell-autonomous manner. Mounting evidence points toward a tight intertwining between circadian clocks and metabolism. Although various aspects of circadian control of metabolic functions have been extensively studied, our knowledge regarding circadian mitochondrial function is rudimentary. In this review, we will survey the current literature related to the circadian nature of mitochondrial biology: from mitochondrial omics studies (e.g., proteome, acetylome, and lipidome), through dissection of mitochondrial morphology, to analyses of mitochondrial processes such as nutrient utilization and respiration. We will describe potential mechanisms that are implicated in circadian regulation of mitochondrial functions in mammals and discuss the possibility of a mitochondrial-autonomous oscillator.

  16. Circadian aspects of mammalian parturition: a review.

    PubMed

    Olcese, James

    2012-02-05

    The identification of circadian clocks in endocrine tissues has added considerable depth and complexity to our understanding of their physiology. A growing body of research reveals circadian clock gene expression in the uterus of non-pregnant and pregnant rodents. This review will focus on the mammalian uterus and its rhythmicity, particularly as it pertains to the circadian timing of parturition. This key event in the reproductive axis shows dramatic species-specific differences in its circadian phase. It is proposed here that these differences in the phasing of mammalian parturition are likely a function of opposite uterine cell responses to humoral cues. The argument will be made that melatonin fulfills many of the criteria to serve as a circadian signal in the initiation of human parturition, including specific actions on uterine smooth muscle cells that are consistent with a role for this hormone in the circadian timing of parturition.

  17. CIRCADIAN RHYTHM REPROGRAMMING DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A.; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G. Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A.; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here, we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian program exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared to the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex reorganization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury. PMID:25208554

  18. [Biology and genetics of circadian rhythm].

    PubMed

    Bellivier, F

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of biological clocks has grown expontentially. This has helped to guide the choice of genes studied to explain inter-individual variations seen in circadian rhythms. In recent years analysis of circadian rhythms has advanced considerably into the study of pathological circadian rhythms in human beings. These findings, combined with those obtained from studying mice whose circadian genes have been rendered incapable, have revealed the role of genetic factors in circadian rhythms. This literature review presents an overview of these findings. Beyond our understanding of the functioning of these biological clocks, this knowledge will be extremely useful to analyse genetic factors involved in morbid conditions involving circadian rhythm abnormalities.

  19. Ribonucleoprotein complexes that control circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongni; Liang, Xiaodi; Chen, Xianyun; Guo, Jinhu

    2013-04-25

    Circadian clocks are internal molecular time-keeping mechanisms that enable organisms to adjust their physiology and behavior to the daily surroundings. Misalignment of circadian clocks leads to both physiological and health impairment. Post-transcriptional regulation and translational regulation of circadian clocks have been extensively investigated. In addition, accumulating evidence has shed new light on the involvement of ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) in the post-transcriptional regulation of circadian clocks. Numerous RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and RNPs have been implicated in the post-transcriptional modification of circadian clock proteins in different model organisms. Herein, we summarize the advances in the current knowledge on the role of RNP complexes in circadian clock regulation.

  20. Mechanism of the circadian clock in physiology

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    It has been well established that the circadian clock plays a crucial role in the regulation of almost every physiological process. It also plays a critical role in pathophysiological states including those of obesity and diabetes. Recent evidence has highlighted the potential for targeting the circadian clock as a potential drug target. New studies have also demonstrated the existence of “clock-independent effects” of the circadian proteins, leading to exciting new avenues of research in the circadian clock field in physiology. The goal of this review is to provide an introduction to and overview of the circadian clock in physiology, including mechanisms, targets, and role in disease states. The role of the circadian clocks in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, renal function, metabolism, the endocrine system, immune, and reproductive systems will be discussed. PMID:23576606

  1. Metabolic and Nontranscriptional Circadian Clocks: Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rey, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are cellular timekeeping mechanisms that coordinate behavior and physiology around the 24-h day in most living organisms. Misalignment of an organism’s clock with its environment is associated with long-term adverse fitness consequences, as exemplified by the link between circadian disruption and various age-related diseases in humans. Current eukaryotic models of the circadian oscillator rely on transcription/translation feedback loop mechanisms, supplemented with accessory cytosolic loops that connect them to cellular physiology. However, there is mounting evidence questioning the absolute necessity of transcription-based oscillators for circadian rhythmicity, supported by the recent discovery of oxidation-reduction cycles of peroxiredoxin proteins, which persist even in the absence of transcription. A more fundamental mechanism based on metabolic cycles could thus underlie circadian transcriptional and cytosolic rhythms, thereby promoting circadian oscillations to integral properties of cellular metabolism. PMID:24606143

  2. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-02-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism's biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis.

  3. The Circadian Nature of Mitochondrial Biology

    PubMed Central

    Manella, Gal; Asher, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate the daily changes in physiology and behavior of light-sensitive organisms. These clocks measure about 24 h and tick in a self-sustained and cell-autonomous manner. Mounting evidence points toward a tight intertwining between circadian clocks and metabolism. Although various aspects of circadian control of metabolic functions have been extensively studied, our knowledge regarding circadian mitochondrial function is rudimentary. In this review, we will survey the current literature related to the circadian nature of mitochondrial biology: from mitochondrial omics studies (e.g., proteome, acetylome, and lipidome), through dissection of mitochondrial morphology, to analyses of mitochondrial processes such as nutrient utilization and respiration. We will describe potential mechanisms that are implicated in circadian regulation of mitochondrial functions in mammals and discuss the possibility of a mitochondrial-autonomous oscillator. PMID:28066327

  4. Circadian rhythm reprogramming during lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Jeffrey A; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Choi, Augustine M K

    2014-09-11

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian programme exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared with the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level, endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex re-organization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury.

  5. Circadian rhythm of wrist temperature in normal-living subjects A candidate of new index of the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Sarabia, J A; Rol, M A; Mendiola, P; Madrid, J A

    2008-11-28

    Most circadian rhythms are under the control of a major pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Some of these rhythms, called marker rhythms, serve to characterize the timing of the internal temporal order. A marker rhythm, (e.g., one used in chronotherapy) has to be periodic and easy to measure over long periods using non-invasive methods. The most frequent reference variables for human chronotherapy include salivary melatonin or cortisol, urinary 6-sulfatoximelatonin, actimetry and core body temperature (CBT). Recent evidence suggests that sleepiness may be more closely linked to increased peripheral skin temperature than to a core temperature drop, and that distal skin temperature seems to be correlated and phase-advanced with respect to CBT, suggesting that heat loss from the extremities may drive the circadian CBT rhythm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the wrist skin temperature rhythm could be used as a possible index of the human circadian system. To this end, wrist skin temperature (WT1), as determined by a wireless data logger in healthy normal living subjects, was correlated with sleep-wake diaries and oral temperature (OT) recordings. WT and sleep habits were studied in 99 university students. Each subject wore a wireless iButton sensor attached to the inner side of a sport wristband. Our results show that the WT rhythm exhibits an inverse phase relationship with OT, and it is phase-advanced by 60 min with respect to OT. WT started to increase in association to bed time and dropped sharply after awakening. A secondary WT increase, independent of feeding, was observed in the early afternoon. In conclusion, WT wireless recording can be considered a reliable procedure to evaluate circadian rhythmicity, and an index to establish and follow the effects of chronotherapy in normal living subjects.

  6. Circadian Plasticity of Mammalian Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons participate in all neuronal circuits in the mammalian brain, including the circadian clock system, and are indispensable for their effective function. Although the clock neurons have different molecular and electrical properties, their main function is the generation of circadian oscillations. Here we review the circadian plasticity of GABAergic interneurons in several areas of the mammalian brain, suprachiasmatic nucleus, neocortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, cerebellum, striatum, and in the retina. PMID:28367335

  7. Aging and Circadian Disruption: Causes and Effects

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven A.; Schmitt, Karen; Eckert, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between aging and daily “circadian” behavior in humans is bidirectional: on the one hand, dysfunction of circadian clocks promotes age-related maladies; on the other, aging per se leads to changes and disruption in circadian behavior and physiology. For the latter case, recent research suggests that changes to both homeostatic and circadian sleep regulatory mechanisms may play a role. Could hormonal changes be in part responsible? PMID:21869460

  8. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  9. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  10. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  11. Circadian clocks: lessons from fish.

    PubMed

    Idda, M Laura; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Vallone, Daniela; Gothilf, Yoav; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and cellular organization of the circadian timing system in vertebrates has increased enormously over the past decade. In large part, progress has been based on genetic studies in the mouse as well as on fundamental similarities between vertebrate and Drosophila clocks. The zebrafish was initially considered as a potentially attractive genetic model for identifying vertebrate clock genes. However, instead, fish have ultimately proven to be valuable complementary models for studying various aspects of clock biology. For example, many fish can shift from diurnal to nocturnal activity implying specific flexibility in their clock function. We have learned much about the function of light input pathways, and the ontogeny and function of the pineal organ, the fish central pacemaker. Finally, blind cavefish have also provided new insight into the evolution of the circadian clock under extreme environmental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Redox regulation and pro-oxidant reactions in the physiology of circadian systems.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Isabel; Vázquez-Martínez, Olivia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Valente-Godínez, Héctor; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    Rhythms of approximately 24 h are pervasive in most organisms and are known as circadian. There is a molecular circadian clock in each cell sustained by a feedback system of interconnected "clock" genes and transcription factors. In mammals, the timing system is formed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, in coordination with a collection of peripheral oscillators. Recently, an extensive interconnection has been recognized between the molecular circadian clock and the set of biochemical pathways that underlie the bioenergetics of the cell. A principle regulator of metabolic networks is the flow of electrons between electron donors and acceptors. The concomitant reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions directly influence the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes. This review summarizes and discusses recent findings concerning the mutual and dynamic interactions between the molecular circadian clock, redox reactions, and redox signaling. The scope includes the regulatory role played by redox coenzymes (NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H, GSH/GSSG), reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide), antioxidants (melatonin), and physiological events that modulate the redox state (feeding condition, circadian rhythms) in determining the timing capacity of the molecular circadian clock. In addition, we discuss a purely metabolic circadian clock, which is based on the redox enzymes known as peroxiredoxins and is present in mammalian red blood cells and in other biological systems. Both the timing system and the metabolic network are key to a better understanding of widespread pathological conditions such as the metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options.

  14. Coordinated Rhythmic Motion by Uncoupled Neuronal Oscillators with Sensory Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Tetsuya

    This paper explores the potential of biological oscillators as a basic unit for feedback control to achieve rhythmic motion of locomotory systems. Among those properties of biological control systems that are useful for engineering applications, we focus on decentralized coordination, that is, the ability of uncoupled neuronal oscillators to coordinate rhythmic body movements to achieve locomotion with the aid of local sensory feedback. We will consider the reciprocal inhibition oscillator (RIO) as a candidate for the basic control unit, and show that uncoupled RIOs can achieve decentralized coordination of a prototype mechanical rectifier (PMR) that captures essential dynamics underlying animal locomotion by a simple arm-disk configuration. Optimality of the induced locomotion is studied in comparison with analytical results we derive for statically optimal PMR locomotion.

  15. Involvement of Drosophila uncoupling protein 5 in metabolism and aging.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Blanco, Adolfo; Fridell, Yih-Woei C; Helfand, Stephen L

    2006-03-01

    A novel uncoupling protein, UCP5, has recently been characterized as a functional mitochondrial uncoupler in Drosophila. Here we demonstrate that UCP5 knockout (UCP5KO) flies are highly sensitive to starvation stress, a phenotype that can be reversed by ectopic neuronal expression of UCP5. UCP5KO flies live longer than controls on low-calorie diets, have a decreased level of fertility, and gain less weight than controls on high-calorie diets. However, isolated mitochondria from UCP5KO flies display the same respiration patterns as controls. Furthermore, total ATP levels in both UCP5KO and control flies are comparable. UCP5KO flies have a lower body composition of sugars, and during starvation stress their triglyceride reserves are depleted more rapidly than controls. Taken together, these data indicate that UCP5 is important to maintain metabolic homeostasis in the fly. We hypothesize that UCP5 influences hormonal control of metabolism.

  16. Perspectives on mitochondrial uncoupling proteins-mediated neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Susana; Correia, Sónia; Carvalho, Cristina; Candeias, Emanuel; Plácido, Ana I; Duarte, Ana I; Seiça, Raquel M; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-04-01

    The integrity of mitochondrial function is essential to cell life. It follows that disturbances of mitochondrial function will lead to disruption of cell function, expressed as disease or even death. Considering that neuronal uncoupling proteins (UCPs) decrease reactive oxygen species (ROS) production at the expense of energy production, it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms by which UCPs control the balance between the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and ROS in the context of normal physiological activity and in pathological conditions. Here we review the current understanding of neuronal UCPs-mediated respiratory uncoupling process by performing a survey in their physiology and regulation. The latest findings regarding neuronal UCPs physiological roles and their involvement and interest as potential targets for therapeutic intervention in brain diseases will also be exploited.

  17. Circadian organization in hemimetabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Kenji; Abdelsalam, Salaheldin

    2004-12-01

    The circadian system of hemimetabolous insects is reviewed in respect to the locus of the circadian clock and multioscillatory organization. Because of relatively easy access to the nervous system, the neuronal organization of the clock system in hemimetabolous insects has been studied, yielding identification of the compound eye as the major photoreceptor for entrainment and the optic lobe for the circadian clock locus. The clock site within the optic lobe is inconsistent among reported species; in cockroaches the lobula was previously thought to be a most likely clock locus but accessory medulla is recently stressed to be a clock center, while more distal part of the optic lobe including the lamina and the outer medulla area for the cricket. Identification of the clock cells needs further critical studies. Although each optic lobe clock seems functionally identical, in respect to photic entrainment and generation of the rhythm, the bilaterally paired clocks form a functional unit. They interact to produce a stable time structure within individual insects by exchanging photic and temporal information through neural pathways, in which serotonin and pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) are involved as chemical messengers. The mutual interaction also plays an important role in seasonal adaptation of the rhythm.

  18. The primate circadian timekeeping system in a hyperdynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of hyperdynamic field (12 d at 1.5 G and 35 d at 2.0 G phases, preceded and followed by 1.0 G phases of 15 and 18 days, respectively) on the circadian rhythm in the feeding and drinking of the squirrel monkey was studied. Two lighting regimens were employed: (1) the 24-hr light-dark cycle (LD 12:12) at all G phases and (2) constant light (LL) during the two 1.0 G phases and a 2.0 G phase. In the LD regimen, both feeding and drinking rhythms were entrained with the 24-hr periods at all G levels, but a phase delay occurred in high G environment. In the LL regimen, the rhythm persisted with a free-running period greater than 24 hours and an increase at 2.0 G, compared to the 1.0 G phases. Thus, although the circadian rhythm is functional at high G, some of its components appear to be regulated at different homeostatic levels.

  19. Circadian rhythms of crawling and swimming in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, James M; Kirouac, Lauren E; Naimie, Amanda A; Bixby, Kimberly A; Lee, Colin; Malanga, Stephanie; Raubach, Maureen; Watson, Winsor H

    2014-12-01

    Daily rhythms of activity driven by circadian clocks are expressed by many organisms, including molluscs. We initiated this study, with the nudibranch Melibe leonina, with four goals in mind: (1) determine which behaviors are expressed with a daily rhythm; (2) investigate which of these rhythmic behaviors are controlled by a circadian clock; (3) determine if a circadian clock is associated with the eyes or optic ganglia of Melibe, as it is in several other gastropods; and (4) test the hypothesis that Melibe can use extraocular photoreceptors to synchronize its daily rhythms to natural light-dark cycles. To address these goals, we analyzed the behavior of 55 animals exposed to either artificial or natural light-dark cycles, followed by constant darkness. We also repeated this experiment using 10 animals that had their eyes removed. Individuals did not express daily rhythms of feeding, but they swam and crawled more at night. This pattern of locomotion persisted in constant darkness, indicating the presence of a circadian clock. Eyeless animals also expressed a daily rhythm of locomotion, with more locomotion at night. The fact that eyeless animals synchronized their locomotion to the light-dark cycle suggests that they can detect light using extraocular photoreceptors. However, in constant darkness, these rhythms deteriorated, suggesting that the clock neurons that influence locomotion may be located in, or near, the eyes. Thus, locomotion in Melibe appears to be influenced by both ocular and extraocular photoreceptors, although the former appear to have a greater influence on the expression of circadian rhythms.

  20. Circadian variation of plasma atrial natriuretic peptide, cortisol and fluid balance in the goat.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, U M; Riskilä, P; Roihankorpi, M T; Soveri, T

    2001-01-01

    Circadian variation of plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cortisol and fluid balance was studied in ten adult female goats. The concentrations of plasma antidiuretic hormone (ADH), electrolytes, creatinine and total protein, as well as plasma and urine osmolalities and renal electrolyte excretion and clearances (Cosm, CH2O, Ccrea), were used to evaluate fluid balance. At 3-h intervals, urine was collected from five goats and venous blood samples from all ten goats. Urethral catheterization had no effect on the results. Besides the lower plasma creatinine level in the dark than in daylight, no other changes were observed in relation to luminousness. Plasma concentrations of ANP, ADH, total protein and K, urine flow rate and osmolality, urine concentrations of Na, K and creatinine, renal Na and K excretion, Cosm, CH2O and Ccrea, and haematocrit showed no circadian variation. Circadian variation was observed in plasma osmolality (P < 0.05) and the concentrations of Na (P < 0.05) and creatinine (P < 0.05), with achrophases around 16:00 hours and nadirs between 01:00 and 07:00 hours. Changes in osmolality and Na followed the feeding schedule. There was a small elevation in plasma cortisol levels in six goats after midnight, which may be the consequence of circadian rhythm. In conclusion, the results suggest that in plasma ANP no circadian rhythm exists.

  1. KAYAK-α modulates circadian transcriptional feedback loops in Drosophila pacemaker neurons.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jinli; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2012-11-21

    Circadian rhythms are generated by well-conserved interlocked transcriptional feedback loops in animals. In Drosophila, the dimeric transcription factor CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) promotes period (per), timeless (tim), vrille (vri), and PAR-domain protein 1 (Pdp1) transcription. PER and TIM negatively feed back on CLK/CYC transcriptional activity, whereas VRI and PDP1 negatively and positively regulate Clk transcription, respectively. Here, we show that the α isoform of the Drosophila FOS homolog KAYAK (KAY) is required for normal circadian behavior. KAY-α downregulation in circadian pacemaker neurons increases period length by 1.5 h. This behavioral phenotype is correlated with decreased expression of several circadian proteins. The strongest effects are on CLK and the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR, which are both under VRI and PDP1 control. Consistently, KAY-α can bind to VRI and inhibit its interaction with the Clk promoter. Interestingly, KAY-α can also repress CLK activity. Hence, in flies with low KAY-α levels, CLK derepression would partially compensate for increased VRI repression, thus attenuating the consequences of KAY-α downregulation on CLK targets. We propose that the double role of KAY-α in the two transcriptional loops controlling Drosophila circadian behavior brings precision and stability to their oscillations.

