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Sample records for fefe hydrogenase model

  1. A sterically stabilized FeI-FeI semi-rotated conformation of [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite model.

    PubMed

    Goy, Roman; Bertini, Luca; Elleouet, Catherine; Görls, Helmar; Zampella, Giuseppe; Talarmin, Jean; De Gioia, Luca; Schollhammer, Philippe; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2015-01-28

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase is a highly sophisticated enzyme for the synthesis of hydrogen via a biological route. The rotated state of the H-cluster in the [Fe(I)Fe(I)] form was found to be an indispensable criteria for an effective catalysis. Mimicking the specific rotated geometry of the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site is highly challenging as no protein stabilization is present in model compounds. In order to simulate the sterically demanding environment of the nature's active site, the sterically crowded meso-bis(benzylthio)diphenylsilane (2) was utilized as dithiolate linker in an [2Fe2S] model complex. The reaction of the obtained hexacarbonyl complex 3 with 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane (dmpe) results three different products depending on the amount of dmpe used in this reaction: [{Fe2(CO)5{μ-(SCHPh)2SiPh2}}2(μ-dmpe)] (4), [Fe2(CO)5(κ(2)-dmpe){μ-(SCHPh)2SiPh2}] (5) and [Fe2(CO)5(μ-dmpe){μ-(SCHPh)2SiPh2}] (6). Interestingly, the molecular structure of compound 5 shows a [FeFe] subsite comprising a semi-rotated conformation, which was fully characterized as well as the other isomers 4 and 6 by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and DFT calculations. The herein reported model complex is the first example so far reported for [Fe(I)Fe(I)] hydrogenase model complex showing a semi-rotated geometry without the need of stabilization via agostic interactions (Fe···H-C).

  2. Biomimetic assembly of the [FeFe] hydrogenase: synthetic mimics in a biological shell.

    PubMed

    Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Weigand, Wolfgang

    2013-11-25

    Combining synthetic chemistry and biology: A new method that allows the incorporation of synthetic [FeFe] hydrogenase mimics into the apo-hydrogenase is highlighted. Azadithiolato-functionalized model complexes showed similar activity to wild-type enzymes when implemented into the protein.

  3. [FeFe] hydrogenases and their evolution: a genomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J

    2007-05-01

    Most hydrogenases (H2ases), the enzymes that produce or oxidize dihydrogen, possess dimetallic active sites and belong to either one of two phylogenetically distinct classes, the [NiFe] and the [FeFe] H2ases. These families of H2ases share a number of similarities regarding active site structure and reaction mechanism, as a result of convergent evolution. They are otherwise alien to each other, in particular with respect to protein sequence and structure, maturation mechanisms, and distribution among the realms of life. One of the interesting features of [FeFe] H2ases is their occurrence in anaerobic bacteria, anaerobic protists, and mitochondriate eukaryotes. They thus have the potential to report on important evolutionary events, including transitions from the prokaryote to the eukaryote lifestyle. Genome sequences yield a variety of [FeFe] H2ase sequences that have been implemented to shed light on the evolution of these proteins and their host organisms.

  4. Recombinant antibodies for specific detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Mangayil, Rahul; Karp, Matti; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Santala, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is based on activity of specific enzymes called hydrogenases. Hydrogenases are oxygen sensitive metalloenzymes containing Ni and/or Fe atoms at the active site, catalyzing reversible reduction of protons. Generally, [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases prefer proton reduction to molecular hydrogen, a potential energy carrier molecule that can be produced by bioprocesses in sustainable manner. Thus, monitoring tools have been developed to study the relationship between [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases and biohydrogen production in bioreactors at DNA and RNA levels. In the present study, novel molecular tools are introduced for quantitative monitoring of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases at the protein level. Aerobic and anaerobic biopanning (for inactive and active [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, respectively) of phage displayed single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody libraries aided in isolating nine potential scFvs. The enriched antibodies demonstrated high specificity towards Clostridium spp. [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases allowing detection from pure and mixed cultures. Additionally, the antibodies showed different binding characteristics towards hydrogenase catalytic states, providing a possible means for functional detection of clostridial [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases. From hydrogenase-antibody interaction studies we observed that though antibody binding reduced the enzyme catalytic activity, it facilitated to retain hydrogen evolution from oxygen exposed hydrogenases. PMID:27786270

  5. Process and genes for expression and overexpression of active [FeFe] hydrogenases

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Posewitz, Matthew C; Smolinski, Sharon L

    2014-09-16

    A process for expression of active [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a host organism that does not contain either the structural gene(s) for [FeFe]-hydrogenases and/or homologues for the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HyG, comprising: cloning the structural hydrogenase gene(s) and/or the maturation genes HydE, HydF and HydG from an organisms that contains these genes into expression plasmids; transferring the plasmids into an organism that lacks a native [FeFe]-hydrogenase or that has a disrupted [FeFe]-hydrogenase and culturing it aerobically; and inducing anaerobiosis to provide [FeFe] hydrogenase biosynthesis and H?2#191 production.

  6. Structural Insight into the Complex of Ferredoxin and [FeFe] Hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Rumpel, Sigrun; Siebel, Judith F; Diallo, Mamou; Farès, Christophe; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-07-27

    The transfer of photosynthetic electrons by the ferredoxin PetF to the [FeFe] hydrogenase HydA1 in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a key step in hydrogen production. Electron delivery requires a specific interaction between PetF and HydA1. However, because of the transient nature of the electron-transfer complex, a crystal structure remains elusive. Therefore, we performed protein-protein docking based on new experimental data from a solution NMR spectroscopy investigation of native and gallium-substituted PetF. This provides valuable information about residues crucial for complex formation and electron transfer. The derived complex model might help to pinpoint residue substitution targets for improved hydrogen production. PMID:26010059

  7. The quest for a functional substrate access tunnel in FeFe hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lautier, Thomas; Ezanno, Pierre; Baffert, Carole; Fourmond, Vincent; Cournac, Laurent; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Soucaille, Philippe; Bertrand, Patrick; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Léger, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    We investigated di-hydrogen transport between the solvent and the active site of FeFe hydrogenases. Substrate channels supposedly exist and serve various functions in certain redox enzymes which use or produce O2, H2, NO, CO, or N2, but the preferred paths have not always been unambiguously identified, and whether a continuous, permanent channel is an absolute requirement for transporting diatomic molecules is unknown. Here, we review the literature on gas channels in proteins and enzymes and we report on the use of site-directed mutagenesis and various kinetic methods, which proved useful for characterizing substrate access to the active site of NiFe hydrogenase to test the putative "static" H2 channel of FeFe hydrogenases. We designed 8 mutations in attempts to interfere with intramolecular diffusion by remodeling this putative route in Clostridium acetobutylicum FeFe hydrogenase, and we observed that none of them has a strong effect on any of the enzyme's kinetic properties. We suggest that H2 may diffuse either via transient cavities, or along a conserved water-filled channel. Nitrogenase sets a precedent for the involvement of a hydrophilic channel to conduct hydrophobic molecules.

  8. [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenase diversity, mechanism, and maturation.

    PubMed

    Peters, John W; Schut, Gerrit J; Boyd, Eric S; Mulder, David W; Shepard, Eric M; Broderick, Joan B; King, Paul W; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-06-01

    The [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the formal interconversion between hydrogen and protons and electrons, possess characteristic non-protein ligands at their catalytic sites and thus share common mechanistic features. Despite the similarities between these two types of hydrogenases, they clearly have distinct evolutionary origins and likely emerged from different selective pressures. [FeFe]-hydrogenases are widely distributed in fermentative anaerobic microorganisms and likely evolved under selective pressure to couple hydrogen production to the recycling of electron carriers that accumulate during anaerobic metabolism. In contrast, many [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze hydrogen oxidation as part of energy metabolism and were likely key enzymes in early life and arguably represent the predecessors of modern respiratory metabolism. Although the reversible combination of protons and electrons to generate hydrogen gas is the simplest of chemical reactions, the [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases have distinct mechanisms and differ in the fundamental chemistry associated with proton transfer and control of electron flow that also help to define catalytic bias. A unifying feature of these enzymes is that hydrogen activation itself has been restricted to one solution involving diatomic ligands (carbon monoxide and cyanide) bound to an Fe ion. On the other hand, and quite remarkably, the biosynthetic mechanisms to produce these ligands are exclusive to each type of enzyme. Furthermore, these mechanisms represent two independent solutions to the formation of complex bioinorganic active sites for catalyzing the simplest of chemical reactions, reversible hydrogen oxidation. As such, the [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases are arguably the most profound case of convergent evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25461840

  9. A diferrous dithiolate as a model of the elusive H(ox)(inact) state of the [FeFe] hydrogenases: an electrochemical and theoretical dissection of its redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chouffai, Dounia; Capon, Jean-François; De Gioia, Luca; Pétillon, François Y; Schollhammer, Philippe; Talarmin, Jean; Zampella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The reduction of the Fe(II)Fe(II) complex [Fe2(CO)2{P(OMe)3}2(κ(2)-IMe-CH2-IMe)(μ-CO)(μ-pdt)](2+) (2P(2+); pdt = S(CH2)3S), which is a synthetic model of the H cluster of the [FeFe] hydrogenases in its inactive state, has been investigated electrochemically and theoretically (by density functional theory, DFT) in order to determine the mechanisms, intermediates, and products of the related processes. The electrochemical reduction of 2P(2+) occurs according to an ECE-type reaction where the intervening chemical step is the loss of one P(OMe)3 ligand. This outcome, which is based on cyclic voltammetric experiments, is strongly supported by DFT calculations that provide additional information on the intermediates and the energetics of the reactions involved. The electrochemical reoxidation of the neutral product of the reduction follows an EEC process where the chemical step is the binding of P(OMe)3 to a dicationic intermediate. DFT calculations reveal that this intermediate has an unusual geometry wherein one of the two C-H bonds of a side methylene from the pdt group forms an agostic interaction with one Fe center. This interaction is crucial to stabilize the 32e(-) diferrous center and concomitantly to preserve Fe(II) from binding of weakly coordinating species. Nonetheless, it could be displaced by a relatively stronger electron donor such as H2, which could be relevant for the design of new oxidation catalysts.

  10. Covalent attachment of FeFe hydrogenases to carbon electrodes for direct electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Baffert, Carole; Sybirna, Kateryna; Ezanno, Pierre; Lautier, Thomas; Hajj, Viviane; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe; Bottin, Hervé; Léger, Christophe

    2012-09-18

    Direct electron transfer between enzymes and electrodes is now commonly achieved, but obtaining protein films that are very stable may be challenging. This is particularly crucial in the case of hydrogenases, the enzymes that catalyze the biological conversion between dihydrogen and protons, because the instability of the hydrogenase films may prevent the use of these enzymes as electrocatalysts of H(2) oxidation and production in biofuel cells and photoelectrochemical cells. Here we show that two different FeFe hydrogenases (from Chamydomonas reinhardtii and Clostridium acetobutylicum) can be covalently attached to functionalized pyrolytic graphite electrodes using peptidic coupling. In both cases, a surface patch of lysine residues makes it possible to favor an orientation that is efficient for fast, direct electron transfer. High hydrogen-oxidation current densities are maintained for up to one week, the only limitation being the intrinsic stability of the enzyme. We also show that covalent attachment has no effect on the catalytic properties of the enzyme, which means that this strategy can also used be for electrochemical studies of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:22891965

  11. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:27494400

  12. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme.

  13. Cysteine as a ligand platform in the biosynthesis of the FeFe hydrogenase H cluster

    PubMed Central

    Suess, Daniel L. M.; Bürstel, Ingmar; De La Paz, Liliana; Kuchenreuther, Jon M.; Pham, Cindy C.; Cramer, Stephen P.; Swartz, James R.; Britt, R. David

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the redox interconversion of protons and H2, an important reaction for a number of metabolic processes and for solar fuel production. In FeFe hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at the H cluster, a metallocofactor comprising a [4Fe–4S]H subcluster coupled to a [2Fe]H subcluster bound by CO, CN–, and azadithiolate ligands. The [2Fe]H subcluster is assembled by the maturases HydE, HydF, and HydG. HydG is a member of the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine family of enzymes that transforms Fe and l-tyrosine into an [Fe(CO)2(CN)] synthon that is incorporated into the H cluster. Although it is thought that the site of synthon formation in HydG is the “dangler” Fe of a [5Fe] cluster, many mechanistic aspects of this chemistry remain unresolved including the full ligand set of the synthon, how the dangler Fe initially binds to HydG, and how the synthon is released at the end of the reaction. To address these questions, we herein show that l-cysteine (Cys) binds the auxiliary [4Fe–4S] cluster of HydG and further chelates the dangler Fe. We also demonstrate that a [4Fe–4S]aux[CN] species is generated during HydG catalysis, a process that entails the loss of Cys and the [Fe(CO)2(CN)] fragment; on this basis, we suggest that Cys likely completes the coordination sphere of the synthon. Thus, through spectroscopic analysis of HydG before and after the synthon is formed, we conclude that Cys serves as the ligand platform on which the synthon is built and plays a role in both Fe2+ binding and synthon release. PMID:26324916

  14. Patterns of [FeFe] Hydrogenase Diversity in the Gut Microbial Communities of Lignocellulose-Feeding Higher Termites

    PubMed Central

    Ballor, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is the central free intermediate in the degradation of wood by termite gut microbes and can reach concentrations exceeding those measured for any other biological system. Degenerate primers targeting the largest family of [FeFe] hydrogenases observed in a termite gut metagenome have been used to explore the evolution and representation of these enzymes in termites. Sequences were cloned from the guts of the higher termites Amitermes sp. strain Cost010, Amitermes sp. strain JT2, Gnathamitermes sp. strain JT5, Microcerotermes sp. strain Cost008, Nasutitermes sp. strain Cost003, and Rhyncotermes sp. strain Cost004. Each gut sample harbored a more rich and evenly distributed population of hydrogenase sequences than observed previously in the guts of lower termites and Cryptocercus punctulatus. This accentuates the physiological importance of hydrogen for higher termite gut ecosystems and may reflect an increased metabolic burden, or metabolic opportunity, created by a lack of gut protozoa. The sequences were phylogenetically distinct from previously sequenced [FeFe] hydrogenases. Phylogenetic and UniFrac comparisons revealed congruence between host phylogeny and hydrogenase sequence library clustering patterns. This may reflect the combined influences of the stable intimate relationship of gut microbes with their host and environmental alterations in the gut that have occurred over the course of termite evolution. These results accentuate the physiological importance of hydrogen to termite gut ecosystems. PMID:22636002

  15. Patterns of [FeFe] hydrogenase diversity in the gut microbial communities of lignocellulose-feeding higher termites.

    PubMed

    Ballor, Nicholas R; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen is the central free intermediate in the degradation of wood by termite gut microbes and can reach concentrations exceeding those measured for any other biological system. Degenerate primers targeting the largest family of [FeFe] hydrogenases observed in a termite gut metagenome have been used to explore the evolution and representation of these enzymes in termites. Sequences were cloned from the guts of the higher termites Amitermes sp. strain Cost010, Amitermes sp. strain JT2, Gnathamitermes sp. strain JT5, Microcerotermes sp. strain Cost008, Nasutitermes sp. strain Cost003, and Rhyncotermes sp. strain Cost004. Each gut sample harbored a more rich and evenly distributed population of hydrogenase sequences than observed previously in the guts of lower termites and Cryptocercus punctulatus. This accentuates the physiological importance of hydrogen for higher termite gut ecosystems and may reflect an increased metabolic burden, or metabolic opportunity, created by a lack of gut protozoa. The sequences were phylogenetically distinct from previously sequenced [FeFe] hydrogenases. Phylogenetic and UniFrac comparisons revealed congruence between host phylogeny and hydrogenase sequence library clustering patterns. This may reflect the combined influences of the stable intimate relationship of gut microbes with their host and environmental alterations in the gut that have occurred over the course of termite evolution. These results accentuate the physiological importance of hydrogen to termite gut ecosystems.

  16. Electronic and geometric effects of phosphatriazaadamantane ligands on the catalytic activity of an [FeFe] hydrogenase inspired complex.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Aaron K; Wang, Shihua; Nichol, Gary S; Lichtenberger, Dennis L; Evans, Dennis H; Glass, Richard S

    2010-03-28

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme active site inspired complexes [Fe(2)(mu-C(6)H(4)S(2))(CO)(5)PTA] (1PTA) and [Fe(2)(mu-C(6)H(4)S(2))(CO)(4)PTA(2)] (1PTA(2)) (PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) were synthesized and characterized. The ability of 1PTA and 1PTA(2) to catalytically produce molecular hydrogen in solution from the weak acid acetic acid was examined electrochemically and compared to previous studies on the all carbonyl containing analogue [Fe(2)(mu-C(6)H(4)S(2))(CO)(6)] (1). Computational methods and cyclic voltammograms indicated that the substitution of CO ligands by PTA in 1 resulted in markedly different reduction chemistry. Both 1PTA and 1PTA(2) catalytically produce molecular hydrogen from acetic acid, however, the mechanism by which and 1PTA and 1PTA(2) catalyze hydrogen differ in the initial reductive processes. PMID:20221539

  17. H₂-dependent azoreduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: involvement of secreted flavins and both [Ni-Fe] and [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Lorquin, Jean; Brugna, Myriam; Rousset, Marc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen (H2)-dependent discoloration of azo dye amaranth by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Experiments with hydrogenase-deficient strains demonstrated that periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (HyaB) and periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase (HydA) are both respiratory hydrogenases of dissimilatory azoreduction in S. oneidensis MR-1. These findings suggest that HyaB and HydA can function as uptake hydrogenases that couple the oxidation of H2 to the reduction of amaranth to sustain cellular growth. This constitutes to our knowledge the first report of the involvement of [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase in a bacterial azoreduction process. Assays with respiratory inhibitors indicated that a menaquinone pool and different cytochromes were involved in the azoreduction process. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that flavin mononucleotide and riboflavin were secreted in culture supernatant by S. oneidensis MR-1 under H2-dependent conditions with concentration of 1.4 and 2.4 μmol g protein(-1), respectively. These endogenous flavins were shown to significantly accelerate the reduction of amaranth at micromolar concentrations acting as electron shuttles between the cell surface and the extracellular azo dye. This work may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms of azoreduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 and may have practical applications for microbiological treatments of dye-polluted industrial effluents.

  18. Hydrogen-producing microflora and Fe-Fe hydrogenase diversities in seaweed bed associated with marine hot springs of Kalianda, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shou-Ying; He, Pei-Qing; Dewi, Seswita-Zilda; Zhang, Xue-Lei; Ekowati, Chasanah; Liu, Tong-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Hang

    2013-05-01

    Microbial fermentation is a promising technology for hydrogen (H(2)) production. H(2) producers in marine geothermal environments are thermophilic and halotolerant. However, no one has surveyed an environment specifically for thermophilic bacteria that produce H(2) through Fe-Fe hydrogenases (H(2)ase). Using heterotrophic medium, several microflora from a seaweed bed associated with marine hot springs were enriched and analyzed for H(2) production. A H(2)-producing microflora was obtained from Sargassum sp., 16S rRNA genes and Fe-Fe H(2)ase diversities of this enrichment were also analyzed. Based on 16S rRNA genes analysis, 10 phylotypes were found in the H(2)-producing microflora showing 90.0-99.5 % identities to known species, and belonged to Clostridia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacillales. Clostridia were the most abundant group, and three Clostridia phylotypes were most related to known H(2) producers such as Anaerovorax odorimutans (94.0 % identity), Clostridium papyrosolvens (98.4 % identity), and Clostridium tepidiprofundi (93.1 % identity). For Fe-Fe H(2)ases, seven phylotypes were obtained, showing 63-97 % identities to known Fe-Fe H(2)ases, and fell into four distinct clusters. Phylotypes HW55-3 and HM55-1 belonged to thermophilic and salt-tolerant H(2)-producing Clostridia, Halothermothrix orenii-like Fe-Fe H(2)ases (80 % identity), and cellulolytic H(2)-producing Clostridia, C. papyrosolvens-like Fe-Fe H(2)ases (97 % identity), respectively. The results of both 16S rRNA genes and Fe-Fe H(2)ases surveys suggested that the thermophilic and halotolerant H(2)-producing microflora in seaweed bed of hot spring area represented previously unknown H(2) producers, and have potential application for H(2) production.

  19. New redox states observed in [FeFe] hydrogenases reveal redox coupling within the H-cluster.

    PubMed

    Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Krawietz, Danuta; Siebel, Judith; Weber, Katharina; Happe, Thomas; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-08-13

    Active [FeFe] hydrogenases can be obtained by expressing the unmaturated enzyme in Escherichia coli followed by incubation with a synthetic precursor of the binuclear [2Fe] subcluster, namely: [NEt4]2[Fe2(adt)(CO)4(CN)2] (adt = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)). The binuclear subsite Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 is attached through a bridging cysteine side chain to a [4Fe-4S] subcluster already present in the unmaturated enzyme thus yielding the intact native "H-cluster". We present FTIR electrochemical studies of the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CrHydA1, maturated with the precursor of the native cofactor [Fe2(adt)(CO)4(CN)2](2-) as well as a non-natural variant [Fe2(pdt)(CO)4(CN)2](2-) in which the bridging amine functionality is replaced by CH2. The obtained active enzyme CrHydA1(adt) shows the same redox states in the respective potential range as observed for the native system (E(ox/red) = -400 mV, E(red/sred) = -470 mV). For the Hox → Hred transition the reducing equivalent is stored on the binuclear part, ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(II)Fe(I) → [4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(I)), while the Hred → Hsred transition is characterized by a reduction of the [4Fe-4S] part of the H-cluster ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(I) → [4Fe-4S](+)Fe(I)Fe(I)). A similar transition is reported here for the CO inhibited state of the H-cluster: ([4Fe-4S](2+)Fe(I)Fe(II)CO → [4Fe-4S](+)Fe(I)Fe(II)CO). An FTIR electrochemical study of the inactive variant with the pdt ligand, CrHydA1(pdt), identified two redox states H(pdt)-ox and H(pdt)-"red". Both EPR and FTIR spectra of H(pdt)-ox are virtually identical to those of the H(adt)-ox and the native Hox state. The H(pdt)-"red" state is also characterized by a reduced [4Fe-4S] subcluster. In contrast to CrHydA1(adt), the H(pdt)-ox state of CrHydA1(pdt) is stable up to rather high potentials (+200 mV). This study demonstrates the distinct redox coupling between the two parts of the H-cluster and confirms that the [4Fe-4S]H subsite is also redox active and as

  20. Hydrogenase Enzymes and Their Synthetic Models: The Role of Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Schilter, David; Camara, James M; Huynh, Mioy T; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2016-08-10

    Hydrogenase enzymes efficiently process H2 and protons at organometallic FeFe, NiFe, or Fe active sites. Synthetic modeling of the many H2ase states has provided insight into H2ase structure and mechanism, as well as afforded catalysts for the H2 energy vector. Particularly important are hydride-bearing states, with synthetic hydride analogues now known for each hydrogenase class. These hydrides are typically prepared by protonation of low-valent cores. Examples of FeFe and NiFe hydrides derived from H2 have also been prepared. Such chemistry is more developed than mimicry of the redox-inactive monoFe enzyme, although functional models of the latter are now emerging. Advances in physical and theoretical characterization of H2ase enzymes and synthetic models have proven key to the study of hydrides in particular, and will guide modeling efforts toward more robust and active species optimized for practical applications. PMID:27353631

  1. N-Substituted Derivatives of the Azadithiolate Cofactor from the [FeFe] Hydrogenases: Stability and Complexation

    PubMed Central

    Angamuthu, Raja; Chen, Chi-Shian; Cochrane, Tyler R.; Gray, Danielle L.; Schilter, David; Ulloa, Olbelina A.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described that probe the stability of N-substituted derivatives of the azadithiolate cofactor recently confirmed in the [FeFe] hydrogenases (Berggren, G., et al. Nature 2013, 499, 66). Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of bis(thioester) BnN(CH2SAc)2 gives [BnNCH2SCH2]2 rather than azadithiol BnN(CH2SH)2. Treatment of BnN(CH2SAc)2 with NaOtBu generates BnN(CH2SNa)2, which was trapped with NiCl2(diphos) (diphos = 1,2-C2H4(PR2)2; R = Ph (dppe) and Cy (dcpe)) to give fully characterized complexes Ni[(SCH2)2NBn](diphos). The related N-aryl derivative Ni[(SCH2)2NC6H4Cl](diphos) was prepared analogously from 4-ClC6H4N(CH2SAc)2, NaOtBu, and NiCl2(dppe). Crystallographic analysis confirmed that these rare nonbridging [adtR]2− complexes feature distorted square planar Ni centers. The analogue Pd[(SCH2)2NBn](dppe) was also prepared. 31P NMR analysis indicates that Ni[(SCH2)2NBn](dppe) has basicity comparable to typical amines. As shown by cyclic voltammetry, the couple [M[(SCH2)2NBn](dppe)]+/0 is reversible near −2.0 V versus Fc+/0. The wave shifts to −1.78 V upon N-protonation. In the presence of CF3CO2H, Ni[(SCH2)2NBn](dppe) catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rate of 22 s−1 in the acid-independent regime, at room temperature in CH2Cl2 solution. In contrast to the instability of RN(CH2SH)2 (R = alkyl, aryl), the dithiol of tosylamide TsN(CH2SH)2 proved sufficiently stable to allow full characterization. This dithiol reacts with Fe3(CO)12 and, in the presence of base, NiCl2(dppe) to give Fe2[(SCH2)2NTs](CO)6 and Ni[(SCH2)2NTs](dppe), respectively. PMID:26000618

  2. Solution-phase photochemistry of a [FeFe]hydrogenase model compound: Evidence of photoinduced isomerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, Rafal; Hunt, Neil T.; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Wright, Joseph A.; Pickett, Christopher J.; Ulijn, Rein V.

    2012-01-28

    The solution-phase photochemistry of the [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite model ({mu}-S(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}S)Fe{sub 2}(CO){sub 4}(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2} has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy supported by density functional theory calculations. In three different solvents, n-heptane, methanol, and acetonitrile, relaxation of the tricarbonyl intermediate formed by UV photolysis of a carbonyl ligand leads to geminate recombination with a bias towards a thermodynamically less stable isomeric form, suggesting that facile interconversion of the ligand groups at the Fe center is possible in the unsaturated species. In a polar or hydrogen bonding solvent, this process competes with solvent substitution leading to the formation of stable solvent adduct species. The data provide further insight into the effect of incorporating non-carbonyl ligands on the dynamics and photochemistry of hydrogenase-derived biomimetic compounds.

  3. Solution-phase photochemistry of a [FeFe]hydrogenase model compound: evidence of photoinduced isomerisation.

    PubMed

    Kania, Rafal; Frederix, Pim W J M; Wright, Joseph A; Ulijn, Rein V; Pickett, Christopher J; Hunt, Neil T

    2012-01-28

    The solution-phase photochemistry of the [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite model (μ-S(CH(2))(3)S)Fe(2)(CO)(4)(PMe(3))(2) has been studied using ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy supported by density functional theory calculations. In three different solvents, n-heptane, methanol, and acetonitrile, relaxation of the tricarbonyl intermediate formed by UV photolysis of a carbonyl ligand leads to geminate recombination with a bias towards a thermodynamically less stable isomeric form, suggesting that facile interconversion of the ligand groups at the Fe center is possible in the unsaturated species. In a polar or hydrogen bonding solvent, this process competes with solvent substitution leading to the formation of stable solvent adduct species. The data provide further insight into the effect of incorporating non-carbonyl ligands on the dynamics and photochemistry of hydrogenase-derived biomimetic compounds.

  4. Coordination and conformational isomers in mononuclear iron complexes with pertinence to the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site.

    PubMed

    Orthaber, Andreas; Karnahl, Michael; Tschierlei, Stefanie; Streich, Daniel; Stein, Matthias; Ott, Sascha

    2014-03-21

    A series of six mononuclear iron complexes of the type [Fe(X-bdt)(P(R)2N(Ph)2)(CO)] (P(R)2N(Ph)2 = 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphaoctane, bdt = benzenedithiolate with X = H, Cl2 or Me and R = Ph, Bn, Cyc or tert-Bu) was prepared. This new class of penta-coordinate iron complexes contains a free coordination site and a pendant base as essential structural features of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site. The bidentate nature of the P(R)2N(Ph)2 ligands was found to be crucial for the preferential formation of coordinatively unsaturated penta-coordinate complexes, which is supported by first principle calculations. IR-spectroscopic data suggest the presence of coordination isomers around the metal center, as well as multiple possible conformers of the P(R)2N(Ph)2 ligand. This finding is further corroborated by X-ray crystallographic and computational studies. (31)P{(1)H}-NMR- and IR-spectroscopic as well as electrochemical measurements show that the electronic properties of the complexes are strongly, and independently, influenced by the P-substituents at the P(R)2N(Ph)2 ligand as well as by modifications of the bdt bridge. These results illustrate the advantages of this modular platform, which allows independent and selective tuning through site specific modifications. Potential catalytic intermediates, namely singly reduced and protonated complexes, have been further investigated by spectroscopic methods and exhibit remarkable stability. Finally, their general capacity for electro-catalytic reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen was verified.

  5. Atomic Resolution Modeling of the Ferredoxin:[FeFe] Hydrogenase Complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; King, P. W.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Kim, K.

    2007-11-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases HydA1 and HydA2 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii catalyze the final reaction in a remarkable metabolic pathway allowing this photosynthetic organism to produce H2 from water in the chloroplast. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin is a critical branch point in electron flow from Photosystem I toward a variety of metabolic fates, including proton reduction by hydrogenases. To better understand the binding determinants involved in ferredoxin:hydrogenase interactions, we have modeled Chlamydomonas PetF1 and HydA2 based on amino-acid sequence homology, and produced two promising electron-transfer model complexes by computational docking. To characterize these models, quantitative free energy calculations at atomic resolution were carried out, and detailed analysis of the interprotein interactions undertaken. The protein complex model we propose for ferredoxin:HydA2 interaction is energetically favored over the alternative candidate by 20kcal/mol. This proposed model of the electron-transfer complex between PetF1 and HydA2 permits a more detailed view of the molecular events leading up to H2 evolution, and suggests potential mutagenic strategies to modulate electron flow to HydA2.

  6. Spin distribution of the H-cluster in the H(ox)-CO state of the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans: HYSCORE and ENDOR study of (14)N and (13)C nuclear interactions.

    PubMed

    Silakov, Alexey; Wenk, Brian; Reijerse, Eduard; Albracht, Simon P J; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes which catalyze the reversible cleavage of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons. In [FeFe] hydrogenases the active center is a 6Fe6S cluster, referred to as the "H-cluster." It consists of the redox-active binuclear subcluster ([2Fe](H)) coordinated by CN(-) and CO ligands and the cubane-like [4Fe-4S](H) subcluster which is connected to the protein via Cys ligands. One of these Cys ligands bridges to the [2Fe](H) subcluster. The CO-inhibited form of [FeFe] hydrogenase isolated from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was studied using advanced EPR methods. In the H(ox)-CO state the open coordination site at the [2Fe](H) subcluster is blocked by extrinsic CO, giving rise to an EPR-active S = 1/2 species. The CO inhibited state was prepared with (13)CO and illuminated under white light at 273 K. In this case scrambling of the CO ligands occurs. Three (13)C hyperfine couplings of 17.1, 7.4, and 3.8 MHz (isotropic part) were observed and assigned to (13)CO at the extrinsic, the bridging, and the terminal CO-ligand positions of the distal iron, respectively. No (13)CO exchange of the CO ligand to the proximal iron was observed. The hyperfine interactions detected indicate a rather large distribution of the spin density over the terminal and bridging CO ligands attached to the distal iron. Furthermore, (14)N nuclear spin interactions were measured. On the basis of the observed (14)N hyperfine couplings, which result from the CN(-) ligands of the [2Fe](H) subcluster, it has been concluded that there is very little unpaired spin density on the cyanides of the binuclear subcluster.

  7. Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from rhenium(I) complexes to [FeFe] hydrogenase mimics in aqueous SDS micellar systems: a biomimetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Wang, Wen-Guang; Si, Gang; Wang, Feng; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2010-06-15

    To offer an intriguing access to photocatalytic H(2) generation in an aqueous solution, the hydrophobic photosensitizer, Re(I)(4,4'-dimethylbpy)(CO)(3)Br (1) or Re(I)(1,10-phenanthroline)(CO)(3)Br (2), and [FeFe] H(2)ases mimics, [Fe(2)(CO)(6)(mu-adt)CH(2)C(6)H(5)] (3) or [Fe(2)(CO)(6)(mu-adt)C(6)H(5)] (4) [mu-adt = N(CH(2)S)(2)], have been successfully incorporated into an aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle solution, in which ascorbic acid (H(2)A) was used as a sacrificial electron donor and proton source. Studies on the reaction efficiency for H(2) generation reveal that both the close contact and the driving force for electron transfer from the excited Re(I) complexes and [FeFe] H(2)ases mimics are crucial for efficient H(2) generation with visible light irradiation. Steady-state and time-resolved investigations demonstrate that the electron transfer takes place from the excited Re(I) complex 1 or 2 to [FeFe] H(2)ases mimic catalyst 3, leading to the formation of the long-lived Fe(I)Fe(0) charge-separated state that can react with a proton to generate Fe(I)Fe(II).H, an intermediate for H(2) production. As a result, a reaction vessel for the photocatalytic H(2) production in an aqueous solution is established.

  8. Vibrational analysis of the model complex (mu-edt)[Fe(CO)(3)](2) and comparison to iron-only hydrogenase: the activation scale of hydrogenase model systems.

    PubMed

    Galinato, Mary Grace I; Whaley, C Matthew; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2010-04-01

    Research on simple [FeFe] hydrogenase model systems of type (mu-S(2)R)[Fe(CO)(3)](2) (R = C(2)H(4) (edt), C(3)H(6) (pdt)) which have been shown to function as robust electrocatalysts for proton reduction, provides a reference to understand the electronic and vibrational properties of the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases and of more sophisticated model systems. In this study, the solution and solid state Raman spectra of (mu-edt)[Fe(CO)(3)](2) and of the corresponding (13)CO-labeled complex are presented and analyzed in detail, with focus on the nu(C=O) and nu(Fe-CO)/delta(Fe-C=O) vibrational regions. These regions are specifically important as vibrations involving CO ligands serve as probes for the "electron richness" of low-valent transition metal centers and the geometric structures of the complexes. The obtained vibrational spectra have been completely assigned in terms of the nu(C=O), nu(Fe-CO), and delta(Fe-C=O) modes, and the force constants of the important C=O and Fe-CO bonds have been determined using our Quantum Chemistry Centered Normal Coordinate Analysis (QCC-NCA). In the 400-650 cm(-1) region, fifteen mixed nu(Fe-CO)/delta(Fe-C=O) modes have been identified. The most prominent Raman peaks at 454, 456, and 483 cm(-1) correspond to a combination of nu(Fe-CO) stretching and delta(Fe-C=O) linear bending modes. The less intense peaks at 416 cm(-1) and 419 cm(-1) correspond to pure delta(Fe-C=O) linear bends. In the nu(C=O) region, the nu(C=O) normal modes at lower energy (1968 and 1964 cm(-1)) are almost pure equatorial (eq) nu(C=O)(eq) stretching vibrations, whereas the remaining four nu(C=O) normal modes show dominant (C=O)(eq) (2070 and 1961 cm(-1)) and (C=O)(ax) (2005 and 1979 cm(-1); ax = axial) contributions. Importantly, an inverse correlation between the f(C=O)(ax/eq) and f(Fe-CO)(ax/eq) force constants is obtained, in agreement with the idea that the Fe(I)-CO bond in these types of complexes is dominated by pi-backdonation. Compared to the

  9. Vibrational Analysis of the Model Complex (μ-edt)[Fe(CO)3]2 and Comparison to Iron-only Hydrogenase: The Activation Scale of Hydrogenase Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Galinato, Mary Grace I.; Whaley, C. Matthew; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Research on simple [FeFe] hydrogenase model systems of type (μ-S2R)[Fe(CO)3]2 (R = ethane, propane) which have been shown to function as robust electrocatalysts for proton reduction, provides a reference to understand the electronic and vibrational properties of the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases and of more sophisticated model systems. In this study, the solution and solid Raman spectra of (μ-S2R)[Fe(CO)3]2 (R = ethane) and of the corresponding 13CO-labeled complex are presented and analyzed in detail, with focus on the ν(C=O) and ν(Fe-CO)/δ(Fe-C=O) vibrational regions. These regions are specifically important as vibrations involving CO ligands serve as probes for the ‘electron richness’ of low-valent transition metal centers and the geometric structures of the complexes. The obtained vibrational spectra have been completely assigned in terms of the ν(C=O), ν(Fe-CO) and δ(Fe-C=O) modes, and the force constants of the important C=O and Fe-CO bonds have been determined using our Quantum Chemistry Centered Normal Coordinate Analysis (QCC-NCA). In the 400–650 cm−1 region, 15 mixed ν(Fe-CO)/δ(Fe-C=O) modes have been identified. The most prominent Raman peaks at 454, 456 and 483 cm−1 correspond to a combination of ν(Fe-CO) stretching and δ(Fe-C=O) linear bending modes. The less intense peaks at 416 cm−1 and 419 cm−1 correspond to pure δ(Fe-C=O) linear bends. In the ν(C=O) region, the ν(C=O) normal modes at lower energy (1968 and 1964 cm−1) are almost pure equatorial (eq) ν(C=O)eq stretching vibrations, whereas the remaining four ν(C=O) normal modes show dominant (C=O)eq (2070 and 1961 cm−1) and (C=O)ax (2005 and 1979 cm−1; ax = axial) contributions. Importantly, an inverse correlation between the f(C=O)ax/eq and f(Fe-CO)ax/eq force constants is obtained, in agreement with the idea that the Fe(I)-CO bond in these types of complexes is dominated by π backdonation. Compared to the reduced form of [FeFe] hydrogenase (Hred), the

  10. Electron transfer and hydrogen generation from a molecular dyad: platinum(II) alkynyl complex anchored to [FeFe] hydrogenase subsite mimic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Guang; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hong-Yan; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2012-02-28

    A PS-Fe(2)S(2) molecular dyad 1a directly anchoring a platinum(II) alkynyl complex to a Fe(2)S(2) active site of a [FeFe] H(2)ase mimic, and an intermolecular system of its reference complexes 1b and 2, have been successfully constructed. Time-dependence of H(2) evolution shows that PS-Fe(2)S(2)1a as well as complex 2 with 1b can produce H(2) in the presence of a proton source and sacrificial donor under visible light irradiation. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies on the electron transfer event reveal that the reduced Fe(I)Fe(0) species generated by the first electron transfer from the excited platinum(II) complex to the Fe(2)S(2) active site in PS-Fe(2)S(2)1a and complex 2 with 1b is essential for photochemical H(2) evolution, while the second electron transfer from the excited platinum(II) complex to the protonated Fe(I)Fe(0) species is thermodynamically unfeasible, which might be an obstacle for the relatively small amount of H(2) obtained by PS-Fe(2)S(2) molecular dyads reported so far.

  11. [FeFe]-hydrogenase models assembled into vesicular structures.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Kristin; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Wolter, Nonio; Rüger, Ronny; Alpermann, Theodor; Steiniger, Frank; Gabel, Detlef; Förster, Stephan; Weigand, Wolfgang; Fahr, Alfred

    2014-03-01

    Compartmentalization is a major prerequisite for the origin of life on earth according to Wächtershäuser "Iron-Sulfur-World". The hypothesis is mainly based on an autocatalytic inorganic energy reproducing redox system consisting of iron and sulfur as requirement for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic structures. Here, we modified [FeFe]-hydrogenase models by means of covalent coupling to either oleic acid or the amphiphilic block copolymer polybutadiene-polyethyleneoxide (PB-PEO) and incorporated those into the membranes of vesicles composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or the unmodified amphiphilic polymer (polymersomes). We employed a [2Fe-2S] cluster as a hydrogenase model, since these structures are known to be suitable catalysts for the generation of H2 in the presence of weak acids. Successful incorporation was confirmed by spectrophotometric iron quantification and the vesicles formed were characterized by size determination (photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS)), and zeta potential as well as by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The modified models could be incorporated into liposomes or polymersomes up to molar proportions of 3.15% and 28%, respectively. Due to the immobilization in vesicular bilayers the [FeFe]-hydrogenase models can even exhibit catalytic action under the particular conditions of the intravesicular microenvironment. Our results suggest that the vesicular systems described may be applied as a nanoreactor for the reduction of encapsulated substances by generating hydrogen and thus as a minimal cell model. PMID:24006843

  12. [FeFe]-hydrogenase models assembled into vesicular structures.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Kristin; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Wolter, Nonio; Rüger, Ronny; Alpermann, Theodor; Steiniger, Frank; Gabel, Detlef; Förster, Stephan; Weigand, Wolfgang; Fahr, Alfred

    2014-03-01

    Compartmentalization is a major prerequisite for the origin of life on earth according to Wächtershäuser "Iron-Sulfur-World". The hypothesis is mainly based on an autocatalytic inorganic energy reproducing redox system consisting of iron and sulfur as requirement for the subsequent synthesis of complex organic structures. Here, we modified [FeFe]-hydrogenase models by means of covalent coupling to either oleic acid or the amphiphilic block copolymer polybutadiene-polyethyleneoxide (PB-PEO) and incorporated those into the membranes of vesicles composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or the unmodified amphiphilic polymer (polymersomes). We employed a [2Fe-2S] cluster as a hydrogenase model, since these structures are known to be suitable catalysts for the generation of H2 in the presence of weak acids. Successful incorporation was confirmed by spectrophotometric iron quantification and the vesicles formed were characterized by size determination (photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS)), and zeta potential as well as by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The modified models could be incorporated into liposomes or polymersomes up to molar proportions of 3.15% and 28%, respectively. Due to the immobilization in vesicular bilayers the [FeFe]-hydrogenase models can even exhibit catalytic action under the particular conditions of the intravesicular microenvironment. Our results suggest that the vesicular systems described may be applied as a nanoreactor for the reduction of encapsulated substances by generating hydrogen and thus as a minimal cell model.

  13. Heterolytic cleavage of hydrogen by an iron hydrogenase model: an Fe-H⋅⋅⋅H-N dihydrogen bond characterized by neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianbiao; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina; DuBois, Daniel L; Bullock, R Morris

    2014-05-19

    Hydrogenase enzymes in nature use hydrogen as a fuel, but the heterolytic cleavage of H-H bonds cannot be readily observed in enzymes. Here we show that an iron complex with pendant amines in the diphosphine ligand cleaves hydrogen heterolytically. The product has a strong Fe-H⋅⋅⋅H-N dihydrogen bond. The structure was determined by single-crystal neutron diffraction, and has a remarkably short H⋅⋅⋅H distance of 1.489(10) Å between the protic N-H(δ+) and hydridic Fe-H(δ-) part. The structural data for [Cp(C5F4N)FeH(P(tBu)2N(tBu)2H)](+) provide a glimpse of how the H-H bond is oxidized or generated in hydrogenase enzymes. These results now provide a full picture for the first time, illustrating structures and reactivity of the dihydrogen complex and the product of the heterolytic cleavage of H2 in a functional model of the active site of the [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme.

  14. Reconstitution of [Fe]-hydrogenase using model complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Seigo; Chen, Dafa; Xu, Tao; Wodrich, Matthew D.; Fujishiro, Takashi; Schultz, Katherine M.; Kahnt, Jörg; Ataka, Kenichi; Hu, Xile

    2015-12-01

    [Fe]-Hydrogenase catalyses the reversible hydrogenation of a methenyltetrahydromethanopterin substrate, which is an intermediate step during the methanogenesis from CO2 and H2. The active site contains an iron-guanylylpyridinol cofactor, in which Fe2+ is coordinated by two CO ligands, as well as an acyl carbon atom and a pyridinyl nitrogen atom from a 3,4,5,6-substituted 2-pyridinol ligand. However, the mechanism of H2 activation by [Fe]-hydrogenase is unclear. Here we report the reconstitution of [Fe]-hydrogenase from an apoenzyme using two FeGP cofactor mimics to create semisynthetic enzymes. The small-molecule mimics reproduce the ligand environment of the active site, but are inactive towards H2 binding and activation on their own. We show that reconstituting the enzyme using a mimic that contains a 2-hydroxypyridine group restores activity, whereas an analogous enzyme with a 2-methoxypyridine complex was essentially inactive. These findings, together with density functional theory computations, support a mechanism in which the 2-hydroxy group is deprotonated before it serves as an internal base for heterolytic H2 cleavage.

  15. The Model [NiFe]-Hydrogenases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sargent, F

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, hydrogen metabolism plays a prominent role in anaerobic physiology. The genome contains the capability to produce and assemble up to four [NiFe]-hydrogenases, each of which are known, or predicted, to contribute to different aspects of cellular metabolism. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of the structure, function, and roles of the E. coli [NiFe]-hydrogenases. The membrane-bound, periplasmically oriented, respiratory Hyd-1 isoenzyme has become one of the most important paradigm systems for understanding an important class of oxygen-tolerant enzymes, as well as providing key information on the mechanism of hydrogen activation per se. The membrane-bound, periplasmically oriented, Hyd-2 isoenzyme has emerged as an unusual, bidirectional redox valve able to link hydrogen oxidation to quinone reduction during anaerobic respiration, or to allow disposal of excess reducing equivalents as hydrogen gas. The membrane-bound, cytoplasmically oriented, Hyd-3 isoenzyme is part of the formate hydrogenlyase complex, which acts to detoxify excess formic acid under anaerobic fermentative conditions and is geared towards hydrogen production under those conditions. Sequence identity between some Hyd-3 subunits and those of the respiratory NADH dehydrogenases has led to hypotheses that the activity of this isoenzyme may be tightly coupled to the formation of transmembrane ion gradients. Finally, the E. coli genome encodes a homologue of Hyd-3, termed Hyd-4, however strong evidence for a physiological role for E. coli Hyd-4 remains elusive. In this review, the versatile hydrogen metabolism of E. coli will be discussed and the roles and potential applications of the spectrum of different types of [NiFe]-hydrogenases available will be explored. PMID:27134027

  16. Nickel-Substituted Rubredoxin as a Minimal Enzyme Model for Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Slater, Jeffrey W; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2015-09-17

    A simple, functional mimic of [NiFe] hydrogenases based on a nickel-substituted rubredoxin (NiRd) protein is reported. NiRd is capable of light-initiated and solution-phase hydrogen production and demonstrates high electrocatalytic activity using protein film voltammetry. The catalytic voltammograms are modeled using analytical expressions developed for hydrogenase enzymes, revealing maximum turnover frequencies of approximately 20-100 s(-1) at 4 °C with an overpotential of 540 mV. These rates are directly comparable to those observed for [NiFe] hydrogenases under similar conditions. Like the native enzymes, the proton reduction activity of NiRd is strongly inhibited by carbon monoxide. This engineered rubredoxin-based enzyme is chemically and thermally robust, easily accessible, and highly tunable. These results have implications for understanding the enzymatic mechanisms of native hydrogenases, and, using NiRd as a scaffold, it will be possible to optimize this catalyst for application in sustainable fuel generation. PMID:26722748

  17. Ultrafast Photodriven Intramolecular Electron Transfer from a Zinc Porphyrin to a Readily Reduced Diiron Hydrogenase Model Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Co, Dick T.; Stern, C. L.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2010-06-10

    Diiron complexes modeled on the active site of the [FeFe] hydrogenases having the general formula [Fe2(μ-R)(CO)6-n(L)n], where commonly R = alkyl or aryl dithiolate and L = CO, CN-, or PR3, are a promising class of catalysts for use in photodriven H2 production. However, many of these catalysts are difficult to photoreduce using chromophores that absorb visible light. Here we report the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of a naphthalene-4,5-dicarboximide-1,8-dithiolate diiron complex [NMI-Fe2S2(CO)6, 1] and a covalently linked, fixed-distance zinc 5,10,15-tri-n-pentyl-20-phenylporphyrin-NMI-Fe2S2(CO)6 donor-acceptor dyad (2). The electron-withdrawing nature of the NMI group makes the diiron complex among the most easily reduced hydrogenase mimics reported to date (-0.74 V vs SCE). In the presence of triflic acid, the cyclic voltammogram of 1 showed an increase in current at the first reduction wave at -0.78 V and a new reduction wave at -1.4 V. As the acid concentration was increased, the current at -0.78 V remained constant while the current at -1.4 V increased significantly, which is consistent with a catalytic proton reduction process. Selective photoexcitation of the Zn porphyrin in 2 with 553 nm, 110 fs laser pulses in both toluene and CH2Cl2 yielded transient absorption spectra showing a distinct peak at 616 nm, which has been assigned to [NMI-Fe2S2(CO)6]-• on the basis of spectroelectrochemical measurements on 1. The 616 nm peak was used to monitor the charge separation (CS) and charge recombination (CR) dynamics of 2, which yielded τCS = 12 ± 1 ps and τCR = 3.0 ± 0.2 ns in toluene and τCS = 24 ± 1 ps and τCR = 57 ± 1 ps in CH2Cl2. Photoexcitation of the disulfide precursor to

  18. Roles of HynAB and Ech, the Only Two Hydrogenases Found in the Model Sulfate Reducer Desulfovibrio gigas

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Silva, Fabio O.; Santos, Catia I.; Rodrigues, Rute

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria are characterized by a high number of hydrogenases, which have been proposed to contribute to the overall energy metabolism of the cell, but exactly in what role is not clear. Desulfovibrio spp. can produce or consume H2 when growing on organic or inorganic substrates in the presence or absence of sulfate. Because of the presence of only two hydrogenases encoded in its genome, the periplasmic HynAB and cytoplasmic Ech hydrogenases, Desulfovibrio gigas is an excellent model organism for investigation of the specific function of each of these enzymes during growth. In this study, we analyzed the physiological response to the deletion of the genes that encode the two hydrogenases in D. gigas, through the generation of ΔechBC and ΔhynAB single mutant strains. These strains were analyzed for the ability to grow on different substrates, such as lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen, under respiratory and fermentative conditions. Furthermore, the expression of both hydrogenase genes in the three strains studied was assessed through quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. The results demonstrate that neither hydrogenase is essential for growth on lactate-sulfate, indicating that hydrogen cycling is not indispensable. In addition, the periplasmic HynAB enzyme has a bifunctional activity and is required for growth on H2 or by fermentation of pyruvate. Therefore, this enzyme seems to play a dominant role in D. gigas hydrogen metabolism. PMID:23974026

  19. Electrochemistry of Simple Organometallic Models of Iron-Iron Hydrogenases in Organic Solvent and Water.

    PubMed

    Gloaguen, Frederic

    2016-01-19

    Synthetic models of the active site of iron-iron hydrogenases are currently the subjects of numerous studies aimed at developing H2-production catalysts based on cheap and abundant materials. In this context, the present report offers an electrochemist's view of the catalysis of proton reduction by simple binuclear iron(I) thiolate complexes. Although these complexes probably do not follow a biocatalytic pathway, we analyze and discuss the interplay between the reduction potential and basicity and how these antagonist properties impact the mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer to the metal centers. This question is central to any consideration of the activity at the molecular level of hydrogenases and related enzymes. In a second part, special attention is paid to iron thiolate complexes holding rigid and unsaturated bridging ligands. The complexes that enjoy mild reduction potentials and stabilized reduced forms are promising iron-based catalysts for the photodriven evolution of H2 in organic solvents and, more importantly, in water.

  20. Femtosecond to microsecond photochemistry of a [FeFe]hydrogenase enzyme model compound.

    PubMed

    Kaziannis, Spyridon; Santabarbara, Stefano; Wright, Joseph A; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Pickett, Christopher J; Hunt, Neil T

    2010-11-25

    The photochemistry and dynamics of a model compound of the active site of the [FeFe]hydrogenase enzyme system have been studied on a wide range of time scales using a unique combination of femtosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, nanosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, and steady-state UV-FTIR methods. Using three different solvents, heptane, acetonitrile, and cyanoheptane, we have observed the rapid formation of solvent adduct species from the first solvation shell of the solute following photolysis of a carbonyl ligand and global fitting techniques have been employed to provide new insights into the ultrafast dynamics of this process. In addition, the use of solvent mixtures has enabled the observation of competitive ligand substitution processes at the newly created coordination site on time scales of a few nanoseconds, shedding new light on the chemical behavior of these enzyme models.

  1. O₂migration rates in [NiFe] hydrogenases. A joint approach combining free-energy calculations and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Topin, Jérémie; Diharce, Julien; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Antonczak, Serge; Golebiowski, Jérôme

    2014-01-23

    Hydrogenases are promising candidates for the catalytic production of green energy by means of biological ways. The major impediment to such a production is rooted in their inhibition under aerobic conditions. In this work, we model dioxygen migration rates in mutants of a hydrogenase of Desulfovibrio fructusovorans. The approach relies on the calculation of the whole potential of mean force for O2 migration within the wild-type as well as in V74M, V74F, and V74Q mutant channels. The three free-energy barriers along the entire migration pathway are converted into chemical rates through modeling based on Transition State Theory. The use of such a model recovers the trend of O2 migration rates among the series.

  2. Flexibility in Anaerobic Metabolism as Revealed in a Mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Lacking Hydrogenase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dubini, A.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Grossman, A. R.; Posewitz, M. C.

    2009-03-13

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a network of fermentation pathways that become active when cells acclimate to anoxia. Hydrogenase activity is an important component of this metabolism, and we have compared metabolic and regulatory responses that accompany anaerobiosis in wild-type C. reinhardtii cells and a null mutant strain for the HYDEF gene (hydEF-1 mutant), which encodes an [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation protein. This mutant has no hydrogenase activity and exhibits elevated accumulation of succinate and diminished production of CO2 relative to the parental strain during dark, anaerobic metabolism. In the absence of hydrogenase activity, increased succinate accumulation suggests that the cells activate alternative pathways for pyruvate metabolism, which contribute to NAD(P)H reoxidation, and continued glycolysis and fermentation in the absence of O2. Fermentative succinate production potentially proceeds via the formation of malate, and increases in the abundance of mRNAs encoding two malateforming enzymes, pyruvate carboxylase and malic enzyme, are observed in the mutant relative to the parental strain following transfer of cells from oxic to anoxic conditions. Although C. reinhardtii has a single gene encoding pyruvate carboxylase, it has six genes encoding putative malic enzymes. Only one of the malic enzyme genes, MME4, shows a dramatic increase in expression (mRNA abundance) in the hydEF-1 mutant during anaerobiosis. Furthermore, there are marked increases in transcripts encoding fumarase and fumarate reductase, enzymes putatively required to convert malate to succinate. These results illustrate the marked metabolic flexibility of C. reinhardtii and contribute to the development of an informed model of anaerobic metabolism in this and potentially other algae.

  3. Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics study of the association between hydrogenase and ferredoxin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Chang, Christopher H; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2008-10-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can catalyze the reduction of protons to hydrogen gas using electrons supplied from photosystem I and transferred via ferredoxin. To better understand the association of the hydrogenase and the ferredoxin, we have simulated the process over multiple timescales. A Brownian dynamics simulation method gave an initial thorough sampling of the rigid-body translational and rotational phase spaces, and the resulting trajectories were used to compute the occupancy and free-energy landscapes. Several important hydrogenase-ferredoxin encounter complexes were identified from this analysis, which were then individually simulated using atomistic molecular dynamics to provide more details of the hydrogenase and ferredoxin interaction. The ferredoxin appeared to form reasonable complexes with the hydrogenase in multiple orientations, some of which were good candidates for inclusion in a transition state ensemble of configurations for electron transfer. PMID:18621810

  4. Reactions of [FeFe]-hydrogenase models involving the formation of hydrides related to proton reduction and hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Mei; Chen, Lin; Sun, Licheng

    2013-09-14

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes in nature that catalyze the reduction of protons and the oxidation of H2 at neutral pH with remarkably high activities and incredibly low overpotential. Structural and functional biomimicking of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases can provide helpful hints for elucidating the mechanism of H2 evolution and uptake at the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site and for designing bioinspired catalysts to replace the expensive noble metal catalysts for H2 generation and uptake. This perspective focuses on the recent progress in the formation and reactivity of iron hydrides closely related to the processes of proton reduction and hydrogen oxidation mediated by diiron dithiolate complexes. The second section surveys the bridging and terminal hydride species formed from various diiron complexes as well as the intramolecular proton transfer. The very recent progress in H2 activation by diiron dithiolate models are reviewed in the third section. In the concluding remarks and outlook, the differences in structure and catalytic mechanism between the synthetic models and the native [FeFe]-H2ase active site are compared and analyzed, which may cause the need for a significantly larger driving force and may lead to lower activities of synthetic models than the [FeFe]-H2ases for H2 generation and uptake.

  5. Functional model for the [Fe] hydrogenase inspired by the frustrated Lewis pair concept.

    PubMed

    Kalz, Kai F; Brinkmeier, Alexander; Dechert, Sebastian; Mata, Ricardo A; Meyer, Franc

    2014-11-26

    serve as a hydride acceptor. This unprecedented functional model for the [Fe] hydrogenase, using a Lewis acidic imidazolinium salt as a biomimetic hydride acceptor in combination with an organometallic Lewis base, may provide new inspiration for biomimetic H2 activation. PMID:25353322

  6. Wiring-up hydrogenase with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Timothy J; Svedruzic, Drazenka; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Zhang, S B; King, Paul W; Heben, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    Many envision a future where hydrogen is the centerpiece of a sustainable, carbon-free energy supply. For example, the energy in sunlight may be stored by splitting water into H2 and O2 using inorganic semiconductors and photoelectrochemical approaches or with artificial photosynthetic systems that seek to mimic the light absorption, energy transfer, electron transfer, and redox catalysis that occurs in green plants. Unfortunately, large scale deployment of artificial water-splitting technologies may be impeded by the need for the large amounts of precious metals required to catalyze the multielectron water-splitting reactions. Nature provides a variety of microbes that can activate the dihydrogen bond through the catalytic activity of [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, and photobiological approaches to water splitting have been advanced. One may also consider a biohybrid approach; however, it is difficult to interface these sensitive, metalloenzymes to other materials and systems. Here we show that surfactant-suspended carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) spontaneously self-assemble with [FeFe] hydrogenases in solution to form catalytically active biohybrids. Photoluminescence excitation and Raman spectroscopy studies show that SWNTs act as molecular wires to make electrical contact to the biocatalytic region of hydrogenase. Hydrogenase mediates electron injection into nanotubes having appropriately positioned lowest occupied molecular orbital levels when the H2 partial pressure is varied. The hydrogenase is strongly attached to the SWNTs, so mass transport effects are eliminated and the absolute potential of the electronic levels of the nanotubes can be unambiguously measured. Our findings reveal new nanotube physics and represent the first example of "wiring-up" an hydrogenase with another nanoscale material. This latter advance offers a nonprecious metal route to the design of new biohybrid architectures and building blocks for hydrogen-related technologies

  7. A functional [NiFe]-hydrogenase model compound that undergoes biologically relevant reversible thiolate protonation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Katharina; Krämer, Tobias; Shafaat, Hannah S; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Bill, Eckhard; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-12-26

    Two model compounds of the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases with an unusual {S(2)Ni(μ-S)(μ-CO)Fe(CO)(2)S}-coordination environment around the metals are reported. The neutral compound [Ni(xbsms)(μ-CO)(μ-S)Fe(CO)(2)('S')], (1) (H(2)xbsms = 1,2-bis(4-mercapto-3,3-dimethyl-2-thiabutyl)benzene) is converted to [1H][BF(4)] by reversible protonation using HBF(4)·Et(2)O. The protonation takes place at the terminal thiolate sulfur atom that is coordinated to nickel. Catalytic intermediates with a protonated terminal cysteinate were suggested for the native protein but have not yet been confirmed experimentally. [1H][BF(4)] is the first dinuclear [NiFe] model compound for such a species. Both complexes have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, NMR-, FTIR-, and (57)Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as by electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results clearly show that the protonation has a significant impact on the electronic structure of the iron center, although it takes place at the nickel site. DFT calculations support the interpretation of the spectroscopic data and indicate the presence of a bonding interaction between the metal ions, which is relevant for the enzyme as well. Electrochemical experiments show that both 1 and [1H][BF(4)] are active for electrocatalytic proton reduction in aprotic solvents.

  8. A functional [NiFe]-hydrogenase model compound that undergoes biologically relevant reversible thiolate protonation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Katharina; Krämer, Tobias; Shafaat, Hannah S; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Bill, Eckhard; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-12-26

    Two model compounds of the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases with an unusual {S(2)Ni(μ-S)(μ-CO)Fe(CO)(2)S}-coordination environment around the metals are reported. The neutral compound [Ni(xbsms)(μ-CO)(μ-S)Fe(CO)(2)('S')], (1) (H(2)xbsms = 1,2-bis(4-mercapto-3,3-dimethyl-2-thiabutyl)benzene) is converted to [1H][BF(4)] by reversible protonation using HBF(4)·Et(2)O. The protonation takes place at the terminal thiolate sulfur atom that is coordinated to nickel. Catalytic intermediates with a protonated terminal cysteinate were suggested for the native protein but have not yet been confirmed experimentally. [1H][BF(4)] is the first dinuclear [NiFe] model compound for such a species. Both complexes have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, NMR-, FTIR-, and (57)Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as by electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results clearly show that the protonation has a significant impact on the electronic structure of the iron center, although it takes place at the nickel site. DFT calculations support the interpretation of the spectroscopic data and indicate the presence of a bonding interaction between the metal ions, which is relevant for the enzyme as well. Electrochemical experiments show that both 1 and [1H][BF(4)] are active for electrocatalytic proton reduction in aprotic solvents. PMID:23194246

  9. Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Roy, Souvik; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D; Gan, Lu; Jones, Anne K

    2015-09-01

    Two synthetic strategies for incorporating diiron analogues of [FeFe]-hydrogenases into short peptides via phosphine functional groups are described. First, utilizing the amine side chain of lysine as an anchor, phosphine carboxylic acids can be coupled via amide formation to resin-bound peptides. Second, artificial, phosphine-containing amino acids can be directly incorporated into peptides via solution phase peptide synthesis. The second approach is demonstrated using three amino acids each with a different phosphine substituent (diphenyl, diisopropyl, and diethyl phosphine). In total, five distinct monophosphine-substituted, diiron model complexes were prepared by reaction of the phosphine-peptides with diiron hexacarbonyl precursors, either (μ-pdt)Fe2(CO)6 or (μ-bdt)Fe2(CO)6 (pdt = propane-1,3-dithiolate, bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate). Formation of the complexes was confirmed by UV/Vis, FTIR and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Electrocatalysis by these complexes is reported in the presence of acetic acid in mixed aqueous-organic solutions. Addition of water results in enhancement of the catalytic rates.

  10. Concerto catalysis--harmonising [NiFe]hydrogenase and NiRu model catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Koji; Nonaka, Kyoshiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kure, Bunsho; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Yagi, Tatsuhiko; Ogo, Seiji

    2010-03-28

    This communication reports the successful merging of the chemical properties of a natural [NiFe]hydrogenase (Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F) and our previously reported [NiRu] hydrogenase-mimic. The catalytic activity of both the natural enzyme and the mimic is almost identical, with the exception of working pH ranges, and this allows us to use them simultaneously in the same reaction flask. In such a manner, isotope exchange between D(2) and H(2)O could be conducted over an extended pH range (about 2-10) in one pot under mild conditions at ambient temperature and pressure.

  11. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  12. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wombwell, Claire; Caputo, Christine A; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-11-17

    The development of technology for the inexpensive generation of the renewable energy vector H2 through water splitting is of immediate economic, ecological, and humanitarian interest. Recent interest in hydrogenases has been fueled by their exceptionally high catalytic rates for H2 production at a marginal overpotential, which is presently only matched by the nonscalable noble metal platinum. The mechanistic understanding of hydrogenase function guides the design of synthetic catalysts, and selection of a suitable hydrogenase enables direct applications in electro- and photocatalysis. [FeFe]-hydrogenases display excellent H2 evolution activity, but they are irreversibly damaged upon exposure to O2, which currently prevents their use in full water splitting systems. O2-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases are known, but they are typically strongly biased toward H2 oxidation, while H2 production by [NiFe]-hydrogenases is often product (H2) inhibited. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases are a subclass of [NiFe]-hydrogenases with a selenocysteine residue coordinated to the active site nickel center in place of a cysteine. They exhibit a combination of unique properties that are highly advantageous for applications in water splitting compared with other hydrogenases. They display a high H2 evolution rate with marginal inhibition by H2 and tolerance to O2. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases are therefore one of the most active molecular H2 evolution catalysts applicable in water splitting. Herein, we summarize our recent progress in exploring the unique chemistry of [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases through biomimetic model chemistry and the chemistry with [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases in semiartificial photosynthetic systems. We gain perspective from the structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties of the [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases and compare them with the chemistry of synthetic models of this hydrogenase active site. Our synthetic models give insight into the effects on the electronic properties and reactivity of

  13. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wombwell, Claire; Caputo, Christine A; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-11-17

    The development of technology for the inexpensive generation of the renewable energy vector H2 through water splitting is of immediate economic, ecological, and humanitarian interest. Recent interest in hydrogenases has been fueled by their exceptionally high catalytic rates for H2 production at a marginal overpotential, which is presently only matched by the nonscalable noble metal platinum. The mechanistic understanding of hydrogenase function guides the design of synthetic catalysts, and selection of a suitable hydrogenase enables direct applications in electro- and photocatalysis. [FeFe]-hydrogenases display excellent H2 evolution activity, but they are irreversibly damaged upon exposure to O2, which currently prevents their use in full water splitting systems. O2-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases are known, but they are typically strongly biased toward H2 oxidation, while H2 production by [NiFe]-hydrogenases is often product (H2) inhibited. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases are a subclass of [NiFe]-hydrogenases with a selenocysteine residue coordinated to the active site nickel center in place of a cysteine. They exhibit a combination of unique properties that are highly advantageous for applications in water splitting compared with other hydrogenases. They display a high H2 evolution rate with marginal inhibition by H2 and tolerance to O2. [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases are therefore one of the most active molecular H2 evolution catalysts applicable in water splitting. Herein, we summarize our recent progress in exploring the unique chemistry of [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases through biomimetic model chemistry and the chemistry with [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases in semiartificial photosynthetic systems. We gain perspective from the structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties of the [NiFeSe]-hydrogenases and compare them with the chemistry of synthetic models of this hydrogenase active site. Our synthetic models give insight into the effects on the electronic properties and reactivity of

  14. Synthetic Active Site Model of the [NiFeSe] Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wombwell, Claire; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    A dinuclear synthetic model of the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase active site and a structural, spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis of this complex is reported. [NiFe(‘S2Se2’)(CO)3] (H2‘S2Se2’=1,2-bis(2-thiabutyl-3,3-dimethyl-4-selenol)benzene) has been synthesized by reacting the nickel selenolate complex [Ni(‘S2Se2’)] with [Fe(CO)3bda] (bda=benzylideneacetone). X-ray crystal structure analysis confirms that [NiFe(‘S2Se2’)(CO)3] mimics the key structural features of the enzyme active site, including a doubly bridged heterobimetallic nickel and iron center with a selenolate terminally coordinated to the nickel center. Comparison of [NiFe(‘S2Se2’)(CO)3] with the previously reported thiolate analogue [NiFe(‘S4’)(CO)3] (H2‘S4’=H2xbsms=1,2-bis(4-mercapto-3,3-dimethyl-2-thiabutyl)benzene) showed that the selenolate groups in [NiFe(‘S2Se2’)(CO)3] give lower carbonyl stretching frequencies in the IR spectrum. Electrochemical studies of [NiFe(‘S2Se2’)(CO)3] and [NiFe(‘S4’)(CO)3] demonstrated that both complexes do not operate as homogenous H2 evolution catalysts, but are precursors to a solid deposit on an electrode surface for H2 evolution catalysis in organic and aqueous solution. PMID:25847470

  15. Interaction of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases with Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D. S.; McDonald, T. J.; Kim, Y.-H.; Blackburn, J. L.; Heben, M. J.; King, P. W.

    2007-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are promising candidates for use in energy conversion devices as an active photo-collecting elements, for dissociation of bound excitons and charge-transfer from photo-excited chromophores, or as molecular wires to transport charge. Hydrogenases are enzymes that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons from a variety of electron donors to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenases together with SWNT suggest a novel biohybrid material for direct conversion of sunlight into H{sub 2}. Here, we report changes in SWNT optical properties upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed under conditions of the hydrogenase catalytic turnover, providing spectroscopic handles for further study and application of this hybrid system.

  16. Interaction of [FeFe]-hydrogenases with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svedruzic Chang, Drazenka; McDonald, Timothy J.; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Heben, Michael J.; King, Paul W.

    2007-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are promising candidates for use in energy conversion devices as an active photo-collecting elements, for dissociation of bound excitons and charge-transfer from photo-excited chromophores, or as molecular wires to transport charge. Hydrogenases are enzymes that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons from a variety of electron donors to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenases together with SWNT suggest a novel biohybrid material for direct conversion of sunlight into H II. Here, we report changes in SWNT optical properties upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed under conditions of the hydrogenase catalytic turnover, providing spectroscopic handles for further study and application of this hybrid system.

  17. Brownian Dynamics and Molecular Dynamics Study of the Association Between Hydrogenase and Ferredoxin from the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.; Chang, C. H.; King, P. W.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Kim, K.