  2. Robots Would Couple And Uncouple Fluid And Electrical Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Castillo, Eduardo Lopez; Davis, Virgil; Ferguson, Bob; Reichle, Garland

    1992-01-01

    Robots make and break connections between umbilical plates and mating connectors on rockets about to be launched. Sensing and control systems include vision, force, and torque subsystems. Enhances safety by making it possible to couple and uncouple umbilical plates quickly, without exposing human technicians to hazards of leaking fuels and oxidizers. Significantly reduces time spent to manually connect umbilicals. Robots based on similar principles used in refueling of National AeroSpace Plane (NASP) and satellites and orbital transfer vehicles in space.

  3. Chimera states in uncoupled neurons induced by a multilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, Soumen; Perc, Matjaž; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-12-01

    Spatial coexistence of coherent and incoherent dynamics in network of coupled oscillators is called a chimera state. We study such chimera states in a network of neurons without any direct interactions but connected through another medium of neurons, forming a multilayer structure. The upper layer is thus made up of uncoupled neurons and the lower layer plays the role of a medium through which the neurons in the upper layer share information among each other. Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with square wave bursting dynamics are considered as nodes in both layers. In addition, we also discuss the existence of chimera states in presence of inter layer heterogeneity. The neurons in the bottom layer are globally connected through electrical synapses, while across the two layers chemical synapses are formed. According to our research, the competing effects of these two types of synapses can lead to chimera states in the upper layer of uncoupled neurons. Remarkably, we find a density-dependent threshold for the emergence of chimera states in uncoupled neurons, similar to the quorum sensing transition to a synchronized state. Finally, we examine the impact of both homogeneous and heterogeneous inter-layer information transmission delays on the observed chimera states over a wide parameter space.

  4. Chimera states in uncoupled neurons induced by a multilayer structure.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Soumen; Perc, Matjaž; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-12-13

    Spatial coexistence of coherent and incoherent dynamics in network of coupled oscillators is called a chimera state. We study such chimera states in a network of neurons without any direct interactions but connected through another medium of neurons, forming a multilayer structure. The upper layer is thus made up of uncoupled neurons and the lower layer plays the role of a medium through which the neurons in the upper layer share information among each other. Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with square wave bursting dynamics are considered as nodes in both layers. In addition, we also discuss the existence of chimera states in presence of inter layer heterogeneity. The neurons in the bottom layer are globally connected through electrical synapses, while across the two layers chemical synapses are formed. According to our research, the competing effects of these two types of synapses can lead to chimera states in the upper layer of uncoupled neurons. Remarkably, we find a density-dependent threshold for the emergence of chimera states in uncoupled neurons, similar to the quorum sensing transition to a synchronized state. Finally, we examine the impact of both homogeneous and heterogeneous inter-layer information transmission delays on the observed chimera states over a wide parameter space.

  5. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Badran, Mohammad; Abuyassin, Bisher; Golbidi, Saeid; Ayas, Najib; Laher, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is often present in diabetic (DB) patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7(m) +/+ Lepr(db) /J) (db/db) mice (10 weeks old) and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA) for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic), IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic), IADB (intermittent air diabetic), and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic) groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO) were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice.

  6. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ayas, Najib

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is often present in diabetic (DB) patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7m +/+ Leprdb/J) (db/db) mice (10 weeks old) and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA) for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic), IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic), IADB (intermittent air diabetic), and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic) groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO) were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice. PMID:27840666

  7. Arrhythmia and neuronal/endothelial myocyte uncoupling in hyperhomocysteinemia*

    PubMed Central

    ROSENBERGER, DOROTHEA; MOSHAL, KARNI S.; KARTHA, GANESH K.; TYAGI, NEETU; SEN, UTPAL; LOMINADZE, DAVID; MALDONADO, CLAUDIO; ROBERTS, ANDREW M.; TYAGI, SURESH C.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated levels of homocysteine (Hcy) known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) are associated with arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Hcy decreases constitutive neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide (NO), and cardiac diastolic relaxation. Hcy increases the iNOS/NO, peroxynitrite, mitochondrial NADPH oxidase, and suppresses superoxide dismutase (SOD) and redoxins. Hcy activates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), disrupts connexin-43 and increases collagen/elastin ratio. The disruption of connexin-43 and accumulation of collagen (fibrosis) disrupt the normal pattern of cardiac conduction and attenuate NO transport from endothelium to myocyte (E-M) causing E-M uncoupling, leading to a pro-arrhythmic environment. The goal of this review is to elaborate the mechanism of Hcy-mediated iNOS/NO in E-M uncoupling and SCD. It is known that Hcy creates arrhythmogenic substrates (i.e. increase in collagen/elastin ratio and disruption in connexin-43) and exacerbates heart failure during chronic volume overload. Also, Hcy behaves as an agonist to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, an excitatory neurotransmitter) receptor-1, and blockade of NMDA-R1 reduces the increase in heart rate-evoked by NMDA-analog and reduces SCD. This review suggest that Hcy increases iNOS/NO, superoxide, metalloproteinase activity, and disrupts connexin-43, exacerbates endothelial-myocyte uncoupling and cardiac failure secondary to inducing NMDA-R1. PMID:17178594

  8. Chimera states in uncoupled neurons induced by a multilayer structure

    PubMed Central

    Majhi, Soumen; Perc, Matjaž; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-01-01

    Spatial coexistence of coherent and incoherent dynamics in network of coupled oscillators is called a chimera state. We study such chimera states in a network of neurons without any direct interactions but connected through another medium of neurons, forming a multilayer structure. The upper layer is thus made up of uncoupled neurons and the lower layer plays the role of a medium through which the neurons in the upper layer share information among each other. Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with square wave bursting dynamics are considered as nodes in both layers. In addition, we also discuss the existence of chimera states in presence of inter layer heterogeneity. The neurons in the bottom layer are globally connected through electrical synapses, while across the two layers chemical synapses are formed. According to our research, the competing effects of these two types of synapses can lead to chimera states in the upper layer of uncoupled neurons. Remarkably, we find a density-dependent threshold for the emergence of chimera states in uncoupled neurons, similar to the quorum sensing transition to a synchronized state. Finally, we examine the impact of both homogeneous and heterogeneous inter-layer information transmission delays on the observed chimera states over a wide parameter space. PMID:27958355

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  10. [Multilayered control of the Mammalian circadian system].

    PubMed

    Ode, Koji L; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2014-06-01

    All mammals show daily rhythms in their physiological activity, for example, sleep-wake cycles. This rhythmicity is endogenously generated by a system called the circadian clock, and is composed of reactions occurring in several neural/cellular layers of multicellular organisms. Inter-cellular and inter-organ communication is important for the synchronous action of circadian rhythmicity across the whole body. The heart of the circadian system lies in the rhythmic neuronal activity of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain. The oscillation emerges as cell-autonomous rhythmic gene expression observed in individual SCN neurons. Inter-neuronal communication synchronizes the circadian phase of each neuron within the SCN. The integrated rhythmic SCN activity works as a pacemaker for the circadian clocks of non-SCN cells, each of which also rhythmically express clock genes. The -24-h period length of the circadian rhythm is predominantly determined by reactions at the molecular level. Cell-autonomous circadian oscillation is driven by a negative feedback loop of transcription regulation, where CRY/PER heterodimers act as the transcriptional repressors of their own genes. One of the rate limiting steps of circadian cycling is a phosphorylation of CRY and PER proteins followed by proteasome-mediated degradation of those proteins. Pharmacological and genetic perturbation of the phosphorylation or degradation pathways alters the circadian period length. This review provides a hierarchical view of the circadian system, which is important to uncover the different effects of medical or social perturbations on circadian regulation of inter-cellular synchronization, or cell-autonomous oscillation.

  11. The liver of goldfish as a component of the circadian system: Integrating a network of signals.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bretaño, Aída; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L; Delgado, María J; Isorna, Esther

    2015-09-15

    The circadian system drives daily physiological and behavioral rhythms that allow animals to anticipate cyclic environmental changes. The discovery of the known as "clock genes", which are very well conserved through vertebrate phylogeny, highlighted the molecular mechanism of circadian oscillators functioning, based on transcription and translation cycles (∼ 24 h) of such clock genes. Studies in goldfish have shown that the circadian system in this species is formed by a net of oscillators distributed at central and peripheral locations, as the retina, brain, gut and liver, among others. In this work we review the existing information about the hepatic oscillator in goldfish due to its relevance in metabolism, and its key role as target of a variety of humoral signals. Different input signals modify the molecular clockwork in the liver of goldfish. Among them, there are environmental cues (photocycle and feeding regime) and different encephalic and peripheral endogenous signals (orexin, ghrelin and glucocorticoids). Per clock genes seem to be a common target for different signals. Thus, this genes family might be important for shifting the hepatic oscillator. The physiological relevance of the crosstalking between metabolic and feeding-related hormones and the hepatic clock sets the stage for the hypothesis that these hormones could act as "internal zeitgebers" communicating oscillators in the goldfish circadian system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Circadian dysfunction induces leptin resistance in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt over...

  13. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake, and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. Both restricted feedi...

  14. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry.

  15. Molecular orchestration of the hepatic circadian symphony.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock determines the rhythmic expression of many different genes throughout a 24-hour period. A recent study investigating the circadian regulation of liver proteins reveals multiple levels of regulation, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms.

  16. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  17. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  18. Running for time: circadian rhythms and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Markova-Car, Elitza P; Jurišić, Davor; Ilić, Nataša; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Circadian timing system includes an input pathway transmitting environmental signals to a core oscillator that generates circadian signals responsible for the peripheral physiological or behavioural events. Circadian 24-h rhythms regulate diverse physiologic processes. Deregulation of these rhythms is associated with a number of pathogenic conditions including depression, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer. Melanoma is a less common type of skin cancer yet more aggressive often with a lethal ending. However, little is known about circadian control in melanoma and exact functional associations between core clock genes and development of melanoma skin cancer. This paper, therefore, comprehensively analyses current literature data on the involvement of circadian clock components in melanoma development. In particular, the role of circadian rhythm deregulation is discussed in the context of DNA repair mechanisms and influence of UV radiation and artificial light exposure on cancer development. The role of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme and impact of melatonin, as a major output factor of circadian rhythm, and its protective role in melanoma are discussed in details. We hypothesise that further understanding of clock genes' involvement and circadian regulation might foster discoveries in the field of melanoma diagnostics and treatment.

  19. Circadian clocks, brain function, and development.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ellen; Sidor, Michelle M; Gamble, Karen L; Cirelli, Chiara; Sharkey, Katherine M; Hoyle, Nathaniel; Tikotzky, Liat; Talbot, Lisa S; McCarthy, Michael J; Hasler, Brant P

    2013-12-01

    Circadian clocks are temporal interfaces that organize biological systems and behavior to dynamic external environments. Components of the molecular clock are expressed throughout the brain and are centrally poised to play an important role in brain function. This paper focuses on key issues concerning the relationship among circadian clocks, brain function, and development, and discusses three topic areas: (1) sleep and its relationship to the circadian system; (2) systems development and psychopathology (spanning the prenatal period through late life); and (3) circadian factors and their application to neuropsychiatric disorders. We also explore circadian genetics and psychopathology and the selective pressures on the evolution of clocks. Last, a lively debate is presented on whether circadian factors are central to mood disorders. Emerging from research on circadian rhythms is a model of the interaction among genes, sleep, and the environment that converges on the circadian clock to influence susceptibility to developing psychopathology. This model may lend insight into effective treatments for mood disorders and inform development of new interventions.

  20. [Circadian clocks and energy metabolism in rodents].

    PubMed

    Challet, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is an important component of physiological processes which provides them with a 24-hour temporal organization and adjustment to cyclical changes in the environment. Circadian rhythms are controlled by a network of endogenous clocks, comprising the main clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus and many secondary clocks in the brain and peripheral tissues. All aspects of energy metabolism, from food intake to intracellular signaling pathways, are strongly influenced by circadian rhythmicity. In turn, meal timing is an efficient synchronizer (time-giver) to set the phase of the peripheral clocks, while the suprachiasmatic clock is synchronized by ambient light. In certain nutritional conditions (i.e., low- or high-calory diets), metabolic factors remaining to be identified modulate the functioning of the suprachiasmatic clock. Animal models of obesity and diabetes show circadian alterations. Conversely, when circadian rhythmicity is disturbed, either due to genetically defective circadian clocks, or to circadian desynchronization (chronic light exposure or repeated meals at odd times of the cycle), lipid and glucose metabolism is deregulated. The metabolic impact of circadian desynchronization justifies the development of preventive or therapeutic strategies that could rely, among others, on dietary interventions combining timed meals and specific composition.

  1. [Relation between dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei; Meguro, Kenichi

    2014-03-01

    Dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance are closely linked. First, dementia patient shows circadian rhythm disorders (e.g. insomnia, night wandering, daytime sleep). These symptoms are a burden for caregivers. Circadian rhythm disturbance of dementia relates ADL and cognitive impairment, and diurnal rhythm disorder of blood pressure and body temperature. Some study shows that circadian rhythm disorders in dementia are a disturbance of neural network between suprachiasmatic nucleus and cerebral white matter, and involvement of both frontal lobes, left parietal and occipital cortex, left temporoparietal region. The first-line treatment of circadian rhythm disturbance should be non-drug therapy (e.g. exercise, bright light exposure, reduce caffeine intake, etc.). If physician prescribe drugs, keep the rule of low-dose and short-term and avoid benzodiazepines. Atypical antipsychotic drugs like risperidone and some antidepressants are useful for treatment of insomnia in dementia. But this usage is off-label. So we must well inform to patient and caregiver, and get consent about treatment. Second, some study shows circadian rhythm disorder is a risk factor of dementia. However, we should discuss that circadian rhythm disturbance is "risk factor of dementia" or "prodromal symptom of dementia". If a clinician finds circadian rhythm disorder in elderly people, should be examined cognitive and ADL function, and careful about that patients have dementia or will develop dementia.

  2. The circadian clock of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks organize our inner physiology with respect to the external world providing life with the ability to anticipate and thereby better prepare for major fluctuations in its environment. Circadian systems are widely represented in nearly all major branches of life except archaebacteria, and within the eukaryotes the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa has served for nearly half a century as a durable model organism for uncovering the basic circadian physiology and molecular biology. Studies using Neurospora have clarified our fundamental understanding of the clock as nested positive and negative feedback loops regulated through transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes. These feedback loops are centered on a limited number of proteins that form molecular complexes, and their regulation provides a physical explanation for nearly all clock properties. This review will introduce the basics of circadian rhythms, the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, and provide an overview of the molecular components and regulation of the circadian clock. PMID:21707668

  3. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  4. Circadian rhythms and treatment implications in depression.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Martiadis, Vassilis; Maj, Mario

    2011-08-15

    In humans almost all physiological and behavioural functions occur on a rhythmic basis. Therefore the possibility that delays, advances or desynchronizations of circadian rhythms may play a role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders is an interesting field of research. In particular mood disorders such as seasonal affective disorder and major depression have been linked to circadian rhythms alterations. Furthermore, the antidepressant efficacy of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies affecting endogenous circadian rhythms, such as new antidepressant medications, light-therapy and sleep deprivation, is consistent with the idea that circadian alterations may represent a core component of depression, at least in a subgroup of depressed patients. This paper briefly describes the molecular and genetic mechanisms regulating the endogenous clock system, and reviews the literature supporting the relationships between depression, antidepressant treatments and changes in circadian rhythms.

  5. Genetic basis of human circadian rhythm disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher R; Huang, Angela L; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2013-05-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health.

  6. The Circadian Clock Coordinates Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Symul, Laura; Martin, Eva; Atger, Florian; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23300384

  7. The sweet tooth of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Fu, Minnie; Yang, Xiaoyong

    2017-08-15

    The endogenous circadian clock is a key regulator of daily metabolic processes. On the other hand, circadian clocks in a broad range of tissues can be tuned by extrinsic and intrinsic metabolic cues. The bidirectional interaction between circadian clocks and metabolism involves both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Nuclear receptors exemplify the transcriptional programs that couple molecular clocks to metabolism. The post-translational modifications of the core clock machinery are known to play a key role in metabolic entrainment of circadian clocks. O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of intracellular proteins is a key mediator of metabolic response to nutrient availability. This review highlights our current understanding of the role of protein O-GlcNAcylation in mediating metabolic input and output of the circadian clock. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Stem cells and the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Weger, Meltem; Diotel, Nicolas; Dorsemans, Anne-Claire; Dickmeis, Thomas; Weger, Benjamin D

    2017-09-09

    The circadian timing system is a complex biological network of interacting circadian clocks that regulates 24h rhythms of behavioral and physiological processes. One intriguing observation is that stem cell homeostasis is subject to circadian clock regulation. Rhythmic oscillations have been observed in a variety of embryonic and adult stem cell dependent processes, such as hematopoietic progenitor cell migration, the hair follicle cycle, bone remodeling, regenerative myogenesis and neurogenesis. This review aims to discuss the nature of the circadian clock in embryonic stem cells and how it changes during differentiation. Furthermore, it will examine how the circadian clock contributes to adult stem cell function in different tissues of the body with an emphasis on the brain and adult neurogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Circadian rhythms in cardiac gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Martin E

    2003-12-01

    Circadian rhythms in blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output have been intensely studied, largely due to the well-documented phenomenon of increased cardiovascular death in the early hours of the morning. Circadian rhythmicity in both cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology has been attributed primarily to diurnal variations in neurohumoral factors, such as sympathetic activity. It has become increasingly apparent that the intrinsic properties of the heart (seen at the level of gene and protein expression, energy metabolism, and contractile function) show significant fluctuations during the course of the day. These changes might be due to extracardiac (eg, neurohumoral factors) and/or intracardiac (eg, circadian clocks) influences. Circadian clocks are transcriptionally based, molecular mechanisms that enable the cell to anticipate diurnal variations in environmental stimuli. The cardiac circadian clock synchronizes responsiveness of the heart to diurnal variations in its environment, and impairment of this mechanism might contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

  10. [Circadian clocks and lifestyle-related diseases].

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated relationships between the disturbance of circadian rhythm and the development of lifestyle-related diseases. First, epidemiological studies showed that rotating shift workers are more likely to develop obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and cancers than day shift employees. In addition, mice with their circadian rhythm chronically impaired by alteration of the light-dark cycle also develop such diseases. Furthermore, both the genotypes and genetic modifications of the clock genes are associated with the development of lifestyle-related diseases in humans and mice, respectively. Finally, circadian clocks in peripheral tissues are impaired in both patients with type 2 diabetes and obese diabetic mice, probably not due to metabolic abnormalities, but to the lifestyle, aging, and/or genetic factors. Thus, disturbance of the circadian rhythm is an important cause of lifestyle-related diseases, and therefore the circadian clocks are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing and treating these conditions.

  11. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  12. The biology of the circadian Ck1epsilon tau mutation in mice and Syrian hamsters: a tale of two species.

    PubMed

    Loudon, A S I; Meng, Q J; Maywood, E S; Bechtold, D A; Boot-Handford, R P; Hastings, M H

    2007-01-01

    The tau mutation in the Syrian hamster resides in the enzyme casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1epsilon), resulting in a dramatic acceleration of wheel-running activity cycles to about 20 hours. tau also impacts growth, energy, metabolism, feeding behavior, and circadian mechanisms underpinning seasonal timing, causing accelerated reproductive and neuroendocrine responses to photoperiodic changes. Modeling and experimental studies suggest that tau acts as a gain of function on specific residues of PER, consistent with hamster studies showing accelerated degradation of PER in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the early circadian night. We have created null and tau mutants of Ck1epsilon in mice. Circadian period lengthens in CK1epsilon(/), whereas CK1epsilon(tau/tau) shortens circadian period of behavior in vivo in a manner nearly identical to that of the Syrian hamster. CK1epsilon(tau/tau) also accelerates molecular oscillations in peripheral tissues, demonstrating its global circadian role. CK1epsilon(tau) acts by promoting degradation of both nuclear and cytoplasmic PERIOD, but not CRYPTOCHROME, proteins. Our studies reveal that tau acts as a gain-of-function mutation, to accelerate degradation of PERIOD proteins. tau has consistent effects in both hamsters and mice on the circadian organization of behavior and metabolism, highlighting the global impact of this mutation on mammalian clockwork in brain and periphery.

  13. Stress-induced protein CSP 310: a third uncoupling system in plants.

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, A V; Pobezhimova, T P; Grabelnych, O I; Voinikov, V K

    2002-06-01

    Addition of the cold-stress-related protein CSP 310 to mitochondria isolated from winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L. cv. Zalarinka), winter rye ( Secale cereale L. cv. Dymka), maize ( Zea mays L. cv. VIR 36) and pea ( Pisum sativum L. cv. Marat) caused an increase in non-phosphorylative respiration. This increase was inhibited by KCN, indicating that the protein is not a CN-resistant alternative oxidase. Unlike plant mitochondrial uncoupling proteins such as PUMP, the uncoupling action of CSP 310 did not depend on the presence of free fatty acids in the incubation medium. We propose that the mechanism of the uncoupling action of CSP 310 differs from that of other known plant uncoupling systems and that the CSP 310 uncoupling system is a third uncoupling system in cereals.

  14. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ... Feeding Tubes Health Information Sheet Q & A with Experts Patient Stories Social Security Disability Application Process For Kids ...

  15. [Circadian markers and genes in bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Yeim, S; Boudebesse, C; Etain, B; Belliviera, F

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and complex multifactorial disease, characterized by alternance of acute episodes of depression and mania/hypomania, interspaced by euthymic periods. The etiological determinants of bipolar disorder yet, are still poorly understood. For the last 30 years, chronobiology is an important field of investigation to better understand the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. We conducted a review using Medline, ISI Database, EMBase, PsyInfo up to January 2015, using the following keywords combinations: "mood disorder", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "unipolar disorder", "major depressive disorder", "affective disorder", for psychiatric conditions; and "circadian rhythms", "circadian markers", "circadian gene", "clock gene", "melatonin" for circadian rhythms. The search critera was presence of word in any field of the article. Quantitative and qualitative circadian abnormalities are associated with bipolar disorders both during acute episodes and euthymic periods, suggesting that these altered circadian rhythms may represent biological trait markers of the disorder. These circadian dysfunctions were assessed by various validated tools including polysomnography, actigraphy, sleep diaries, chronotype assessments and blood melatonin/cortisol measures. Other altered endogenous circadian activities have also been reported in bipolar patients, such as hormones secretion, core body temperature or fibroblasts activity. Moreover, these markers were also altered in healthy relatives of bipolar patients, suggesting a degree of heritability. Several genetic association studies have also showed associations between multiple circadian genes and bipolar disorder, such as CLOCK, ARTNL1, GSK3β, PER3, NPAS2, NR1D1, TIMELESS, RORA, RORB, and CSNK1ε. Thus, these circadian gene variants may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of the disease. Furthermore, the study of the clock system may help to better understand some phenotypic aspects like the

  16. Targeted mitochondrial uncoupling beyond UCP1 - The fine line between death and metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Ost, Mario; Keipert, Susanne; Klaus, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    In the early 1930s, the chemical uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) was promoted for the very first time as a powerful and effective weight loss pill but quickly withdrawn from the market due to its lack of tissue-selectivity with resulting dangerous side effects, including hyperthermia and death. Today, novel mitochondria- or tissue-targeted chemical uncouplers with higher safety and therapeutic values are under investigation in order to tackle obesity, diabetes and fatty liver disease. Moreover, in the past 20 years, transgenic mouse models were generated to understand the molecular and metabolic consequences of targeted uncoupling, expressing functional uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) ectopically in white adipose tissue or skeletal muscle. Similar to the action of chemical mitochondrial uncouplers, UCP1 protein dissipates the proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thus allowing maximum activity of the respiratory chain and compensatory increase in oxygen consumption, uncoupled from ATP synthesis. Consequently, targeted mitochondrial uncoupling in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of UCP1-transgenic mice increased substrate metabolism and ameliorates obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance. Further, muscle-specific decrease in mitochondrial efficiency promotes a cell-autonomous and cell-non-autonomous adaptive metabolic remodeling with increased oxidative stress tolerance. This review provides an overview of novel chemical uncouplers as well as the metabolic consequences and adaptive processes of targeted mitochondrial uncoupling on metabolic health and survival.

  17. Uncoupler-reversible inhibition of mitochondrial ATPase by metal chelates of bathophenanthroline. I. General features.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, C; Ernster, L

    1981-12-14

    (1) Certain metal chelates of 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthroline, BPh) are potent inhibitors of soluble mitochondrial F1-ATPase. (2) The BPh-metal chelate inhibition of soluble mitochondrial F1-ATPase is relieved by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. (3) The uncouplers appear to interact directly with the inhibitory chelates, forming stoichiometric adducts. (4) A complex between F1 and bPh3Fe2+, containing 3 mol BPh3Fe2+/mol F1, has been isolated. The enzymically inactive F1-BPh3Fe2+ complex binds uncouplers, yielding an enzymically active F1-BPh3Fe2+-uncoupler complex.

  18. Cellular interactions uncouple beta-adrenergic receptors from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ciment, G; de Vellis, J

    1978-11-17

    C6 glioma cells and B104 neuroblastoma cells both possess adenylate cyclase activity, but only C6 cells have beta-adrenergic receptors. However, when cocultured with B104 cells, C6 cells show a marked decrease in their ability to accumulate adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate upon stimulation with beta receptor agonists. Since both beta receptors and cholera toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities are present in C6/B104 cocultures, we conclude that the beta receptor/adenylate cyclase transduction mechanism in cocultured C6 cells is uncoupled.

  19. EGCG ameliorates diet-induced metabolic syndrome associating with the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yashi; Qi, Guoyuan; Fan, Rong; Ji, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Xuebo

    2017-06-01

    In response to the daily light-dark (LD) cycle, organisms on Earth have evolved with the approximately 24-h endogenous oscillations to coordinate behavioral and physiological processes, including feeding, sleep, and metabolism homeostasis. Circadian desynchrony triggered by an energy-dense diet rich in fats and fructose is intimately connected with a series of metabolic disorders. Previous studies revealed that (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could mitigate metabolic misalignment; however, only a few reports have focused on its potential effect on directly manipulating circadian rhythms to ameliorate metabolic syndrome. Our goal was to investigate the regulating effect of EGCG treatment on metabolic misalignment triggered by a high-fat and high-fructose diet (HFFD) associating with the circadian clock. Our results indicated that HFFD treatment partially exhibited poor circadian oscillations of the core clock gene and the clock-controlled gene in the liver and fat relative to the control group. EGCG administration may ameliorate the diet-dependent decline in circadian function by controlling the Sirt1-PGC1αloop, implying the existence of an EGCG-entrainable oscillator. Subsequently, reducing fatty acid synthesis and elevating β-oxidation in the liver coupled with the increasing brown adipose tissue (BAT) energy expenditure observed in the EGCG group of mice prevented the adipocyte hypertrophy and fat accumulations common to BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT) derived from the HFFD mice. This study is the first to provide compelling evidences that EGCG may ameliorate diet-induced metabolic misalignment by regulating the rhythmic expression of the circadian clock genes in the liver and fat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Weakly Circadian Cells Improve Resynchrony

    PubMed Central

    Thoroughman, Kurt A.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) contain thousands of neurons capable of generating near 24-h rhythms. When isolated from their network, SCN neurons exhibit a range of oscillatory phenotypes: sustained or damping oscillations, or arrhythmic patterns. The implications of this variability are unknown. Experimentally, we found that cells within SCN explants recover from pharmacologically-induced desynchrony by re-establishing rhythmicity and synchrony in waves, independent of their intrinsic circadian period We therefore hypothesized that a cell's location within the network may also critically determine its resynchronization. To test this, we employed a deterministic, mechanistic model of circadian oscillators where we could independently control cell-intrinsic and network-connectivity parameters. We found that small changes in key parameters produced the full range of oscillatory phenotypes seen in biological cells, including similar distributions of period, amplitude and ability to cycle. The model also predicted that weaker oscillators could adjust their phase more readily than stronger oscillators. Using these model cells we explored potential biological consequences of their number and placement within the network. We found that the population synchronized to a higher degree when weak oscillators were at highly connected nodes within the network. A mathematically independent phase-amplitude model reproduced these findings. Thus, small differences in cell-intrinsic parameters contribute to large changes in the oscillatory ability of a cell, but the location of weak oscillators within the network also critically shapes the degree of synchronization for the population. PMID:23209395

  1. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  2. Circadian Clocks in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The immune system is a complex set of physiological mechanisms whose general aim is to defend the organism against non-self-bodies, such as pathogens (bacteria, viruses, parasites), as well as cancer cells. Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-h variations found in virtually all physiological processes. These circadian rhythms are generated by circadian clocks, located in most cell types, including cells of the immune system. This review presents an overview of the clocks in the immune system and of the circadian regulation of the function of immune cells. Most immune cells express circadian clock genes and present a wide array of genes expressed with a 24-h rhythm. This has profound impacts on cellular functions, including a daily rhythm in the synthesis and release of cytokines, chemokines and cytolytic factors, the daily gating of the response occurring through pattern recognition receptors, circadian rhythms of cellular functions such as phagocytosis, migration to inflamed or infected tissue, cytolytic activity, and proliferative response to antigens. Consequently, alterations of circadian rhythms (e.g., clock gene mutation in mice or environmental disruption similar to shift work) lead to disturbed immune responses. We discuss the implications of these data for human health and the areas that future research should aim to address. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Cognition in circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kathryn J; McGee-Koch, Lori L; Zee, Phyllis C

    2011-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior exist in all living organisms, from cells to humans. The most evident rhythms are the recurrent cycles of sleep and wake as well as changes in alertness and cognitive performance across the 24h. Clearly, sleep pressure can exert a strong influence on cognitive performance, but the influence of circadian modulation of alertness and cognitive function is evident even when the pressure for sleep is high. Circadian rhythms also influence more complex cognitive tasks, such as selective attention and executive function, which are important for work performance and safety. The circadian timekeeping system also ensures that circadian rhythms are appropriately synchronized to the external physical environment and work and social schedules. Circadian misalignment is the basis for all circadian rhythm sleep disorders. These disorders are often associated with impairments of cognitive performance that can have adverse effects on school and work performance, overall quality of life, and safety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Circadian regulators of intestinal lipid absorption

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Among all the metabolites present in the plasma, lipids, mainly triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol, show extensive circadian rhythms. These lipids are transported in the plasma as part of lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and intestine and their production exhibits circadian rhythmicity. Studies have shown that various proteins involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein biosynthesis show circadian expression. Further, intestinal epithelial cells express circadian clock genes and these genes might control circadian expression of different proteins involved in intestinal lipid absorption. Intestinal circadian clock genes are synchronized by signals emanating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei that constitute a master clock and from signals coming from other environmental factors, such as food availability. Disruptions in central clock, as happens due to disruptions in the sleep/wake cycle, affect intestinal function. Similarly, irregularities in temporal food intake affect intestinal function. These changes predispose individuals to various metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Here, we summarize how circadian rhythms regulate microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apoAIV, and nocturnin to affect diurnal regulation of lipid absorption. PMID:25057097

  5. Principles for circadian orchestration of metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Thurley, Kevin; Herbst, Christopher; Wesener, Felix; Koller, Barbara; Wallach, Thomas; Maier, Bert; Kramer, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern multiple aspects of animal metabolism. Transcriptome-, proteome- and metabolome-wide measurements have revealed widespread circadian rhythms in metabolism governed by a cellular genetic oscillator, the circadian core clock. However, it remains unclear if and under which conditions transcriptional rhythms cause rhythms in particular metabolites and metabolic fluxes. Here, we analyzed the circadian orchestration of metabolic pathways by direct measurement of enzyme activities, analysis of transcriptome data, and developing a theoretical method called circadian response analysis. Contrary to a common assumption, we found that pronounced rhythms in metabolic pathways are often favored by separation rather than alignment in the times of peak activity of key enzymes. This property holds true for a set of metabolic pathway motifs (e.g., linear chains and branching points) and also under the conditions of fast kinetics typical for metabolic reactions. By circadian response analysis of pathway motifs, we determined exact timing separation constraints on rhythmic enzyme activities that allow for substantial rhythms in pathway flux and metabolite concentrations. Direct measurements of circadian enzyme activities in mouse skeletal muscle confirmed that such timing separation occurs in vivo. PMID:28159888

  6. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Deprivation, and Human Performance

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Namni; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi; Dinges, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the current science on, and mathematical modeling of, dynamic changes in human performance within and between days is dominated by the two-process model of sleep–wake regulation, which posits a neurobiological drive for sleep that varies homeostatically (increasing as a saturating exponential during wakefulness and decreasing in a like manner during sleep), and a circadian process that neurobiologically modulates both the homeostatic drive for sleep and waking alertness and performance. Endogenous circadian rhythms in neurobehavioral functions, including physiological alertness and cognitive performance, have been demonstrated using special laboratory protocols that reveal the interaction of the biological clock with the sleep homeostatic drive. Individual differences in circadian rhythms and genetic and other components underlying such differences also influence waking neurobehavioral functions. Both acute total sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction increase homeostatic sleep drive and degrade waking neurobehavioral functions as reflected in sleepiness, attention, cognitive speed, and memory. Recent evidence indicating a high degree of stability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep loss suggests that these trait-like individual differences are phenotypic and likely involve genetic components, including circadian genes. Recent experiments have revealed both sleep homeostatic and circadian effects on brain metabolism and neural activation. Investigation of the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying the dynamically complex interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian systems is beginning. A key goal of this work is to identify biomarkers that accurately predict human performance in situations in which the circadian and sleep homeostatic systems are perturbed. PMID:23899598

  7. Light inputs shape the Arabidopsis circadian system.

    PubMed

    Wenden, Bénédicte; Kozma-Bognár, László; Edwards, Kieron D; Hall, Anthony J W; Locke, James C W; Millar, Andrew J

    2011-05-01

    The circadian clock is a fundamental feature of eukaryotic gene regulation that is emerging as an exemplar genetic sub-network for systems biology. The circadian system in Arabidopsis plants is complex, in part due to its phototransduction pathways, which are themselves under circadian control. We therefore analysed two simpler experimental systems. Etiolated seedlings entrained by temperature cycles showed circadian rhythms in the expression of genes that are important for the clock mechanism, but only a restricted set of downstream target genes were rhythmic in microarray assays. Clock control of phototransduction pathways remained robust across a range of light inputs, despite the arrhythmic transcription of light-signalling genes. Circadian interactions with light signalling were then analysed using a single active photoreceptor. Phytochrome A (phyA) is expected to be the only active photoreceptor that can mediate far-red (FR) light input to the circadian clock. Surprisingly, rhythmic gene expression was profoundly altered under constant FR light, in a phyA-dependent manner, resulting in high expression of evening genes and low expression of morning genes. Dark intervals were required to allow high-amplitude rhythms across the transcriptome. Clock genes involved in this response were identified by mutant analysis, showing that the EARLY FLOWERING 4 gene is a likely target and mediator of the FR effects. Both experimental systems illustrate how profoundly the light input pathways affect the plant circadian clock, and provide strong experimental manipulations to understand critical steps in the plant clock mechanism.

  8. Peripheral circadian oscillators and their rhythmic regulation.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Tosini, Gianluca

    2003-05-01

    Most of the organisms living on earth show 24 hour (circadian) rhythms that are endogenously controlled by biological clocks. In mammals, these rhythms are generated by the circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. However, recent studies have demonstrated that circadian oscillators can be found in many organs and tissues, and it appears that the circadian oscillators in the periphery are not self-sustained, since, in vitro, the oscillation disappears after a few cycles. Although analysis of the clockwork mechanism indicates that the molecular composition of the clock in the SCN and in the peripheral tissues is very similar, the mechanism responsible for the damping of the circadian oscillation in the periphery is unknown. Recent studies have also indicated that the mammalian circadian system is hierarchically organized in that the SCN (i.e., the master circadian pacemaker) controls the peripheral oscillators in order to coordinate the physiological events in an entire body. The mechanisms by which the SCN controls peripheral oscillators are just starting to be elucidated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings on functioning of these extra-SCN oscillators and the mechanisms the SCN controls peripheral oscillators.

  9. Association of intrinsic circadian period with morningness-eveningness, usual wake time, and circadian phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The biological basis of preferences for morning or evening activity patterns ("early birds" and "night owls") has been hypothesized but has remained elusive. The authors reported that, compared with evening types, the circadian pacemaker of morning types was entrained to an earlier hour with respect to both clock time and wake time. The present study explores a chronobiological mechanism by which the biological clock of morning types may be set to an earlier hour. Intrinsic period, a fundamental property of the circadian system, was measured in a month-long inpatient study. A subset of participants also had their circadian phase assessed. Participants completed a morningness-eveningness questionnaire before study. Circadian period was correlated with morningness-eveningness, circadian phase, and wake time, demonstrating that a fundamental property of the circadian pacemaker is correlated with the behavioral trait of morningness-eveningness.