    2008-10-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can catalyze the reduction of protons to hydrogen gas using electrons supplied from photosystem I and transferred via ferredoxin. To better understand the association of the hydrogenase and the ferredoxin, we have simulated the process over multiple timescales. A Brownian dynamics simulation method gave an initial thorough sampling of the rigid-body translational and rotational phase spaces, and the resulting trajectories were used to compute the occupancy and free-energy landscapes. Several important hydrogenase-ferredoxin encounter complexes were identified from this analysis, which were then individually simulated using atomistic molecular dynamics to provide more details of the hydrogenase and ferredoxin interaction. The ferredoxin appeared to form reasonable complexes with the hydrogenase in multiple orientations, some of which were good candidates for inclusion in a transition state ensemble of configurations for electron transfer.

  18. The mechanism of hydrogen uptake in [NiFe] hydrogenase: first-principles molecular dynamics investigation of a model compound.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sara; La Penna, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of a model compounds of [NiFe] hydrogenase that catalyzes the heterolytic cleavage of the H(2) molecule into a proton and a stable hydride in water solution under room conditions opened up the possibility to understand the mechanism of H(2) uptake by this peculiar class of enzymes. The simplest model compound belongs to the class of NiRu bimetallic cationic complexes mimicking, in water solution and at room conditions, the hydrogenase active site. By using first-principles molecular dynamics computer simulations, in the Car-Parrinello scheme, we investigated models including the water solvent and nitrate counterions. Several simulations, starting from different initial configurations, provided information on the first step of the H(2) cleavage: (1) the pathway of H(2) approach towards the active site; (2) the role of the ruthenium-bonded water molecule in providing a base that extracts the proton from the activated H(2) molecule; (3) the minor role of Ni in activating the H(2) molecule and its role in stabilizing the hydride produced. PMID:21892688

  19. Unusual formation of a [NiSFe(2)(CO)(6)] cluster: a structural model for the inactive form of [NiFe] hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Perra, Alessandro; Wang, Qiang; Blake, Alexander J; Davies, E Stephen; McMaster, Jonathan; Wilson, Claire; Schröder, Martin

    2009-02-14

    The synthesis and characterisation of the trinuclear Ni-Fe complex [Ni(L(2))SFe(2)(CO)(6)] (1) formed from the reaction of [Ni(L(1))] with Fe(3)(CO)(12) is described. The single-crystal X-ray structure of 1 shows Ni(ii) bound to three thioether R(2)-S donors and bridged by a sulfide (S(2-)) group to two Fe(CO)(3) units. undergoes a reversible one-electron reduction process at E(1/2) = -1.62 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc to generate 1 (-), which has been characterised by UV-vis and IR spectroelectrochemistry and by EPR spectroscopy. DFT calculations on 1and 1 (-) reveal electronic structures that are delocalised across the NiFe(2) core. The SOMO in 1 (-) possesses Ni-Fe and Fe-Fe anti-bonding character and lies approximately in the plane defined by the equilateral triangle of Ni and Fe atoms. It possesses d-orbital contributions of 18.5, 15.0 and 19.8% for the Ni(1), Fe(1) and Fe(2) atoms, respectively. The Ni-S(sulfide) bond length in 1 [2.1654(7) A] is identical to that for the bridging sulfide found in the oxidised inactive form of the [NiFe] hydrogenase from D. vulgaris (2.16 A). Thus, 1 provides a useful comparison for biological [NiFe] centres bridged by sulfide donors. PMID:19173074

  20. Hydrogen Activation by Biomimetic [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Model Containing Protected Cyanide Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Brian C.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Described are experiments that allow incorporation of cyanide cofactors and hydride substrate into active site models [NiFe]-hydrogenases (H2ases). Complexes of the type (CO)2(CN)2Fe(pdt)Ni(dxpe), (dxpe = dppe, 1; dxpe = dcpe, 2) bind the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 (BArF3) to give the adducts (CO)2(CNBArF3)2Fe(pdt)Ni(dxpe), (1(BArF3)2, 2(BArF3)2). Upon decarbonylation using amine oxides, these adducts react with H2 to give hydrido derivatives Et4N[(CO)(CNBArF3)2Fe(H)(pdt)Ni(dxpe)], (dxpe = dppe, Et4N[H3(BArF3)2]; dxpe = dcpe, Et4N[H4(BArF3)2]). Crystallographic analysis shows that Et4N[H3(BArF3)2] generally resembles the active site of the enzyme in the reduced, hydride-containing states (Ni-C/R). The Fe-H…Ni center is unsymmetrical with rFe-H = 1.51(3) and rNi-H = 1.71(3) Å. Both crystallographic and 19F NMR analysis show that the CNBArF3− ligands occupy basal and apical sites. Unlike cationic Ni-Fe hydrides, [H3(BArF3)2]− and [H4(BArF3)2]− oxidize at mild potentials, near the Fc+/0 couple. Electrochemical measurements indicate that in the presence of base, [H3(BArF3)2]− catalyzes the oxidation of H2. NMR evidence indicates dihydrogen bonding between these anionic hydrides and ammonium salts, which is relevant to the mechanism of hydrogenogenesis. In the case of Et4N[H3(BArF3)2], strong acids such as HCl induce H2 release to give the chloride Et4N[(CO)(CNBArF3)2Fe(pdt)(Cl)Ni(dppe)]. PMID:23899049

  1. HydDB: A web tool for hydrogenase classification and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Søndergaard, Dan; Pedersen, Christian N. S.; Greening, Chris

    2016-01-01

    H2 metabolism is proposed to be the most ancient and diverse mechanism of energy-conservation. The metalloenzymes mediating this metabolism, hydrogenases, are encoded by over 60 microbial phyla and are present in all major ecosystems. We developed a classification system and web tool, HydDB, for the structural and functional analysis of these enzymes. We show that hydrogenase function can be predicted by primary sequence alone using an expanded classification scheme (comprising 29 [NiFe], 8 [FeFe], and 1 [Fe] hydrogenase classes) that defines 11 new classes with distinct biological functions. Using this scheme, we built a web tool that rapidly and reliably classifies hydrogenase primary sequences using a combination of k-nearest neighbors’ algorithms and CDD referencing. Demonstrating its capacity, the tool reliably predicted hydrogenase content and function in 12 newly-sequenced bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. HydDB provides the capacity to browse the amino acid sequences of 3248 annotated hydrogenase catalytic subunits and also contains a detailed repository of physiological, biochemical, and structural information about the 38 hydrogenase classes defined here. The database and classifier are freely and publicly available at http://services.birc.au.dk/hyddb/ PMID:27670643

  2. In search of metal hydrides: an X-ray absorption and emission study of [NiFe] hydrogenase model complexes.

    PubMed

    Hugenbruch, Stefan; Shafaat, Hannah S; Krämer, Tobias; Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Weber, Katharina; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-04-28

    Metal hydrides are invoked as important intermediates in both chemical and biological H2 production. In the [NiFe] hydrogenase enzymes, pulsed EPR and high-resolution crystallography have argued that the hydride interacts primarily at the Ni site. In contrast, in [NiFe] hydrogenase model complexes, it is observed that the bridging hydride interacts primarily with the Fe. Herein, we utilize a combination of Ni and Fe X-ray absorption (XAS) and emission (XES) spectroscopies to examine the contribution of the bridging hydride to the observed spectral features in [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H)Fe(CO)3](+). The corresponding data on (dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)Fe(CO)3 are used as a reference for the changes that occur in the absence of a hydride bridge. For further interpretation of the observed spectral features, all experimental spectra were calculated using a density functional theory (DFT) approach, with excellent agreement between theory and experiment. It is found that the iron valence-to-core (VtC) XES spectra reveal clear signatures for the presence of a Fe-H interaction in the hydride bridged model complex. In contrast, the Ni VtC XES spectrum largely reflects changes in the local Ni geometry and shows little contribution from a Ni-H interaction. A stepwise theoretical analysis of the hydride contribution and the Ni site symmetry provides insights into the factors, which govern the different metal-hydride interactions in both the model complexes and the enzyme. Furthermore, these results establish the utility of two-color XES to reveal important insights into the electronic structure of various metal-hydride species. PMID:26924248

  3. Synthesis, Characterization, and Reactivity of Functionalized Trinuclear Iron–Sulfur Clusters – A New Class of Bioinspired Hydrogenase Models

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Manuel; Knör, Günther

    2015-01-01

    The air- and moisture-stable iron–sulfur carbonyl clusters Fe3S2(CO)7(dppm) (1) and Fe3S2(CO)7(dppf) (2) carrying the bisphosphine ligands bis(diphenylphosphanyl)methane (dppm) and 1,1′-bis(diphenylphosphanyl)ferrocene (dppf) were prepared and fully characterized. Two alternative synthetic routes based on different thionation reactions of triiron dodecacarbonyl were tested. The molecular structures of the methylene-bridged compound 1 and the ferrocene-functionalized derivative 2 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The catalytic reactivity of the trinuclear iron–sulfur cluster core for proton reduction in solution at low overpotential was demonstrated. These deeply colored bisphosphine-bridged sulfur-capped iron carbonyl systems are discussed as promising candidates for the development of new bioinspired model compounds of iron-based hydrogenases. PMID:26512211

  4. Models of the iron-only hydrogenase: a comparison of chelate and bridge isomers of Fe2(CO)4{Ph2PN(R)PPh2}(μ-pdt) as proton-reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shishir; Hogarth, Graeme; Hollingsworth, Nathan; Holt, Katherine B; Richards, Idris; Richmond, Michael G; Sanchez, Ben E; Unwin, David

    2013-05-21

    the two metal centres based on the DFT calculations. The LUMO in the isomeric model compounds is similar in nature and is best described as an antibonding Fe-Fe interaction that contains differing amounts of aryl π* contributions from the ancillary PNP ligand. The proton reduction catalysis observed under electrochemical conditions at ca. -1.55 V is discussed as a function of the initial isomer and a mechanism that involves an initial protonation step involving the iron-iron bond. The measured CV currents were higher at this potential for the chelating complex, indicating faster turnover. Digital simulations showed that the faster rate of catalysis of the chelating complex can be traced to its greater propensity for protonation. This supports the theory that asymmetric distribution of electron density along the iron-iron bond leads to faster catalysis for models of the Fe-Fe hydrogenase active site.

  5. Hydrogen Production Catalyzed by Bidirectional, Biomimetic Models of the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site.

    PubMed

    Lansing, James C; Camara, James M; Gray, Danielle E; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2014-10-27

    Active site mimics of [FeFe]-hydrogenase are shown to be bidirectional catalysts, producing H2 upon treatment with protons and reducing equivalents. This reactivity complements the previously reported oxidation of H2 by these same catalysts in the presence of oxidants. The complex Fe2(adt(Bn))(CO)3(dppv)(PFc*(Et2) ) ([1](0); adt(Bn) = (SCH2)2NBn, dppv = cis-1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethylene, PFc*(Et2) = Et2PCH2C5Me4FeCp*) reacts with excess [H(OEt2)2]BAr(F) 4 (BAr(F) 4 (-) = B(C6H3-3,5-(CF3)2)4 (-)) to give ∼0.5 equiv of H2 and [Fe2(adt(Bn)H)(CO)3(dppv)(PFc*(Et2) )](2+) ([1H](2+)). The species [1H](2+) consists of a ferrocenium ligand, an N-protonated amine, and an Fe(I)Fe(I) core. In the presence of additional reducing equivalents in the form of decamethylferrocene (Fc*), hydrogen evolution is catalytic, albeit slow. The related catalyst Fe2(adt(Bn))(CO)3(dppv)(PMe3) (3) behaves similarly in the presence of Fc*, except that in the absence of excess reducing agent it converts to the catalytically inactive μ-hydride derivative [μ-H3](+). Replacement of the adt in [1](0) with propanedithiolate (pdt) results in a catalytically inactive complex. In the course of synthesizing [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimics, new routes to ferrocenylphosphine ligands and nonamethylferrocene were developed. PMID:25364093

  6. Diiron dithiolato carbonyls related to the H(ox)CO state of [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Justice, Aaron K; Nilges, Mark J; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Wilson, Scott R; De Gioia, Luca; Zampella, Giuseppe

    2008-04-16

    Oxidation of the electron-rich (E(1/2) = -175 vs Ag/AgCl) ethanedithiolato complex Fe2(S2C2H4)(CO)2(dppv)2 (1) under a CO atmosphere yielded [Fe2(S2C2H4)(mu-CO)(CO)2(dppv)2](+) ([1(CO)](+)), a model for the H(ox)(CO) state of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases. This complex exists as two isomers: a kinetically favored unsymmetrical derivative, unsym-[1(CO)](+), and a thermodynamically favored isomer, sym-[1(CO)](+), wherein both diphosphines span apical and basal sites. Crystallographic characterization of sym-[1(CO)](+) confirmed a C2-symmetric structure with a bridging CO ligand and an elongated Fe-Fe bond of 2.7012(14) A, as predicted previously. Oxidation of sym-[1(CO)](+) and unsym-[1(CO)](+) again by 1e(-) oxidation afforded the respective diamagnetic diferrous derivatives where the relative stabilities of the sym and unsym isomers are reversed. DFT calculations indicate that the stabilities of sym and unsym isomers are affected differently by the oxidation state of the diiron unit: the mutually trans CO ligands in the sym isomer are more destabilizing in the mixed-valence state than in the diferrous state. EPR analysis of mixed-valence complexes revealed that, for [1](+), the unpaired spin is localized on a single iron center, whereas for unsym/sym-[1(CO)](+), the unpaired spin was delocalized over both iron centers, as indicated by the magnitude of the hyperfine coupling to the phosphine ligands trans to the Fe-Fe vector. Oxidation of 1 by 2 equiv of acetylferrocenium afforded the dication [1](2+), which, on the basis of low-temperature IR spectrum, is structurally similar to [1](+). Treatment of [1](2+) with CO gives unsym-[1(CO)](2+).

  7. Relating diffusion along the substrate tunnel and oxygen sensitivity in hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Leroux, Fanny; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien; Baffert, Carole; Lautier, Thomas; Fourmond, Vincent; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Cavazza, Christine; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Soucaille, Philippe; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan Carlos; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick; Rousset, Marc; Léger, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    In hydrogenases and many other redox enzymes, the buried active site is connected to the solvent by a molecular channel whose structure may determine the enzyme's selectivity with respect to substrate and inhibitors. The role of these channels has been addressed using crystallography and molecular dynamics, but kinetic data are scarce. Using protein film voltammetry, we determined and then compared the rates of inhibition by CO and O2 in ten NiFe hydrogenase mutants and two FeFe hydrogenases. We found that the rate of inhibition by CO is a good proxy of the rate of diffusion of O2 toward the active site. Modifying amino acids whose side chains point inside the tunnel can slow this rate by orders of magnitude. We quantitatively define the relations between diffusion, the Michaelis constant for H2 and rates of inhibition, and we demonstrate that certain enzymes are slowly inactivated by O2 because access to the active site is slow.

  8. Studies of Hybrid Nano-Bio-System: Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Svedruzic-Chang, D.; Blackburn, J. L.; McDonald, T. J.; Heben, M. J.; King, P. W.

    2008-01-01

    We have examined changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) optical signals upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum or Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We found evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed only under conditions of hydrogenase catalytic turnover. Formation of the complex sensitizes the nanotubes to the proton-to-hydrogen redox half-reaction. Thus, the experimental potential can be altered by changing the pH or molecular hydrogen concentration. In the presence of molecular hydrogen, hydrogenase mediates electron injection into the conduction band of semiconducting SWNT, which was observed as a quenching of the photoluminescence signals. Here, we will present recent Raman studies, which revealed that SWNTs in a complex with hydrogenase may undergo either oxidation or reduction, depending on the electronic structure of the SWNT and the oxidation state of the enzyme. In addition, we will describe our efforts to prepare stable, solubilized SWNT/hydrogenase complexes in the absence of detergent. This work shows that SWNT/hydrogenase complexes have potential applications as a component of an energy conversion device.

  9. Hydride binding to the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Chernev, Petko; Lambertz, Camilla; Brünje, Annika; Leidel, Nils; Sigfridsson, Kajsa G V; Kositzki, Ramona; Hsieh, Chung-Hung; Yao, Shenglai; Schiwon, Rafael; Driess, Matthias; Limberg, Christian; Happe, Thomas; Haumann, Michael

    2014-11-17

    [FeFe]-hydrogenase from green algae (HydA1) is the most efficient hydrogen (H2) producing enzyme in nature and of prime interest for (bio)technology. Its active site is a unique six-iron center (H-cluster) composed of a cubane cluster, [4Fe4S]H, cysteine-linked to a diiron unit, [2Fe]H, which carries unusual carbon monoxide (CO) and cyanide ligands and a bridging azadithiolate group. We have probed the molecular and electronic configurations of the H-cluster in functional oxidized, reduced, and super-reduced or CO-inhibited HydA1 protein, in particular searching for intermediates with iron-hydride bonds. Site-selective X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy were used to distinguish between low- and high-spin iron sites in the two subcomplexes of the H-cluster. The experimental methods and spectral simulations were calibrated using synthetic model complexes with ligand variations and bound hydride species. Distinct X-ray spectroscopic signatures of electronic excitation or decay transitions in [4Fe4S]H and [2Fe]H were obtained, which were quantitatively reproduced by density functional theory calculations, thereby leading to specific H-cluster model structures. We show that iron-hydride bonds are absent in the reduced state, whereas only in the super-reduced state, ligand rotation facilitates hydride binding presumably to the Fe-Fe bridging position at [2Fe]H. These results are in agreement with a catalytic cycle involving three main intermediates and at least two protonation and electron transfer steps prior to the H2 formation chemistry in [FeFe]-hydrogenases. PMID:25369169

  10. Models of the Ni-L and Ni-SIa States of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Geoffrey M; Huynh, Mioy T; Li, Yulong; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-19

    A new class of synthetic models for the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases are described. The Ni(I/II)(SCys)2 and Fe(II)(CN)2CO sites are represented with (RC5H4)Ni(I/II) and Fe(II)(diphos)(CO) modules, where diphos = 1,2-C2H4(PPh2)2(dppe) or cis-1,2-C2H2(PPh2)2(dppv). The two bridging thiolate ligands are represented by CH2(CH2S)2(2-) (pdt(2-)), Me2C(CH2S)2(2-) (Me2pdt(2-)), and (C6H5S)2(2-). The reaction of Fe(pdt)(CO)2(dppe) and [(C5H5)3Ni2]BF4 affords [(C5H5)Ni(pdt)Fe(dppe)(CO)]BF4 ([1a]BF4). Monocarbonyl [1a]BF4 features an S = 0 Ni(II)Fe(II) center with five-coordinated iron, as proposed for the Ni-SIa state of the enzyme. One-electron reduction of [1a](+) affords the S = 1/2 derivative [1a](0), which, according to density functional theory (DFT) calculations and electron paramagnetic resonance and Mössbauer spectroscopies, is best described as a Ni(I)Fe(II) compound. The Ni(I)Fe(II) assignment matches that for the Ni-L state in [NiFe]-hydrogenase, unlike recently reported Ni(II)Fe(I)-based models. Compound [1a](0) reacts with strong acids to liberate 0.5 equiv of H2 and regenerate [1a](+), indicating that H2 evolution is catalyzed by [1a](0). DFT calculations were used to investigate the pathway for H2 evolution and revealed that the mechanism can proceed through two isomers of [1a](0) that differ in the stereochemistry of the Fe(dppe)CO center. Calculations suggest that protonation of [1a](0) (both isomers) affords Ni(III)-H-Fe(II) intermediates, which represent mimics of the Ni-C state of the enzyme.

  11. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigating protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.

  12. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigatingmore » protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.« less

  13. Redox reactions of [FeFe]-hydrogenase models containing an internal amine and a pendant phosphine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dehua; Wang, Mei; Chen, Lin; Wang, Ning; Sun, Licheng

    2014-02-01

    A diiron dithiolate complex with a pendant phosphine coordinated to one of the iron centers, [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H4-o-PPh2){Fe2(CO)5}] (1), was prepared and structurally characterized. The pendant phosphine is dissociated together with a CO ligand in the presence of excess PMe3, to afford [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H4-o-PPh2){Fe(CO)2(PMe3)}2] (2). Redox reactions of 2 and related complexes were studied in detail by in situ IR spectroscopy. A series of new Fe(II)Fe(I) ([3](+) and [6](+)), Fe(II)Fe(II) ([4](2+)), and Fe(I)Fe(I) (5) complexes relevant to Hox, Hox(CO), and Hred states of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site were detected. Among these complexes, the molecular structures of the diferrous complex [4](2+) with the internal amine and the pendant phosphine co-coordinated to the same iron center and the triphosphine diiron complex 5 were determined by X-ray crystallography. To make a comparison, the redox reactions of an analogous complex, [(μ-SCH2)2N(CH2C6H5){Fe(CO)2(PMe3)}2] (7), were also investigated by in situ IR spectroscopy in the absence or presence of extrinsic PPh3, which has no influence on the oxidation reaction of 7. The pendant phosphine in the second coordination sphere makes the redox reaction of 2 different from that of its analogue 7.

  14. Ligand Displacement Reaction Paths in a Diiron Hydrogenase Active Site Model Complex.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jan H; Moncho, Salvador; Lunsford, Allen M; Brothers, Edward N; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y; Bengali, Ashfaq A

    2016-08-26

    The mechanism and energetics of CO, 1-hexene, and 1-hexyne substitution from the complexes (SBenz)2 [Fe2 (CO)6 ] (SBenz=SCH2 Ph) (1-CO), (SBenz)2 [Fe2 (CO)5 (η(2) -1-hexene)] (1-(η(2) -1-hexene)), and (SBenz)2 [Fe2 (CO)5 (η(2) -1-hexyne)] (1-(η(2) -1-hexyne)) were studied by using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Exchange of both CO and 1-hexyne by P(OEt)3 and pyridine, respectively, proceeds by a bimolecular mechanism. As similar activation enthalpies are obtained for both reactions, the rate-determining step in both cases is assumed to be the rotation of the Fe(CO)2 L (L=CO or 1-hexyne) unit to accommodate the incoming ligand. The kinetic profile for the displacement of 1-hexene is quite different than that for the alkyne and, in this case, both reaction channels, that is, dissociative (SN 1) and associative (SN 2), were found to be competitive. Because DFT calculations predict similar binding enthalpies of alkene and alkyne to the iron center, the results indicate that the bimolecular pathway in the case of the alkyne is lower in free energy than that of the alkene. In complexes of this type, subtle changes in the departing ligand characteristics and the nature of the mercapto bridge can influence the exchange mechanism, such that more than one reaction pathway is available for ligand substitution. The difference between this and the analogous study of (μ-pdt)[Fe(CO)3 ]2 (pdt=S(CH2 )3 S) underscores the unique characteristics of a three-atom S-S linker in the active site of diiron hydrogenases. PMID:27482938

  15. Reactivity of Fe/FeS nanoparticles: electrolyte composition effects on corrosion electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Turcio-Ortega, David; Fan, Dimin; Tratnyek, Paul G; Kim, Eun-Ju; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2012-11-20

    Zerovalent iron nanoparticles (Fe(0) NPs or nZVI) synthesized by reductive precipitation in aqueous solution (Fe/FeO) differ in composition and reactivity from the NPs obtained by reductive precipitation in the presence of a S-source such as dithionite (Fe/FeS). To compare the redox properties of these types of NPs under a range of environmentally relevant solution conditions, stationary powder disk electrodes (PDEs) made from Fe/FeO and Fe/FeS were characterized using a series of complementary electrochemical techniques: open-circuit chronopotentiometry (CP), linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The passive films on these materials equilibrate within minutes of first immersion and do not show further breakdown until >1 day of exposure. During this period, the potentials and currents measured by LPR and LSV suggest that Fe/FeS undergoes more rapid corrosion and is more strongly influence by solution chemical conditions than Fe/FeO. Chloride containing media were strongly activating and natural organic matter (NOM) was mildly passivating for both materials. These effects were also seen in the impedance data obtained by EIS, and equivalent circuit modeling of the electrodes composed of these powders suggested that the higher reactivity of Fe/FeS is due to greater abundance of defects in its passive film.

  16. Combining acid-base, redox and substrate binding functionalities to give a complete model for the [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, James M.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Some enzymes function by coupling substrate turnover with electron transfer from a redox cofactor such as ferredoxin. In the [FeFe]-hydrogenases, nature's fastest catalysts for the production and oxidation of H2, the one-electron redox by a ferredoxin complements the one-electron redox by the diiron active site. In this Article, we replicate the function of the ferredoxins with the redox-active ligand Cp*Fe(C5Me4CH2PEt2) (FcP*). FcP* oxidizes at mild potentials, in contrast to most ferrocene-based ligands, which suggests that it might be a useful mimic of ferredoxin cofactors. The specific model is Fe2[(SCH2)2NBn](CO)3(FcP*)(dppv) (1), which contains the three functional components of the active site: a reactive diiron centre, an amine as a proton relay and, for the first time, a one-electron redox module. By virtue of the synthetic redox cofactor, [1]2+ exhibits unique reactivity towards hydrogen and CO. In the presence of excess oxidant and base, H2 oxidation by [1]2+ is catalytic.

  17. Iron Hydride Detection and Intramolecular Hydride Transfer in a Synthetic Model of Mono-Iron Hydrogenase with a CNS Chelate.

    PubMed

    Durgaprasad, Gummadi; Xie, Zhu-Lin; Rose, Michael J

    2016-01-19

    We report the identification and reactivity of an iron hydride species in a synthetic model complex of monoiron hydrogenase. The hydride complex is derived from a phosphine-free CNS chelate that includes a Fe-C(NH)(═O) bond (carbamoyl) as a mimic of the active site iron acyl. The reaction of [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(CO)2(Br)] (1) with NaHBEt3 generates the iron hydride intermediate [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(H)(CO)2] (2; δFe-H = -5.08 ppm). Above -40 °C, the hydride species extrudes CH3S(-) via intramolecular hydride transfer, which is stoichiometrically trapped in the structurally characterized dimer μ2-(CH3S)2-[((O═)C(HN)N(Ph))Fe(CO)2]2 (3). Alternately, when activated by base ((t)BuOK), 1 undergoes desulfurization to form a cyclometalated species, [((O═)C(NH)NC(Ph))Fe(CO)2] (5); derivatization of 5 with PPh3 affords the structurally characterized species [((O═)C(NH)NC)Fe(CO)(PPh3)2] (6), indicating complex 6 as the common intermediate along each pathway of desulfurization.

  18. Dependence of Localized Electronic Structure on Ligand Configuration in the [2Fe] Hydrogenase Catalytic Core^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher H.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-03-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme is found in a variety of organisms, including Archaea, Eubacteria, and green algae^1,2, and crystallographically determined atomic position data is available for two examples. The biologically unusual catalytic H-cluster, responsible for proton reduction to H2 in vivo, is conserved in the known structures and includes two bis-thiolato bridged iron ions with extensive cyano- and carbonyl ligation. To address the configurational specificity of the diatomic ligand ligation, density functional theoretical calculations were done on [2Fe] core models of the active center, with varying CO and CN^- ligation patterns. Bonding in each complex has been characterized within the Natural Bond Orbital formalism. The effect of ligand configuration on bonding and charge distribution as well as Kohn-Sham orbital structure will be presented. [1] M. Forestier, P. King, L. Zhang, M. Posewitz, S. Schwarzer, T. Happe, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Eur. J. Biochem. 270, 2750 (2003). [2] Posewitz, M.C., P.W. King, S.L. Smolinski, R.D. Smith, II, A.R. Ginley, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Biochem. Soc. Trans. 33, 102 (2005). ^*This work was supported by the US DOE-SC-BES Hydrogen Fuels Initiative, and done in collaboration with the NREL Chemical and Biosciences Center.

  19. Chelate control of diiron(I) dithiolates relevant to the [Fe-Fe]- hydrogenase active site.

    PubMed

    Justice, Aaron K; Zampella, Giuseppe; De Gioia, Luca; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar; Wilson, Scott R

    2007-03-01

    The reaction of Fe2(S2C2H4)(CO)6 with cis-Ph2PCH=CHPPh2 (dppv) yields Fe2(S2C2H4)(CO)4(dppv), 1(CO)4, wherein the dppv ligand is chelated to a single iron center. NMR analysis indicates that in 1(CO)4, the dppv ligand spans axial and basal coordination sites. In addition to the axial-basal isomer, the 1,3-propanedithiolate and azadithiolate derivatives exist as dibasal isomers. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the axial-basal isomer is destabilized by nonbonding interactions between the dppv and the central NH or CH2 of the larger dithiolates. The Fe(CO)3 subunit in 1(CO)4 undergoes substitution with PMe3 and cyanide to afford 1(CO)3(PMe3) and (Et4N)[1(CN)(CO)3], respectively. Kinetic studies show that 1(CO)4 reacts faster with donor ligands than does its parent Fe2(S2C2H4)(CO)6. The rate of reaction of 1(CO)4 with PMe3 was first order in each reactant, k = 3.1 x 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1). The activation parameters for this substitution reaction, DeltaH = 5.8(5) kcal/mol and DeltaS = -48(2) cal/deg.mol, indicate an associative pathway. DFT calculations suggest that, relative to Fe2(S2C2H4)(CO)6, the enhanced electrophilicity of 1(CO)4 arises from the stabilization of a "rotated" transition state, which is favored by the unsymmetrically disposed donor ligands. Oxidation of MeCN solutions of 1(CO)3(PMe3) with Cp2FePF6 yielded [Fe2(S2C2H4)(mu-CO)(CO)2(dppv)(PMe3)(NCMe)](PF6)2. Reaction of this compound with PMe3 yielded [Fe2(S2C2H4)(mu-CO)(CO)(dppv)(PMe3)2(NCMe)](PF6)2.

  20. Heterolytic Cleavage of Hydrogen by an Iron Hydrogenase Model: An Fe-H - - - H-N Dihydorgen Bond Characterized by Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tianbiao L.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2014-05-19

    Use of hydrogen as a fuel by [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes in nature requires heterolytic cleavage of the H-H bond into a proton (H+) and hydride (H-), a reaction that is also a critical step in homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation of C=O and C=N bonds. An understanding of the catalytic oxidation of H2 by hydrogenases provides insights into the design of synthetic catalysts that are sought as cost-effective alternatives to the use of the precious metal platinum in fuel cells. Crystallographic studies on the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme were critical to understanding of its reactivity, but the key H-H cleavage step is not readily observed experimentally in natural hydrogenases. Synthetic biomimics have provided evidence for H2 cleavage leading to hydride transfer to the metal and proton transfer to an amine. Limitations on the precise location of hydrogen atoms by x-ray diffraction can be overcome by use of neutron diffraction, though its use is severely limited by the difficulty of obtaining suitable crystals and by the scarcity of neutron sources. Here we show that an iron complex with a pendant amine in the diphosphine ligand cleaves hydrogen heterolytically under mild conditions, leading to [CpC5F4NFeH(PtBu2NtBu2H)]+BArF4-, [PtBu2NtBu2 = 1,5-di(tert-butyl)-3,7-di(tert-butyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; ArF = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]. The Fe-H- - - H-N moiety has a strong dihydrogen bond, with a remarkably short H • • • H distance of 1.489(10) Å between the protic N-Hδ+ and hydridic Fe-Hδ-. The structural data for [CpC5F4NFeH(PtBu2NtBu2H)]+ provide a glimpse of how the H-H bond is oxidized or generated in hydrogenase enzymes, with the pendant amine playing a key role as a proton relay. The iron complex [CpC5F4NFeH(PtBu2NtBu2H)]+BArF4- is an electrocatalyst for oxidation of H2 (1 atm) at 22 °C, so the structural data are obtained on a complex that is a functional model for catalysis by [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes. This research was supported

  1. Computational Investigation of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Models: Characterization of Singly and Doubly Protonated Intermediates and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes catalyze hydrogen oxidation and production efficiently with binuclear Fe metal centers. Recently the bioinspired H2-producing model system Fe2(adt)(CO)2(dppv)2 (adt=azadithiolate and dppv=diphosphine) was synthesized and studied experimentally. In this system, the azadithiolate bridge facilitates the formation of a doubly protonated ammonium-hydride species through a proton relay. Herein computational methods are utilized to examine this system in the various oxidation states and protonation states along proposed mechanistic pathways for H2 production. The calculated results agree well with the experimental data for the geometries, CO vibrational stretching frequencies, and reduction potentials. The calculations illustrate that the NH···HFe dihydrogen bonding distance in the doubly protonated species is highly sensitive to the effects of ion-pairing between the ammonium and BF4– counterions, which are present in the crystal structure, in that the inclusion of BF4– counterions leads to a significantly longer dihydrogen bond. The non-hydride Fe center was found to be the site of reduction for terminal hydride species and unsymmetric bridging hydride species, whereas the reduced symmetric bridging hydride species exhibited spin delocalization between the Fe centers. According to both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of the relative pKa values, the Fed center of the neutral species is more basic than the amine, and the bridging hydride species is more thermodynamically stable than the terminal hydride species. The calculations implicate a possible pathway for H2 evolution that involves an intermediate with H2 weakly bonded to one Fe, a short H2 distance similar to the molecular bond length, the spin density delocalized over the two Fe centers, and a nearly symmetrically bridged CO ligand. Overall, this study illustrates the mechanistic roles of the ammonium-hydride interaction, flexibility of the bridging CO

  2. Intramolecular CH Activation and Metallacycle Aromaticity in the Photochemistry of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Model Compounds in Low-Temperature Frozen Matrices.

    PubMed

    Thornley, Wyatt A; Bitterwolf, Thomas E

    2015-12-01

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase model complexes [(μ-pdt){Fe(CO)3 }2 ], [(μ-edt){Fe(CO)3 }2 ], and [(μ-mdt){Fe(CO)3 }2 ], where pdt=1,3-propanedithiolate, edt=1,2-ethanedithiolate, and mdt=methanedithiolate, undergo wavelength dependent photodecarbonylation in hydrocarbon matrices at 85 K resulting in multiple decarbonylation isomers. As previously reported in time-resolved solution photolysis experiments, the major photoproduct is attributed to a basal carbonyl-loss species. Apical carbonyl-loss isomers are also generated and may undergo secondary photolysis, resulting in β-hydride activation of the alkyldithiolate bridge, as well as formation of bridging carbonyl isomers. For [(μ-bdt){Fe(CO)3 }2 ], (bdt=1,2-benzenedithiolate), apical photodecarbonylation results in generation of a 10 π-electron aromatic FeS2 C6 H4 metallacycle that coordinates the remaining iron through an η(5) mode.

  3. Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires enhanced Fenton oxidation by accelerating the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingu; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-08-01

    In this study we demonstrate Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires can improve Fenton oxidation efficiency by two times with rhodamine B as a model pollutant at pH > 4. Active species trapping experiments revealed that the rhodamine B oxidation enhancement was attributed to molecular oxygen activation induced by Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires. The molecular oxygen activation process could generate superoxide radicals to assist iron core for the reduction of ferric ions to accelerate the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycles, which favored the H2O2 decomposition to produce more hydroxyl radicals for the rhodamine B oxidation. The combination of Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires and ferrous ions (Fe@Fe2O3/Fe(2+)) offered a superior Fenton catalyst to decompose H2O2 for producing OH. We employed benzoic acid as a probe reagent to check the generation of OH and found the OH generation rate of Fe@Fe2O3/Fe(2+) was 2-4 orders of magnitude larger than those of commonly used iron based Fenton catalysts and 38 times that of Fe(2+). The reusability and the stability of Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires were studied. Total organic carbon and ion chromatography analyses revealed the mineralization of rhodamine B and the releasing of nitrate ions. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry was used to investigate the degradation intermediates to propose the possible rhodamine B Fenton oxidation pathway in the presence of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires. This study not only provides a new Fenton oxidation system for pollutant control, but also widen the application of molecular oxygen activation induced by nanoscale zero valent iron.

  4. Deletion of a gene cluster for [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase maturation in the anaerobic hyperthermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii identifies its role in hydrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minseok; Chung, Daehwan; Westpheling, Janet

    2016-02-01

    The anaerobic, hyperthermophlic, cellulolytic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii grows optimally at ∼80 °C and effectively degrades plant biomass without conventional pretreatment. It utilizes a variety of carbohydrate carbon sources, including both C5 and C6 sugars, released from plant biomass and produces lactate, acetate, CO2, and H2 as primary fermentation products. The C. bescii genome encodes two hydrogenases, a bifurcating [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase and a [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase. The [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase is the most widely distributed in nature and is predicted to catalyze hydrogen production and to pump protons across the cellular membrane creating proton motive force. Hydrogenases are the key enzymes in hydrogen metabolism and their crystal structure reveals complexity in the organization of their prosthetic groups suggesting extensive maturation of the primary protein. Here, we report the deletion of a cluster of genes, hypABFCDE, required for maturation of the [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase. These proteins are specific for the hydrogenases they modify and are required for hydrogenase activity. The deletion strain grew more slowly than the wild type or the parent strain and produced slightly less hydrogen overall, but more hydrogen per mole of cellobiose. Acetate yield per mole of cellobiose was increased ∼67 % and ethanol yield per mole of cellobiose was decreased ∼39 %. These data suggest that the primary role of the [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase is to generate a proton gradient in the membrane driving ATP synthesis and is not the primary enzyme for hydrogen catalysis. In its absence, ATP is generated from increased acetate production resulting in more hydrogen produced per mole of cellobiose.

  5. Cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster: a model for the in vitro assembly of metalloprotein metal centers.

    PubMed

    Kuchenreuther, Jon M; Shiigi, Stacey A; Swartz, James R

    2014-01-01

    Many organometallic cofactors are highly complex and require multiple accessory proteins for both their assembly and transfer to a target protein. A cell-free system in which the biosynthetic pathway for a prosthetic group has been fully or even partially reconstructed enables investigations of the reaction sequence as well as the cofactor itself. As a model for the in vitro assembly of protein-bound metal centers, we describe a procedure for the cell-free synthesis of the H-cluster in the context of producing purified and active [FeFe] hydrogenase samples for spectroscopic studies. In general terms, this in vitro system is a combination of non-purified accessory proteins, exogenous substrates, and purified hydrogenase apoprotein. We also describe methods for making the required components used in the cell-free system. Specifically, these procedures include anaerobic expression of heterologous metalloproteins in Escherichia coli, anaerobic cell lysate production, and anaerobic metalloprotein purification using Strep-Tactin(®) chromatography.

  6. Production and Engineering of Hydrogenase as a Biocatalyst for Hydrogen Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guangyi

    2010-04-09

    Hydrogenases are fascinating redox proteins, showing tremendous promise in the utilization of hydrogen fuel as a bioelectrocatalyst. They play critical roles in both biohydrogen production and hydrogen oxidation. Specifically, the recently-established comparability of the oxidative activity of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site to that of the fuel cell catalyst platinum marks a significant milestone for the potential application of hydrogenase in hydrogen fuel cells to replace platinum. However, the ability of producing hydrogenase in heterologous expression hosts and the sensitivity of hydrogenases to oxygen and carbon monoxide, etc. have seriously limited the viable macroscale utilization and production of hydrogen from the renewable source. A new technology for the production of up-take hydrogenase is being developed for the utilization of hydrogenase as a hydrogen catalyst. The development of this new technology integrates knowledge of structural biology, molecular biology, and principles of metabolic engineering to produce and engineer a stable hydrogenase as a hydrogen bioelectrocatalyst. It contributes to the critical issues of “expensive noble metal catalysts (i.e., platinum) and their limited reserves threatening the long-term sustainability of a hydrogen economy”. It also provides a model to “design natural materials and enzyme catalyst” for “efficient and cost-effective technologies” for a clean and sustainable energy in 21st century. This new technology includes 3 major components. The first component is the synthetic operons, which carry hydrogenase maturation pathways of Ralstonia eutropha. These synthetic operons are engineered to produce RH hydrogenase in the Escherichia coli strains based on our current molecular and genetic information of hydrogenase maturation mechanisms and pathways of R. eutropha. It presents the first example of producing hydrogenase in the conventional expression host using synthetic biology principles and tool

  7. Hydrogenase/ferredoxin charge-transfer complexes: effect of hydrogenase mutations on the complex association.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2009-04-23

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii utilize photogenerated electrons to reduce protons into hydrogen gas. The electrons are supplied from photosystem I and transferred to the [FeFe]-hydrogenase through specific hydrogenase-ferredoxin association. To understand how structural and kinetic factors control the association better, we used Brownian dynamics simulation methods to simulate the charge-transfer complex formation between both native and in silico mutants of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase HYDA2 and the [2Fe2S]-ferredoxin FDX1 from C. reinhardtii . The changes in binding free energy between different HYDA2 mutants and the native FDX1 were calculated by the free-energy perturbation method. Within the limits of our current models, we found that two HYDA2 mutations, T99K(H) and D102K(H), led to lower binding free energies and higher association rate with FDX1 and are thus promising targets for improving hydrogen production rates in engineered organisms. PMID:19317477

  8. Cyanobacterial hydrogenases and hydrogen metabolism revisited: recent progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Namita; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-05-08

    Cyanobacteria have garnered interest as potential cell factories for hydrogen production. In conjunction with photosynthesis, these organisms can utilize inexpensive inorganic substrates and solar energy for simultaneous biosynthesis and hydrogen evolution. However, the hydrogen yield associated with these organisms remains far too low to compete with the existing chemical processes. Our limited understanding of the cellular hydrogen production pathway is a primary setback in the potential scale-up of this process. In this regard, the present review discusses the recent insight around ferredoxin/flavodoxin as the likely electron donor to the bidirectional Hox hydrogenase instead of the generally accepted NAD(P)H. This may have far reaching implications in powering solar driven hydrogen production. However, it is evident that a successful hydrogen-producing candidate would likely integrate enzymatic traits from different species. Engineering the [NiFe] hydrogenases for optimal catalytic efficiency or expression of a high turnover [FeFe] hydrogenase in these photo-autotrophs may facilitate the development of strains to reach target levels of biohydrogen production in cyanobacteria. The fundamental advancements achieved in these fields are also summarized in this review.

  9. Cyanobacterial Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism Revisited: Recent Progress and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Namita; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have garnered interest as potential cell factories for hydrogen production. In conjunction with photosynthesis, these organisms can utilize inexpensive inorganic substrates and solar energy for simultaneous biosynthesis and hydrogen evolution. However, the hydrogen yield associated with these organisms remains far too low to compete with the existing chemical processes. Our limited understanding of the cellular hydrogen production pathway is a primary setback in the potential scale-up of this process. In this regard, the present review discusses the recent insight around ferredoxin/flavodoxin as the likely electron donor to the bidirectional Hox hydrogenase instead of the generally accepted NAD(P)H. This may have far reaching implications in powering solar driven hydrogen production. However, it is evident that a successful hydrogen-producing candidate would likely integrate enzymatic traits from different species. Engineering the [NiFe] hydrogenases for optimal catalytic efficiency or expression of a high turnover [FeFe] hydrogenase in these photo-autotrophs may facilitate the development of strains to reach target levels of biohydrogen production in cyanobacteria. The fundamental advancements achieved in these fields are also summarized in this review. PMID:26006225

  10. Fluorophenyl-substituted Fe-only hydrogenases active site ADT models: different electrocatalytic process for proton reduction in HOAc and HBF4/Et2O.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Guang; Wang, Hong-Yan; Si, Gang; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2009-04-21

    A set of fluorophenyl-substituted adt-bridged Fe2S2 active site models of Fe-only hydrogenase, [(micro-SCH2)2NR]Fe2(CO)6 (, R=C6F4CF3-p; , R=C6H4CF3-p) and [(micro-SCH2)2NR]Fe2(CO)5(PPh3) (, R=C6F4CF3-p; , R=C6H4CF3-p), have been synthesized and well characterized. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies demonstrate that the aryl-substituted complexes are stable toward a strong acid HBF4/Et2O, and electrocatalytic process for the hydrogen production is mostly dependent on the strength of the available proton source. When CH3COOH is used as the proton source, the electrocatalytic process begins with successively two one-electron reduction processes to produce H2 at Fe(0)Fe(0) (E2pc); whereas in the presence of strong acid, HBF4/Et2O, the process is initiated by protonation of a N-bridged atom followed by reduction of the protonated N-bridged atom around -1.29 V, and then release of H2 at Fe(0)Fe(I) (E1pc). Varying the strength of acid leads to the initial electron-transfer step from the reduction of a protonated N-bridged atom to the active site of [Fe(I)Fe(I)].

  11. Effects of impurity states on exchange coupling in Fe/Fe3O4 junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, J.; Honda, S.; Itoh, H.; Mibu, K.; Yanagihara, H.; Kita, E.

    2012-05-01

    Exchange coupling (EC) in Fe/Fe3O4 junctions containing magnetic impurities and in-gap states at the interface is calculated using a formula obtained by a cleaved layer method. The model for EC is constructed by performing first-principles calculations of the electronic and magnetic states of Co, Mn, and Cr impurities on the Fe surface and those of in-gap states in a bulk γ-Fe2O3, which has the same lattice structure as Fe3O4 but contains Fe defects. We show that the effect of Co impurities on EC is opposite to that of Cr and Mn impurities and that in-gap states tend to cause parallel magnetization alignment of two ferromagnets. These results are attributed to the change in electronic states caused by the presence of impurities. Further, we compare calculated results with experimental ones obtained in Fe/Fe3O4 junctions and suggest that doping magnetic impurities at the interface could be a useful way to control the magnitude and sign of the EC.

  12. Characterization of the Fe Site in Iron-Sulfur-Cluster-Free Hydrogenase (Hmd) and of a Model Compound via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yisong; Wang, Hongxin; Xiao, Yuming; vogt, Sonja; Shima, Seigo; Volkers, Phillip I.; Pelmentschikov, Vladimir; Alp, Ercan E.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Yada, Yoshitaka

    2009-01-01

    We have used 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the iron site in the iron-sulfur-cluster-free hydrogenase Hmd from the methanogenic archaeon Methanothermobacter marburgensis. The spectra have been interpreted by comparison with a cis-(CO)2-ligated Fe model compound, Fe(S2C2H4)(CO)2(PMe3)2, as well as by normal mode simulations of plausible active site structures. For this model complex, normal mode analyses both from an optimized Urey-Bradley force field and from complementary density functional theory (DFT) calculations produced consistent results. Previous IR spectroscopic studies found strong CO stretching modes at 1944 and 2011 cm−1, interpreted as evidence for cis-Fe(CO)2 ligation. The NRVS data provide further insight into the dynamics of the Fe site, revealing Fe-CO stretch and Fe-CO bend modes at 494, 562, 590, and 648 cm−1, consistent with the proposed cis-Fe(CO)2 ligation. The NRVS also reveals a band assigned to Fe-S stretching motion at ~311 cm−1, and another reproducible feature at ~380 cm−1. The 57Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) for Hmd can be reasonably well simulated by a normal mode analysis based on a Urey-Bradley force field for a 5-coordinate cis-(CO)2-ligated Fe site with additional cysteine, water, and pyridone cofactor ligands. A final interpretation of the Hmd NRVS data, including DFT analysis, awaits a 3-dimensional structure for the active site. PMID:18407624

  13. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe] hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.

  14. Elimination of hydrogenase active site assembly blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-02-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe]more » hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.« less

  15. Proton reduction and dihydrogen oxidation on models of the [2Fe]H cluster of [Fe] hydrogenases. A density functional theory investigation.

    PubMed

    Zampella, Giuseppe; Greco, Claudio; Fantucci, Piercarlo; De Gioia, Luca

    2006-05-15

    Density functional theory was used to compare reaction pathways for H2 formation and H+ reduction catalyzed by models of the binuclear cluster found in the active site of [Fe] hydrogenases. Terminal H+ binding to an Fe(I)-Fe(I) form, followed by monoelectron reduction and protonation of the di(thiomethyl)amine ligand, can conveniently lead to H2 formation and release, suggesting that this mechanism could be operative within the enzyme active site. However, a pathway that implies the initial formation of Fe(II)-Fe(II) mu-H species and release of H2 from an Fe(II)-Fe(I) form is characterized by only slightly less favored energy profiles. In both cases, H2 formation becomes less favored when taking into account the competition between CN and amine groups for H+ binding, an observation that can be relevant for the design of novel synthetic catalysts. H2 cleavage can take place on Fe(II)-Fe(II) redox species, in agreement with previous proposals [Fan, H.-J.; Hall, M. B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3828] and, in complexes characterized by terminal CO groups, does not need the involvement of an external base. The step in H2 oxidation characterized by larger energy barriers corresponds to the second H+ extraction from the cluster, both considering Fe(II)-Fe(II) and Fe(II)-Fe(III) species. A comparison of the different reaction pathways reveals that H2 formation could involve only Fe(I)-Fe(I), Fe(II)-Fe(I), and Fe(II)-Fe(II) species, whereas Fe(III)-Fe(II) species might be relevant in H2 cleavage.

  16. [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774: gene sequencing, three-dimensional structure determination and refinement at 1.8 A and modelling studies of its interaction with the tetrahaem cytochrome c3.

    PubMed

    Matias, P M; Soares, C M; Saraiva, L M; Coelho, R; Morais, J; Le Gall, J; Carrondo, M A

    2001-01-01

    The primary and three-dimensional structures of a [NiFe] hydrogenase isolated from D. desulfitricans ATCC 27774 were determined, by nucleotide analysis and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The three-dimensional structural model was refined to R=0.167 and Rfree=0.223 using data to 1.8 A resolution. Two unique structural features are observed: the [4Fe-4S] cluster nearest the [NiFe] centre has been modified [4Fe-3S-3O] by loss of one sulfur atom and inclusion of three oxygen atoms; a three-fold disorder was observed for Cys536 which binds to the nickel atom in the [NiFe] centre. Also, the bridging sulfur atom that caps the active site was found to have partial occupancy, thus corresponding to a partly activated enzyme. These structural features may have biological relevance. In particular, the two less-populated rotamers of Cys536 may be involved in the activation process of the enzyme, as well as in the catalytic cycle. Molecular modelling studies were carried out on the interaction between this [NiFe] hydrogenase and its physiological partner, the tetrahaem cytochrome c3 from the same organism. The lowest energy docking solutions were found to correspond to an interaction between the haem IV region in tetrahaem cytochrome c3 with the distal [4Fe-4S] cluster in [NiFe] hydrogenase. This interaction should correspond to efficient electron transfer and be physiologically relevant, given the proximity of the two redox centres and the fact that electron transfer decay coupling calculations show high coupling values and a short electron transfer pathway. On the other hand, other docking solutions have been found that, despite showing low electron transfer efficiency, may give clues on possible proton transfer mechanisms between the two molecules. PMID:11191224

  17. Cyanide inactivation of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii

    SciTech Connect

    Seefeldt, L.C.; Arp, D.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The effects of cyanide on membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii were characterized. Inactivation of hydrogenase by cyanide was dependent on the activity (oxidation) state of the enzyme. Active (reduced) hydrogenase showed no inactivation when treated with cyanide over several hours. Treatment of reversibly inactive (oxidized) states of both membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase, however, resulted in a time-dependent, irreversible loss of hydrogenase activity. The rate of cyanide inactivation was dependent on the cyanide concentration and was an apparent first-order process for purified enzyme (bimolecular rate constant, 23.1 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} for CN{sup {minus}}). The rate of inactivation decreased with decreasing pH. ({sup 14}C)cyanide remained associated with cyanide-inactivated hydrogenase after gel filtration chromatography, with a stoichiometry of 1.7 mol of cyanide bound per mol of inactive enzyme. The presence of saturating concentrations of CO had no effect on the rate or extent of cyanide inactivation of hydrogenases. The results indicate that cyanide can cause a time-dependent, irreversible inactivation of hydrogenase in the oxidized, activatable state but has no effect when hydrogenase is in the reduced, active state.

  18. Modeling the Active Sites in Metalloenzymes 5. The Heterolytic Bond Cleavage of H2 in the [NiFe] Hydrogenase of DesulfoWibrio gigas by a Nucleophilic Addition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Shuqiang; Hall, Michael B.

    2001-11-19

    The H2 activation catalyzed by an Fe(II)-Ni(III) model of the [NiFe] hydrogenase of DesulfoVibrio gigas has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) calculations on the neutral and anionic active site complexes, [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)(SH2)]0 and [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)2]-. The results suggest that the reaction proceeds by a nucleophilic addition mechanism that cleaves the H-H bond heterolytically. The terminal cysteine residue Cys530 in the [NiFe] hydrogenase active site of the D. gigas enzyme plays a crucial role in the catalytic process by accepting the proton. The active site is constructed to provide access by this cysteine residue, and this role explains the change in activity observed when this cysteine is replaced by a selenocysteine. Furthermore, the optimized geometry of the transition state in the model bears a striking resemblance to the geometry of the active site as determined by X-ray crystallography.

  19. Effects of metal ions on the reactivity and corrosion electrochemistry of Fe/FeS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Turcio-Ortega, David; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2014-04-01

    Nano-zerovalent iron (nZVI) formed under sulfidic conditions results in a biphasic material (Fe/FeS) that reduces trichloroethene (TCE) more rapidly than nZVI associated only with iron oxides (Fe/FeO). Exposing Fe/FeS to dissolved metals (Pd(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Mn(2+)) results in their sequestration by coprecipitation as dopants into FeS and FeO and/or by electroless precipitation as zerovalent metals that are hydrogenation catalysts. Using TCE reduction rates to probe the effect of metal amendments on the reactivity of Fe/FeS, it was found that Mn(2+) and Cu(2+) decreased TCE reduction rates, while Pd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) increased them. Electrochemical characterization of metal-amended Fe/FeS showed that aging caused passivation by growth of FeO and FeS phases and poisoning of catalytic metal deposits by sulfide. Correlation of rate constants for TCE reduction (kobs) with electrochemical parameters (corrosion potentials and currents, Tafel slopes, and polarization resistance) and descriptors of hydrogen activation by metals (exchange current density for hydrogen reduction and enthalpy of solution into metals) showed the controlling process changed with aging. For fresh Fe/FeS, kobs was best described by the exchange current density for activation of hydrogen, whereas kobs for aged Fe/FeS correlated with electrochemical descriptors of electron transfer.

  20. Diversity and transcription of proteases involved in the maturation of hydrogenases in Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The last step in the maturation process of the large subunit of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is a proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminal by a hydrogenase specific protease. Contrary to other accessory proteins these hydrogenase proteases are believed to be specific whereby one type of hydrogenases specific protease only cleaves one type of hydrogenase. In cyanobacteria this is achieved by the gene product of either hupW or hoxW, specific for the uptake or the bidirectional hydrogenase respectively. The filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Nostoc sp strain PCC 7120 may contain a single uptake hydrogenase or both an uptake and a bidirectional hydrogenase respectively. Results In order to examine these proteases in cyanobacteria, transcriptional analyses were performed of hupW in Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and hupW and hoxW in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. These studies revealed numerous transcriptional start points together with putative binding sites for NtcA (hupW) and LexA (hoxW). In order to investigate the diversity and specificity among hydrogeanse specific proteases we constructed a phylogenetic tree which revealed several subgroups that showed a striking resemblance to the subgroups previously described for [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally the proteases specificity was also addressed by amino acid sequence analysis and protein-protein docking experiments with 3D-models derived from bioinformatic studies. These studies revealed a so called "HOXBOX"; an amino acid sequence specific for protease of Hox-type which might be involved in docking with the large subunit of the hydrogenase. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the hydrogenase specific proteases are under similar regulatory control as the hydrogenases they cleave. The result from the phylogenetic study also indicates that the hydrogenase and the protease have co-evolved since ancient time and suggests that at least one major horizontal gene transfer has occurred. This co

  1. Hydrogenase polypeptide and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Michael W.W.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Jenney, JR, Francis E.; Sun, Junsong

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are polypeptides having hydrogenase activity. The polypeptide may be multimeric, and may have hydrogenase activity of at least 0.05 micromoles H.sub.2 produced min.sup.-1 mg protein.sup.-1. Also provided herein are polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides, genetically modified microbes that include polynucleotides encoding one or more subunits of the multimeric polypeptide, and methods for making and using the polypeptides.

  2. Discovery of [NiFe] hydrogenase genes in metagenomic DNA: cloning and heterologous expression in Thiocapsa roseopersicina.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Gergely; Tong, Yingkai; Yooseph, Shibu; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Smith, Hamilton O; Kovács, Kornél L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig; Xu, Qing

    2009-09-01

    Using a metagenomics approach, we have cloned a piece of environmental DNA from the Sargasso Sea that encodes an [NiFe] hydrogenase showing 60% identity to the large subunit and 64% to the small subunit of a Thiocapsa roseopersicina O2-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase. The DNA sequence of the hydrogenase identified by the metagenomic approach was subsequently found to be 99% identical to the hyaA and hyaB genes of an Alteromonas macleodii hydrogenase, indicating that it belongs to the Alteromonas clade. We were able to express our new Alteromonas hydrogenase in T. roseopersicina. Expression was accomplished by coexpressing only two accessory genes, hyaD and hupH, without the need to express any of the hyp accessory genes (hypABCDEF). These results suggest that the native accessory proteins in T. roseopersicina could substitute for the Alteromonas counterparts that are absent in the host to facilitate the assembly of a functional Alteromonas hydrogenase. To further compare the complex assembly machineries of these two [NiFe] hydrogenases, we performed complementation experiments by introducing the new Alteromonas hyaD gene into the T. roseopersicina hynD mutant. Interestingly, Alteromonas endopeptidase HyaD could complement T. roseopersicina HynD to cleave endoproteolytically the C-terminal end of the T. roseopersicina HynL hydrogenase large subunit and activate the enzyme. This study refines our knowledge on the selectivity and pleiotropy of the elements of the [NiFe] hydrogenase assembly machineries. It also provides a model for functionally analyzing novel enzymes from environmental microbes in a culture-independent manner. PMID:19633107

  3. CO and CN- syntheses by [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturase HydG are catalytically differentiated events.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Adrien; Martin, Lydie; Zeppieri, Laura; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of the active site [FeFe] unit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases require at least three maturases. The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine HydG, the best characterized of these proteins, is responsible for the synthesis of the hydrogenase CO and CN(-) ligands from tyrosine-derived dehydroglycine (DHG). We speculated that CN(-) and the CO precursor (-):CO2H may be generated through an elimination reaction. We tested this hypothesis with both wild type and HydG variants defective in second iron-sulfur cluster coordination by measuring the in vitro production of CO, CN(-), and (-):CO2H-derived formate. We indeed observed formate production under these conditions. We conclude that HydG is a multifunctional enzyme that produces DHG, CN(-), and CO at three well-differentiated catalytic sites. We also speculate that homocysteine, cysteine, or a related ligand could be involved in Fe(CO)x(CN)y transfer to the HydF carrier/scaffold. PMID:26699472

  4. CO and CN− syntheses by [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturase HydG are catalytically differentiated events

    PubMed Central

    Pagnier, Adrien; Martin, Lydie; Zeppieri, Laura; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of the active site [FeFe] unit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases require at least three maturases. The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine HydG, the best characterized of these proteins, is responsible for the synthesis of the hydrogenase CO and CN− ligands from tyrosine-derived dehydroglycine (DHG). We speculated that CN− and the CO precursor −:CO2H may be generated through an elimination reaction. We tested this hypothesis with both wild type and HydG variants defective in second iron-sulfur cluster coordination by measuring the in vitro production of CO, CN−, and −:CO2H-derived formate. We indeed observed formate production under these conditions. We conclude that HydG is a multifunctional enzyme that produces DHG, CN−, and CO at three well-differentiated catalytic sites. We also speculate that homocysteine, cysteine, or a related ligand could be involved in Fe(CO)x(CN)y transfer to the HydF carrier/scaffold. PMID:26699472

  5. The phylogeny of uptake hydrogenases in Frankia.

    PubMed

    Leul, Melakeselam; Normand, Philippe; Sellstedt, Anita

    2009-03-01

    Uptake hydrogenase is an enzyme that is beneficial for nitrogen fixation in bacteria. Recent studies have shown that Frankia sp. has two sets of uptake hydrogenase genes, organized in synton 1 and synton 2. In the present study, phylogenetic analysis of the structural subunits of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 showed a distinct clustering pattern between the proteins of Frankia strains that were isolated from different host plants and non-Frankia organisms. The structural subunits of hydrogenase synton 1 of Frankia sp. CpI1, Frankia alni ACN14a, and F. alni AvCI1 were grouped together while those of Frankia spp. CcI3, KB5, UGL140104, and UGL011102 formed another group. The structural subunits of hydrogenase synton 2 of F. alni ACN14a and Frankia spp. CcI3 and BCU110501 grouped together, but those of Frankia spp. KB5 and CpI1, F. alni ArI3, and F. alniAvCI1 comprised a separate group. The structural subunits of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 of Frankia sp. EAN1pec were more closely related to those of non-Frankia bacteria, i.e., Streptomyces avermitilis and Anaeromyxobacter sp., respectively, than to those of other Frankia strains, suggesting the occurrence of lateral gene transfer between these organisms. In addition, the accessory Hyp proteins of hydrogenase syntons 1 and 2 of F. alni ACN14a and Frankia sp. CcI3 were shown to be phylogenetically more related to each other than to those of Frankia EAN1pec. PMID:19440980

  6. Cobaloxime-based artificial hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Marine; Berggren, Gustav; Niklas, Jens; Veinberg, Elias; Mara, Michael W; Shelby, Megan L; Poluektov, Oleg G; Chen, Lin X; Tiede, David M; Cavazza, Christine; Field, Martin J; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Cobaloximes are popular H2 evolution molecular catalysts but have so far mainly been studied in nonaqueous conditions. We show here that they are also valuable for the design of artificial hydrogenases for application in neutral aqueous solutions and report on the preparation of two well-defined biohybrid species via the binding of two cobaloxime moieties, {Co(dmgH)2} and {Co(dmgBF2)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime), to apo Sperm-whale myoglobin (SwMb). All spectroscopic data confirm that the cobaloxime moieties are inserted within the binding pocket of the SwMb protein and are coordinated to a histidine residue in the axial position of the cobalt complex, resulting in thermodynamically stable complexes. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations indicated a coordination preference for His93 over the other histidine residue (His64) present in the vicinity. Interestingly, the redox activity of the cobalt centers is retained in both biohybrids, which provides them with the catalytic activity for H2 evolution in near-neutral aqueous conditions. PMID:25029381

  7. Cobaloxime-based artificial hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Marine; Berggren, Gustav; Niklas, Jens; Veinberg, Elias; Mara, Michael W; Shelby, Megan L; Poluektov, Oleg G; Chen, Lin X; Tiede, David M; Cavazza, Christine; Field, Martin J; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    Cobaloximes are popular H2 evolution molecular catalysts but have so far mainly been studied in nonaqueous conditions. We show here that they are also valuable for the design of artificial hydrogenases for application in neutral aqueous solutions and report on the preparation of two well-defined biohybrid species via the binding of two cobaloxime moieties, {Co(dmgH)2} and {Co(dmgBF2)2} (dmgH2 = dimethylglyoxime), to apo Sperm-whale myoglobin (SwMb). All spectroscopic data confirm that the cobaloxime moieties are inserted within the binding pocket of the SwMb protein and are coordinated to a histidine residue in the axial position of the cobalt complex, resulting in thermodynamically stable complexes. Quantum chemical/molecular mechanical docking calculations indicated a coordination preference for His93 over the other histidine residue (His64) present in the vicinity. Interestingly, the redox activity of the cobalt centers is retained in both biohybrids, which provides them with the catalytic activity for H2 evolution in near-neutral aqueous conditions.

  8. De novo modeling of the F420-reducing [NiFe]-hydrogenase from a methanogenic archaeon by cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Deryck J; Vitt, Stella; Strauss, Mike; Shima, Seigo; Vonck, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea use a [NiFe]-hydrogenase, Frh, for oxidation/reduction of F420, an important hydride carrier in the methanogenesis pathway from H2 and CO2. Frh accounts for about 1% of the cytoplasmic protein and forms a huge complex consisting of FrhABG heterotrimers with each a [NiFe] center, four Fe-S clusters and an FAD. Here, we report the structure determined by near-atomic resolution cryo-EM of Frh with and without bound substrate F420. The polypeptide chains of FrhB, for which there was no homolog, was traced de novo from the EM map. The 1.2-MDa complex contains 12 copies of the heterotrimer, which unexpectedly form a spherical protein shell with a hollow core. The cryo-EM map reveals strong electron density of the chains of metal clusters running parallel to the protein shell, and the F420-binding site is located at the end of the chain near the outside of the spherical structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00218.001 PMID:23483797

  9. Correlation between computed gas-phase and experimentally determined solution-phase infrared spectra: models of the iron-iron hydrogenase enzyme active site.

    PubMed

    Tye, Jesse W; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y; Hall, Michael B

    2006-09-01

    Gas-phase density functional theory calculations (B3LYP, double zeta plus polarization basis sets) are used to predict the solution-phase infrared spectra for a series of CO- and CN-containing iron complexes. It is shown that simple linear scaling of the computed C--O and C--N stretching frequencies yields accurate predictions of the the experimentally determined nu(CO) and nu(CN) values for a variety of complexes of different charges and in solvents of varying polarity. As examples of the technique, the resulting correlation is used to assign structures to spectroscopically observed but structurally ambiguous species in two different systems. For the (mu-SCH2CH2CH2S)[Fe(CO)3]2 complex in tetrahydrofuran solution, our calculations show that the initial electrochemical reduction process leads to a simple one-electron reduced product with a structure very similar to the (mu-SCH2CH2CH2S)[Fe(CO)3]2 parent complex. For the iron-iron hydrogenase enzyme active site, our computations show that the absence or presence of a water molecule near the distal iron center (the iron center further from the [4Fe4S] cluster and protein backbone) has very little effect on the predicted infrared spectra.

  10. Atomic model of the F420-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase by electron cryo-microscopy using a direct electron detector.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, Matteo; Mills, Deryck J; McMullan, Greg; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Vonck, Janet

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of direct electron detectors with higher detective quantum efficiency and fast read-out marks the beginning of a new era in electron cryo-microscopy. Using the FEI Falcon II direct electron detector in video mode, we have reconstructed a map at 3.36 Å resolution of the 1.2 MDa F420-reducing hydrogenase (Frh) from methanogenic archaea from only 320,000 asymmetric units. Videos frames were aligned by a combination of image and particle alignment procedures to overcome the effects of beam-induced motion. The reconstructed density map shows all secondary structure as well as clear side chain densities for most residues. The full coordination of all cofactors in the electron transfer chain (a [NiFe] center, four [4Fe4S] clusters and an FAD) is clearly visible along with a well-defined substrate access channel. From the rigidity of the complex we conclude that catalysis is diffusion-limited and does not depend on protein flexibility or conformational changes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01963.001. PMID:24569482

  11. A model for the CO-inhibited form of [NiFe] hydrogenase: synthesis of (CO)3Fe(μ-StBu)3Ni{SC6H3-2,6-(mesityl)2} and reversible CO addition at the Ni site

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Yasuhiro; Yasumura, Kazunari; Ando, Masaru; Shimokata, Satoko; Tatsumi, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    A [NiFe] hydrogenase model compound having a distorted trigonal-pyramidal nickel center, (CO)3Fe(μ-StBu)3Ni(SDmp), 1 (Dmp = C6H3-2,6-(mesityl)2), was synthesized from the reaction of the tetranuclear Fe-Ni-Ni-Fe complex [(CO)3Fe(μ-StBu)3Ni]2(μ-Br)2, 2 with NaSDmp at -40 °C. The nickel site of complex 1 was found to add CO or CNtBu at -40 °C to give (CO)3Fe(StBu)(μ-StBu)2Ni(CO)(SDmp), 3, or (CO)3Fe(StBu)(μ-StBu)2Ni(CNtBu)(SDmp), 4, respectively. One of the CO bands of 3, appearing at 2055 cm-1 in the infrared spectrum, was assigned as the Ni-CO band, and this frequency is comparable to those observed for the CO-inhibited forms of [NiFe] hydrogenase. Like the CO-inhibited forms of [NiFe] hydrogenase, the coordination of CO at the nickel site of 1 is reversible, while the CNtBu adduct 4 is more robust. PMID:20147622

  12. Evolutionary Significance of an Algal Gene Encoding an [FeFe]-Hydrogenase with F-Domain Homology and Hydrogenase Activity in Chlorella Variabilis NC64A

    SciTech Connect

    Meuser, J. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Ananyev, G.; Karns, D.; Radakovits, R.; Murthy, U. M. N.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Dismukes, G. C.; Peters, J. W.; Posewitz, M. C.

    2011-10-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA) link the production of molecular H{sub 2} to anaerobic metabolism in many green algae. Similar to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella variabilis NC64A (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) exhibits [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HYDA) activity during anoxia. In contrast to C. reinhardtii and other chlorophycean algae, which contain hydrogenases with only the HYDA active site (H-cluster), C. variabilis NC64A is the only known green alga containing HYDA genes encoding accessory FeS cluster-binding domains (F-cluster). cDNA sequencing confirmed the presence of F-cluster HYDA1 mRNA transcripts, and identified deviations from the in silico splicing models. We show that HYDA activity in C. variabilis NC64A is coupled to anoxic photosynthetic electron transport (PSII linked, as well as PSII-independent) and dark fermentation. We also show that the in vivo H{sub 2}-photoproduction activity observed is as O2 sensitive as in C. reinhardtii. The two C. variabilis NC64A HYDA sequences are similar to homologs found in more deeply branching bacteria (Thermotogales), diatoms, and heterotrophic flagellates, suggesting that an F-cluster HYDA is the ancestral enzyme in algae. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the algal HYDA H-cluster domains are monophyletic, suggesting that they share a common origin, and evolved from a single ancestral F-cluster HYDA. Furthermore, phylogenetic reconstruction indicates that the multiple algal HYDA paralogs are the result of gene duplication events that occurred independently within each algal lineage. Collectively, comparative genomic, physiological, and phylogenetic analyses of the C. variabilis NC64A hydrogenase has provided new insights into the molecular evolution and diversity of algal [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  13. Analyses of the Large Subunit Histidine-Rich Motif Expose an Alternative Proton Transfer Pathway in [NiFe] Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Szőri-Dorogházi, Emma; Maróti, Gergely; Szőri, Milán; Nyilasi, Andrea; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L.

    2012-01-01

    A highly conserved histidine-rich region with unknown function was recognized in the large subunit of [NiFe] hydrogenases. The HxHxxHxxHxH sequence occurs in most membrane-bound hydrogenases, but only two of these histidines are present in the cytoplasmic ones. Site-directed mutagenesis of the His-rich region of the T. roseopersicina membrane-attached Hyn hydrogenase disclosed that the enzyme activity was significantly affected only by the replacement of the His104 residue. Computational analysis of the hydrogen bond network in the large subunits indicated that the second histidine of this motif might be a component of a proton transfer pathway including Arg487, Asp103, His104 and Glu436. Substitutions of the conserved amino acids of the presumed transfer route impaired the activity of the Hyn hydrogenase. Western hybridization was applied to demonstrate that the cellular level of the mutant hydrogenases was similar to that of the wild type. Mostly based on theoretical modeling, few proton transfer pathways have already been suggested for [NiFe] hydrogenases. Our results propose an alternative route for proton transfer between the [NiFe] active center and the surface of the protein. A novel feature of this model is that this proton pathway is located on the opposite side of the large subunit relative to the position of the small subunit. This is the first study presenting a systematic analysis of an in silico predicted proton translocation pathway in [NiFe] hydrogenases by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:22511957

  14. Merging [FeFe]-hydrogenases with materials and nanomaterials as biohybrid catalysts for solar H II production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Paul W.; Svedruzic, Drazenka; Hambourger, Michael; Gervaldo, Miguel; McDonald, Tim; Blackburn, Jeff; Heben, Michael; Gust, Devens; Moore, Ana L.; Moore, Thomas A.; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2007-09-01

    The catalysts commonly used for the H II producing reaction in artificial solar systems are typically platinum or particulate platinum composites. Biological catalysts, the hydrogenases, exist in a wide-variety of microbes and are biosynthesized from abundant, non-precious metals. By virtue of a unique catalytic metallo-cluster that is composed of iron and sulfur, [FeFe]-hydrogenases are capable of catalyzing H II production at turnover rates of millimoles-per-second. In addition, these biological catalysts possess some of the characteristics that are desired for cost-effective solar H II production systems, high solubilities in aqueous solutions and low activation energies, but are sensitive to CO and O II. We are investigating ways to merge [FeFe]-hydrogenases with a variety of organic materials and nanomaterials for the fabrication of electrodes and biohybrids as catalysts for use in artificial solar H II production systems. These efforts include designs that allow for the integration of [FeFe]-hydrogenase in dye-solar cells as models to measure solar conversion and H II production efficiencies. In support of a more fundamental understanding of [FeFe]-hydrogenase for these and other applications the role of protein structure in catalysis is being investigated. Currently there is little known about the mechanism of how these and other enzymes couple multi-electron transfer to proton reduction. To further the mechanistic understanding of [FeFe]-hydrogenases, structural models for substrate transfer are being used to create enzyme variants for biochemical analysis. Here results are presented on investigations of proton-transfer pathways in [FeFe]-hydrogenase and their interaction with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  15. Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tamagnini, Paula; Axelsson, Rikard; Lindberg, Pia; Oxelfelt, Fredrik; Wünschiers, Röbbe; Lindblad, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cyanobacteria may possess several enzymes that are directly involved in dihydrogen metabolism: nitrogenase(s) catalyzing the production of hydrogen concomitantly with the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia, an uptake hydrogenase (encoded by hupSL) catalyzing the consumption of hydrogen produced by the nitrogenase, and a bidirectional hydrogenase (encoded by hoxFUYH) which has the capacity to both take up and produce hydrogen. This review summarizes our knowledge about cyanobacterial hydrogenases, focusing on recent progress since the first molecular information was published in 1995. It presents the molecular knowledge about cyanobacterial hupSL and hoxFUYH, their corresponding gene products, and their accessory genes before finishing with an applied aspect—the use of cyanobacteria in a biological, renewable production of the future energy carrier molecular hydrogen. In addition to scientific publications, information from three cyanobacterial genomes, the unicellular Synechocystis strain PCC 6803 and the filamentous heterocystous Anabaena strain PCC 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme (PCC 73102/ATCC 29133) is included. PMID:11875125

  16. Relation between anaerobic inactivation and oxygen tolerance in a large series of NiFe hydrogenase mutants

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hamdan, Abbas; Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Fourmond, Vincent; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Infossi, Pascale; Rousset, Marc; Dementin, Sébastien; Léger, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-containing hydrogenases, the biological catalysts of oxidation and production, reversibly inactivate under anaerobic, oxidizing conditions. We aim at understanding the mechanism of (in)activation and what determines its kinetics, because there is a correlation between fast reductive reactivation and oxygen tolerance, a property of some hydrogenases that is very desirable from the point of view of biotechnology. Direct electrochemistry is potentially very useful for learning about the redox-dependent conversions between active and inactive forms of hydrogenase, but the voltammetric signals are complex and often misread. Here we describe simple analytical models that we used to characterize and compare 16 mutants, obtained by substituting the position-74 valine of the -sensitive NiFe hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans. We observed that this substitution can accelerate reactivation up to 1,000-fold, depending on the polarity of the position 74 amino acid side chain. In terms of kinetics of anaerobic (in)activation and oxygen tolerance, the valine-to-histidine mutation has the most spectacular effect: The V74H mutant compares favorably with the -tolerant hydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus, which we use here as a benchmark. PMID:23169623

  17. Relation between anaerobic inactivation and oxygen tolerance in a large series of NiFe hydrogenase mutants.

    PubMed

    Abou Hamdan, Abbas; Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Fourmond, Vincent; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; De Lacey, Antonio L; Infossi, Pascale; Rousset, Marc; Dementin, Sébastien; Léger, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Nickel-containing hydrogenases, the biological catalysts of oxidation and production, reversibly inactivate under anaerobic, oxidizing conditions. We aim at understanding the mechanism of (in)activation and what determines its kinetics, because there is a correlation between fast reductive reactivation and oxygen tolerance, a property of some hydrogenases that is very desirable from the point of view of biotechnology. Direct electrochemistry is potentially very useful for learning about the redox-dependent conversions between active and inactive forms of hydrogenase, but the voltammetric signals are complex and often misread. Here we describe simple analytical models that we used to characterize and compare 16 mutants, obtained by substituting the position-74 valine of the -sensitive NiFe hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans. We observed that this substitution can accelerate reactivation up to 1,000-fold, depending on the polarity of the position 74 amino acid side chain. In terms of kinetics of anaerobic (in)activation and oxygen tolerance, the valine-to-histidine mutation has the most spectacular effect: The V74H mutant compares favorably with the -tolerant hydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus, which we use here as a benchmark. PMID:23169623

  18. Hydrogenase activity in the thermophile mastigocladus laminosus

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.; Miyamoto, K.; Hallenbeck, P.C.; Murry, M.A.

    1982-06-30

    Hydrogenase activity in the thermophilic cyanobacterium, Mastigocladus laminosus was studied both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo hydrogen consumption required oxygen but not light, was about ten-fold higher than in mesophilic cyanobacteria, and was relatively insensitive to carbon monoxide. H/sub 2/-supported acetylene reduction in reductant-limited cultures was a light-dependent, but O/sub 2/-independent reaction. In vitro hydrogen evolution was unaffected by carbon monoxide, and this activity could be partially purified using a procedure developed for Anabaena cylindrica.

  19. Induction of Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in Anoxia Relies on Hydrogenase Activity and Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, Benjamin; Berne, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is frequently subject to periods of dark and anoxia in its natural environment. Here, by resorting to mutants defective in the maturation of the chloroplastic oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases or in Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1 (PGRL1)-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (PSI-CEF), we demonstrate the sequential contribution of these alternative electron flows (AEFs) in the reactivation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during a shift from dark anoxia to light. At light onset, hydrogenase activity sustains a linear electron flow from photosystem II, which is followed by a transient PSI-CEF in the wild type. By promoting ATP synthesis without net generation of photosynthetic reductants, the two AEF are critical for restoration of the capacity for carbon dioxide fixation in the light. Our data also suggest that the decrease in hydrogen evolution with time of illumination might be due to competition for reduced ferredoxins between ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase and hydrogenases, rather than due to the sensitivity of hydrogenase activity to oxygen. Finally, the absence of the two alternative pathways in a double mutant pgrl1 hydrogenase maturation factor G-2 is detrimental for photosynthesis and growth and cannot be compensated by any other AEF or anoxic metabolic responses. This highlights the role of hydrogenase activity and PSI-CEF in the ecological success of microalgae in low-oxygen environments. PMID:25931521

  20. Induction of Photosynthetic Carbon Fixation in Anoxia Relies on Hydrogenase Activity and Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Godaux, Damien; Bailleul, Benjamin; Berne, Nicolas; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is frequently subject to periods of dark and anoxia in its natural environment. Here, by resorting to mutants defective in the maturation of the chloroplastic oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases or in Proton-Gradient Regulation-Like1 (PGRL1)-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (PSI-CEF), we demonstrate the sequential contribution of these alternative electron flows (AEFs) in the reactivation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during a shift from dark anoxia to light. At light onset, hydrogenase activity sustains a linear electron flow from photosystem II, which is followed by a transient PSI-CEF in the wild type. By promoting ATP synthesis without net generation of photosynthetic reductants, the two AEF are critical for restoration of the capacity for carbon dioxide fixation in the light. Our data also suggest that the decrease in hydrogen evolution with time of illumination might be due to competition for reduced ferredoxins between ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase and hydrogenases, rather than due to the sensitivity of hydrogenase activity to oxygen. Finally, the absence of the two alternative pathways in a double mutant pgrl1 hydrogenase maturation factor G-2 is detrimental for photosynthesis and growth and cannot be compensated by any other AEF or anoxic metabolic responses. This highlights the role of hydrogenase activity and PSI-CEF in the ecological success of microalgae in low-oxygen environments. PMID:25931521

  1. Nitrogen-doped Fe/Fe3C@graphitic layer/carbon nanotube hybrids derived from MOFs: efficient bifunctional electrocatalysts for ORR and OER.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji-Sen; Li, Shun-Li; Tang, Yu-Jia; Han, Min; Dai, Zhi-Hui; Bao, Jian-Chun; Lan, Ya-Qian

    2015-02-14

    A novel nitrogen-doped Fe/Fe3C@graphitic layer/carbon nanotube hybrid derived from MOFs has been first fabricated by a facile approach. The hybrid exhibited outstanding bifunctional electrocatalytic activity for ORR and OER, due to the merits of graphitic layer/carbon nanotube structures with highly active N and Fe/Fe3C sites.

  2. Biomimetic assembly and activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Berggren, G; Adamska, A; Lambertz, C; Simmons, T R; Esselborn, J; Atta, M; Gambarelli, S; Mouesca, J-M; Reijerse, E; Lubitz, W; Happe, T; Artero, V; Fontecave, M

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogenases are the most active molecular catalysts for hydrogen production and uptake, and could therefore facilitate the development of new types of fuel cell. In [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis takes place at a unique di-iron centre (the [2Fe] subsite), which contains a bridging dithiolate ligand, three CO ligands and two CN(-) ligands. Through a complex multienzymatic biosynthetic process, this [2Fe] subsite is first assembled on a maturation enzyme, HydF, and then delivered to the apo-hydrogenase for activation. Synthetic chemistry has been used to prepare remarkably similar mimics of that subsite, but it has failed to reproduce the natural enzymatic activities thus far. Here we show that three synthetic mimics (containing different bridging dithiolate ligands) can be loaded onto bacterial Thermotoga maritima HydF and then transferred to apo-HydA1, one of the hydrogenases of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Full activation of HydA1 was achieved only when using the HydF hybrid protein containing the mimic with an azadithiolate bridge, confirming the presence of this ligand in the active site of native [FeFe]-hydrogenases. This is an example of controlled metalloenzyme activation using the combination of a specific protein scaffold and active-site synthetic analogues. This simple methodology provides both new mechanistic and structural insight into hydrogenase maturation and a unique tool for producing recombinant wild-type and variant [FeFe]-hydrogenases, with no requirement for the complete maturation machinery. PMID:23803769

  3. DFT dissection of the reduction step in H2 catalytic production by [FeFe]-hydrogenase-inspired models: can the bridging hydride become more reactive than the terminal isomer?

    PubMed

    Filippi, Giulia; Arrigoni, Federica; Bertini, Luca; De Gioia, Luca; Zampella, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Density functional theory has been used to study diiron dithiolates [HFe2(xdt)(PR3)n(CO)5-nX] (n = 0, 2, 4; R = H, Me, Et; X = CH3S(-), PMe3, NHC = 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene; xdt = adt, pdt; adt = azadithiolate; pdt = propanedithiolate). These species are related to the [FeFe]-hydrogenases catalyzing the 2H(+) + 2e(-) ↔ H2 reaction. Our study is focused on the reduction step following protonation of the Fe2(SR)2 core. Fe(H)s detected in solution are terminal (t-H) and bridging (μ-H) hydrides. Although unstable versus μ-Hs, synthetic t-Hs feature milder reduction potentials than μ-Hs. Accordingly, attempts were previously made to hinder the isomerization of t-H to μ-H. Herein, we present another strategy: in place of preventing isomerization, μ-H could be made a stronger oxidant than t-H (E°μ-H > E°t-H). The nature and number of PR3 unusually affect ΔE°t-H-μ-H: 4PEt3 models feature a μ-H with a milder E° than t-H, whereas the 4PMe3 analogues behave oppositely. The correlation ΔE°t-H-μ-H ↔ stereoelectronic features arises from the steric strain induced by bulky Et groups in 4PEt3 derivatives. One-electron reduction alleviates intramolecular repulsions only in μ-H species, which is reflected in the loss of bridging coordination. Conversely, in t-H, the strain is retained because a bridging CO holds together the Fe2 core. That implies that E°μ-H > E°t-H in 4-PEt3 species but not in 4PMe3 analogues. Also determinant to observe E°μ-H > E°t-H is the presence of a Fe apical σ-donor because its replacement with a CO yields E°μ-H < E°t-H even in 4PEt3 species. Variants with neutral NHC and PMe3 in place of CH3S(-) still feature E°μ-H > E°t-H. Replacing pdt with (Hadt)(+) lowers E° but yields E°μ-H < E°t-H, indicating that μ-H activation can occur to the detriment of the overpotential increase. In conclusion, our results indicate that the electron richness of the Fe2 core influences ΔE°t-H-μ-H, provided that (i) the R size of PR3

  4. Hydrogenase in actinorhizal root nodules and root nodule homogenates.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, D R; Arp, D J; Burris, R H

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogenases were measured in intact actinorhizal root nodules and from disrupted nodules of Alnus glutinosa, Alnus rhombifolia, Alnus rubra, and Myrica pensylvanica. Whole nodules took up H2 in an O2-dependent reaction. Endophyte preparations oxidized H2 through the oxyhydrogen reaction, but rates were enhanced when hydrogen uptake was coupled to artificial electron acceptors. Oxygen inhibited artifical acceptor-dependent H2 uptake. The hydrogenase system from M. pensylvanica had a different pattern of coupling to various electron acceptors than the hydrogenase systems from the alders; only the bayberry system evolved H2 from reduced viologen dyes. PMID:6989799

  5. Nanocrystalline Fe-Fe2O3 particle-deposited N-doped graphene as an activity-modulated Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavale, Vishal M.; Singh, Santosh K.; Nadeema, Ayasha; Gaikwad, Sachin S.; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-11-01

    The size-controlled growth of nanocrystalline Fe-Fe2O3 particles (2-3 nm) and their concomitant dispersion on N-doped graphene (Fe-Fe2O3/NGr) could be attained when the mutually assisted redox reaction between NGr and Fe3+ ions could be controlled within the aqueous droplets of a water-in-oil emulsion. The synergistic interaction existing between Fe-Fe2O3 and NGr helped the system to narrow down the overpotential for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by bringing a significant positive shift to the reduction onset potential, which is just 15 mV higher than its Pt-counterpart. In addition, the half-wave potential (E1/2) of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr is found to be improved by a considerable amount of 135 mV in comparison to the system formed by dispersing Fe-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (Fe-Fe2O3/RGO), which indicates the presence of a higher number of active sites in Fe-Fe2O3/NGr. Despite this, the ORR kinetics of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr are found to be shifted significantly to the preferred 4-electron-transfer pathway compared to NGr and Fe-Fe2O3/RGO. Consequently, the H2O2% was found to be reduced by 78.3% for Fe-Fe2O3/NGr (13.0%) in comparison to Fe-Fe2O3/RGO (51.2%) and NGr (41.0%) at -0.30 V (vs. Hg/HgO). This difference in the yield of H2O2 formed between the systems along with the improvements observed in terms of the oxygen reduction onset and E1/2 in the case of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr reveals the activity modulation achieved for the latter is due to the coexistence of factors such as the presence of the mixed valancies of iron nanoparticles, small size and homogeneous distribution of Fe-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and the electronic modifications induced by the doped nitrogen in NGr. A controlled interplay of these factors looks like worked favorably in the case of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr. As a realistic system level validation, Fe-Fe2O3/NGr was employed as the cathode electrode of a single cell in a solid alkaline electrolyte membrane fuel cell (AEMFC). The system could display an open

  6. Force Field Development and Molecular Dynamics of [NiFe] Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Xiong, Yijia; Straatsma, TP; Rosso, Kevin M.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-05-09

    Classical molecular force-field parameters describing the structure and motion of metal clusters in [NiFe] hydrogenase enzymes can be used to compare the dynamics and thermodynamics of [NiFe] under different oxidation, protonation, and ligation circumstances. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations of small model clusters representative of the active site and the proximal, medial, and distal Fe/S metal centers and their attached protein side chains, we have calculated classical force-field parameters for [NiFe] in reduced and oxidized states, including internal coordinates, force constants, and atom-centered charges. Derived force constants revealed that cysteinate ligands bound to the metal ions are more flexible in the Ni-B active site, which has a bridging hydroxide ligand, than in the Ni-C active site, which has a bridging hydride. Ten nanosecond all-atom, explicit-solvent MD simulations of [NiFe] hydrogenase in oxidized and reduced catalytic states established the stability of the derived force-field parameters in terms of C{alpha} and metal cluster fluctuations. Average active site structures from the protein MD simulations are consistent with [NiFe] structures from the Protein Data Bank, suggesting that the derived force-field parameters are transferrable to other hydrogenases beyond the structure used for testing. A comparison of experimental H{sub 2}-production rates demonstrated a relationship between cysteinate side chain rotation and activity, justifying the use of a fully dynamic model of [NiFe] metal cluster motion.

  7. Biomimetic assembly and activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, G.; Esselborn, J.; Atta, M.; Gambarelli, S.; Mouesca, JM; Reijerse, E.; Lubitz, W.; Happe, T.; Artero, V.; Fontecave, M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogenases are the most active molecular catalysts for hydrogen production and uptake on earth1,2 and are thus extensively studied with respect to their technological exploitation as noble metal substitutes in (photo)electrolysers and fuel cells3-5. In [FeFe]-hydrogenases catalysis takes place at a unique diiron center (the [2Fe] subsite) featuring a bridging dithiolate ligand, as well as three CO and two CN− ligands (Figure 1)6,7. Through a complex and as yet poorly understood multienzymatic biosynthetic process, this [2Fe] subsite is first assembled onto a maturation enzyme, HydF. From there, it is delivered to the apo-hydrogenase for activation8. Synthetic chemistry has allowed the preparation of remarkably close mimics of that subsite1 but failed to reproduce the natural enzymatic activities so far. Here we show that three such synthetic mimics (with different bridging dithiolate ligands) can be loaded onto HydF and then transferred to apo-HydA1, one of the hydrogenases of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Remarkably, full activation of HydA1 was achieved exclusively using the HydF hybrid protein containing the mimic with an azadithiolate bridge, confirming the presence of this ligand in the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases9,10. This is the first example of controlled metalloenzyme activation using the combination of a specific protein scaffold and active site synthetic analogues. This simple methodology provides both new mechanistic and structural insight into hydrogenase maturation and a unique tool for producing recombinant wild-type and variant [FeFe]-hydrogenases, with no requirement for the complete maturation machinery. It opens the possibility to engineer the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site through synthetic chemistry. PMID:23803769

  8. Maturation of Rhizobium leguminosarum Hydrogenase in the Presence of Oxygen Requires the Interaction of the Chaperone HypC and the Scaffolding Protein HupK*

    PubMed Central

    Albareda, Marta; Pacios, Luis F.; Manyani, Hamid; Rey, Luis; Brito, Belén; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are key enzymes for the energy and redox metabolisms of different microorganisms. Synthesis of these metalloenzymes involves a complex series of biochemical reactions catalyzed by a plethora of accessory proteins, many of them required to synthesize and insert the unique NiFe(CN)2CO cofactor. HypC is an accessory protein conserved in all [NiFe] hydrogenase systems and involved in the synthesis and transfer of the Fe(CN)2CO cofactor precursor. Hydrogenase accessory proteins from bacteria-synthesizing hydrogenase in the presence of oxygen include HupK, a scaffolding protein with a moderate sequence similarity to the hydrogenase large subunit and proposed to participate as an intermediate chaperone in the synthesis of the NiFe cofactor. The endosymbiotic bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum contains a single hydrogenase system that can be expressed under two different physiological conditions: free-living microaerobic cells (∼12 μm O2) and bacteroids from legume nodules (∼10–100 nm O2). We have used bioinformatic tools to model HupK structure and interaction of this protein with HypC. Site-directed mutagenesis at positions predicted as critical by the structural analysis have allowed the identification of HupK and HypC residues relevant for the maturation of hydrogenase. Mutant proteins altered in some of these residues show a different phenotype depending on the physiological condition tested. Modeling of HypC also predicts the existence of a stable HypC dimer whose presence was also demonstrated by immunoblot analysis. This study widens our understanding on the mechanisms for metalloenzyme biosynthesis in the presence of oxygen. PMID:24942742

  9. Hydrogens detected by subatomic resolution protein crystallography in a [NiFe] hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideaki; Nishikawa, Koji; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-04-23

    The enzyme hydrogenase reversibly converts dihydrogen to protons and electrons at a metal catalyst. The location of the abundant hydrogens is of key importance for understanding structure and function of the protein. However, in protein X-ray crystallography the detection of hydrogen atoms is one of the major problems, since they display only weak contributions to diffraction and the quality of the single crystals is often insufficient to obtain sub-ångström resolution. Here we report the crystal structure of a standard [NiFe] hydrogenase (∼91.3 kDa molecular mass) at 0.89 Å resolution. The strictly anoxically isolated hydrogenase has been obtained in a specific spectroscopic state, the active reduced Ni-R (subform Ni-R1) state. The high resolution, proper refinement strategy and careful modelling allow the positioning of a large part of the hydrogen atoms in the structure. This has led to the direct detection of the products of the heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen into a hydride (H(-)) bridging the Ni and Fe and a proton (H(+)) attached to the sulphur of a cysteine ligand. The Ni-H(-) and Fe-H(-) bond lengths are 1.58 Å and 1.78Å, respectively. Furthermore, we can assign the Fe-CO and Fe-CN(-) ligands at the active site, and can obtain the hydrogen-bond networks and the preferred proton transfer pathway in the hydrogenase. Our results demonstrate the precise comprehensive information available from ultra-high-resolution structures of proteins as an alternative to neutron diffraction and other methods such as NMR structural analysis. PMID:25624102

  10. Optimized Expression and Purification for High-Activity Preparations of Algal [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Yacoby, I.; Tegler, L. T.; Pochekailov, S.; Zhang, S.; King, P. W.

    2012-04-01

    Recombinant expression and purification of metallo-enzymes, including hydrogenases, at high-yields is challenging due to complex, and enzyme specific, post-translational maturation processes. Low fidelities of maturation result in preparations containing a significant fraction of inactive, apo-protein that are not suitable for biophysical or crystallographic studies. We describe the construction, overexpression and high-yield purification of a fusion protein consisting of the algal [2Fe2S]-ferredoxin PetF (Fd) and [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1. The maturation of Fd-HydA1 was optimized through improvements in culture conditions and media components used for expression. We also demonstrated that fusion of Fd to the N-terminus of HydA1, in comparison to the C-terminus, led to increased expression levels that were 4-fold higher. Together, these improvements led to enhanced HydA1 activity and improved yield after purification. The strong binding-affinity of Fd for DEAE allowed for two-step purification by ion exchange and StrepTactin affinity chromatography. In addition, the incorporation of a TEV protease site in the Fd-HydA1 linker allowed for the proteolytic removal of Fd after DEAE step, and purification of HydA1 alone by StrepTactin. In combination, this process resulted in HydA1 purification yields of 5 mg L{sup -1} of culture from E. coli with specific activities of 1000 U (U = 1 {micro}mol hydrogen evolved mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}). The [FeFe]-hydrogenases are highly efficient enzymes and their catalytic sites provide model structures for synthetic efforts to develop robust hydrogen activation catalysts. In order to characterize their structure-function properties in greater detail, and to use hydrogenases for biotechnological applications, reliable methods for rapid, high-yield expression and purification are required.

  11. Enzymatic catalysis in organic solvents: Polyethylene glycol modified hydrogenase retains sulfhydrogenase activity in toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, C.A.; Kaufman, E.N.

    1996-11-05

    Naturally occurring enzymes may be modified by covalently attaching hydrophobic groups that render the enzyme soluble and active in organic solvents, and have the potential to greatly expand applications of enzymatic catalysis. The reduction of elemental sulfur to hydrogen sulfide by a hydrogenase isolated from Pyrococcus furiosus has been investigated as a model system for organic biocatalysis. While the native hydrogenase catalyzed the reduction of sulfur to H{sub 2}S in aqueous solution, no activity was observed when the aqueous solvent was replaced with anhydrous toluene. Hydrogenase modified with PEG p-nitrophenyl carbonate demonstrated its native biocatalytic ability in toluene when the reducing dye, benzyl viologen, was also present. Neither benzyl viologen or PEG p-nitrophenyl carbonate alone demonstrated reducing capability. PEG modified cellulase and benzyl viologen were also incapable of reducing sulfur to H{sub 2}S, indicating that the enzyme itself, and not the modification procedure, is responsible for the conversion in the nonpolar organic solvent. Sulfide production in toluene was tenfold higher than that produced in an aqueous system with equal enzyme activity, demonstrating the advantages of organic biocatalysis. Applications of bioprocessing in nonaqueous media are expected to provide significant advances in the areas of fossil fuels, renewable feedstocks, organic synthesis, and environmental control technology.

  12. Synthesis of the H-Cluster Framework of Iron-Only Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Tard, Cedric; Liu, Xiaohong; Ibrahim, S K.; Mauizio, Bruschi; De Gioia, Luca; Davies, Sian; Yang, Xin; Wang, Lai S.; Sawers, G; Pickett, Chris J.

    2005-02-10

    The reversible reduction of protons to dihydrogen is deceptively the simplest of reactions but one which requires multi-step catalysis to proceed at practical rates. How the metal-sulfur of the hydrogenases catalyse this interconversion has been the subject has been the subject of intensive structural, spectroscopic and mechanistic studies of the enzymes, of synthetic assemblies and of in silico models. Beyond the intrinsic desire to understand how metallo-sulfur clusters in biology catalyses a range of difficult chemistry, including nitrogen fixation, research on hydrogenase chemistry is particularly driven by the view that understanding active-site structure and function will inform the design of new materials for hydrogen production or uptake, pertinent to energy transduction technology and a hydrogen economy. Herein we report the assembly of the first materials with di-iron sub-sites linked by a thiolate bridge to a (4Fe4S) ? cluster, as found at the active site of the iron-only hydrogenase, the H-cluster.

  13. High-valent [MnFe] and [FeFe] cofactors in ribonucleotide reductases.

    PubMed

    Leidel, Nils; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Havelius, Kajsa G V; Chernev, Petko; Voevodskaya, Nina; Gräslund, Astrid; Haumann, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are essential for DNA synthesis in most organisms. In class-Ic RNR from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), a MnFe cofactor in subunit R2 forms the site required for enzyme activity, instead of an FeFe cofactor plus a redox-active tyrosine in class-Ia RNRs, for example in mouse (Mus musculus, Mm). For R2 proteins from Ct and Mm, either grown in the presence of, or reconstituted with Mn and Fe ions, structural and electronic properties of higher valence MnFe and FeFe sites were determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and complementary techniques, in combination with bond-valence-sum and density functional theory calculations. At least ten different cofactor species could be tentatively distinguished. In Ct R2, two different Mn(IV)Fe(III) site configurations were assigned either L(4)Mn(IV)(μO)(2)Fe(III)L(4) (metal-metal distance of ~2.75Å, L = ligand) prevailing in metal-grown R2, or L(4)Mn(IV)(μO)(μOH)Fe(III)L(4) (~2.90Å) dominating in metal-reconstituted R2. Specific spectroscopic features were attributed to an Fe(IV)Fe(III) site (~2.55Å) with a L(4)Fe(IV)(μO)(2)Fe(III)L(3) core structure. Several Mn,Fe(III)Fe(III) (~2.9-3.1Å) and Mn,Fe(III)Fe(II) species (~3.3-3.4Å) likely showed 5-coordinated Mn(III) or Fe(III). Rapid X-ray photoreduction of iron and shorter metal-metal distances in the high-valent states suggested radiation-induced modifications in most crystal structures of R2. The actual configuration of the MnFe and FeFe cofactors seems to depend on assembly sequences, bound metal type, valence state, and previous catalytic activity involving subunit R1. In Ct R2, the protonation of a bridging oxide in the Mn(IV)(μO)(μOH)Fe(III) core may be important for preventing premature site reduction and initiation of the radical chemistry in R1. PMID:22222354

  14. Modeling the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases and the [NiFeu] subsite of the C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenases: low-spin iron(II) versus high-spin iron(II).

    PubMed

    Weber, Katharina; Erdem, Özlen F; Bill, Eckhard; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-06-16

    A series of four [S2Ni(μ-S)2FeCp*Cl] compounds with different tetradentate thiolate/thioether ligands bound to the Ni(II) ion is reported (Cp* = C5Me5). The {S2Ni(μ-S)2Fe} core of these compounds resembles structural features of the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases. Detailed analyses of the electronic structures of these compounds by Mössbauer and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and density functional theory calculations reveal the oxidation states Ni(II) low spin and Fe(II) high spin for the metal ions. The same electronic configurations have been suggested for the Cred1 state of the C-cluster [NiFeu] subsite in carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODH). The Ni-Fe distance of ∼3 Å excludes a metal-metal bond between nickel and iron, which is in agreement with the computational results. Electrochemical experiments show that iron is the redox active site in these complexes, performing a reversible one-electron oxidation. The four complexes are discussed with regard to their similarities and differences both to the [NiFe] hydrogenases and the C-cluster of Ni-containing CODH.

  15. Purification and properties of hydrogenase from Megasphaera elsdenii.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, C; Mayhew, S G; Grande, H J; Veeger, C

    1979-12-17

    A hydrogenase has been purified to homogeneity from the soluble fraction of the rumen bacterium Megasphaera elsdenii, the overall purification is 200 times with a yield of 14%. The pure enzyme consists of a single polypeptide chain with Mr approximately 50 000 which contains 12 atoms of non-haem iron and 12 atoms of acid-labile sulphide. The enzyme is rapidly inactivated by O2 and it is therefore purified under nitrogen and in the presence of sodium dithionite. The optical spectrum of the enzyme, after removal of the dithionite with air, shows a peak at 275 nm (epsilon 275 nm = 143 mM-1 cm-1) and a shoulder between 350 nm and 400 nm (epsilon 400 nm = 46 mM-1 cm-1). The enzyme catalyses hydrogen production from sodium dithionite at a low rate. The rate is greatly enhanced by addition of the electron donors flavodoxin, ferredoxin and methyl viologen. The kinetic data with these three electron donors suggest co-operativity, but no indication of self-association of the enzyme was obtained. Sodium chloride enhances the rate of hydrogen production with methyl viologen semiquinone and changes the kinetic behaviour of the enzyme with this electron donor, but causes inhibition of the reactions mediated by ferredoxin and flavodoxin. Two kinetic models were developed which are consistent with the kinetic data of the three electron donors tested. The apparent co-operativity for the hydrogen production can be fitted with the mathematical form of those models. The identical kinetic behaviour of the hydrogenase with the one-electron donors flavodoxin and methyl viologen semiquinone monomer and the two-electron donor ferredoxin indicates that the hydrogenase accepts two electrons in two separate, independent steps and further indicates that the two (4Fe-4S) clusters of the donor ferredoxin are independent. The interpretation of the kinetic data with methyl viologen semiquinone is complicated by the fact that the semiquinone dimerises, and that the formation of the dimer is

  16. Structural and gene expression analyses of uptake hydrogenases and other proteins involved in nitrogenase protection in Frankia.

    PubMed

    Richau, K H; Kudahettige, R L; Pujic, P; Kudahettige, N P; Sellstedt, A

    2013-11-01

    The actinorhizal bacterium Frankia expresses nitrogenase and can therefore convert molecular nitrogen into ammonia and the by-product hydrogen. However, nitrogenase is inhibited by oxygen. Consequently, Frankia and its actinorhizal hosts have developed various mechanisms for excluding oxygen from their nitrogen-containing compartments. These include the expression of oxygen-scavenging uptake hydrogenases, the formation of hopanoid-rich vesicles, enclosed by multi-layered hopanoid structures, the lignification of hyphal cell walls, and the production of haemoglobins in the symbiotic nodule. In this work, we analysed the expression and structure of the so-called uptake hydrogenase (Hup), which catalyses the in vivo dissociation of hydrogen to recycle the energy locked up in this 'waste' product. Two uptake hydrogenase syntons have been identified in Frankia: synton 1 is expressed under freeliving conditions while synton 2 is expressed during symbiosis. We used qPCR to determine synton 1 hup gene expression in two Frankia strains under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. We also predicted the 3D structures of the Hup protein subunits based on multiple sequence alignments and remote homology modelling. Finally, we performed BLAST searches of genome and protein databases to identify genes that may contribute to the protection of nitrogenase against oxygen in the two Frankia strains. Our results show that in Frankia strain ACN14a, the expression patterns of the large (HupL1) and small (HupS1) uptake hydrogenase subunits depend on the abundance of oxygen in the external environment. Structural models of the membrane-bound hydrogenase subunits of ACN14a showed that both subunits resemble the structures of known [NiFe] hydrogenases (Volbeda et al. 1995), but contain fewer cysteine residues than the uptake hydrogenase of the Frankia DC12 and Eu1c strains. Moreover, we show that all of the investigated Frankia strains have two squalene hopane cyclase genes (shc1 and shc2). The

  17. Nanocrystalline Fe-Fe2O3 particle-deposited N-doped graphene as an activity-modulated Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavale, Vishal M.; Singh, Santosh K.; Nadeema, Ayasha; Gaikwad, Sachin S.; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-11-01

    The size-controlled growth of nanocrystalline Fe-Fe2O3 particles (2-3 nm) and their concomitant dispersion on N-doped graphene (Fe-Fe2O3/NGr) could be attained when the mutually assisted redox reaction between NGr and Fe3+ ions could be controlled within the aqueous droplets of a water-in-oil emulsion. The synergistic interaction existing between Fe-Fe2O3 and NGr helped the system to narrow down the overpotential for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by bringing a significant positive shift to the reduction onset potential, which is just 15 mV higher than its Pt-counterpart. In addition, the half-wave potential (E1/2) of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr is found to be improved by a considerable amount of 135 mV in comparison to the system formed by dispersing Fe-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (Fe-Fe2O3/RGO), which indicates the presence of a higher number of active sites in Fe-Fe2O3/NGr. Despite this, the ORR kinetics of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr are found to be shifted significantly to the preferred 4-electron-transfer pathway compared to NGr and Fe-Fe2O3/RGO. Consequently, the H2O2% was found to be reduced by 78.3% for Fe-Fe2O3/NGr (13.0%) in comparison to Fe-Fe2O3/RGO (51.2%) and NGr (41.0%) at -0.30 V (vs. Hg/HgO). This difference in the yield of H2O2 formed between the systems along with the improvements observed in terms of the oxygen reduction onset and E1/2 in the case of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr reveals the activity modulation achieved for the latter is due to the coexistence of factors such as the presence of the mixed valancies of iron nanoparticles, small size and homogeneous distribution of Fe-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and the electronic modifications induced by the doped nitrogen in NGr. A controlled interplay of these factors looks like worked favorably in the case of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr. As a realistic system level validation, Fe-Fe2O3/NGr was employed as the cathode electrode of a single cell in a solid alkaline electrolyte membrane fuel cell (AEMFC). The system could display an open

  18. Solar powered biohydrogen production requires specific localization of the hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Burroughs, Nigel J.; Boehm, Marko; Eckert, Carrie; Mastroianni, Giulia; Spence, Edward M.; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Appel, Jens; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Bryan, Samantha J.

    2014-09-04

    Cyanobacteria contain a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase which transiently produces hydrogen upon exposure of anoxic cells to light, potentially acting as a “valve” releasing excess electrons from the electron transport chain. However, its interaction with the photosynthetic electron transport chain remains unclear. By GFP-tagging the HoxF diaphorase subunit we show that the hydrogenase is thylakoid associated, comprising a population dispersed uniformly through the thylakoids and a subpopulation localized to discrete puncta in the distal thylakoid. Thylakoid localisation of both the HoxH and HoxY hydrogenase subunits is confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. The diaphorase HoxE subunit is essential for recruitment to themore » dispersed thylakoid population, potentially anchoring the hydrogenase to the membrane, but aggregation to puncta occurs through a distinct HoxE-independent mechanism. Membrane association does not require NDH-1. Localization is dynamic on a scale of minutes, with anoxia and high light inducing a significant redistribution between these populations in favour of puncta. Lastly, since HoxE is essential for access to its electron donor, electron supply to the hydrogenase depends on a physiologically controlled localization, potentially offering a new avenue to enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production by exploiting localization/aggregation signals.« less

  19. Solar powered biohydrogen production requires specific localization of the hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, Nigel J.; Boehm, Marko; Eckert, Carrie; Mastroianni, Giulia; Spence, Edward M.; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Appel, Jens; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Bryan, Samantha J.

    2014-09-04

    Cyanobacteria contain a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase which transiently produces hydrogen upon exposure of anoxic cells to light, potentially acting as a “valve” releasing excess electrons from the electron transport chain. However, its interaction with the photosynthetic electron transport chain remains unclear. By GFP-tagging the HoxF diaphorase subunit we show that the hydrogenase is thylakoid associated, comprising a population dispersed uniformly through the thylakoids and a subpopulation localized to discrete puncta in the distal thylakoid. Thylakoid localisation of both the HoxH and HoxY hydrogenase subunits is confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. The diaphorase HoxE subunit is essential for recruitment to the dispersed thylakoid population, potentially anchoring the hydrogenase to the membrane, but aggregation to puncta occurs through a distinct HoxE-independent mechanism. Membrane association does not require NDH-1. Localization is dynamic on a scale of minutes, with anoxia and high light inducing a significant redistribution between these populations in favour of puncta. Lastly, since HoxE is essential for access to its electron donor, electron supply to the hydrogenase depends on a physiologically controlled localization, potentially offering a new avenue to enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production by exploiting localization/aggregation signals.

  20. Physiological Reactions of the Reversible Hydrogenase from Anabaena 7120 1

    PubMed Central

    Houchins, Jeffrey P.; Burris, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    The reversible hydrogenase from Anabaena 7120 appeared when O2 was continuously removed from a growing culture. Activity increased further when cells were incubated under argon in the dark or in the light plus 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. Hydrogenase existed in an inactive state during periods of O2 evolution. It could be reductively activated by exposure to reduced methyl viologen or by dark, anaerobic incubation. Hydrogenase-containing cells evolved H2 slowly during dark anaerobic incubations, and the rate of H2 evolution was increased by illumination with low intensity light. Light enhancement of H2 evolution was of short duration and was eliminated by the ferredoxin antagonist disalicylidene diaminopropane. Physiological acceptors that supported H2 uptake included NO3−, NO2−, and HSO3−, and light had a slight influence on the rate of H2 uptake with these acceptors. Low levels of O2 supported H2 uptake, but higher concentrations of O2 inactivated the hydrogenase. Hydrogen uptake with HCO3− as acceptor was the most rapid reaction measured, and it was strictly light-dependent. It occurred only at low light intensities, and higher light intensities restored normal O2-evolving photosynthesis. It is suggested that hydrogenase is present to capture exogenous H2 as a source of reducing equivalents during growth in anaerobic environments. PMID:16661986

  1. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Proton Transport in Hydrogenase and Hydrogenase Mimics.

    PubMed

    Ginovska, B; Raugei, S; Shaw, W J

    2016-01-01

    There is extensive interest in hydrogenases based on their ability to rapidly and efficiently interconvert H2 with protons and electrons, and their (typically) superior function relative to molecular mimics. Understanding the function of enzymes is one approach to implementing design features to make better catalysts and is an approach we have implemented in our work. In this review, we will discuss our efforts to develop design principles from enzymes, with specific focus on proton transport. We will also present computational studies of the mimics we have investigated with similar methodologies. We will discuss the mechanisms used by small scaffolds on molecular mimics which in many cases are surprisingly similar to those used by nature, while in other cases, computational analysis allowed us to reveal an unexpected role. Computational methods provide one of the best ways, and in some cases, the only way, to gain insight into the mechanistic details of enzymes. In this review, we illustrate the general computational strategy we used to study the proton pathway of [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and the similar strategy to investigate small molecules. We present the main results we obtained and how our computational work stimulated or worked in concert with experimental investigations. We also focus on estimation of errors and convergence of properties in the simulations. These studies demonstrate the powerful results that can be obtained by the close pairing of experimental and theoretical approaches. PMID:27497163

  2. Hydrogen activation by [NiFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Carr, Stephen B; Evans, Rhiannon M; Brooke, Emily J; Wehlin, Sara A M; Nomerotskaia, Elena; Sargent, Frank; Armstrong, Fraser A; Phillips, Simon E V

    2016-06-15

    Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd-1) from Escherichia coli is a membrane-bound enzyme that catalyses the reversible oxidation of molecular H2 The active site contains one Fe and one Ni atom and several conserved amino acids including an arginine (Arg(509)), which interacts with two conserved aspartate residues (Asp(118) and Asp(574)) forming an outer shell canopy over the metals. There is also a highly conserved glutamate (Glu(28)) positioned on the opposite side of the active site to the canopy. The mechanism of hydrogen activation has been dissected by site-directed mutagenesis to identify the catalytic base responsible for splitting molecular hydrogen and possible proton transfer pathways to/from the active site. Previous reported attempts to mutate residues in the canopy were unsuccessful, leading to an assumption of a purely structural role. Recent discoveries, however, suggest a catalytic requirement, for example replacing the arginine with lysine (R509K) leaves the structure virtually unchanged, but catalytic activity falls by more than 100-fold. Variants containing amino acid substitutions at either or both, aspartates retain significant activity. We now propose a new mechanism: heterolytic H2 cleavage is via a mechanism akin to that of a frustrated Lewis pair (FLP), where H2 is polarized by simultaneous binding to the metal(s) (the acid) and a nitrogen from Arg(509) (the base). PMID:27284053

  3. Anoxic and oxic removal of humic acids with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-04-01

    In this study we comparatively investigate the removal of humic acids with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires under anoxic and oxic conditions. The products of humic acids after reacting with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires under anoxic and oxic conditions were carefully examined with three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. It was found that humic acids were removed by Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires via adsorption under anoxic condition. Langmuir adsorption isotherm was applicable to describe the adsorption processes. Kinetics of humic acids adsorption onto Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires was found to follow pseudo-second-order rate equation. By contrast, the oxic removal of humic acids with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires involved adsorption and subsequent oxidation of humic acids because Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires could activate molecular oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species to oxidize humic acids. This subsequent oxidation of humic acids could improve the oxic removal rate to 2.5 times that of anoxic removal, accompanying with about 8.4% of mineralization. This study provides a new method for humic acids removal and also sheds light on the effects of humic acids on the pollutant removal by nano zero-valent iron. PMID:24463174

  4. Anoxic and oxic removal of humic acids with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-04-01

    In this study we comparatively investigate the removal of humic acids with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires under anoxic and oxic conditions. The products of humic acids after reacting with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires under anoxic and oxic conditions were carefully examined with three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. It was found that humic acids were removed by Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires via adsorption under anoxic condition. Langmuir adsorption isotherm was applicable to describe the adsorption processes. Kinetics of humic acids adsorption onto Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires was found to follow pseudo-second-order rate equation. By contrast, the oxic removal of humic acids with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires involved adsorption and subsequent oxidation of humic acids because Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires could activate molecular oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species to oxidize humic acids. This subsequent oxidation of humic acids could improve the oxic removal rate to 2.5 times that of anoxic removal, accompanying with about 8.4% of mineralization. This study provides a new method for humic acids removal and also sheds light on the effects of humic acids on the pollutant removal by nano zero-valent iron.

  5. Nanocrystalline Fe-Fe2O3 particle-deposited N-doped graphene as an activity-modulated Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Dhavale, Vishal M; Singh, Santosh K; Nadeema, Ayasha; Gaikwad, Sachin S; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-12-21

    The size-controlled growth of nanocrystalline Fe-Fe2O3 particles (2-3 nm) and their concomitant dispersion on N-doped graphene (Fe-Fe2O3/NGr) could be attained when the mutually assisted redox reaction between NGr and Fe(3+) ions could be controlled within the aqueous droplets of a water-in-oil emulsion. The synergistic interaction existing between Fe-Fe2O3 and NGr helped the system to narrow down the overpotential for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by bringing a significant positive shift to the reduction onset potential, which is just 15 mV higher than its Pt-counterpart. In addition, the half-wave potential (E1/2) of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr is found to be improved by a considerable amount of 135 mV in comparison to the system formed by dispersing Fe-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (Fe-Fe2O3/RGO), which indicates the presence of a higher number of active sites in Fe-Fe2O3/NGr. Despite this, the ORR kinetics of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr are found to be shifted significantly to the preferred 4-electron-transfer pathway compared to NGr and Fe-Fe2O3/RGO. Consequently, the H2O2% was found to be reduced by 78.3% for Fe-Fe2O3/NGr (13.0%) in comparison to Fe-Fe2O3/RGO (51.2%) and NGr (41.0%) at -0.30 V (vs. Hg/HgO). This difference in the yield of H2O2 formed between the systems along with the improvements observed in terms of the oxygen reduction onset and E1/2 in the case of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr reveals the activity modulation achieved for the latter is due to the coexistence of factors such as the presence of the mixed valancies of iron nanoparticles, small size and homogeneous distribution of Fe-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and the electronic modifications induced by the doped nitrogen in NGr. A controlled interplay of these factors looks like worked favorably in the case of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr. As a realistic system level validation, Fe-Fe2O3/NGr was employed as the cathode electrode of a single cell in a solid alkaline electrolyte membrane fuel cell (AEMFC). The system could display an open

  6. Nanocrystalline Fe-Fe2O3 particle-deposited N-doped graphene as an activity-modulated Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Dhavale, Vishal M; Singh, Santosh K; Nadeema, Ayasha; Gaikwad, Sachin S; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-12-21

    The size-controlled growth of nanocrystalline Fe-Fe2O3 particles (2-3 nm) and their concomitant dispersion on N-doped graphene (Fe-Fe2O3/NGr) could be attained when the mutually assisted redox reaction between NGr and Fe(3+) ions could be controlled within the aqueous droplets of a water-in-oil emulsion. The synergistic interaction existing between Fe-Fe2O3 and NGr helped the system to narrow down the overpotential for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by bringing a significant positive shift to the reduction onset potential, which is just 15 mV higher than its Pt-counterpart. In addition, the half-wave potential (E1/2) of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr is found to be improved by a considerable amount of 135 mV in comparison to the system formed by dispersing Fe-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (Fe-Fe2O3/RGO), which indicates the presence of a higher number of active sites in Fe-Fe2O3/NGr. Despite this, the ORR kinetics of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr are found to be shifted significantly to the preferred 4-electron-transfer pathway compared to NGr and Fe-Fe2O3/RGO. Consequently, the H2O2% was found to be reduced by 78.3% for Fe-Fe2O3/NGr (13.0%) in comparison to Fe-Fe2O3/RGO (51.2%) and NGr (41.0%) at -0.30 V (vs. Hg/HgO). This difference in the yield of H2O2 formed between the systems along with the improvements observed in terms of the oxygen reduction onset and E1/2 in the case of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr reveals the activity modulation achieved for the latter is due to the coexistence of factors such as the presence of the mixed valancies of iron nanoparticles, small size and homogeneous distribution of Fe-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and the electronic modifications induced by the doped nitrogen in NGr. A controlled interplay of these factors looks like worked favorably in the case of Fe-Fe2O3/NGr. As a realistic system level validation, Fe-Fe2O3/NGr was employed as the cathode electrode of a single cell in a solid alkaline electrolyte membrane fuel cell (AEMFC). The system could display an open

  7. Distribution and activity of hydrogenase enzymes in subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R.; Nickel, J.; Glombitza, C.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Metabolically active microbial communities are present in a wide range of subsurface environments. Techniques like enumeration of microbial cells, activity measurements with radiotracer assays and the analysis of porewater constituents are currently being used to explore the subsurface biosphere, alongside with molecular biological analyses. However, many of these techniques reach their detection limits due to low microbial activity and abundance. Direct measurements of microbial turnover not just face issues of insufficient sensitivity, they only provide information about a single specific process rather than an overall microbial activity. Since hydrogenase enzymes are intracellular and ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, the enzyme activity represents a measure of total activity of the entire microbial community. A hydrogenase activity assay could quantify total metabolic activity without having to identify specific processes. This would be a major advantage in subsurface biosphere studies, where several metabolic processes can occur simultaneously. We quantified hydrogenase enzyme activity and distribution in sediment samples from different aquatic subsurface environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico) using a tritium-based assay. We found enzyme activity at all sites and depths. Volumetric hydrogenase activity did not show much variability between sites and sampling depths, whereas cell-specific activity ranged from 10-5 to 1 nmol H2 cell-1 d-1. Activity was lowest in sediment layers where nitrate was detected. Higher activity was associated with samples in which sulfate was the predominant electron acceptor. We found highest activity in samples from environments with >10 ppm methane in the pore water. The results show that cell-specific hydrogenase enzyme activity increases with decreasing energy yield of the electron acceptor used. It is not possible to convert volumetric or cell-specific hydrogenase activity into a

  8. A hidden reservoir of Fe/FeS in interstellar silicates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, M.; Jones, A.; Ysard, N.

    2014-05-01

    Context. The depletion of iron and sulphur into dust in the interstellar medium and the exact nature of interstellar amorphous silicate grains is still an open question. Aims: We study the incorporation of iron and sulphur into amorphous silicates of olivine- and pyroxene-types and their effects on the dust spectroscopy and thermal emission. Methods: We used the Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium theory to construct the optical constants for a mixture of silicates, metallic iron, and iron sulphide. We also studied the effects of iron and iron sulphide in aggregate grains. Results: Iron sulphide inclusions within amorphous silicates that contain iron metal inclusions show no strong differences in the optical properties of the grains. A mix of amorphous olivine- and pyroxene-type silicate broadens the silicate features. An amorphous carbon mantle with a thickness of 10 nm on the silicate grains leads to an increase in absorption on the short-wavelength side of the 10 μm silicate band. Conclusions: The assumption of amorphous olivine-type and pyroxene-type silicates and a 10 nm thick amorphous carbon mantle better matches the interstellar silicate band profiles. Including iron nano-particles leads to an increase in the mid-IR extinction, while up to 5 ppm of sulphur can be incorporated as Fe/FeS nano inclusions into silicate grains without leaving a significant trace of its presence.

  9. Targeting intermediates of [FeFe]-hydrogenase by CO and CN vibrational signatures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lian; Greco, Claudio; Bruschi, Maurizio; Ryde, Ulf; De Gioia, Luca; Reiher, Markus

    2011-05-01

    In this work, we employ density functional theory to assign vibrational signatures of [FeFe]-hydrogenase intermediates to molecular structures. For this purpose, we perform an exhaustive analysis of structures and harmonic vibrations of a series of CN and CO containing model clusters of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme active site considering also different charges, counterions, and solvents. The pure density functional BP86 in combination with a triple-ζ polarized basis set produce reliable molecular structures as well as harmonic vibrations. Calculated CN and CO stretching vibrations are analyzed separately. Scaled vibrational frequencies are then applied to assign intermediates in [FeFe]-hydrogenase's reaction cycle. The results nicely complement the previous studies of Darensbourg and Hall, and Zilberman et al. The infrared spectrum of the H(ox) form is in very good agreement with the calculated spectrum of the Fe(I)Fe(II) model complex featuring a free coordination site at the distal Fe atom, as well as, with the calculated spectra of the complexes in which H(2) or H(2)O are coordinated at this site. The spectrum of H(red) measured from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans is compatible with a mixture of a Fe(I)Fe(I) species with all terminal COs, and a Fe(I)Fe(I) species with protonated dtma ligand, while the spectrum of H(red) recently measured from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is compatible with a mixture of a Fe(I)Fe(I) species with a bridged CO, and a Fe(II)Fe(II) species with a terminal hydride bound to the Fe atom.

  10. Dihydrogen activation by sulfido-bridged dinuclear Ru/Ge complexes: insight into the [NiFe] hydrogenase unready state.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi; Itakura, Naohisa; Nakaya, Yukiko; Tatsumi, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-21

    A S/SH bridged hetero-dinuclear Ru/Ge complex cation reacted with H(2) to afford the μ-S/μ-H complex. The reaction was considerably slower compared to that of the μ-S/μ-OH complex. Thus, the μ-S/μ-SH and μ-S/μ-OH complexes might provide models for the unready and ready states, respectively, of [NiFe] hydrogenase. PMID:21072402

  11. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies λ of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible. PMID:26218232

  12. The crystal structure of an oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase uncovers a novel iron-sulphur centre.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Johannes; Scheerer, Patrick; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; Kroschinsky, Sebastian; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver; Spahn, Christian M T

    2011-10-16

    Hydrogenases are abundant enzymes that catalyse the reversible interconversion of H(2) into protons and electrons at high rates. Those hydrogenases maintaining their activity in the presence of O(2) are considered to be central to H(2)-based technologies, such as enzymatic fuel cells and for light-driven H(2) production. Despite comprehensive genetic, biochemical, electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations, the molecular background allowing a structural interpretation of how the catalytic centre is protected from irreversible inactivation by O(2) has remained unclear. Here we present the crystal structure of an O(2)-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase from the aerobic H(2) oxidizer Ralstonia eutropha H16 at 1.5 Å resolution. The heterodimeric enzyme consists of a large subunit harbouring the catalytic centre in the H(2)-reduced state and a small subunit containing an electron relay consisting of three different iron-sulphur clusters. The cluster proximal to the active site displays an unprecedented [4Fe-3S] structure and is coordinated by six cysteines. According to the current model, this cofactor operates as an electronic switch depending on the nature of the gas molecule approaching the active site. It serves as an electron acceptor in the course of H(2) oxidation and as an electron-delivering device upon O(2) attack at the active site. This dual function is supported by the capability of the novel iron-sulphur cluster to adopt three redox states at physiological redox potentials. The second structural feature is a network of extended water cavities that may act as a channel facilitating the removal of water produced at the [NiFe] active site. These discoveries will have an impact on the design of biological and chemical H(2)-converting catalysts that are capable of cycling H(2) in air.

  13. From enzyme maturation to synthetic chemistry: the case of hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Artero, Vincent; Berggren, Gustav; Atta, Mohamed; Caserta, Giorgio; Roy, Souvik; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-08-18

    Water splitting into oxygen and hydrogen is one of the most attractive strategies for storing solar energy and electricity. Because the processes at work are multielectronic, there is a crucial need for efficient and stable catalysts, which in addition have to be cheap for future industrial developments (electrolyzers, photoelectrochemicals, and fuel cells). Specifically for the water/hydrogen interconversion, Nature is an exquisite source of inspiration since this chemistry contributes to the bioenergetic metabolism of a number of living organisms via the activity of fascinating metalloenzymes, the hydrogenases. In this Account, we first briefly describe the structure of the unique dinuclear organometallic active sites of the two classes of hydrogenases as well as the complex protein machineries involved in their biosynthesis, their so-called maturation processes. This knowledge allows for the development of a fruitful bioinspired chemistry approach, which has already led to a number of interesting and original catalysts mimicking the natural active sites. More specifically, we describe our own attempts to prepare artificial hydrogenases. This can be achieved via the standard bioinspired approach using the combination of a synthetic bioinspired catalyst and a polypeptide scaffold. Such hybrid complexes provide the opportunity to optimize the system by manipulating both the catalyst through chemical synthesis and the protein component through mutagenesis. We also raise the possibility to reach such artificial systems via an original strategy based on mimicking the enzyme maturation pathways. This is illustrated in this Account by two examples developed in our laboratory. First, we show how the preparation of a lysozyme-{Mn(I)(CO)3} hybrid and its clean reaction with a nickel complex led us to generate a new class of binuclear Ni-Mn H2-evolving catalysts mimicking the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Then we describe how we were able to rationally design and

  14. Guiding Principles of Hydrogenase Catalysis Instigated and Clarified by Protein Film Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Fraser A; Evans, Rhiannon M; Hexter, Suzannah V; Murphy, Bonnie J; Roessler, Maxie M; Wulff, Philip

    2016-05-17

    Protein film electrochemistry (PFE) is providing cutting-edge insight into the chemical principles underpinning biological hydrogen. Attached to an electrode, many enzymes exhibit "reversible" electrocatalytic behavior, meaning that a catalyzed redox reaction appears reversible or quasi-reversible when viewed by cyclic voltammetry. This efficiency is most relevant for enzymes that are inspiring advances in renewable energy, such as hydrogen-activating and CO2-reducing enzymes. Exploiting the rich repertoire of available instrumental methods, PFE experiments yield both a general snapshot and fine detail, all from tiny samples of enzyme. The dynamic electrochemical investigations blaze new trails and add exquisite detail to the information gained from structural and spectroscopic studies. This Account describes recent investigations of hydrogenases carried out in Oxford, including ideas initiated with PFE and followed through with complementary techniques, all contributing to an eventual complete picture of fast and efficient H2 activation without Pt. By immobilization of an enzyme on an electrode, catalytic electron flow and the chemistry controlling it can be addressed at the touch of a button. The buried nature of the active site means that structures that have been determined by crystallography or spectroscopy are likely to be protected, retained, and fully relevant in a PFE experiment. An electrocatalysis model formulated for the PFE of immobilized enzymes predicts interesting behavior and gives insight into why some hydrogenases are H2 producers and others are H2 oxidizers. Immobilization also allows for easy addition and removal of inhibitors along with precise potential control, one interesting outcome being that formaldehyde forms a reversible complex with reduced [FeFe]-hydrogenases, thereby providing insight into the order of electron and proton transfers. Experiments on O2-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenases show that O2 behaves like a reversible inhibitor: it

  15. Structure and magnetic properties of irradiated Fe/Fe oxide core-shell nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Jiang, Weilin; Sundararajan, Jennifer A.; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai

    2013-04-25

    A cluster deposition method was used to produce a film of loosely aggregated particles of Fe-Fe3O4 core-shell nanoclusters with an 8 nm iron core size and 2 nm oxide shell thickness. The film of particles on a silicon substrate was irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions to a fluence of 1016 cm-2 near room temperature, and computer simulations based on the SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) code show that the implanted Si species stops near the film-substrate interface. The ion irradiation creates a structural change in the film with corresponding chemical and magnetic changes. X-ray diffraction shows that the core size and chemistry stay the same but the shell becomes FeO that grows to a thickness of 17 nm. Helium ion microscopy shows that the previously separate particles have densified into a nearly continuous film. Major loop magnetic hysteresis measurements show a decrease in saturation magnetization that we attribute to the presence of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) FeO shell. First-order reversal curve measurements on the irradiated film performed with a vibrating sample magnetometer show that the AFM shell prevents the particles from interacting magnetically, leading to low coercivity from the iron core and little bias field from the core interactions. These results, and others reported previously on different compositions (Fe3O4 or FeO+Fe3N nanoclusters), show that the ion irradiation behavior of nanocluster films such as these depends strongly on the initial nanostructure and chemistry.

  16. Force-field development and molecular dynamics simulations of ferrocene-peptide conjugates as a scaffold for hydrogenase mimics.

    SciTech Connect

    De Hatten, Xavier; Cournia, Zoe; Smith, Jeremy C; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2007-08-01

    The increasing importance of hydrogenase enzymes in the new energy research field has led us to examine the structure and dynamics of potential hydrogenase mimics, based on a ferrocene-peptide scaffold, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To enable this MD study, a molecular mechanics force field for ferrocene-bearing peptides was developed and implemented in the CHARMM simulation package, thus extending the usefulness of the package into peptide-bioorganometallic chemistry. Using the automated frequency-matching method (AFMM), optimized intramolecular force-field parameters were generated through quantum chemical reference normal modes. The partial charges for ferrocene were derived by fitting point charges to quantum-chemically computed electrostatic potentials. The force field was tested against experimental X-ray crystal structures of dipeptide derivatives of ferrocene-1,1{prime}-dicarboxylic acid. The calculations reproduce accurately the molecular geometries, including the characteristic C2-symmetrical intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern, that were stable over 0.1{micro}s MD simulations. The crystal packing properties of ferrocene-1-(D)alanine-(D)proline{prime}-1-(D)alanine-(D)proline were also accurately reproduced. The lattice parameters of this crystal were conserved during a 0.1 s MD simulation and match the experimental values almost exactly. Simulations of the peptides in dichloromethane are also in good agreement with experimental NMR and circular dichroism (CD) data in solution. The developed force field was used to perform MD simulations on novel, as yet unsynthesized peptide fragments that surround the active site of [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase. The results of this simulation lead us to propose an improved design for synthetic peptide-based hydrogenase models. The presented MD simulation results of metallocenes thereby provide a convincing validation of our proposal to use ferrocene-peptides as minimal enzyme mimics.

  17. Force-field development and molecular dynamics simulations of ferrocene-peptide conjugates as a scaffold for hydrogenase mimics

    SciTech Connect

    De Hatten, Xavier; Cournia, Zoe; Smith, Jeremy C; Huc, I; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2007-08-01

    The increasing importance of hydrogenase enzymes in the new energy research field has led us to examine the structure and dynamics of potential hydrogenase mimics, based on a ferrocene-peptide scaffold, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To enable this MD study, a molecular mechanics force field for ferrocene-bearing peptides was developed and implemented in the CHARMM simulation package, thus extending the usefulness of the package into peptide-bioorganometallic chemistry. Using the automated frequency-matching method (AFMM), optimized intramolecular force-field parameters were generated through quantum chemical reference normal modes. The partial charges for ferrocene were derived by fitting point charges to quantum-chemically computed electrostatic potentials. The force field was tested against experimental X-ray crystal structures of dipeptide derivatives of ferrocene-1,1'-dicarboxylic acid. The calculations reproduce accurately the molecular geometries, including the characteristic C{sub 2}-symmetrical intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern, that were stable over 0.1 {micro}s MD simulations. The crystal packing properties of ferrocene-1-(D)alanine-(D)proline-1'-(D)alanine-(D)proline were also accurately reproduced. The lattice parameters of this crystal were conserved during a 0.1 {micro}s MD simulation and match the experimental values almost exactly. Simulations of the peptides in dichloromethane are also in good agreement with experimental NMR and circular dichroism (CD) data in solution. The developed force field was used to perform MD simulations on novel, as yet unsynthesized peptide fragments that surround the active site of [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase. The results of this simulation lead us to propose an improved design for synthetic peptide-based hydrogenase models. The presented MD simulation results of metallocenes thereby provide a convincing validation of our proposal to use ferrocene-peptides as minimal enzyme mimics.

  18. H, not O or pressure, causes eutectic T depression in the Fe-FeS System to 8 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, Antonio S.; Walker, David

    2015-04-01

    The Fe-FeS system maintains a eutectic temperature of 990 ± 10 °C to at least 8 GPa if starting materials and pressure media are rigorously dehydrated. Literature reports of pressure-induced freezing point depression of the eutectic for the Fe-FeS system are not confirmed. Modest addition of oxygen alone is confirmed to cause negligible freezing point depression at 6 GPa. Addition of H alone causes a progressive decrease in the eutectic temperature with P in the Fe-FeS-H system to below 965 °C at 6 GPa to below 950 °C at 8 GPa. It is our hypothesis that moisture contamination in unrigorously dried experiments may be an H source for freezing point depression. O released from H2O disproportionation reacts with Fe and is sequestered as ferropericlase along the sample capsules walls, leaving the H to escape the system and/or enter the Fe-FeS mixture. The observed occurrence of ferropericlase on undried MgO capsule margins is otherwise difficult to explain, because an alternate source for the oxygen in the ferropericlase layer is difficult to identify. This study questions the use of pressure-depressed Fe-S eutectic temperatures and suggests that the lower eutectic temperatures sometimes reported are achieved by moving into the ternary Fe-S-H system. These results adjust slightly the constraints on eutectic temperatures allowed for partly solidified cores on small planets. H substantially diminishes the temperature extent of the melting interval in Fe-S by reducing the melting points of the crystalline phases more than it depresses the eutectic.

  19. Melting relations in the Fe-rich portion of the system FeFeS at 30 kb pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.; Bell, P.M.

    1969-01-01

    The melting relations of FeFeS mixtures covering the composition range from Fe to Fe67S33 have been determined at 30 kb pressure. The phase relations are similar to those at low pressure. The eutectic has a composition of Fe72.9S27.1 and a temperature of 990??C. Solubility of S in Fe at elevated temperatures at 30 kb is of the same order of magnitude as at low pressure. Sulfur may have significantly lowered the melting point of iron in the upper mantle during the period of coalescence of metal prior to core formation in the primitive earth. ?? 1969.

  20. Hydrogenase activity in aged, nonviable Desulfovibrio vulgaris cultures and its significance in anaerobic biocorrosion.

    PubMed

    Chatelus, C; Carrier, P; Saignes, P; Libert, M F; Berlier, Y; Lespinat, P A; Fauque, G; Legall, J

    1987-07-01

    Batch cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris stored at 32 degrees C for 10 months have been found to retain 50% of the hydrogenase activity of a 1-day culture. The hydrogenase found in old cultures needs reducing conditions for its activation. Viable cell counts are negative after 6 months, showing that the hydrogenase activity does not depend on the presence of viable cells. These observations are of importance in the understanding of anaerobic biocorrosion of metals caused by depolarization phenomena.

  1. Role of nickel in membrane-bound hydrogenase and nickel metabolism in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Stults, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase of Rhizobium japonicum requires nickel for activity. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni co-migrates with hydrogenase activity in native gel systems and co-elutes with purified hydrogenase form an affinity matrix column. A simplified scheme for the purification of hydrogenase has been developed and constitutes the first report of the aerobic purification of this enzyme from R. japonicum. The aerobic purification utilizes the general affinity matrix. Reactive Red 120-agarose and results in higher specific activity and yield of enzyme than previously reported. The stability of aerobically purified hydrogenase to oxygen is substantially greater than that reported for anaerobically isolated enzyme. Reduction of the aerobically purified enzyme in the presence of oxygen, however, results in the rapid loss of activity. R. japonicum cells accumulate nickel during heterotrophic growth and as non-growing cells. The hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 accumulates substantially greater amounts of nickel under both conditions. Kinetic studies indicate that the nickel uptake system in the hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 is upregulated relative to SRwt cells. The uptake system is specific for nickel, although a 10-fold excess (relative to nickel) of copper or zinc inhibits nickel uptake. The nickel uptake system appears to require energy. Under nickel-free conditions hydrogenase protein is not synthesized as determined by cross-reactivity with antibodies directed against hydrogenase, indicating that nickel regulates the formation of the enzyme as well as being a constituent of the active protein.