  10. In vitro circadian period is associated with circadian/sleep preference

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Akiko; Kitamura, Shingo; Ohsawa, Yosuke; Enomoto, Minori; Katayose, Yasuko; Motomura, Yuki; Moriguchi, Yoshiya; Nozaki, Kentaro; Watanabe, Makiko; Aritake, Sayaka; Higuchi, Shigekazu; Kato, Mie; Kamei, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Shin; Goto, Yu-ichi; Ikeda, Masaaki; Mishima, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of circadian phenotypes is crucial for understanding the pathophysiology of diseases associated with disturbed biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). We measured clock gene expression in fibroblasts from individual subjects and observed circadian rhythms in the cells (in vitro rhythms). Period length of the in vitro rhythm (in vitro period) was compared with the intrinsic circadian period, τ, measured under a forced desynchrony protocol (in vivo period) and circadian/sleep parameters evaluated by questionnaires, sleep log, and actigraphy. Although no significant correlation was observed between the in vitro and in vivo periods, the in vitro period was correlated with chronotype, habitual sleep time, and preferred sleep time. Our data demonstrate that the in vitro period is significantly correlated with circadian/sleep preference. The findings suggest that fibroblasts from individual patients can be utilized for in vitro screening of therapeutic agents to provide personalized therapeutic regimens for CRSD patients. PMID:23797865

  11. Association of intrinsic circadian period with morningness-eveningness, usual wake time, and circadian phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The biological basis of preferences for morning or evening activity patterns ("early birds" and "night owls") has been hypothesized but has remained elusive. The authors reported that, compared with evening types, the circadian pacemaker of morning types was entrained to an earlier hour with respect to both clock time and wake time. The present study explores a chronobiological mechanism by which the biological clock of morning types may be set to an earlier hour. Intrinsic period, a fundamental property of the circadian system, was measured in a month-long inpatient study. A subset of participants also had their circadian phase assessed. Participants completed a morningness-eveningness questionnaire before study. Circadian period was correlated with morningness-eveningness, circadian phase, and wake time, demonstrating that a fundamental property of the circadian pacemaker is correlated with the behavioral trait of morningness-eveningness.

  12. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  13. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds.

  14. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  15. The circadian timing system in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Innominato, Pasquale F; Roche, Véronique P; Palesh, Oxana G; Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Spiegel, David; Lévi, Francis A

    2014-06-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) controls several critical molecular pathways for cancer processes and treatment effects over the 24 hours, including drug metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair mechanisms. This results in the circadian time dependency of whole-body and cellular pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anticancer agents. However, CTS robustness and phase varies among cancer patients, based on circadian monitoring of rest- activity, body temperature, sleep, and/or hormonal secretion rhythms. Circadian disruption has been further found in up to 50% of patients with metastatic cancer. Such disruption was associated with poor outcomes, including fatigue, anorexia, sleep disorders, and short progression-free and overall survival. Novel, minimally invasive devices have enabled continuous CTS assessment in non-hospitalized cancer patients. They revealed up to 12-hour differences in individual circadian phase. Taken together, the data support the personalization of chronotherapy. This treatment method aims at the adjustment of cancer treatment delivery according to circadian rhythms, using programmable-in-time pumps or novel release formulations, in order to increase both efficacy and tolerability. A fixed oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin chronotherapy protocol prolonged median overall survival in men with metastatic colorectal cancer by 3.3 months as compared to conventional delivery, according to a meta-analysis (P=0.009). Further analyses revealed the need for the prevention of circadian disruption or the restoration of robust circadian function in patients on chronotherapy, in order to further optimize treatment effects. The strengthening of external synchronizers could meet such a goal, through programmed exercise, meal timing, light exposure, improved social support, sleep scheduling, and the properly timed administration of drugs that target circadian clocks. Chrono-rehabilitation warrants clinical testing for improving

  16. Circadian control of mRNA polyadenylation dynamics regulates rhythmic protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shihoko; Sher-Chen, Elaine L.; Green, Carla B.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A) tails are 3′ modifications of eukaryotic mRNAs that are important in the control of translation and mRNA stability. We identified hundreds of mouse liver mRNAs that exhibit robust circadian rhythms in the length of their poly(A) tails. Approximately 80% of these are primarily the result of nuclear adenylation coupled with rhythmic transcription. However, unique decay kinetics distinguish these mRNAs from other mRNAs that are transcribed rhythmically but do not exhibit poly(A) tail rhythms. The remaining 20% are uncoupled from transcription and exhibit poly(A) tail rhythms even though the steady-state mRNA levels are not rhythmic. These are under the control of rhythmic cytoplasmic polyadenylation, regulated at least in some cases by cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins (CPEBs). Importantly, we found that the rhythmicity in poly(A) tail length is closely correlated with rhythmic protein expression, with a several-hour delay between the time of longest tail and the time of highest protein level. Our study demonstrates that the circadian clock regulates the dynamic polyadenylation status of mRNAs, which can result in rhythmic protein expression independent of the steady-state levels of the message. PMID:23249735

  17. The Nuclear Receptor Rev-erbα Controls Circadian Thermogenic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Everett, Logan J.; Loro, Emanuele; Briggs, Erika R.; Bugge, Anne; Hou, Catherine; Ferrara, Christine; Seale, Patrick; Pryma, Daniel A.; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian oscillation of body temperature is a basic, evolutionary-conserved feature of mammalian biology1. Additionally, homeostatic pathways allow organisms to protect their core temperatures in response to cold exposure2. However, the mechanism responsible for coordinating daily body temperature rhythm and adaptability to environmental challenges is unknown. Here we show that the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα, a powerful transcriptional repressor, links circadian and thermogenic networks through the regulation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) function. Mice exposed to cold fare dramatically better at 5 AM (Zeitgeber time 22) when Rev-erbα is barely expressed than at 5 PM (ZT10) when Rev-erbα is abundant. Deletion of Rev-erbα markedly improves cold tolerance at 5 PM, indicating that overcoming Rev-erbα-dependent repression is a fundamental feature of the thermogenic response to cold. Physiological induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) by cold temperatures is preceded by rapid down-regulation of Rev-erbα in BAT. Rev-erbα represses UCP1 in a brown adipose cell-autonomous manner and BAT UCP1 levels are high in Rev-erbα-null mice even at thermoneutrality. Genetic loss of Rev-erbα also abolishes normal rhythms of body temperature and BAT activity. Thus, Rev-erbα acts as a thermogenic focal point required for establishing and maintaining body temperature rhythm in a manner that is adaptable to environmental demands. PMID:24162845

  18. Circadian Integration of Metabolism and Energetics

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Joseph; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks align behavioral and biochemical processes with the day/night cycle. Nearly all vertebrate cells possess self-sustained clocks that couple endogenous rhythms with changes in cellular environment. Genetic disruption of clock genes in mice perturbs metabolic functions of specific tissues at distinct phases of the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian desynchrony, a characteristic of shift work and sleep disruption in humans, also leads to metabolic pathologies. Here we review advances in understanding the interrelationship among circadian disruption, sleep deprivation, obesity and diabetes, and implications for rational therapeutics for these conditions. PMID:21127246

  19. Circadian Disruption: comparing humans with mice.

    PubMed

    Radetsky, Leora C; Rea, Mark S; Bierman, Andrew; Figueiro, Mariana G

    2013-10-01

    Disruption of the 24-h light-dark cycle has been implicated as an endocrine disruptor and linked to increased morbidity and mortality in animal studies. Previously reported measurements of circadian disruption in day-shift and rotating-shift nurses were compared with new mouse data where the light-dark patterns simulated shiftwork. Phasor magnitudes, a measure of circadian entrainment, were shown to be similar for humans and for mice when exposed to similar patterns of light and dark. Phasor analyses may be a useful method for quantitatively bridging ecological measurements of circadian disruption in human with parametric studies of health outcomes in a mouse model.

  20. Mitochondrial ATP-Pi exchange complex and the site of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hatefi, Y; Hanstein, W G; Galante, Y; Stiggall, D L

    1975-07-01

    Five enzyme complexes, which are concerned with electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, have been isolated from beef heart mitochondria. Enzyme complexes I, II, III and IV are the electron transfer complexes discovered in 1961. Complex V is an energy-conserving complex. It catalyzes ATP-Pi exchange and ATP hydrolysis. The exchange reaction is sensitive to uncouplers, rutamycin, valinomycin plus K-+, dicyclorexylcarboditmide, arsenate, azide, and adenylyl imidodiphosphate. It is also specific for ATP; ITP, GTP and UTP are essentially ineffective. Studies with the photoaffinity labeling uncoupler, 2-azido-4-nitrophenol (NPA), have shown that the mitochondrial uncoupler-binding sites are located exclusively in complex V. Complexes I, III and IV, which carry the three coupling sites of the respiratory chain, had negligible capacity for the binding of NPA, whereas the uncoupler-binding capacity of complex V appeared to be increased two- to threefold as compared to mitochondria. Complexes I, II, III, IV and V are obtained from the same batch of mitochondria by a simple fractionation procedure, which employs cholate, deoxycholate, ammonium acetate and ammonium sulfate. Studies with NPA have shown that mitochondria contain per milligram protein about 0.6 nmole of uniformly reacting uncoupler binding site. All of the uncouplers tested appeared to interact competitively with this site. Photoaffinity labeling with tritiated NPA has shown that a major portion of NPA binds to a polypeptide of molecular weight between 26,000 and 30,000. Other studies on the mechanism of uncoupling have shown that picrate is a membrane-impermeable uncoupler. It cannot uncouple mitochondria. However, it is an effective uncoupler of ATP synthesis and ATP-induced transhydrogenation or reverse electron transfer when used in conjunction with sonicated submitochondrial particles, which have an inside-out orientation of the inner membrane with respect to the medium. In these particles, picrate

  1. Seasonal uncoupling of demographic processes in a marine clonal plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaró, O.; Romero, J.; Pérez, M.

    2014-04-01

    In temperate regions, climatic factors impose a general seasonal pattern on seagrass growth that can be observed in leaf growth rates and, in small species, also in shoot density. Large variations in shoot density suggest a strong temporal uncoupling between shoot recruitment and shoot mortality, and the dependence of each of these processes on different drivers. Here we examine seasonal patterns of recruitment and mortality in the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa, one of the species most sensitive to seasonal forcing in the Mediterranean. We sampled two local populations submitted to different nutrient availability in Alfacs Bay (NW Mediterranean) and determined recruitment and mortality rates, as well as other plant traits, on a monthly basis. Our results confirm the hypothesized uncoupling, with maximum mortality 2 months after maximum recruitment. Whereas timing of recruitment was associated with light availability, and was supported by carbohydrate remobilisation, mortality was related to high water temperatures and probably also to light limitation in late summer due to self-shading. In the high-nutrient population, algal overgrowth caused further light deprivation, with mortality rates higher than in the low-nutrient population. It is emphasised that the demographic balance of the studied populations was negative for most of the year, with the exception of August and September. Therefore, caution is necessary when overall population trends are inferred from single annual sampling events.

  2. Flavivirus Infection Uncouples Translation Suppression from Cellular Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Hanna; Magg, Vera; Uch, Fabian; Mutz, Pascal; Klein, Philipp; Haneke, Katharina; Lohmann, Volker; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Fackler, Oliver T.; Locker, Nicolas; Stoecklin, Georg

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT As obligate parasites, viruses strictly depend on host cell translation for the production of new progeny, yet infected cells also synthesize antiviral proteins to limit virus infection. Modulation of host cell translation therefore represents a frequent strategy by which viruses optimize their replication and spread. Here we sought to define how host cell translation is regulated during infection of human cells with dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV), two positive-strand RNA flaviviruses. Polysome profiling and analysis of de novo protein synthesis revealed that flavivirus infection causes potent repression of host cell translation, while synthesis of viral proteins remains efficient. Selective repression of host cell translation was mediated by the DENV polyprotein at the level of translation initiation. In addition, DENV and ZIKV infection suppressed host cell stress responses such as the formation of stress granules and phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α (α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2). Mechanistic analyses revealed that translation repression was uncoupled from the disruption of stress granule formation and eIF2α signaling. Rather, DENV infection induced p38-Mnk1 signaling that resulted in the phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E and was essential for the efficient production of virus particles. Together, these results identify the uncoupling of translation suppression from the cellular stress responses as a conserved strategy by which flaviviruses ensure efficient replication in human cells. PMID:28074025

  3. The role of uncoupling proteins in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Li, Ji; Li, Wen-Jian; Wang, Chun-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are anion carriers expressed in the mitochondrial inner membrane that uncouple oxygen consumption by the respiratory chain from ATP synthesis. The physiological functions of UCPs have long been debated since the new UCPs (UCP2 to 5) were discovered, and the role of UCPs in the pathogeneses of diabetes mellitus is one of the hottest topics. UCPs are thought to be activated by superoxide and then decrease mitochondrial free radicals generation; this may provide a protective effect on diabetes mellitus that is under the oxidative stress conditions. UCP1 is considered to be a candidate gene for diabetes because of its role in thermogenesis and energy expenditure. UCP2 is expressed in several tissues and acts in the negative regulation of insulin secretion by β-cells and in fatty acid metabolism. UCP3 plays a role in fatty acid metabolism and energy homeostasis and modulates insulin sensitivity. Several gene polymorphisms of UCP1, UCP2, and UCP3 were reported to be associated with diabetes. The progress in the role of UCP1, UCP2, and UCP3 on diabetes mellitus is summarized in this review.

  4. Inflammation and Uncoupling as Mechanisms of Periodontal Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Graves, D.T.; Li, J.; Cochran, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by both inflammation and bone loss. Advances in research in both these areas have led to a new appreciation of not only each field but also the intimate relationship between inflammation and bone loss. This relationship has resulted in a new field of science called osteoimmunology and provides a context for better understanding the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In this review, we discuss several aspects of the immuno-inflammatory host response that ultimately results in loss of alveolar bone. A proposal is made that periodontal inflammation not only stimulates osteoclastogenesis but also interferes with the uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, consistent with a pathologic process. Furthermore, arguments based on experimental animal models suggest a critical role of the spatial and temporal aspects of inflammation in the periodontium. A review of these findings leads to a new paradigm to help explain more fully the impact of inflammation on alveolar bone in periodontal disease so that it includes the effects of inflammation on uncoupling of bone formation from resorption. PMID:21135192

  5. Circadian rhythm of corticosterone secretion in the neonatal rabbit.

    PubMed

    Rovirosa, Maria J; Levine, Seymour; Gordon, M Kathleen; Caba, Mario

    2005-08-08

    Maternal care in the rabbit is restricted to a single 3- to 5-min period of nursing each day. One to three hours prior to the arrival of the mother, pups exhibit anticipatory behavioral arousal and elevation of core body temperature. In rodents, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is quiescent and levels of the adrenal hormone, corticosterone (CORT), are stable and extremely low during the first days of life, which are known collectively as the stress-hyporesponsive period (SHRP). It has been proposed that the rabbit also has an SHRP. However, we decided to examine CORT changes associated with the daily nursing bout, since behavioral arousal, core body temperature, and CORT are elevated prior to the onset of feeding in many other species. We scheduled the nursing bout at 1000 h and analyzed CORT concentration using RIA in pups sampled at various intervals after suckling. CORT levels showed a circadian variation that peaked at the time of the daily nursing bout. After nursing, values steadily decreased to a nadir at 2200 h and then rose again in advance of the next scheduled nursing. The three-fold difference between the highest (1000 h) and the lowest (2200 h) CORT values suggests that either the SHRP does not exist in rabbit pups or else it has properties that differ from those described for rodents. Unlike rodents, rabbit pups show a circadian secretion of CORT synchronized to the scheduled nursing bout.

  6. Circadian entrainment and its role in depression: a mechanistic review.

    PubMed

    Lall, G S; Atkinson, L A; Corlett, S A; Broadbridge, P J; Bonsall, D R

    2012-10-01

    The natural rotation of the earth generates an environmental day-night cycle that repeats every 24 h. This daily transition from dawn to dusk provides one of the most important time cues to which the majority of organisms synchronise their activity. Under these conditions, natural light, a photic stimulus, provides the principal entraining cue. In mammals, an endogenous circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus acts as a coordinating centre to align physiological activity with the environmental light-dark cycle. However, the SCN also receives regulatory input from a number of behavioural, non-photic, cues such as physical activity, social interactions and feeding routines. The unique ability of the SCN to integrate both photic and non-photic cues allows it to generate a rhythm that is tailored to the individual and entrained to the environment. Here, we review the key neurotransmitter systems involved in both photic and non-photic transmission to the SCN and their interactions that assist in generating an entrained output rhythm. We also consider the impact on health of a desynchronised circadian system with a focus on depressive affective disorders and current therapies aimed at manipulating the relationship between photic and non-photic SCN regulators.

  7. Exploring the role of locomotor sensitization in the circadian food entrainment pathway

    PubMed Central

    Opiol, Hanna; de Zavalia, Nuria; Delorme, Tara; Solis, Pavel; Rutherford, Spencer; Shalev, Uri; Amir, Shimon

    2017-01-01

    Food entrainment is the internal mechanism whereby the phase and period of circadian clock genes comes under the control of daily scheduled food availability. Food entrainment allows the body to efficiently realign the internal timing of behavioral and physiological functions such that they anticipate food intake. Food entrainment can occur with or without caloric restriction, as seen with daily schedules of restricted feeding (RF) or restricted treat (RT) that restrict food or treat intake to a single feeding time. However, the extent of clock gene control is more pronounced with caloric restriction, highlighting the role of energy balance in regulating clock genes. Recent studies have implicated dopamine (DA) to be involved in food entrainment and caloric restriction is known to affect dopaminergic pathways to enhance locomotor activity. Since food entrainment results in the development of a distinct behavioral component, called food anticipatory activity (FAA), we examined the role of locomotor sensitization (LS) in food entrainment by 1) observing whether amphetamine (AMPH) sensitization results in enhanced locomotor output of FAA and 2) measuring LS of circadian and non-circadian feeding paradigms to an acute injection of AMPH (AMPH cross-sensitization). Unexpectedly, AMPH sensitization did not show enhancement of FAA. On the contrary, LS did develop with sufficient exposure to RF. LS was present after 2 weeks of RF, but not after 1, 3 or 7 days into RF. When food was returned and rats regain their original body weight at 10–15 days post-RF, LS remained present. LS did not develop to RT, nor to feedings of a non-circadian schedule, e.g. variable restricted feeding (VRF) or variable RT (VRT). Further, when RF was timed to the dark period, LS was observed only when tested at night; RF timed to the light period resulted in LS that was present during day and night. Taken together our results show that LS develops with food entrainment to RF, an effect that is

  8. Exploring the role of locomotor sensitization in the circadian food entrainment pathway.

    PubMed

    Opiol, Hanna; de Zavalia, Nuria; Delorme, Tara; Solis, Pavel; Rutherford, Spencer; Shalev, Uri; Amir, Shimon

    2017-01-01

    Food entrainment is the internal mechanism whereby the phase and period of circadian clock genes comes under the control of daily scheduled food availability. Food entrainment allows the body to efficiently realign the internal timing of behavioral and physiological functions such that they anticipate food intake. Food entrainment can occur with or without caloric restriction, as seen with daily schedules of restricted feeding (RF) or restricted treat (RT) that restrict food or treat intake to a single feeding time. However, the extent of clock gene control is more pronounced with caloric restriction, highlighting the role of energy balance in regulating clock genes. Recent studies have implicated dopamine (DA) to be involved in food entrainment and caloric restriction is known to affect dopaminergic pathways to enhance locomotor activity. Since food entrainment results in the development of a distinct behavioral component, called food anticipatory activity (FAA), we examined the role of locomotor sensitization (LS) in food entrainment by 1) observing whether amphetamine (AMPH) sensitization results in enhanced locomotor output of FAA and 2) measuring LS of circadian and non-circadian feeding paradigms to an acute injection of AMPH (AMPH cross-sensitization). Unexpectedly, AMPH sensitization did not show enhancement of FAA. On the contrary, LS did develop with sufficient exposure to RF. LS was present after 2 weeks of RF, but not after 1, 3 or 7 days into RF. When food was returned and rats regain their original body weight at 10-15 days post-RF, LS remained present. LS did not develop to RT, nor to feedings of a non-circadian schedule, e.g. variable restricted feeding (VRF) or variable RT (VRT). Further, when RF was timed to the dark period, LS was observed only when tested at night; RF timed to the light period resulted in LS that was present during day and night. Taken together our results show that LS develops with food entrainment to RF, an effect that is