  2. Regulation and genetic organization of hydrogenase: Progress report, 1 June 1985--31 March 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Krasna, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    The experiments concentrate on development of screening methods and cloning of the hydrogenase gene. The first method used to distinguish between hydrogenase-negative and hydrogenase-positive cells of E. coli is to measure the ability of colonies of the cells on agar plates (with complex or minimal media with or without antibiotics) to reduce the dye methyl viologen with H/sub 2/ gas. The presence of hydrogenase activity in the positive colonies is confirmed by growth in liquid media. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Spontaneous activation of [FeFe]-hydrogenases by an inorganic [2Fe] active site mimic

    PubMed Central

    Esselborn, Julian; Berggren, Gustav; Noth, Jens; Siebel, Judith; Hemschemeier, Anja; Artero, Vincent; Reijerse, Edward; Fontecave, Marc; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Happe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the formation of hydrogen. The cofactor (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases consists of a [4Fe-4S]-cluster bridged to a unique [2Fe]-subcluster whose biosynthesis in vivo requires hydrogenase-specific maturases. Here we show that a chemical mimic of the [2Fe]-subcluster can reconstitute apo-hydrogenase to full activity, independent of helper proteins. The assembled H-cluster is virtually indistinguishable from the native cofactor. This procedure will be a powerful tool for developing novel artificial H2-producing catalysts. PMID:23934246

  4. Implementation of photobiological H2 production: the O 2 sensitivity of hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Ghirardi, Maria L

    2015-09-01

    The search for the ultimate carbon-free fuel has intensified in recent years, with a major focus on photoproduction of H2. Biological sources of H2 include oxygenic photosynthetic green algae and cyanobacteria, both of which contain hydrogenase enzymes. Although algal and cyanobacterial hydrogenases perform the same enzymatic reaction through metallo-clusters, their hydrogenases have evolved separately, are expressed differently (transcription of algal hydrogenases is anaerobically induced, while bacterial hydrogenases are constitutively expressed), and display different sensitivity to O2 inactivation. Among various physiological factors, the sensitivity of hydrogenases to O2 has been one of the major factors preventing implementation of biological systems for commercial production of renewable H2. This review addresses recent strategies aimed at engineering increased O2 tolerance into hydrogenases (as of now mainly unsuccessful), as well as towards the development of methods to bypass the O2 sensitivity of hydrogenases (successful but still yielding low solar conversion efficiencies). The author concludes with a description of current approaches from various laboratories to incorporate multiple genetic traits into either algae or cyanobacteria to jointly address limiting factors other than the hydrogenase O2 sensitivity and achieve more sustained H2 photoproduction activity.

  5. Oxygen-resistant hydrogenases and methods for designing and making same

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul; Ghirardi, Maria Lucia; Seibert, Michael

    2014-03-04

    The invention provides oxygen-resistant iron-hydrogenases ([Fe]-hydrogenases) for use in the production of H.sub.2. Methods used in the design and engineering of the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases are disclosed, as are the methods of transforming and culturing appropriate host cells with the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases. Finally, the invention provides methods for utilizing the transformed, oxygen insensitive, host cells in the bulk production of H.sub.2 in a light catalyzed reaction having water as the reactant.

  6. Oxygen-resistant hydrogenases and methods for designing and making same

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul; Ghirardi, Maria L; Seibert, Michael

    2009-03-10

    The invention provides oxygen- resistant iron-hydrogenases ([Fe]-hydrogenases) for use in the production of H2. Methods used in the design and engineering of the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases are disclosed, as are the methods of transforming and culturing appropriate host cells with the oxygen-resistant [Fe]-hydrogenases. Finally, the invention provides methods for utilizing the transformed, oxygen insensitive, host cells in the bulk production of H.sub.2 in a light catalyzed reaction having water as the reactant.

  7. MR/SPECT Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy of Tumor-Targeting Fe@Fe3O4 Nanoparticles in Vivo with Low Mononuclear Phagocyte Uptake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Heng; Zhou, Zhiguo; Zhou, Ping; Yan, Yuping; Wang, Mingwei; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Yingjian; Yang, Shiping

    2016-08-10

    The (125)I-c(RGDyK) peptide PEGylated Fe@Fe3O4 nanoparticles ((125)I-RGD-PEG-MNPs) with the average hydrodynamic diameter of ∼40 nm as a novel multifunctional platform were developed for tumor-targeting MR/SPECT imaging guided photothermal therapy in vivo. On the αvβ3-positive U87MG glioblastoma xenograft model, the signals of tumor from T2-weighted MR and SPECT imaging were much higher than those in the blocking group at 6 h post injection (p.i.) of RGD-PEG-MNPs and (125)I-RGD-PEG-MNPs intravenously, respectively. The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution were analyzed quantitatively by gamma counter ex vivo. The fact suggested that RGD-PEG-MNPs exhibited excellent targeting property and low mononuclear phagocyte uptake. At 6 h p.i. for (125)I-RGD-PEG-MNPs, the maximum uptake of 6.75 ± 1.24% of the percentage injected dose per gram (ID/g) was accumulated in the tumor. At 48 h p.i., only 1.11 ± 0.21% and 0.16 ± 0.09% ID/g were accumulated in the liver and spleen, respectively. With the guidance of MR/SPECT imaging, the multifunctional nanoparticles achieved a good photothermal therapeutic efficacy in vivo. PMID:27428929

  8. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M.; Walter, Mary E.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity's growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed. PMID:26543406

  9. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Walter, Mary E; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity's growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed. PMID:26543406

  10. Influence of pH and ionic strength on electrostatic properties of ferredoxin, FNR, and hydrogenase and the rate constants of their interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, A. N.; Khrushchev, S. S.; Kovalenko, I. B.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein transfers electrons from photosystem I (PSI) to ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as other metabolic pathways. In some photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria and green unicellular algae under anaerobic conditions Fd transfers electrons not only to FNR but also to hydrogenase—an enzyme which catalyzes reduction of atomic hydrogen to H2. One of the questions posed by this competitive relationship between proteins is which characteristics of thylakoid stroma media allow switching of the electron flow between the linear path PSI-Fd-FNR-NADP+ and the path PSI-Fd-hydrogenase-H2. The study was conducted using direct multiparticle simulation approach. In this method protein molecules are considered as individual objects that experience Brownian motion and electrostatic interaction with the surrounding media and each other. Using the model we studied the effects of pH and ionic strength (I) upon complex formation between ferredoxin and FNR and ferredoxin and hydrogenase. We showed that the rate constant of Fd-FNR complex formation is constant in a wide range of physiologically significant pH values. Therefore it can be argued that regulation of FNR activity doesn’t involve pH changes in stroma. On the other hand, in the model rate constant of Fd-hydrogenase interaction dramatically depends upon pH: in the range 7–9 it increases threefold. It may seem that because hydrogenase reduces protons it should be more active when pH is acidic. Apparently, regulation of hydrogenase’s affinity to both her reaction partners (H+ and Fd) is carried out by changes in its electrostatic properties. In the dark, the protein is inactive and in the light it is activated and starts to interact with both Fd and H+. Therefore, we can conclude that in chloroplasts the rate of hydrogen production is regulated by pH through the changes in the affinity between hydrogenase and ferredoxin.

  11. Dramatically enhanced aerobic atrazine degradation with Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires by tetrapolyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cao, Menghua; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2014-03-18

    In this study, the effects of an inorganic ligand tetrapolyphosphate on the molecular oxygen activation and the subsequent aerobic atrazine degradation by Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires were investigated systematically at a circumneutral to alkaline pH range (pH 6.0-9.0). We interestingly found that the addition of tetrapolyphosphate could enhance the aerobic atrazine degradation rate 955 times, which was even 10 times that of the traditional organic ligand ethylenediamine tetraacetate. This tetrapolyphosphate induced dramatic aerobic atrazine degradation enhancement could be attributed to two factors. One was that the presence of tetrapolyphosphate strongly suppressed hydrogen evolution from the reduction of proton by Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires through proton confinement, leaving over more electrons for the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) and the subsequent molecular oxygen activation. The other was that the complexation of tetrapolyphosphate with ferrous ions not only guaranteed enough soluble Fe(II) for Fenton reaction, but also provided another route to produce more •OH in the solution via the single-electron molecular oxygen reduction pathway. We employed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify the atrazine degradation intermediates and proposed a possible aerobic atrazine degradation pathway. This study not only sheds light on the promotion effects of ligands on the molecular oxygen activation by nanoscale zerovalent iron, but also offers a facile and green iron-based method for the oxidative atrazine removal.

  12. EPR Spectroscopic Studies of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Suess, Daniel L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Proton reduction and H2 oxidation are key elementary reactions for solar fuel production. Hydrogenases interconvert H+ and H2 with remarkable efficiency and have therefore received much attention in this context. For [FeFe]-hydrogenases, catalysis occurs at a unique cofactor called the H-cluster. In this article, we discuss ways in which EPR spectroscopy has elucidated aspects of the bioassembly of the H-cluster, with a focus on four case studies: EPR spectroscopic identification of a radical en route to the CO and CN− ligands of the H-cluster, tracing 57Fe from the maturase HydG into the H-cluster, characterization of the auxiliary Fe–S cluster in HydG, and isotopic labeling of the CN− ligands of HydA for electronic structure studies of its Hox state. Advances in cell-free maturation protocols have enabled several of these mechanistic studies, and understanding H-cluster maturation may in turn provide insights leading to improvements in hydrogenase production for biotechnological applications. PMID:26508821

  13. Wiring of Photosystem II to Hydrogenase for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Mersch, Dirk; Lee, Chong-Yong; Zhang, Jenny Zhenqi; Brinkert, Katharina; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Rutherford, A William; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    In natural photosynthesis, light is used for the production of chemical energy carriers to fuel biological activity. The re-engineering of natural photosynthetic pathways can provide inspiration for sustainable fuel production and insights for understanding the process itself. Here, we employ a semiartificial approach to study photobiological water splitting via a pathway unavailable to nature: the direct coupling of the water oxidation enzyme, photosystem II, to the H2 evolving enzyme, hydrogenase. Essential to this approach is the integration of the isolated enzymes into the artificial circuit of a photoelectrochemical cell. We therefore developed a tailor-made hierarchically structured indium-tin oxide electrode that gives rise to the excellent integration of both photosystem II and hydrogenase for performing the anodic and cathodic half-reactions, respectively. When connected together with the aid of an applied bias, the semiartificial cell demonstrated quantitative electron flow from photosystem II to the hydrogenase with the production of H2 and O2 being in the expected two-to-one ratio and a light-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 5.4% under low-intensity red-light irradiation. We thereby demonstrate efficient light-driven water splitting using a pathway inaccessible to biology and report on a widely applicable in vitro platform for the controlled coupling of enzymatic redox processes to meaningfully study photocatalytic reactions.

  14. Unusual reaction of [NiFe]-hydrogenases with cyanide.

    PubMed

    Hexter, Suzannah V; Chung, Min-Wen; Vincent, Kylie A; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2014-07-23

    Cyanide reacts rapidly with [NiFe]-hydrogenases (hydrogenase-1 and hydrogenase-2 from Escherichia coli) under mild oxidizing conditions, inhibiting the electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen as recorded by protein film electrochemistry. Electrochemical, EPR, and FTIR measurements show that the final enzyme product, formed within a second (even under 100% H2), is the resting state known as Ni-B, which contains a hydroxido-bridged species, Ni(III)-μ(OH)-Fe(II), at the active site. "Cyanide inhibition" is easily reversed because it is simply the reductive activation of Ni-B. This paper brings back into focus an observation originally made in the 1940s that cyanide inhibits microbial H2 oxidation and addresses the interesting mechanism by which cyanide promotes the formation of Ni-B. As a much stronger nucleophile than hydroxide, cyanide binds more rapidly and promotes oxidation of Ni(II) to Ni(III); however, it is quickly replaced by hydroxide which is a far superior bridging ligand.

  15. Distribution Analysis of Hydrogenases in Surface Waters of Marine and Freshwater Environments

    PubMed Central

    Barz, Martin; Beimgraben, Christian; Staller, Torsten; Germer, Frauke; Opitz, Friederike; Marquardt, Claudia; Schwarz, Christoph; Gutekunst, Kirstin; Vanselow, Klaus Heinrich; Schmitz, Ruth; LaRoche, Julie; Schulz, Rüdiger; Appel, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Background Surface waters of aquatic environments have been shown to both evolve and consume hydrogen and the ocean is estimated to be the principal natural source. In some marine habitats, H2 evolution and uptake are clearly due to biological activity, while contributions of abiotic sources must be considered in others. Until now the only known biological process involved in H2 metabolism in marine environments is nitrogen fixation. Principal Findings We analyzed marine and freshwater environments for the presence and distribution of genes of all known hydrogenases, the enzymes involved in biological hydrogen turnover. The total genomes and the available marine metagenome datasets were searched for hydrogenase sequences. Furthermore, we isolated DNA from samples from the North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, North Sea, Baltic Sea, and two fresh water lakes and amplified and sequenced part of the gene encoding the bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase. In 21% of all marine heterotrophic bacterial genomes from surface waters, one or several hydrogenase genes were found, with the membrane-bound H2 uptake hydrogenase being the most widespread. A clear bias of hydrogenases to environments with terrestrial influence was found. This is exemplified by the cyanobacterial bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase that was found in freshwater and coastal areas but not in the open ocean. Significance This study shows that hydrogenases are surprisingly abundant in marine environments. Due to its ecological distribution the primary function of the bidirectional NAD(P)-linked hydrogenase seems to be fermentative hydrogen evolution. Moreover, our data suggests that marine surface waters could be an interesting source of oxygen-resistant uptake hydrogenases. The respective genes occur in coastal as well as open ocean habitats and we presume that they are used as additional energy scavenging devices in otherwise nutrient limited environments. The membrane-bound H2-evolving

  16. Energy-converting [NiFe] hydrogenases from archaea and extremophiles: ancestors of complex I.

    PubMed

    Hedderich, Reiner

    2004-02-01

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are well-characterized enzymes that have a key function in the H2 metabolism of various microorganisms. In the recent years a subfamily of [NiFe] hydrogenases with unique properties has been identified. The members of this family form multisubunit membrane-bound enzyme complexes composed of at least four hydrophilic and two integral membrane proteins. These six conserved subunits, which built the core of these hydrogenases, have closely related counterparts in energy-conserving NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (complex I). However, the reaction catalyzed by these hydrogenases differs significantly from the reaction catalyzed by complex I. For some of these hydrogenases the physiological role is to catalyze the reduction of H+ with electrons derived from reduced ferredoxins or poly-ferredoxins. This exergonic reaction is coupled to energy conservation by means of electron-transport phosphorylation. Other members of this hydrogenase family mainly function to provide the cell with reduced ferredoxin with H2 as electron donor in a reaction driven by reverse electron transport. As complex I these hydrogenases function as ion pumps and have therefore been designated as energy-converting [NiFe] hydrogenases.

  17. Enhanced Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Hydrogenase and Nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Young Su; Park, Ju-Yong; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-03-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a bacterium that can produce hydrogen by interaction with hydrogenase and nitrogenase. We report a hydrogen production system using co-cultivation of hydrogenase in liquid medium and immobilized nitrogenase in Escherichia coli. The recombinant plasmid has been constructed to analyze the effect of hydrogen production on the expression of hupSL hydrogenase and nifHDK nitrogenase isolated from R. sphaeroides. All recombinant E. coli strains were cultured anaerobically, and cells for nitrogenase were immobilized in agar gel, whereas cells for hydrogenase were supplemented on the nitrogenase agar gel. The hupSL hydrogenase has been observed to enhance hydrogen production and hydrogenase activity under co-culture with nifHDK nitrogenase. The maximum hydrogen production has been obtained at an agar gel concentration and a cell concentration for co-culture of 2 % and 6.4 × 10(8) CFU. Thus, co-culture of hupSL hydrogenase and nifHDK nitrogenase provides a promising route for enhancing the hydrogen production and hydrogenase activity.

  18. Differences in Hydrogenase Gene Expression between Methanosarcina acetivorans and Methanosarcina barkeri▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Adam M.; Kulkarni, Gargi; Metcalf, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A encodes three putative hydrogenases, including one cofactor F420-linked (frh) and two methanophenazine-linked (vht) enzymes. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of these putative hydrogenases to those of Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina mazei shows that each predicted subunit contains all the known residues essential for hydrogenase function. The DNA sequences upstream of the genes in M. acetivorans were aligned with those in other Methanosarcina species to identify conserved transcription and translation signals. The M. acetivorans vht promoter region is well conserved among the sequenced Methanosarcina species, while the second vht-type homolog (here called vhx) and frh promoters have only limited similarity. To experimentally determine whether these promoters are functional in vivo, we constructed and characterized both M. acetivorans and M. barkeri strains carrying reporter gene fusions to each of the M. acetivorans and M. barkeri hydrogenase promoters. Generally, the M. acetivorans gene fusions are not expressed in either organism, suggesting that cis-acting mutations inactivated the M. acetivorans promoters. The M. barkeri hydrogenase gene fusions, on the other hand, are expressed in both organisms, indicating that M. acetivorans possesses the machinery to express hydrogenases, although it does not express its own hydrogenases. These data are consistent with specific inactivation of the M. acetivorans hydrogenase promoters and highlight the importance of testing hypotheses generated by using genomic data. PMID:19201801

  19. Enhancement of photoheterotrophic biohydrogen production at elevated temperatures by the expression of a thermophilic clostridial hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shou-Chen; Shih, Shau-Hua; Chang, Jui-Jen; Wang, Chun-Ying; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2012-08-01

    The working temperature of a photobioreactor under sunlight can be elevated above the optimal growth temperature of a microorganism. To improve the biohydrogen productivity of photosynthetic bacteria at higher temperatures, a [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene from the thermophile Clostridium thermocellum was expressed in the mesophile Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 (strain CGA-CThydA) using a log-phase expression promoter P( pckA ) to drive the expression of heterogeneous hydrogenase gene. In contrast, a mesophilic Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene was also constructed and expressed in R. palustris (strain CGA-CAhydA). Both transgenic strains were tested for cell growth, in vivo hydrogen production rate, and in vitro hydrogenase activity at elevated temperatures. Although both CGA-CThydA and CGA-CAhydA strains demonstrated enhanced growth over the vector control at temperatures above 38 °C, CGA-CThydA produced more hydrogen than the other strains. The in vitro hydrogenase activity assay, measured at 40 °C, confirmed that the activity of the CGA-CThydA hydrogenase was higher than the CGA-CAhydA hydrogenase. These results showed that the expression of a thermophilic [FeFe]-hydrogenase in R. palustris increased the growth rate and biohydrogen production at elevated temperatures. This transgenic strategy can be applied to a broad range of purple photosynthetic bacteria used to produce biohydrogen under sunlight.

  20. Hydrogenase-based nanomaterials as anode electrode catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Muneyuki; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki

    2005-03-01

    We consider hydrogenase-based nanomaterials for possible use as anode electrode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). We choose Fe-only hydrogenase component of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (DdHase) as a hydrogenase complex, and investigate its catalytic activity for H 2 dissociation using ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). We found two possible H-H bond cleavage pathways, which are heterolytic and possess low activation barriers. Moreover, the H 2 dissociation can be promoted by inducing spin polarization of the H 2 adduct. We report that hydrogenase or hydrogenase-based nanomaterials can manipulate to exhibit the catalytic activity equivalent to the well-known platinum catalyst.

  1. Detection and localization of two hydrogenases in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and their potential role in methane metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hanczár, Tímea; Csáki, Robert; Bodrossy, Levente; Murrell, J Colin; Kovács, Kornél L

    2002-02-01

    Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) was shown to contain two distinct hydrogenases, a soluble hydrogenase and a membrane-bound hydrogenase. This is the first report of a membrane-bound hydrogenase in methanotrophs. Both enzymes were expressed apparently constitutively under normal growth conditions. The soluble hydrogenase was capable of reducing NAD(+) with molecular hydrogen. The activities of both soluble and particulate methane monooxygenases could be driven by molecular hydrogen. This confirmed that molecular hydrogen could be used as a source of reducing power for methane oxidation. Hydrogen-driven methane monooxygenase activities tolerated elevated temperatures and moderate oxygen concentrations. The significance of these findings for biotechnological applications of methanotrophs is discussed. PMID:11807566

  2. Structural differences of oxidized iron-sulfur and nickel-iron cofactors in O2-tolerant and O2-sensitive hydrogenases studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sigfridsson, Kajsa G V; Leidel, Nils; Sanganas, Oliver; Chernev, Petko; Lenz, Oliver; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Nishihara, Hirofumi; Parkin, Alison; Armstrong, Fraser A; Dementin, Sébastien; Rousset, Marc; De Lacey, Antonio L; Haumann, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The class of [NiFe]-hydrogenases comprises oxygen-sensitive periplasmic (PH) and oxygen-tolerant membrane-bound (MBH) enzymes. For three PHs and four MBHs from six bacterial species, structural features of the nickel-iron active site of hydrogen turnover and of the iron-sulfur clusters functioning in electron transfer were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Fe-XAS indicated surplus oxidized iron and a lower number of ~2.7 Å Fe-Fe distances plus additional shorter and longer distances in the oxidized MBHs compared to the oxidized PHs. This supported a double-oxidized and modified proximal FeS cluster in all MBHs with an apparent trimer-plus-monomer arrangement of its four iron atoms, in agreement with crystal data showing a [4Fe3S] cluster instead of a [4Fe4S] cubane as in the PHs. Ni-XAS indicated coordination of the nickel by the thiol group sulfurs of four conserved cysteines and at least one iron-oxygen bond in both MBH and PH proteins. Structural differences of the oxidized inactive [NiFe] cofactor of MBHs in the Ni-B state compared to PHs in the Ni-A state included a ~0.05 Å longer Ni-O bond, a two times larger spread of the Ni-S bond lengths, and a ~0.1 Å shorter Ni-Fe distance. The modified proximal [4Fe3S] cluster, weaker binding of the Ni-Fe bridging oxygen species, and an altered localization of reduced oxygen species at the active site may each contribute to O2 tolerance.

  3. Molecular evolution of gas cavity in [NiFeSe] hydrogenases resurrected in silico.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takashi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tolerance of selenium-containing [NiFeSe] hydrogenases (Hases) is attributable to the high reducing power of the selenocysteine residue, which sustains the bimetallic Ni-Fe catalytic center in the large subunit. Genes encoding [NiFeSe] Hases are inherited by few sulphate-reducing δ-proteobacteria globally distributed under various anoxic conditions. Ancestral sequences of [NiFeSe] Hases were elucidated and their three-dimensional structures were recreated in silico using homology modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, which suggested that deep gas channels gradually developed in [NiFeSe] Hases under absolute anaerobic conditions, whereas the enzyme remained as a sealed edifice under environmental conditions of a higher oxygen exposure risk. The development of a gas cavity appears to be driven by non-synonymous mutations, which cause subtle conformational changes locally and distantly, even including highly conserved sequence regions. PMID:26818780

  4. Molecular evolution of gas cavity in [NiFeSe] hydrogenases resurrected in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Takashi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tolerance of selenium-containing [NiFeSe] hydrogenases (Hases) is attributable to the high reducing power of the selenocysteine residue, which sustains the bimetallic Ni-Fe catalytic center in the large subunit. Genes encoding [NiFeSe] Hases are inherited by few sulphate-reducing δ-proteobacteria globally distributed under various anoxic conditions. Ancestral sequences of [NiFeSe] Hases were elucidated and their three-dimensional structures were recreated in silico using homology modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, which suggested that deep gas channels gradually developed in [NiFeSe] Hases under absolute anaerobic conditions, whereas the enzyme remained as a sealed edifice under environmental conditions of a higher oxygen exposure risk. The development of a gas cavity appears to be driven by non-synonymous mutations, which cause subtle conformational changes locally and distantly, even including highly conserved sequence regions.

  5. Molecular evolution of gas cavity in [NiFeSe] hydrogenases resurrected in silico

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Takashi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tolerance of selenium-containing [NiFeSe] hydrogenases (Hases) is attributable to the high reducing power of the selenocysteine residue, which sustains the bimetallic Ni–Fe catalytic center in the large subunit. Genes encoding [NiFeSe] Hases are inherited by few sulphate-reducing δ-proteobacteria globally distributed under various anoxic conditions. Ancestral sequences of [NiFeSe] Hases were elucidated and their three-dimensional structures were recreated in silico using homology modelling and molecular dynamic simulation, which suggested that deep gas channels gradually developed in [NiFeSe] Hases under absolute anaerobic conditions, whereas the enzyme remained as a sealed edifice under environmental conditions of a higher oxygen exposure risk. The development of a gas cavity appears to be driven by non-synonymous mutations, which cause subtle conformational changes locally and distantly, even including highly conserved sequence regions. PMID:26818780

  6. Tysnes Island - An unusual clast composed of solidified, immiscible, Fe-FeS and silicate melts. [in meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkening, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    An inclusion found in the Tysnes Island gas-rich H4 chondrite is described. The clast consists of two distinct portions, separated by a smooth boundary; the portions are a tear-drop shaped Fe-FeS eutecticlike intergrowth (0.5 cm greatest dimension) and a silicate consisting primarily of olivine in glass. Nickel enrichment is found in the metal at the metal-sulfide boundaries and in nodules within the metal. It is thought that the portions separated from one another as immiscible liquids and that the modal composition of each portion agrees with the compositions predicted for a total melt of an H-group chondrite. The inclusion is discussed in terms of the process of metal-silicate fractionation suggested by Fodor and Keil (1976).

  7. Structure prediction and molecular simulation of gases diffusion pathways in hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Shanthy; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Gupta, Vipul

    2010-01-01

    Although hydrogen is considered to be one of the most promising future energy sources and the technical aspects involved in using it have advanced considerably, the future supply of hydrogen from renewable sources is still unsolved. The [Fe]- hydrogenase enzymes are highly efficient H(2) catalysts found in ecologically and phylogenetically diverse microorganisms, including the photosynthetic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. While these enzymes can occur in several forms, H(2) catalysis takes place at a unique [FeS] prosthetic group or H-cluster, located at the active site. 3D structure of the protein hydA1 hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtti was predicted using the MODELER 8v2 software. Conserved region was depicted from the NCBI CDD Search. Template selection was done on the basis NCBI BLAST results. For single template 1FEH was used and for multiple templates 1FEH and 1HFE were used. The result of the Homology modeling was verified by uploading the file to SAVS server. On the basis of the SAVS result 3D structure predicted using single template was chosen for performing molecular simulation. For performing molecular simulation three strategies were used. First the molecular simulation of the protein was performed in solvated box containing bulk water. Then 100 H(2) molecules were randomly inserted in the solvated box and two simulations of 50 and 100 ps were performed. Similarly 100 O(2) molecules were randomly placed in the solvated box and again 50 and 100 ps simulation were performed. Energy minimization was performed before each simulation was performed. Conformations were saved after each simulation. Analysis of the gas diffusion was done on the basis of RMSD, Radius of Gyration and no. of gas molecule/ps plot. PMID:21364783

  8. Structure prediction and molecular simulation of gases diffusion pathways in hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Shanthy; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Gupta, Vipul

    2010-10-06

    Although hydrogen is considered to be one of the most promising future energy sources and the technical aspects involved in using it have advanced considerably, the future supply of hydrogen from renewable sources is still unsolved. The [Fe]- hydrogenase enzymes are highly efficient H(2) catalysts found in ecologically and phylogenetically diverse microorganisms, including the photosynthetic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. While these enzymes can occur in several forms, H(2) catalysis takes place at a unique [FeS] prosthetic group or H-cluster, located at the active site. 3D structure of the protein hydA1 hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtti was predicted using the MODELER 8v2 software. Conserved region was depicted from the NCBI CDD Search. Template selection was done on the basis NCBI BLAST results. For single template 1FEH was used and for multiple templates 1FEH and 1HFE were used. The result of the Homology modeling was verified by uploading the file to SAVS server. On the basis of the SAVS result 3D structure predicted using single template was chosen for performing molecular simulation. For performing molecular simulation three strategies were used. First the molecular simulation of the protein was performed in solvated box containing bulk water. Then 100 H(2) molecules were randomly inserted in the solvated box and two simulations of 50 and 100 ps were performed. Similarly 100 O(2) molecules were randomly placed in the solvated box and again 50 and 100 ps simulation were performed. Energy minimization was performed before each simulation was performed. Conformations were saved after each simulation. Analysis of the gas diffusion was done on the basis of RMSD, Radius of Gyration and no. of gas molecule/ps plot.

  9. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.; Danson, M.

    1996-07-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based on the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with the continuous recycling of cofactor. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value chemical commodity. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  10. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  11. Production and Application of a Soluble Hydrogenase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M.; Walter, Mary E.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is a potential renewable alternative energy carrier that could be used in the future to help supplement humanity’s growing energy needs. Unfortunately, current industrial methods for hydrogen production are expensive or environmentally unfriendly. In recent years research has focused on biological mechanisms for hydrogen production and specifically on hydrogenases, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the reduction of protons to generate hydrogen. In particular, a better understanding of this enzyme might allow us to generate hydrogen that does not use expensive metals, such as platinum, as catalysts. The soluble hydrogenase I (SHI) from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus ,more » a member of the euryarchaeota, has been studied extensively and used in various biotechnological applications. This review summarizes the strategies used in engineering and characterizing three different forms of SHI and the properties of the recombinant enzymes. SHI has also been used in in vitro systems for hydrogen production and NADPH generation and these systems are also discussed.« less

  12. Iron-dependent hydrogenases of Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia: activity of the recombinant entamoebic enzyme and evidence for lateral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Julie E J; Field, Jessica; McArthur, Andrew G; Sogin, Mitchell L; Yarlett, Nigel; Loftus, Brendan J; Samuelson, John

    2003-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica and Spironucleus barkhanus have genes that encode short iron-dependent hydrogenases (Fe-hydrogenases), even though these protists lack hydrogenosomes. To understand better the biochemistry of the protist Fe-hydrogenases, we prepared a recombinant E. histolytica short Fe-hydrogenase and measured its activity in vitro. A Giardia lamblia gene encoding a short Fe-hydrogenase was identified from shotgun genomic sequences, and RT-PCR showed that cultured entamoebas and giardias transcribe short Fe-hydrogenase mRNAs. A second E. histolytica gene, which encoded a long Fe-hydrogenase, was identified from shotgun genomic sequences. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the short Fe-hydrogenase genes of entamoeba and diplomonads share a common ancestor, while the long Fe-hydrogenase gene of entamoeba appears to have been laterally transferred from a bacterium. These results are discussed in the context of competing ideas for the origins of genes encoding fermentation enzymes of these protists.

  13. Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine chemistry in the synthesis of hydrogenase and nitrogenase metal cofactors.

    PubMed

    Byer, Amanda S; Shepard, Eric M; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2015-02-13

    Nitrogenase, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and [Fe]-hydrogenase enzymes perform catalysis at metal cofactors with biologically unusual non-protein ligands. The FeMo cofactor of nitrogenase has a MoFe7S9 cluster with a central carbon, whereas the H-cluster of [FeFe]-hydrogenase contains a 2Fe subcluster coordinated by cyanide and CO ligands as well as dithiomethylamine; the [Fe]-hydrogenase cofactor has CO and guanylylpyridinol ligands at a mononuclear iron site. Intriguingly, radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzymes are vital for the assembly of all three of these diverse cofactors. This minireview presents and discusses the current state of knowledge of the radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes required for synthesis of these remarkable metal cofactors.

  14. Electrochemical studies of the mono-Fe, Fe-Zn, and Fe-Fe metalloisoforms of bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Tiffany A; Rusnak, Frank

    2004-01-27

    Bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase (lambdaPP) is a member of a large superfamily of metallophosphoesterases, including serine/threonine protein phosphatases, purple acid phosphatases, 5'-nucleotidase, and DNA repair enzymes such as Mre11. Members of this family share several common characteristics, including a common phosphoesterase motif, secondary structural fold (betaalphabetaalphabeta), and metal ligand environment, and often accommodate a dinuclear metal center. The identity of the active site metals often differs between family members. Despite the extensive spectroscopic studies of several family members, only the standard redox potential of porcine purple acid phosphate (PAP) has been measured. In this report, we investigate the redox properties of another member of this protein family. The standard redox potentials of the mono-Fe, Fe-Zn, and Fe-Fe metalloisoforms of lambdaPP were determined from anaerobic redox titration experiments. Two different S = 5/2, mono-Fe3+ lambdaPP species were identified: the first with an E/D approximately 0.17, g = 8.9 and 4.8, and an Eo' approximately +130 mV; the second with E/D approximately 0.05, g = 6.7, 5.9, and 4.4, and an Eo' approximately +120 mV. The first and second mono-Fe3+ species are thought to represent Fe present in the M2 and M1 sites, respectively. The addition of Zn2+ to mono-Fe3+ lambdaPP results in a decrease in both mono-Fe3+ species and the appearance of a new S = 5/2, Fe(3+)-Zn2+ species (E/D approximately 0.02, g = 5.9, and an Eo' > +175 mV). The Fe-Fe lambdaPP titration revealed an S = 1/2, Fe(3+)-Fe2+ (g < 2) species with an Eo' > +128 mV. These results suggest that the active site of lambdaPP supports a high oxidation potential for both metal sites and may indicate an equally oxidizing active site for other member metallophosphoesterases.

  15. Broad Negative Thermal Expansion Operation-Temperature Window Achieved by Adjusting Fe-Fe Magnetic Exchange Coupling in La(Fe,Si)13 Compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaopeng; Huang, Rongjin; Zhao, Yuqiang; Li, Wen; Wang, Wei; Huang, Chuanjun; Gong, Pifu; Lin, Zheshuai; Li, Laifeng

    2015-08-17

    Cubic La(Fe,Si)13-based compounds have been recently developed as promising negative thermal expansion(NTE) materials, but the narrow NTE operation-temperature window(∼110 K) restricts their actual applications. In this work, we demonstrate that the NTE operation-temperature window of LaFe(13-x)Si(x) can be significantly broadened by adjusting Fe-Fe magnetic exchange coupling as x ranges from 2.8 to 3.1. In particular, the NTE operation-temperature window of LaFe10.1Si2.9 is extended to 220 K. More attractively, the coefficients of thermal expansion of LaFe10.0Si3.0 and LaFe9.9Si3.1 are homogeneous in the NTE operation-temperature range of about 200 K, which is much valuable for the stability of fabricating devices. The further experimental characterizations combined with first-principles studies reveal that the tetragonal phase is gradually introduced into the cubic phase as the Si content increases, hence modifies the Fe-Fe interatomic distance. The reduction of the overall Fe-Fe magnetic exchange interactions contributes to the broadness of NTE operation-temperature window for LaFe(13-x)Si(x). PMID:26196377

  16. Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Final technical report, August 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    This project is focused on investigations of the catalytic mechanism of the hydrogenase found in the aerobic, N{sub 2}-fixing microorganism Azotobacter vinelandii. This report summarizes the progress during the first two years of the current project and include the anticipated course of the research for the remaining year of the current project. Because the current proposal represents a change in direction, the authors also include a brief progress report of prior DOE-sponsored research dealing with hydrogenases.

  17. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-01-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate the oxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe] hydrogenase, an [NiFeSe] hydrogenase, and two [NiFe] hydrogenases encoded by the hyd, hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand their cellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hyd and hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those of the wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5 or 50% (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfate reduction. Only strains missing the [Fe] hydrogenase were significantly affected during growth with lactate or with 50% (vol/vol) hydrogen as the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5% [vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe] hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate data correlated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarray hybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grown under the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed the order 5% hydrogen > 50% hydrogen > lactate, whereas expression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These results suggest that growth with lactate and 50% hydrogen is associated with high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best captured by the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe] hydrogenase. In contrast, growth with 5% hydrogen is associated with a low intracellular hydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. PMID:17601789

  18. (Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from aerobic N sub 2 -fixing microorganisms)

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The results of this DOE-sponsored project have contributed to our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of A. vinelandii hydrogenase. A group of inhibitors have been characterized. These provide information about the different types of redox clusters involved in catalysis and the roles of each. One group has already used acetylene in a study of three desulfovibrian hydrogenases and shown that only the NiFe hydrogenases are inhibited. We have characterized a number of spectral properties of A. vinelandii hydrogenase. The EPR signals associated with this hydrogenase in the reduced state are reminiscent of other NiFe dimeric hydrogenases such as A. eutrophus, but distinctly difference from others such as D. gigas and Chromatium vinosum. Thus, while the NiFe dimeric hydrogenases are now recognized as a large group of similar enzymes, there are differences in the spectral and catalytic properties which are not explained by their similar redox inventories, identical subunit structures, immunological cross reactivity and conserved sequences. The inhibitors we have characterized are also proving of value in the spectral characterizations. Surprisingly, we only see a significant EP signal attributable to Ni after the enzyme has been inactivated with O{sub 2} and then reduced (though not reactivated). No spectral perterbations (EPR or UV-V is) of active enzyme can be attributed to binding of H{sub 2}, even though H{sub 2} clearly binds to this form of the enzyme. Acetylene, which does not substantially perterb the EPR signal of active hydrogenase, does result in a new absorption envelope in the UV-V is spectrum. Overall, the results of this project have revealed the complex interactions of the redox clusters in catalysis through studies of inhibitor mechanisms and spectral properties. 14 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Function of Periplasmic Hydrogenases in the Sulfate-ReducingBacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung-Soo; Voordouw, Johanna K.; He,Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2007-09-24

    The sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough possesses four periplasmic hydrogenases to facilitate theoxidation of molecular hydrogen. These include an [Fe]hydrogenase, an[NiFeSe]hydrogenase, and two [NiFe]hydrogenases encoded by the hyd,hys, hyn1, and hyn2 genes, respectively. In order to understand theircellular functions, we have compared the growth rates of existing (hydand hyn1) and newly constructed (hys and hyn-1 hyd) mutants to those ofthe wild type in defined media in which lactate or hydrogen at either 5or 50 percent (vol/vol) was used as the sole electron donor for sulfatereduction. Only strains missing the [Fe]hydrogenase were significantlyaffected during growth with lactate or with 50 percent (vol/vol) hydrogenas the sole electron donor. When the cells were grown at low (5 percent[vol/vol]) hydrogen concentrations, those missing the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase suffered the greatest impairment. The growth rate datacorrelated strongly with gene expression results obtained from microarrayhybridizations and real-time PCR using mRNA extracted from cells grownunder the three conditions. Expression of the hys genes followed theorder 5 percent hydrogen>50 percent hydrogen>lactate, whereasexpression of the hyd genes followed the reverse order. These resultssuggest that growth with lactate and 50 percent hydrogen is associatedwith high intracellular hydrogen concentrations, which are best capturedby the higher activity, lower affinity [Fe]hydrogenase. In contrast,growth with 5 percent hydrogen is associated with a low intracellularhydrogen concentration, requiring the lower activity, higher affinity[NiFeSe]hydrogenase.

  20. Regulation of uptake hydrogenase and effects of hydrogen utilization on gene expression in Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Rey, Federico E; Oda, Yasuhiro; Harwood, Caroline S

    2006-09-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris is a purple, facultatively phototrophic bacterium that uses hydrogen gas as an electron donor for carbon dioxide fixation during photoautotrophic growth or for ammonia synthesis during nitrogen fixation. It also uses hydrogen as an electron supplement to enable the complete assimilation of oxidized carbon compounds, such as malate, into cell material during photoheterotrophic growth. The R. palustris genome predicts a membrane-bound nickel-iron uptake hydrogenase and several regulatory proteins to control hydrogenase synthesis. There is also a novel sensor kinase gene (RPA0981) directly adjacent to the hydrogenase gene cluster. Here we show that the R. palustris regulatory sensor hydrogenase HupUV acts in conjunction with the sensor kinase-response regulator protein pair HoxJ-HoxA to activate hydrogenase expression in response to hydrogen gas. Transcriptome analysis indicated that the HupUV-HoxJA regulatory system also controls the expression of genes encoding a predicted dicarboxylic acid transport system, a putative formate transporter, and a glutamine synthetase. RPA0981 had a small effect in repressing hydrogenase synthesis. We also determined that the two-component system RegS-RegR repressed expression of the uptake hydrogenase, probably in response to changes in intracellular redox status. Transcriptome analysis indicated that about 30 genes were differentially expressed in R. palustris cells that utilized hydrogen when growing photoheterotrophically on malate under nitrogen-fixing conditions compared to a mutant strain that lacked uptake hydrogenase. From this it appears that the recycling of reductant in the form of hydrogen does not have extensive nonspecific effects on gene expression in R. palustris. PMID:16923881

  1. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L; King, Paul W; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-06-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP(+)-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP(+). Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport.

  2. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L; King, Paul W; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-06-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP(+)-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP(+). Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  3. Integration of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase into the anaerobic metabolism of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciarán L.; Pinske, Constanze; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Parkin, Alison; Armstrong, Fraser; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Biohydrogen is a potentially useful product of microbial energy metabolism. One approach to engineering biohydrogen production in bacteria is the production of non-native hydrogenase activity in a host cell, for example Escherichia coli. In some microbes, hydrogenase enzymes are linked directly to central metabolism via diaphorase enzymes that utilise NAD+/NADH cofactors. In this work, it was hypothesised that heterologous production of an NAD+/NADH-linked hydrogenase could connect hydrogen production in an E. coli host directly to its central metabolism. To test this, a synthetic operon was designed and characterised encoding an apparently NADH-dependent, hydrogen-evolving [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Caldanaerobacter subterranus. The synthetic operon was stably integrated into the E. coli chromosome and shown to produce an active hydrogenase, however no H2 production was observed. Subsequently, it was found that heterologous co-production of a pyruvate::ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima was found to be essential to drive H2 production by this system. This work provides genetic evidence that the Ca.subterranus [FeFe]-hydrogenase could be operating in vivo as an electron-confurcating enzyme. PMID:26839796

  4. Identification of an uptake hydrogenase for hydrogen-dependent dissimilatory azoreduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi-Guo; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2008-09-01

    Shewanella decolorationis S12, a representative dissimilatory azo-reducing bacterium of Shewanella genus, can grow by coupling the oxidation of hydrogen to the reduction of azo compounds as the sole electron acceptor, indicating that an uptake hydrogenase is an important component for electron transfer for azoreduction. For searching to the uptake hydrogenase in the genome of S. decolorationis, two operons, hyd and hya, were cloned and sequenced, which encode periplasmically oriented Fe-only hydrogenase and a Ni-Fe hydrogenase, respectively, according to the homologous comparison with other bacterial hydrogenases. In order to assess the roles of these two enzymes in hydrogen-dependent azoreduction and growth, hyd- and hya-deficient mutants were generated by gene replacement. Hya was found to be required for hydrogen-dependent reduction of azo compound by resting cell suspensions and to be essential for growth with hydrogen as electron donor and azo compound as electron acceptor. Hyd, in contrast, was not. These findings suggest that Hya is an essential respiratory hydrogenase of dissimilatory azoreduction in S. decolorationis.

  5. Decolorization and degradation of textile dyes with biosulfidogenic hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Mutambanengwe, C C Z; Togo, C A; Whiteley, C G

    2007-01-01

    Successful decolorization of azo dyes (Orange II, Amido Black 10, Reactive Black 5, and Reactive Red 120) and industrial textile dye influents and effluents with sulfate-reducing bacteria from within a biosulfidogenic reactor was achieved with decolorizations ranging from 96% to 49% over 144 h. Concomitant with the decrease in absorbance of the dye in the visible region (480-620 nm) was an increase in the absorbance at 280 nm, over 48 h, suggesting an increase in concentration of single aromatic amines. With an extended period of time there was a subsequent decrease in the absorbance at 280 nm indicating that the aromatic amines had been degraded. The anthraquinone dye, Reactive Blue 2, remained unchanged after 144 h of incubation in the biosulfidogenic reactor and was only rapidly decolored at 192 h, implying that certain factors are induced in the reactor to break down this non-azo dye. The fastest decolorization/degradation rates and highest hydrogenase enzyme production were observed with Orange II, while the slowest decolorization/degradation rate and least enzyme production were with Reactive Blue 2, suggesting that these processes are controlled, to a certain degree, by an enzymatic mechanism. With sulfate-reducing bacteria that had been cultured on a lactate medium, there was complete decolorization of both authentic dyes and industrial influents and effluents as monitored by the decrease of absorbance in the visible region (480-620 nm). There was, however, very little breakdown of the single aromatic compounds as the absorbance at 280 nm remained fairly significant. This supports the suggestion that, within the biosulfidogenic reactor, there are factors other than the identified hydrogenases that are responsible for degradation of the aromatic compounds.

  6. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein).

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni-Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression. PMID:27547572

  7. Proton Inventory and Dynamics in the Nia-S to Nia-C Transition of a [NiFe] Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; Vansuch, Gregory E; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2016-03-29

    Hydrogenases (H2ases) represent one of the most striking examples of biological proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) chemistry, functioning in facile proton reduction and H2 oxidation involving long-range proton and electron transport. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies of the [NiFe] H2ases have identified several catalytic intermediates, but the details of their interconversion are still a matter of debate. Here we use steady state and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, sensitive to the CO ligand of the active site iron, as a probe of the proton inventory as well as electron and proton transfer dynamics in the soluble hydrogenase I from Pyrococcus furiosus. Subtle shifts in infrared signatures associated with the Nia-C and Nia-S states as a function of pH revealed an acid-base equilibrium associated with an ionizable amino acid near the active site. Protonation of this residue was found to correlate with the photoproduct distribution that results from hydride photolysis of the Nia-C state, in which one of the two photoproduct states becomes inaccessible at low pH. Additionally, the ability to generate Nia-S via PCET from Nia-C was weakened at low pH, suggesting prior protonation of the proton acceptor. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of electron and proton transfer with respect to the various proton inventories was utilized to develop a chemical model for reversible hydride oxidation involving two intermediates differing in their hydrogen bonding character.

  8. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein)

    PubMed Central

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni–Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression. PMID:27547572

  9. Construction and use of a Cupriavidus necator H16 soluble hydrogenase promoter (PSH) fusion to gfp (green fluorescent protein).

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Welch, Jeffrey; Braidy, Nady; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that reversibly catalyse the oxidation or production of molecular hydrogen (H2). Amongst a number of promising candidates for application in the oxidation of H2 is a soluble [Ni-Fe] uptake hydrogenase (SH) produced by Cupriavidus necator H16. In the present study, molecular characterisation of the SH operon, responsible for functional SH synthesis, was investigated by developing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to characterise PSH promoter activity using several gene cloning approaches. A PSH promoter-gfp fusion was successfully constructed and inducible GFP expression driven by the PSH promoter under de-repressing conditions in heterotrophic growth media was demonstrated in the recombinant C. necator H16 cells. Here we report the first successful fluorescent reporter system to study PSH promoter activity in C. necator H16. The fusion construct allowed for the design of a simple screening assay to evaluate PSH activity. Furthermore, the constructed reporter system can serve as a model to develop a rapid fluorescent based reporter for subsequent small-scale process optimisation experiments for SH expression.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the phosphate mineral barbosalite FeFe23+()2( - Implications for the molecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; López, Andrés; Scholz, Ricardo; Lana, Cristiano de Carvalho; Souza, Bárbara Firmino e.

    2013-11-01

    Natural single-crystal specimens of barbosalite from Brazil, with general formula FeFe23+()2( were investigated by Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The mineral occurs as secondary products in granitic pegmatites. The Raman spectrum of barbosalite is characterized by bands at 1020, 1033 and 1044 cm-1 cm-1, assigned to ν1 symmetric stretching mode of the HOPO33- and PO43- units. Raman bands at around 1067, 1083 and 1138 cm-1 are attributed to both the HOP and PO antisymmetric stretching vibrations. The set of Raman bands observed at 575, 589 and 606 cm-1 are assigned to the ν4 out of plane bending modes of the PO4 and H2PO4 units. Raman bands at 439, 461, 475 and 503 cm-1 are attributed to the ν2 PO4 and H2PO4 bending modes. Strong Raman bands observed at 312, 346 cm-1 with shoulder bands at 361, 381 and 398 cm-1 are assigned to FeO stretching vibrations. No bands which are attributable to water vibrations were found. Vibrational spectroscopy enables aspects of the molecular structure of barbosalite to be assessed.

  11. Distribution of hydrogenase genes in Desulforvibrio spp. and their use in identification of species from the oil field environment

    SciTech Connect

    Voordouw, G.; Niviere, V. ); Ferris, F.G. ); Fedorak, P.M.; Westlake, D.W.S. )

    1990-12-01

    The distribution of genes for (Fe), (NiFe), and (NiFeSe) hydrogenases was determined for 22 Desulfovibrio species. The genes for (NiFe) hydrogenase were present in all species, whereas those for the (Fe) and (NiFeSe) hydrogenases had a more limited distribution. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from 16S rRNA groups other than the genus Desulfovibrio did not react with the (NiFe) hydrogenase gene probe, which could be used to identify different Desulfovibrio species in oil field samples following growth on lactate-sulfate medium.

  12. Hydrogenase Activity of Mineral-Associated and Suspended Populations of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Essex 6

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Reardon; T.S. Magnuson; E.S. Boyd; W.D. Leavitt; D.W. Reed; G.G. Geesey

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate electron transfer to metals and may contribute to the formation and speciation of ferrous sulfides formed at the cell–mineral interface. In the present study, we compared the whole cell hydrogenase activity of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain Essex 6 growing as biofilms on hematite (hematite-associated) or as suspended populations using different metabolic pathways. Hematite-associated cells exhibited significantly greater hydrogenase activity than suspended populations during sulfate respiration but not during pyruvate fermentation. The enhanced activity of the hematite-associated, sulfate-grown cells appears to be dependent on iron availability rather than a general response to surface attachment since the activity of glass-associated cells did not differ from that of suspended populations. Hydrogenase activity of pyruvate-fermenting cells was stimulated by addition of iron as soluble Fe(II)Cl2 and, in the absence of added iron, both sulfate-reducing and pyruvate-fermenting cells displayed similar rates of hydrogenase activity. These data suggest that iron exerts a stronger influence on whole cell hydrogenase activity than either metabolic pathway or mode of growth. The location of hydrogenase to the cell envelope and the enhanced activity at the hematite surface in sulfate-reducing cells may influence the redox conditions that control the species of iron sulfides on the mineral surface.

  13. Essential anaplerotic role for the energy-converting hydrogenase Eha in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Thomas J.; Costa, Kyle C.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Korpole, Suresh; Whitman, William B.; Leigh, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of study, electron flow and energy conservation in methanogenic Archaea are still not thoroughly understood. For methanogens without cytochromes, flavin-based electron bifurcation has been proposed as an essential energy-conserving mechanism that couples exergonic and endergonic reactions of methanogenesis. However, an alternative hypothesis posits that the energy-converting hydrogenase Eha provides a chemiosmosis-driven electron input to the endergonic reaction. In vivo evidence for both hypotheses is incomplete. By genetically eliminating all nonessential pathways of H2 metabolism in the model methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis and using formate as an additional electron donor, we isolate electron flow for methanogenesis from flux through Eha. We find that Eha does not function stoichiometrically for methanogenesis, implying that electron bifurcation must operate in vivo. We show that Eha is nevertheless essential, and a substoichiometric requirement for H2 suggests that its role is anaplerotic. Indeed, H2 via Eha stimulates methanogenesis from formate when intermediates are not otherwise replenished. These results fit the model for electron bifurcation, which renders the methanogenic pathway cyclic, and as such requires the replenishment of intermediates. Defining a role for Eha and verifying electron bifurcation provide a complete model of methanogenesis where all necessary electron inputs are accounted for. PMID:22872868

  14. Hydrogenase Gene Distribution and H2 Consumption Ability within the Thiomicrospira Lineage.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H2↔2H(+) + 2e(-)) for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in Thiomicrospira crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment.

  15. Formaldehyde--a rapid and reversible inhibitor of hydrogen production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Wait, Annemarie F; Brandmayr, Caterina; Stripp, Sven T; Cavazza, Christine; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Happe, Thomas; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2011-02-01

    Dihydrogen (H(2)) production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases is strongly inhibited by formaldehyde (methanal) in a reaction that is rapid, reversible, and specific to this type of hydrogenase. This discovery, using three [FeFe]-hydrogenases that are homologous about the active site but otherwise structurally distinct, was made by protein film electrochemistry, which measures the activity (as electrical current) of enzymes immobilized on an electrode; importantly, the inhibitor can be removed after addition. Formaldehyde causes rapid loss of proton reduction activity which is restored when the solution is exchanged. Inhibition is confirmed by conventional solution assays. The effect depends strongly on the direction of catalysis: inhibition of H(2) oxidation is much weaker than for H(2) production, and formaldehyde also protects against CO and O(2) inactivation. By contrast, inhibition of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is weak. The results strongly suggest that formaldehyde binds at, or close to, the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases at a site unique to this class of enzyme--highly conserved lysine and cysteine residues, the bridgehead atom of the dithiolate ligand, or the reduced Fe(d) that is the focal center of catalysis.

  16. Hydrogenase Gene Distribution and H2 Consumption Ability within the Thiomicrospira Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H2↔2H+ + 2e-) for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in Thiomicrospira crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment. PMID:26903978

  17. Formaldehyde--a rapid and reversible inhibitor of hydrogen production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Wait, Annemarie F; Brandmayr, Caterina; Stripp, Sven T; Cavazza, Christine; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Happe, Thomas; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2011-02-01

    Dihydrogen (H(2)) production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases is strongly inhibited by formaldehyde (methanal) in a reaction that is rapid, reversible, and specific to this type of hydrogenase. This discovery, using three [FeFe]-hydrogenases that are homologous about the active site but otherwise structurally distinct, was made by protein film electrochemistry, which measures the activity (as electrical current) of enzymes immobilized on an electrode; importantly, the inhibitor can be removed after addition. Formaldehyde causes rapid loss of proton reduction activity which is restored when the solution is exchanged. Inhibition is confirmed by conventional solution assays. The effect depends strongly on the direction of catalysis: inhibition of H(2) oxidation is much weaker than for H(2) production, and formaldehyde also protects against CO and O(2) inactivation. By contrast, inhibition of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is weak. The results strongly suggest that formaldehyde binds at, or close to, the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenases at a site unique to this class of enzyme--highly conserved lysine and cysteine residues, the bridgehead atom of the dithiolate ligand, or the reduced Fe(d) that is the focal center of catalysis. PMID:21204519

  18. Hydrogenase Gene Distribution and H2 Consumption Ability within the Thiomicrospira Lineage.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H2↔2H(+) + 2e(-)) for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in Thiomicrospira crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment. PMID:26903978

  19. (Catalytic mechanism of hydrogenase from aerobic N sub 2 -fixing microorganisms)

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes which catalyze reactions involving dihydrogen. They serve integral roles in a number of microbial metabolic pathways. Our research is focussed on investigations of the catalytic mechanism of the hydrogenases found in aerobic, N{sub 2}-fixing microorganisms such as Azotobacter vinelandii and the agronomically important Bradyrhizobium japonicum as well as microorganisms with similar hydrogenases. The hydrogenases isolated from these microorganisms are Ni- and Fe-containing heterodimers. Our work has focussed on three areas during the last grant period. In all cases, a central theme has been the role of inhibitors in the characteristics under investigation. In addition, a number of collaborative efforts have yielded interesting results. In metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, inhibitors often influence the activity of the enzyme through ligand interactions with redox centers, often metals, within the enzyme. Therefore, investigations of the ability of various compounds to inhibit an enzyme's activity, as well as the mechanism of inhibition, can provide insight into the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme as well as the role of various redox centers in catalysis. We have investigated in detail four inhibitors of A. vinelandii and the results are summarized here. The influence of these inhibitors on the spectral properties of the enzyme are summarized. Electron paramagnetic resonance and ultraviolet spectra investigations are discussed. 9 figs.

  20. Three different [NiFe] hydrogenases confer metabolic flexibility in the obligate aerobe Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Greening, Chris; Hards, Kiel; Collins, Desmond; Cook, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is an obligate aerobe that harbours three predicted [NiFe] hydrogenases, Hyd1 (MSMEG_2262–2263), Hyd2 (MSMEG_2720-2719) and Hyd3 (MSMEG_3931-3928). We show here that these three enzymes differ in their phylogeny, regulation and catalytic activity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Hyd1 groups with hydrogenases that oxidize H2 produced by metabolic processes, and Hyd2 is homologous to a novel group of putative high-affinity hydrogenases. Hyd1 and Hyd2 respond to carbon and oxygen limitation, and, in the case of Hyd1, hydrogen supplementation. Hydrogen consumption measurements confirmed that both enzymes can oxidize hydrogen. In contrast, the phylogenetic analysis and activity measurements of Hyd3 are consistent with the enzyme evolving hydrogen. Hyd3 is controlled by DosR, a regulator that responds to hypoxic conditions. The strict dependence of hydrogen oxidation of Hyd1 and Hyd2 on oxygen suggests that the enzymes are oxygen tolerant and linked to the respiratory chain. This unique combination of hydrogenases allows M. smegmatis to oxidize hydrogen at high (Hyd1) and potentially tropospheric (Hyd2) concentrations, as well as recycle reduced equivalents by evolving hydrogen (Hyd3). The distribution of these hydrogenases throughout numerous soil and marine species of actinomycetes suggests that oxic hydrogen metabolism provides metabolic flexibility in environments with changing nutrient fluxes.

  1. Characterization of the oxygen tolerance of a hydrogenase linked to a carbon monoxide oxidation pathway in Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    PubMed

    Maness, Pin-Ching; Smolinski, Sharon; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J; Weaver, Paul F

    2002-06-01

    A hydrogenase linked to the carbon monoxide oxidation pathway in Rubrivivax gelatinosus displays tolerance to O2. When either whole-cell or membrane-free partially purified hydrogenase was stirred in full air (21% O2, 79% N2), its H2 evolution activity exhibited a half-life of 20 or 6 h, respectively, as determined by an anaerobic assay using reduced methyl viologen. When the partially purified hydrogenase was stirred in an atmosphere containing either 3.3 or 13% O2 for 15 min and evaluated by a hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange assay, nearly 80 or 60% of its isotopic exchange rate was retained, respectively. When this enzyme suspension was subsequently returned to an anaerobic atmosphere, more than 90% of the H-D exchange activity was recovered, reflecting the reversibility of this hydrogenase toward O2 inactivation. Like most hydrogenases, the CO-linked hydrogenase was extremely sensitive to CO, with 50% inhibition occurring at 3.9 microM dissolved CO. Hydrogen production from the CO-linked hydrogenase was detected when ferredoxins of a prokaryotic source were the immediate electron mediator, provided they were photoreduced by spinach thylakoid membranes containing active water-splitting activity. Based on its appreciable tolerance to O2, potential applications of this hydrogenase are discussed.

  2. Characterization of the Oxygen Tolerance of a Hydrogenase Linked to a Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Pathway in Rubrivivax gelatinosus

    PubMed Central

    Maness, Pin-Ching; Smolinski, Sharon; Dillon, Anne C.; Heben, Michael J.; Weaver, Paul F.

    2002-01-01

    A hydrogenase linked to the carbon monoxide oxidation pathway in Rubrivivax gelatinosus displays tolerance to O2. When either whole-cell or membrane-free partially purified hydrogenase was stirred in full air (21% O2, 79% N2), its H2 evolution activity exhibited a half-life of 20 or 6 h, respectively, as determined by an anaerobic assay using reduced methyl viologen. When the partially purified hydrogenase was stirred in an atmosphere containing either 3.3 or 13% O2 for 15 min and evaluated by a hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange assay, nearly 80 or 60% of its isotopic exchange rate was retained, respectively. When this enzyme suspension was subsequently returned to an anaerobic atmosphere, more than 90% of the H-D exchange activity was recovered, reflecting the reversibility of this hydrogenase toward O2 inactivation. Like most hydrogenases, the CO-linked hydrogenase was extremely sensitive to CO, with 50% inhibition occurring at 3.9 μM dissolved CO. Hydrogen production from the CO-linked hydrogenase was detected when ferredoxins of a prokaryotic source were the immediate electron mediator, provided they were photoreduced by spinach thylakoid membranes containing active water-splitting activity. Based on its appreciable tolerance to O2, potential applications of this hydrogenase are discussed. PMID:12039713

  3. [NiFe]-hydrogenase is essential for cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 aerobic growth in the dark

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Edith; Checchetto, Vanessa; Franchin, Cinzia; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Berto, Paola; Szabò, Ildikò; Giacometti, Giorgio M.; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Costantini, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has a bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Hox hydrogenase) which reversibly reduces protons to H2. This enzyme is composed of a hydrogenase domain and a diaphorase moiety, which is distinctly homologous to the NADH input module of mitochondrial respiratory Complex I. Hox hydrogenase physiological function is still unclear, since it is not required for Synechocystis fitness under standard growth conditions. We analyzed the phenotype under prolonged darkness of three Synechocystis knock-out strains, lacking either Hox hydrogenase (ΔHoxE-H) or one of the proteins responsible for the assembly of its NiFe active site (ΔHypA1 and ΔHypB1). We found that Hox hydrogenase is required for Synechocystis growth under this condition, regardless of the functional status of its catalytic site, suggesting an additional role beside hydrogen metabolism. Moreover, quantitative proteomic analyses revealed that the expression levels of several subunits of the respiratory NADPH/plastoquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1) are reduced when Synechocystis is grown in the dark. Our findings suggest that the Hox hydrogenase could contribute to electron transport regulation when both photosynthetic and respiratory pathways are down-regulated, and provide a possible explanation for the close evolutionary relationship between mitochondrial respiratory Complex I and cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenases. PMID:26215212

  4. A modular system for regeneration of NAD cofactors using graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and diaphorase moieties.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Holly A; Lauterbach, Lars; Ash, Philip A; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Kylie A

    2012-02-01

    Pyrolytic graphite particles modified with hydrogenase and an NAD(+)/NADH cycling enzyme provide a modular heterogeneous catalyst system for regeneration of oxidised or reduced nicotinamide cofactors using H(2) and H(+) as electron source or sink. Particles can be tuned for cofactor supply under different conditions by appropriate choice of hydrogenase. PMID:21986817

  5. [{Fe(tim)}2]: an Fe-Fe dimer containing an unsupported metal-metal bond and redox-active N4 macrocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Hess, Corinna R; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Bill, Eckhard; Wieghardt, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Mixed doubles: The dimeric complex [{Fe(tim)}(2)] (see structure, tim = 2,3,9,10-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-1,3,8,10-tetraene) represents an unprecedented complex containing an unsupported Fe-Fe bond. The crystal structure confirms the presence of reduced tim units, thus indicating ligand redox activity. Spectroscopic and computational studies establish a triplet ground state for [{Fe(tim)}(2)] and suggest a mixed-valence compound with respect to both the Fe ions and the ligands.

  6. Dihydrogen activation by a diruthenium analogue of the Fe-only hydrogenase active site.

    PubMed

    Justice, Aaron K; Linck, Rachel C; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Wilson, Scott R

    2004-10-20

    The photochemical reaction of Ru2(S2C3H6)(CO)4(PCy3)2 (1) and H2 gives the dihydride Ru2(S2C3H6)(mu-H)(H)(CO)3(PCy3)2 (2). NMR and crystallographic studies reveal mutually trans basal phosphine ligands and both bridging and terminal hydrides. Ru2(S2C2H4)(CO)4(PCy3)2 behaves similarly. Other HX substrates undergo photoaddition to 1, affording Ru2(S2C3H6)(mu-H)(X)(CO)3(PCy3)2 for X = OTs (3a), Cl (3b), and SPh (3c). Treatment of Ru2(S2C3H6)(mu-H)(H)(CO)3(PCy3)2 with [H(OEt2)]BArF4 (ArF = B(C6H3-3,5-(CF3)2) in CD2Cl2 gives [Ru2(S2C3H6)(mu-H)(CO)3(PCy3)2(H2)]+ (4), which catalyzes H2-D2 exchange. The reaction of 2 with [D(OEt2)]BArF4 gave [Ru2(S2C3H6)(mu-H)(CO)3(PCy3)2(HD)]+ (JH-D = 31 Hz). These studies provide the first models for the Fe-only hydrogenases that bear dihydrogen and terminal hydrido ligands. PMID:15479062

  7. Advances in the Function and Regulation of Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Veaudor, Théo; Chauvat, Franck

    2014-01-01

    In order to use cyanobacteria for the biological production of hydrogen, it is important to thoroughly study the function and the regulation of the hydrogen-production machine in order to better understand its role in the global cell metabolism and identify bottlenecks limiting H2 production. Most of the recent advances in our understanding of the bidirectional [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (Hox) came from investigations performed in the widely-used model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 where Hox is the sole enzyme capable of combining electrons with protons to produce H2 under specific conditions. Recent findings suggested that the Hox enzyme can receive electrons from not only NAD(P)H as usually shown, but also, or even preferentially, from ferredoxin. Furthermore, plasmid-encoded functions and glutathionylation (the formation of a mixed-disulfide between the cysteines residues of a protein and the cysteine residue of glutathione) are proposed as possible new players in the function and regulation of hydrogen production. PMID:25365180

  8. Dual role of HupF in the biosynthesis of [NiFe] hydrogenase in Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background [NiFe] hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of hydrogen into protons and electrons, to use H2 as energy source, or the production of hydrogen through proton reduction, as an escape valve for the excess of reduction equivalents in anaerobic metabolism. Biosynthesis of [NiFe] hydrogenases is a complex process that occurs in the cytoplasm, where a number of auxiliary proteins are required to synthesize and insert the metal cofactors into the enzyme structural units. The endosymbiotic bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum requires the products of eighteen genes (hupSLCDEFGHIJKhypABFCDEX) to synthesize an active hydrogenase. hupF and hupK genes are found only in hydrogenase clusters from bacteria expressing hydrogenase in the presence of oxygen. Results HupF is a HypC paralogue with a similar predicted structure, except for the C-terminal domain present only in HupF. Deletion of hupF results in the inability to process the hydrogenase large subunit HupL, and also in reduced stability of this subunit when cells are exposed to high oxygen tensions. A ΔhupF mutant was fully complemented for hydrogenase activity by a C-terminal deletion derivative under symbiotic, ultra low-oxygen tensions, but only partial complementation was observed in free living cells under higher oxygen tensions (1% or 3%). Co-purification experiments using StrepTag-labelled HupF derivatives and mass spectrometry analysis indicate the existence of a major complex involving HupL and HupF, and a less abundant HupF-HupK complex. Conclusions The results indicate that HupF has a dual role during hydrogenase biosynthesis: it is required for hydrogenase large subunit processing and it also acts as a chaperone to stabilize HupL when hydrogenase is synthesized in the presence of oxygen. PMID:23136881

  9. Mechanism of inhibition of NiFe hydrogenase by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Pierre; Etienne, Emilien; Dementin, Sébastien; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Léger, Christophe; Burlat, Bénédicte

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogenases reversibly catalyze the oxidation of molecular hydrogen and are inhibited by several small molecules including O2, CO and NO. In the present work, we investigate the mechanism of inhibition by NO of the oxygen-sensitive NiFe hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans by coupling site-directed mutagenesis, protein film voltammetry (PFV) and EPR spectroscopy. We show that micromolar NO strongly inhibits NiFe hydrogenase and that the mechanism of inhibition is complex, with NO targeting several metallic sites in the protein. NO reacts readily at the NiFe active site according to a two-step mechanism. The first and faster step is the reversible binding of NO to the active site followed by a slower and irreversible transformation at the active site. NO also induces irreversible damage of the iron-sulfur centers chain. We give direct evidence of preferential nitrosylation of the medial [3Fe-4S] to form dinitrosyl-iron complexes. PMID:26827939

  10. Immobilization of isolated and cellular hydrogenase of D. desulfuricans in radiation-polymerized polyacrylamides

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek, E.; Martin, W.G.; Williams, R.E.

    1984-02-01

    Purified hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was immobilized either by entrapment or absorption onto porous neutral and charged acrylamide beads. Surface absorption and crosslinking on the beads resulted in a high hydrogenase activity and a good immobilization coefficient compared to the enzyme and whole cells entrapped in the same matrix. Maximum enzyme activity (citrate-phosphate buffer) was shifted to pH 6.5 upon immobilization in contrast to 6.0 for the free enzyme and the range of 6-7 for whole cells. Both the purified enzyme and whole cells were most active when held in neutral matrices. Immobilization improved the temperature stability (65 degrees C) and long term storage (4 degrees C) of the hydrogenase activity of both the purified enzyme and whole cells.

  11. Immobilization of isolated and cellular hydrogenase of D. desulfuricans in radiation-polymerized polyacrylamides.

    PubMed

    Ziomek, E; Martin, W G; Williams, R E

    1984-02-01

    Purified hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was immobilized either by entrapment or absorption onto porous neutral and charged acrylamide beads. Surface absorption and crosslinking on the beads resulted in a high hydrogenase activity and a good immobilization coefficient compared to the enzyme and whole cells entrapped in the same matrix. Maximum enzyme activity (citrate-phosphate buffer) was shifted to pH 6.5 upon immobilization in contrast to 6.0 for the free enzyme and the range of 6-7 for whole cells. Both the purified enzyme and whole cells were most active when held in neutral matrices. Immobilization improved the temperature stability (65 degrees C) and long term storage (4 degrees C) of the hydrogenase activity of both the purified enzyme and whole cells. PMID:6383215

  12. Hydrogenases in green algae: do they save the algae's life and solve our energy problems?

    PubMed

    Happe, Thomas; Hemschemeier, Anja; Winkler, Martin; Kaminski, Annette

    2002-06-01

    Green algae are the only known eukaryotes with both oxygenic photosynthesis and a hydrogen metabolism. Recent physiological and genetic discoveries indicate a close connection between these metabolic pathways. The anaerobically inducible hydA genes of algae encode a special type of highly active [Fe]-hydrogenase. Electrons from reducing equivalents generated during fermentation enter the photosynthetic electron transport chain via the plastoquinone pool. They are transferred to the hydrogenase by photosystem I and ferredoxin. Thus, the [Fe]-hydrogenase is an electron 'valve' that enables the algae to survive under anaerobic conditions. During sulfur deprivation, illuminated algal cultures evolve large quantities of hydrogen gas, and this promises to be an alternative future energy source. PMID:12049920

  13. Immobilized chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase system for the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Greenbaum, E.

    1983-01-01

    The chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase (CFH) system is capable of the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen using water as the source of electrons. The immobilization of chloroplasts and hydrogenase, which has been the subject of several reports, has been attempted in order to increase their storage and functional stability. However, immobilized chloroplasts and hydrogenase have never been shown to produce hydrogen and oxygen simultaneously. The simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen is a valuable guide in assessing the role of water as the primary substrate in biophotolysis. As has been shown previously, the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen to oxygen is, in general, not equal to two. By measuring the oxygen that is produced along with the hydrogen, it is possible to set an upper limit on the photoproduced hydrogen that is derived from water. The study reported here describes for the first time the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by the CFH system immobilized in calcium alginate gel spheres.

  14. Hydrogen Formation and Its Regulation in Ruminococcus albus: Involvement of an Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase, of a Non-Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase, and of a Putative Hydrogen-Sensing [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanning; Kahnt, Jörg; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2014-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 has played a key role in the development of the concept of interspecies hydrogen transfer. The rumen bacterium ferments glucose to 1.3 acetate, 0.7 ethanol, 2 CO2, and 2.6 H2 when growing in batch culture and to 2 acetate, 2 CO2, and 4 H2 when growing in continuous culture in syntrophic association with H2-consuming microorganisms that keep the H2 partial pressure low. The organism uses NAD+ and ferredoxin for glucose oxidation to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and CO2, NADH for the reduction of acetyl-CoA to ethanol, and NADH and reduced ferredoxin for the reduction of protons to H2. Of all the enzymes involved, only the enzyme catalyzing the formation of H2 from NADH remained unknown. Here, we report that R. albus 7 grown in batch culture on glucose contained, besides a ferredoxin-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydA2), a ferredoxin- and NAD-dependent electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase (HydABC) that couples the endergonic formation of H2 from NADH to the exergonic formation of H2 from reduced ferredoxin. Interestingly, hydA2 is adjacent to the hydS gene, which is predicted to encode an [FeFe]-hydrogenase with a C-terminal PAS domain. We showed that hydS and hydA2 are part of a larger transcriptional unit also harboring putative genes for a bifunctional acetaldehyde/ethanol dehydrogenase (Aad), serine/threonine protein kinase, serine/threonine protein phosphatase, and a redox-sensing transcriptional repressor. Since HydA2 and Aad are required only when R. albus grows at high H2 partial pressures, HydS could be a H2-sensing [FeFe]-hydrogenase involved in the regulation of their biosynthesis. PMID:25157086

  15. Engineering Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus to Overproduce Its Cytoplasmic [NiFe]-Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; McTernan, Patrick M.; Hopkins, R. Christopher; Sun, Junsong; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2012-01-01

    The cytoplasmic hydrogenase (SHI) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is an NADP(H)-dependent heterotetrameric enzyme that contains a nickel-iron catalytic site, flavin, and six iron-sulfur clusters. It has potential utility in a range of bioenergy systems in vitro, but a major obstacle in its use is generating sufficient amounts. We have engineered P. furiosus to overproduce SHI utilizing a recently developed genetic system. In the overexpression (OE-SHI) strain, transcription of the four-gene SHI operon was under the control of a strong constitutive promoter, and a Strep-tag II was added to the N terminus of one subunit. OE-SHI and wild-type P. furiosus strains had similar rates of growth and H2 production on maltose. Strain OE-SHI had a 20-fold higher transcription of the polycistronic hydrogenase mRNA encoding SHI, and the specific activity of the cytoplasmic hydrogenase was ∼10-fold higher when compared with the wild-type strain, although the expression levels of genes encoding processing and maturation of SHI were the same in both strains. Overexpressed SHI was purified by a single affinity chromatography step using the Strep-tag II, and it and the native form had comparable activities and physical properties. Based on protein yield per gram of cells (wet weight), the OE-SHI strain yields a 100-fold higher amount of hydrogenase when compared with the highest homologous [NiFe]-hydrogenase system previously reported (from Synechocystis). This new P. furiosus system will allow further engineering of SHI and provide hydrogenase for efficient in vitro biohydrogen production. PMID:22157005

  16. Evolutionary and Biotechnological Implications of Robust Hydrogenase Activity in Halophilic Strains of Tetraselmis

    PubMed Central

    D'Adamo, Sarah; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Boyd, Eric S.; Brown, Susan L.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Peters, John W.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Although significant advances in H2 photoproduction have recently been realized in fresh water algae (e.g. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), relatively few studies have focused on H2 production and hydrogenase adaptations in marine or halophilic algae. Salt water organisms likely offer several advantages for biotechnological H2 production due to the global abundance of salt water, decreased H2 and O2 solubility in saline and hypersaline systems, and the ability of extracellular NaCl levels to influence metabolism. We screened unialgal isolates obtained from hypersaline ecosystems in the southwest United States and identified two distinct halophilic strains of the genus Tetraselmis (GSL1 and QNM1) that exhibit both robust fermentative and photo H2-production activities. The influence of salinity (3.5%, 5.5% and 7.0% w/v NaCl) on H2 production was examined during anoxic acclimation, with the greatest in vivo H2-production rates observed at 7.0% NaCl. These Tetraselmis strains maintain robust hydrogenase activity even after 24 h of anoxic acclimation and show increased hydrogenase activity relative to C. reinhardtii after extended anoxia. Transcriptional analysis of Tetraselmis GSL1 enabled sequencing of the cDNA encoding the FeFe-hydrogenase structural enzyme (HYDA) and its maturation proteins (HYDE, HYDEF and HYDG). In contrast to freshwater Chlorophyceae, the halophilic Tetraselmis GSL1 strain likely encodes a single HYDA and two copies of HYDE, one of which is fused to HYDF. Phylogenetic analyses of HYDA and concatenated HYDA, HYDE, HYDF and HYDG in Tetraselmis GSL1 fill existing knowledge gaps in the evolution of algal hydrogenases and indicate that the algal hydrogenases sequenced to date are derived from a common ancestor. This is consistent with recent hypotheses that suggest fermentative metabolism in the majority of eukaryotes is derived from a common base set of enzymes that emerged early in eukaryotic evolution with subsequent losses in some organisms. PMID

  17. Evolutionary and biotechnological implications of robust hydrogenase activity in halophilic strains of Tetraselmis.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, Sarah; Jinkerson, Robert E; Boyd, Eric S; Brown, Susan L; Baxter, Bonnie K; Peters, John W; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    Although significant advances in H2 photoproduction have recently been realized in fresh water algae (e.g. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), relatively few studies have focused on H2 production and hydrogenase adaptations in marine or halophilic algae. Salt water organisms likely offer several advantages for biotechnological H2 production due to the global abundance of salt water, decreased H2 and O2 solubility in saline and hypersaline systems, and the ability of extracellular NaCl levels to influence metabolism. We screened unialgal isolates obtained from hypersaline ecosystems in the southwest United States and identified two distinct halophilic strains of the genus Tetraselmis (GSL1 and QNM1) that exhibit both robust fermentative and photo H2-production activities. The influence of salinity (3.5%, 5.5% and 7.0% w/v NaCl) on H2 production was examined during anoxic acclimation, with the greatest in vivo H2-production rates observed at 7.0% NaCl. These Tetraselmis strains maintain robust hydrogenase activity even after 24 h of anoxic acclimation and show increased hydrogenase activity relative to C. reinhardtii after extended anoxia. Transcriptional analysis of Tetraselmis GSL1 enabled sequencing of the cDNA encoding the FeFe-hydrogenase structural enzyme (HYDA) and its maturation proteins (HYDE, HYDEF and HYDG). In contrast to freshwater Chlorophyceae, the halophilic Tetraselmis GSL1 strain likely encodes a single HYDA and two copies of HYDE, one of which is fused to HYDF. Phylogenetic analyses of HYDA and concatenated HYDA, HYDE, HYDF and HYDG in Tetraselmis GSL1 fill existing knowledge gaps in the evolution of algal hydrogenases and indicate that the algal hydrogenases sequenced to date are derived from a common ancestor. This is consistent with recent hypotheses that suggest fermentative metabolism in the majority of eukaryotes is derived from a common base set of enzymes that emerged early in eukaryotic evolution with subsequent losses in some organisms. PMID

  18. Flow-FISH analysis and isolation of clostridial strains in an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen producing system by hydrogenase gene target.

    PubMed

    Jen, Chang Jui; Chou, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Chen, Wei-En; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Wen, Fu-Shyan

    2007-04-01

    By using hydrogenase gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), the predominant clostridial hydrogenase that may have contributed to biohydrogen production in an anaerobic semi-solid fermentation system has been monitored. The results revealed that a Clostridium pasteurianum-like hydrogenase gene sequence can be detected by both PCR and RT-PCR and suggested that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene was dominant in hydrogenase activity and population. Whereas another Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene can be detected only by RT-PCR and suggest that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene may be less dominant in population. In this study, hydrogenase gene-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that only 6.6% of the total eubacterial cells in a hydrogen-producing culture were detected to express the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase, whereas the eubacteria that expressed the C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase was 25.6%. A clostridial strain M1 possessing the identical nucleotide sequences of the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene was then isolated and identified as Clostridium butyricum based on 16S rRNA sequence. Comparing to the original inoculum with mixed microflora, either using C. butyricum M1 as the only inoculum or co-culturing with a Bacillus thermoamylovorans isolate will guarantee an effective and even better production of hydrogen from brewery yeast waste.

  19. Hydrogen Production by a Hyperthermophilic Membrane-Bound Hydrogenase in Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S E; Hopkins, R C; Blanchette, C; Walsworth, V; Sumbad, R; Fischer, N; Kuhn, E; Coleman, M; Chromy, B; Letant, S; Hoeprich, P; Adams, M W; Henderson, P T

    2008-10-22

    Hydrogenases constitute a promising class of enzymes for ex vivo hydrogen production. Implementation of such applications is currently hindered by oxygen sensitivity and, in the case of membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH), poor water solubility. Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), formed from apolipoproteins and phospholipids, offer a novel means to incorporate MBH into in a well-defined water-soluble matrix that maintains the enzymatic activity and is amenable to incorporation into more complex architectures. We report the synthesis, hydrogen-evolving activity and physical characterization of the first MBH-NLP assembly. This may ultimately lead to the development of biomimetic hydrogen production devices.

  20. Conserved Amino Acid Sequence Features in the α Subunits of MoFe, VFe, and FeFe Nitrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Kechris, Katerina J.

    2009-01-01

    Background This study examines the structural features and phylogeny of the α subunits of 69 full-length NifD (MoFe subunit), VnfD (VFe subunit), and AnfD (FeFe subunit) sequences. Methodology/Principal Findings The analyses of this set of sequences included BLAST scores, multiple sequence alignment, examination of patterns of covariant residues, phylogenetic analysis and comparison of the sequences flanking the conserved Cys and His residues that attach the FeMo cofactor to NifD and that are also conserved in the alternative nitrogenases. The results show that NifD nitrogenases fall into two distinct groups. Group I includes NifD sequences from many genera within Bacteria, including all nitrogen-fixing aerobes examined, as well as strict anaerobes and some facultative anaerobes, but no archaeal sequences. In contrast, Group II NifD sequences were limited to a small number of archaeal and bacterial sequences from strict anaerobes. The VnfD and AnfD sequences fall into two separate groups, more closely related to Group II NifD than to Group I NifD. The pattern of perfectly conserved residues, distributed along the full length of the Group I and II NifD, VnfD, and AnfD, confirms unambiguously that these polypeptides are derived from a common ancestral sequence. Conclusions/Significance There is no indication of a relationship between the patterns of covariant residues specific to each of the four groups discussed above that would give indications of an evolutionary pathway leading from one type of nitrogenase to another. Rather the totality of the data, along with the phylogenetic analysis, is consistent with a radiation of Group I and II NifDs, VnfD and AnfD from a common ancestral sequence. All the data presented here strongly support the suggestion made by some earlier investigators that the nitrogenase family had already evolved in the last common ancestor of the Archaea and Bacteria. PMID:19578539

  1. A Core-Shell Fe/Fe2 O3 Nanowire as a High-Performance Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Na, Zhaolin; Huang, Gang; Liang, Fei; Yin, Dongming; Wang, Limin

    2016-08-16

    The preparation of novel one-dimensional core-shell Fe/Fe2 O3 nanowires as anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) is reported. The nanowires are prepared in a facile synthetic process in aqueous solution under ambient conditions with subsequent annealing treatment that could tune the capacity for lithium storage. When this hybrid is used as an anode material for LIBs, the outer Fe2 O3 shell can act as an electrochemically active material to store and release lithium ions, whereas the highly conductive and inactive Fe core functions as nothing more than an efficient electrical conducting pathway and a remarkable buffer to tolerate volume changes of the electrode materials during the insertion and extraction of lithium ions. The core-shell Fe/Fe2 O3 nanowire maintains an excellent reversible capacity of over 767 mA h g(-1) at 500 mA g(-1) after 200 cycles with a high average Coulombic efficiency of 98.6 %. Even at 2000 mA g(-1) , a stable capacity as high as 538 mA h g(-1) could be obtained. The unique composition and nanostructure of this electrode material contribute to this enhanced electrochemical performance. Due to the ease of large-scale fabrication and superior electrochemical performance, these hybrid nanowires are promising anode materials for the next generation of high-performance LIBs. PMID:27406922

  2. Negative impact of oxygen molecular activation on Cr(VI) removal with core-shell Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yi; Wu, Hao; Ai, Zhihui

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that the presence of oxygen molecule can inhibit Cr(VI) removal with core-shell Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires at neutral pH of 6.1. 100% of Cr(VI) removal was achieved by the Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires within 60 min in the anoxic condition, in contrast, only 81.2% of Cr(VI) was sequestrated in the oxic condition. Removal kinetics analysis indicated that the presence of oxygen could inhibit the Cr(VI) removal efficiency by near 3 times. XRD, SEM, and XPS analysis revealed that either the anoxic or oxic Cr(VI) removal was involved with adsorption, reduction, co-precipitation, and re-adsorption processes. More Cr(VI) was bound in a reduced state of Cr(III) in the anoxic process, while a thicker Cr(III)/Fe(III)/Cr(VI) oxyhydroxides shell, leading to inhibiting the electron transfer, was found under the oxic process. The negative impact of oxygen molecule was attributed to the oxygen molecular activation which competed with Cr(VI) adsorbed for the consumption of donor electrons from Fe(0) core and ferrous ions bound on the iron oxides surface under the oxic condition. This study sheds light on the understanding of the fate and transport of Cr(VI) in oxic and anoxic environment, as well provides helpful guide for optimizing Cr(VI) removal conditions in real applications.

  3. Function of the Chloroplast Hydrogenase in the Microalga Chlamydomonas: The Role of Hydrogenase and State Transitions during Photosynthetic Activation in Anaerobiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghysels, Bart; Godaux, Damien; Matagne, René F.; Cardol, Pierre; Franck, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Like a majority of photosynthetic microorganisms, the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may encounter O2 deprived conditions on a regular basis. In response to anaerobiosis or in a respiration defective context, the photosynthetic electron transport chain of Chlamydomonas is remodeled by a state transition process to a conformation that favours the photoproduction of ATP at the expense of reductant synthesis. In some unicellular green algae including Chlamydomonas, anoxia also triggers the induction of a chloroplast-located, oxygen sensitive hydrogenase, which accepts electrons from reduced ferredoxin to convert protons into molecular hydrogen. Although microalgal hydrogen evolution has received much interest for its biotechnological potential, its physiological role remains unclear. By using specific Chlamydomonas mutants, we demonstrate that the state transition ability and the hydrogenase function are both critical for induction of photosynthesis in anoxia. These two processes are thus important for survival of the cells when they are transiently placed in an anaerobic environment. PMID:23717558

  4. Function of the chloroplast hydrogenase in the microalga Chlamydomonas: the role of hydrogenase and state transitions during photosynthetic activation in anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Ghysels, Bart; Godaux, Damien; Matagne, René F; Cardol, Pierre; Franck, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Like a majority of photosynthetic microorganisms, the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may encounter O2 deprived conditions on a regular basis. In response to anaerobiosis or in a respiration defective context, the photosynthetic electron transport chain of Chlamydomonas is remodeled by a state transition process to a conformation that favours the photoproduction of ATP at the expense of reductant synthesis. In some unicellular green algae including Chlamydomonas, anoxia also triggers the induction of a chloroplast-located, oxygen sensitive hydrogenase, which accepts electrons from reduced ferredoxin to convert protons into molecular hydrogen. Although microalgal hydrogen evolution has received much interest for its biotechnological potential, its physiological role remains unclear. By using specific Chlamydomonas mutants, we demonstrate that the state transition ability and the hydrogenase function are both critical for induction of photosynthesis in anoxia. These two processes are thus important for survival of the cells when they are transiently placed in an anaerobic environment. PMID:23717558

  5. Mutational analysis of the hyc-operon determining the relationship between hydrogenase-3 and NADH pathway in Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jian; Jawed, Muhammad; Wang, Jun; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the hydrogenase-3 gene cluster (hycDEFGH) was isolated and identified from Enterobacter aerogenes CCTCC AB91102. All gene products were highly homologous to the reported bacterial hydrogenase-3 (Hyd-3) proteins. The genes hycE, hycF, hycG encoding the subunits of hydrogenase-3 were targeted for genetic knockout to inhibit the FHL hydrogen production pathway via the Red recombination system, generating three mutant strains AB91102-E (ΔhycE), AB91102-F (ΔhycF) and AB91102-G (ΔhycG). Deletion of the three genes affected the integrity of hydrogenase-3. The hydrogen production experiments with the mutant strains showed that no hydrogen was detected compared with the wild type (0.886 mol/mol glucose), demonstrating that knocking out any of the three genes could inhibit NADH hydrogen production pathway. Meanwhile, the metabolites of the mutant strains were significantly changed in comparison with the wild type, indicating corresponding changes in metabolic flux by mutation. Additionally, the activity of NADH-mediated hydrogenase was found to be nil in the mutant strains. The chemostat experiments showed that the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the mutant strains increased nearly 1.4-fold compared with the wild type. The NADH-mediated hydrogenase activity and NADH/NAD(+) ratio analysis both suggested that NADH pathway required the involvement of the electron transport chain of hydrogenase-3.

  6. The Uptake Hydrogenase in the Unicellular Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Strain PCC 7822 Protects Nitrogenase from Oxygen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Sherman, Debra M.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can produce large quantities of H2 when grown diazotrophically. This strain is also capable of genetic manipulations and can represent a good model for improving H2 production from cyanobacteria. To this end, a knockout mutation was made in the hupL gene (ΔhupL), and we determined how this would affect the amount of H2 produced. The ΔhupL mutant demonstrated virtually no nitrogenase activity or H2 production when grown under N2-fixing conditions. To ensure that this mutation only affected the hupL gene, a complementation strain was constructed readily with wild-type properties; this indicated that the original insertion was only in hupL. The mutant had no uptake hydrogenase activity but had increased bidirectional hydrogenase (Hox) activity. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry under the electron microscope indicated that the mutant had neither HupL nor NifHDK, although the nif genes were transcribed. Interestingly, biochemical analysis demonstrated that both HupL and NifH could be membrane associated. The results indicated that the nif genes were transcribed but that NifHDK was either not translated or was translated but rapidly degraded. We hypothesized that the Nif proteins were made but were unusually susceptible to O2 damage. Thus, we grew the mutant cells under anaerobic conditions and found that they grew well under N2-fixing conditions. We conclude that in unicellular diazotrophs, like Cyanothece sp. strain PCC 7822, the HupLS complex helps remove oxygen from the nitrogenase, and that this is a more important function than merely oxidizing the H2 produced by the nitrogenase. PMID:24317398

  7. Powerful fermentative hydrogen evolution of photosynthate in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya aestuarii BL J mediated by a bidirectional hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ankita; Parameswaran, Prathap; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered good models for biohydrogen production because they are relatively simple organisms with a demonstrable ability to generate H2 under certain physiological conditions. However, most produce only little H2, revert readily to H2 consumption, and suffer from hydrogenase sensitivity to O2. Strains of the cyanobacteria Lyngbya aestuarii and Microcoleus chthonoplastes obtained from marine intertidal cyanobacterial mats were recently found to display much better H2 production potential. Because of their ecological origin in environments that become quickly anoxic in the dark, we hypothesized that this differential ability may have evolved to serve a role in the fermentation of the photosynthate. Here we show that, when forced to ferment internal substrate, these cyanobacteria display desirable characteristics of physiological H2 production. Among them, the strain L. aestuarii BL J had the fastest specific rates and attained the highest H2 concentrations during fermentation of photosynthate, which proceeded via a mixed acid fermentation pathway to yield acetate, ethanol, lactate, H2, CO2, and pyruvate. Contrary to expectations, the H2 yield per mole of glucose was only average compared to that of other cyanobacteria. Thermodynamic analyses point to the use of electron donors more electronegative than NAD(P)H in Lyngbya hydrogenases as the basis for its strong H2 production ability. In any event, the high specific rates and H2 concentrations coupled with the lack of reversibility of the enzyme, at the expense of internal, photosynthetically generated reductants, makes L. aestuarii BL J and/or its enzymes, a potentially feasible platform for large-scale H2 production. PMID:25540642

  8. Flexible plastic bioreactors for photobiological hydrogen production by hydrogenase-deficient cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kitashima, Masaharu; Masukawa, Hajime; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Inoue, Kazuhito

    2012-01-01

    Uptake hydrogenase mutant cells of the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7422 photobiologically produced H(2) catalyzed by nitrogenase for several days in H(2)-barrier transparent plastic bags, and accumulated H(2) in the presence of O(2) evolved by photosynthesis. Their H(2) production activity was higher in the sealed flexible bags than in stoppered serum bottles of fixed gas volume.

  9. Hydrogenase activity of mineral-associated and suspended populations of Desulfovibrio Desulfuricans Essex 6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interactions between sulfate-reducing microorganisms and iron oxides influence a number of important redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes including the formation of iron sulfides. Enzymes, such as hydrogenase which catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen, are known to mediate...

  10. Lyophilization protects [FeFe]-hydrogenases against O2-induced H-cluster degradation

    PubMed Central

    Noth, Jens; Kositzki, Ramona; Klein, Kathrin; Winkler, Martin; Haumann, Michael; Happe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nature has developed an impressive repertoire of metal-based enzymes that perform complex chemical reactions under moderate conditions. Catalysts that produce molecular hydrogen (H2) are particularly promising for renewable energy applications. Unfortunately, natural and chemical H2-catalysts are often irreversibly degraded by molecular oxygen (O2). Here we present a straightforward procedure based on freeze-drying (lyophilization), that turns [FeFe]-hydrogenases, which are excellent H2-producers, but typically extremely O2-sensitive in solution, into enzymes that are fully resistant against O2. Complete dryness protects and conserves both, the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins and their inorganic active-site cofactor (H-cluster), when exposed to 100% O2 for days. The full H2-formation capacity is restored after solvation of the lyophilized enzymes. However, even minimal moisturizing re-establishes O2-sensitivity. The dry [FeFe]-hydrogenase material is superior also for advanced spectroscopic investigations on the H-cluster reaction mechanism. Our method provides a convenient way for long-term storage and impacts on potential biotechnological hydrogen production applications of hydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26364994

  11. A redox hydrogel protects hydrogenase from high-potential deactivation and oxygen damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumeré, Nicolas; Rüdiger, Olaf; Oughli, Alaa Alsheikh; Williams, Rhodri; Vivekananthan, Jeevanthi; Pöller, Sascha; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogenases are nature's efficient catalysts for both the generation of energy via oxidation of molecular hydrogen and the production of hydrogen via the reduction of protons. However, their O2 sensitivity and deactivation at high potential limit their applications in practical devices, such as fuel cells. Here, we show that the integration of an O2-sensitive hydrogenase into a specifically designed viologen-based redox polymer protects the enzyme from O2 damage and high-potential deactivation. Electron transfer between the polymer-bound viologen moieties controls the potential applied to the active site of the hydrogenase and thus insulates the enzyme from excessive oxidative stress. Under catalytic turnover, electrons provided from the hydrogen oxidation reaction induce viologen-catalysed O2 reduction at the polymer surface, thus providing self-activated protection from O2. The advantages of this tandem protection are demonstrated using a single-compartment biofuel cell based on an O2-sensitive hydrogenase and H2/O2 mixed feed under anode-limiting conditions.

  12. Metabolic control of Clostridium thermocellum via inhibition of hydrogenase activity and the glucose transport rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium thermocellum has the ability to catabolize cellulosic biomass into ethanol, but acetic acid, lactic acid, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen gas (H2) are also produced. The effect of hydrogenase inhibitors (H2, carbon monoxide (CO) and methyl viologen) on product selectivity was investigated....

  13. Lyophilization protects [FeFe]-hydrogenases against O2-induced H-cluster degradation.

    PubMed

    Noth, Jens; Kositzki, Ramona; Klein, Kathrin; Winkler, Martin; Haumann, Michael; Happe, Thomas

    2015-09-14

    Nature has developed an impressive repertoire of metal-based enzymes that perform complex chemical reactions under moderate conditions. Catalysts that produce molecular hydrogen (H2) are particularly promising for renewable energy applications. Unfortunately, natural and chemical H2-catalysts are often irreversibly degraded by molecular oxygen (O2). Here we present a straightforward procedure based on freeze-drying (lyophilization), that turns [FeFe]-hydrogenases, which are excellent H2-producers, but typically extremely O2-sensitive in solution, into enzymes that are fully resistant against O2. Complete dryness protects and conserves both, the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins and their inorganic active-site cofactor (H-cluster), when exposed to 100% O2 for days. The full H2-formation capacity is restored after solvation of the lyophilized enzymes. However, even minimal moisturizing re-establishes O2-sensitivity. The dry [FeFe]-hydrogenase material is superior also for advanced spectroscopic investigations on the H-cluster reaction mechanism. Our method provides a convenient way for long-term storage and impacts on potential biotechnological hydrogen production applications of hydrogenase enzymes.

  14. Theoretical 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy: isomer shifts of [Fe]-hydrogenase intermediates.

    PubMed

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan; Knecht, Stefan; Ryde, Ulf; Kongsted, Jacob; Saue, Trond

    2014-03-14

    Mössbauer spectroscopy is an indispensable spectroscopic technique and analytical tool in iron coordination chemistry. The linear correlation between the electron density at the nucleus ("contact density") and experimental isomer shifts has been used to link calculated contact densities to experimental isomer shifts. Here we have investigated relativistic methods of systematically increasing sophistication, including the eXact 2-Component (X2C) Hamiltonian and a finite-nucleus model, for the calculation of isomer shifts of iron compounds. While being of similar accuracy as the full four-component treatment, X2C calculations are far more efficient. We find that effects of spin-orbit coupling can safely be neglected, leading to further speedup. Linear correlation plots using effective densities rather than contact densities versus experimental isomer shift lead to a correlation constant a = -0.294 a0(-3) mm s(-1) (PBE functional) which is close to an experimentally derived value. Isomer shifts of similar quality can thus be obtained both with and without fitting, which is not the case if one pursues a priori a non-relativistic model approach. As an application for a biologically relevant system, we have studied three recently proposed [Fe]-hydrogenase intermediates. The structures of these intermediates were extracted from QM/MM calculations using large QM regions surrounded by the full enzyme and a solvation shell of water molecules. We show that a comparison between calculated and experimentally observed isomer shifts can be used to discriminate between different intermediates, whereas calculated atomic charges do not necessarily correlate with Mössbauer isomer shifts. Detailed analysis reveals that the difference in isomer shifts between two intermediates is due to an overlap effect.

  15. Characterization of the CO-induced, CO-tolerant hydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum and the gene encoding the large subunit of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J D; Kerby, R L; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1996-01-01

    In the presence of carbon monoxide, the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum induces expression of proteins which allow the organism to metabolize carbon monoxide in the net reaction CO + H2O --> CO2 + H2. These proteins include the enzymes carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) and a CO-tolerant hydrogenase. In this paper, we present the complete amino acid sequence for the large subunit of this hydrogenase and describe the properties of the crude enzyme in relation to other known hydrogenases. The amino acid sequence deduced from the CO-induced hydrogenase large-subunit gene (cooH) shows significant similarity to large subunits of other Ni-Fe hydrogenases. The closest similarity is with HycE (58% similarity and 37% identity) from Escherichia coli, which is the large subunit of an Ni-Fe hydrogenase (isoenzyme 3). The properties of the CO-induced hydrogenase are unique. It is exceptionally resistant to inhibition by carbon monoxide. It also exhibits a very high ratio of H2 evolution to H2 uptake activity compared with other known hydrogenases. The CO-induced hydrogenase is tightly membrane bound, and its inhibition by nonionic detergents is described. Finally, the presence of nickel in the hydrogenase is addressed. Analysis of wild-type R. rubrum grown on nickel-depleted medium indicates a requirement for nickel for hydrogenase activity. However, analysis of strain UR294 (cooC insertion mutant defective in nickel insertion into CODH) shows that independent nickel insertion mechanisms are utilized by hydrogenase and CODH. CooH lacks the C-terminal peptide that is found in other Ni-Fe hydrogenases; in other systems, this peptide is cleaved during Ni processing. PMID:8626276

  16. Refining the active site structure of iron-iron hydrogenase using computational infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tye, Jesse W; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y; Hall, Michael B

    2008-04-01

    Iron-iron hydrogenases ([FeFe]H2ases) are exceptional natural catalysts for the reduction of protons to dihydrogen. Future biotechnological applications based on these enzymes require a precise understanding of their structures and properties. Although the [FeFe]H2ases have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography and a range of spectroscopic techniques, ambiguities remain regarding the details of the molecular structures of the spectroscopically observed forms. We use density functional theory (DFT) computations on small-molecule computational models of the [FeFe]H2ase active site to address this problem. Specifically, a series of structural candidates are geometry optimized and their infrared (IR) spectra are simulated using the computed C-O and C-N stretching frequencies and infrared intensities. Structural assignments are made by comparing these spectra to the experimentally determined IR spectra for each form. The H red form is assigned as a mixture of an Fe(I)Fe(I) form with an open site on the distal iron center and either a Fe(I)Fe(I) form in which the distal cyanide has been protonated or a Fe(II)Fe(II) form with a bridging hydride ligand. The Hox form is assigned as a valence-localized Fe(I)Fe(II) redox level with an open site at the distal iron. The Hox(air)(ox) form is assigned as an Fe(II)Fe(II) redox level with OH(-) or OOH(-) bound to the distal iron center that may or may not have an oxygen atom bound to one of the sulfur atoms of the dithiolate linker. Comparisons of the computed IR spectra of the (12)CO and (13)CO inhibited form with the experimental IR spectra show that exogenous CO binds terminally to the distal iron center.

  17. [FeFe]-hydrogenase in Yellowstone National Park: evidence for dispersal limitation and phylogenetic niche conservatism.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Spear, John R; Lavin, Matthew; Peters, John W

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen (H₂) has an important role in the anaerobic degradation of organic carbon and is the basis for many syntrophic interactions that commonly occur in microbial communities. Little is known, however, with regard to the biotic and/or abiotic factors that control the distribution and phylogenetic diversity of organisms which produce H₂ in microbial communities. In this study, we examined the [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene (hydA) as a proxy for fermentative bacterial H₂ production along physical and chemical gradients in various geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. The distribution of hydA in YNP geothermal springs was constrained by pH to environments co-inhabited by oxygenic phototrophs and to environments predicted to have low inputs of abiotic H₂. The individual HydA asssemblages from YNP springs were more closely related when compared with randomly assembled communities, which suggests ecological filtering. Model selection approaches revealed that geographic distance was the best explanatory variable to predict the phylogenetic relatedness of HydA communities. This evinces the dispersal limitation imposed by the geothermal spring environment on HydA phylogenetic diversity even at small spatial scales. pH differences between sites is the second highest ranked explanatory variable of HydA phylogenetic relatedness, which suggests that the ecology related to pH imposes strong phylogenetic niche conservatism. Collectively, these results indicate that pH has imposed strong niche conservatism on fermentative bacteria and that, within a narrow pH realm, YNP springs are dispersal limited with respect to fermentative bacterial communities.

  18. Diiron Dithiolato Carbonyls Related to the HoxCO State of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Justice, Aaron K.; Nilges, Mark J.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Wilson, Scott R.; De Gioia, Luca; Zampella, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Oxidation of the electron-rich (E1/2 = −175 vs Ag/AgCl) ethanedithiolato complex Fe2(S2C2H4)-(CO)2(dppv)2 (1) under a CO atmosphere yielded [Fe2(S2C2H4)(μ-CO)(CO)2(dppv)2]+ ([1(CO)]+), a model for the HoxCO state of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases. This complex exists as two isomers: a kinetically favored unsymmetrical derivative, unsym-[1(CO)]+, and a thermodynamically favored isomer, sym-[1(CO)]+, wherein both diphosphines span apical and basal sites. Crystallographic characterization of sym-[1(CO)]+ confirmed a C2-symmetric structure with a bridging CO ligand and an elongated Fe–Fe bond of 2.7012(14) Å, as predicted previously. Oxidation of sym-[1(CO)]+ and unsym-[1(CO)]+ again by 1e− oxidation afforded the respective diamagnetic diferrous derivatives where the relative stabilities of the sym and unsym isomers are reversed. DFT calculations indicate that the stabilities of sym and unsym isomers are affected differently by the oxidation state of the diiron unit: the mutually trans CO ligands in the sym isomer are more destabilizing in the mixed-valence state than in the diferrous state. EPR analysis of mixed-valence complexes revealed that, for [1]+, the unpaired spin is localized on a single iron center, whereas for unsym/sym-[1(CO)]+, the unpaired spin was delocalized over both iron centers, as indicated by the magnitude of the hyperfine coupling to the phosphine ligands trans to the Fe–Fe vector. Oxidation of 1 by 2 equiv of acetylferrocenium afforded the dication [1]2+, which, on the basis of low-temperature IR spectrum, is structurally similar to [1]+. Treatment of [1]2+ with CO gives unsym-[1(CO)]2+. PMID:18341276

  19. A redox hydrogel protects the O2 -sensitive [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Oughli, Alaa Alsheikh; Conzuelo, Felipe; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Rüdiger, Olaf; Plumeré, Nicolas

    2015-10-12

    The integration of sensitive catalysts in redox matrices opens up the possibility for their protection from deactivating molecules such as O2 . [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes catalyzing H2 oxidation/production which are irreversibly deactivated by O2 . Therefore, their use under aerobic conditions has never been achieved. Integration of such hydrogenases in viologen-modified hydrogel films allows the enzyme to maintain catalytic current for H2 oxidation in the presence of O2 , demonstrating a protection mechanism independent of reactivation processes. Within the hydrogel, electrons from the hydrogenase-catalyzed H2 oxidation are shuttled to the hydrogel-solution interface for O2 reduction. Hence, the harmful O2 molecules do not reach the hydrogenase. We illustrate the potential applications of this protection concept with a biofuel cell under H2 /O2 mixed feed.

  20. The biosynthetic routes for carbon monoxide and cyanide in the Ni-Fe active site of hydrogenases are different.

    PubMed

    Roseboom, Winfried; Blokesch, Melanie; Böck, August; Albracht, Simon P J

    2005-01-17

    The incorporation of carbon into the carbon monoxide and cyanide ligands of [NiFe]-hydrogenases has been investigated by using (13)C labelling in infrared studies of the Allochromatium vinosum enzyme and by (14)C labelling experiments with overproduced Hyp proteins from Escherichia coli. The results suggest that the biosynthetic routes of the carbon monoxide and cyanide ligands in [NiFe]-hydrogenases are different.

  1. Synthesis, structure and geometrically frustrated magnetism of the layered oxide-stannide compounds Fe(Fe3-xMnx)Si2Sn7O16.

    PubMed

    Allison, M C; Avdeev, M; Schmid, S; Liu, S; Söhnel, T; Ling, C D

    2016-06-21

    Fe4Si2Sn7O16 has a unique crystal structure that contains alternating layers of Fe(2+) ions octahedrally coordinated by O (oxide layer) and Sn (stannide layer), bridged by SiO4 tetrahedra. The formula can be written as FeFe3Si2Sn7O16 to emphasise the distinction between the layers. Here, we report the changes in structure and properties as iron is selectively replaced by manganese in the oxide layer. Solid-state synthesis was used to produce polycrystalline samples of Fe(Fe3-xMnx)Si2Sn7O16 for x≤ 2.55, the structures of which were characterised using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Single-crystal samples were also grown at x = 0.35, 0.95, 2.60 and characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction. We show that manganese is doped exclusively into the oxide layer, and that this layer contains exclusively magnetically active high-spin M(2+) transition metal cations; while the stannide layer only accommodates non-magnetic low-spin Fe(2+). All samples show clear evidence of geometrically frustrated magnetism, which we associate with the fact that the topology of the high-spin M(2+) ions in the oxide layer describes a perfect kagomé lattice. Despite this frustration, the x = 0 and x = 2.55 samples undergo long-range antiferromagnetic ordering transitions at 3.0 K and 2.5 K, respectively.

  2. Impact of the chemicals, essential for the purification process of strict Fe-hydrogenase, on the corrosion of mild steel.

    PubMed

    Rouvre, Ingrid; Gauquelin, Charles; Meynial-Salles, Isabelle; Basseguy, Régine

    2016-06-01

    The influence of additional chemical molecules, necessary for the purification process of [Fe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium acetobutylicum, was studied on the anaerobic corrosion of mild steel. At the end of the purification process, the pure [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase was recovered in a Tris-HCl medium containing three other chemicals at low concentration: DTT, dithionite and desthiobiotin. Firstly, mild steel coupons were exposed in parallel to a 0.1 M pH7 Tris-HCl medium with or without pure hydrogenase. The results showed that hydrogenase and the additional molecules were in competition, and the electrochemical response could not be attributed solely to hydrogenase. Then, solutions with additional chemicals of different compositions were studied electrochemically. DTT polluted the electrochemical signal by increasing the Eoc by 35 mV 24 h after the injection of 300 μL of control solutions with DTT, whereas it drastically decreased the corrosion rate by increasing the charge transfer resistance (Rct 10 times the initial value). Thus, DTT was shown to have a strong antagonistic effect on corrosion and was removed from the purification process. An optimal composition of the medium was selected (0.5 mM dithionite, 7.5 mM desthiobiotin) that simultaneously allowed a high activity of hydrogenase and a lower impact on the electrochemical response for corrosion tests.

  3. Hydrogenase of the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus is an elemental sulfur reductase or sulfhydrogenase: Evidence for a sulfur-reducing hydrogenase ancestor

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, K.; Adams, M.W.W. ); Schicho, R.N. ); Kelly, R.M. )

    1993-06-01

    Microorganisms growing near and above 100[degrees]C have recently been discovered near shallow and deep sea hydrothermal vents. Most are obligately dependent upon the reduction of elemental sulfur (S[sup 0]) to hydrogen sulfide (H[sub 2]S) for optimal growth, even though S[sup 0] reduction readily occurs abiotically at their growth temperatures. The sulfur reductase activity of the anaerobic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100[degrees]C by a metabolism that produces H[sub 2]S if S[sup 0] is present, was found in the cytoplasm. It was purified anaerobically and was shown to be identical to the hydrogenase that had been previously purified from this organism. Both S[sup 0] and polysulfide served as substrates for H[sub 2]S production, and the S[sub 0] reduction activity but not the H[sub 2]-oxidation activity was enhanced by the redox protein rubredoxin. The H[sub 2]-oxidizing and S[sup 0]-reduction activities of the enzyme also showed different responses to pH, temperature, and inhibitors. This bifunctional [open quotes]sulfhydrogenase[close quotes] enzyme can, therefore, dispose of the excess reductant generated during fermentation using either protons or polysulfides as the electron acceptor. In addition, purified hydrogenases from both hyperthermophilic and mesophilic representatives of the archaeal and bacterial domains were shown to reduce S[sup 0] to H[sub 2]S. It is suggested that the function of some form of ancestral hydrogenase was S[sup 0] reduction rather than, or in addition, to the reduction of protons. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Artificial hydrogenases: biohybrid and supramolecular systems for catalytic hydrogen production or uptake.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Giorgio; Roy, Souvik; Atta, Mohamed; Artero, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-04-01

    There is an urgent need for cheap, abundant and efficient catalysts as an alternative to platinum for hydrogen production and oxidation in (photo)electrolyzers and fuel cells. Hydrogenases are attractive solutions. These enzymes use exclusively nickel and iron in their active sites and function with high catalytic rates at the thermodynamic equilibrium. As an alternative, a number of biomimetic and bioinspired catalysts for H2 production and/or uptake, based on Ni, Fe and Co, have been developed and shown to display encouraging performances. In this review we discuss specifically recent approaches aiming at incorporating these compounds within oligomeric and polymeric hosts. The latter are most often biological compounds (peptides, proteins, polysaccharides, etc.) but we also discuss non-biological scaffolds (synthetic polymers, Metal-organic-Frameworks, etc.) which can provide the appropriate environment to tune the activity and stability of the synthetic catalysts. These supramolecular catalytic systems thus define a class of original compounds so-called artificial hydrogenases.

  5. From hydrogenases to noble metal-free catalytic nanomaterials for H2 production and uptake.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Alan; Artero, Vincent; Jousselme, Bruno; Tran, Phong Dinh; Guillet, Nicolas; Métayé, Romain; Fihri, Aziz; Palacin, Serge; Fontecave, Marc

    2009-12-01

    Interconversion of water and hydrogen in unitized regenerative fuel cells is a promising energy storage framework for smoothing out the temporal fluctuations of solar and wind power. However, replacement of presently available platinum catalysts by lower-cost and more abundant materials is a requisite for this technology to become economically viable. Here, we show that the covalent attachment of a nickel bisdiphosphine-based mimic of the active site of hydrogenase enzymes onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes results in a high-surface area cathode material with high catalytic activity under the strongly acidic conditions required in proton exchange membrane technology. Hydrogen evolves from aqueous sulfuric acid solution with very low overvoltages (20 millivolts), and the catalyst exhibits exceptional stability (more than 100,000 turnovers). The same catalyst is also very efficient for hydrogen oxidation in this environment, exhibiting current densities similar to those observed for hydrogenase-based materials.

  6. Electrochemical insights into the mechanism of NiFe membrane-bound hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Lindsey A.; Parkin, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes of great biotechnological relevance because they catalyse the interconversion of H2, water (protons) and electricity using non-precious metal catalytic active sites. Electrochemical studies into the reactivity of NiFe membrane-bound hydrogenases (MBH) have provided a particularly detailed insight into the reactivity and mechanism of this group of enzymes. Significantly, the control centre for enabling O2 tolerance has been revealed as the electron-transfer relay of FeS clusters, rather than the NiFe bimetallic active site. The present review paper will discuss how electrochemistry results have complemented those obtained from structural and spectroscopic studies, to present a complete picture of our current understanding of NiFe MBH. PMID:26862221

  7. Rhizobium leguminosarum hupE encodes a nickel transporter required for hydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Brito, Belén; Prieto, Rosa-Isabel; Cabrera, Ezequiel; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, José-Manuel

    2010-02-01

    Synthesis of the hydrogen uptake (Hup) system in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae requires the function of an 18-gene cluster (hupSLCDEFGHIJK-hypABFCDEX). Among them, the hupE gene encodes a protein showing six transmembrane domains for which a potential role as a nickel permease has been proposed. In this paper, we further characterize the nickel transport capacity of HupE and that of the translated product of hupE2, a hydrogenase-unlinked gene identified in the R. leguminosarum genome. HupE2 is a potential membrane protein that shows 48% amino acid sequence identity with HupE. Expression of both genes in the Escherichia coli nikABCDE mutant strain HYD723 restored hydrogenase activity and nickel transport. However, nickel transport assays revealed that HupE and HupE2 displayed different levels of nickel uptake. Site-directed mutagenesis of histidine residues in HupE revealed two motifs (HX(5)DH and FHGX[AV]HGXE) that are required for HupE functionality. An R. leguminosarum double mutant, SPF22A (hupE hupE2), exhibited reduced levels of hydrogenase activity in free-living cells, and this phenotype was complemented by nickel supplementation. Low levels of symbiotic hydrogenase activity were also observed in SPF22A bacteroid cells from lentil (Lens culinaris L.) root nodules but not in pea (Pisum sativum L.) bacteroids. Moreover, heterologous expression of the R. leguminosarum hup system in bacteroid cells of Rhizobium tropici and Mesorhizobium loti displayed reduced levels of hydrogen uptake in the absence of hupE. These data support the role of R. leguminosarum HupE as a nickel permease required for hydrogen uptake under both free-living and symbiotic conditions.

  8. Hydrogenase-independent uptake and metabolism of electrons by the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Svenja T; Deutzmann, Jörg S; Logan, Bruce E; Leigh, John; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-08-01

    Direct, shuttle-free uptake of extracellular, cathode-derived electrons has been postulated as a novel mechanism of electron metabolism in some prokaryotes that may also be involved in syntrophic electron transport between two microorganisms. Experimental proof for direct uptake of cathodic electrons has been mostly indirect and has been based on the absence of detectable concentrations of molecular hydrogen. However, hydrogen can be formed as a transient intermediate abiotically at low cathodic potentials (<-414 mV) under conditions of electromethanogenesis. Here we provide genetic evidence for hydrogen-independent uptake of extracellular electrons. Methane formation from cathodic electrons was observed in a wild-type strain of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis as well as in a hydrogenase-deletion mutant lacking all catabolic hydrogenases, indicating the presence of a hydrogenase-independent mechanism of electron catabolism. In addition, we discovered a new route for hydrogen or formate production from cathodic electrons: Upon chemical inhibition of methanogenesis with 2-bromo-ethane sulfonate, hydrogen or formate accumulated in the bioelectrochemical cells instead of methane. These results have implications for our understanding on the diversity of microbial electron uptake and metabolism.

  9. [FeFe]-hydrogenase oxygen inactivation is initiated at the H cluster 2Fe subcluster.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kevin D; Ratzloff, Michael W; Mulder, David W; Artz, Jacob H; Ghose, Shourjo; Hoffman, Andrew; White, Spencer; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Broderick, Joan B; Bothner, Brian; King, Paul W; Peters, John W

    2015-02-11

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase catalytic site H cluster is a complex iron sulfur cofactor that is sensitive to oxygen (O2). The O2 sensitivity is a significant barrier for production of hydrogen as an energy source in water-splitting, oxygenic systems. Oxygen reacts directly with the H cluster, which results in rapid enzyme inactivation and eventual degradation. To investigate the progression of O2-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase inactivation and the process of H cluster degradation, the highly O2-sensitive [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exposed to defined concentrations of O2 while monitoring the loss of activity and accompanying changes in H cluster spectroscopic properties. The results indicate that H cluster degradation proceeds through a series of reactions, the extent of which depend on the initial enzyme reduction/oxidation state. The degradation process begins with O2 interacting and reacting with the 2Fe subcluster, leading to degradation of the 2Fe subcluster and leaving an inactive [4Fe-4S] subcluster state. This final inactive degradation product could be reactivated in vitro by incubation with 2Fe subcluster maturation machinery, specifically HydF(EG), which was observed by recovery of enzyme activity.

  10. Proton-coupled electron transfer dynamics in the catalytic mechanism of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-04-01

    The movement of protons and electrons is common to the synthesis of all chemical fuels such as H2. Hydrogenases, which catalyze the reversible reduction of protons, necessitate transport and reactivity between protons and electrons, but a detailed mechanism has thus far been elusive. Here, we use a phototriggered chemical potential jump method to rapidly initiate the proton reduction activity of a [NiFe] hydrogenase. Coupling the photochemical initiation approach to nanosecond transient infrared and visible absorbance spectroscopy afforded direct observation of interfacial electron transfer and active site chemistry. Tuning of intramolecular proton transport by pH and isotopic substitution revealed distinct concerted and stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in catalysis. The observed heterogeneity in the two sequential proton-associated reduction processes suggests a highly engineered protein environment modulating catalysis and implicates three new reaction intermediates; Nia-I, Nia-D, and Nia-SR(-). The results establish an elementary mechanistic understanding of catalysis in a [NiFe] hydrogenase with implications in enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer and biomimetic catalyst design.

  11. Enhancing hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes by heterologous expression of hydrogenase genes originated from Synechocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlu; Cheng, Jun; Zhao, Jinfang; Zhang, Chuanxi; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogenase genes (hoxEFUYH) of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were cloned and heterologously expressed in Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC13408 for the first time in this study, and the hydrogen yield was significantly enhanced using the recombinant strain. A recombinant plasmid containing the gene in-frame with Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) gene was transformed into E. aerogenes ATCC13408 to produce a GST-fusion protein. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis confirm the successful expression of the hox genes. The hydrogenase activity of the recombinant strain is 237.6±9.3ml/(g-DW·h), which is 152% higher than the wild strain. The hydrogen yield of the recombinant strain is 298.3ml/g-glucose, which is 88% higher than the wild strain. During hydrogen fermentation, the recombinant strain produces more acetate and butyrate, but less ethanol. This is corresponding to the NADH metabolism in the cell due to the higher hydrogenase activity with the heterologous expression of hox genes. PMID:27343449

  12. Hydrogenase-independent uptake and metabolism of electrons by the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    PubMed Central

    Lohner, Svenja T; Deutzmann, Jörg S; Logan, Bruce E; Leigh, John; Spormann, Alfred M

    2014-01-01

    Direct, shuttle-free uptake of extracellular, cathode-derived electrons has been postulated as a novel mechanism of electron metabolism in some prokaryotes that may also be involved in syntrophic electron transport between two microorganisms. Experimental proof for direct uptake of cathodic electrons has been mostly indirect and has been based on the absence of detectable concentrations of molecular hydrogen. However, hydrogen can be formed as a transient intermediate abiotically at low cathodic potentials (<−414 mV) under conditions of electromethanogenesis. Here we provide genetic evidence for hydrogen-independent uptake of extracellular electrons. Methane formation from cathodic electrons was observed in a wild-type strain of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis as well as in a hydrogenase-deletion mutant lacking all catabolic hydrogenases, indicating the presence of a hydrogenase-independent mechanism of electron catabolism. In addition, we discovered a new route for hydrogen or formate production from cathodic electrons: Upon chemical inhibition of methanogenesis with 2-bromo-ethane sulfonate, hydrogen or formate accumulated in the bioelectrochemical cells instead of methane. These results have implications for our understanding on the diversity of microbial electron uptake and metabolism. PMID:24844759

  13. Proton Reduction Using a Hydrogenase-Modified Nanoporous Black Silicon Photoelectrode.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Anderson, Nicholas C; Ratzloff, Michael W; Mulder, David W; Zhu, Kai; Turner, John A; Neale, Nathan R; King, Paul W; Branz, Howard M

    2016-06-15

    Metalloenzymes featuring earth-abundant metal-based cores exhibit rates for catalytic processes such as hydrogen evolution comparable to those of noble metals. Realizing these superb catalytic properties in artificial systems is challenging owing to the difficulty of effectively interfacing metalloenzymes with an electrode surface in a manner that supports efficient charge-transfer. Here, we demonstrate that a nanoporous "black" silicon (b-Si) photocathode provides a unique interface for binding an adsorbed [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme ([FeFe]-H2ase). The resulting [FeFe]-H2ase/b-Si photoelectrode displays a 280 mV more positive onset potential for hydrogen generation than bare b-Si without hydrogenase, similar to that observed for a b-Si/Pt photoelectrode at the same light intensity. Additionally, we show that this H2ase/b-Si electrode exhibits a turnover frequency of ≥1300 s(-1) and a turnover number above 10(7) and sustains current densities of at least 1 mA/cm(2) based on the actual surface area of the electrode (not the smaller projected geometric area), orders of magnitude greater than that observed for previous enzyme-catalyzed electrodes. While the long-term stability of hydrogenase on the b-Si surface remains too low for practical applications, this work extends the proof-of-concept that biologically derived metalloenzymes can be interfaced with inorganic substrates to support technologically relevant current densities. PMID:27219350

  14. Enhancing hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes by heterologous expression of hydrogenase genes originated from Synechocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlu; Cheng, Jun; Zhao, Jinfang; Zhang, Chuanxi; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    The hydrogenase genes (hoxEFUYH) of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were cloned and heterologously expressed in Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC13408 for the first time in this study, and the hydrogen yield was significantly enhanced using the recombinant strain. A recombinant plasmid containing the gene in-frame with Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) gene was transformed into E. aerogenes ATCC13408 to produce a GST-fusion protein. SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis confirm the successful expression of the hox genes. The hydrogenase activity of the recombinant strain is 237.6±9.3ml/(g-DW·h), which is 152% higher than the wild strain. The hydrogen yield of the recombinant strain is 298.3ml/g-glucose, which is 88% higher than the wild strain. During hydrogen fermentation, the recombinant strain produces more acetate and butyrate, but less ethanol. This is corresponding to the NADH metabolism in the cell due to the higher hydrogenase activity with the heterologous expression of hox genes.

  15. [FeFe]-hydrogenase oxygen inactivation is initiated at the H cluster 2Fe subcluster.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kevin D; Ratzloff, Michael W; Mulder, David W; Artz, Jacob H; Ghose, Shourjo; Hoffman, Andrew; White, Spencer; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Broderick, Joan B; Bothner, Brian; King, Paul W; Peters, John W

    2015-02-11

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase catalytic site H cluster is a complex iron sulfur cofactor that is sensitive to oxygen (O2). The O2 sensitivity is a significant barrier for production of hydrogen as an energy source in water-splitting, oxygenic systems. Oxygen reacts directly with the H cluster, which results in rapid enzyme inactivation and eventual degradation. To investigate the progression of O2-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase inactivation and the process of H cluster degradation, the highly O2-sensitive [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exposed to defined concentrations of O2 while monitoring the loss of activity and accompanying changes in H cluster spectroscopic properties. The results indicate that H cluster degradation proceeds through a series of reactions, the extent of which depend on the initial enzyme reduction/oxidation state. The degradation process begins with O2 interacting and reacting with the 2Fe subcluster, leading to degradation of the 2Fe subcluster and leaving an inactive [4Fe-4S] subcluster state. This final inactive degradation product could be reactivated in vitro by incubation with 2Fe subcluster maturation machinery, specifically HydF(EG), which was observed by recovery of enzyme activity. PMID:25579778

  16. Reversible [4Fe-3S] cluster morphing in an O(2)-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Frielingsdorf, Stefan; Fritsch, Johannes; Schmidt, Andrea; Hammer, Mathias; Löwenstein, Julia; Siebert, Elisabeth; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Jaenicke, Tina; Kalms, Jacqueline; Rippers, Yvonne; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Zebger, Ingo; Teutloff, Christian; Kaupp, Martin; Bittl, Robert; Hildebrandt, Peter; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver; Scheerer, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of H(2) into protons and electrons and are usually readily inactivated by O(2). However, a subgroup of the [NiFe] hydrogenases, including the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha, has evolved remarkable tolerance toward O(2) that enables their host organisms to utilize H(2) as an energy source at high O(2). This feature is crucially based on a unique six cysteine-coordinated [4Fe-3S] cluster located close to the catalytic center, whose properties were investigated in this study using a multidisciplinary approach. The [4Fe-3S] cluster undergoes redox-dependent reversible transformations, namely iron swapping between a sulfide and a peptide amide N. Moreover, our investigations unraveled the redox-dependent and reversible occurence of an oxygen ligand located at a different iron. This ligand is hydrogen bonded to a conserved histidine that is essential for H(2) oxidation at high O(2). We propose that these transformations, reminiscent of those of the P-cluster of nitrogenase, enable the consecutive transfer of two electrons within a physiological potential range. PMID:24705592

  17. Immobilized chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase system for the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.; Greenbaum, E.

    1983-01-01

    The chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase (CFH) system is capable of the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen using water as the source of electrons. The immobilization of chloroplasts and hydrogenase, which has been the subject of several reports has been attempted in order to increase their storage and functional stability. However, immobilized chloroplasts and hydrogenase have never been shown to produce hydrogen and oxygen simultaneously. The simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen is a valuable guide in assessing the role of water as the primary substrate in biophotolysis. As has been shown previously, the stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen to oxygen is, in general, not equal to 2. By measuring the oxygen that is produced along with the hydrogen, it is possible to set an upper limit on the photoproduced hydrogen that is derive d from water. The study reported here describes for the first time the simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by the CFH system immobilized in calcium alginate gel spheres. 15 references, 4 figures.

  18. Halotolerant and Resistant to High pH Hydrogenase from Haloalkaliphilic Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, it catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins containing either Nickel and Iron, or the only Iron in theirs active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as Methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, photosynthetic and sulfate-reducing bacteria that could utilize the hydrogen as energy source or use it as electron sink. Hydrogenases are subject for wide physiological, biochemical, physicochemical and genetic studies due to theirs abilities produce the molecular hydrogen as alternative source of pure energy. Notwithstanding on enough large quantity of works that deal with intracellular and extrasellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about hydrogenases and theirs functions of salts practically are absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium mabaticum showed dramatic increasing activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCI (close to saturated solution). Here we present the data of free-cells extracted hydrogenase from new haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grow on highly miniralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in salinity range 1 to 7 % and at pH 7.8 - 10.5. Studied enzyme was active in Concentration range from 0 to 4.3 M NaCl with optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme activity was increased on 20 %, but with changing concentration from 2.1 M to 3.4 M the activity decreased and was kept on constant level. NaHCO3 inhibited hydrogenase activity on more then 30 %. The maximum of enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits 7.5 and 11.5 that practically equal to pH optimum of bacterial growth. Therefore the hydrogenase of Desulfanatronum thiodismutans is tolerant to high concentrations of sodium salts and it also resistant to

  19. Salt-tolerant and high-pH-resistant hydrogenase from the haloalkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    Hydrogenase is the key enzyme of energetic metabolism in cells, catalyzing the converse reaction of hydrogen oxidation and responsible for the consumption and excretion of hydrogen in bacteria. Hydrogenases are proteins, most of which contain either nickel and iron or iron alone in their active center. Hydrogenases have been found in many microorganisms, such as methanogenic, acetogenic, nitrogen-fixing, sulfate-reducing, photosynthetic bacteria, and algae that use the hydrogen as an energy source or as an electron sink. Hydrogenases are the subject of wide physiological, biochemical, physico-chemical and genetic studies due to their abilities to produce molecular hydrogen as an alternative source of energy. Despite the large quantity of work dealing with the intracellular and extracellular enzymes of halophilic bacteria, the data about the response of hydrogenases to salts are practically absent. The study of hydrogenase in cell-free extracts of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Acetohalobium arabaticum showed a dramatic increase in the activity of the enzyme at high concentrations of NaCl and KCl (near saturated solutions). Here we present data about hydrogenase in a free-cell extract from the new halo-alkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans, which grows on a highly mineralized carbonate-bicarbonate medium in the salinity range from 1 to 7 % NaCl and at pH 8.0-10.0. The studied enzyme was active in concentration range from 0.0 to 4.3 M NaCl with the optimum at 1.0 M NaCl. At 1.0 M NaCl the enzyme expressed 20 % additional activity, with NaCl concentration changing from 2.1 M to 3.4 M, and then the activity decreased and reached a constant level. Although sodium bicarbonate decreases the hydrogenase activity, the enzyme still showed activity at 60 % of the maximum level at concentration in a near saturated solution (1.2 M NaHCO3). The maximum enzyme activity was observed at pH 9.5 with limits of 7.5 and 11.5, which is practically

  20. Genetic diversity and expression of the [NiFe] hydrogenase large-subunit gene of Desulfovibrio spp. in environmental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, C; Jetten, M S; Muyzer, G

    1997-01-01

    The genetic diversity and expression of the [NiFe] hydrogenase large-subunit gene of Desulfovibrio spp. in environmental samples were determined in order to show in parallel the existing and active members of Desulfovibrio populations. DNA and total RNA were extracted from different anaerobic bioreactor samples; RNA was transcribed into cDNA. Subsequently, PCR was performed to amplify a ca.-440-bp fragment of the [NiFe] hydrogenase large-subunit gene and its mRNA. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis was used to separate the PCR products according to their sequence and thereby to visualize the individual community members. Desulfovibrio strains corresponding to amplified [NiFe] hydrogenase transcripts were regarded as metabolically active, because in pure cultures transcripts were detectable in exponentially growing cells but not in cultures in the stationary phase. DNA sequencing and comparative sequence analysis were used to identify the detected organisms on the basis of their [NiFe] hydrogenase sequences. The genes of characterized Desulfovibrio spp. showed a considerable extent of divergence (ca. 30%), whereas sequences obtained from bacterial populations of the bioreactors showed a low level of variation and indicated the coexistence of closely related strains probably belonging to the species Desulfovibrio sulfodismutans. Under methanogenic conditions, all detected populations were active; under denitrifying conditions, no [NiFe] hydrogenase mRNA was visible. Changes in activity and composition of Desulfovibrio populations caused by changes in the environmental conditions could be monitored by using the approach described in this study. PMID:9361423

  1. The Hydrogenase Chip: a tiling oligonucleotide DNA microarray technique for characterizing hydrogen-producing and -consuming microbes in microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Ian PG; Berggren, Dusty RV; Azizian, Mohammad F; Burow, Luke C; Semprini, Lewis; Spormann, Alfred M

    2012-01-01

    We developed a broad-ranging method for identifying key hydrogen-producing and consuming microorganisms through analysis of hydrogenase gene content and expression in complex anaerobic microbial communities. The method is based on a tiling hydrogenase gene oligonucleotide DNA microarray (Hydrogenase Chip), which implements a high number of probes per gene by tiling probe sequences across genes of interest at 1.67 × –2 × coverage. This design favors the avoidance of false positive gene identification in samples of DNA or RNA extracted from complex microbial communities. We applied this technique to interrogate interspecies hydrogen transfer in complex communities in (i) lab-scale reductive dehalogenating microcosms enabling us to delineate key H2-consuming microorganisms, and (ii) hydrogen-generating microbial mats where we found evidence for significant H2 production by cyanobacteria. Independent quantitative PCR analysis on selected hydrogenase genes showed that this Hydrogenase Chip technique is semiquantitative. We also determined that as microbial community complexity increases, specificity must be traded for sensitivity in analyzing data from tiling DNA microarrays. PMID:21993396

  2. Identification, cloning and heterologous expression of active [NiFe]-hydrogenase 2 from Citrobacter sp. SG in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maier, Johannes A H; Ragozin, Sergey; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-04-10

    Hydrogen (H2) is a potential alternative energy carrier which only produces water and heat upon combustion. Today, industrial hydrogen production mainly uses thermochemical processes based on fossil fuels or electrolysis of water. Therefore, biotechnological approaches to produce H2 from biomass are an interesting alternative. We introduce here a novel direct hydrogen measurement system using a semiconducting device specific for hydrogen detection. Using this device, a bacterium producing considerable amounts of hydrogen under aerobic cultivation was isolated and identified by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Citrobacter sp. The enzyme responsible for the observed hydrogenase activity was partially purified by 3 chromatographic purification steps and could be identified by peptide mass fingerprinting to be a type 2 [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Expression of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase 2 containing operon from Citrobacter sp. SG in Escherichia coli allowed recombinant hydrogen production. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase 2 identified here may be useful for biotechnological hydrogen production. We speculate that the expression of the hydrogenase in Citrobacter may be an adaptation to growth in acidic conditions.

  3. Theoretical studies of [FeFe]-hydrogenase: infrared fingerprints of the dithiol-bridging ligand in the active site.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Silviu; Stiefel, Edward I; Cohen, Morrel H; Car, Roberto

    2007-02-19

    An unresolved structural issue for [FeFe]-hydrogenases is the nature of the dithiol-bridging ligand in the diiron subcluster of the active site. The two most probable candidates are 1,3-dithiopropane (propane dithiol, PDT) and di-(thiomethyl)-amine (DTN). In the latter case, the dithiol-bridging ligand is assumed to play a major role in the reaction cycle. We report density-functional theory studies of the differing roles of these dithiol-bridging ligands in the infrared spectra of synthetic models and of computational representations of the diiron cluster of the active site. Our analysis shows distinct spectral features associated with the dithiol-bridging NH mode for compounds having a DTN bridge, which, however, would have been obscured by the H2O vibrations in existing measurements. However, if indeed nitrogen is present in the dithiol-bridging ligand, a combination of selective deuteration and chemical inactivation with CO would create a unique signature in an accessible region of the infrared spectrum, whose position and intensity are predicted.

  4. Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts indicative of active facultative aerobes and obligate anaerobes in earthworm gut contents.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Oliver; Wüst, Pia K; Hellmuth, Susanne; Borst, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A; Drake, Harold L

    2011-09-01

    The concomitant occurrence of molecular hydrogen (H(2)) and organic acids along the alimentary canal of the earthworm is indicative of ongoing fermentation during gut passage. Fermentative H(2) production is catalyzed by [FeFe]-hydrogenases and group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenases in obligate anaerobes (e.g., Clostridiales) and facultative aerobes (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), respectively, functional groups that might respond differently to contrasting redox conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the redox potentials of the alimentary canal of Lumbricus terrestris and analyze the hydrogenase transcript diversities of H(2) producers in glucose-supplemented gut content microcosms. Although redox potentials in the core of the alimentary canal were variable on an individual worm basis, average redox potentials were similar. The lowest redox potentials occurred in the foregut and midgut regions, averaging 40 and 110 mV, respectively. Correlation plots between hydrogenase amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that closely related hydrogenases belonged to closely related taxa, whereas distantly related hydrogenases did not necessarily belong to distantly related taxa. Of 178 [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 177 clustered in 12 Clostridiales-affiliated operational taxonomic units, the majority of which were indicative of heretofore unknown hydrogenases. Of 86 group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 79% and 21% were affiliated with organisms in the Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae, respectively. The collective results (i) suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal, (ii) demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and (iii) corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworm gut content. PMID:21784904

  5. Genomic and metagenomic surveys of hydrogenase distribution indicate H2 is a widely utilised energy source for microbial growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Greening, Chris; Biswas, Ambarish; Carere, Carlo R; Jackson, Colin J; Taylor, Matthew C; Stott, Matthew B; Cook, Gregory M; Morales, Sergio E

    2016-03-01

    Recent physiological and ecological studies have challenged the long-held belief that microbial metabolism of molecular hydrogen (H2) is a niche process. To gain a broader insight into the importance of microbial H2 metabolism, we comprehensively surveyed the genomic and metagenomic distribution of hydrogenases, the reversible enzymes that catalyse the oxidation and evolution of H2. The protein sequences of 3286 non-redundant putative hydrogenases were curated from publicly available databases. These metalloenzymes were classified into multiple groups based on (1) amino acid sequence phylogeny, (2) metal-binding motifs, (3) predicted genetic organisation and (4) reported biochemical characteristics. Four groups (22 subgroups) of [NiFe]-hydrogenase, three groups (6 subtypes) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and a small group of [Fe]-hydrogenases were identified. We predict that this hydrogenase diversity supports H2-based respiration, fermentation and carbon fixation processes in both oxic and anoxic environments, in addition to various H2-sensing, electron-bifurcation and energy-conversion mechanisms. Hydrogenase-encoding genes were identified in 51 bacterial and archaeal phyla, suggesting strong pressure for both vertical and lateral acquisition. Furthermore, hydrogenase genes could be recovered from diverse terrestrial, aquatic and host-associated metagenomes in varying proportions, indicating a broad ecological distribution and utilisation. Oxygen content (pO2) appears to be a central factor driving the phylum- and ecosystem-level distribution of these genes. In addition to compounding evidence that H2 was the first electron donor for life, our analysis suggests that the great diversification of hydrogenases has enabled H2 metabolism to sustain the growth or survival of microorganisms in a wide range of ecosystems to the present day. This work also provides a comprehensive expanded system for classifying hydrogenases and identifies new prospects for investigating H2

  6. Novel [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts Indicative of Active Facultative Aerobes and Obligate Anaerobes in Earthworm Gut Contents▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Oliver; Wüst, Pia K.; Hellmuth, Susanne; Borst, Katharina; Horn, Marcus A.; Drake, Harold L.

    2011-01-01

    The concomitant occurrence of molecular hydrogen (H2) and organic acids along the alimentary canal of the earthworm is indicative of ongoing fermentation during gut passage. Fermentative H2 production is catalyzed by [FeFe]-hydrogenases and group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenases in obligate anaerobes (e.g., Clostridiales) and facultative aerobes (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), respectively, functional groups that might respond differently to contrasting redox conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to assess the redox potentials of the alimentary canal of Lumbricus terrestris and analyze the hydrogenase transcript diversities of H2 producers in glucose-supplemented gut content microcosms. Although redox potentials in the core of the alimentary canal were variable on an individual worm basis, average redox potentials were similar. The lowest redox potentials occurred in the foregut and midgut regions, averaging 40 and 110 mV, respectively. Correlation plots between hydrogenase amino acid sequences and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that closely related hydrogenases belonged to closely related taxa, whereas distantly related hydrogenases did not necessarily belong to distantly related taxa. Of 178 [FeFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 177 clustered in 12 Clostridiales-affiliated operational taxonomic units, the majority of which were indicative of heretofore unknown hydrogenases. Of 86 group 4 [NiFe]-hydrogenase gene transcripts, 79% and 21% were affiliated with organisms in the Enterobacteriaceae and Aeromonadaceae, respectively. The collective results (i) suggest that fermenters must cope with variable and moderately oxidative redox conditions along the alimentary canal, (ii) demonstrate that heretofore undetected hydrogenases are present in the earthworm gut, and (iii) corroborate previous findings implicating Clostridiaceae and Enterobacteriaceae as active fermentative taxa in earthworm gut content. PMID:21784904

  7. Photoelectrochemical H2 Evolution with a Hydrogenase Immobilized on a TiO2 -Protected Silicon Electrode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Park, Hyun S; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-05-10

    The combination of enzymes with semiconductors enables the photoelectrochemical characterization of electron-transfer processes at highly active and well-defined catalytic sites on a light-harvesting electrode surface. Herein, we report the integration of a hydrogenase on a TiO2 -coated p-Si photocathode for the photo-reduction of protons to H2 . The immobilized hydrogenase exhibits activity on Si attributable to a bifunctional TiO2 layer, which protects the Si electrode from oxidation and acts as a biocompatible support layer for the productive adsorption of the enzyme. The p-Si|TiO2 |hydrogenase photocathode displays visible-light driven production of H2 at an energy-storing, positive electrochemical potential and an essentially quantitative faradaic efficiency. We have thus established a widely applicable platform to wire redox enzymes in an active configuration on a p-type semiconductor photocathode through the engineering of the enzyme-materials interface. PMID:27061334

  8. "Two-step" chronoamperometric method for studying the anaerobic inactivation of an oxygen tolerant NiFe hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fourmond, Vincent; Infossi, Pascale; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Bertrand, Patrick; Léger, Christophe

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the oxidation and production of H(2). The fact that they could be used in biotechnological devices if they resisted inhibition by O(2) motivates the current research on their inactivation mechanism. Direct electrochemistry has been thoroughly used in this respect but often in a qualitative manner. We propose a new and precise chronoamperometric method for studying the anaerobic inactivation mechanism of hydrogenase, which we apply to the oxygen-tolerant NiFe enzyme from Aquifex aeolicus . We demonstrate that the voltammetric data cannot be used for measuring the reduction potential of the so-called NiB inactive state, even in the small scan rate limit. We show that the inactivation mechanism proposed for standard (oxygen-sensitive) NiFe hydrogenases does not apply in the case of the enzyme from A. aeolicus . In particular, the activation and inactivation reactions cannot follow the same reaction pathway.