  9. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Mitochondrial Uncoupling in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yaguang; Shi, Hai; Lee, Kyongbum

    2009-01-01

    Background Increasing energy expenditure at the cellular level offers an attractive option to limit adiposity and improve whole body energy balance. In vivo and in vitro observations have correlated mitochondrial uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) expression with reduced white adipose tissue triglyceride (TG) content. The metabolic basis for this correlation remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings This study tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial uncoupling requires the cell to compensate for the decreased oxidation phosphorylation efficiency by up-regulating lactate production, thus redirecting carbon flux away from TG synthesis. Metabolic flux analysis was used to characterize the effects of non-lethal, long-term mitochondrial uncoupling (up to 18 days) on the pathways of intermediary metabolism in differentiating 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Uncoupling was induced by forced expression of UCP1 and chemical (FCCP) treatment. Chemical uncoupling significantly decreased TG content by ca. 35%. A reduction in the ATP level suggested diminished oxidative phosphorylation efficiency in the uncoupled adipocytes. Flux analysis estimated significant up-regulation of glycolysis and down-regulation of fatty acid synthesis, with chemical uncoupling exerting quantitatively larger effects. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study support our hypothesis regarding uncoupling-induced redirection of carbon flux into glycolysis and lactate production, and suggest mitochondrial proton translocation as a potential target for controlling adipocyte lipid metabolism. PMID:19746157

  10. Participation of the Olfactory Bulb in Circadian Organization during Early Postnatal Life in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Erika; Ortega-Bernal, Juan Roberto; Trejo-Muñoz, Lucero; Díaz, Georgina; Montúfar-Chaveznava, Rodrigo; Caldelas, Ivette

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that during pre-visual stages of development in mammals, circadian regulation is still not under the control of the light-entrainable hypothalamic pacemaker, raising the possibility that the circadian rhythmicity that occurs during postnatal development is under the control of peripheral oscillators, such as the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We evaluated the outcome of olfactory bulbectomy on the temporal pattern of core body temperature and gross locomotor activity in newborn rabbits. From postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: intact pups (INT), intact pups fed by enteral gavage (INT+ENT), sham operated pups (SHAM), pups with unilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-UNI), and pups with bilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-BI). At the beginning of the experiment, from P1-8, the animals in all groups were fed at 11:00, from P9-13 the feeding schedule was delayed 6 h (17:00), and finally, from P14-15 the animals were subjected to fasting conditions. The rabbit pups of the INT, INT+ENT, SHAM and OBx-UNI groups exhibited a clear circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and locomotor activity, with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to the nursing or feeding schedule, which persisted even during fasting conditions. In addition, phase delays in the nursing or feeding schedule induced a clear phase shift in both parameters. In contrast, the OBx-BI group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters under entrained conditions that altered the anticipatory component, as well as deficient phase control of both rhythms. The present results demonstrate that the expression of circadian rhythmicity at behavioral and physiological levels during early stages of rabbit development largely depends on the integrity of the main olfactory bulb.

  11. Participation of the Olfactory Bulb in Circadian Organization during Early Postnatal Life in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Erika; Ortega-Bernal, Juan Roberto; Trejo-Muñoz, Lucero; Díaz, Georgina; Montúfar-Chaveznava, Rodrigo; Caldelas, Ivette

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that during pre-visual stages of development in mammals, circadian regulation is still not under the control of the light-entrainable hypothalamic pacemaker, raising the possibility that the circadian rhythmicity that occurs during postnatal development is under the control of peripheral oscillators, such as the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We evaluated the outcome of olfactory bulbectomy on the temporal pattern of core body temperature and gross locomotor activity in newborn rabbits. From postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: intact pups (INT), intact pups fed by enteral gavage (INT+ENT), sham operated pups (SHAM), pups with unilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-UNI), and pups with bilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-BI). At the beginning of the experiment, from P1-8, the animals in all groups were fed at 11:00, from P9-13 the feeding schedule was delayed 6 h (17:00), and finally, from P14-15 the animals were subjected to fasting conditions. The rabbit pups of the INT, INT+ENT, SHAM and OBx-UNI groups exhibited a clear circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and locomotor activity, with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to the nursing or feeding schedule, which persisted even during fasting conditions. In addition, phase delays in the nursing or feeding schedule induced a clear phase shift in both parameters. In contrast, the OBx-BI group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters under entrained conditions that altered the anticipatory component, as well as deficient phase control of both rhythms. The present results demonstrate that the expression of circadian rhythmicity at behavioral and physiological levels during early stages of rabbit development largely depends on the integrity of the main olfactory bulb. PMID:27305041

  12. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Sleep:wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease. Mechanisms underlying the connection between circadian/sleep dysregulation and neurodegeneration remain unclear, but several recent studies provide interesting possibilities. While mechanistic analysis is underway, it is worth considering treatment of circadian/sleep disruption as a means to alleviate symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26947521

  13. The Logic of Circadian Organization in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dissel, Stephane; Hansen, Celia N.; Özkaya, Özge; Hemsley, Matthew; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; Rosato, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, interlocked negative transcription/translation feedback loops provide the core of the circadian clock that generates rhythmic phenotypes. Although the current molecular model portrays the oscillator as cell autonomous, cross-talk among clock neurons is essential for robust cycling behavior. Nevertheless, the functional organization of the neuronal network remains obscure. Results Here we show that shortening or lengthening of the circadian period of locomotor activity can be obtained either by targeting different groups of clock cells with the same genetic manipulation or by challenging the same group of cells with activators and repressors of neuronal excitability. Conclusions Based on these observations we interpret circadian rhythmicity as an emerging property of the circadian network and we propose an initial model for its architectural design. PMID:25220056

  14. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep, and Disorders of Aging.

    PubMed

    Mattis, Joanna; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-04-01

    Sleep-wake cycles are known to be disrupted in people with neurodegenerative disorders. These findings are now supported by data from animal models for some of these disorders, raising the question of whether the disrupted sleep/circadian regulation contributes to the loss of neural function. As circadian rhythms and sleep consolidation also break down with normal aging, changes in these may be part of what makes aging a risk factor for disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mechanisms underlying the connection between circadian/sleep dysregulation and neurodegeneration remain unclear, but several recent studies provide interesting possibilities. While mechanistic analysis is under way, it is worth considering treatment of circadian/sleep disruption as a means to alleviate symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Circadian Dysfunction Induces Leptin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Nicole M; Mayo, Sara A; Hua, Jack; Lee, Choogon; Moore, David D; Fu, Loning

    2015-09-01

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt overall energy homeostasis and Leptin signaling. We found that BMAL1/CLOCK generates circadian rhythm of C/EBPα-mediated leptin transcription in adipose. Per and Cry mutant mice show similar disruption of peripheral clock and deregulation of leptin in fat, but opposite body weight and composition phenotypes that correlate with their distinct patterns of POMC neuron deregulation in the arcuate nucleus. Chronic jet lag is sufficient to disrupt the endogenous adipose clock and also induce central Leptin resistance in wild-type mice. Thus, coupling of the central and peripheral clocks controls Leptin endocrine feedback homeostasis. We propose that Leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity in humans, plays a key role in circadian dysfunction-induced obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  16. Using circadian entrainment to find cryptic clocks.

    PubMed

    Eelderink-Chen, Zheng; Olmedo, Maria; Bosman, Jasper; Merrow, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Three properties are most often attributed to the circadian clock: a ca. 24-h free-running rhythm, temperature compensation of the circadian rhythm, and its entrainment to zeitgeber cycles. Relatively few experiments, however, are performed under entrainment conditions. Rather, most chronobiology protocols concern constant conditions. We have turned this paradigm around and used entrainment to study the circadian clock in organisms where a free-running rhythm is weak or lacking. We describe two examples therein: Caenorhabditis elegans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By probing the system with zeitgeber cycles that have various structures and amplitudes, we can demonstrate the establishment of systematic entrained phase angles in these organisms. We conclude that entrainment can be utilized to discover hitherto unknown circadian clocks and we discuss the implications of using entrainment more broadly, even in model systems that show robust free-running rhythms.

  17. Circadian Rhythms and Hormonal Homeostasis: Pathophysiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gnocchi, Davide; Bruscalupi, Giovannella

    2017-01-01

    Over recent years, a deeper comprehension of the molecular mechanisms that control biological clocks and circadian rhythms has been achieved. In fact, many studies have contributed to unravelling the importance of the molecular clock for the regulation of our physiology, including hormonal and metabolic homeostasis. Here we will review the structure, organisation and molecular machinery that make our circadian clock work, and its relevance for the proper functioning of physiological processes. We will also describe the interconnections between circadian rhythms and endocrine homeostasis, as well as the underlying consequences that circadian dysregulations might have in the development of several pathologic affections. Finally, we will discuss how a better knowledge of such relationships might prove helpful in designing new therapeutic approaches for endocrine and metabolic diseases. PMID:28165421

  18. Photopic transduction implicated in human circadian entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Despite the preeminence of light as the synchronizer of the circadian timing system, the phototransductive machinery in mammals which transmits photic information from the retina to the hypothalamic circadian pacemaker remains largely undefined. To determine the class of photopigments which this phototransductive system uses, we exposed a group (n = 7) of human subjects to red light below the sensitivity threshold of a scotopic (i.e. rhodopsin/rod-based) system, yet of sufficient strength to activate a photopic (i.e. cone-based) system. Exposure to this light stimulus was sufficient to reset significantly the human circadian pacemaker, indicating that the cone pigments which mediate color vision can also mediate circadian vision.

  19. Photopic transduction implicated in human circadian entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Despite the preeminence of light as the synchronizer of the circadian timing system, the phototransductive machinery in mammals which transmits photic information from the retina to the hypothalamic circadian pacemaker remains largely undefined. To determine the class of photopigments which this phototransductive system uses, we exposed a group (n = 7) of human subjects to red light below the sensitivity threshold of a scotopic (i.e. rhodopsin/rod-based) system, yet of sufficient strength to activate a photopic (i.e. cone-based) system. Exposure to this light stimulus was sufficient to reset significantly the human circadian pacemaker, indicating that the cone pigments which mediate color vision can also mediate circadian vision.

  20. The early bee catches the flower - circadian rhythmicity influences learning performance in honey bees, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Marina; Gustav, David

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity plays an important role for many aspects of honey bees’ lives. However, the question whether it also affects learning and memory remained unanswered. To address this question, we studied the effect of circadian timing on olfactory learning and memory in honey bees Apis mellifera using the olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex paradigm. Bees were differentially conditioned to odours and tested for their odour learning at four different “Zeitgeber” time points. We show that learning behaviour is influenced by circadian timing. Honey bees perform best in the morning compared to the other times of day. Additionally, we found influences of the light condition bees were trained at on the olfactory learning. This circadian-mediated learning is independent from feeding times bees were entrained to, indicating an inherited and not acquired mechanism. We hypothesise that a co-evolutionary mechanism between the honey bee as a pollinator and plants might be the driving force for the evolution of the time-dependent learning abilities of bees. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00265-010-1026-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21350590

  1. Circadian rhythms in glucose and lipid metabolism in nocturnal and diurnal mammals.

    PubMed

    Kumar Jha, Pawan; Challet, Etienne; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2015-12-15

    Most aspects of energy metabolism display clear variations during day and night. This daily rhythmicity of metabolic functions, including hormone release, is governed by a circadian system that consists of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN) and many secondary clocks in the brain and peripheral organs. The SCN control peripheral timing via the autonomic and neuroendocrine system, as well as via behavioral outputs. The sleep-wake cycle, the feeding/fasting rhythm and most hormonal rhythms, including that of leptin, ghrelin and glucocorticoids, usually show an opposite phase (relative to the light-dark cycle) in diurnal and nocturnal species. By contrast, the SCN clock is most active at the same astronomical times in these two categories of mammals. Moreover, in both species, pineal melatonin is secreted only at night. In this review we describe the current knowledge on the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism by central and peripheral clock mechanisms. Most experimental knowledge comes from studies in nocturnal laboratory rodents. Nevertheless, we will also mention some relevant findings in diurnal mammals, including humans. It will become clear that as a consequence of the tight connections between the circadian clock system and energy metabolism, circadian clock impairments (e.g., mutations or knock-out of clock genes) and circadian clock misalignments (such as during shift work and chronic jet-lag) have an adverse effect on energy metabolism, that may trigger or enhancing obese and diabetic symptoms.

  2. Pilot Fatigue and Circadian Desynchronosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Pilot fatigue and circadian desynchronosis, its significance to air transport safety, and research approaches, were examined. There is a need for better data on sleep, activity, and other pertinent factors from pilots flying a variety of demanding schedules. Simulation studies of flight crew performance should be utilized to determine the degree of fatigue induced by demanding schedules and to delineate more precisely the factors responsible for performance decrements in flight and to test solutions proposed to resolve problems induced by fatigue and desynchronosis. It was concluded that there is a safety problem of uncertain magnitude due to transmeridian flying and a potential problem due to fatigue associated with various factors found in air transport operations.

  3. Behavioral decoupling of circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Mrosovsky, N; Janik, D

    1993-01-01

    Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) were kept in a light-dark cycle (LD 14:10). For 2 weeks, almost every day they were placed in a novel running wheel for 3 hr, starting 7 hr before dark onset. Most of the animals made several thousand wheel revolutions during this 3 hr. When these animals were subsequently transferred to a dark room, their activity was split into two components, one close to the time of the previous exposure to the novel wheel and the other close to the time when they had been active in the dark phase of the previous LD cycle. The two components fused after a few days in darkness. These observations show that nonphotic events are capable of causing major reorganizations of circadian activity patterns, despite the presence of an LD cycle.

  4. Circadian Rhythm in Cytokines Administration.

    PubMed

    Trufakin, Valery A; Shurlygina, Anna V

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, a number of diseases involving immune system dysfunction have appeared. This increases the importance of research aimed at finding and developing optimized methods for immune system correction. Numerous studies have found a positive effect in using cytokines to treat a variety of diseases, yet the clinical use of cytokines is limited by their toxicity. Research in the field of chronotherapy, aimed at designing schedules of medicine intake using circadian biorhythms of endogenous production of factors, and receptors' expression to the factors on the target cells, as well as chronopharmacodynamics and chronopharmacokinetics of medicines may contribute to the solution of this problem. Advantages of chronotherapy include a greater effectiveness of treatment, reduced dose of required drugs, and minimized adverse effects. This review presents data on the presence of circadian rhythms of spontaneous and induced cytokine production, as well as the expression of cytokine receptors in the healthy body and in a number of diseases. The article reviews various effects of cytokines, used at different times of the day in humans and experimental animals, as well as possible mechanisms underlying the chronodependent effects of cytokines. The article presents the results of chronotherapeutic modes of administering IL-2, interferons, G-CSF, and GM-CSF in treatment of various types of cancer as well as in experimental models of immune suppression and inflammation, which lead to a greater effectiveness of therapy, the possibility of reducing or increasing the dosage, and reduced drug toxicity. Further research in this field will contribute to the effectiveness and safety of cytokine therapy.

  5. ADHD, circadian rhythms and seasonality.

    PubMed

    Wynchank, Dora S; Bijlenga, Denise; Lamers, Femke; Bron, Tannetje I; Winthorst, Wim H; Vogel, Suzan W; Penninx, Brenda W; Beekman, Aartjan T; Kooij, J Sandra

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated whether the association between Adult Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) was mediated by the circadian rhythm. Data of 2239 persons from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used. Two groups were compared: with clinically significant ADHD symptoms (N = 175) and with No ADHD symptoms (N = 2064). Sleep parameters were sleep-onset and offset times, mid sleep and sleep duration from the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. We identified the prevalence of probable SAD and subsyndromal SAD using the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ). Clinically significant ADHD symptoms were identified by using a T score>65 on the Conners Adult ADHD Rating Scale. The prevalence of probable SAD was estimated at 9.9% in the ADHD group (vs. 3.3% in the No ADHD group) and of probable s-SAD at 12.5% in the ADHD group (vs 4.6% in the No ADHD group). Regression analyses showed consistently significant associations between ADHD symptoms and probable SAD, even after adjustment for current depression and anxiety, age, sex, education, use of antidepressants and benzodiazepines (B = 1.81, p < 0.001). Late self-reported sleep onset was an important mediator in the significant relationship between ADHD symptoms and probable SAD, even after correction for confounders (total model effects: B = 0.14, p ≤ 0.001). Both seasonal and circadian rhythm disturbances are significantly associated with ADHD symptoms. Delayed sleep onset time in ADHD may explain the increase in SAD symptoms. Treating patients with SAD for possible ADHD and delayed sleep onset time may reduce symptom severity in these complex patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Circadian rhythms of performance: new trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, J.; Monk, T. H.

    2000-01-01

    This brief review is concerned with how human performance efficiency changes as a function of time of day. It presents an overview of some of the research paradigms and conceptual models that have been used to investigate circadian performance rhythms. The influence of homeostatic and circadian processes on performance regulation is discussed. The review also briefly presents recent mathematical models of alertness that have been used to predict cognitive performance. Related topics such as interindividual differences and the postlunch dip are presented.

  7. Melatonin, the Pineal Gland, and Circadian Rhythms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    astrocytes in the chick visual suprachiasmatic nucleus . Trans, Soc. Res. Biol. Rhythms 4:118 4) Brooks, D.S., AJ. Mitchell and...W.S., T.H. Champney and V.M. Cassone ( in press) The suprachiasmatic nucleus controls circadian rhythms of heart-rate via the sympathetic nervous...sparrows. N•,u•.si.LAbs. 19: 1487 2) Warren, W.S., V.M. Cassone (1993) The regulation of multiple circadian outputs by the suprachiasmatic

  8. Changes in GDP binding to brown adipose tissue mitochondria and the uncoupling protein

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.; Swick, R.W. )

    1988-12-01

    Incubation in vitro of brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria with divalent cations, spermine, or alkaline phosphatase led to a marked increase in the binding of ({sup 3}H)GDP. The effect of Mg{sup 2+} appeared to be the most specific and led to the largest increase in GDP binding. A simplified method was developed for measuring GDP binding to purified uncoupling protein from rat BAT mitochondria. Application of this method indicates that uncoupling protein from cold-acclimated rats binds twice as much GDP as uncoupling protein from cold-acclimated rats that were briefly returned to thermoneutrality, paralleling changes in GDP binding to the mitochondria. Incubation of BAT mitochondria with Mg{sup 2+} led to a smaller increase in GDP binding to the subsequently purified uncoupling protein, suggesting that divalent cations may somehow participate in the regulation of the activity of the uncoupling protein.