  9. Role of the Hya Hydrogenase in Recycling of Anaerobically Produced H2 in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium▿

    PubMed Central

    Zbell, Andrea L.; Maier, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Double and triple uptake-type hydrogenase mutants were used to determine which hydrogenase recycles fermentatively produced hydrogen. The Δhyb Δhya and Δhyd Δhya double mutants evolved H2 at rates similar to that of the triple mutant strain, so Hya alone oxidizes the bulk of H2 produced during fermentation. When only Hya was present, no hydrogen production was observed in nutrient-limited medium. H2 uptake assays showed that Hya can oxidize both exogenously added H2 and formate hydrogen lyase-evolved H2 anaerobically. Even after anaerobic growth, all three uptake-type hydrogenases could function in the presence of oxygen, including using O2 as a terminal acceptor. PMID:19114523

  10. Determination of Hydrogenase in Free-living Cultures of Rhizobium japonicum and Energy Efficiency of Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo T.

    1978-01-01

    A sensitive tritium exchange assay was applied to the Rhizobium system for measuring the expression of uptake hydrogenase in free-living cultures of Rhizobium japonicum. Hydrogenase was detected about 45 hours after inoculation of cultures maintained under microaerophilic conditions (about 0.1% O2). The tritium exchange assay was used to screen a variety of different strains of R. japonicum (including major production strains) with the findings that about 30% of the strains expressed hydrogenase activity with identical results being observed using an alternative assay based on uptake of H2. The relative efficiency of intact soybean nodules inoculated with 10 different rhizobial strains gave results identical to those obtained using free-living cultures. The tritium exchange assay provides an easy, quick, and accurate assessment of H2 uptake efficiency of intact nodules. PMID:16660568

  11. Hydrogen production by termite gut protists: characterization of iron hydrogenases of Parabasalian symbionts of the termite Coptotermes formosanus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun-Ichi; Saita, Kanako; Kudo, Toshiaki; Ui, Sadaharu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2007-10-01

    Cellulolytic flagellated protists in the guts of termites produce molecular hydrogen (H(2)) that is emitted by the termites; however, little is known about the physiology and biochemistry of H(2) production from cellulose in the gut symbiotic protists due to their formidable unculturability. In order to understand the molecular basis for H(2) production, we here identified two genes encoding proteins homologous to iron-only hydrogenases (Fe hydrogenases) in Pseudotrichonympha grassii, a large cellulolytic symbiont in the phylum Parabasalia, in the gut of the termite Coptotermes formosanus. The two Fe hydrogenases were phylogenetically distinct and had different N-terminal accessory domains. The long-form protein represented a phylogenetic lineage unique among eukaryotic Fe hydrogenases, whereas the short form was monophyletic with those of other parabasalids. Active recombinant enzyme forms of these two Fe hydrogenases were successfully obtained without the specific auxiliary maturases. Although they differed in their extent of specific activity and optimal pH, both enzymes preferentially catalyzed H(2) evolution rather than H(2) uptake. H(2) evolution, at least that associated with the short-form enzyme, was still active even under high hydrogen partial pressure. H(2) evolution activity was detected in the hydrogenosomal fraction of P. grassii cells; however, the vigorous H(2) uptake activity of the endosymbiotic bacteria compensated for the strong H(2) evolution activity of the host protists. The results suggest that termite gut symbionts are a rich reservoir of novel Fe hydrogenases whose properties are adapted to the gut environment and that the potential of H(2) production in termite guts has been largely underestimated.

  12. Purification and properties of the membrane-bound by hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans.

    PubMed

    Lalla-Maharajh, W V; Hall, D O; Cammack, R; Rao, K K; Le Gall, J

    1983-02-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase from the anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (Norway strain) has been purified to homogeneity, with an overall 80-fold purification and a specific activity of 70 mumol of H2 evolved/min per mg of protein. The hydrogenase had a relative molecular mass of 58 000 as determined by gel filtration and was estimated to contain six iron atoms and six acid-labile sulphur groups per molecule. The absorption spectrum of the enzyme was characteristic of an iron-sulphur protein. The E400 and E280 were 28 500 and 109 000 M-1.cm-1 respectively. The e.s.r. of the oxidized protein indicated the presence of [4Fe-4S]3+ or [3Fe-3S]3+, and another paramagnetic centre, probably Ni(III). The hydrogenase was inhibited by heavy-metal salts, carbon monoxide and high ionic strength. However, it was resistant to inhibition by thiol-blocking and metal-complexing reagents. N-Bromosuccinimide totally inhibited the enzyme activity at low concentrations. The enzyme was stable to O2 over long periods and to high temperatures. It catalyses both H2-evolution and H2-uptake with a variety of artificial electron carriers. D. desulfuricans cytochrome C3, its natural electron carrier, had a high affinity for the enzyme (Km = 2 microns). Rate enhancement was observed when cytochrome C3 was added to Methyl Viologen in the H2-evolution assay. The pH optimum for H2-evolution was 6.5. PMID:6303306

  13. Metabolic control of Clostridium thermocellum via inhibition of hydrogenase activity and the glucose transport rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Fen; Knutson, Barbara L; Nokes, Sue E; Lynn, Bert C; Flythe, Michael D

    2012-02-01

    Clostridium thermocellum has the ability to catabolize cellulosic biomass into ethanol, but acetic acid, lactic acid, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen gas (H(2)) are also produced. The effect of hydrogenase inhibitors (H(2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methyl viologen) on product selectivity was investigated. The anticipated effect of these hydrogenase inhibitors was to decrease acetate production. However, shifts to ethanol and lactate production are also observed as a function of cultivation conditions. When the sparge gas of cellobiose-limited chemostat cultures was switched from N(2) to H(2), acetate declined, and ethanol production increased 350%. In resting cell suspensions, lactate increased when H(2) or CO was the inhibitor or when the cells were held at elevated hyperbaric pressure (6.8 atm). In contrast, methyl-viologen-treated resting cells produced twice as much ethanol as the other treatments. The relationship of chemostat physiology to methyl viologen inhibition was revealed by glucose transport experiments, in which methyl viologen decreased the rate of glucose transport by 90%. C. thermocellum produces NAD(+) from NADH by H(2), lactate, and ethanol production. When the hydrogenases were inhibited, the latter two products increased. However, excess substrate availability causes fructose 1,6-diphosphate, the glycolytic intermediate that triggers lactate production, to increase. Compensatory ethanol production was observed when the chemostat fluid dilution rate or methyl viologen decreased substrate transport. This research highlights the complex effects of high concentrations of dissolved gases in fermentation, which are increasingly envisioned in microbial applications of H(2) production for the conversion of synthetic gases to chemicals. PMID:22218768

  14. A Redox Active [2Fe-2S] Cluster on the Hydrogenase Maturase HydF.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Eric M; Byer, Amanda S; Betz, Jeremiah N; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2016-06-28

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are nature's most prolific hydrogen catalysts, excelling at facilely interconverting H2 and protons. The catalytic core common to all [FeFe]-hydrogenases is a complex metallocofactor, referred to as the H-cluster, which is composed of a standard [4Fe-4S] cluster linked through a bridging thiolate to a 2Fe subcluster harboring dithiomethylamine, carbon monoxide, and cyanide ligands. This 2Fe subcluster is synthesized and inserted into [FeFe]-hydrogenase by three maturase enzymes denoted HydE, HydF, and HydG. HydE and HydG are radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes and synthesize the nonprotein ligands of the H-cluster. HydF is a GTPase that functions as a scaffold or carrier for 2Fe subcluster production. Herein, we utilize UV-visible, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies to establish the existence of redox active [4Fe-4S] and [2Fe-2S] clusters bound to HydF. We have used spectroelectrochemical titrations to assign iron-sulfur cluster midpoint potentials, have shown that HydF purifies with a reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster in the absence of exogenous reducing agents, and have tracked iron-sulfur cluster spectroscopic changes with quaternary structural perturbations. Our results provide an important foundation for understanding the maturation process by defining the iron-sulfur cluster content of HydF prior to its interaction with HydE and HydG. We speculate that the [2Fe-2S] cluster of HydF either acts as a placeholder for HydG-derived Fe(CO)2CN species or serves as a scaffold for 2Fe subcluster assembly. PMID:27232385

  15. Kinetics and thermodynamics of gas diffusion in a NiFe hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Topin, Jérémie; Rousset, Marc; Antonczak, Serge; Golebiowski, Jérôme

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated O₂ and H₂ transport across a NiFe hydrogenase at the atomic scale by means of computational methods. The Wild Type protein has been compared with the V74Q mutant. Two distinct methodologies have been applied to study the gas access to the active site. Temperature locally enhanced sampling simulations have emphasized the importance of protein dynamics on gas diffusion. The O₂ diffusion free energy profiles, obtained by umbrella sampling, are in agreement with the known kinetic data and show that in the V74Q mutant, the inhibition process is lowered from both a kinetic and a thermodynamic point of view.

  16. Molecular detection of the clostridia in an anaerobic biohydrogen fermentation system by hydrogenase mRNA-targeted reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Jen; Chen, Wei-En; Shih, Shiou-Yun; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Wen, Fu-Shyan; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2006-05-01

    Molecular biological approaches were developed to monitor the potential biohydrogen-producing clostridia in an anaerobic semisolid fermentation system that used brewery yeast waste as the fermentation substrate. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis with 16S rDNA gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was employed to confirm the existence of clostridia in the system. Remarkably, reproducible nucleotide sequences of clostridia were obtained from different hydrogen production stages by using hydrogenase gene-targeted reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. These RNA-based information suggested that the predominant hydrogen-producing strains possess either a specific Clostridium pasteurianum-like or a specific Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase sequence. Comparison of the hydrogenase gene-targeted sequence profiles between PCR and RT-PCR revealed that the specific C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase harboring bacterial strains were dominant in both mRNA and bacterial population level. On the other hand, the specific C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase harboring strains expressed high level of hydrogenase mRNA but may not be dominant in population. Furthermore, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed the expression pattern of the clostridial hydrogenase mRNA and may serve as an activity index for the system.

  17. HupO, a Novel Regulator Involved in Thiosulfate-Responsive Control of HupSL [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Synthesis in Thiocapsa roseopersicina

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Ildikó K.; Kovács, Kornél L.

    2016-01-01

    [NiFe]-hydrogenases are regulated by various factors to fulfill their physiological functions in bacterial cells. The photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Thiocapsa roseopersicina harbors four functional [NiFe]-hydrogenases: HynSL, HupSL, Hox1, and Hox2. Most of these hydrogenases are functionally linked to sulfur metabolism, and thiosulfate has a central role in this organism. The membrane-associated Hup hydrogenases have been shown to play a role in energy conservation through hydrogen recycling. The expression of Hup-type hydrogenases is regulated by H2 in Rhodobacter capsulatus and Cupriavidus necator; however, it has been shown that the corresponding hydrogen-sensing system is nonfunctional in T. roseopersicina and that thiosulfate is a regulating factor of hup expression. Here, we describe the discovery and analysis of mutants of a putative regulator (HupO) of the Hup hydrogenase in T. roseopersicina. HupO appears to mediate the transcriptional repression of Hup enzyme synthesis under low-thiosulfate conditions. We also demonstrate that the presence of the Hox1 hydrogenase strongly influences Hup enzyme synthesis in that hup expression was decreased significantly in the hox1 mutant. This reduction in Hup synthesis could be reversed by mutation of hupO, which resulted in strongly elevated hup expression, as well as Hup protein levels, and concomitant in vivo hydrogen uptake activity in the hox1 mutant. However, this regulatory control was observed only at low thiosulfate concentrations. Additionally, weak hydrogen-dependent hup expression was shown in the hupO mutant strain lacking the Hox1 hydrogenase. HupO-mediated Hup regulation therefore appears to link thiosulfate metabolism and the hydrogenase network in T. roseopersicina. PMID:26801573

  18. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-08-10

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labelled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique ‘wagging’ mode involving H- motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On Ni(μ-D)57Fe deuteride substitution, this wagging causes a characteristic perturbation of Fe–CO/CN bands. Spectra have been interpreted by comparison with Ni(μ-H/D)57Fe enzyme mimics [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H/D)57Fe(CO)3]+ and DFT calculations, which collectively indicate a low-spin Ni(II)(μ-H)Fe(II) core for Ni-R, with H- binding Ni more tightly than Fe. Lastly, the present methodology is also relevant to characterizing Fe–H moieties in other important natural and synthetic catalysts.

  19. Stepwise isotope editing of [FeFe]-hydrogenases exposes cofactor dynamics.

    PubMed

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Heberle, Joachim; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven Timo

    2016-07-26

    The six-iron cofactor of [FeFe]-hydrogenases (H-cluster) is the most efficient H2-forming catalyst in nature. It comprises a diiron active site with three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN(-)) ligands in the active oxidized state (Hox) and one additional CO ligand in the inhibited state (Hox-CO). The diatomic ligands are sensitive reporter groups for structural changes of the cofactor. Their vibrational dynamics were monitored by real-time attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Combination of (13)CO gas exposure, blue or red light irradiation, and controlled hydration of three different [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins produced 8 Hox and 16 Hox-CO species with all possible isotopic exchange patterns. Extensive density functional theory calculations revealed the vibrational mode couplings of the carbonyl ligands and uniquely assigned each infrared spectrum to a specific labeling pattern. For Hox-CO, agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies improved by up to one order of magnitude for an apical CN(-) at the distal iron ion of the cofactor as opposed to an apical CO. For Hox, two equally probable isomers with partially rotated ligands were suggested. Interconversion between these structures implies dynamic ligand reorientation at the H-cluster. Our experimental protocol for site-selective (13)CO isotope editing combined with computational species assignment opens new perspectives for characterization of functional intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  20. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-08-01

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labelled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique `wagging' mode involving H- motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On Ni(μ-D)57Fe deuteride substitution, this wagging causes a characteristic perturbation of Fe-CO/CN bands. Spectra have been interpreted by comparison with Ni(μ-H/D)57Fe enzyme mimics [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H/D)57Fe(CO)3]+ and DFT calculations, which collectively indicate a low-spin Ni(II)(μ-H)Fe(II) core for Ni-R, with H- binding Ni more tightly than Fe. The present methodology is also relevant to characterizing Fe-H moieties in other important natural and synthetic catalysts.

  1. Isolation of genes (nif/hup cosmids) involved in hydrogenase and nitrogenase activities in Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Hom, S S; Graham, L A; Maier, R J

    1985-03-01

    Recombinant cosmids containing a Rhizobium japonicum gene involved in both hydrogenase (Hup) and nitrogenase (Nif) activities were isolated. An R. japonicum gene bank utilizing broad-host-range cosmid pLAFR1 was conjugated into Hup- Nif- R. japonicum strain SR139. Transconjugants containing the nif/hup cosmid were identified by their resistance to tetracycline (Tcr) and ability to grow chemoautotrophically (Aut+) with hydrogen. All Tcr Aut+ transconjugants possessed high levels of H2 uptake activity, as determined amperometrically. Moreover, all Hup+ transconjugants tested possessed the ability to reduce acetylene (Nif+) in soybean nodules. Cosmid DNAs from 19 Hup+ transconjugants were transferred to Escherichia coli by transformation. When the cosmids were restricted with EcoRI, 15 of the 19 cosmids had a restriction pattern with 13.2-, 4.0-, 3.0-, and 2.5-kilobase DNA fragments. Six E. coli transformants containing the nif/hup cosmids were conjugated with strain SR139. All strain SR139 transconjugants were Hup+ Nif+. Moreover, one nif/hup cosmid was transferred to 15 other R. japonicum Hup- mutants. Hup+ transconjugants of six of the Hup- mutants appeared at a frequency of 1.0, whereas the transconjugants of the other nine mutants remained Hup-. These results indicate that the nif/hup gene cosmids contain a gene involved in both nitrogenase and hydrogenase activities and at least one and perhaps other hup genes which are exclusively involved in H2 uptake activity.

  2. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labelled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique ‘wagging' mode involving H− motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On Ni(μ-D)57Fe deuteride substitution, this wagging causes a characteristic perturbation of Fe–CO/CN bands. Spectra have been interpreted by comparison with Ni(μ-H/D)57Fe enzyme mimics [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H/D)57Fe(CO)3]+ and DFT calculations, which collectively indicate a low-spin Ni(II)(μ-H)Fe(II) core for Ni-R, with H− binding Ni more tightly than Fe. The present methodology is also relevant to characterizing Fe–H moieties in other important natural and synthetic catalysts. PMID:26259066

  3. Transcriptional and Mutational Analysis of the Uptake Hydrogenase of the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    PubMed Central

    Happe, Thomas; Schütz, Kathrin; Böhme, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    A 10-kb DNA region of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 containing the structural genes of the uptake hydrogenase (hupSL) was cloned and sequenced. In contrast to the hupL gene of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which is interrupted by a 10.5-kb DNA fragment in vegetative cells, there is no programmed rearrangement within the hupL gene during the heterocyst differentiation of A. variabilis. The hupSL genes were transcribed as a 2.7-kb operon and were induced only under nitrogen-fixing conditions, as shown by Northern blot experiments and reverse transcriptase PCR. Primer extension experiments with a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide primer confirmed these results and identified the 5′ start of the mRNA transcript 103 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. A consensus sequence in the promoter that is recognized by the fumarate nitrate reductase regulator (Fnr) could be detected. The hupSL operon in A. variabilis was interrupted by an interposon deletion (mutant strain AVM13). Under N2-fixing conditions, the mutant strain exhibited significantly increased rates in H2 accumulation and produced three times more hydrogen than the wild type. These results indicate that the uptake hydrogenase is catalytically active in the wild type and that the enzyme reoxidizes the H2 developed by the nitrogenase. The Nif phenotype of the mutant strain showed a slight decrease of acetylene reduction compared to that of the wild type. PMID:10692368

  4. Stepwise isotope editing of [FeFe]-hydrogenases exposes cofactor dynamics.

    PubMed

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Heberle, Joachim; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven Timo

    2016-07-26

    The six-iron cofactor of [FeFe]-hydrogenases (H-cluster) is the most efficient H2-forming catalyst in nature. It comprises a diiron active site with three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN(-)) ligands in the active oxidized state (Hox) and one additional CO ligand in the inhibited state (Hox-CO). The diatomic ligands are sensitive reporter groups for structural changes of the cofactor. Their vibrational dynamics were monitored by real-time attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Combination of (13)CO gas exposure, blue or red light irradiation, and controlled hydration of three different [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins produced 8 Hox and 16 Hox-CO species with all possible isotopic exchange patterns. Extensive density functional theory calculations revealed the vibrational mode couplings of the carbonyl ligands and uniquely assigned each infrared spectrum to a specific labeling pattern. For Hox-CO, agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies improved by up to one order of magnitude for an apical CN(-) at the distal iron ion of the cofactor as opposed to an apical CO. For Hox, two equally probable isomers with partially rotated ligands were suggested. Interconversion between these structures implies dynamic ligand reorientation at the H-cluster. Our experimental protocol for site-selective (13)CO isotope editing combined with computational species assignment opens new perspectives for characterization of functional intermediates in the catalytic cycle. PMID:27432985

  5. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; et al

    2015-08-10

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labelled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique ‘wagging’ mode involving H- motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On Ni(μ-D)57Fe deuteride substitution, this wagging causes a characteristic perturbation of Fe–CO/CN bands. Spectra have been interpreted by comparison with Ni(μ-H/D)57Fe enzyme mimics [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H/D)57Fe(CO)3]+ and DFT calculations, which collectively indicate amore » low-spin Ni(II)(μ-H)Fe(II) core for Ni-R, with H- binding Ni more tightly than Fe. Lastly, the present methodology is also relevant to characterizing Fe–H moieties in other important natural and synthetic catalysts.« less

  6. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2−}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  7. Structural differences between the ready and unready oxidized states of [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Volbeda, Anne; Martin, Lydie; Cavazza, Christine; Matho, Michaël; Faber, Bart W; Roseboom, Winfried; Albracht, Simon P J; Garcin, Elsa; Rousset, Marc; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2005-05-01

    [NiFe] hydrogenases catalyze the reversible heterolytic cleavage of molecular hydrogen. Several oxidized, inactive states of these enzymes are known that are distinguishable by their very different activation properties. So far, the structural basis for this difference has not been understood because of lack of relevant crystallographic data. Here, we present the crystal structure of the ready Ni-B state of Desulfovibrio fructosovorans [NiFe] hydrogenase and show it to have a putative mu-hydroxo Ni-Fe bridging ligand at the active site. On the other hand, a new, improved refinement procedure of the X-ray diffraction data obtained for putative unready Ni-A/Ni-SU states resulted in a more elongated electron density for the bridging ligand, suggesting that it is a diatomic species. The slow activation of the Ni-A state, compared with the rapid activation of the Ni-B state, is therefore proposed to result from the different chemical nature of the ligands in the two oxidized species. Our results along with very recent electrochemical studies suggest that the diatomic ligand could be hydro-peroxide. PMID:15803334

  8. Structure of an Actinobacterial-Type [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Reveals Insight into O2-Tolerant H2 Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Caspar; Bommer, Martin; Hennig, Sandra E; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Dobbek, Holger; Lenz, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    A novel group of bacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenases is responsible for high-affinity H2 uptake from the troposphere, and is therefore thought to play an important role in the global H2 cycle. Here we present the first crystal structure at 2.85-Å resolution of such an actinobacterial-type hydrogenase (AH), which was isolated from the dihydrogen oxidizing bacterium, Ralstonia eutropha. The enzyme has a dimeric structure carrying two active [NiFe] sites that are interconnected by six [4Fe4S] clusters over a range of approximately 90 Å. Unlike most other [NiFe]-hydrogenases, the [4Fe4S] cluster proximal to the [NiFe] site is coordinated by three cysteines and one aspartate. Mutagenesis experiments revealed that this aspartate residue is related to the apparent O2 insensitivity of the AH. Our data provide first structural insight into specialized hydrogenases that are supposed to consume atmospheric H2 under challenging conditions, i.e. at high O2 concentration and wide temperature and pH ranges.

  9. [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like gene is involved in the regulation of sensitivity to oxygen in yeast and nematode.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Michihiko; Adachi, Noritaka; Shikatani, Kazuki; Ayusawa, Dai

    2009-04-01

    Oxygen is essential for the life of aerobic organisms, but reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from oxygen can be a threat for it. Many genes are involved in generation of ROS, but not much attention has been focused on the reactions from which ROS are generated. We therefore screened for mutants that showed an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and isolated a novel mutant, oxy-4(qa5001). This mutant showed an increased sensitivity to a high concentration of oxygen, and decreased longevity at 20 degrees C but not at 26 degrees C. The genetic analysis has revealed that oxy-4 had a causative mutation in an [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like gene (Y54H5A.4). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a deletion of NAR1, a possible homologue of oxy-4, also caused a similar increased sensitivity to oxygen. [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze both the formation and the splitting of molecular hydrogen, and function in anaerobic respiration in anaerobes. In contrast, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like genes identified in aerobic eukaryotes do not generate hydrogen, and its functional roles are less understood. Our results suggested that [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like genes were involved in the regulation of sensitivity to oxygen in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans. PMID:19335616

  10. O2-stable membrane-bound [NiFe]hydrogenase from a newly isolated Citrobacter sp. S-77.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Shigenobu; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogenases are of great interest due to their potential use in H(2)-based technology. However, most hydrogenases are highly sensitive to O(2), which have been the major bottleneck in hydrogenase studies. Here we report an O(2)-stable membrane-bound [NiFe]hydrogenase (MBH) purified from a newly isolated strain, S-77. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the strain S-77, it belongs to the genus of Citrobacter. In vitro experiments using the cytoplasmic membrane of strain S-77 suggested that a cytochrome b acts as the physiological electron acceptor of the MBH. The purified MBH was composed of a dimer of heterodimers, consisting of two distinct subunits with the molecular weights of 58.5 and 38.5 kDa. The enzyme showed a specific activity for H(2)-oxidation of 661 U/mg, which is 35-fold greater than that for H(2)-production of 18.7 U/mg. Notably, the MBH showed a remarkable O(2)-stability, maintaining almost 95% of its original activity even after incubation for 30 h in air at 4°C. These results suggest that the O(2)-stable MBH may play an important role in the H(2)-metabolic pathway under the aerobic conditions of Citrobacter sp. S-77. This is the first report of the purification and biochemical characterization of an O(2)-stable MBH from the genus of Citrobacter.

  11. A soil actinobacterium scavenges atmospheric H2 using two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Greening, Chris; Berney, Michael; Hards, Kiel; Cook, Gregory M; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-03-18

    In the Earth's lower atmosphere, H2 is maintained at trace concentrations (0.53 ppmv/0.40 nM) and rapidly turned over (lifetime ≤ 2.1 y(-1)). It is thought that soil microbes, likely actinomycetes, serve as the main global sink for tropospheric H2. However, no study has ever unambiguously proven that a hydrogenase can oxidize this trace gas. In this work, we demonstrate, by using genetic dissection and sensitive GC measurements, that the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 constitutively oxidizes subtropospheric concentrations of H2. We show that two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases mediate this process. Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd1) (MSMEG_2262-2263) is well-adapted to rapidly oxidize H2 at a range of concentrations [Vmax(app) = 12 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 180 nM; threshold = 130 pM in the Δhyd23 (Hyd1 only) strain], whereas Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2720) catalyzes a slower-acting, higher-affinity process [Vmax(app) = 2.5 nmol⋅g⋅dw(-1)⋅min(-1); Km(app) = 50 nM; threshold = 50 pM in the Δhyd13 (Hyd2 only) strain]. These observations strongly support previous studies that have linked group 5 [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd2) to the oxidation of tropospheric H2 in soil ecosystems. We further reveal that group 2a [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd1) can contribute to this process. Hydrogenase expression and activity increases in carbon-limited cells, suggesting that scavenging of trace H2 helps to sustain dormancy. Distinct physiological roles for Hyd1 and Hyd2 during the adaptation to this condition are proposed. Soil organisms harboring high-affinity hydrogenases may be especially competitive, given that they harness a highly dependable fuel source in otherwise unstable environments.

  12. A soil actinobacterium scavenges atmospheric H2 using two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Greening, Chris; Berney, Michael; Hards, Kiel; Cook, Gregory M.; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    In the Earth’s lower atmosphere, H2 is maintained at trace concentrations (0.53 ppmv/0.40 nM) and rapidly turned over (lifetime ≤ 2.1 y−1). It is thought that soil microbes, likely actinomycetes, serve as the main global sink for tropospheric H2. However, no study has ever unambiguously proven that a hydrogenase can oxidize this trace gas. In this work, we demonstrate, by using genetic dissection and sensitive GC measurements, that the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 constitutively oxidizes subtropospheric concentrations of H2. We show that two membrane-associated, oxygen-dependent [NiFe] hydrogenases mediate this process. Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd1) (MSMEG_2262-2263) is well-adapted to rapidly oxidize H2 at a range of concentrations [Vmax(app) = 12 nmol⋅g⋅dw−1⋅min−1; Km(app) = 180 nM; threshold = 130 pM in the Δhyd23 (Hyd1 only) strain], whereas Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2720) catalyzes a slower-acting, higher-affinity process [Vmax(app) = 2.5 nmol⋅g⋅dw−1⋅min−1; Km(app) = 50 nM; threshold = 50 pM in the Δhyd13 (Hyd2 only) strain]. These observations strongly support previous studies that have linked group 5 [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd2) to the oxidation of tropospheric H2 in soil ecosystems. We further reveal that group 2a [NiFe] hydrogenases (e.g., Hyd1) can contribute to this process. Hydrogenase expression and activity increases in carbon-limited cells, suggesting that scavenging of trace H2 helps to sustain dormancy. Distinct physiological roles for Hyd1 and Hyd2 during the adaptation to this condition are proposed. Soil organisms harboring high-affinity hydrogenases may be especially competitive, given that they harness a highly dependable fuel source in otherwise unstable environments. PMID:24591586

  13. Connecting [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases: mixed-valence nickel-iron dithiolates with rotated structures.

    PubMed

    Schilter, David; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Stein, Matthias

    2012-08-20

    New mixed-valence iron-nickel dithiolates are described that exhibit structures similar to those of mixed-valence diiron dithiolates. The interaction of tricarbonyl salt [(dppe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)(3)]BF(4) ([1]BF(4), where dppe = Ph(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2) and pdt(2-) = -SCH(2)CH(2)CH(2)S-) with P-donor ligands (L) afforded the substituted derivatives [(dppe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)(2)L]BF(4) incorporating L = PHCy(2) ([1a]BF(4)), PPh(NEt(2))(2) ([1b]BF(4)), P(NMe(2))(3) ([1c]BF(4)), P(i-Pr)(3) ([1d]BF(4)), and PCy(3) ([1e]BF(4)). The related precursor [(dcpe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)(3)]BF(4) ([2]BF(4), where dcpe = Cy(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PCy(2)) gave the more electron-rich family of compounds [(dcpe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)(2)L]BF(4) for L = PPh(2)(2-pyridyl) ([2a]BF(4)), PPh(3) ([2b]BF(4)), and PCy(3) ([2c]BF(4)). For bulky and strongly basic monophosphorus ligands, the salts feature distorted coordination geometries at iron: crystallographic analyses of [1e]BF(4) and [2c]BF(4) showed that they adopt "rotated" Fe(I) centers, in which PCy(3) occupies a basal site and one CO ligand partially bridges the Ni and Fe centers. Like the undistorted mixed-valence derivatives, members of the new class of complexes are described as Ni(II)Fe(I) (S = ½) systems according to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, although with attenuated (31)P hyperfine interactions. Density functional theory calculations using the BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0 exchange-correlation functionals agree with the structural and spectroscopic data, suggesting that the spin for [1e](+) is mostly localized in a Fe(I)-centered d(z(2)) orbital, orthogonal to the Fe-P bond. The PCy(3) complexes, rare examples of species featuring "rotated" Fe centers, both structurally and spectroscopically incorporate features from homobimetallic mixed-valence diiron dithiolates. Also, when the NiS(2)Fe core of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site is reproduced, the "hybrid models" incorporate key features of the two major classes of hydrogenase. Furthermore, cyclic

  14. Connecting [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenases: mixed-valence nickel-iron dithiolates with rotated structures.

    PubMed

    Schilter, David; Rauchfuss, Thomas B; Stein, Matthias

    2012-08-20

    New mixed-valence iron-nickel dithiolates are described that exhibit structures similar to those of mixed-valence diiron dithiolates. The interaction of tricarbonyl salt [(dppe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)(3)]BF(4) ([1]BF(4), where dppe = Ph(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2) and pdt(2-) = -SCH(2)CH(2)CH(2)S-) with P-donor ligands (L) afforded the substituted derivatives [(dppe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)(2)L]BF(4) incorporating L = PHCy(2) ([1a]BF(4)), PPh(NEt(2))(2) ([1b]BF(4)), P(NMe(2))(3) ([1c]BF(4)), P(i-Pr)(3) ([1d]BF(4)), and PCy(3) ([1e]BF(4)). The related precursor [(dcpe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)(3)]BF(4) ([2]BF(4), where dcpe = Cy(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PCy(2)) gave the more electron-rich family of compounds [(dcpe)Ni(pdt)Fe(CO)(2)L]BF(4) for L = PPh(2)(2-pyridyl) ([2a]BF(4)), PPh(3) ([2b]BF(4)), and PCy(3) ([2c]BF(4)). For bulky and strongly basic monophosphorus ligands, the salts feature distorted coordination geometries at iron: crystallographic analyses of [1e]BF(4) and [2c]BF(4) showed that they adopt "rotated" Fe(I) centers, in which PCy(3) occupies a basal site and one CO ligand partially bridges the Ni and Fe centers. Like the undistorted mixed-valence derivatives, members of the new class of complexes are described as Ni(II)Fe(I) (S = ½) systems according to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, although with attenuated (31)P hyperfine interactions. Density functional theory calculations using the BP86, B3LYP, and PBE0 exchange-correlation functionals agree with the structural and spectroscopic data, suggesting that the spin for [1e](+) is mostly localized in a Fe(I)-centered d(z(2)) orbital, orthogonal to the Fe-P bond. The PCy(3) complexes, rare examples of species featuring "rotated" Fe centers, both structurally and spectroscopically incorporate features from homobimetallic mixed-valence diiron dithiolates. Also, when the NiS(2)Fe core of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site is reproduced, the "hybrid models" incorporate key features of the two major classes of hydrogenase. Furthermore, cyclic

  15. Comparison of N2 Fixation and Yields in Cajanus cajan between Hydrogenase-Positive and Hydrogenase-Negative Rhizobia by In Situ Acetylene Reduction Assays and Direct 15N Partitioning 1

    PubMed Central

    La Favre, Jeffrey S.; Focht, Dennis D.

    1983-01-01

    Pigeon peas [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] were grown in soil columns containing 15N-enriched organic matter. Seasonal N2 fixation activity was determined by periodically assaying plants for reduction of C2H2. N2 fixation rose sharply from the first assay period at 51 days after planting to a peak of activity between floral initiation and fruit set. N2 fixation (acetylene reduction) activity dropped concomitantly with pod maturation but recovered after pod harvests. Analysis of 15N content of plant shoots revealed that approximately 91 to 94% of plant N was derived from N2 fixation. The effect of inoculation with hydrogenase-positive and hydrogenase-negative rhizobia was examined. Pigeon peas inoculated with strain P132 (hydrogenase-positive) yielded significantly more total shoot N than other inoculated or uninoculated treatments. However, two other hydrogenase-positive strains did not yield significantly more total shoot N than a hydrogenase-negative strain. The extent of nodulation by inoculum strains compared to indigenous rhizobia was determined by typing nodules according to intrinsic antibiotic resistance of the inoculum strains. The inoculum strains were detected in almost all typed nodules of inoculated plants. Gas samples were taken from soil columns several times during the growth cycle of the plants. H2 was never detected, even in columns containing pigeon peas inoculated with hydrogenase-negative rhizobia. This was attributed to H2 consumption by soil bacteria. Estimation of N2 fixation by acetylene reduction activity was closest to the direct 15N method when ethylene concentrations in the gas headspace (between the column lid and soil surface) were extrapolated to include the soil pore space as opposed solely to measurement in the headspace. There was an 8-fold difference between the two acetylene reduction assay methods of estimation. Based on a planting density of 15,000 plants per hectare, the direct 15N fixation rates ranged from 67 (noninoculated

  16. The bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenase in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is reduced by flavodoxin and ferredoxin and is essential under mixotrophic, nitrate-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Kirstin; Chen, Xi; Schreiber, Karoline; Kaspar, Ursula; Makam, Srinivas; Appel, Jens

    2014-01-24

    Cyanobacteria are able to use solar energy for the production of hydrogen. It is generally accepted that cyanobacterial NiFe-hydrogenases are reduced by NAD(P)H. This is in conflict with thermodynamic considerations, as the midpoint potentials of NAD(P)H do not suffice to support the measured hydrogen production under physiological conditions. We show that flavodoxin and ferredoxin directly reduce the bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenase of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in vitro. A merodiploid ferredoxin-NADP reductase mutant produced correspondingly more photohydrogen. We furthermore found that the hydrogenase receives its electrons via pyruvate:flavodoxin/ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR)-flavodoxin/ferredoxin under fermentative conditions, enabling the cells to gain ATP. These results strongly support that the bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenases in cyanobacteria function as electron sinks for low potential electrons from photosystem I and as a redox balancing device under fermentative conditions. However, the selective advantage of this enzyme is not known. No strong phenotype of mutants lacking the hydrogenase has been found. Because bidirectional hydrogenases are widespread in aquatic nutrient-rich environments that are capable of triggering phytoplankton blooms, we mimicked those conditions by growing cells in the presence of increased amounts of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic nitrogen. Under these conditions the hydrogenase was found to be essential. As these conditions close the two most important sinks for reduced flavodoxin/ferredoxin (CO2-fixation and nitrate reduction), this discovery further substantiates the connection between flavodoxin/ferredoxin and the NiFe-hydrogenase. PMID:24311779

  17. Genetics and biotechnology of the H(2)-uptake [NiFe] hydrogenase from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, a legume endosymbiotic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Palacios, J M; Manyani, H; Martínez, M; Ureta, A C; Brito, B; Báscones, E; Rey, L; Imperial, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    2005-02-01

    A limited number of strains belonging to several genera of Rhizobiaceae are capable of expressing a hydrogenase system that allows partial or full recycling of hydrogen evolved by nitrogenase, thus increasing the energy efficiency of the nitrogen fixation process. This review is focused on the genetics and biotechnology of the hydrogenase system from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, a frequent inhabitant of European soils capable of establishing symbiotic association with peas, lentils, vetches and other legumes. PMID:15667275

  18. Orientation-Controlled Electrocatalytic Efficiency of an Adsorbed Oxygen-Tolerant Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Nina; Utesch, Tillmann; Zerball, Maximilian; Horch, Marius; Millo, Diego; Fritsch, Johannes; Lenz, Oliver; von Klitzing, Regine; Hildebrandt, Peter; Fischer, Anna; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Zebger, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Protein immobilization on electrodes is a key concept in exploiting enzymatic processes for bioelectronic devices. For optimum performance, an in-depth understanding of the enzyme-surface interactions is required. Here, we introduce an integral approach of experimental and theoretical methods that provides detailed insights into the adsorption of an oxygen-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase on a biocompatible gold electrode. Using atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy, and protein film voltammetry, we explore enzyme coverage, integrity, and activity, thereby probing both structure and catalytic H2 conversion of the enzyme. Electrocatalytic efficiencies can be correlated with the mode of protein adsorption on the electrode as estimated theoretically by molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that pre-activation at low potentials results in increased current densities, which can be rationalized in terms of a potential-induced re-orientation of the immobilized enzyme. PMID:26580976

  19. Orientation-Controlled Electrocatalytic Efficiency of an Adsorbed Oxygen-Tolerant Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zerball, Maximilian; Horch, Marius; Millo, Diego; Fritsch, Johannes; Lenz, Oliver; von Klitzing, Regine; Hildebrandt, Peter; Fischer, Anna; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Zebger, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Protein immobilization on electrodes is a key concept in exploiting enzymatic processes for bioelectronic devices. For optimum performance, an in-depth understanding of the enzyme-surface interactions is required. Here, we introduce an integral approach of experimental and theoretical methods that provides detailed insights into the adsorption of an oxygen-tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase on a biocompatible gold electrode. Using atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy, and protein film voltammetry, we explore enzyme coverage, integrity, and activity, thereby probing both structure and catalytic H2 conversion of the enzyme. Electrocatalytic efficiencies can be correlated with the mode of protein adsorption on the electrode as estimated theoretically by molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that pre-activation at low potentials results in increased current densities, which can be rationalized in terms of a potential-induced re-orientation of the immobilized enzyme. PMID:26580976

  20. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production using Polymeric Carbon Nitride with a Hydrogenase and a Bioinspired Synthetic Ni Catalyst**

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Christine A; Gross, Manuela A; Lau, Vincent W; Cavazza, Christine; Lotsch, Bettina V; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Solar-light-driven H2 production in water with a [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase (H2ase) and a bioinspired synthetic nickel catalyst (NiP) in combination with a heptazine carbon nitride polymer, melon (CNx), is reported. The semibiological and purely synthetic systems show catalytic activity during solar light irradiation with turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 50 000 mol H2 (mol H2ase)−1 and approximately 155 mol H2 (mol NiP)−1 in redox-mediator-free aqueous solution at pH 6 and 4.5, respectively. Both systems maintained a reduced photoactivity under UV-free solar light irradiation (λ>420 nm). PMID:26300567

  1. Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production using Polymeric Carbon Nitride with a Hydrogenase and a Bioinspired Synthetic Ni Catalyst**

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Christine A; Gross, Manuela A; Lau, Vincent W; Cavazza, Christine; Lotsch, Bettina V; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Solar-light-driven H2 production in water with a [NiFeSe]-hydrogenase (H2ase) and a bioinspired synthetic nickel catalyst (NiP) in combination with a heptazine carbon nitride polymer, melon (CNx), is reported. The semibiological and purely synthetic systems show catalytic activity during solar light irradiation with turnover numbers (TONs) of more than 50 000 mol H2 (mol H2ase)−1 and approximately 155 mol H2 (mol NiP)−1 in redox-mediator-free aqueous solution at pH 6 and 4.5, respectively. Both systems maintained a reduced photoactivity under UV-free solar light irradiation (λ>420 nm). PMID:25205168

  2. An NAD(P)H-Dependent Artificial Transfer Hydrogenase for Multienzymatic Cascades.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasunori; Köhler, Valentin; Ward, Thomas R

    2016-05-11

    Enzymes typically depend on either NAD(P)H or FADH2 as hydride source for reduction purposes. In contrast, organometallic catalysts most often rely on isopropanol or formate to generate the reactive hydride moiety. Here we show that incorporation of a Cp*Ir cofactor possessing a biotin moiety and 4,7-dihydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline into streptavidin yields an NAD(P)H-dependent artificial transfer hydrogenase (ATHase). This ATHase (0.1 mol%) catalyzes imine reduction with 1 mM NADPH (2 mol%), which can be concurrently regenerated by a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) using only 1.2 equiv of glucose. A four-enzyme cascade consisting of the ATHase, the GDH, a monoamine oxidase, and a catalase leads to the production of enantiopure amines. PMID:27100673

  3. Refinement of the nickel site structure in Desulfovibrio gigas hydrogenase using range-extended EXAFS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weiwei; Jacquamet, L; Patil, D S; Wang, H X; Evans, D J; Smith, M C; Millar, M; Koch, S; Eichhorn, D M; Latimer, M; Cramer, S P

    2003-01-01

    We have reexamined the Ni EXAFS of oxidized, inactive (as-isolated) and H(2) reduced Desulfovibrio gigas hydrogenase. Better spatial resolution was achieved by analyzing the data over a 50% wider k-range than was previously available. A lower k(min) was obtained using the FEFF code for phase shifts and amplitudes. A higher k(max) was obtained by removing an interfering Cu signal from the raw spectra using multiple energy fluorescence detection. The larger k-range allowed us to better resolve the Ni-S bond lengths and to define more accurately the Ni-O and Ni-Fe bond lengths. We find that as-isolated, hydrogenase has two Ni-S bonds at approximately 2.2 A, but also 1-2 Ni-S bonds in the 2.35+/-0.05 A range. A Ni-O interaction is evident at 1.91 A. The as-isolated Ni-Fe distance cannot be unambiguously determined. Upon H(2) reduction, two short Ni-S bonds persist at approximately 2.2 A, but the remaining Ni-S bonds lengthen to 2.47+/-0.05 A. Good simulations are obtained with a Ni-Fe distance at 2.52 A, in agreement with crystal structures of the reduced enzyme. Although not evident in the crystal structures, an improvement in the fit is obtained by inclusion of one Ni-O interaction at 2.03 A. Implications of these distances for the spin-state of H(2) reduced H(2)ase are discussed. PMID:12538051

  4. Enhanced Oxygen-Tolerance of the Full Heterotrimeric Membrane-Bound [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenases are oxygen-sensitive enzymes that catalyze the conversion between protons and hydrogen. Water-soluble subcomplexes of membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases (MBH) have been extensively studied for applications in hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells as they are relatively tolerant to oxygen, although even these catalysts are still inactivated in oxidative conditions. Here, the full heterotrimeric MBH of Ralstonia eutropha, including the membrane-integral cytochrome b subunit, was investigated electrochemically using electrodes modified with planar tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLM). Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry experiments show that MBH, in equilibrium with the quinone pool in the tBLM, does not anaerobically inactivate under oxidative redox conditions. In aerobic environments, the MBH is reversibly inactivated by O2, but reactivation was found to be fast even under oxidative redox conditions. This enhanced resistance to inactivation is ascribed to the oligomeric state of MBH in the lipid membrane. PMID:24866391

  5. Photosensitivity of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F with visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Osuka, Hisao; Shomura, Yasuhito; Komori, Hirofumi; Shibata, Naoki; Nagao, Satoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase showed light sensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New FT-IR bands were observed with light irradiation of the Ni-A state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPR g-values of the Ni-A state shifted upon light irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The light-induced state converted back to the Ni-A state under the dark condition. -- Abstract: [NiFe] hydrogenase catalyzes reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Its active site is constructed of a hetero dinuclear Ni-Fe complex, and the oxidation state of the Ni ion changes according to the redox state of the enzyme. We found that the Ni-A state (an inactive unready, oxidized state) of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) is light sensitive and forms a new state (Ni-AL) with irradiation of visible light. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) bands at 1956, 2084 and 2094 cm{sup -1} of the Ni-A state shifted to 1971, 2086 and 2098 cm{sup -1} in the Ni-AL state. The g-values of g{sub x} = 2.30, g{sub y} = 2.23 and g{sub z} = 2.01 for the signals in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the Ni-A state at room temperature varied for -0.009, +0.012 and +0.010, respectively, upon light irradiation. The light-induced Ni-AL state converted back immediately to the Ni-A state under dark condition at room temperature. These results show that the coordination structure of the Fe site of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase is perturbed significantly by light irradiation with relatively small coordination change at the Ni site.

  6. Cloning of hydrogenase genes and fine structure analysis of an operon essential for H2 metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, P; Lee, J H; Shanmugam, K T

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli has two unlinked genes that code for hydrogenase synthesis and activity. The DNA fragments containing the two genes (hydA and hydB) were cloned into a plasmid vector, pBR322. The plasmids containing the hyd genes (pSE-290 and pSE-111 carrying the hydA and hydB genes, respectively) were used to genetically map a total of 51 mutant strains with defects in hydrogenase activity. A total of 37 mutants carried a mutation in the hydB gene, whereas the remaining 14 hyd were hydA. This complementation analysis also established the presence of two new genes, so far unidentified, one coding for formate dehydrogenase-2 (fdv) and another producing an electron transport protein (fhl) coupling formate dehydrogenase-2 to hydrogenase. Three of the four genes, hydB, fhl, and fdv, may constitute a single operon, and all three genes are carried by a 5.6-kilobase-pair chromosomal DNA insert in plasmid pSE-128. Plasmids carrying a part of this 5.6-kilobase-pair DNA (pSE-130) or fragments derived from this DNA in different orientations (pSE-126 and pSE-129) inhibited the production of active formate hydrogenlyase. This inhibition occurred even in a prototrophic E. coli, strain K-10, but only during an early induction period. These results, based on complementation analysis with cloned DNA fragments, show that both hydA and hydB genes are essential for the production of active hydrogenase. For the expression of active formate hydrogenlyase, two other gene products, fhl and fdv are also needed. All four genes map between 58 and 59 min in the E. coli chromosome. PMID:3884595

  7. Hydrogenase- and Outer Membrane c-Type Cytochrome-Facilitated Reduction of Technetium(VII) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Reed, Samantha B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Simonson, Cody J.; Liu, Chongxuan; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-01-15

    Pertechnetate, 99Tc(VII)O4-, is a highly mobile radionuclide contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy sites that can be enzymatically reduced by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble Tc(IV)O2(s). In other microorganisms, Tc(VII)O4- reduction is generally considered to be catalyzed by hydrogenase. Here, we provide evidence that although the NiFe hydrogenase of MR-1 was involved in the H2-driven reduction of Tc(VII)O4- (presumably through a direct coupling of H2 oxidation and Tc(VII) reduction), the deletion of both hydrogenase genes did not completely eliminate the ability of MR-1 to reduce Tc(VII). With lactate as the electron donor, mutants lacking the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA or the proteins required for the maturation of c-type cytochromes were defective in reducing Tc(VII) to nanoparticulate TcO2·nH2O(s) relative to MR-1 or a NiFe hydrogenase mutant. In addition, reduced MtrC and OmcA were oxidized by Tc(VII)O4-, confirming the capacity for direct electron transfer from these OMCs to TcO4-. c-Type cytochrome-catalyzed Tc(VII) reduction could be a potentially important mechanism in environments where organic electron donor concentrations are sufficient to allow this reaction to dominate.

  8. Synthesis and enzymatic photo-activity of an O2 tolerant hydrogenase-CdSe@CdS quantum rod bioconjugate.

    PubMed

    Hamon, C; Ciaccafava, A; Infossi, P; Puppo, R; Even-Hernandez, P; Lojou, E; Marchi, V

    2014-05-21

    This communication reports on the preparation of stable and photo-active nano-heterostructures composed of O2 tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase extracted from the Aquifex aeolicus bacterium grafted onto hydrophilic CdSe/CdS quantum rods in view of the development of H2/O2 biofuel cells. The resulting complex is efficient towards H2 oxidation, displays good stability and new photosensitive properties. PMID:24468861

  9. RNA silencing of hydrogenase(-like) genes and investigation of their physiological roles in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Godman, James E; Molnár, Attila; Baulcombe, David C; Balk, Janneke

    2010-11-01

    The genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii encodes two [FeFe]-hydrogenases, HydA1 and HydA2, and the hydrogenase-like protein HYD3. The unique combination of these proteins in one eukaryotic cell allows for direct comparison of their in vivo functions, which have not been established for HydA2 and HYD3. Using an artificial microRNA silencing method developed recently, the expression of HydA1, HydA2 and HYD3 was specifically down-regulated. Silencing of HydA1 resulted in 4-fold lower hydrogenase protein and activity under anaerobic conditions. In contrast, silencing of HydA2 or HYD3 did not affect hydrogen production. Cell lines with strongly (>90%) decreased HYD3 transcript levels grew more slowly than wild-type. The activity of aldehyde oxidase, a cytosolic Fe-S enzyme, was decreased in HYD3-knockdown lines, whereas Fe-S dependent activities in the chloroplast and mitochondria were unaffected. In addition, the HYD3-knockdown lines grew poorly on hypoxanthine, indicating impaired function of xanthine dehydrogenase, another cytosolic Fe-S enzyme. The expression levels of selected genes in response to hypoxia were unaltered upon HYD3 silencing. Together, our results clearly distinguish the cellular roles of HydA1 and HYD3, and indicate that HYD3, like its yeast and human homologues, has an evolutionary conserved role in the biogenesis or maintenance of cytosolic Fe-S proteins.

  10. Photoelectrochemical H2 Evolution with a Hydrogenase Immobilized on a TiO2‐Protected Silicon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong‐Yong; Park, Hyun S.; Fontecilla‐Camps, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The combination of enzymes with semiconductors enables the photoelectrochemical characterization of electron‐transfer processes at highly active and well‐defined catalytic sites on a light‐harvesting electrode surface. Herein, we report the integration of a hydrogenase on a TiO2‐coated p‐Si photocathode for the photo‐reduction of protons to H2. The immobilized hydrogenase exhibits activity on Si attributable to a bifunctional TiO2 layer, which protects the Si electrode from oxidation and acts as a biocompatible support layer for the productive adsorption of the enzyme. The p‐Si|TiO2|hydrogenase photocathode displays visible‐light driven production of H2 at an energy‐storing, positive electrochemical potential and an essentially quantitative faradaic efficiency. We have thus established a widely applicable platform to wire redox enzymes in an active configuration on a p‐type semiconductor photocathode through the engineering of the enzyme–materials interface. PMID:27061334

  11. Photoelectrochemical H2 Evolution with a Hydrogenase Immobilized on a TiO2‐Protected Silicon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong‐Yong; Park, Hyun S.; Fontecilla‐Camps, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The combination of enzymes with semiconductors enables the photoelectrochemical characterization of electron‐transfer processes at highly active and well‐defined catalytic sites on a light‐harvesting electrode surface. Herein, we report the integration of a hydrogenase on a TiO2‐coated p‐Si photocathode for the photo‐reduction of protons to H2. The immobilized hydrogenase exhibits activity on Si attributable to a bifunctional TiO2 layer, which protects the Si electrode from oxidation and acts as a biocompatible support layer for the productive adsorption of the enzyme. The p‐Si|TiO2|hydrogenase photocathode displays visible‐light driven production of H2 at an energy‐storing, positive electrochemical potential and an essentially quantitative faradaic efficiency. We have thus established a widely applicable platform to wire redox enzymes in an active configuration on a p‐type semiconductor photocathode through the engineering of the enzyme–materials interface. PMID:27570301

  12. Genetic analysis of the Hox hydrogenase in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 reveals subunit roles in association, assembly, maturation, and function.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Carrie; Boehm, Marko; Carrieri, Damian; Yu, Jianping; Dubini, Alexandra; Nixon, Peter J; Maness, Pin-Ching

    2012-12-21

    Hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that catalyze 2H(+) + 2e(-) ↔ H(2). A multisubunit, bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase has been identified and characterized in a number of bacteria, including cyanobacteria, where it is hypothesized to function as an electron valve, balancing reductant in the cell. In cyanobacteria, this Hox hydrogenase consists of five proteins in two functional moieties: a hydrogenase moiety (HoxYH) with homology to heterodimeric [NiFe]-hydrogenases and a diaphorase moiety (HoxEFU) with homology to NuoEFG of respiratory Complex I, linking NAD(P)H ↔ NAD(P)(+) as a source/sink for electrons. Here, we present an extensive study of Hox hydrogenase in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We identify the presence of HoxEFUYH, HoxFUYH, HoxEFU, HoxFU, and HoxYH subcomplexes as well as association of the immature, unprocessed large subunit (HoxH) with other Hox subunits and unidentified factors, providing a basis for understanding Hox maturation and assembly. The analysis of mutants containing individual and combined hox gene deletions in a common parental strain reveals apparent alterations in subunit abundance and highlights an essential role for HoxF and HoxU in complex/subcomplex association. In addition, analysis of individual and combined hox mutant phenotypes in a single strain background provides a clear view of the function of each subunit in hydrogenase activity and presents evidence that its physiological function is more complicated than previously reported, with no outward defects apparent in growth or photosynthesis under various growth conditions.

  13. EPR and FTIR analysis of the mechanism of H2 activation by [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Ratzloff, Michael W; Shepard, Eric M; Byer, Amanda S; Noone, Seth M; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B; King, Paul W

    2013-05-01

    While a general model of H2 activation has been proposed for [FeFe]-hydrogenases, the structural and biophysical properties of the intermediates of the H-cluster catalytic site have not yet been discretely defined. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the H-cluster catalytic site, a [4Fe-4S]H subcluster linked by a cysteine thiolate to an organometallic diiron subsite with CO, CN, and dithiolate ligands, in [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1). Oxidized CrHydA1 displayed a rhombic 2.1 EPR signal (g = 2.100, 2.039, 1.997) and an FTIR spectrum previously assigned to the oxidized H-cluster (Hox). Reduction of the Hox sample with 100% H2 or sodium dithionite (NaDT) nearly eliminated the 2.1 signal, which coincided with appearance of a broad 2.3-2.07 signal (g = 2.3-2.07, 1.863) and/or a rhombic 2.08 signal (g = 2.077, 1.935, 1.880). Both signals displayed relaxation properties similar to those of [4Fe-4S] clusters and are consistent with an S = 1/2 H-cluster containing a [4Fe-4S]H(+) subcluster. These EPR signals were correlated with differences in the CO and CN ligand modes in the FTIR spectra of H2- and NaDT-reduced samples compared with Hox. The results indicate that reduction of [4Fe-4S]H from the 2+ state to the 1+ state occurs during both catalytic H2 activation and proton reduction and is accompanied by structural rearrangements of the diiron subsite CO/CN ligand field. Changes in the [4Fe-4S]H oxidation state occur in electron exchange with the diiron subsite during catalysis and mediate electron transfer with either external carriers or accessory FeS clusters. PMID:23578101

  14. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Linehan, John C.; Cheng, Yuhui; Dupuis, Michel; Raugei, Simone; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-01-15

    Possible proton channels in Clostridium pasteurianum [FeFe]-hydrogenase were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. This study was undertaken to discern proposed channels, compare their properties, evaluate the functional channel, and to provide insight into the features of an active proton channel. Our simulations suggest that protons are not transported through water wires. Instead, a five-residue motif (E282, S319, E279, HOH, C299) was found to be the likely channel, consistent with experimental observations. This channel connects the surface of the enzyme and the di-thiomethylamine bridge of the catalytic H-cluster, permitting the transport of protons. The channel was found to have a persistent hydrogen bonded core (residues E279 to S319), with less persistent hydrogen bonds at the ends of the channel. The hydrogen bond occupancy in this network was found to be sensitive to the protonation state of the residues in the channel, with different protonation states enhancing or stabilizing hydrogen bonding in different regions of the network. Single site mutations to non-hydrogen bonding residues break the hydrogen bonding network at that residue, consistent with experimental observations showing catalyst inactivation. In many cases, these mutations alter the hydrogen bonding in other regions of the channel which may be equally important in catalytic failure. A correlation between the protein dynamics near the proton channel and the redox partner binding regions was also found as a function of protonation state. The likely mechanism of proton movement in [FeFe]-hydrogenases is discussed based on the structural analysis presented here. This work was funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of

  15. Genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio spp. in environmental samples analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of [NiFe] hydrogenase gene fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, C; Muyzer, G

    1995-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio species in environmental samples was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified [NiFe] hydrogenase gene fragments. Five different PCR primers were designed after comparative analysis of [NiFe] hydrogenase gene sequences from three Desulfovibrio species. These primers were tested in different combinations on the genomic DNAs of a variety of hydrogenase-containing and hydrogenase-lacking bacteria. One primer pair was found to be specific for Desulfovibrio species only, while the others gave positive results with other bacteria also. By using this specific primer pair, we were able to amplify the [NiFe] hydrogenase genes of DNAs isolated from environmental samples and to detect the presence of Desulfovibrio species in these samples. However, only after DGGE analysis of these PCR products could the number of different Desulfovibrio species within the samples be determined. DGGE analysis of PCR products from different bioreactors demonstrated up to two bands, while at least five distinguishable bands were detected in a microbial mat sample. Because these bands most likely represent as many Desulfovibrio species present in these samples, we conclude that the genetic diversity of Desulfovibrio species in the natural microbial mat is far greater than that in the experimental bioreactors. PMID:7793940

  16. Microoxic Niches within the Thylakoid Stroma of Air-Grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Protect [FeFe]-Hydrogenase and Support Hydrogen Production under Fully Aerobic Environment.

    PubMed

    Liran, Oded; Semyatich, Rinat; Milrad, Yuval; Eilenberg, Haviva; Weiner, Iddo; Yacoby, Iftach

    2016-09-01

    Photosynthetic hydrogen production in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is catalyzed by two [FeFe]-hydrogenase isoforms, HydA1 and HydA2, both irreversibly inactivated upon a few seconds exposure to atmospheric oxygen. Until recently, it was thought that hydrogenase is not active in air-grown microalgal cells. In contrast, we show that the entire pool of cellular [FeFe]-hydrogenase remains active in air-grown cells due to efficient scavenging of oxygen. Using membrane inlet mass spectrometry, (18)O2 isotope, and various inhibitors, we were able to dissect the various oxygen uptake mechanisms. We found that both chlororespiration, catalyzed by plastid terminal oxidase, and Mehler reactions, catalyzed by photosystem I and Flavodiiron proteins, significantly contribute to oxygen uptake rate. This rate is considerably enhanced with increasing light, thus forming local anaerobic niches at the proximity of the stromal face of the thylakoid membrane. Furthermore, we found that in transition to high light, the hydrogen production rate is significantly enhanced for a short duration (100 s), thus indicating that [FeFe]-hydrogenase functions as an immediate sink for surplus electrons in aerobic as well as in anaerobic environments. In summary, we show that an anaerobic locality in the chloroplast preserves [FeFe]-hydrogenase activity and supports continuous hydrogen production in air-grown microalgal cells. PMID:27443604

  17. Microoxic Niches within the Thylakoid Stroma of Air-Grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Protect [FeFe]-Hydrogenase and Support Hydrogen Production under Fully Aerobic Environment1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liran, Oded; Milrad, Yuval; Eilenberg, Haviva; Weiner, Iddo

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic hydrogen production in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is catalyzed by two [FeFe]-hydrogenase isoforms, HydA1 and HydA2, both irreversibly inactivated upon a few seconds exposure to atmospheric oxygen. Until recently, it was thought that hydrogenase is not active in air-grown microalgal cells. In contrast, we show that the entire pool of cellular [FeFe]-hydrogenase remains active in air-grown cells due to efficient scavenging of oxygen. Using membrane inlet mass spectrometry, 18O2 isotope, and various inhibitors, we were able to dissect the various oxygen uptake mechanisms. We found that both chlororespiration, catalyzed by plastid terminal oxidase, and Mehler reactions, catalyzed by photosystem I and Flavodiiron proteins, significantly contribute to oxygen uptake rate. This rate is considerably enhanced with increasing light, thus forming local anaerobic niches at the proximity of the stromal face of the thylakoid membrane. Furthermore, we found that in transition to high light, the hydrogen production rate is significantly enhanced for a short duration (100 s), thus indicating that [FeFe]-hydrogenase functions as an immediate sink for surplus electrons in aerobic as well as in anaerobic environments. In summary, we show that an anaerobic locality in the chloroplast preserves [FeFe]-hydrogenase activity and supports continuous hydrogen production in air-grown microalgal cells. PMID:27443604

  18. H2-driven biotransformation of n-octane to 1-octanol by a recombinant Pseudomonas putida strain co-synthesizing an O2-tolerant hydrogenase and a P450 monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Thomas H; Lauterbach, Lars; Honda Malca, Sumire; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Lenz, Oliver

    2015-11-21

    An in vivo biotransformation system is presented that affords the hydroxylation of n-octane to 1-octanol on the basis of NADH-dependent CYP153A monooxygenase and NAD(+)-reducing hydrogenase heterologously synthesized in a bacterial host. The hydrogenase sustains H2-driven NADH cofactor regeneration even in the presence of O2, the co-substrate of monooxygenase.

  19. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster. PMID:19737003

  20. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster.

  1. Hydrogen evolution in [NiFe] hydrogenases and related biomimetic systems: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Das, Ranjita; Neese, Frank; van Gastel, Maurice

    2016-09-21

    In this work, a detailed quantum chemical study of the mechanism of [Ni(bdt)(dppf)] (Ni(II)L) catalyzed hydrogen formation [A. Gan, T. L. Groy, P. Tarakeshwar, S. K. S. Mazinani, J. Shearer, V. Mujica and A. K. Jones, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2015, 137, 1109-1115] following an electro-chemical-electro-chemical (ECEC) pathway is reported. The complex exclusively catalyzes the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen. The calculations suggest that the first one-electron reduction of the [Ni(II)L] catalyst is the rate limiting step of the catalytic cycle and hence, the buildup of detectable reaction intermediates is not expected. The catalytic activity of the [Ni(II)L] complex is facilitated by the flexibility of the ligand system, which allows the ligand framework to adapt to changes in the Ni oxidation state over the course of the reaction. Additionally, a comparison is made with the catalytic activity of [NiFe] hydrogenase. It is argued that the directionality of the reversible hydrogen formation reaction is controlled by the ligand field of the nickel ion and the possibility for side-on (η(2)) binding of H2: if the ligand framework does not allow for η(2) binding of H2, as is the case for [Ni(II)L], the catalyst irreversibly reduces protons. If the ligand field allows η(2) binding of H2, the catalyst can in principle work reversibly. The conditions for η(2) binding are discussed. PMID:27545687

  2. Metabolic Pathways for Photobiological Hydrogen Production by Nitrogenase- and Hydrogenase-containing Unicellular Cyanobacteria Cyanothece*

    PubMed Central

    Skizim, Nicholas J.; Ananyev, Gennady M.; Krishnan, Anagha; Dismukes, G. Charles

    2012-01-01

    Current biotechnological interest in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria stems from their robust respiration and capacity to produce hydrogen. Here we quantify both dark- and light-induced H2 effluxes by Cyanothece sp. Miami BG 043511 and establish their respective origins. Dark, anoxic H2 production occurs via hydrogenase utilizing reductant from glycolytic catabolism of carbohydrates (autofermentation). Photo-H2 is shown to occur via nitrogenase and requires illumination of PSI, whereas production of O2 by co-illumination of PSII is inhibitory to nitrogenase above a threshold pO2. Carbohydrate also serves as the major source of reductant for the PSI pathway mediated via nonphotochemical reduction of the plastoquinone pool by NADH dehydrogenases type-1 and type-2 (NDH-1 and NDH-2). Redirection of this reductant flux exclusively through the proton-coupled NDH-1 by inhibition of NDH-2 with flavone increases the photo-H2 production rate by 2-fold (at the expense of the dark-H2 rate), due to production of additional ATP (via the proton gradient). Comparison of photobiological hydrogen rates, yields, and energy conversion efficiencies reveals opportunities for improvement. PMID:22128188

  3. Encapsulating Subsite Analogues of the [FeFe]-Hydrogenases in Micelles Enables Direct Water Interactions.

    PubMed

    Fritzsch, Robby; Brady, Owen; Adair, Elaine; Wright, Joseph A; Pickett, Christopher J; Hunt, Neil T

    2016-07-21

    Encapsulation of subsite analogues of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes in supramolecular structures has been shown to dramatically increase their catalytic ability, but the molecular basis for this enhancement remains unclear. We report the results of experiments employing infrared absorption, ultrafast infrared pump-probe, and 2D-IR spectroscopy to investigate the molecular environment of Fe2(pdt)(CO)6 (pdt: propanedithiolate) [1] encapsulated in the dispersed alkane phase of a heptane-dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide-water microemulsion. It is demonstrated that 1 is partitioned between two molecular environments, one that closely resembles bulk heptane solution and a second that features direct hydrogen-bonding interactions with water molecules that penetrate the surfactant shell. Our results demonstrate that the extent of water access to the normally water-insoluble subsite analogue 1 can be tuned with micelle size, while IR spectroscopy provides a straightforward tool that can be used to measure and fine-tune the chemical environment of catalyst species in self-assembled structures. PMID:27396585

  4. Functional Analysis by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the NAD+-Reducing Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Tanja; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2002-01-01

    The tetrameric cytoplasmic [NiFe] hydrogenase (SH) of Ralstonia eutropha couples the oxidation of hydrogen to the reduction of NAD+ under aerobic conditions. In the catalytic subunit HoxH, all six conserved motifs surrounding the [NiFe] site are present. Five of these motifs were altered by site-directed mutagenesis in order to dissect the molecular mechanism of hydrogen activation. Based on phenotypic characterizations, 27 mutants were grouped into four different classes. Mutants of the major class, class I, failed to grow on hydrogen and were devoid of H2-oxidizing activity. In one of these isolates (HoxH I64A), H2 binding was impaired. Class II mutants revealed a high D2/H+ exchange rate relative to a low H2-oxidizing activity. A representative (HoxH H16L) displayed D2/H+ exchange but had lost electron acceptor-reducing activity. Both activities were equally affected in class III mutants. Mutants forming class IV showed a particularly interesting phenotype. They displayed O2-sensitive growth on hydrogen due to an O2-sensitive SH protein. PMID:12399498

  5. Infrared studies of the CO-inhibited form of the Fe-only hydrogenase from Clostridium pasteurianum I: examination of its light sensitivity at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhujun; Lemon, Brian J; Huang, Shan; Swartz, Derrick J; Peters, John W; Bagley, Kimberly A

    2002-02-12

    Infrared spectroscopy has been used to examine the oxidized and CO-inhibited forms of Fe-only hydrogenase I from Clostridium pasteurianum. For the oxidized enzyme, five bands are detected in the infrared spectral region between 2100 and 1800 cm(-1). The pattern of infrared bands is consistent with the presence of two terminally coordinated carbon monoxide molecules, two terminally coordinated cyanide molecules, and one bridging carbon monoxide molecule, ligated to the Fe atoms of the active site [2Fe] subcluster. Infrared spectra of the carbon monoxide-inhibited state, prepared using both natural abundance CO and 13CO, indicate that the two terminally coordinated CO ligands that are intrinsic to the enzyme are coordinated to different Fe atoms of the active site [2Fe] subcluster. Irradiation of the CO-inhibited state at cryogenic temperatures gives rise to two species with dramatically different infrared spectra. The first species has an infrared spectrum identical to the spectrum of the oxidized enzyme, and can be assigned as arising from the photolysis of the exogenous CO from the active site. This species, which has been observed in X-ray crystallographic measurements [Lemon, B. J., and Peters, J. W. (2000) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 3793], decays above 150 K. The second light-induced species decays above 80 K and is characterized by loss of the infrared band associated with the Fe bridging CO at 1809 cm(-1). Potential models for the second photolysis event are discussed.