  9. Circadian clock genes in Drosophila: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, P; Balamurugan, E; Suthakar, G

    2003-08-01

    Circadian rhythms provide a temporal framework to living organisms and are established in a majority of eukaryotes and in a few prokaryotes. The molecular mechanisms of circadian clock is constantly being investigated in Drosophila melanogaster. The core of the clock mechanism was described by a transcription-translation feedback loop model involving period (per), timeless (tim), dclock and cycle genes. However, recent research has identified multiple feedback loops controlling rhythm generation and expression. Novel mutations of timeless throw more light on the functions of per and tim products. Analysis of pdf neuropeptide gene (expressed in circadian pacemaker cells in Drosophila), indicate that PDF acts as the principal circadian transmitter and is involved in output pathways. The product of cryptochrome is known to function as a circadian photoreceptor as well as component of the circadian clock. This review focuses on the recent progress in the field of molecular rhythm research in the fruit fly. The gene(s) and the gene product(s) that are involved in the transmission of environmental information to the clock, as well as the timing signals from the clock outward to cellular functions are remain to be determined.

  10. Circadian clocks are resounding in peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Zvonic, Sanjin; Conrad, Steven A; Scott, L Keith; Mynatt, Randall L; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2006-03-01

    Circadian rhythms are prevalent in most organisms. Even the smallest disturbances in the orchestration of circadian gene expression patterns among different tissues can result in functional asynchrony, at the organism level, and may to contribute to a wide range of physiologic disorders. It has been reported that as many as 5%-10% of transcribed genes in peripheral tissues follow a circadian expression pattern. We have conducted a comprehensive study of circadian gene expression on a large dataset representing three different peripheral tissues. The data have been produced in a large-scale microarray experiment covering replicate daily cycles in murine white and brown adipose tissues as well as in liver. We have applied three alternative algorithmic approaches to identify circadian oscillation in time series expression profiles. Analyses of our own data indicate that the expression of at least 7% to 21% of active genes in mouse liver, and in white and brown adipose tissues follow a daily oscillatory pattern. Indeed, analysis of data from other laboratories suggests that the percentage of genes with an oscillatory pattern may approach 50% in the liver. For the rest of the genes, oscillation appears to be obscured by stochastic noise. Our phase classification and computer simulation studies based on multiple datasets indicate no detectable boundary between oscillating and non-oscillating fractions of genes. We conclude that greater attention should be given to the potential influence of circadian mechanisms on any biological pathway related to metabolism and obesity.

  11. Circadian Clocks Are Resounding in Peripheral Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Zvonic, Sanjin; Conrad, Steven A; Scott, L. Keith; Mynatt, Randall L; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are prevalent in most organisms. Even the smallest disturbances in the orchestration of circadian gene expression patterns among different tissues can result in functional asynchrony, at the organism level, and may to contribute to a wide range of physiologic disorders. It has been reported that as many as 5%–10% of transcribed genes in peripheral tissues follow a circadian expression pattern. We have conducted a comprehensive study of circadian gene expression on a large dataset representing three different peripheral tissues. The data have been produced in a large-scale microarray experiment covering replicate daily cycles in murine white and brown adipose tissues as well as in liver. We have applied three alternative algorithmic approaches to identify circadian oscillation in time series expression profiles. Analyses of our own data indicate that the expression of at least 7% to 21% of active genes in mouse liver, and in white and brown adipose tissues follow a daily oscillatory pattern. Indeed, analysis of data from other laboratories suggests that the percentage of genes with an oscillatory pattern may approach 50% in the liver. For the rest of the genes, oscillation appears to be obscured by stochastic noise. Our phase classification and computer simulation studies based on multiple datasets indicate no detectable boundary between oscillating and non-oscillating fractions of genes. We conclude that greater attention should be given to the potential influence of circadian mechanisms on any biological pathway related to metabolism and obesity. PMID:16532060

  12. Personalized medicine for pathological circadian dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rachel L.; Kornhauser, Jon M.; Tate, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    The recent approval of a therapeutic for a circadian disorder has increased interest in developing additional medicines for disorders characterized by circadian disruption. However, previous experience demonstrates that drug development for central nervous system (CNS) disorders has a high failure rate. Personalized medicine, or the approach to identifying the right treatment for the right patient, has recently become the standard for drug development in the oncology field. In addition to utilizing Companion Diagnostics (CDx) that identify specific genetic biomarkers to prescribe certain targeted therapies, patient profiling is regularly used to enrich for a responsive patient population during clinical trials, resulting in fewer patients required for statistical significance and a higher rate of success for demonstrating efficacy and hence receiving approval for the drug. This personalized medicine approach may be one mechanism that could reduce the high clinical trial failure rate in the development of CNS drugs. This review will discuss current circadian trials, the history of personalized medicine in oncology, lessons learned from a recently approved circadian therapeutic, and how personalized medicine can be tailored for use in future clinical trials for circadian disorders to ultimately lead to the approval of more therapeutics for patients suffering from circadian abnormalities. PMID:26150790

  13. Personalized medicine for pathological circadian dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Rachel L; Kornhauser, Jon M; Tate, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    The recent approval of a therapeutic for a circadian disorder has increased interest in developing additional medicines for disorders characterized by circadian disruption. However, previous experience demonstrates that drug development for central nervous system (CNS) disorders has a high failure rate. Personalized medicine, or the approach to identifying the right treatment for the right patient, has recently become the standard for drug development in the oncology field. In addition to utilizing Companion Diagnostics (CDx) that identify specific genetic biomarkers to prescribe certain targeted therapies, patient profiling is regularly used to enrich for a responsive patient population during clinical trials, resulting in fewer patients required for statistical significance and a higher rate of success for demonstrating efficacy and hence receiving approval for the drug. This personalized medicine approach may be one mechanism that could reduce the high clinical trial failure rate in the development of CNS drugs. This review will discuss current circadian trials, the history of personalized medicine in oncology, lessons learned from a recently approved circadian therapeutic, and how personalized medicine can be tailored for use in future clinical trials for circadian disorders to ultimately lead to the approval of more therapeutics for patients suffering from circadian abnormalities.

  14. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in schizophrenia†

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Katharina; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Middleton, Benita; Foster, Russell G.; Joyce, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbances comparable with insomnia occur in up to 80% of people with schizophrenia, but very little is known about the contribution of circadian coordination to these prevalent disruptions. Aims A systematic exploration of circadian time patterns in individuals with schizophrenia with recurrent sleep disruption. Method We examined the relationship between sleep-wake activity, recorded actigraphically over 6 weeks, along with ambient light exposure and simultaneous circadian clock timing, by collecting weekly 48 h profiles of a urinary metabolite of melatonin in 20 out-patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy control individuals matched for age, gender and being unemployed. Results Significant sleep/circadian disruption occurred in all the participants with schizophrenia. Half these individuals showed severe circadian misalignment ranging from phase-advance/delay to non-24 h periods in sleep-wake and melatonin cycles, and the other half showed patterns from excessive sleep to highly irregular and fragmented sleep epochs but with normally timed melatonin production. Conclusions Severe circadian sleep/wake disruptions exist despite stability in mood, mental state and newer antipsychotic treatment. They cannot be explained by the individuals' level of everyday function. PMID:22194182

  16. Linking Core Promoter Classes to Circadian Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Westermark, Pål O.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in transcription are generated by rhythmic abundances and DNA binding activities of transcription factors. Propagation of rhythms to transcriptional initiation involves the core promoter, its chromatin state, and the basal transcription machinery. Here, I characterize core promoters and chromatin states of genes transcribed in a circadian manner in mouse liver and in Drosophila. It is shown that the core promoter is a critical determinant of circadian mRNA expression in both species. A distinct core promoter class, strong circadian promoters (SCPs), is identified in mouse liver but not Drosophila. SCPs are defined by specific core promoter features, and are shown to drive circadian transcriptional activities with both high averages and high amplitudes. Data analysis and mathematical modeling further provided evidence for rhythmic regulation of both polymerase II recruitment and pause release at SCPs. The analysis provides a comprehensive and systematic view of core promoters and their link to circadian mRNA expression in mouse and Drosophila, and thus reveals a crucial role for the core promoter in regulated, dynamic transcription. PMID:27504829

  17. Circadian clock proteins in prokaryotes: hidden rhythms?

    PubMed

    Loza-Correa, Maria; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clock genes are vital features of eukaryotes that have evolved such that organisms can adapt to our planet's rotation in order to anticipate the coming day or night as well as unfavorable seasons. This circadian clock uses oscillation as a timekeeping element. However, circadian clock mechanisms exist also in prokaryotes. The circadian clock of Cyanobacteria is well studied. It is regulated by a cluster of three genes: kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC. In this review, we will discuss the circadian system in cyanobacteria, and provide an overview and updated phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic organisms that contain the main circadian genes. It is evident that the evolution of the kai genes has been influenced by lateral transfers but further and deeper studies are needed to get an in depth understanding of the exact evolutionary history of these genes. Interestingly, Legionella pneumophila an environmental bacterium and opportunistic human pathogen that parasitizes protozoa in fresh water environments also contains kaiB and kaiC, but their functions are not known. All of the residues described for the biochemical functions of the main pacemaker KaiC in Synechococcus elongatus are also conserved in the L. pneumophila KaiC protein.

  18. Circadian genes, the stress axis, and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Dipak K

    2012-01-01

    The body's internal system to control the daily rhythm of the body's functions (i.e., the circadian system), the body's stress response, and the body's neurobiology are highly interconnected. Thus, the rhythm of the circadian system impacts alcohol use patterns; at the same time, alcohol drinking also can alter circadian functions. The sensitivity of the circadian system to alcohol may result from alcohol's effects on the expression of several of the clock genes that regulate circadian function. The stress response system involves the hypothalamus and pituitary gland in the brain and the adrenal glands, as well as the hormones they secrete, including corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and glucocorticoids. It is controlled by brain-signaling molecules, including endogenous opioids such as β-endorphin. Alcohol consumption influences the activity of this system and vice versa. Finally, interactions exist between the circadian system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and alcohol consumption. Thus, it seems that certain clock genes may control functions of the stress response system and that these interactions are affected by alcohol.

  19. The frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm is modulated on a circadian period and is entrained by food availability.

    PubMed

    Munn, Robert G K; Tyree, Susan M; McNaughton, Neil; Bilkey, David K

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in the generation of episodic memory. While the encoding of the spatial and contextual components of memory have been extensively studied, how the hippocampus encodes temporal information, especially at long time intervals, is less well understood. The activity of place cells in hippocampus has previously been shown to be modulated at a circadian time-scale, entrained by a behavioral stimulus, but not entrained by light. The experimental procedures used in the previous study of this phenomenon, however, necessarily conflated two alternative entraining stimuli, the exposure to the recording environment and the availability of food, making it impossible to distinguish between these possibilities. Here we demonstrate that the frequency of theta-band hippocampal EEG varies with a circadian period in freely moving animals and that this periodicity mirrors changes in the firing rate of hippocampal neurons. Theta activity serves, therefore, as a proxy of circadian-modulated hippocampal neuronal activity. We then demonstrate that the frequency of hippocampal theta driven by stimulation of the reticular formation also varies with a circadian period. Because this effect can be observed without having to feed the animal to encourage movement we were able to identify what stimulus entrains the circadian oscillation. We show that with reticular-activated recordings started at various times of the day the frequency of theta varies quasi-sinusoidally with a 25 h period and phase-aligned when referenced to the animal's regular feeding time, but not the recording start time. Furthermore, we show that theta frequency consistently varied with a circadian period when the data obtained from repeated recordings started at various times of the day were referenced to the start of food availability in the recording chamber. This pattern did not occur when data were referenced to the start of the recording session or to the actual time of day

  20. The frequency of hippocampal theta rhythm is modulated on a circadian period and is entrained by food availability

    PubMed Central

    Munn, Robert G. K.; Tyree, Susan M.; McNaughton, Neil; Bilkey, David K.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in the generation of episodic memory. While the encoding of the spatial and contextual components of memory have been extensively studied, how the hippocampus encodes temporal information, especially at long time intervals, is less well understood. The activity of place cells in hippocampus has previously been shown to be modulated at a circadian time-scale, entrained by a behavioral stimulus, but not entrained by light. The experimental procedures used in the previous study of this phenomenon, however, necessarily conflated two alternative entraining stimuli, the exposure to the recording environment and the availability of food, making it impossible to distinguish between these possibilities. Here we demonstrate that the frequency of theta-band hippocampal EEG varies with a circadian period in freely moving animals and that this periodicity mirrors changes in the firing rate of hippocampal neurons. Theta activity serves, therefore, as a proxy of circadian-modulated hippocampal neuronal activity. We then demonstrate that the frequency of hippocampal theta driven by stimulation of the reticular formation also varies with a circadian period. Because this effect can be observed without having to feed the animal to encourage movement we were able to identify what stimulus entrains the circadian oscillation. We show that with reticular-activated recordings started at various times of the day the frequency of theta varies quasi-sinusoidally with a 25 h period and phase-aligned when referenced to the animal’s regular feeding time, but not the recording start time. Furthermore, we show that theta frequency consistently varied with a circadian period when the data obtained from repeated recordings started at various times of the day were referenced to the start of food availability in the recording chamber. This pattern did not occur when data were referenced to the start of the recording session or to the actual time of

  1. Potassium channel openers are uncoupling protonophores: implication in cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Jahangir, Arshad; Oberlin, Andrew; Komarov, Alexander; Colombini, Marco; Terzic, Andre

    2004-06-18

    Excessive build-up of mitochondrial protonic potential is harmful to cellular homeostasis, and modulation of inner membrane permeability a proposed countermeasure. Here, we demonstrate that structurally distinct potassium channel openers, diazoxide and pinacidil, facilitated transmembrane proton translocation generating H(+)-selective current through planar phospholipid membrane. Both openers depolarized mitochondria, activated state 4 respiration and reduced oxidative phosphorylation, recapitulating the signature of mitochondrial uncoupling. This effect was maintained in K(+)-free conditions and shared with the prototypic protonophore 2,4-dinitrophenol. Diazoxide, pinacidil and 2,4-dinitrophenol, but not 2,4-dinitrotoluene lacking protonophoric properties, preserved functional recovery of ischemic heart. The identified protonophoric property of potassium channel openers, thus, implicates a previously unrecognized component in their mechanism of cardioprotection.

  2. Molecular identity of uncoupling proteins in thermogenic skunk cabbage.

    PubMed

    Ito-Inaba, Yasuko; Hida, Yamato; Mori, Hitoshi; Inaba, Takehito

    2008-12-01

    Thermogenic skunk cabbage has been reported to have two types of uncoupling protein (UCP), a typical 6-transmembrane (TM) SrUCPA and an atypical 5-TM SrUCPB. To verify further the role of SrUCPs in thermogenic skunk cabbage, we examined the molecular identity of SrUCPs in more detail. Both mRNA and genomic analyses supported the presence of SrUCPA, but not SrUCPB. Furthermore, SrUCP protein purified from spadix mitochondria was identified as SrUCPA by mass spectrometry. These results clearly indicate that SrUCPA is the major expressed UCP in skunk cabbage, and the presence of atypical SrUCPB is unlikely to be associated with thermogenesis of skunk cabbage.

  3. Uncoupling the links between male mating tactics and female attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Ojanguren, Alfredo F; Magurran, Anne E

    2004-12-07

    Because not all females are equally attractive, and because mating reduces the chances of getting further copulations, males should prefer better-quality mates. In this paper, we use the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) to explore the effects of two non-correlated measures of female quality--size and reproductive status--on male mating decisions. All male guppies employ two alternative mating tactics. We found that large females, particularly those from a high predation site, were the target of most sneaky mating attempts. The response persisted in fish raised under standard conditions over several generations in the laboratory. In addition, non-pregnant females received more courtship displays. We conclude that males can discriminate among females and that they uncouple their mating tactics to track different axes of quality.

  4. Uncoupling the links between male mating tactics and female attractiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Ojanguren, Alfredo F; Magurran, Anne E

    2004-01-01

    Because not all females are equally attractive, and because mating reduces the chances of getting further copulations, males should prefer better-quality mates. In this paper, we use the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) to explore the effects of two non-correlated measures of female quality--size and reproductive status--on male mating decisions. All male guppies employ two alternative mating tactics. We found that large females, particularly those from a high predation site, were the target of most sneaky mating attempts. The response persisted in fish raised under standard conditions over several generations in the laboratory. In addition, non-pregnant females received more courtship displays. We conclude that males can discriminate among females and that they uncouple their mating tactics to track different axes of quality. PMID:15801594

  5. Uncoupling primer and releaser responses to pheromone in honey bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozinger, Christina M.; Fischer, Patrick; Hampton, Jacob E.

    2007-05-01

    Pheromones produce dramatic behavioral and physiological responses in a wide variety of species. Releaser pheromones elicit rapid responses within seconds or minutes, while primer pheromones produce long-term changes which may take days to manifest. Honeybee queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) elicits multiple distinct behavioral and physiological responses in worker bees, as both a releaser and primer, and thus produces responses on vastly different time scales. In this study, we demonstrate that releaser and primer responses to QMP can be uncoupled. First, treatment with the juvenile hormone analog methoprene leaves a releaser response (attraction to QMP) intact, but modulates QMP’s primer effects on sucrose responsiveness. Secondly, two components of QMP (9-ODA and 9-HDA) do not elicit a releaser response (attraction) but are as effective as QMP at modulating a primer response, downregulation of foraging-related brain gene expression. These results suggest that different responses to a single pheromone may be produced via distinct pathways.

  6. Possible physiological roles of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins--UCPn.

    PubMed

    Jezek, Petr

    2002-10-01

    Five mitochondrial uncoupling proteins exist in the human gemone: UCP2, expressed ubiquitously; UCP1, exclusively in brown adipose tissue (BAT); UCP3, predominantly in muscle; UCP4 and BMCP (UCP5), in brain. UCP4 is the ancestral prototype from which the other UCPn diverged. Findings on the level of organism and reconstituted recombinant proteins demonstrated that UCPn exhibit a protonophoric function, documented by overexpression in mice, L6 myotubes, INS1 cells, muscle, and yeast. In a few cases (yeast), this protonophoric function was correlated with elevated fatty acid (FA) levels. Reconstituted UCPn exhibited nucleotide-sensitive FA induced H(+) uniport. Two mechanisms, local buffering or FA cycling were suggested as an explanation. A basic UCPn role with mild uncoupling is to accelerate metabolism and reduce reactive oxygen species. UCP2 (UCP3) roles were inferred from transcriptional up-regulation mediated by FAs via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, cytokines, leptin signalling via hypothalamic pathway, and by thyroide and beta2 adrenergic stimulation. The latter indicated a role in catecholamine-induced thermogenesis in skeletal muscle. UCP2 (UCP3) may contribute to body weight regulation, although obesity was not induced in knockout (KO) mice. An obesity reduction in middle-aged humans was associated with the less common allele of -866 G/A polymorphism in the ucp2 gene promoter enhancing the exon 8 insertion: deletion transcript ratio. Up-regulated UCP2 transcription by pyrogenic cytokines (tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)) suggested a role in fever. UCP2 could induce type 2 diabetes as developed from obesity due to up-regulated UCP2 transcription by FAs in pancreatic beta-cells. UCPn might be pro-apoptotic as well as anti-apoptotic, depending on transcriptional and biochemical regulation. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  7. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling in a murine cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely Cristine; Shestov, Alexander A; Constantinou, Caterina; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Righi, Valeria; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Busquets, Silvia; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J; Milot, Sylvain; Lepine, Francois; Mindrinos, Michael N; Rahme, Laurence G; Argiles, Josep M

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of all cancer patients present with cachexia, a condition in which disease-associated metabolic changes lead to a severe loss of skeletal muscle mass. Working toward an integrated and mechanistic view of cancer cachexia, we investigated the hypothesis that cancer promotes mitochondrial uncoupling in skeletal muscle. We subjected mice to in vivo phosphorous-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy and subjected murine skeletal muscle samples to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mice used in both experiments were Lewis lung carcinoma models of cancer cachexia. A novel 'fragmented mass isotopomer' approach was used in our dynamic analysis of 13C mass isotopomer data. Our 31P NMR and GC/MS results indicated that the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were reduced by 49% and 22%, respectively, in the cancer-bearing mice (p<0.008; t-test vs. controls). The ratio of ATP synthesis rate to the TCA cycle flux (an index of mitochondrial coupling) was reduced by 32% in the cancer-bearing mice (p=0.036; t-test vs. controls). Genomic analysis revealed aberrant expression levels for key regulatory genes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the muscle fiber, consistent with the presence of abnormal, giant mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggest that mitochondrial uncoupling occurs in cancer cachexia and thus point to the mitochondria as a potential pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cachexia. These findings may prove relevant to elucidating the mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle wasting observed in other chronic diseases, as well as in aging.

  8. Astrocyte uncoupling as a cause of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bedner, Peter; Dupper, Alexander; Hüttmann, Kerstin; Müller, Julia; Herde, Michel K; Dublin, Pavel; Deshpande, Tushar; Schramm, Johannes; Häussler, Ute; Haas, Carola A; Henneberger, Christian; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Glial cells are now recognized as active communication partners in the central nervous system, and this new perspective has rekindled the question of their role in pathology. In the present study we analysed functional properties of astrocytes in hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without (n = 44) and with sclerosis (n = 75) combining patch clamp recording, K(+) concentration analysis, electroencephalography/video-monitoring, and fate mapping analysis. We found that the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis is completely devoid of bona fide astrocytes and gap junction coupling, whereas coupled astrocytes were abundantly present in non-sclerotic specimens. To decide whether these glial changes represent cause or effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, we developed a mouse model that reproduced key features of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis. In this model, uncoupling impaired K(+) buffering and temporally preceded apoptotic neuronal death and the generation of spontaneous seizures. Uncoupling was induced through intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, prevented in Toll-like receptor4 knockout mice and reproduced in situ through acute cytokine or lipopolysaccharide incubation. Fate mapping confirmed that in the course of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, astrocytes acquire an atypical functional phenotype and lose coupling. These data suggest that astrocyte dysfunction might be a prime cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis and identify novel targets for anti-epileptogenic therapeutic intervention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins in human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Hagen, T; Vidal-Puig, A

    2002-02-01

    Uncoupling proteins are mitochondrial carrier proteins that catalyse a regulated proton leak across the inner mitochondrial membrane, diverting free energy from ATP synthesis by the mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase to the production of heat. Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is exclusively expressed in brown adipose tissue, is the mediator of thermogenesis in response to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Using gene a knockout mouse model, UCP1 has been shown to be required for cold acclimation. Two homologues of UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3, have been identified recently and show a much wider tissue distribution. UCP2 and UCP3 have been postulated to play a role in the regulation of cold acclimation, energy expenditure and diet-induced thermogenesis in humans, who, in contrast to rodents, have very little brown fat in adult life. However, evidence is accumulating that thermogenesis and regulation of body weight may not be the physiological functions of UCP2 and UCP3. For instance, mice deficient for UCP2 or UCP3 are not cold-intolerant and do not develop obesity. Alternative functions were suggested, primarily based on findings in UCP2 and UCP3 gene knockout mice. Both UCP2- and UCP3-deficient mice were found to overproduce reactive oxygen species and UCP2-deficient mice to hypersecrete insulin. Thus, the UCP1 homologues may play a role in regulating mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and b-cell function. In this review, we discuss the role of UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 in human physiology and disease, primarily based on findings from the various animal models that have been generated.

  10. Circadian-Based Therapies for Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Emens, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes recent developments relevant to the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. The clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders is described, followed by recent treatment studies for delayed sleep-wake phase disorder, non-24 hour sleep-wake disorder, irregular sleep-wake disorder and shift work. New methods to estimate circadian phase, including home saliva collection to estimate the dim light melatonin onset, circadian questionnaires and general rules to guide light and exogenous melatonin treatments are described. New developments in light treatment are detailed, including light flashes during sleep and wearable light devices. Substances such as caffeine and alcohol, and devices such as electronic tablets are also considered for their potential to shift circadian timing. Finally, an update on melatonin supplements in the US is discussed, along with the controversy surrounding the use of melatonin supplements in patients with prediabetes or diabetes. PMID:27990327

  11. Circadian Rhythms in Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine: Potential importance of circadian disruptions

    PubMed Central

    Brainard, Jason; Gobel, Merit; Bartels, Karsten; Scott, Benjamin; Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The rotation of the earth and associated alternating cycles of light and dark–the basis of our circadian rhythms–are fundamental to human biology and culture. However, it was not until 1971 that researchers first began to describe the molecular mechanisms for the circadian system. During the last few years, groundbreaking research has revealed a multitude of circadian genes affecting a variety of clinical diseases, including diabetes, obesity, sepsis, cardiac ischemia, and sudden cardiac death. Anesthesiologists, in the operating room and intensive care units, manage these diseases on a daily basis as they significantly impact patient outcomes. Intriguingly, sedatives, anesthetics, and the ICU environment have all been shown to disrupt the circadian system in patients. In the current review we will discuss how newly acquired knowledge of circadian rhythms could lead to changes in clinical practice and new therapeutic concepts. PMID:25294583

  12. Circadian-Based Therapies for Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Helen J; Emens, Jonathan S

    2016-09-01

    This review summarizes recent developments relevant to the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. The clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders is described, followed by recent treatment studies for delayed sleep-wake phase disorder, non-24 hour sleep-wake disorder, irregular sleep-wake disorder and shift work. New methods to estimate circadian phase, including home saliva collection to estimate the dim light melatonin onset, circadian questionnaires and general rules to guide light and exogenous melatonin treatments are described. New developments in light treatment are detailed, including light flashes during sleep and wearable light devices. Substances such as caffeine and alcohol, and devices such as electronic tablets are also considered for their potential to shift circadian timing. Finally, an update on melatonin supplements in the US is discussed, along with the controversy surrounding the use of melatonin supplements in patients with prediabetes or diabetes.

  13. Direct regulation of myocardial triglyceride metabolism by the cardiomyocyte circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Yun; Kienesberger, Petra C; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; Sailors, Mary H; Durgan, David J; Villegas-Montoya, Carolina; Jahoor, Anil; Gonzalez, Raquel; Garvey, Merissa E; Boland, Brandon; Blasier, Zachary; McElfresh, Tracy A; Nannegari, Vijayalakshmi; Chow, Chi-Wing; Heird, William C; Chandler, Margaret P; Dyck, Jason R B; Bray, Molly S; Young, Martin E

    2010-01-29

    Maintenance of circadian alignment between an organism and its environment is essential to ensure metabolic homeostasis. Synchrony is achieved by cell autonomous circadian clocks. Despite a growing appreciation of the integral relation between clocks and metabolism, little is known regarding the direct influence of a peripheral clock on cellular responses to fatty acids. To address this important issue, we utilized a genetic model of disrupted clock function specifically in cardiomyocytes in vivo (termed cardiomyocyte clock mutant (CCM)). CCM mice exhibited altered myocardial response to chronic high fat feeding at the levels of the transcriptome and lipidome as well as metabolic fluxes, providing evidence that the cardiomyocyte clock regulates myocardial triglyceride metabolism. Time-of-day-dependent oscillations in myocardial triglyceride levels, net triglyceride synthesis, and lipolysis were markedly attenuated in CCM hearts. Analysis of key proteins influencing triglyceride turnover suggest that the cardiomyocyte clock inactivates hormone-sensitive lipase during the active/awake phase both at transcriptional and post-translational (via AMP-activated protein kinase) levels. Consistent with increased net triglyceride synthesis during the end of the active/awake phase, high fat feeding at this time resulted in marked cardiac steatosis. These data provide evidence for direct regulation of triglyceride turnover by a peripheral clock and reveal a potential mechanistic explanation for accelerated metabolic pathologies after prevalent circadian misalignment in Western society.

  14. Clock-Talk: Interactions between Central and Peripheral Circadian Oscillators in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Schibler, Ueli; Gotic, Ivana; Saini, Camille; Gos, Pascal; Curie, Thomas; Emmenegger, Yann; Sinturel, Flore; Gosselin, Pauline; Gerber, Alan; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Rando, Gianpaolo; Demarque, Maud; Franken, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, including humans, nearly all physiological processes are subject to daily oscillations that are governed by a circadian timing system with a complex hierarchical structure. The central pacemaker, residing in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the ventral hypothalamus, is synchronized daily by photic cues transmitted from the retina to SCN neurons via the retinohypothalamic tract. In turn, the SCN must establish phase coherence between self-sustained and cell-autonomous oscillators present in most peripheral cell types. The synchronization signals (Zeitgebers) can be controlled more or less directly by the SCN. In mice and rats, feeding-fasting rhythms, which are driven by the SCN through rest-activity cycles, are the most potent Zeitgebers for the circadian oscillators of peripheral organs. Signaling through the glucocorticoid receptor and the serum response factor also participate in the phase entrainment of peripheral clocks, and these two pathways are controlled by the SCN independently of feeding-fasting rhythms. Body temperature rhythms, governed by the SCN directly and indirectly through rest-activity cycles, are perhaps the most surprising cues for peripheral oscillators. Although the molecular makeup of circadian oscillators is nearly identical in all cells, these oscillators are used for different purposes in the SCN and in peripheral organs.

  15. Detrimental effects of constant light exposure and high-fat diet on circadian energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Coomans, Claudia P; van den Berg, Sjoerd A A; Houben, Thijs; van Klinken, Jan-Bert; van den Berg, Rosa; Pronk, Amanda C M; Havekes, Louis M; Romijn, Johannes A; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Biermasz, Nienke R; Meijer, Johanna H

    2013-04-01

    Circadian rhythm disturbances are observed in, e.g., aging and neurodegenerative diseases and are associated with an increased incidence of obesity and diabetes. We subjected male C57Bl/6J mice to constant light [12-h light-light (LL) cycle] to examine the effects of a disturbed circadian rhythm on energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in the central pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) revealed an immediate reduction in rhythm amplitude, stabilizing at 44% of normal amplitude values after 4 d LL. Food intake was increased (+26%) and energy expenditure decreased (-13%), and we observed immediate body weight gain (d 4: +2.4%, d 14: +5.0%). Mixed model analysis revealed that weight gain developed more rapidly in response to LL as compared to high fat. After 4 wk in LL, the circadian pattern in feeding and energy expenditure was completely lost, despite continuing low-amplitude rhythms in the SCN and in behavior, whereas weight gain had stabilized. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analysis revealed complete abolishment of normal circadian variation in insulin sensitivity in LL. In conclusion, a reduction in amplitude of the SCN, to values previously observed in aged mice, is sufficient to induce a complete loss of circadian rhythms in energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  16. Real-time recording of circadian liver gene expression in freely moving mice reveals the phase-setting behavior of hepatocyte clocks

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Camille; Liani, André; Curie, Thomas; Gos, Pascal; Kreppel, Florian; Emmenegger, Yann; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Poget, Yves-Alain; Franken, Paul; Schibler, Ueli

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus, which is thought to set the phase of slave oscillators in virtually all body cells. However, due to the lack of appropriate in vivo recording technologies, it has been difficult to study how the SCN synchronizes oscillators in peripheral tissues. Here we describe the real-time recording of bioluminescence emitted by hepatocytes expressing circadian luciferase reporter genes in freely moving mice. The technology employs a device dubbed RT-Biolumicorder, which consists of a cylindrical cage with reflecting conical walls that channel photons toward a photomultiplier tube. The monitoring of circadian liver gene expression revealed that hepatocyte oscillators of SCN-lesioned mice synchronized more rapidly to feeding cycles than hepatocyte clocks of intact mice. Hence, the SCN uses signaling pathways that counteract those of feeding rhythms when their phase is in conflict with its own phase. PMID:23824542

  17. Barley Hv CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 and Hv PHOTOPERIOD H1 Are Circadian Regulators That Can Affect Circadian Rhythms in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Martí, María C.; Laurie, David A.; Greenland, Andy J.; Hall, Anthony; Webb, Alex A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks regulate many aspects of plant physiology and development that contribute to essential agronomic traits. Circadian clocks contain transcriptional feedback loops that are thought to generate circadian timing. There is considerable similarity in the genes that comprise the transcriptional and translational feedback loops of the circadian clock in the plant Kingdom. Functional characterisation of circadian clock genes has been restricted to a few model species. Here we provide a functional characterisation of the Hordeum vulgare (barley) circadian clock genes Hv CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (HvCCA1) and Hv PHOTOPERIODH1, which are respectively most similar to Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1) and PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 7 (AtPRR7). This provides insight into the circadian regulation of one of the major crop species of Northern Europe. Through a combination of physiological assays of circadian rhythms in barley and heterologous expression in wild type and mutant strains of A. thaliana we demonstrate that HvCCA1 has a conserved function to AtCCA1. We find that Hv PHOTOPERIOD H1 has AtPRR7-like functionality in A. thaliana and that the effects of the Hv photoperiod h1 mutation on photoperiodism and circadian rhythms are genetically separable. PMID:26076005

  18. Barley Hv CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 and Hv PHOTOPERIOD H1 Are Circadian Regulators That Can Affect Circadian Rhythms in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kusakina, Jelena; Rutterford, Zoe; Cotter, Sean; Martí, María C; Laurie, David A; Greenland, Andy J; Hall, Anthony; Webb, Alex A R

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks regulate many aspects of plant physiology and development that contribute to essential agronomic traits. Circadian clocks contain transcriptional feedback loops that are thought to generate circadian timing. There is considerable similarity in the genes that comprise the transcriptional and translational feedback loops of the circadian clock in the plant Kingdom. Functional characterisation of circadian clock genes has been restricted to a few model species. Here we provide a functional characterisation of the Hordeum vulgare (barley) circadian clock genes Hv circadian clock associated 1 (HvCCA1) and Hv photoperiodh1, which are respectively most similar to Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock associated 1 (AtCCA1) and pseudo response regulator 7 (AtPRR7). This provides insight into the circadian regulation of one of the major crop species of Northern Europe. Through a combination of physiological assays of circadian rhythms in barley and heterologous expression in wild type and mutant strains of A. thaliana we demonstrate that HvCCA1 has a conserved function to AtCCA1. We find that Hv photoperiod H1 has AtPRR7-like functionality in A. thaliana and that the effects of the Hv photoperiod h1 mutation on photoperiodism and circadian rhythms are genetically separable.

  19. Medical residents' circadian preferences across specialties.

    PubMed

    Chin-Quee, Anthony L; Yaremchuk, Kathleen

    2017-10-01

    Circadian preference refers to the tendency of individuals to be more alert and effective in the morning (larks) or the evening (owls). Given the rigors of medical residency training and perceived lifestyle differences among specialties, circadian preference may play a role in choice of medical specialty and subsequent job satisfaction during training. This study aimed to determine the circadian preferences of residents across specialties and correlations with specialty choice and job satisfaction. Single-institution, cross-sectional survey. The Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness questionnaire, the standard to identify circadian preference, was modified to include demographic and job satisfaction variables and administered to residents at our tertiary care hospital in 2014. Independent t tests were used to correlate circadian preference and specialty choice, and Spearman's correlations were used to correlate circadian preference and job satisfaction. A total of 160 residents from postgraduate years 1 through 7 and 10 specialties responded. The mean chronotype scores from all specialties met the category of "neither" morning nor evening type. A significant difference occurred between emergency medicine residents and residents from anesthesiology (P = 0.0007), surgery (P < 0.0001), and medicine (P = 0.0005). Residents in the surgical specialties trended toward the morning chronotype, whereas emergency medicine trended toward evening chronotype. There was no significant correlation between chronotype and job satisfaction. Although preliminary because of the low response rate, this study points to the potential of considering circadian preference in choice of specialty training and for designing resident on-call schedules. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:2236-2238, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Cellular circadian clocks in mood disorders.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2012-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are heritable neuropsychiatric disorders associated with disrupted circadian rhythms. The hypothesis that circadian clock dysfunction plays a causal role in these disorders has endured for decades but has been difficult to test and remains controversial. In the meantime, the discovery of clock genes and cellular clocks has revolutionized our understanding of circadian timing. Cellular circadian clocks are located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's primary circadian pacemaker, but also throughout the brain and peripheral tissues. In BD and MDD patients, defects have been found in SCN-dependent rhythms of body temperature and melatonin release. However, these are imperfect and indirect indicators of SCN function. Moreover, the SCN may not be particularly relevant to mood regulation, whereas the lateral habenula, ventral tegmentum, and hippocampus, which also contain cellular clocks, have established roles in this regard. Dysfunction in these non-SCN clocks could contribute directly to the pathophysiology of BD/MDD. We hypothesize that circadian clock dysfunction in non-SCN clocks is a trait marker of mood disorders, encoded by pathological genetic variants. Because network features of the SCN render it uniquely resistant to perturbation, previous studies of SCN outputs in mood disorders patients may have failed to detect genetic defects affecting non-SCN clocks, which include not only mood-regulating neurons in the brain but also peripheral cells accessible in human subjects. Therefore, reporters of rhythmic clock gene expression in cells from patients or mouse models could provide a direct assay of the molecular gears of the clock, in cellular clocks that are likely to be more representative than the SCN of mood-regulating neurons in patients. This approach, informed by the new insights and tools of modern chronobiology, will allow a more definitive test of the role of cellular circadian clocks

  1. Essential and expendable features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Paul E

    2006-12-01

    Circadian clocks control behavioral, physiological and metabolic rhythms via one or more transcriptional feedback loops. In animals, two conserved feedback loops are thought to keep circadian time by mediating rhythmic transcription in opposite phases of the circadian cycle. Recent work in cyanobacteria nevertheless demonstrates that rhythmic transcription is dispensable for circadian timekeeping, raising the possibility that some features of the transcriptional feedback loops in animals are also expendable. Indeed, one of the two feedback loops is not necessary for circadian timekeeping in animals, but rhythmic transcription and post-translational modifications are both essential for keeping circadian time. These results not only confirm additional requirements within the animal circadian timekeeping mechanism, but also raise important questions about the function of conserved, yet expendable, features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in animals.