  6. Light-Driven Hydrogen Production by Hydrogenases and a Ru-Complex inside a Nanoporous Glass Plate under Aerobic External Conditions.

    PubMed

    Noji, Tomoyasu; Kondo, Masaharu; Jin, Tetsuro; Yazawa, Tetsuo; Osuka, Hisao; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Nango, Mamoru; Itoh, Shigeru; Dewa, Takehisa

    2014-07-17

    Hydrogenases are powerful catalysts for light-driven H2 production using a combination of photosensitizers. However, except oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases, they are immediately deactivated under aerobic conditions. We report a light-driven H2 evolution system that works stably even under aerobic conditions. A [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was immobilized inside nanoporous glass plates (PGPs) with a pore diameter of 50 nm together with a ruthenium complex and methyl viologen as a photosensitizer and an electron mediator, respectively. After immersion of PGP into the medium containing the catalytic components, an anaerobic environment automatically established inside the nanopores even under aerobic external conditions upon irradiation with solar-simulated light; this system constantly evolved H2 with an efficiency of 3.7 μmol H2 m(-2) s(-1). The PGP system proposed in this work represents a promising first step toward the development of an O2-tolerant solar energy conversion system.

  7. Fractionation of sulfur isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Min Sub; Wang, David T.; Zane, Grant M.; Wall, Judy D.; Bosak, Tanja; Ono, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    The sulfur isotope effect produced by sulfate reducing microbes is commonly used to trace biogeochemical cycles of sulfur and carbon in aquatic and sedimentary environments. To test the contribution of intracellular coupling between carbon and sulfur metabolisms to the overall magnitude of the sulfur isotope effect, this study compared sulfur isotope fractionations by mutants of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. We tested mutant strains lacking one or two periplasmic (Hyd, Hyn-1, Hyn-2, and Hys) or cytoplasmic hydrogenases (Ech and CooL), and a mutant lacking type I tetraheme cytochrome (TpI-c3). In batch culture, wild-type D. vulgaris and its hydrogenase mutants had comparable growth kinetics and produced the same sulfur isotope effects. This is consistent with the reported redundancy of hydrogenases in D. vulgaris. However, the TpI-c3 mutant (ΔcycA) exhibited slower growth and sulfate reduction rates in batch culture, and produced more H2 and an approximately 50% larger sulfur isotope effect, compared to the wild type. The magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation in the CycA deletion strain, thus, increased due to the disrupted coupling of the carbon oxidation and sulfate reduction pathways. In continuous culture, wild-type D. vulgaris and the CycA mutant produced similar sulfur isotope effects, underscoring the influence of environmental conditions on the relative contribution of hydrogen cycling to the electron transport. The large sulfur isotope effects associated with the non-ideal stoichiometry of sulfate reduction in this study imply that simultaneous fermentation and sulfate reduction may be responsible for some of the large naturally-occurring sulfur isotope effects. Overall, mutant strains provide a powerful tool to test the effect of specific redox proteins and pathways on sulfur isotope fractionation. PMID:23805134

  8. Rubredoxin-related Maturation Factor Guarantees Metal Cofactor Integrity during Aerobic Biosynthesis of Membrane-bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Johannes; Siebert, Elisabeth; Priebe, Jacqueline; Zebger, Ingo; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Teutloff, Christian; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase (MBH) supports growth of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with H2 as the sole energy source. The enzyme undergoes a complex biosynthesis process that proceeds during cell growth even at ambient O2 levels and involves 14 specific maturation proteins. One of these is a rubredoxin-like protein, which is essential for biosynthesis of active MBH at high oxygen concentrations but dispensable under microaerobic growth conditions. To obtain insights into the function of HoxR, we investigated the MBH protein purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of hoxR mutant cells. Compared with wild-type MBH, the mutant enzyme displayed severely decreased hydrogenase activity. Electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopic analyses revealed features resembling those of O2-sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases and/or oxidatively damaged protein. The catalytic center resided partially in an inactive Niu-A-like state, and the electron transfer chain consisting of three different Fe-S clusters showed marked alterations compared with wild-type enzyme. Purification of HoxR protein from its original host, R. eutropha, revealed only low protein amounts. Therefore, recombinant HoxR protein was isolated from Escherichia coli. Unlike common rubredoxins, the HoxR protein was colorless, rather unstable, and essentially metal-free. Conversion of the atypical iron-binding motif into a canonical one through genetic engineering led to a stable reddish rubredoxin. Remarkably, the modified HoxR protein did not support MBH-dependent growth at high O2. Analysis of MBH-associated protein complexes points toward a specific interaction of HoxR with the Fe-S cluster-bearing small subunit. This supports the previously made notion that HoxR avoids oxidative damage of the metal centers of the MBH, in particular the unprecedented Cys6[4Fe-3S] cluster. PMID:24448806

  9. Overproduction of the membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase in Thermococcus kodakarensis and its effect on hydrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Simons, Jan-Robert; Tsukamoto, Ryohei; Nakajima, Akihito; Omori, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Ryoji; Beppu, Haruki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2015-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis can utilize sugars or pyruvate for growth. In the absence of elemental sulfur, the electrons via oxidation of these substrates are accepted by protons, generating molecular hydrogen (H2). The hydrogenase responsible for this reaction is a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Mbh). In this study, we have examined several possibilities to increase the protein levels of Mbh in T. kodakarensis by genetic engineering. Highest levels of intracellular Mbh levels were achieved when the promoter of the entire mbh operon (TK2080-TK2093) was exchanged to a strong constitutive promoter from the glutamate dehydrogenase gene (TK1431) (strain MHG1). When MHG1 was cultivated under continuous culture conditions using pyruvate-based medium, a nearly 25% higher specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) of 35.3 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1 was observed at a dilution rate of 0.31 h−1. We also combined mbh overexpression using an even stronger constitutive promoter from the cell surface glycoprotein gene (TK0895) with disruption of the genes encoding the cytosolic hydrogenase (Hyh) and an alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT), both of which are involved in hydrogen consumption (strain MAH1). At a dilution rate of 0.30 h−1, the SHPR was 36.2 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1, corresponding to a 28% increase compared to that of the host T. kodakarensis strain. Increasing the dilution rate to 0.83 h−1 or 1.07 h−1 resulted in a SHPR of 120 mmol H2 g-dcw−1 h−1, which is one of the highest production rates observed in microbial fermentation. PMID:26379632

  10. Unification of [FeFe]-hydrogenases into three structural and functional groups

    DOE PAGES

    Poudel, Saroj; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Colman, Daniel R.; Refai, Mohammed; Schut, Gerrit J.; King, Paul W.; Maness, Pin-Ching; Adams, Michael W. W.; Peters, John W.; Bothner, Brian; et al

    2016-05-27

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases (Hyd) are structurally diverse enzymes that catalyze the reversible oxidation of hydrogen (H2). Recent biochemical data demonstrate new functional roles for these enzymes, including those that function in electron bifurcation where an exergonic reaction is coupled with an endergonic reaction to drive the reversible oxidation/production of H2. To identify the structural determinants that underpin differences in enzyme functionality, a total of 714 homologous sequences of the catalytic subunit, HydA, were compiled. Bioinformatics approaches informed by biochemical data were then used to characterize differences in inferred quaternary structure, HydA active site protein environment, accessory iron-sulfur clusters in HydA, and regulatorymore » proteins encoded in HydA gene neighborhoods. HydA homologs were clustered into one of three classification groups, Group 1 (G1), Group 2 (G2), and Group 3 (G3). G1 enzymes were predicted to be monomeric while those in G2 and G3 were predicted to be multimeric and include HydB, HydC (G2/G3) and HydD (G3) subunits. Variation in the HydA active site and accessory iron-sulfur clusters did not vary by group type. Group-specific regulatory genes were identified in the gene neighborhoods of both G2 and G3 Hyd. Analyses of purified G2 and G3 enzymes by mass spectrometry strongly suggests that they are post-translationally modified by phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results suggest that bifurcation capability is dictated primarily by the presence of both HydB and HydC in Hyd complexes, rather than by variation in HydA.« less

  11. Hybrid [FeFe]-hydrogenases with modified active sites show remarkable residual enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Judith F; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Weber, Katharina; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are to date the only enzymes for which it has been demonstrated that the native inorganic binuclear cofactor of the active site Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 (adt = azadithiolate = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)) can be synthesized on the laboratory bench and subsequently inserted into the unmaturated enzyme to yield fully functional holo-enzyme (Berggren, G. et al. (2013) Nature 499, 66-70; Esselborn, J. et al. (2013) Nat. Chem. Biol. 9, 607-610). In the current study, we exploit this procedure to introduce non-native cofactors into the enzyme. Mimics of the binuclear subcluster with a modified bridging dithiolate ligand (thiodithiolate, N-methylazadithiolate, dimethyl-azadithiolate) and three variants containing only one CN(-) ligand were inserted into the active site of the enzyme. We investigated the activity of these variants for hydrogen oxidation as well as proton reduction and their structural accommodation within the active site was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interestingly, the monocyanide variant with the azadithiolate bridge showed ∼50% of the native enzyme activity. This would suggest that the CN(-) ligands are not essential for catalytic activity, but rather serve to anchor the binuclear subsite inside the protein pocket through hydrogen bonding. The inserted artificial cofactors with a propanedithiolate and an N-methylazadithiolate bridge as well as their monocyanide variants also showed residual activity. However, these activities were less than 1% of the native enzyme. Our findings indicate that even small changes in the dithiolate bridge of the binuclear subsite lead to a rather strong decrease of the catalytic activity. We conclude that both the Brønsted base function and the conformational flexibility of the native azadithiolate amine moiety are essential for the high catalytic activity of the native enzyme. PMID:25633077

  12. The influence of oxygen on [NiFe]-hydrogenase cofactor biosynthesis and how ligation of carbon monoxide precedes cyanation.

    PubMed

    Stripp, Sven T; Lindenstrauss, Ute; Granich, Claudia; Sawers, R Gary; Soboh, Basem

    2014-01-01

    The class of [NiFe]-hydrogenases is characterized by a bimetallic cofactor comprising low-spin nickel and iron ions, the latter of which is modified with a single carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN-) molecules. Generation of these ligands in vivo requires a complex maturation apparatus in which the HypC-HypD complex acts as a 'construction site' for the Fe-(CN)2CO portion of the cofactor. The order of addition of the CO and CN- ligands determines the ultimate structure and catalytic efficiency of the cofactor; however much debate surrounds the succession of events. Here, we present an FT-IR spectroscopic analysis of HypC-HypD isolated from a hydrogenase-competent wild-type strain of Escherichia coli. In contrast to previously reported samples, HypC-HypD showed spectral contributions indicative of an electron-rich Fe-CO cofactor, at the same time lacking any Fe-CN- signatures. This immature iron site binds external CO and undergoes oxidative damage when in contact with O2. Binding of CO protects the site against loss of spectral features associated with O2 damage. Our findings strongly suggest that CO ligation precedes cyanation in vivo. Furthermore, the results provide a rationale for the deleterious effects of O2 on in vivo cofactor biosynthesis.

  13. Disruption of the Operon Encoding Ehb Hydrogenase Limits AnabolicCO2 Assimilation in the Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    SciTech Connect

    Porat, Iris; Kim, Wonduck; Hendrickson, Erik L.; Xia, Qiangwei; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tiansong; Taub, Fred; Moore, Brian C.; Anderson, IainJ.; Hackett, Murray; Leigh, John A.; Whitman, William B.

    2006-02-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis is a mesophilic archaeon thatreduces CO2 to methane with H2 or formate as an energy source. Itcontains two membrane-bound energy-conserving hydrogenases, Eha and Ehb.To determine therole of Ehb, a deletion in the ehb operon wasconstructed to yield the mutant, strain S40. Growth of S40 was severelyimpaired in minimal medium. Both acetate and yeast extract were necessaryto restore growth to nearly wild-type levels, suggesting that Ehb wasinvolved in multiple steps in carbon assimilation. However, nodifferences in the total hydrogenase specific activities were foundbetween the wild type and mutant in either cell extracts ormembrane-purified fractions. Methanogenesis by resting cells withpyruvate as the electron donor was also reduced by 30 percent in S40,suggesting a defect in pyruvate oxidation. CO dehydrogenase/acetylcoenzyme A (CoA) synthase and pyruvate oxidoreductase had higher specificactivities in the mutant, and genes encoding these enzymes, as well asAMP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase, were expressed at increased levels.These observations support a role for Ehb in anabolic CO2 assimilation inmethanococci.

  14. Single-Amino Acid Modifications Reveal Additional Controls on the Proton Pathway of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Adam J; Ginovska, Bojana; Thelen, Adam; da Silva, Julio C S; Soares, Thereza A; Raugei, Simone; Dupuis, Michel; Shaw, Wendy J; Hegg, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    The proton pathway of [FeFe]-hydrogenase is essential for enzymatic H2 production and oxidation and is composed of four residues and a water molecule. A computational analysis of this pathway in the [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium pasteurianum revealed that the solvent-exposed residue of the pathway (Glu282) forms hydrogen bonds to two residues outside of the pathway (Arg286 and Ser320), implying that these residues could function in regulating proton transfer. In this study, we show that substituting Arg286 with leucine eliminates hydrogen bonding with Glu282 and results in an ∼3-fold enhancement of H2 production activity when methyl viologen is used as an electron donor, suggesting that Arg286 may help control the rate of proton delivery. In contrast, substitution of Ser320 with alanine reduces the rate ∼5-fold, implying that it either acts as a member of the pathway or influences Glu282 to permit proton transfer. Interestingly, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics calculations indicate that Ser320 does not play a structural role or indirectly influence the barrier for proton movement at the entrance of the channel. Rather, it may act as an additional proton acceptor for the pathway or serve in a regulatory role. While further studies are needed to elucidate the role of Ser320, collectively these data provide insights into the complex proton transport process. PMID:27186945

  15. Krypton Derivatization of an O2 -Tolerant Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reveals a Hydrophobic Tunnel Network for Gas Transport.

    PubMed

    Kalms, Jacqueline; Schmidt, Andrea; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; van der Linden, Peter; von Stetten, David; Lenz, Oliver; Carpentier, Philippe; Scheerer, Patrick

    2016-04-25

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are metalloenzymes catalyzing the reversible heterolytic cleavage of hydrogen into protons and electrons. Gas tunnels make the deeply buried active site accessible to substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the architecture and function of the tunnels is pivotal to modulating the feature of O2 tolerance in a subgroup of these [NiFe] hydrogenases, as they are interesting for developments in renewable energy technologies. Here we describe the crystal structure of the O2 -tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha (ReMBH), using krypton-pressurized crystals. The positions of the krypton atoms allow a comprehensive description of the tunnel network within the enzyme. A detailed overview of tunnel sizes, lengths, and routes is presented from tunnel calculations. A comparison of the ReMBH tunnel characteristics with crystal structures of other O2 -tolerant and O2 -sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases revealed considerable differences in tunnel size and quantity between the two groups, which might be related to the striking feature of O2 tolerance.

  16. Observation of the Fe—CN and Fe—CO Vibrations in the Active Site of [NiFe] Hydrogenase by Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy**

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Saeed; Wang, Hongxin; Mitra, Devrani; Ogata, Hideaki; Manor, Brian C.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Byrne, Deborah; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Jenney, Francis E.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Alp, Ercan; Zhao, Jiyong; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering of 57Fe labeled [NiFe] hydrogenase is shown to give information on different states of the enzyme. It was thus possible to detect and assign Fe–CO and Fe–CN bending and stretching vibrations of the active site outside the spectral range of the Fe–S cluster normal modes. PMID:23136119

  17. Krypton Derivatization of an O2 -Tolerant Membrane-Bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reveals a Hydrophobic Tunnel Network for Gas Transport.

    PubMed

    Kalms, Jacqueline; Schmidt, Andrea; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; van der Linden, Peter; von Stetten, David; Lenz, Oliver; Carpentier, Philippe; Scheerer, Patrick

    2016-04-25

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are metalloenzymes catalyzing the reversible heterolytic cleavage of hydrogen into protons and electrons. Gas tunnels make the deeply buried active site accessible to substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the architecture and function of the tunnels is pivotal to modulating the feature of O2 tolerance in a subgroup of these [NiFe] hydrogenases, as they are interesting for developments in renewable energy technologies. Here we describe the crystal structure of the O2 -tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase of Ralstonia eutropha (ReMBH), using krypton-pressurized crystals. The positions of the krypton atoms allow a comprehensive description of the tunnel network within the enzyme. A detailed overview of tunnel sizes, lengths, and routes is presented from tunnel calculations. A comparison of the ReMBH tunnel characteristics with crystal structures of other O2 -tolerant and O2 -sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases revealed considerable differences in tunnel size and quantity between the two groups, which might be related to the striking feature of O2 tolerance. PMID:26913499

  18. Protonation of Nickel–Iron Hydrogenase Models Proceeds after Isomerization at Nickel

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Theory and experiment indicate that the protonation of reduced NiFe dithiolates proceeds via a previously undetected isomer with enhanced basicity. In particular, it is proposed that protonation of (OC)3Fe(pdt)Ni(dppe) (1; pdt2– = –S(CH2)3S–; dppe = Ph2P(CH2)2PPh2) occurs at the Fe site of the two-electron mixed-valence Fe(0)Ni(II) species, not the Fe(I)-Ni(I) bond for the homovalence isomer of 1. The new pathway, which may have implications for protonation of other complexes and clusters, was uncovered through studies on the homologous series L(OC)2Fe(pdt)M(dppe), where M = Ni, Pd (2), and Pt (3) and L = CO, PCy3. Similar to 1, complexes 2 and 3 undergo both protonation and 1e– oxidation to afford well-characterized hydrides ([2H]+ and [3H]+) and mixed-valence derivatives ([2]+ and [3]+), respectively. Whereas the Pd site is tetrahedral in 2, the Pt site is square-planar in 3, indicating that this complex is best described as Fe(0)Pt(II). In view of the results on 2 and 3, the potential energy surface of 1 was reinvestigated with density functional theory. These calculations revealed the existence of an energetically accessible and more basic Fe(0)Ni(II) isomer with a square-planar Ni site. PMID:25094041

  19. Reversible oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase carried by free-living N2-fixing bacteria isolated from the rhizospheres of rice, maize, and wheat

    PubMed Central

    Roumagnac, Philippe; Richaud, Pierre; Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Roncato, Marie-Anne; Heulin, Thierry; Peltier, Gilles; Achouak, Wafa; Cournac, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen production by microorganisms is often described as a promising sustainable and clean energy source, but still faces several obstacles, which prevent practical application. Among them, oxygen sensitivity of hydrogenases represents one of the major limitations hampering the biotechnological implementation of photobiological production processes. Here, we describe a hierarchical biodiversity-based approach, including a chemochromic screening of hydrogenase activity of hundreds of bacterial strains collected from several ecosystems, followed by mass spectrometry measurements of hydrogenase activity of a selection of the H2-oxidizing bacterial strains identified during the screen. In all, 131 of 1266 strains, isolated from cereal rhizospheres and basins containing irradiating waste, were scored as H2-oxidizing bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., Stenotrophomonas sp., Enterobacter sp., Rahnella sp., Burkholderia sp., and Ralstonia sp. isolates. Four free-living N2-fixing bacteria harbored a high and oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase activity, which was not fully inhibited within entire cells up to 150–250 μmol/L O2 concentration or within soluble protein extracts up to 25–30 μmol/L. The only hydrogenase-related genes that we could reveal in these strains were of the hyc type (subunits of formate hydrogenlyase complex). The four free-living N2-fixing bacteria were closely related to Enterobacter radicincitans based on the sequences of four genes (16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp60, and hycE genes). These results should bring interesting prospects for microbial biohydrogen production and might have ecophysiological significance for bacterial adaptation to the oxic–anoxic interfaces in the rhizosphere. PMID:23233392

  20. Purification and Characterization of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Herve; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-08-02

    The γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that was implicated in both H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned into a protein expression vector. The resulting plasmid was transformed into a MR-1 mutant deficient in H2 formation. Expression of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant’s ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for wild type. Following expression, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase was purified to near homogeneity. The purified MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase could couple H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII) and methyl viologen directly. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated Tc(VII) but not methyl viologen reductions. Under the conditions tested, Tc(VII) reduction was complete in Tris buffer but not in HEPES buffer. The reduced Tc(IV) was soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc(IV) precipitates formed in HEPES buffer were packed with crystallites. Although X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements confirmed that the reduction products found in both buffers were Tc(IV), extended X-ray adsorption fine-structure measurements revealed that these products were very different. While the product in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2•nH2O. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase is a bidirectional enzyme that catalyzes both H2 formation and oxidation as well as Tc(VII) reduction directly by coupling H2 oxidation.

  1. Purification and Characterization of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that has been implicated in H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase coupled H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O4− and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O4− but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O4− used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O4− was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2·nH2O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O4− reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O4− reduction directly by coupling to H2 oxidation. PMID:21724888

  2. Exposure studies of core-shell Fe/Fe(3)O(4) and Cu/CuO NPs to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) plants: Are they a potential physiological and nutritional hazard?

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Reyes, J; Majumdar, S; Botez, C E; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2014-02-28

    Iron and copper nanomaterials are widely used in environmental remediation and agriculture. However, their effects on physiological parameters and nutritional quality of terrestrial plants such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa) are still unknown. In this research, 18-day-old hydroponically grown lettuce seedlings were treated for 15 days with core-shell nanoscale materials (Fe/Fe(3)O(4), Cu/CuO) at 10 and 20mg/L, and FeSO(4)·7H(2)O and CuSO(4)·5H(2)O at 10mg/L. At harvest, Fe, Cu, micro and macronutrients were determined by ICP-OES. Also, we evaluated chlorophyll content, plant growth, and catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities. Our results showed that iron ions/NPs did not affect the physiological parameters with respect to water control. Conversely, Cu ions/NPs reduced water content, root length, and dry biomass of the lettuce plants. ICP-OES results showed that nano-Cu/CuO treatments produced significant accumulation of Cu in roots compared to the CuSO(4)·5H(2)O treatment. In roots, all Cu treatments increased CAT activity but decreased APX activity. In addition, relative to the control, nano-Cu/CuO altered the nutritional quality of lettuce, since the treated plants had significantly more Cu, Al and S but less Mn, P, Ca, and Mg.

  3. Production and purification of a soluble hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha H16 for potential hydrogen fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Lebhar, Helene; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Marquis, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    The soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 is a promising candidate enzyme for H2-based biofuel application as it favours H2 oxidation and is relatively oxygen-tolerant. In this report, bioprocess development studies undertaken to produce and purify an active SH are described, based on the methods previously reported [1], [2], [3], [4]. Our modifications are: •Upstream method optimizations were undertaken on heterotrophic growth media and cell lysis involving ultrasonication.•Two anion exchangers (Q Sepharose and RESOURCE Q) and size exclusion chromatographic (Superdex 200) matrices were successfully employed for purification of a hexameric SH from R. eutropha.•The H2 oxidizing activity of the SH was demonstrated spectrophotometrically in solution and also immobilized on an EPG electrode using cyclic voltammetry. PMID:27077052

  4. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  5. [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 surpasses platinum as an electrode for H2 oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Eguchi, Shigenobu; Nakai, Hidetaka; Hibino, Takashi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-08-18

    Reported herein is an electrode for dihydrogen (H2) oxidation, and it is based on [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 ([NiFe]S77). It has a 637 times higher mass activity than Pt (calculated based on 1 mg of [NiFe]S77 or Pt) at 50 mV in a hydrogen half-cell. The [NiFe]S77 electrode is also stable in air and, unlike Pt, can be recovered 100 % after poisoning by carbon monoxide. Following characterization of the [NiFe]S77 electrode, a fuel cell comprising a [NiFe]S77 anode and Pt cathode was constructed and shown to have a a higher power density than that achievable by Pt. PMID:24895095

  6. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase with Chalcogenide Substitutions at the H-Cluster Maintains Full H2 Evolution Activity.

    PubMed

    Noth, Jens; Esselborn, Julian; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Brünje, Annika; Sawyer, Anne; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Gerwert, Klaus; Hofmann, Eckhard; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2016-07-11

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase HYDA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is particularly amenable to biochemical and biophysical characterization because the H-cluster in the active site is the only inorganic cofactor present. Herein, we present the complete chemical incorporation of the H-cluster into the HYDA1-apoprotein scaffold and, furthermore, the successful replacement of sulfur in the native [4FeH ] cluster with selenium. The crystal structure of the reconstituted pre-mature HYDA1[4Fe4Se]H protein was determined, and a catalytically intact artificial H-cluster variant was generated upon in vitro maturation. Full hydrogen evolution activity as well as native-like composition and behavior of the redesigned enzyme were verified through kinetic assays, FTIR spectroscopy, and X-ray structure analysis. These findings reveal that even a bioinorganic active site with exceptional complexity can exhibit a surprising level of compositional plasticity. PMID:27214763

  7. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase with Chalcogenide Substitutions at the H-Cluster Maintains Full H2 Evolution Activity.

    PubMed

    Noth, Jens; Esselborn, Julian; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Brünje, Annika; Sawyer, Anne; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Gerwert, Klaus; Hofmann, Eckhard; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2016-07-11

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase HYDA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is particularly amenable to biochemical and biophysical characterization because the H-cluster in the active site is the only inorganic cofactor present. Herein, we present the complete chemical incorporation of the H-cluster into the HYDA1-apoprotein scaffold and, furthermore, the successful replacement of sulfur in the native [4FeH ] cluster with selenium. The crystal structure of the reconstituted pre-mature HYDA1[4Fe4Se]H protein was determined, and a catalytically intact artificial H-cluster variant was generated upon in vitro maturation. Full hydrogen evolution activity as well as native-like composition and behavior of the redesigned enzyme were verified through kinetic assays, FTIR spectroscopy, and X-ray structure analysis. These findings reveal that even a bioinorganic active site with exceptional complexity can exhibit a surprising level of compositional plasticity.

  8. [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 surpasses platinum as an electrode for H2 oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Eguchi, Shigenobu; Nakai, Hidetaka; Hibino, Takashi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-08-18

    Reported herein is an electrode for dihydrogen (H2) oxidation, and it is based on [NiFe]Hydrogenase from Citrobacter sp. S-77 ([NiFe]S77). It has a 637 times higher mass activity than Pt (calculated based on 1 mg of [NiFe]S77 or Pt) at 50 mV in a hydrogen half-cell. The [NiFe]S77 electrode is also stable in air and, unlike Pt, can be recovered 100 % after poisoning by carbon monoxide. Following characterization of the [NiFe]S77 electrode, a fuel cell comprising a [NiFe]S77 anode and Pt cathode was constructed and shown to have a a higher power density than that achievable by Pt.

  9. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Abundance and Diversity along a Vertical Redox Gradient in Great Salt Lake, USA

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Hamilton, Trinity L.; Swanson, Kevin D.; Howells, Alta E.; Baxter, Bonnie K.; Meuser, Jonathan E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Peters, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes for the biotechnological production of H2 or other reduced products has been limited by their sensitivity to oxygen (O2). Here, we apply a PCR-directed approach to determine the distribution, abundance, and diversity of hydA gene fragments along co-varying salinity and O2 gradients in a vertical water column of Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The distribution of hydA was constrained to water column transects that had high salt and relatively low O2 concentrations. Recovered HydA deduced amino acid sequences were enriched in hydrophilic amino acids relative to HydA from less saline environments. In addition, they harbored interesting variations in the amino acid environment of the complex H-cluster metalloenzyme active site and putative gas transfer channels that may be important for both H2 transfer and O2 susceptibility. A phylogenetic framework was created to infer the accessory cluster composition and quaternary structure of recovered HydA protein sequences based on phylogenetic relationships and the gene contexts of known complete HydA sequences. Numerous recovered HydA are predicted to harbor multiple N- and C-terminal accessory iron-sulfur cluster binding domains and are likely to exist as multisubunit complexes. This study indicates an important role for [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the functioning of the GSL ecosystem and provides new target genes and variants for use in identifying O2 tolerant enzymes for biotechnological applications. PMID:25464382

  10. Intact Functional Fourteen-subunit Respiratory Membrane-bound [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Complex of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus*

    PubMed Central

    McTernan, Patrick M.; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Wu, Chang-Hao; Vaccaro, Brian J.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Yang, Qingyuan; Fu, Dax; Hura, Greg L.; Tainer, John A.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    The archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally at 100 °C by converting carbohydrates to acetate, CO2, and H2, obtaining energy from a respiratory membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH). This conserves energy by coupling H2 production to oxidation of reduced ferredoxin with generation of a sodium ion gradient. MBH is encoded by a 14-gene operon with both hydrogenase and Na+/H+ antiporter modules. Herein a His-tagged MBH was expressed in P. furiosus and the detergent-solubilized complex purified under anaerobic conditions by affinity chromatography. Purified MBH contains all 14 subunits by electrophoretic analysis (13 subunits were also identified by mass spectrometry) and had a measured iron:nickel ratio of 15:1, resembling the predicted value of 13:1. The as-purified enzyme exhibited a rhombic EPR signal characteristic of the ready nickel-boron state. The purified and membrane-bound forms of MBH both preferentially evolved H2 with the physiological donor (reduced ferredoxin) as well as with standard dyes. The O2 sensitivities of the two forms were similar (half-lives of ∼15 h in air), but the purified enzyme was more thermolabile (half-lives at 90 °C of 1 and 25 h, respectively). Structural analysis of purified MBH by small angle x-ray scattering indicated a Z-shaped structure with a mass of 310 kDa, resembling the predicted value (298 kDa). The angle x-ray scattering analyses reinforce and extend the conserved sequence relationships of group 4 enzymes and complex I (NADH quinone oxidoreductase). This is the first report on the properties of a solubilized form of an intact respiratory MBH complex that is proposed to evolve H2 and pump Na+ ions. PMID:24860091

  11. Investigations on the role of proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen activation by [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Ratzloff, Michael W; Bruschi, Maurizio; Greco, Claudio; Koonce, Evangeline; Peters, John W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-29

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is a fundamental process at the core of oxidation-reduction reactions for energy conversion. The [FeFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the reversible activation of molecular H2 through a unique metallocofactor, the H-cluster, which is finely tuned by the surrounding protein environment to undergo fast PCET transitions. The correlation of electronic and structural transitions at the H-cluster with proton-transfer (PT) steps has not been well-resolved experimentally. Here, we explore how modification of the conserved PT network via a Cys → Ser substitution at position 169 proximal to the H-cluster of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CrHydA1) affects the H-cluster using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Despite a substantial decrease in catalytic activity, the EPR and FTIR spectra reveal different H-cluster catalytic states under reducing and oxidizing conditions. Under H2 or sodium dithionite reductive treatments, the EPR spectra show signals that are consistent with a reduced [4Fe-4S]H(+) subcluster. The FTIR spectra showed upshifts of νCO modes to energies that are consistent with an increase in oxidation state of the [2Fe]H subcluster, which was corroborated by DFT analysis. In contrast to the case for wild-type CrHydA1, spectra associated with Hred and Hsred states are less populated in the Cys → Ser variant, demonstrating that the exchange of -SH with -OH alters how the H-cluster equilibrates among different reduced states of the catalytic cycle under steady-state conditions. PMID:25286239

  12. X-ray crystallographic and computational studies of the O2-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Volbeda, Anne; Amara, Patricia; Darnault, Claudine; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Parkin, Alison; Roessler, Maxie M; Armstrong, Fraser A; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2012-04-01

    The crystal structure of the membrane-bound O(2)-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 from Escherichia coli (EcHyd-1) has been solved in three different states: as-isolated, H(2)-reduced, and chemically oxidized. As very recently reported for similar enzymes from Ralstonia eutropha and Hydrogenovibrio marinus, two supernumerary Cys residues coordinate the proximal [FeS] cluster in EcHyd-1, which lacks one of the inorganic sulfide ligands. We find that the as-isolated, aerobically purified species contains a mixture of at least two conformations for one of the cluster iron ions and Glu76. In one of them, Glu76 and the iron occupy positions that are similar to those found in O(2)-sensitive [NiFe]-hydrogenases. In the other conformation, this iron binds, besides three sulfur ligands, the amide N from Cys20 and one Oε of Glu76. Our calculations show that oxidation of this unique iron generates the high-potential form of the proximal cluster. The structural rearrangement caused by oxidation is confirmed by our H(2)-reduced and oxidized EcHyd-1 structures. Thus, thanks to the peculiar coordination of the unique iron, the proximal cluster can contribute two successive electrons to secure complete reduction of O(2) to H(2)O at the active site. The two observed conformations of Glu76 are consistent with this residue playing the role of a base to deprotonate the amide moiety of Cys20 upon iron binding and transfer the resulting proton away, thus allowing the second oxidation to be electroneutral. The comparison of our structures also shows the existence of a dynamic chain of water molecules, resulting from O(2) reduction, located near the active site. PMID:22431599

  13. Intact functional fourteen-subunit respiratory membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase complex of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    McTernan, Patrick M; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Wu, Chang-Hao; Vaccaro, Brian J; Lancaster, W Andrew; Yang, Qingyuan; Fu, Dax; Hura, Greg L; Tainer, John A; Adams, Michael W W

    2014-07-11

    The archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally at 100 °C by converting carbohydrates to acetate, CO2, and H2, obtaining energy from a respiratory membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH). This conserves energy by coupling H2 production to oxidation of reduced ferredoxin with generation of a sodium ion gradient. MBH is encoded by a 14-gene operon with both hydrogenase and Na(+)/H(+) antiporter modules. Herein a His-tagged MBH was expressed in P. furiosus and the detergent-solubilized complex purified under anaerobic conditions by affinity chromatography. Purified MBH contains all 14 subunits by electrophoretic analysis (13 subunits were also identified by mass spectrometry) and had a measured iron:nickel ratio of 15:1, resembling the predicted value of 13:1. The as-purified enzyme exhibited a rhombic EPR signal characteristic of the ready nickel-boron state. The purified and membrane-bound forms of MBH both preferentially evolved H2 with the physiological donor (reduced ferredoxin) as well as with standard dyes. The O2 sensitivities of the two forms were similar (half-lives of ∼ 15 h in air), but the purified enzyme was more thermolabile (half-lives at 90 °C of 1 and 25 h, respectively). Structural analysis of purified MBH by small angle x-ray scattering indicated a Z-shaped structure with a mass of 310 kDa, resembling the predicted value (298 kDa). The angle x-ray scattering analyses reinforce and extend the conserved sequence relationships of group 4 enzymes and complex I (NADH quinone oxidoreductase). This is the first report on the properties of a solubilized form of an intact respiratory MBH complex that is proposed to evolve H2 and pump Na(+) ions. PMID:24860091

  14. Quantification of microbial activity in subsurface environments using a hydrogenase enzyme assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, R. R.; Nickel, J.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-04-01

    The subsurface biosphere is the largest microbial ecosystem on Earth. Despite its large size and extensive industrial exploitation, very little is known about the role of microbial activity in the subsurface. Subsurface microbial activity plays a fundamental role in geochemical cycles of carbon and other biologically important elements. How the indigenous microbial communities are supplied with energy is one of the most fundamental questions in subsurface research. It is still an enigma how these communities can survive with such recalcitrant carbon over geological time scales. Despite its usually very low concentration, hydrogen is an important element in subsurface environments. Heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms use hydrogen in their metabolic pathways; they either obtain protons from the radiolysis of water and/or cleavage of hydrogen generated by the alteration of basaltic crust, or they dispose of protons by formation of water. Hydrogenase (H2ase) is a ubiquitous intracellular enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of molecular hydrogen and/or water into protons and electrons. The protons are used for the synthesis of ATP, thereby coupling energy-generating metabolic processes to electron acceptors such as carbon dioxide or sulfate. H2ase activity can therefore be used as a measure for total microbial activity as it targets a key metabolic compound rather than a specific turnover process. Using a highly sensitive tritium assay we measured H2ase enzyme activity in the organic-rich sediments of Lake Van, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern Turkey and in marine subsurface sediments of the Barents Sea. Additionally, sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) were measured to compare the results of the H2ase enzyme assay with the quantitatively most important electron acceptor process. H2ase activity was found at all sites, measured values and distribution of activity varied widely with depth and between sites. At the Lake Van sites H2ase activity ranged from

  15. Atypical effect of temperature tuning on the insertion of the catalytic iron-sulfur center in a recombinant [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Morra, Simone; Cordara, Alessandro; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Valetti, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    The expression of recombinant [FeFe]-hydrogenases is an important step for the production of large amount of these enzymes for their exploitation in biotechnology and for the characterization of the protein-metal cofactor interactions. The correct assembly of the organometallic catalytic site, named H-cluster, requires a dedicated set of maturases that must be coexpressed in the microbial hosts or used for in vitro assembly of the active enzymes. In this work, the effect of the post-induction temperature on the recombinant expression of CaHydA [FeFe]-hydrogenase in E. coli is investigated. The results show a peculiar behavior: the enzyme expression is maximum at lower temperatures (20°C), while the specific activity of the purified CaHydA is higher at higher temperature (30°C), as a consequence of improved protein folding and active site incorporation.

  16. Direct comparison of the performance of a bio-inspired synthetic nickel catalyst and a [NiFe]-hydrogenase, both covalently attached to electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Maciá, Patricia; Dutta, Arnab; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Shaw, Wendy J; Rüdiger, Olaf

    2015-10-12

    The active site of hydrogenases has been a source of inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. However, direct comparisons between molecular catalysts and enzymes have not been possible because different techniques are used to evaluate both types of catalysts, minimizing our ability to determine how far we have come in mimicking the enzymatic performance. The catalytic properties of the [Ni(P(Cy) 2 N(Gly) 2 )2 ](2+) complex with the [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris immobilized on a functionalized electrode were compared under identical conditions. At pH 7, the enzyme shows higher activity and lower overpotential with better stability, while at low pH, the molecular catalyst outperforms the enzyme in all respects. This is the first direct comparison of enzymes and molecular complexes, enabling a unique understanding of the benefits and detriments of both systems, and advancing our understanding of the utilization of these bio-inspired complexes in fuel cells.

  17. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  18. Immobilization of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase CrHydA1 on a gold electrode: design of a catalytic surface for the production of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Krassen, Henning; Stripp, Sven; von Abendroth, Gregory; Ataka, Kenichi; Happe, Thomas; Heberle, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Hydrogenase-modified electrodes are a promising catalytic surface for the electrolysis of water with an overpotential close to zero. The [FeFe]-hydrogenase CrHydA1 from the photosynthetic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the smallest [FeFe]-hydrogenase known and exhibits an extraordinary high hydrogen evolution activity. For the first time, we immobilized CrHydA1 on a gold surface which was modified by different carboxy-terminated self-assembled monolayers. The immobilization was in situ monitored by surface-enhanced infrared spectroscopy. In the presence of the electron mediator methyl viologen the electron transfer from the electrode to the hydrogenase was detected by cyclic voltammetry. The hydrogen evolution potential (-290 mV vs NHE, pH 6.8) of this protein modified electrode is close to the value for bare platinum (-270 mV vs NHE). The surface coverage by CrHydA1 was determined to 2.25 ng mm(-2) by surface plasmon resonance, which is consistent with the formation of a protein monolayer. Hydrogen evolution was quantified by gas chromatography and the specific hydrogen evolution activity of surface-bound CrHydA1 was calculated to 1.3 micromol H(2)min(-1)mg(-1) (or 85 mol H(2)min(-1)mol(-1)). In conclusion, a viable hydrogen-evolving surface was developed that may be employed in combination with immobilized photosystems to provide a platform for hydrogen production from water and solar energy with enzymes as catalysts. PMID:19480942

  19. Impact of the iron-sulfur cluster proximal to the active site on the catalytic function of an O2-tolerant NAD(+)-reducing [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Wahlefeld, Stefan; Horch, Marius; Grunzel, Miriam; Lauterbach, Lars; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver

    2015-01-20

    The soluble NAD(+)-reducing hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha H16 belongs to the O2-tolerant subtype of pyridine nucleotide-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenases. To identify molecular determinants for the O2 tolerance of this enzyme, we introduced single amino acids exchanges in the SH small hydrogenase subunit. The resulting mutant strains and proteins were investigated with respect to their physiological, biochemical, and spectroscopic properties. Replacement of the four invariant conserved cysteine residues, Cys41, Cys44, Cys113, and Cys179, led to unstable protein, strongly supporting their involvement in the coordination of the iron-sulfur cluster proximal to the catalytic [NiFe] center. The Cys41Ser exchange, however, resulted in an SH variant that displayed up to 10% of wild-type activity, suggesting that the coordinating role of Cys41 might be partly substituted by the nearby Cys39 residue, which is present only in O2-tolerant pyridine nucleotide-dependent [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Indeed, SH variants carrying glycine, alanine, or serine in place of Cys39 showed increased O2 sensitivity compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. Substitution of further amino acids typical for O2-tolerant SH representatives did not greatly affect the H2-oxidizing activity in the presence of O2. Remarkably, all mutant enzymes investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy did not reveal significant spectral changes in relation to wild-type SH, showing that the proximal iron-sulfur cluster does not contribute to the wild-type spectrum. Interestingly, exchange of Trp42 by serine resulted in a completely redox-inactive [NiFe] site, as revealed by infrared spectroscopy and H2/D(+) exchange experiments. The possible role of this residue in electron and/or proton transfer is discussed.

  20. Characterization of a unique [FeS] cluster in the electron transfer chain of the oxygen tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenase from Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Infossi, Pascale; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Bill, Eckhard; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2011-04-12

    Iron-sulfur clusters are versatile electron transfer cofactors, ubiquitous in metalloenzymes such as hydrogenases. In the oxygen-tolerant Hydrogenase I from Aquifex aeolicus such electron "wires" form a relay to a diheme cytb, an integral part of a respiration pathway for the reduction of O(2) to water. Amino acid sequence comparison with oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases showed conserved binding motifs for three iron-sulfur clusters, the nature and properties of which were unknown so far. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra exhibited complex signals that disclose interesting features and spin-coupling patterns; by redox titrations three iron-sulfur clusters were identified in their usual redox states, a [3Fe4S] and two [4Fe4S], but also a unique high-potential (HP) state was found. On the basis of (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy we attribute this HP form to a superoxidized state of the [4Fe4S] center proximal to the [NiFe] site. The unique environment of this cluster, characterized by a surplus cysteine coordination, is able to tune the redox potentials and make it compliant with the [4Fe4S](3+) state. It is actually the first example of a biological [4Fe4S] center that physiologically switches between 3+, 2+, and 1+ oxidation states within a very small potential range. We suggest that the (1 + /2+) redox couple serves the classical electron transfer reaction, whereas the superoxidation step is associated with a redox switch against oxidative stress.

  1. Electrochemical and Infrared Spectroscopic Studies Provide Insight into Reactions of the NiFe Regulatory Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha with O2 and CO.

    PubMed

    Ash, Philip A; Liu, Juan; Coutard, Nathan; Heidary, Nina; Horch, Marius; Gudim, Ingvild; Simler, Thomas; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Vincent, Kylie A

    2015-10-29

    The regulatory hydrogenase (RH) from Ralstonia eutropha acts as the H2-sensing unit of a two-component system that regulates biosynthesis of the energy conserving hydrogenases of the organism according to the availability of H2. The H2 oxidation activity, which was so far determined in vitro with artificial electron acceptors, has been considered to be insensitive to O2 and CO. It is assumed that bulky isoleucine and phenylalanine amino acid residues close to the NiFe active site "gate" gas access, preventing molecules larger than H2 interacting with the active site. We have carried out sensitive electrochemical measurements to demonstrate that O2 is in fact an inhibitor of H2 oxidation by the RH, and that both H(+) reduction and H2 oxidation are inhibited by CO. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of O2 arises due to interaction of O2 with the active site. Using protein film infrared electrochemistry (PFIRE) under H2 oxidation conditions, in conjunction with solution infrared measurements, we have identified previously unreported oxidized inactive and catalytically active reduced states of the RH active site. These findings suggest that the RH has a rich active site chemistry similar to that of other NiFe hydrogenases. PMID:26115011

  2. Identification of an Isothiocyanate on the HypEF Complex Suggests a Route for Efficient Cyanyl–Group Channeling during [NiFe]–Hydrogenase Cofactor Generation

    PubMed Central

    Stripp, Sven T.; Lindenstrauss, Ute; Sawers, R. Gary; Soboh, Basem

    2015-01-01

    [NiFe]–hydrogenases catalyze uptake and evolution of H2 in a wide range of microorganisms. The enzyme is characterized by an inorganic nickel/ iron cofactor, the latter of which carries carbon monoxide and cyanide ligands. In vivo generation of these ligands requires a number of auxiliary proteins, the so–called Hyp family. Initially, HypF binds and activates the precursor metabolite carbamoyl phosphate. HypF catalyzes removal of phosphate and transfers the carbamate group to HypE. In an ATP–dependent condensation reaction, the C–terminal cysteinyl residue of HypE is modified to what has been interpreted as thiocyanate. This group is the direct precursor of the cyanide ligands of the [NiFe]–hydrogenase active site cofactor. We present a FT–IR analysis of HypE and HypF as isolated from E. coli. We follow the HypF–catalyzed cyanation of HypE in vitro and screen for the influence of carbamoyl phosphate and ATP. To elucidate on the differences between HypE and the HypEF complex, spectro–electrochemistry was used to map the vibrational Stark effect of naturally cyanated HypE. The IR signature of HypE could ultimately be assigned to isothiocyanate (–N=C=S) rather than thiocyanate (–S–C≡N). This has important implications for cyanyl–group channeling during [NiFe]–hydrogenase cofactor generation. PMID:26186649

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the [NiFe] hydrogenase maturation proteins HypC and HypD

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsumi, Rie; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Miki, Kunio

    2007-06-01

    The [NiFe] hydrogenase maturation proteins HypC and HypD were purified and crystallized. Crystals of HypC and HypD suitable for data collection diffracted to 1.80 and 2.07 Å resolution, respectively. HypC and HypD proteins are required for the insertion of the Fe atom with diatomic ligands into the large subunit of [NiFe] hydrogenases, an important step in the maturation process of this type of hydrogenase. The crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of HypC and HypD from Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 are reported. Crystals of HypC grew in two different forms. Monoclinic crystals of HypC in space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 78.2, b = 59.1, c = 54.0 Å, β = 109.0° were obtained using PEG 4000 and ammonium sulfate or sodium bromide as precipitants. They diffracted X-rays to 1.8 Å resolution and were suitable for structure determination. Crystals of HypD were also obtained in two different forms. The monoclinic crystals obtained using PEG 4000 and magnesium chloride diffracted X-rays to beyond 2.1 Å resolution, despite growing as clusters. They belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.3, b = 118.4, c = 81.2 Å, β = 100.9°, and are suitable for data collection.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of [NiFe]-hydrogenase maturation factor HypE from Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Takayuki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsumi, Rie; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Miki, Kunio

    2007-09-01

    The [NiFe]-hydrogenase maturation protein HypE was purified and crystallized. Crystals of HypE suitable for data collection diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution. The hydrogenase maturation protein HypE is involved in the biosynthesis of the CN ligands of the active-site iron of [NiFe] hydrogenases using carbamoylphosphate as a substrate. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of HypE from Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 are reported. Crystals of HypE (338 amino acids, 35.9 kDa) have been obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.3, b = 45.8, c = 75.1 Å. There is one HypE molecule in the asymmetric unit. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was collected to a maximum resolution of 1.55 Å at 100 K.

  5. Effect of the culture media optimization, pH and temperature on the biohydrogen production and the hydrogenase activities by Klebsiella pneumoniae ECU-15.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Minglong; Tan, Wensong

    2013-06-01

    The low yield of the biohydrogen production is the main constraint for its industrialization process. In order to improve its production, medium compositions of the hydrogen fermentation by Klebsiella pneumoniae ECU-15 were optimized through the response surface methodology (RSM). Experimental results showed that the optimum hydrogen production of 5363.8 ml/L was obtained when the concentration of glucose, the ammonium sulfate and the trace elements were 35.62 g/L, 2.78 g/L and 23.15 ml/L at temperature 37.0°C, pH 6.0. H2 evolving hydrogenase was greatly enhanced by the optimization of the medium compositions. The activity of H2 evolving hydrogenase increased with the temperature, and decreased with the pH, while the activity of the uptake hydrogenase increased with the temperature and the pH. So the biohydrogen production process of the K. pneumoniae ECU-15 was the comprehensive results of the evolution hydrogen process and the uptake hydrogen process.

  6. Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris Mutants Lacking Periplasmic Hydrogenases or the Type I Tetraheme Cytochrome c3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, M.; Ono, S.; Bosak, T.

    2012-12-01

    A large fraction of anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds relies on microbial sulfate reduction. Sulfur isotope fractionation by these microbes has been widely used to trace the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and carbon, but intracellular mechanisms behind the wide range of fractionations observed in nature and cultures are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the influence of electron transport chain components on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by culturing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (Tp1-c3). The mutants were grown both in batch and continuous cultures. All tested mutants grew on lactate or pyruvate as the sole carbon and energy sources, generating sulfide. Mutants lacking cytoplasmic and periplasmic hydrogenases exhibited similar growth physiologies and sulfur isotope fractionations to their parent strains. On the other hand, a mutant lacking Tp1-c3 (ΔcycA) fractionated the 34S/32S ratio more than the wild type, evolving H2 in the headspace and exhibiting a lower specific respiration rate. In the presence of high concentrations of pyruvate, the growth of ΔcycA relied largely on fermentation rather than sulfate reduction, even when sulfate was abundant, producing the largest sulfur isotope effect observed in this study. Differences between sulfur isotope fractionation by ΔcycA and the wild type highlight the effect of electron transfer chains on the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation. Because Tp1-c3 is known to exclusively shuttle electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases to transmembrane complexes, electron transfers in the absence of Tp1-c3 should bypass the periplasmic hydrogen cycling, and the loss of reducing equivalents in the form of H2 can impair the flow of electrons from organic acids to sulfur, increasing isotope fractionation. Larger fractionation by ΔcycA can inform interpretations of sulfur isotope data at an environmental scale as well

  7. A threonine stabilizes the NiC and NiR catalytic intermediates of [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Lebrette, Hugo; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent; Guigliarelli, Bruno; De Lacey, Antonio L; Léger, Christophe; Volbeda, Anne; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-03-27

    The heterodimeric [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans catalyzes the reversible oxidation of H2 into protons and electrons. The catalytic intermediates have been attributed to forms of the active site (NiSI, NiR, and NiC) detected using spectroscopic methods under potentiometric but non-catalytic conditions. Here, we produced variants by replacing the conserved Thr-18 residue in the small subunit with Ser, Val, Gln, Gly, or Asp, and we analyzed the effects of these mutations on the kinetic (H2 oxidation, H2 production, and H/D exchange), spectroscopic (IR, EPR), and structural properties of the enzyme. The mutations disrupt the H-bond network in the crystals and have a strong effect on H2 oxidation and H2 production turnover rates. However, the absence of correlation between activity and rate of H/D exchange in the series of variants suggests that the alcoholic group of Thr-18 is not necessarily a proton relay. Instead, the correlation between H2 oxidation and production activity and the detection of the NiC species in reduced samples confirms that NiC is a catalytic intermediate and suggests that Thr-18 is important to stabilize the local protein structure of the active site ensuring fast NiSI-NiC-NiR interconversions during H2 oxidation/production.

  8. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media

    PubMed Central

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 104 s−1 at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability. PMID:26844297

  9. The Influence of Oxygen on [NiFe]–Hydrogenase Cofactor Biosynthesis and How Ligation of Carbon Monoxide Precedes Cyanation

    PubMed Central

    Stripp, Sven T.; Lindenstrauss, Ute; Granich, Claudia; Sawers, R. Gary; Soboh, Basem

    2014-01-01

    The class of [NiFe]–hydrogenases is characterized by a bimetallic cofactor comprising low–spin nickel and iron ions, the latter of which is modified with a single carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN−) molecules. Generation of these ligands in vivo requires a complex maturation apparatus in which the HypC–HypD complex acts as a ‘construction site’ for the Fe–(CN)2CO portion of the cofactor. The order of addition of the CO and CN– ligands determines the ultimate structure and catalytic efficiency of the cofactor; however much debate surrounds the succession of events. Here, we present an FT–IR spectroscopic analysis of HypC–HypD isolated from a hydrogenase–competent wild–type strain of Escherichia coli. In contrast to previously reported samples, HypC–HypD showed spectral contributions indicative of an electron–rich Fe–CO cofactor, at the same time lacking any Fe–CN– signatures. This immature iron site binds external CO and undergoes oxidative damage when in contact with O2. Binding of CO protects the site against loss of spectral features associated with O2 damage. Our findings strongly suggest that CO ligation precedes cyanation in vivo. Furthermore, the results provide a rationale for the deleterious effects of O2 on in vivo cofactor biosynthesis. PMID:25211029

  10. Protonation states of intermediates in the reaction mechanism of [NiFe] hydrogenase studied by computational methods.

    PubMed

    Dong, Geng; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-01

    The [NiFe] hydrogenases catalyse the reversible conversion of H2 to protons and electrons. The active site consists of a Fe ion with one carbon monoxide, two cyanide, and two cysteine (Cys) ligands. The latter two bridge to a Ni ion, which has two additional terminal Cys ligands. It has been suggested that one of the Cys residues is protonated during the reaction mechanism. We have used combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) geometry optimisations, large QM calculations with 817 atoms, and QM/MM free energy simulations, using the TPSS and B3LYP methods with basis sets extrapolated to the quadruple zeta level to determine which of the four Cys residues is more favourable to protonate for four putative states in the reaction mechanism, Ni-SIa, Ni-R, Ni-C, and Ni-L. The calculations show that for all states, the terminal Cys-546 residue is most easily protonated by 14-51 kJ/mol, owing to a more favourable hydrogen-bond pattern around this residue in the protein. PMID:26940957

  11. Electrochemistry of metalloproteins: protein film electrochemistry for the study of E. coli [NiFe]-hydrogenase-1.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rhiannon M; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2014-01-01

    Protein film electrochemistry is a technique which allows the direct control of redox-active enzymes, providing particularly detailed information on their catalytic properties. The enzyme is deposited onto a working electrode tip, and through control of the applied potential the enzyme activity is monitored as electrical current, allowing for direct study of inherent activity as electrons are transferred to and from the enzyme redox center(s). No mediators are used. Because the only enzyme present in the experiment is bound at the electrode surface, gaseous and liquid phase inhibitors can be introduced and removed whilst the enzyme remains in situ. Potential control means that kinetics and thermodynamics are explored simultaneously; the kinetics of a reaction can be studied as a function of potential. Steady-state catalytic rates are observed directly as current (for a given potential) and non-steady-state rates (such as interconversions between different forms of the enzyme) are observed from the change in current with time. The more active the enzyme, the higher the current and the better the signal-to-noise. In this chapter we outline the practical aspects of PFE for studying electroactive enzymes, using the Escherichia coli [NiFe]-hydrogenase 1 (Hyd-1) as an example.

  12. A Threonine Stabilizes the NiC and NiR Catalytic Intermediates of [NiFe]-hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Ceccaldi, Pierre; Lebrette, Hugo; Gutiérrez-Sanz, Oscar; Richaud, Pierre; Cournac, Laurent; Guigliarelli, Bruno; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Léger, Christophe; Volbeda, Anne; Burlat, Bénédicte; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The heterodimeric [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio fructosovorans catalyzes the reversible oxidation of H2 into protons and electrons. The catalytic intermediates have been attributed to forms of the active site (NiSI, NiR, and NiC) detected using spectroscopic methods under potentiometric but non-catalytic conditions. Here, we produced variants by replacing the conserved Thr-18 residue in the small subunit with Ser, Val, Gln, Gly, or Asp, and we analyzed the effects of these mutations on the kinetic (H2 oxidation, H2 production, and H/D exchange), spectroscopic (IR, EPR), and structural properties of the enzyme. The mutations disrupt the H-bond network in the crystals and have a strong effect on H2 oxidation and H2 production turnover rates. However, the absence of correlation between activity and rate of H/D exchange in the series of variants suggests that the alcoholic group of Thr-18 is not necessarily a proton relay. Instead, the correlation between H2 oxidation and production activity and the detection of the NiC species in reduced samples confirms that NiC is a catalytic intermediate and suggests that Thr-18 is important to stabilize the local protein structure of the active site ensuring fast NiSI-NiC-NiR interconversions during H2 oxidation/production. PMID:25666617

  13. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 10(4) s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability.

  14. Structure of [NiFe] Hydrogenase Maturation Protein HypE from Escherichia coli and its Interaction with HypF

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Asinas, A.; Proteau, A.; Munger, C.; Baardsnes, j.; Iannuzzi, P.; Matte, A.; Cygler, m.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenases are enzymes involved in hydrogen metabolism, utilizing H2 as an electron source. [NiFe] hydrogenases are heterodimeric Fe-S proteins, with a large subunit containing the reaction center involving Fe and Ni metal ions and a small subunit containing one or more Fe-S clusters. Maturation of the [NiFe] hydrogenase involves assembly of nonproteinaceous ligands on the large subunit by accessory proteins encoded by the hyp operon. HypE is an essential accessory protein and participates in the synthesis of two cyano groups found in the large subunit. We report the crystal structure of Escherichia coli HypE at 2.0- Angstroms resolution. HypE exhibits a fold similar to that of PurM and ThiL and forms dimers. The C-terminal catalytically essential Cys336 is internalized at the dimer interface between the N- and C-terminal domains. A mechanism for dehydration of the thiocarbamate to the thiocyanate is proposed, involving Asp83 and Glu272. The interactions of HypE and HypF were characterized in detail by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry, revealing a Kd (dissociation constant) of {approx}400 nM. The stoichiometry and molecular weights of the complex were verified by size exclusion chromatography and gel scanning densitometry. These experiments reveal that HypE and HypF associate to form a stoichiometric, hetero-oligomeric complex predominantly consisting of a [EF]2 heterotetramer which exists in a dynamic equilibrium with the EF heterodimer. The surface plasmon resonance results indicate that a conformational change occurs upon heterodimerization which facilitates formation of a productive complex as part of the carbamate transfer reaction.

  15. Impact of membrane-associated hydrogenases on the F₀F₁-ATPase in Escherichia coli during glycerol and mixed carbon fermentation: ATPase activity and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the mutants lacking hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-08-01

    Escherichia coli is able to ferment glycerol and to produce molecular hydrogen (H2) by four membrane-associated hydrogenases (Hyd) changing activity in response to different conditions. In this study, overall ATPase activity of glycerol alone and mixed carbon sources (glucose and glycerol) fermented E. coli wild type and different Hyd mutants and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) were first investigated. ATPase activity was higher in glycerol fermented wild type cells at pH 7.5 compared to pH 6.5 and pH 5.5; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity at pH 7.5. The ATPase activity at pH 7.5, compared with wild type, was lower in selC and less in hypF single mutants, suppressed in hyaB hybC selC triple mutant. Moreover, total ATPase activity of mixed carbon fermented wild type cells was maximal at pH 7.5 and lowered at pH 5.5. The ATPase activities of hypF and hyaB hybC selC mutants were higher at pH 5.5, compared with wild type; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity of hypF mutant. These results demonstrate that in E. coli during glycerol fermentation the membrane proton-translocating FOF1-ATPase has major input in overall ATPase activity and alkaline pH is more optimal for the FOF1-ATPase operation. Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 are required for the FOF1-ATPase activity upon anaerobic fermentation of glycerol. The impact of Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 on the FOF1-ATPase is more obvious during mixed carbon fermentation at slightly acidic pH.

  16. A hybrid photocatalytic system comprising ZnS as light harvester and an [Fe(2)S(2)] hydrogenase mimic as hydrogen evolution catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuyu; Wang, Xiuli; Huang, Lei; Ma, Guijun; Yang, Jinhui; Li, Can

    2012-05-01

    Photo opportunity: A highly efficient and stable hybrid artificial photosynthetic H(2) evolution system is assembled by using a semiconductor (ZnS) as light-harvester and an [Fe(2)S(2)] hydrogenase mimic ([(μ-SPh-4-NH(2) )(2) Fe(2) (CO)(6)]) as catalyst for H(2) evolution. Photocatalytic H(2) production is achieved with more than 2607 turnovers (based on [Fe(2)S(2)]) and an initial turnover frequency of 100 h(-1) through the efficient transfer of photogenerated electrons from ZnS to the [Fe(2)S(2)] complex.

  17. Synthesis and Photophysical Study of a [NiFe] Hydrogenase Biomimetic Compound Covalently Linked to a Re-diimine Photosensitizer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis, photophysics, and photochemistry of a linked dyad ([Re]-[NiFe2]) containing an analogue ([NiFe2]) of the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenase, covalently bound to a Re-diimine photosensitizer ([Re]), are described. Following excitation, the mechanisms of electron transfer involving the [Re] and [NiFe2] centers and the resulting decomposition were investigated. Excitation of the [Re] center results in the population of a diimine-based metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state. Reductive quenching by NEt3 produces the radically reduced form of [Re], [Re]− (kq = 1.4 ± 0.1 × 107 M–1 s–1). Once formed, [Re]− reduces the [NiFe2] center to [NiFe2]−, and this reduction was followed using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. The concentration dependence of the electron transfer rate constants suggests that both inter- and intramolecular electron transfer pathways are involved, and the rate constants for these processes have been estimated (kinter = 5.9 ± 0.7 × 108 M–1 s–1, kintra = 1.5 ± 0.1 × 105 s–1). For the analogous bimolecular system, only intermolecular electron transfer could be observed (kinter = 3.8 ± 0.5 × 109 M–1 s–1). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies confirms that decomposition of the dyad occurs upon prolonged photolysis, and this appears to be a major factor for the low activity of the system toward H2 production in acidic conditions. PMID:26605700

  18. Direct Comparison of the Performance of a Bio-inspired Synthetic Nickel Catalyst and a [NiFe]-Hydrogenase, Both Covalently Attached to Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Macia, Patricia; Dutta, Arnab; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Shaw, Wendy J.; Rudiger, Olaf

    2015-10-12

    The active site of hydrogenases has been a source of inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. However, direct comparisons between molecular catalysts and enzymes have not been possible because different techniques are used to evaluate both types of catalysts, minimizing our ability to determine how far we’ve come in mimicking the impressive enzymatic performance. Here we directly compare the catalytic properties of the [Ni(PCy2NGly2)2]2+ complex with the [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfobivrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) immobilized to a functionalized electrode under identical conditions. At pH=7, the enzyme has higher performance in both activity and overpotential, and is more stable, while at low pH, the molecular catalyst outperforms the enzyme in all respects. The Ni complex also has increased tolerance to CO. This is the first direct comparison of enzymes and molecular complexes, enabling a unique understanding of the benefits and detriments of both systems, and advancing our understanding of the utilization of these bioinspired complexes in fuel cells. AD and WJS acknowledge the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the US Department of Energy (US DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US DOE.

  19. A strenuous experimental journey searching for spectroscopic evidence of a bridging nickel–iron–hydride in [NiFe] hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for a hydride bridge in the Ni–R form of [NiFe] hydrogenase has been obtained using iron-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). The Ni–H–Fe wag mode at 675 cm−1 is the first spectroscopic evidence for a bridging hydride in Ni–R as well as the first iron-hydride-related NRVS feature observed for a biological system. Although density function theory (DFT) calculation assisted the determination of the Ni–R structure, it did not predict the Ni–H–Fe wag mode at ∼675 cm−1 before NRVS. Instead, the observed Ni–H–Fe mode provided a critical reference for the DFT calculations. While the overall science about Ni–R is presented and discussed elsewhere, this article focuses on the long and strenuous experimental journey to search for and experimentally identify the Ni–H–Fe wag mode in a Ni–R sample. As a methodology, the results presented here will go beyond Ni–R and hydrogenase research and will also be of interest to other scientists who use synchrotron radiation for measuring dilute samples or weak spectroscopic features. PMID:26524296

  20. Urease-Null and Hydrogenase-Null Phenotypes of a Phylloplane Bacterium Reveal Altered Nickel Metabolism in Two Soybean Mutants 1

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mark A.; Polacco, Joseph C.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation at either of two genetic loci (Eu2 or Eu3) in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) results in a pleiotropic elimination of the activity of both major urease isozymes. Surprisingly, the phenotype of a phylloplane bacterium, Methylobacterium mesophilicum, living on the leaves of eu2/eu2 or eu3-e1/eu3-e1 mutants is also affected by these plant mutations. The bacteria isolated from leaves of these soybean mutants have transient urease- and hydrogenase-deficient phenotypes that can be corrected by the addition of nickel to free-living cultures. The same bacterium growing on wild-type soybeans or on urease mutants eu1-sun/eu1-sun or eu4/eu4, each deficient in only one urease isozyme, are urease-positive. These results suggest that the bacterium living on the eu2/eu2 or eu3-e1/eu3-e1 mutant is unable to produce an active urease or hydrogenase because it is effectively starved for nickel. We infer that mutations at Eu2 or Eu3 result in defects in nickel metabolism but not in Ni2+ uptake or transport, because eu2/eu2 and eu3-e1/eu3-e1 mutants exhibit normal uptake of 63NiCl2. Moreover, wild-type plants grafted on mutant rootstocks produce seeds with fully active urease, indicating unimpeded transport of nickel through mutant roots and stems. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668768

  1. Hydrogen bioelectrooxidation on gold nanoparticle-based electrodes modified by Aquifex aeolicus hydrogenase: Application to hydrogen/oxygen enzymatic biofuel cells.

    PubMed

    Monsalve, Karen; Roger, Magali; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Cristina; Ilbert, Marianne; Nitsche, Serge; Byrne-Kodjabachian, Deborah; Marchi, Valérie; Lojou, Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    For the first time, gold nanoparticle-based electrodes have been used as platforms for efficient immobilization of the [NiFe] hydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. AuNPs were characterized by electronic microscopy, dynamic light scattering and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Two sizes around 20.0±5.3 nm and 37.2±4.3 nm nm were synthesized. After thiol-based functionalization, the AuNPs were proved to allow direct H2 oxidation over a large range of temperatures. A high current density up to 1.85±0.15 mA·cm(-2) was reached at the smallest AuNPs, which is 170 times higher than the one recorded at the bare gold electrode. The catalytic current was especially studied as a function of the AuNP size and amount, and procedure for deposition. A synergetic effect between the AuNP porous deposit and the increase surface area was shown. Compared to previously used nanomaterials such as carbon nanofibers, the covalent grafting of the enzyme on the thiol-modified gold nanoparticles was shown to enhance the stability of the hydrogenase. This bioanode was finally coupled to a biocathode where BOD from Myrothecium verrucaria was immobilized on AuNP-based film. The performance of the so-mounted H2/O2 biofuel cell was evaluated, and a power density of 0.25 mW·cm(-2) was recorded.

  2. Contributions of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase to H2 production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as revealed by isotope ratio analysis of evolved H(2).

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Hill, Eric A; Moran, James J; Bartholomew, Rachel A; Yang, Hui; Hegg, Eric L

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes both a [NiFe]- and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase. While the output of these proteins has been characterized in mutant strains expressing only one of the enzymes, the contribution of each to H2 synthesis in the wild-type organism is not clear. Here, we use stable isotope analysis of H2 in the culture headspace, along with transcription data and measurements of the concentrations of gases in the headspace, to characterize H2 production in the wild-type strain. After most of the O2 in the headspace had been consumed, H2 was produced and then consumed by the bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Once the cultures were completely anaerobic, a new burst of H2 synthesis catalyzed by both enzymes took place. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that at this point in the culture cycle, a pool of electrons is shunted toward both hydrogenases in the wild-type organisms, but that in the absence of one of the hydrogenases, the flux is redirected to the available enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first use of natural-abundance stable isotope analysis of a metabolic product to elucidate substrate flux through two alternative enzymes in the same cellular system.

  3. Contributions of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase to H2 production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as revealed by isotope ratio analysis of evolved H2

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Hill, Eric A.; Moran, James J.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Hui, Yang; Hegg, Eric L.

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes both a [NiFe]- and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase. While the output of these proteins has been characterized in mutant strains expressing only one of the enzymes, the contribution of each to H2 synthesis in the wild-type organism is not clear. Here we use stable isotope analysis of H2 in the culture headspace, along with transcription data and measurements of the concentrations of gases in the headspace, to characterize H2 production in the wild-type strain. After most of the O2 in the headspace had been consumed, H2 was produced and then consumed by the bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Once the cultures were completely anaerobic, a new burst of H2 synthesis catalyzed by both enzymes took place. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that at this point in the culture cycle, a pool of electrons is shunted toward both hydrogenases in the wild-type organism, but that in the absence of one of the hydrogenases, the flux is redirected to the available enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first use of stable isotope analysis of a metabolic product to elucidate substrate flux through two alternative enzymes in the same cellular system.

  4. Photoactivation of the Ni-SIr state to the Ni-SIa state in [NiFe] hydrogenase: FT-IR study on the light reactivity of the ready Ni-SIr state and as-isolated enzyme revisited.

    PubMed

    Tai, Hulin; Xu, Liyang; Inoue, Seiya; Nishikawa, Koji; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2016-08-10

    The Ni-SIr state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was photoactivated to its Ni-SIa state by Ar(+) laser irradiation at 514.5 nm, whereas the Ni-SL state was light induced from a newly identified state, which was less active than any other identified state and existed in the "as-isolated" enzyme.