  2. Mammalian retinal Müller cells have circadian clock function.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Ruan, Guoxiang; Dai, Heng; Liu, Andrew C; Penn, John; McMahon, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    To test whether Müller glia of the mammalian retina have circadian rhythms. We used Müller glia cultures isolated from mouse lines or from humans and bioluminescent reporters of circadian clock genes to monitor molecular circadian rhythms. The clock gene dependence of the Müller cell rhythms was tested using clock gene knockout mouse lines or with siRNA for specific clock genes. We demonstrated that retinal Müller glia express canonical circadian clock genes, are capable of sustained circadian oscillations in isolation from other cell types, and exhibit unique features of their molecular circadian clock compared to the retina as a whole. Mouse and human Müller cells demonstrated circadian clock function; however, they exhibited species-specific differences in the gene dependence of their clocks. Müller cells are the first mammalian retinal cell type in which sustained circadian rhythms have been demonstrated in isolation from other retinal cells.

  3. The emerging roles of lipids in circadian control.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Yaarit; Aviram, Rona; Asher, Gad

    2015-08-01

    Lipids play vital roles in a wide variety of cellular functions. They act as structural components in cell membranes, serve as a major form of energy storage, and function as key signaling molecules. Mounting evidence points towards a tight interplay between lipids and circadian clocks. In mammals, circadian clocks regulate the daily physiology and metabolism, and disruption of circadian rhythmicity is associated with altered lipid homeostasis and pathologies such as fatty liver and obesity. Concomitantly, emerging evidence suggest that lipids are embedded within the core clock circuitry and participate in circadian control. Recent advances in lipidomics methodologies and their application in chronobiology studies have shed new light on the cross talk between circadian clocks and lipid homeostasis. We review herein the latest literature related to the involvement of lipids in circadian clock's function and highlight the contribution of circadian lipidomics studies to our understanding of circadian rhythmicity and lipid homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  4. Circadian Rhythms of Crawling and Swimming in the Nudibranch Mollusc Melibe leonina

    PubMed Central

    NEWCOMB, JAMES M.; KIROUAC, LAUREN E.; NAIMIE, AMANDA A.; BIXBY, KIMBERLY A.; LEE, COLIN; MALANGA, STEPHANIE; RAUBACH, MAUREEN; WATSON, WINSOR H.

    2015-01-01

    Daily rhythms of activity driven by circadian clocks are expressed by many organisms, including molluscs. We initiated this study, with the nudibranch Melibe leonina, with four goals in mind: (1) determine which behaviors are expressed with a daily rhythm; (2) investigate which of these rhythmic behaviors are controlled by a circadian clock; (3) determine if a circadian clock is associated with the eyes or optic ganglia of Melibe, as it is in several other gastropods; and (4) test the hypothesis that Melibe can use extraocular photoreceptors to synchronize its daily rhythms to natural light-dark cycles. To address these goals, we analyzed the behavior of 55 animals exposed to either artificial or natural light-dark cycles, followed by constant darkness. We also repeated this experiment using 10 animals that had their eyes removed. Individuals did not express daily rhythms of feeding, but they swam and crawled more at night. This pattern of locomotion persisted in constant darkness, indicating the presence of a circadian clock. Eyeless animals also expressed a daily rhythm of locomotion, with more locomotion at night. The fact that eyeless animals synchronized their locomotion to the light-dark cycle suggests that they can detect light using extraocular photoreceptors. However, in constant darkness, these rhythms deteriorated, suggesting that the clock neurons that influence locomotion may be located in, or near, the eyes. Thus, locomotion in Melibe appears to be influenced by both ocular and extraocular photoreceptors, although the former appear to have a greater influence on the expression of circadian rhythms. PMID:25572214

  5. Biotinylation: a novel posttranslational modification linking cell autonomous circadian clocks with metabolism.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Hamm, J Austin; Reddy, Alex; Sams, David; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; McGinnis, Graham R; Bailey, Shannon M; Chow, Chi-Wing; Rowe, Glenn C; Chatham, John C; Young, Martin E

    2016-06-01

    Circadian clocks are critical modulators of metabolism. However, mechanistic links between cell autonomous clocks and metabolic processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report that expression of the biotin transporter slc5a6 gene is decreased in hearts of two distinct genetic mouse models of cardiomyocyte-specific circadian clock disruption [i.e., cardiomyocyte-specific CLOCK mutant (CCM) and cardiomyocyte-specific BMAL1 knockout (CBK) mice]. Biotinylation is an obligate posttranslational modification for five mammalian carboxylases: acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACCα), ACCβ, pyruvate carboxylase (PC), methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC), and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). We therefore hypothesized that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock impacts metabolism through biotinylation. Consistent with decreased slc5a6 expression, biotinylation of all carboxylases is significantly decreased (10-46%) in CCM and CBK hearts. In association with decreased biotinylated ACC, oleate oxidation rates are increased in both CCM and CBK hearts. Consistent with decreased biotinylated MCC, leucine oxidation rates are significantly decreased in both CCM and CBK hearts, whereas rates of protein synthesis are increased. Importantly, feeding CBK mice with a biotin-enriched diet for 6 wk normalized myocardial 1) ACC biotinylation and oleate oxidation rates; 2) PCC/MCC biotinylation (and partially restored leucine oxidation rates); and 3) net protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, data suggest that the RRAGD/mTOR/4E-BP1 signaling axis is chronically activated in CBK and CCM hearts. Finally we report that the hepatocyte circadian clock also regulates both slc5a6 expression and protein biotinylation in the liver. Collectively, these findings suggest that biotinylation is a novel mechanism by which cell autonomous circadian clocks influence metabolic pathways.

  6. Biotinylation: a novel posttranslational modification linking cell autonomous circadian clocks with metabolism

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Hamm, J. Austin.; Reddy, Alex; Sams, David; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A.; McGinnis, Graham R.; Bailey, Shannon M.; Chow, Chi-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are critical modulators of metabolism. However, mechanistic links between cell autonomous clocks and metabolic processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report that expression of the biotin transporter slc5a6 gene is decreased in hearts of two distinct genetic mouse models of cardiomyocyte-specific circadian clock disruption [i.e., cardiomyocyte-specific CLOCK mutant (CCM) and cardiomyocyte-specific BMAL1 knockout (CBK) mice]. Biotinylation is an obligate posttranslational modification for five mammalian carboxylases: acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACCα), ACCβ, pyruvate carboxylase (PC), methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC), and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). We therefore hypothesized that the cardiomyocyte circadian clock impacts metabolism through biotinylation. Consistent with decreased slc5a6 expression, biotinylation of all carboxylases is significantly decreased (10–46%) in CCM and CBK hearts. In association with decreased biotinylated ACC, oleate oxidation rates are increased in both CCM and CBK hearts. Consistent with decreased biotinylated MCC, leucine oxidation rates are significantly decreased in both CCM and CBK hearts, whereas rates of protein synthesis are increased. Importantly, feeding CBK mice with a biotin-enriched diet for 6 wk normalized myocardial 1) ACC biotinylation and oleate oxidation rates; 2) PCC/MCC biotinylation (and partially restored leucine oxidation rates); and 3) net protein synthesis rates. Furthermore, data suggest that the RRAGD/mTOR/4E-BP1 signaling axis is chronically activated in CBK and CCM hearts. Finally we report that the hepatocyte circadian clock also regulates both slc5a6 expression and protein biotinylation in the liver. Collectively, these findings suggest that biotinylation is a novel mechanism by which cell autonomous circadian clocks influence metabolic pathways. PMID:27084392

  7. Short communication: Early modification of the circadian organization of cow activity in relation to disease or estrus.

    PubMed

    Veissier, Isabelle; Mialon, Marie-Madeleine; Sloth, Karen Helle

    2017-03-16

    Biological rhythms are an essential regulator of life. There is evidence that circadian rhythm of activity is disrupted under chronic stress in animals and humans, and it may also be less marked during diseases. Here we investigated whether a detectable circadian rhythm of activity exists in dairy cows in commercial settings using a real-time positioning system. We used CowView (GEA Farm Technologies) to regularly record the individual positions of 350 cows in a Danish dairy farm over 5 mo and to infer the cows' activity (resting, feeding, in alley). We ran a factorial correspondence analysis on the cows' activities and used the first component of this analysis to express the variations in activity. On this axis, the activities obtained the following weights: resting = -0.15; in alleys = +0.12; feeding = +0.34. By applying these weights to the proportions of time each cow spent on each of the 3 activities, we were able to chart a circadian rhythm of activity. We found that average level of activity of a cow on a given day and its variations during that day varied with specific states (i.e., estrus, lameness, mastitis). More specifically, circadian variations in activity appeared to be particularly sensitive and to vary 1 to 2 d before the farmer detected a disorder. These findings offer promising avenues for further research to design models to predict physiological or pathological states of cows from real-time positioning data.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the regular environmental circadian cues in addition to stringent and demanding operational schedules are two main factors that undoubtedly impact sleep patterns and vigilant performance in the astronaut crews during spaceflight. Most research is focused on the behavioral aspects of the risk of circadian desynchronization, characterized by fatigue and health and performance decrement. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate this risk. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. The molecular clock consists of sets of proteins that perform different functions within the clock machinery: circadian oscillators (genes whose expression levels cycle during the day, keep the pass of cellular time and regulate downstream effector genes), the effector or output genes (those which impact the physiology of the tissue or organism), and the input genes (responsible for sensing the environmental cues that allow circadian entrainment). The main environmental cue is light. As opposed to the known photoreceptors (rods and cones), the non-visual light stimulus is received by a subset of the population of retinal ganglion cells called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) that express melanopsin (opsin 4 -Opn4-) as the photoreceptor. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ipRGC and melanopsin expression, which may be a contributing cause of circadian disruption during spaceflight. To answer this question, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (animal enclosure module) mice were used as ground controls. Opn4 expression was analyzed by real time RT/qPCR and retinal sections were stained for Opn4

  9. Active stabilization of a flexible antenna feed tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1983-04-01

    Active stabilization logic is synthesized to hold a feed at the focus of a spacecraft antenna dish. The feed support structure is modeled as a tetrahedron made up of flexible bars and connected to the dish by six short legs containing force actuators. Using the symmetry of the structure, the model can be decomposed into four uncoupled subsystems: pitch/forward motions with four degrees of freedom (DOF) and two controls; roll/lateral motions with four DOF and two controls; vertical motions with three DOF and one control; and yaw motion with one DOF and one control. This greatly simplifies the synthesis of control logic.

  10. Circadian Rhythm of Pyrocystis fusiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishaar, B.

    2016-12-01

    For the Academy of Science St. Louis Science Fair, I tested how different photoperiods affect the morphology of Pyrocystis fusiformis with respect to the placement and formation of the chloroplasts. I set up four different rooms to observe the effect the different times in the photoperiod on location of chloroplasts in the cell. At 3:00pm, one room has been in the dark for 12 hours, one for 6 hours, one had been in the light phase for 12 hours and the fourth in the light phase for 6 hours. P fusiformis samples were obtained from each room, observed, photographed at X100 power, and categorized as being a 1, 2, 3, or 4 depending on the position of the chloroplasts. The samples in the different rooms were observed once a week for two weeks, then the samples were rotated to see if P. fusiformis would synchronize the same to the new photoperiod. It was observed that the cells changed morphological stages in the circadian cycle, the chloroplasts moved further away from the nucleus when exposed to light and moved closer to the nucleus when experiencing no light.

  11. Network Dynamics Mediate Circadian Clock Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Abdelhalim; Evans, Jennifer A; Leise, Tanya; Myung, Jihwan; Takumi, Toru; Davidson, Alec J; Brown, Steven A

    2017-01-18

    A circadian clock governs most aspects of mammalian behavior. Although its properties are in part genetically determined, altered light-dark environment can change circadian period length through a mechanism requiring de novo DNA methylation. We show here that this mechanism is mediated not via cell-autonomous clock properties, but rather through altered networking within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the circadian "master clock," which is DNA methylated in region-specific manner. DNA methylation is necessary to temporally reorganize circadian phasing among SCN neurons, which in turn changes the period length of the network as a whole. Interruption of neural communication by inhibiting neuronal firing or by physical cutting suppresses both SCN reorganization and period changes. Mathematical modeling suggests, and experiments confirm, that this SCN reorganization depends upon GABAergic signaling. Our results therefore show that basic circadian clock properties are governed by dynamic interactions among SCN neurons, with neuroadaptations in network function driven by the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Circadian molecular clocks tick along ontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sumová, A; Bendová, Z; Sládek, M; El-Hennamy, R; Matejů, K; Polidarová, L; Sosniyenko, S; Illnerová, H

    2008-01-01

    The circadian system controls the timing of behavioral and physiological functions in most organisms studied. The review addresses the question of when and how the molecular clockwork underlying circadian oscillations within the central circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN) and the peripheral circadian clocks develops during ontogenesis. The current model of the molecular clockwork is summarized. The central SCN clock is viewed as a complex structure composed of a web of mutually synchronized individual oscillators. The importance of development of both the intracellular molecular clockwork as well as intercellular coupling for development of the formal properties of the circadian SCN clock is also highlighted. Recently, data has accumulated to demonstrate that synchronized molecular oscillations in the central and peripheral clocks develop gradually during ontogenesis and development extends into postnatal period. Synchronized molecular oscillations develop earlier in the SCN than in the peripheral clocks. A hypothesis is suggested that the immature clocks might be first driven by external entraining cues, and therefore, serve as "slave" oscillators. During ontogenesis, the clocks may gradually develop a complete set of molecular interlocked oscillations, i.e., the molecular clockwork, and become self-sustained clocks.

  13. Circadian systems biology: When time matters

    PubMed Central

    Fuhr, Luise; Abreu, Mónica; Pett, Patrick; Relógio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a powerful endogenous timing system, which allows organisms to fine-tune their physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. The interplay of a distinct set of core-clock genes and proteins generates oscillations in expression of output target genes which temporally regulate numerous molecular and cellular processes. The study of the circadian timing at the organismal as well as at the cellular level outlines the field of chronobiology, which has been highly interdisciplinary ever since its origins. The development of high-throughput approaches enables the study of the clock at a systems level. In addition to experimental approaches, computational clock models exist which allow the analysis of rhythmic properties of the clock network. Such mathematical models aid mechanistic understanding and can be used to predict outcomes of distinct perturbations in clock components, thereby generating new hypotheses regarding the putative function of particular clock genes. Perturbations in the circadian timing system are linked to numerous molecular dysfunctions and may result in severe pathologies including cancer. A comprehensive knowledge regarding the mechanistic of the circadian system is crucial to develop new procedures to investigate pathologies associated with a deregulated clock. In this manuscript we review the combination of experimental methodologies, bioinformatics and theoretical models that have been essential to explore this remarkable timing-system. Such an integrative and interdisciplinary approach may provide new strategies with regard to chronotherapeutic treatment and new insights concerning the restoration of the circadian timing in clock-associated diseases. PMID:26288701

  14. Systems biology of circadian-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, P D; Scheff, J D; Calvano, S E; Androulakis, I P

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the immune system is regulated by circadian rhythms. A wide range of immune parameters, such as the number of red blood cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells as well as the level of critical immune mediators, such as cytokines, undergo daily fluctuations. Current experimental data indicate that circadian information reaches immune tissues mainly through diurnal patterns of autonomic and endocrine rhythms. In addition, immune factors such as cytokines can also influence the phase of the circadian clock, providing bidirectional flow of circadian information between the neuroendocrine and immune systems. This network of neuroendocrine-immune interactions consists of complexly integrated molecular feedback and feedforward loops that function in synchrony in order to optimize immune response. Chronic stress can disrupt this intrinsic orchestration, as several endocrine signals of chronically stressed patients present blunted rhythmic characteristics. Reprogramming of biological rhythms has recently gained much attention as a potent method to leverage homeostatic circadian controls to ultimately improve clinical outcomes. Elucidation of the intrinsic properties of such complex systems and optimization of intervention strategies require not only an accurate identification of the signaling pathways that mediate host responses, but also a system-level description and evaluation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The circadian clock in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Stow, Lisa R; Gumz, Michelle L

    2011-04-01

    Circadian variations in renal function were first described in the 19th century, and GFR, renal blood flow, urine production, and electrolyte excretion exhibit daily oscillations. These clinical observations are well established, but the underlying mechanisms that govern circadian fluctuations in kidney are not fully understood. Here we provide a brief overview of the machinery governing the circadian clock and examine the clinical and molecular evidence supporting a critical role for circadian rhythm in the kidney. There is a connection between BP oscillation and renal disease that supports the use of chronotherapy in the treatment of hypertension or correction of nondipping BP. Such studies support a developing model of clock controlled sodium and water transport in renal epithelial cells. Recent advances in identifying novel clock-controlled genes using rodent and cellular models also shed light on the molecular mechanisms by which the circadian clock controls renal function; however, the field is new and much more work remains. Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Nephrology

  16. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  17. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  18. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  19. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  20. Immunosuppressant calcineurin inhibitors phase shift circadian rhythms and inhibit circadian responses to light.

    PubMed

    Katz, Marcelo E; Simonetta, Sergio H; Ralph, Martin R; Golombek, Diego A

    2008-10-01

    PP2B is a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase that is ubiquitously expressed in mammals. Among other actions, it is an effector mechanism in NMDA-mediated glutamate neurotransmission as well as a regulator of GSK3beta and MAPK signaling cascades. Because all of these mechanisms have demonstrable roles in the control of circadian rhythyms, we hypothesized that PP2B would be a key regulator of rhythm generation and entrainment, and that through inhibition of its phosphatase activity, the circadian system would be affected by immunosuppressant drug therapy. We report here that immunosuppressant drugs (cyclosporin A, FK506) (1) block the circadian responses to light that underlie photic entrainment; (2) produce circadian phase shifts with a characteristic nonphotic profile; and (3) disrupt circadian rhythm expression when applied chronically. These results indicate a role for PP2B in circadian rhythm generation and entrainment. In addition, because rhythm disturbance has been implicated in impairment of both physical and mental health, we suggest that the use of immunosuppressants would be safer and more efficacious if their impacts on circadian rhythmicity were taken into account.

  1. Enteral feedings.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, R

    1980-01-01

    The benefits, equipment used, commercially available sources, and the indications and techniques for administration of enteral nutrients are reviewed. In many malabsorption states, enteral feeding is preferable and parenteral nutrients are seldom indicated. Transitional enteral nutrient support usually is indicated after parenteral nutrient therapy. Enteral tube-feeding formulas should be matched to the patient's needs; formulas using blenderized natural foods or intact isolated nutrients are appropriate for patients with intact gastrointestinal tracts. Patients should be monitored for glucosuria and hyperglycemia, bloating, nausea, dehydration, and renal, hepatic and hematologic status. Formula dilution, and a reduced flow rate or use of continuous-drip feeding, will reduce the incidence of osmotic diarrhea. The effectiveness, low cost and low potential for serious complications make enteral feeding preferable to parenteral nutrient therapy for many patients.

  2. The circadian clock controls the expression pattern of the circadian