  5. Genome Data Mining and Soil Survey for the Novel Group 5 [NiFe]-Hydrogenase To Explore the Diversity and Ecological Importance of Presumptive High-Affinity H2-Oxidizing Bacteria ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Constant, Philippe; Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Hesse, Laura; Pratscher, Jennifer; Conrad, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces soil isolates exhibiting the unique ability to oxidize atmospheric H2 possess genes specifying a putative high-affinity [NiFe]-hydrogenase. This study was undertaken to explore the taxonomic diversity and the ecological importance of this novel functional group. We propose to designate the genes encoding the small and large subunits of the putative high-affinity hydrogenase hhyS and hhyL, respectively. Genome data mining revealed that the hhyL gene is unevenly distributed in the phyla Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Acidobacteria. The hhyL gene sequences comprised a phylogenetically distinct group, namely, the group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes. The presumptive high-affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria constituting group 5 were shown to possess a hydrogenase gene cluster, including the genes encoding auxiliary and structural components of the enzyme and four additional open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function. A soil survey confirmed that both high-affinity H2 oxidation activity and the hhyL gene are ubiquitous. A quantitative PCR assay revealed that soil contained 106 to 108 hhyL gene copies g (dry weight)−1. Assuming one hhyL gene copy per genome, the abundance of presumptive high-affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria was higher than the maximal population size for which maintenance energy requirements would be fully supplied through the H2 oxidation activity measured in soil. Our data indicate that the abundance of the hhyL gene should not be taken as a reliable proxy for the uptake of atmospheric H2 by soil, because high-affinity H2 oxidation is a facultatively mixotrophic metabolism, and microorganisms harboring a nonfunctional group 5 [NiFe]-hydrogenase may occur. PMID:21742924

  6. NADP-specific electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase in a functional complex with formate dehydrogenase in Clostridium autoethanogenum grown on CO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg; Mueller, Alexander P; Köpke, Michael; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2013-10-01

    Flavin-based electron bifurcation is a recently discovered mechanism of coupling endergonic to exergonic redox reactions in the cytoplasm of anaerobic bacteria and archaea. Among the five electron-bifurcating enzyme complexes characterized to date, one is a heteromeric ferredoxin- and NAD-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase. We report here a novel electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase that is NADP rather than NAD specific and forms a complex with a formate dehydrogenase. The complex was found in high concentrations (6% of the cytoplasmic proteins) in the acetogenic Clostridium autoethanogenum autotrophically grown on CO, which was fermented to acetate, ethanol, and 2,3-butanediol. The purified complex was composed of seven different subunits. As predicted from the sequence of the encoding clustered genes (fdhA/hytA-E) and from chemical analyses, the 78.8-kDa subunit (FdhA) is a selenocysteine- and tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase, the 65.5-kDa subunit (HytB) is an iron-sulfur flavin mononucleotide protein harboring the NADP binding site, the 51.4-kDa subunit (HytA) is the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proper, and the 18.1-kDa (HytC), 28.6-kDa (HytD), 19.9-kDa (HytE1), and 20.1-kDa (HytE2) subunits are iron-sulfur proteins. The complex catalyzed both the reversible coupled reduction of ferredoxin and NADP(+) with H2 or formate and the reversible formation of H2 and CO2 from formate. We propose the complex to have two functions in vivo, namely, to normally catalyze CO2 reduction to formate with NADPH and reduced ferredoxin in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and to catalyze H2 formation from NADPH and reduced ferredoxin when these redox mediators get too reduced during unbalanced growth of C. autoethanogenum on CO (E0' = -520 mV).

  7. NADP-Specific Electron-Bifurcating [FeFe]-Hydrogenase in a Functional Complex with Formate Dehydrogenase in Clostridium autoethanogenum Grown on CO

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg; Mueller, Alexander P.; Köpke, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Flavin-based electron bifurcation is a recently discovered mechanism of coupling endergonic to exergonic redox reactions in the cytoplasm of anaerobic bacteria and archaea. Among the five electron-bifurcating enzyme complexes characterized to date, one is a heteromeric ferredoxin- and NAD-dependent [FeFe]-hydrogenase. We report here a novel electron-bifurcating [FeFe]-hydrogenase that is NADP rather than NAD specific and forms a complex with a formate dehydrogenase. The complex was found in high concentrations (6% of the cytoplasmic proteins) in the acetogenic Clostridium autoethanogenum autotrophically grown on CO, which was fermented to acetate, ethanol, and 2,3-butanediol. The purified complex was composed of seven different subunits. As predicted from the sequence of the encoding clustered genes (fdhA/hytA-E) and from chemical analyses, the 78.8-kDa subunit (FdhA) is a selenocysteine- and tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase, the 65.5-kDa subunit (HytB) is an iron-sulfur flavin mononucleotide protein harboring the NADP binding site, the 51.4-kDa subunit (HytA) is the [FeFe]-hydrogenase proper, and the 18.1-kDa (HytC), 28.6-kDa (HytD), 19.9-kDa (HytE1), and 20.1-kDa (HytE2) subunits are iron-sulfur proteins. The complex catalyzed both the reversible coupled reduction of ferredoxin and NADP+ with H2 or formate and the reversible formation of H2 and CO2 from formate. We propose the complex to have two functions in vivo, namely, to normally catalyze CO2 reduction to formate with NADPH and reduced ferredoxin in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and to catalyze H2 formation from NADPH and reduced ferredoxin when these redox mediators get too reduced during unbalanced growth of C. autoethanogenum on CO (E0′ = −520 mV). PMID:23893107

  8. Borane-Protected Cyanides as Surrogates of H-Bonded Cyanides in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Active Site Models

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Brian C.; Ringenberg, Mark R.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Triarylborane Lewis acids bind [Fe2(pdt)-(CO)4(CN)2]2− (pdt2− = 1,3-propanedithiolate) and [Fe2(adt)(CO)4(CN)2]2− [3]2− (adt2− = 1,3-azadithiolate, HN(CH2S−)2) to give the 2:1 adducts [Fe2(xdt)-(CO)4(CNBAr3)2]2−. Attempts to prepare the 1:1 adducts [1(BAr3)]2− (Ar = Ph, C6F5) were unsuccessful, but related 1:1 adducts were obtained using the bulky borane B(C6F4-o-C6F5)3 (BArF*3). By virtue of the N-protection by the borane, salts of [Fe2(pdt)(CO)4(CNBAr3)2]2− sustain protonation to give hydrides that are stable (in contrast to [H1]−). The hydrides [H1(BAr3)2]− are 2.5–5 pKa units more acidic than the parent [H1]−. The adducts [1(BAr3)2]2− oxidize quasi-reversibly around −0.3 V versus Fc0/+ in contrast to ca. −0.8 V observed for the [1]2−/− couple. A simplified synthesis of [1]2−, [3]2−, and [Fe2(pdt)(CO)5(CN)]− ([2]−) was developed, entailing reaction of the diiron hexacarbonyl complexes with KCN in MeCN. PMID:24992155

  9. Terminal Hydride in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Model Has Lower Potential for H2 Production Than the Isomeric Bridging Hydride

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Bryan E.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Protonation of the symmetrical tetraphosphine complexes Fe2(S2CnH2n)(CO)2(dppv)2 afforded the corresponding terminal hydrides, establishing that even symmetrical diiron(I) dithiolates undergo protonation at terminal sites. The terminal hydride [HFe2(S2C3H6)(CO)2(dppv)2]+ was found to catalyze proton reduction at potentials 200 mV milder than the isomeric bridging hydride, thereby establishing a thermodynamic advantage for catalysis operating via terminal hydride. The azadithiolate protonates to afford, [Fe2[(SCH2)2NH2](CO)2(dppv)2]+, [HFe2[(SCH2)2NH](CO)2−(dppv)2]+, and [HFe2[(SCH2)2NH2](CO)2(dppv)2]2+, depending on conditions. PMID:18333613

  10. Synthetic Models for the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase: Catalytic Proton Reduction and the Structure of the Doubly Protonated Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Maria E.; Barton, Bryan E.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Carroll, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    This report compares biomimetic HER catalysts with and without the amine cofactor (adtNH): Fe2(adtNH)(CO)2(dppv)2 (1NH) and Fe2(pdt)(CO)2(dppv)2 (2; (adtNH)2− = (HN(CH2S)22−, pdt2− = 1,3-(CH2)3S22−). These compounds are spectroscopically, structurally, and stereodynamically very similar but exhibit very different catalytic properties. Protonation of 1NH and 2 each give three isomeric hydrides beginning with the kinetically favored terminal hydride, which converts sequentially to sym and unsym isomers of the bridging hydrides. In the case of the amine, the corresponding ammonium-hydrides are also observed. In the case of the terminal amine hydride [t-H1NH]BF4, the ammonium/amine-hydride equilibrium is sensitive to counteranions and solvent. The species [t-H1NH2](BF4)2 represents the first example of a crystallographically characterized terminal hydride produced by protonation. The NH--HFe distance of 1.88(7) Å indicates dihydrogen bonding. The bridging hydrides [µ-H1NH]+ and [µ-H2]+ reduce near −1.8 V, about 150 mV more negative than the reductions of the terminal hydride [t-H1NH]+ and [t-H2]+ at −1.65 V. Reductions of the amine hydrides [t-H1NH]+ and [t-H1NH2]2+ are irreversible. For the pdt analog, the [t-H2]+/0 couple is unaffected by weak acids (pKaMeCN 15.3) but exhibits catalysis with HBF4•Et2O, albeit with a TOF around 4 s−1 and an overpotential greater than 1 V. The voltammetry of [t-H1NH]+ is strongly affected by relatively weak acids and proceeds at 5000 s−1 with an overpotential of 0.7 V. The ammonium-hydride [t-H1NH2]2+ is a faster catalyst with an estimated TOF of 58,000 s−1 and an overpotential of 0.5 V. PMID:23126330

  11. Mechanism of H2 Production by Models for the [NiFe]-Hydrogenases: Role of Reduced Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Olbelina A; Huynh, Mioy T; Richers, Casseday P; Bertke, Jeffery A; Nilges, Mark J; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Rauchfuss, Thomas B

    2016-07-27

    The intermediacy of a reduced nickel-iron hydride in hydrogen evolution catalyzed by Ni-Fe complexes was verified experimentally and computationally. In addition to catalyzing hydrogen evolution, the highly basic and bulky (dppv)Ni(μ-pdt)Fe(CO)(dppv) ([1](0); dppv = cis-C2H2(PPh2)2) and its hydride derivatives have yielded to detailed characterization in terms of spectroscopy, bonding, and reactivity. The protonation of [1](0) initially produces unsym-[H1](+), which converts by a first-order pathway to sym-[H1](+). These species have C1 (unsym) and Cs (sym) symmetries, respectively, depending on the stereochemistry of the octahedral Fe site. Both experimental and computational studies show that [H1](+) protonates at sulfur. The S = 1/2 hydride [H1](0) was generated by reduction of [H1](+) with Cp*2Co. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that [H1](0) is best described as a Ni(I)-Fe(II) derivative with significant spin density on Ni and some delocalization on S and Fe. EPR spectroscopy reveals both kinetic and thermodynamic isomers of [H1](0). Whereas [H1](+) does not evolve H2 upon protonation, treatment of [H1](0) with acids gives H2. The redox state of the "remote" metal (Ni) modulates the hydridic character of the Fe(II)-H center. As supported by DFT calculations, H2 evolution proceeds either directly from [H1](0) and external acid or from protonation of the Fe-H bond in [H1](0) to give a labile dihydrogen complex. Stoichiometric tests indicate that protonation-induced hydrogen evolution from [H1](0) initially produces [1](+), which is reduced by [H1](0). Our results reconcile the required reductive activation of a metal hydride and the resistance of metal hydrides toward reduction. This dichotomy is resolved by reduction of the remote (non-hydride) metal of the bimetallic unit. PMID:27328053

  12. Photoinduced hydrogen evolution in supramolecular devices with a rhenium photosensitizer linked to FeFe-hydrogenase model complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhui; Jiang, Weina

    2012-08-28

    Coordination of the pyridyl-attached diiron azadithiolate hexacarbonyl complexes (2 and 3) through the pyridyl nitrogen to the Re on 10-phenanthroline rhenium (5a) and 2,9-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline rhenium (5b) forms novel [Re-Fe] complexes 7a, 7b and 8 respectively. Under visible light illumination using triethylamine as a sacrificial electron donor and [Re-Fe] type complexes (7a, 7b or 8) as catalysts, remarkably increased efficiency was observed for photoinduced hydrogen production with a turnover number reaching 11.8 from complex 7a and 8.75 from 7b. To the best of our knowledge, these are the best values compared to other [Re-Fe] photocatalysts reported so far. In contrast to the parent molecules, the turnover number by the intermolecular combination of complexes 6a and 2 showed a value of 5.23, and that from 6b and 2 is 3.8, while no H(2) was detected from 8a and 3 under the same experimental conditions. Obviously, the intramolecular combination of rhenium(I) and [2Fe2S] as a catalyst is promising for efficient H(2) evolution, and it is better than the intermolecular multi-component system.

  13. Designing interfaces of hydrogenase-nanomaterial hybrids for efficient solar conversion.

    PubMed

    King, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The direct conversion of sunlight into biofuels is an intriguing alternative to a continued reliance on fossil fuels. Natural photosynthesis has long been investigated both as a potential solution, and as a model for utilizing solar energy to drive a water-to-fuel cycle. The molecules and organizational structure provide a template to inspire the design of efficient molecular systems for photocatalysis. A clear design strategy is the coordination of molecular interactions that match kinetic rates and energetic levels to control the direction and flow of energy from light harvesting to catalysis. Energy transduction and electron-transfer reactions occur through interfaces formed between complexes of donor-acceptor molecules. Although the structures of several of the key biological complexes have been solved, detailed descriptions of many electron-transfer complexes are lacking, which presents a challenge to designing and engineering biomolecular systems for solar conversion. Alternatively, it is possible to couple the catalytic power of biological enzymes to light harvesting by semiconductor nanomaterials. In these molecules, surface chemistry and structure can be designed using ligands. The passivation effect of the ligand can also dramatically affect the photophysical properties of the semiconductor, and energetics of external charge-transfer. The length, degree of bond saturation (aromaticity), and solvent exposed functional groups of ligands can be manipulated to further tune the interface to control molecular assembly, and complex stability in photocatalytic hybrids. The results of this research show how ligand selection is critical to designing molecular interfaces that promote efficient self-assembly, charge-transfer and photocatalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems. PMID:23541891

  14. Transcriptional regulation of genes encoding the selenium-free [NiFe]-hydrogenases in the archaeon Methanococcus voltae involves positive and negative control elements.

    PubMed Central

    Noll, I; Müller, S; Klein, A

    1999-01-01

    Methanococcus voltae harbors genetic information for two pairs of homologous [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the enzymes contain selenocysteine, while the other two gene groups encode apparent isoenzymes that carry cysteinyl residues in the homologous positions. The genes coding for the selenium-free enzymes, frc and vhc, are expressed only under selenium limitation. They are transcribed out of a common intergenic region. A series of deletions made in the intergenic region localized a common negative regulatory element for the vhc and frc promoters as well as two activator elements that are specific for each of the two transcription units. Repeated sequences, partially overlapping the frc promoter, were also detected. Mutations in these repeated heptanucleotide sequences led to a weak induction of a reporter gene under the control of the frc promoters in the presence of selenium. This result suggests that the heptamer repeats contribute to the negative regulation of the frc transcription unit. PMID:10430564

  15. The Radical SAM Enzyme HydG Requires Cysteine and a Dangler Iron for Generating an Organometallic Precursor to the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase H-Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Suess, Daniel L. M.; Pham, Cindy C.; Bürstel, Ingmar; Swartz, James R.; Cramer, Stephen P.; Britt, R. David

    2016-01-01

    Three maturase enzymes—HydE, HydF, and HydG—synthesize and insert the organometallic component of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase active site (the H-cluster). HydG generates the first organometallic intermediates in this process, ultimately producing an [Fe(CO)2(CN)] complex. A limitation in understanding the mechanism by which this complex forms has been uncertainty regarding the precise metallocluster composition of HydG that comprises active enzyme. We herein show that the HydG auxiliary cluster must bind both l-cysteine and a dangler Fe in order to generate the [Fe(CO)2(CN)] product. These findings support a mechanistic framework in which a [(Cys)Fe(CO)2(CN)]− species is a key intermediate in H-cluster maturation. PMID:26764535

  16. Hydrogen production at high Faradaic efficiency by a bio-electrode based on TiO2 adsorption of a new [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Morra, Simone; Valetti, Francesca; Sarasso, Veronica; Castrignanò, Silvia; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase CpHydA from Clostridium perfringens was immobilized by adsorption on anatase TiO2 electrodes for clean hydrogen production. The immobilized enzyme proved to perform direct electron transfer to and from the electrode surface and catalyses both H2 oxidation (H2 uptake) and H2 production (H2 evolution) with a current density for H2 evolution of about 2 mA cm(-1). The TiO2/CpHydA bioelectrode remained active for several days upon storage and when a reducing potential was set, H2 evolution occurred with a mean Faradaic efficiency of 98%. The high turnover frequency of H2 production and the tight coupling of electron transfer, resulting in a Faradaic efficiency close to 100%, support the exploitation of the novel TiO2/CpHydA stationary electrode as a powerful device for H2 production.

  17. Biosynthesis of the iron-guanylylpyridinol cofactor of [Fe]-hydrogenase in methanogenic archaea as elucidated by stable-isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Schick, Michael; Xie, Xiulan; Ataka, Kenichi; Kahnt, Jörg; Linne, Uwe; Shima, Seigo

    2012-02-15

    [Fe]-hydrogenase catalyzes the reversible hydride transfer from H(2) to methenyltetrahydromethanoptherin, which is an intermediate in methane formation from H(2) and CO(2) in methanogenic archaea. The enzyme harbors a unique active site iron-guanylylpyridinol (FeGP) cofactor, in which a low-spin Fe(II) is coordinated by a pyridinol-N, an acyl group, two carbon monoxide, and the sulfur of the enzyme's cysteine. Here, we studied the biosynthesis of the FeGP cofactor by following the incorporation of (13)C and (2)H from labeled precursors into the cofactor in growing methanogenic archaea and by subsequent NMR, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) and IR analysis of the isolated cofactor and reference compounds. The pyridinol moiety of the cofactor was found to be synthesized from three C-1 of acetate, two C-2 of acetate, two C-1 of pyruvate, one carbon from the methyl group of l-methionine, and one carbon directly from CO(2). The metabolic origin of the two CO-ligands was CO(2) rather than C-1 or C-2 of acetate or pyruvate excluding that the two CO are derived from dehydroglycine as has previously been shown for the CO-ligands in [FeFe]-hydrogenases. A formation of CO from CO(2) via direct reduction catalyzed by a nickel-dependent CO dehydrogenase or from formate could also be excluded. When the cells were grown in the presence of (13)CO, the two CO-ligands and the acyl group became (13)C-labeled, indicating either that free CO is an intermediate in their synthesis or that free CO can exchange with these iron-bound ligands. Based on these findings, we propose pathways for how the FeGP cofactor might be synthesized.

  18. X-ray crystallographic and EPR spectroscopic analysis of HydG, a maturase in [FeFe]-hydrogenase H-cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Dinis, Pedro; Suess, Daniel L M; Fox, Stephen J; Harmer, Jenny E; Driesener, Rebecca C; De La Paz, Liliana; Swartz, James R; Essex, Jonathan W; Britt, R David; Roach, Peter L

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogenases use complex metal cofactors to catalyze the reversible formation of hydrogen. In [FeFe]-hydrogenases, the H-cluster cofactor includes a diiron subcluster containing azadithiolate, three CO, and two CN(-) ligands. During the assembly of the H cluster, the radical S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) enzyme HydG lyses the substrate tyrosine to yield the diatomic ligands. These diatomic products form an enzyme-bound Fe(CO)x(CN)y synthon that serves as a precursor for eventual H-cluster assembly. To further elucidate the mechanism of this complex reaction, we report the crystal structure and EPR analysis of HydG. At one end of the HydG (βα)8 triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel, a canonical [4Fe-4S] cluster binds SAM in close proximity to the proposed tyrosine binding site. At the opposite end of the active-site cavity, the structure reveals the auxiliary Fe-S cluster in two states: one monomer contains a [4Fe-5S] cluster, and the other monomer contains a [5Fe-5S] cluster consisting of a [4Fe-4S] cubane bridged by a μ2-sulfide ion to a mononuclear Fe(2+) center. This fifth iron is held in place by a single highly conserved protein-derived ligand: histidine 265. EPR analysis confirms the presence of the [5Fe-5S] cluster, which on incubation with cyanide, undergoes loss of the labile iron to yield a [4Fe-4S] cluster. We hypothesize that the labile iron of the [5Fe-5S] cluster is the site of Fe(CO)x(CN)y synthon formation and that the limited bonding between this iron and HydG may facilitate transfer of the intact synthon to its cognate acceptor for subsequent H-cluster assembly.

  19. Structural basis for a [4Fe-3S] cluster in the oxygen-tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Shomura, Yasuhito; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Nishihara, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2011-11-10

    Membrane-bound respiratory [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MBH), a H(2)-uptake enzyme found in the periplasmic space of bacteria, catalyses the oxidation of dihydrogen: H(2) → 2H(+) + 2e(-) (ref. 1). In contrast to the well-studied O(2)-sensitive [NiFe]-hydrogenases (referred to as the standard enzymes), MBH has an O(2)-tolerant H(2) oxidation activity; however, the mechanism of O(2) tolerance is unclear. Here we report the crystal structures of Hydrogenovibrio marinus MBH in three different redox conditions at resolutions between 1.18 and 1.32 Å. We find that the proximal iron-sulphur (Fe-S) cluster of MBH has a [4Fe-3S] structure coordinated by six cysteine residues--in contrast to the [4Fe-4S] cubane structure coordinated by four cysteine residues found in the proximal Fe-S cluster of the standard enzymes--and that an amide nitrogen of the polypeptide backbone is deprotonated and additionally coordinates the cluster when chemically oxidized, thus stabilizing the superoxidized state of the cluster. The structure of MBH is very similar to that of the O(2)-sensitive standard enzymes except for the proximal Fe-S cluster. Our results give a reasonable explanation why the O(2) tolerance of MBH is attributable to the unique proximal Fe-S cluster; we propose that the cluster is not only a component of the electron transfer for the catalytic cycle, but that it also donates two electrons and one proton crucial for the appropriate reduction of O(2) in preventing the formation of an unready, inactive state of the enzyme. PMID:22002607

  20. Relationship between Ni(II) and Zn(II) Coordination and Nucleotide Binding by the Helicobacter pylori [NiFe]-Hydrogenase and Urease Maturation Factor HypB*

    PubMed Central

    Sydor, Andrew M.; Lebrette, Hugo; Ariyakumaran, Rishikesh; Cavazza, Christine; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires two nickel-containing enzymes, urease and [NiFe]-hydrogenase, for efficient colonization of the human gastric mucosa. These enzymes possess complex metallocenters that are assembled by teams of proteins in multistep pathways. One essential accessory protein is the GTPase HypB, which is required for Ni(II) delivery to [NiFe]-hydrogenase and participates in urease maturation. Ni(II) or Zn(II) binding to a site embedded in the GTPase domain of HypB modulates the enzymatic activity, suggesting a mechanism of regulation. In this study, biochemical and structural analyses of H. pylori HypB (HpHypB) revealed an intricate link between nucleotide and metal binding. HpHypB nickel coordination, stoichiometry, and affinity were modulated by GTP and GDP, an effect not observed for zinc, and biochemical evidence suggests that His-107 coordination to nickel toggles on and off in a nucleotide-dependent manner. These results are consistent with the crystal structure of HpHypB loaded with Ni(II), GDP, and Pi, which reveals a nickel site distinct from that of zinc-loaded Methanocaldococcus jannaschii HypB as well as subtle changes to the protein structure. Furthermore, Cys-142, a metal ligand from the Switch II GTPase motif, was identified as a key component of the signal transduction between metal binding and the enzymatic activity. Finally, potassium accelerated the enzymatic activity of HpHypB but had no effect on the other biochemical properties of the protein. Altogether, this molecular level information about HpHypB provides insight into its cellular function and illuminates a possible mechanism of metal ion discrimination. PMID:24338018

  1. X-ray crystallographic and EPR spectroscopic analysis of HydG, a maturase in [FeFe]-hydrogenase H-cluster assembly

    PubMed Central

    Dinis, Pedro; Suess, Daniel L. M.; Fox, Stephen J.; Harmer, Jenny E.; Driesener, Rebecca C.; De La Paz, Liliana; Swartz, James R.; Essex, Jonathan W.; Britt, R. David; Roach, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenases use complex metal cofactors to catalyze the reversible formation of hydrogen. In [FeFe]-hydrogenases, the H-cluster cofactor includes a diiron subcluster containing azadithiolate, three CO, and two CN− ligands. During the assembly of the H cluster, the radical S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) enzyme HydG lyses the substrate tyrosine to yield the diatomic ligands. These diatomic products form an enzyme-bound Fe(CO)x(CN)y synthon that serves as a precursor for eventual H-cluster assembly. To further elucidate the mechanism of this complex reaction, we report the crystal structure and EPR analysis of HydG. At one end of the HydG (βα)8 triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel, a canonical [4Fe-4S] cluster binds SAM in close proximity to the proposed tyrosine binding site. At the opposite end of the active-site cavity, the structure reveals the auxiliary Fe-S cluster in two states: one monomer contains a [4Fe-5S] cluster, and the other monomer contains a [5Fe-5S] cluster consisting of a [4Fe-4S] cubane bridged by a μ2-sulfide ion to a mononuclear Fe2+ center. This fifth iron is held in place by a single highly conserved protein-derived ligand: histidine 265. EPR analysis confirms the presence of the [5Fe-5S] cluster, which on incubation with cyanide, undergoes loss of the labile iron to yield a [4Fe-4S] cluster. We hypothesize that the labile iron of the [5Fe-5S] cluster is the site of Fe(CO)x(CN)y synthon formation and that the limited bonding between this iron and HydG may facilitate transfer of the intact synthon to its cognate acceptor for subsequent H-cluster assembly. PMID:25605932

  2. Differential Expression of the Chlamydomonas [FeFe]-Hydrogenase-Encoding HYDA1 Gene Is Regulated by the COPPER RESPONSE REGULATOR11[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Miriam; Lambertz, Camilla; Happe, Thomas; Hemschemeier, Anja

    2012-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii adapts to anaerobic or hypoxic conditions by developing a complex fermentative metabolism including the production of molecular hydrogen by [FeFe]-hydrogenase isoform1 (HYDA1). HYDA1 transcript and hydrogenase protein accumulate in the absence of oxygen or copper (Cu). Factors regulating this differential gene expression have been unknown so far. In this study, we report on the isolation of a Chlamydomonas mutant strain impaired in HYDA1 gene expression by screening an insertional mutagenesis library for HYDA1 promoter activity using the arylsulfatase-encoding ARYLSULFATASE2 gene as a selection marker. The mutant strain has a deletion of the COPPER RESPONSE REGULATOR1 (CRR1) gene encoding for CRR1, indicating that this SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP) domain transcription factor is involved in the regulation of HYDA1 transcription. Treating the C. reinhardtii wild type with mercuric ions, which were shown to inhibit the binding of the SBP domain to DNA, prevented or deactivated HYDA1 gene expression. Reporter gene analyses of the HYDA1 promoter revealed that two GTAC motifs, which are known to be the cores of CRR1 binding sites, are necessary for full promoter activity in hypoxic conditions or upon Cu starvation. However, mutations of the GTAC sites had a much stronger impact on reporter gene expression in Cu-deficient cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the CRR1 SBP domain binds to one of the GTAC cores in vitro. These combined results prove that CRR1 is involved in HYDA1 promoter activation. PMID:22669892

  3. Photoactivation of the Ni-SIr state to the Ni-SIa state in [NiFe] hydrogenase: FT-IR study on the light reactivity of the ready Ni-SIr state and as-isolated enzyme revisited.

    PubMed

    Tai, Hulin; Xu, Liyang; Inoue, Seiya; Nishikawa, Koji; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2016-08-10

    The Ni-SIr state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was photoactivated to its Ni-SIa state by Ar(+) laser irradiation at 514.5 nm, whereas the Ni-SL state was light induced from a newly identified state, which was less active than any other identified state and existed in the "as-isolated" enzyme. PMID:27456760

  4. Discovery of Dark pH-Dependent H(+) Migration in a [NiFe]-Hydrogenase and Its Mechanistic Relevance: Mobilizing the Hydrido Ligand of the Ni-C Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Bonnie J; Hidalgo, Ricardo; Roessler, Maxie M; Evans, Rhiannon M; Ash, Philip A; Myers, William K; Vincent, Kylie A; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2015-07-01

    Despite extensive studies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, the mechanism by which these enzymes produce and activate H2 so efficiently remains unclear. A well-known EPR-active state produced under H2 and known as Ni-C is assigned as a Ni(III)-Fe(II) species with a hydrido ligand in the bridging position between the two metals. It has long been known that low-temperature photolysis of Ni-C yields distinctive EPR-active states, collectively termed Ni-L, that are attributed to migration of the bridging-H species as a proton; however, Ni-L has mainly been regarded as an artifact with no mechanistic relevance. It is now demonstrated, based on EPR and infrared spectroscopic studies, that the Ni-C to Ni-L interconversion in Hydrogenase-1 (Hyd-1) from Escherichia coli is a pH-dependent process that proceeds readily in the dark-proton migration from Ni-C being favored as the pH is increased. The persistence of Ni-L in Hyd-1 must relate to unassigned differences in proton affinities of metal and adjacent amino acid sites, although the unusually high reduction potentials of the adjacent Fe-S centers in this O2-tolerant hydrogenase might also be a contributory factor, impeding elementary electron transfer off the [NiFe] site after proton departure. The results provide compelling evidence that Ni-L is a true, albeit elusive, catalytic intermediate of [NiFe]-hydrogenases.

  5. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, which is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.

  6. RAPD analysis and sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 and Fe-hydrogenase as tools for genetic classification of potentially pathogenic isolates of Trichomonas gallinae.

    PubMed

    Sansano-Maestre, José; Martínez-Herrero, María Del Carmen; Garijo-Toledo, María Magdalena; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a worldwide parasite that causes oropharyngeal avian trichomonosis. During eight years, 60 axenic isolates were obtained from different bird species and characterized by three molecular methods: RAPD analysis and PCR-sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 fragment and Fe-hydrogenase gene. We have found two genotypes of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 widely distributed among bird populations, a new variant and also two sequences with mixed pattern. Genotype ITS-OBT-Tg-1 was associated with the presence of gross lesions in birds. We have found eight genotypes of the Fe-hydrogenase (A1, A2, C2, C2.1, C4, C5, C6 and C7), three of them are new reports (C5, C6 and C7), and also three sequences with mixed pattern. Subtype A1 of the Fe-hydrogenase was also related with the presence of lesions. RAPD analyses included most of the strains isolated from animals with lesions in one of the sub-clusters. Potentially pathogenic isolates of T. gallinae obtained in this study fulfill the following criteria with one exception: isolated from lesions+ITS-OBT-Tg-1 genotype+FeHyd A1+RAPD sub-cluster I2.

  7. [Dependence of the intracellular concentrations of univalent ions and hydrogenase activity on the salt composition and pH of the medium in the haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfonatronum thiodismutans].

    PubMed

    Soboleva, G S; Dulov, L E; Pusheva, M A

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that the intracellular concentrations of Na+, K+, and Cl- ions in Desulfonatronum thiodismutans depend on the extracellular concentration of Na' ions. An increase in the extracellular concentration of Na+ results in the accumulation of K+ ions in cells, which points to the possibility that these ions perform an osmoprotective function. When the concentration of the NaCI added to the medium was increased to 4%, the concentration gradient of Cl- ions changed insignificantly. It was found that D. thiodismutans contains two forms of hydrogenase--periplasmic and cytoplasmic. Both enzymes are capable of functioning in solutions with high ionic force; however they exhibit different sensitivities to Na+, K+, and Li+ salts and pH. The enzymes were found to be resistant to high concentrations of Na+ and K+ chlorides and Na+ bicarbonate. The cytoplasmic hydrogenase differed significantly from the periplasmic one in having much higher salt tolerance and lower pH optimum. The activity of these enzymes depended on the nature of both the cationic and anionic components of the salts. For instance, the inhibitory effect of NaCl was less pronounced than that of LiCl, whereas Na+ and Li+ sulfates inhibited the activity of both hydrogenase types to an equal degree. The highest activity of these enzymes was observed at low Na+ concentrations, close to those typical of cells growing at optimal salt concentrations. PMID:17410870

  8. RAPD analysis and sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 and Fe-hydrogenase as tools for genetic classification of potentially pathogenic isolates of Trichomonas gallinae.

    PubMed

    Sansano-Maestre, José; Martínez-Herrero, María Del Carmen; Garijo-Toledo, María Magdalena; Gómez-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas gallinae is a worldwide parasite that causes oropharyngeal avian trichomonosis. During eight years, 60 axenic isolates were obtained from different bird species and characterized by three molecular methods: RAPD analysis and PCR-sequencing of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 fragment and Fe-hydrogenase gene. We have found two genotypes of ITS1/5.8S rRNA/ITS2 widely distributed among bird populations, a new variant and also two sequences with mixed pattern. Genotype ITS-OBT-Tg-1 was associated with the presence of gross lesions in birds. We have found eight genotypes of the Fe-hydrogenase (A1, A2, C2, C2.1, C4, C5, C6 and C7), three of them are new reports (C5, C6 and C7), and also three sequences with mixed pattern. Subtype A1 of the Fe-hydrogenase was also related with the presence of lesions. RAPD analyses included most of the strains isolated from animals with lesions in one of the sub-clusters. Potentially pathogenic isolates of T. gallinae obtained in this study fulfill the following criteria with one exception: isolated from lesions+ITS-OBT-Tg-1 genotype+FeHyd A1+RAPD sub-cluster I2. PMID:27473993

  9. An Innovative Cloning Platform Enables Large-Scale Production and Maturation of an Oxygen-Tolerant [NiFe]-Hydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schiffels, Johannes; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Schelden, Maximilian; Aboulnaga, El-Hussiny A. A.; Baumann, Marcus E. M.; Selmer, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Expression of multiple heterologous genes in a dedicated host is a prerequisite for approaches in synthetic biology, spanning from the production of recombinant multiprotein complexes to the transfer of tailor-made metabolic pathways. Such attempts are often exacerbated, due in most cases to a lack of proper directional, robust and readily accessible genetic tools. Here, we introduce an innovative system for cloning and expression of multiple genes in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Using the novel methodology, genes are equipped with individual promoters and terminators and subsequently assembled. The resulting multiple gene cassettes may either be placed in one vector or alternatively distributed among a set of compatible plasmids. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed tool by production and maturation of the NAD+reducing soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH) from Cupriavidus necator H16 (formerly Ralstonia eutropha H16) in E. coli BL21Star™ (DE3). The SH (encoded in hoxFUYHI) was successfully matured by co-expression of a dedicated set of auxiliary genes, comprising seven hyp genes (hypC1D1E1A2B2F2X) along with hoxW, which encodes a specific endopeptidase. Deletion of genes involved in SH maturation reduced maturation efficiency substantially. Further addition of hoxN1, encoding a high-affinity nickel permease from C. necator, considerably increased maturation efficiency in E. coli. Carefully balanced growth conditions enabled hydrogenase production at high cell-densities, scoring mg·(Liter culture)−1 yields of purified functional SH. Specific activities of up to 7.2±1.15 U·mg−1 were obtained in cell-free extracts, which is in the range of the highest activities ever determined in C. necator extracts. The recombinant enzyme was isolated in equal purity and stability as previously achieved with the native form, yielding ultrapure preparations with anaerobic specific activities of up to 230 U·mg−1. Owing to the combinatorial power exhibited by the

  10. Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Iron-Based Metal Oxide Nanostructured Materials: A NEXAFS Investigation of BiFeO3, Bi2Fe4O9, α-Fe2O3, γ-Fe2O3, and Fe/Fe3O4

    SciTech Connect

    Park,T.; Sambasivan, S.; Fischer, D.; Yoon, W.; Misewich, J.; Wong, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a systematic and detailed near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experimental investigation of the electronic structure and chemistry of iron-based metal oxide nanostructured (FeMONS) materials including BiFeO3, Bi2Fe4O9, a-Fe2O3, ?-Fe2O3, and Fe/Fe3O4. Correlations of the electronic structure and structural chemistry of these intriguing nanomaterials are presented, ranging from the nano to the bulk scale. In this work, variations in the shape, position, and intensity of the O K-edge and Fe L-edge NEXAFS spectra have been analyzed in terms of electronic structure and surface chemistry of the FeMONS materials as compared with that of the bulk. We hypothesize that surface imperfection and surface strain anisotropies in nanoparticles induce distortion and site inequivalency of the oxygen Oh sites around the Fe ion located close to the surface, resulting in an increase in the degree of multiplicity as well as in nonstoichiometric effects in FeMONS materials.

  11. X-ray crystal structure of the Fe-only hydrogenase (CpI) from Clostridium pasteurianum to 1.8 angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Peters, J W; Lanzilotta, W N; Lemon, B J; Seefeldt, L C

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional structure for the monomeric iron-containing hydrogenase (CpI) from Clostridium pasteurianum was determined to 1.8 angstrom resolution by x-ray crystallography using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing. CpI, an enzyme that catalyzes the two-electron reduction of two protons to yield dihydrogen, was found to contain 20 gram atoms of iron per mole of protein, arranged into five distinct [Fe-S] clusters. The probable active-site cluster, previously termed the H-cluster, was found to be an unexpected arrangement of six iron atoms existing as a [4Fe-4S] cubane subcluster covalently bridged by a cysteinate thiol to a [2Fe] subcluster. The iron atoms of the [2Fe] subcluster both exist with an octahedral coordination geometry and are bridged to each other by three non-protein atoms, assigned as two sulfide atoms and one carbonyl or cyanide molecule. This structure provides insights into the mechanism of biological hydrogen activation and has broader implications for [Fe-S] cluster structure and function in biological systems.

  12. Secondary coordination sphere accelerates hole transfer for enhanced hydrogen photogeneration from [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic and CdSe QDs in water

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Min; Li, Xu-Bing; Jian, Jing-Xin; Wang, Xu-Zhe; Wu, Hao-Lin; Chen, Bin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Achieving highly efficient hydrogen (H2) evolution via artificial photosynthesis is a great ambition pursued by scientists in recent decades because H2 has high specific enthalpy of combustion and benign combustion product. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase ([FeFe]-H2ase) mimics have been demonstrated to be promising catalysts for H2 photoproduction. However, the efficient photocatalytic H2 generation system, consisting of PAA-g-Fe2S2, CdSe QDs and H2A, suffered from low stability, probably due to the hole accumulation induced photooxidation of CdSe QDs and the subsequent crash of [FeFe]-H2ase mimics. In this work, we take advantage of supramolecular interaction for the first time to construct the secondary coordination sphere of electron donors (HA−) to CdSe QDs. The generated secondary coordination sphere helps realize much faster hole removal with a ~30-fold increase, thus leading to higher stability and activity for H2 evolution. The unique photocatalytic H2 evolution system features a great increase of turnover number to 83600, which is the highest one obtained so far for photocatalytic H2 production by using [FeFe]-H2ase mimics as catalysts. PMID:27417065

  13. H2-Producing Bacterial Community during Rice Straw Decomposition in Paddy Field Soil: Estimation by an Analysis of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Ryuko; Asakawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The transcription patterns of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes (hydA), which encode the enzymes responsible for H2 production, were investigated during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil using molecular biological techniques. Paddy soil amended with and without rice straw was incubated under anoxic conditions. RNA was extracted from the soil, and three clone libraries of hydA were constructed using RNAs obtained from samples in the initial phase of rice straw decomposition (day 1 with rice straw), methanogenic phase of rice straw decomposition (day 14 with rice straw), and under a non-amended condition (day 14 without rice straw). hydA genes related to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Thermotogae were mainly transcribed in paddy soil samples; however, their proportions markedly differed among the libraries. Deltaproteobacteria-related hydA genes were predominantly transcribed on day 1 with rice straw, while various types of hydA genes related to several phyla were transcribed on day 14 with rice straw. Although the diversity of transcribed hydA was significantly higher in the library on day 14 with rice straw than the other two libraries, the composition of hydA transcripts in the library was similar to that in the library on day 14 without rice straw. These results indicate that the composition of active H2 producers and/or H2 metabolic patterns dynamically change during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil. PMID:27319579

  14. Computational Design of Iron Diphosphine Complexes with Pendant Amines for Hydrogenation of CO2 to Methanol: A Mimic of [NiFe] Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangyang; Jing, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xinzheng

    2016-06-20

    Inspired by the active-site structure of the [NiFe] hydrogenase, we have computationally designed the iron complex [P(tBu) 2 N(tBu) 2 )Fe(CN)2 CO] by using an experimentally ready-made diphosphine ligand with pendant amines for the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the rate-determining step in the whole catalytic reaction is the direct hydride transfer from the Fe center to the carbon atom in the formic acid with a total free energy barrier of 28.4 kcal mol(-1) in aqueous solution. Such a barrier indicates that the designed iron complex is a promising low-cost catalyst for the formation of methanol from CO2 and H2 under mild conditions. The key role of the diphosphine ligand with pendent amine groups in the reaction is the assistance of the cleavage of H2 by forming a Fe-H(δ-) ⋅⋅⋅H(δ+) -N dihydrogen bond in a fashion of frustrated Lewis pairs. PMID:27225505

  15. Nitrogen Fixation and Hydrogen Metabolism in Relation to the Dissolved Oxygen Tension in Chemostat Cultures of the Wild Type and a Hydrogenase-Negative Mutant of Azorhizobium caulinodans

    PubMed Central

    Boogerd, Fred C.; Ferdinandy-van Vlerken, Marijke M. A.; Mawadza, Crispen; Pronk, Annemieke F.; Stouthamer, Adriaan H.; van Verseveld, Henk W.

    1994-01-01

    Both the wild type and an isogenic hydrogenase-negative mutant of Azorhizobium caulinodans growing ex planta on N2 as the N source were studied in succinate-limited steady-state chemostat cultures under 0.2 to 3.0% dissolved O2 tension. Production or consumption of O2, H2, and CO2 was measured with an on-line-connected mass spectrometer. In the range of 0.2 to 3.0%, growth of both the wild type and the mutant was equally dependent on the dissolved O2 tension: the growth yield decreased, and the specific O2 consumption and CO2 production increased. A similar dependency on the dissolved O2 tension was found for the mutant with 2.5% H2 in the influent gas. The H2/N2 ratio (moles of H2 evolved per mole of N2 consumed via nitrogenase) of the mutant, growing with or without 2.5% H2, increased with increasing dissolved O2 tensions. This increase in the H2/N2 ratio was small but significant. The dependencies of the ATP/N2 ratio (moles of ATP consumed per mole of N2 fixed) and the ATP/2e- ratio [moles of ATP consumed per mole of electron pairs transferred from NAD(P)H to nitrogenase] on the dissolved O2 tension were estimated. These dependencies were interpreted in terms of the physiological concepts of respiratory protection and autoprotection. PMID:16349280

  16. Direct electrochemistry of Megasphaera elsdenii iron hydrogenase. Definition of the enzyme's catalytic operating potential and quantitation of the catalytic behaviour over a continuous potential range.

    PubMed

    Butt, J N; Filipiak, M; Hagen, W R

    1997-04-01

    The Fe-hydrogenase from Megasphaera elsdenii undergoes direct electron exchange with glassy carbon electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry defines the catalytic-performance of the enzyme over a continuous but precisely defined range of potentials. In the presence of H2 and protons the bias of the enzyme towards H2 production is readily visualised. Variation of the response with pH indicates that protein ionisations with pK of approximately 6.7 and 8.3 regulate the catalytic activity. Possible origins for these observations in the chemistry of the H2-activating site are discussed. The mid-wave potential of the catalytic response, Emid, is defined as the catalytic operating potential of the enzyme. Under an atmosphere of hydrogen Emid = -421 +/- 10 mV, pH 7 with a variation of -21 +/- 4 mV pH-1, 22 degrees C. Deviation of Emid from the thermodynamic potential of the hydrogen/proton couple reflects the enzyme's influence over the catalysed reaction. Emid is the reduction potential of the H2-activating centre (H-cluster) in the absence of kinetic bottle-necks at other steps in the reaction mechanism.

  17. H2-Producing Bacterial Community during Rice Straw Decomposition in Paddy Field Soil: Estimation by an Analysis of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Baba, Ryuko; Asakawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-09-29

    The transcription patterns of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes (hydA), which encode the enzymes responsible for H2 production, were investigated during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil using molecular biological techniques. Paddy soil amended with and without rice straw was incubated under anoxic conditions. RNA was extracted from the soil, and three clone libraries of hydA were constructed using RNAs obtained from samples in the initial phase of rice straw decomposition (day 1 with rice straw), methanogenic phase of rice straw decomposition (day 14 with rice straw), and under a non-amended condition (day 14 without rice straw). hydA genes related to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Thermotogae were mainly transcribed in paddy soil samples; however, their proportions markedly differed among the libraries. Deltaproteobacteria-related hydA genes were predominantly transcribed on day 1 with rice straw, while various types of hydA genes related to several phyla were transcribed on day 14 with rice straw. Although the diversity of transcribed hydA was significantly higher in the library on day 14 with rice straw than the other two libraries, the composition of hydA transcripts in the library was similar to that in the library on day 14 without rice straw. These results indicate that the composition of active H2 producers and/or H2 metabolic patterns dynamically change during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil.

  18. H2-Producing Bacterial Community during Rice Straw Decomposition in Paddy Field Soil: Estimation by an Analysis of [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Gene Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Baba, Ryuko; Asakawa, Susumu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-09-29

    The transcription patterns of [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes (hydA), which encode the enzymes responsible for H2 production, were investigated during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil using molecular biological techniques. Paddy soil amended with and without rice straw was incubated under anoxic conditions. RNA was extracted from the soil, and three clone libraries of hydA were constructed using RNAs obtained from samples in the initial phase of rice straw decomposition (day 1 with rice straw), methanogenic phase of rice straw decomposition (day 14 with rice straw), and under a non-amended condition (day 14 without rice straw). hydA genes related to Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Thermotogae were mainly transcribed in paddy soil samples; however, their proportions markedly differed among the libraries. Deltaproteobacteria-related hydA genes were predominantly transcribed on day 1 with rice straw, while various types of hydA genes related to several phyla were transcribed on day 14 with rice straw. Although the diversity of transcribed hydA was significantly higher in the library on day 14 with rice straw than the other two libraries, the composition of hydA transcripts in the library was similar to that in the library on day 14 without rice straw. These results indicate that the composition of active H2 producers and/or H2 metabolic patterns dynamically change during rice straw decomposition in paddy soil. PMID:27319579

  19. Secondary coordination sphere accelerates hole transfer for enhanced hydrogen photogeneration from [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic and CdSe QDs in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Min; Li, Xu-Bing; Jian, Jing-Xin; Wang, Xu-Zhe; Wu, Hao-Lin; Chen, Bin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2016-07-01

    Achieving highly efficient hydrogen (H2) evolution via artificial photosynthesis is a great ambition pursued by scientists in recent decades because H2 has high specific enthalpy of combustion and benign combustion product. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase ([FeFe]-H2ase) mimics have been demonstrated to be promising catalysts for H2 photoproduction. However, the efficient photocatalytic H2 generation system, consisting of PAA-g-Fe2S2, CdSe QDs and H2A, suffered from low stability, probably due to the hole accumulation induced photooxidation of CdSe QDs and the subsequent crash of [FeFe]-H2ase mimics. In this work, we take advantage of supramolecular interaction for the first time to construct the secondary coordination sphere of electron donors (HA‑) to CdSe QDs. The generated secondary coordination sphere helps realize much faster hole removal with a ~30-fold increase, thus leading to higher stability and activity for H2 evolution. The unique photocatalytic H2 evolution system features a great increase of turnover number to 83600, which is the highest one obtained so far for photocatalytic H2 production by using [FeFe]-H2ase mimics as catalysts.

  20. Application to Photocatalytic H2 Production of a Whole-Cell Reaction by Recombinant Escherichia coli Cells Expressing [FeFe]-Hydrogenase and Maturases Genes.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuki; Hagiwara, Hidehisa; Ida, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2016-07-01

    A photocatalytic H2 production system using an inorganic-bio hybrid photocatalyst could contribute to the efficient utilization of solar energy, but would require the development of a new approach for preparing a H2 -forming biocatalyst. In the present study, we constructed a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli expressing the genes encoding the [FeFe]-hydrogenase and relevant maturases from Clostridium acetobutylicum NBRC 13948 for use as a biocatalyst. We investigated the direct application of a whole-cell of the recombinant E. coli. The combination of TiO2 , methylviologen, and the recombinant E. coli formed H2 under light irradiation, demonstrating that whole cells of the recombinant E. coli could be employed for photocatalytic H2 production without any time-consuming and costly manipulations (for example, enzyme purification). This is the first report of the direct application of a whole-cell reaction of recombinant E. coli to photocatalytic H2 production. PMID:27194524

  1. Secondary coordination sphere accelerates hole transfer for enhanced hydrogen photogeneration from [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic and CdSe QDs in water.

    PubMed

    Wen, Min; Li, Xu-Bing; Jian, Jing-Xin; Wang, Xu-Zhe; Wu, Hao-Lin; Chen, Bin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Achieving highly efficient hydrogen (H2) evolution via artificial photosynthesis is a great ambition pursued by scientists in recent decades because H2 has high specific enthalpy of combustion and benign combustion product. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase ([FeFe]-H2ase) mimics have been demonstrated to be promising catalysts for H2 photoproduction. However, the efficient photocatalytic H2 generation system, consisting of PAA-g-Fe2S2, CdSe QDs and H2A, suffered from low stability, probably due to the hole accumulation induced photooxidation of CdSe QDs and the subsequent crash of [FeFe]-H2ase mimics. In this work, we take advantage of supramolecular interaction for the first time to construct the secondary coordination sphere of electron donors (HA(-)) to CdSe QDs. The generated secondary coordination sphere helps realize much faster hole removal with a ~30-fold increase, thus leading to higher stability and activity for H2 evolution. The unique photocatalytic H2 evolution system features a great increase of turnover number to 83600, which is the highest one obtained so far for photocatalytic H2 production by using [FeFe]-H2ase mimics as catalysts. PMID:27417065

  2. Investigating the Role of the Outer-Coordination Sphere in [Ni(PPh2NPh-R2)2]2+ Hydrogenase Mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Reback, Matthew L.; Lindstrom, Mary L.; Thogerson, Colleen E.; Helm, Monte L.; Appel, Aaron M.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-06-18

    A series of dipeptide nickel complexes with the general formula, [Ni(PPh2NNNA-amino acid/ester2)2](BF4)2, have been synthesized and characterized (P2N2= 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane, amino acid/esters = glutamic acid, alanine, lysine, and aspartic acid). Each of these complexes is an efficient electrocatalyst for H2 production. The contribution of the outer-coordination sphere, specifically the impact of sterics, the ability to protonate and the pKa of amino acid side chain on the hydrogen production activity of these complexes, was investigated. The rates of all of the catalysts ranged over an order of magnitude. The amino acid containing complexes display 2-3 times higher rates of hydrogen production than the corresponding ester complexes, suggesting the significance of protonated species (side chains/backbone of amino acids) in the outer-coordination sphere. The largest had the fastest rates suggesting that catalytic activity is not hindered by sterics. However, the shapes of catalytic waves are indicative of hindered electron transfer and may suggest a competing mechanism for catalysis than that observed for the unsubstituted parent complex. These studies demonstrate the significant contribution that the outer-coordination sphere can have in tuning the catalytic activity of small molecule hydrogenase mimics.

  3. A computational library for multiscale modeling of material failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Silani, Mohammad; Bordas, Stéphane P. A.; Kerfriden, Pierre; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-05-01

    We present an open-source software framework called PERMIX for multiscale modeling and simulation of fracture in solids. The framework is an object oriented open-source effort written primarily in Fortran 2003 standard with Fortran/C++ interfaces to a number of other libraries such as LAMMPS, ABAQUS, LS-DYNA and GMSH. Fracture on the continuum level is modeled by the extended finite element method (XFEM). Using several novel or state of the art methods, the piece software handles semi-concurrent multiscale methods as well as concurrent multiscale methods for fracture, coupling two continuum domains or atomistic domains to continuum domains, respectively. The efficiency of our open-source software is shown through several simulations including a 3D crack modeling in clay nanocomposites, a semi-concurrent FE-FE coupling, a 3D Arlequin multiscale example and an MD-XFEM coupling for dynamic crack propagation.

  4. Pd(II)-Directed Encapsulation of Hydrogenase within the Layer-by-Layer Multilayers of Carbon Nanotube Polyelectrolyte Used as a Heterogeneous Catalyst for Oxidation of Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Zorin, Nikolay A; Chen, Meng; Qian, Dong-Jin

    2015-06-16

    A metal-directed assembling approach has been developed to encapsulate hydrogenase (H2ase) within a layer-by-layer (LBL) multilayer of carbon nanotube polyelectrolyte (MWNT-PVPMe), which showed efficient biocatalytic oxidation of H2 gas. The MWNT-PVPMe was prepared via a diazonium process and addition reactions with poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) and methyl iodide (MeI). The covalently attached polymers and organic substituents in the polyelectrolyte comprised 60-70% of the total weight. The polyelectrolyte was then used as a substrate for H2ase binding to produce MWNT-PVPMe@H2ase bionanocomposites. X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed that the bionanocomposites included the elements of Br, S, C, N, O, I, Fe, and Ni, which confirmed that they were composed of MWNT-PVPMe and H2ase. Field emission transmission electron microscope images revealed that the H2ase was adsorbed on the surface of MWNT-PVPMe with the domains ranging from 20 to 40 nm. Further, with the use of the bionanocomposites as nanolinkers and Na2PdCl4 as connectors, the (Pd/MWNT-PVPMe@H2ase)n multilayers were constructed on the quartz and gold substrate surfaces by the Pd(II)-directed LBL assembling technique. Finally, the as-prepared LBL multilayers were used as heterogeneous catalysts for hydrogen oxidation with methyl viologen (MV(2+)) as an electron carrier. The dynamic processes for the reversible color change between blue-colored MV(+) and colorless MV(2+) (catalyzed by the LBL multilayers) were video recorded, which confirmed that the H2ase encapsulated within the present LBL multilayers was of much stronger stability and higher biocatalytic activity of H2 oxidation resulting in potential applications for the development of H2 biosensors and fuel cells.

  5. Temperature tolerance of hydrogenase expression in Alcaligenes eutrophus is conferred by a single amino acid exchange in the transcriptional activator HoxA.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, D; Schwartz, E; Tran-Betcke, A; Gewinner, P; Friedrich, B

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the soluble (SH) and membrane-bound (MBH) hydrogenases in the facultatively lithoautotrophic bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus is dependent on the transcriptional activator HoxA and the alternative sigma factor sigma 54. Deletion analysis revealed that a region 170 bp upstream of the transcriptional start of the SH operon is necessary for high-level promoter activity. Mobility shift assays with DNA fragments containing the SH upstream region and purified beta-galactosidase-HoxA fusion protein isolated from Escherichia coli or authentic HoxA isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography from A. eutrophus failed to detect specific binding. In contrast, A. eutrophus extracts enriched for HoxA by heparin-Sepharose chromatography and ammonium sulfate fractionation produced a weak but discrete shift in the mobility of the target DNA. This effect was not observed with comparable extracts prepared from hoxA mutants. A similar experiment using antibodies against HoxA confirmed that HoxA was responsible for the observed mobility shift. Extracts prepared from a temperature-tolerant mutant of A. eutrophus gave a stronger retardation than did those from the wild type. Unlike the wild type, the hox(Tr) mutant is able to grow with hydrogen at temperatures above 33 degrees C because of a mutation in the regulatory gene hoxA. In this paper, we show that a single amino acid substitution (Gly-468-->Val) in the C-terminal part of HoxA is responsible for temperature tolerance. The SH upstream region also contains sequence motifs resembling the E. coli integration host factor (IHF) binding site, and purified E. coli IHF protein shifted the corresponding indicator fragment. PMID:7730267

  6. Hydrogen Photoproduction by Immobilized N2-Fixing Cyanobacteria: Understanding the Role of the Uptake Hydrogenase in the Long-Term Process

    PubMed Central

    Kosourov, Sergey; Leino, Hannu; Murukesan, Gayathri; Lynch, Fiona; Sivonen, Kaarina; Tsygankov, Anatoly A.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated two approaches to enhance and extend H2 photoproduction yields in heterocystous, N2-fixing cyanobacteria entrapped in thin alginate films. In the first approach, periodic CO2 supplementation was provided to alginate-entrapped, N-deprived cells. N deprivation led to the inhibition of photosynthetic activity in vegetative cells and the attenuation of H2 production over time. Our results demonstrated that alginate-entrapped ΔhupL cells were considerably more sensitive to high light intensity, N deficiency, and imbalances in C/N ratios than wild-type cells. In the second approach, Anabaena strain PCC 7120, its ΔhupL mutant, and Calothrix strain 336/3 films were supplemented with N2 by periodic treatments of air, or air plus CO2. These treatments restored the photosynthetic activity of the cells and led to a high level of H2 production in Calothrix 336/3 and ΔhupL cells (except for the treatment air plus CO2) but not in the Anabaena PCC 7120 strain (for which H2 yields did not change after air treatments). The highest H2 yield was obtained by the air treatment of ΔhupL cells. Notably, the supplementation of CO2 under an air atmosphere led to prominent symptoms of N deficiency in the ΔhupL strain but not in the wild-type strain. We propose that uptake hydrogenase activity in heterocystous cyanobacteria not only supports nitrogenase activity by removing excess O2 from heterocysts but also indirectly protects the photosynthetic apparatus of vegetative cells from photoinhibition, especially under stressful conditions that cause an imbalance in the C/N ratio in cells. PMID:25015894

  7. Hydrogen photoproduction by immobilized n2-fixing cyanobacteria: understanding the role of the uptake hydrogenase in the long-term process.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey; Leino, Hannu; Murukesan, Gayathri; Lynch, Fiona; Sivonen, Kaarina; Tsygankov, Anatoly A; Aro, Eva-Mari; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated two approaches to enhance and extend H2 photoproduction yields in heterocystous, N2-fixing cyanobacteria entrapped in thin alginate films. In the first approach, periodic CO2 supplementation was provided to alginate-entrapped, N-deprived cells. N deprivation led to the inhibition of photosynthetic activity in vegetative cells and the attenuation of H2 production over time. Our results demonstrated that alginate-entrapped ΔhupL cells were considerably more sensitive to high light intensity, N deficiency, and imbalances in C/N ratios than wild-type cells. In the second approach, Anabaena strain PCC 7120, its ΔhupL mutant, and Calothrix strain 336/3 films were supplemented with N2 by periodic treatments of air, or air plus CO2. These treatments restored the photosynthetic activity of the cells and led to a high level of H2 production in Calothrix 336/3 and ΔhupL cells (except for the treatment air plus CO2) but not in the Anabaena PCC 7120 strain (for which H2 yields did not change after air treatments). The highest H2 yield was obtained by the air treatment of ΔhupL cells. Notably, the supplementation of CO2 under an air atmosphere led to prominent symptoms of N deficiency in the ΔhupL strain but not in the wild-type strain. We propose that uptake hydrogenase activity in heterocystous cyanobacteria not only supports nitrogenase activity by removing excess O2 from heterocysts but also indirectly protects the photosynthetic apparatus of vegetative cells from photoinhibition, especially under stressful conditions that cause an imbalance in the C/N ratio in cells.

  8. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (< 40°C), and low-salinity fluids are discharged in both intertidal and shallow submarine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and distribution of potentially hydrogen-producing bacteria in Prony hyperalkaline springs by using metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ. PMID:27625634

  9. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E.; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (< 40°C), and low-salinity fluids are discharged in both intertidal and shallow submarine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and distribution of potentially hydrogen-producing bacteria in Prony hyperalkaline springs by using metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ.

  10. How Formaldehyde Inhibits Hydrogen Evolution by [FeFe]-Hydrogenases: Determination by ¹³C ENDOR of Direct Fe-C Coordination and Order of Electron and Proton Transfers.

    PubMed

    Bachmeier, Andreas; Esselborn, Julian; Hexter, Suzannah V; Krämer, Tobias; Klein, Kathrin; Happe, Thomas; McGrady, John E; Myers, William K; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2015-04-29

    Formaldehyde (HCHO), a strong electrophile and a rapid and reversible inhibitor of hydrogen production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases, is used to identify the point in the catalytic cycle at which a highly reactive metal-hydrido species is formed. Investigations of the reaction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe]-hydrogenase with formaldehyde using pulsed-EPR techniques including electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy establish that formaldehyde binds close to the active site. Density functional theory calculations support an inhibited super-reduced state having a short Fe-(13)C bond in the 2Fe subsite. The adduct forms when HCHO is available to compete with H(+) transfer to a vacant, nucleophilic Fe site: had H(+) transfer already occurred, the reaction of HCHO with the Fe-hydrido species would lead to methanol, release of which is not detected. Instead, Fe-bound formaldehyde is a metal-hydrido mimic, a locked, inhibited form analogous to that in which two electrons and only one proton have transferred to the H-cluster. The results provide strong support for a mechanism in which the fastest pathway for H2 evolution involves two consecutive proton transfer steps to the H-cluster following transfer of a second electron to the active site. PMID:25871921

  11. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E.; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (< 40°C), and low-salinity fluids are discharged in both intertidal and shallow submarine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and distribution of potentially hydrogen-producing bacteria in Prony hyperalkaline springs by using metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ. PMID:27625634

  12. Re-engineering a NiFe hydrogenase to increase the H2 production bias while maintaining native levels of O2 tolerance† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental protocol details and Fig. S1–S7. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cc00515b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Lindsey A.; Wright, John J.; Roessler, Maxie M.; Moir, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring oxygen tolerant NiFe membrane bound hydrogenases have a conserved catalytic bias towards hydrogen oxidation which limits their technological value. We present an Escherichia coli Hyd-1 amino acid exchange that apparently causes the catalytic rate of H2 production to double but does not impact the O2 tolerance. PMID:27055899

  13. Approaches to developing biological H(2)-photoproducing organisms and processes.

    PubMed

    Ghirardi, M L; King, P W; Posewitz, M C; Maness, P Ching; Fedorov, A; Kim, K; Cohen, J; Schulten, K; Seibert, M

    2005-02-01

    The development of efficient biological systems for the direct photoproduction of H(2) gas from water faces several challenges, the more serious of which is the sensitivity of the H(2)-evolving enzymes (hydrogenases) to O(2), an obligatory by-product of photosynthesis. This high sensitivity is common to both FeFe and NiFe hydrogenases, and is caused by O(2) binding to their respective metallocatalytic sites. This overview describes approaches to (i) molecular engineering of algal FeFe-hydrogenase to prevent O(2) access to its catalytic site; (ii) transform a cyanobacterium with an O(2)-tolerant bacterial NiFe hydrogenase or (c) partially inactivate algal O(2)-evolution activity to create physiologically anaerobiosis and induce hydrogenase expression. PMID:15667268

  14. The active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. I. Light sensitivity and magnetic hyperfine interactions as observed by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Albracht, Simon P J; Roseboom, Winfried; Hatchikian, E Claude

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen-activating cluster (H cluster) in [FeFe]-hydrogenases consists of two moieties. The [2Fe]H subcluster is a (L)(CO)(CN)Fe(mu-RS2)(mu-CO)Fe(CysS)(CO)(CN) centre. The Cys-bound Fe is called Fe1, the other iron Fe2. The Cys-thiol forms a bridge to a [4Fe-4S] cluster, the [4Fe-4S]H subcluster. We report that electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the 57Fe-enriched enzyme from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in the H(ox)-CO state are consistent with a magnetic hyperfine interaction of the unpaired spin with all six Fe atoms of the H cluster. In contrast to the inactive aerobic enzyme, the active enzyme is easily destroyed by light. The [2Fe]H subcluster in some enzyme molecules loses CO by photolysis, whereupon other molecules firmly bind the released CO to form the H(ox)-CO state giving rise to the so-called axial 2.06 EPR signal. Though not destroyed by light, the H(ox)-CO state is affected by it. As demonstrated in the accompanying paper [49] two of the intrinsic COs, both bound to Fe2, can be exchanged by extrinsic 13CO during illumination at 2 degrees C. We found that only one of the three 13COs, the one at the extrinsic position, gives an EPR-detectable isotropic superhyperfine interaction of 0.6 mT. At 30 K both the inhibiting extrinsic CO bound to Fe2 and one more CO can be photolysed. EPR spectra of the photolysed products are consistent with a 3d7 system of Fe with the formal oxidation state +1. The damaged enzyme shows a light-sensitive g = 5 signal which is ascribed to an S = 3/2 form of the [2Fe](H) subcluster. The light sensitivity of the enzyme explains the occurrence of the g = 5 signal and the axial 2.06 signal in published EPR spectra of nearly all preparations studied thus far.

  15. The active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. II. Redox properties, light sensitivity and CO-ligand exchange as observed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roseboom, Winfried; De Lacey, Antonio L; Fernandez, Victor M; Hatchikian, E Claude; Albracht, Simon P J

    2006-01-01

    In [FeFe]-hydrogenases, the H cluster (hydrogen-activating cluster) contains a di-iron centre ([2Fe]H subcluster, a (L)(CO)(CN)Fe(mu-RS2)(mu-CO)Fe(CysS)(CO)(CN) group) covalently attached to a cubane iron-sulphur cluster ([4Fe-4S]H subcluster). The Cys-thiol functions as the link between one iron (called Fe1) of the [2Fe]H subcluster and one iron of the cubane subcluster. The other iron in the [2Fe]H subcluster is called Fe2. The light sensitivity of the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans enzyme in a variety of states has been studied with infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The aerobic inactive enzyme (H(inact) state) and the CO-inhibited active form (H(ox)-CO state) were stable in light. Illumination of the H(ox) state led to a kind of cannibalization; in some enzyme molecules the H cluster was destroyed and the released CO was captured by the H clusters in other molecules to form the light-stable H(ox)-CO state. Illumination of active enzyme under 13CO resulted in the complete exchange of the two intrinsic COs bound to Fe2. At cryogenic temperatures, light induced the photodissociation of the extrinsic CO and the bridging CO of the enzyme in the H(ox)-CO state. Electrochemical redox titrations showed that the enzyme in the H(inact) state converts to the transition state (H(trans)) in a reversible one-electron redox step (E (m, pH 7) = -75 mV). IR spectra demonstrate that the added redox equivalent not only affects the [4Fe-4S]H subcluster, but also the di-iron centre. Enzyme in the H(trans) state reacts with extrinsic CO, which binds to Fe2. The H(trans) state converts irreversibly into the H(ox) state in a redox-dependent reaction most likely involving two electrons (E (m, pH 7) = -261 mV). These electrons do not end up on any of the six Fe atoms of the H cluster; the possible destiny of the two redox equivalents is discussed. An additional reversible one-electron redox reaction leads to the H(red) state (E (m, pH 7) = -354 mV), where both Fe atoms of the [2Fe]H subcluster

  16. Relationship of proton motive force and the F(0)F (1)-ATPase with bio-hydrogen production activity of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: effects of diphenylene iodonium, hydrogenase inhibitor, and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, Lilit; Gabrielyan, Lilit; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-08-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides MDC 6521 was able to produce bio-hydrogen (H(2)) in anaerobic conditions under illumination. In this study the effects of the hydrogenase inhibitor-diphenylene iodonium (Ph(2)I) and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) on growth characteristics and H(2) production by R. sphaeroides were investigated. The results point out the concentration dependent DMSO effect: in the presence of 10 mM DMSO H(2) yield was ~6 fold lower than that of the control. The bacterium was unable to produce H(2) in the presence of Ph(2)I. In order to examine the mediatory role of proton motive force (∆p) or the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides, the effects of Ph(2)I and DMSO on ∆p and its components (membrane potential (∆ψ) and transmembrane pH gradient), and ATPase activity were determined. In these conditions ∆ψ was of -98 mV and the reversed ∆pH was +30 mV, resulting in ∆p of -68 mV. Ph(2)I decreased ∆ψ in concentrations of 20 μM and higher; lower concentrations of Ph(2)I as DMSO had no valuable effect on ∆ψ. The R. sphaeroides membrane vesicles demonstrated significant ATPase activity sensitive to N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The 10-20 μM Ph(2)I did not affect the ATPase activity, whereas 40 μM Ph(2)I caused a marked inhibition (~2 fold) in ATPase activity. The obtained results provide novel evidence on the involvement of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides. Moreover, these data indicate the role of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in ∆p generation. In addition, DMSO might increase an interaction of nitrogenase with CO(2), decreasing nitrogenase activity and affecting H(2) production.

  17. Carbon monoxide as an intrinsic ligand to iron in the active site of the iron-sulfur-cluster-free hydrogenase H2-forming methylenetetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase as revealed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Erica J; Shima, Seigo; Boecher, Reinhard; Thauer, Rudolf K; Grevels, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Bill, Eckhard; Roseboom, Winfried; Albracht, Simon P J

    2004-11-01

    The iron-sulfur-cluster-free hydrogenase Hmd (H(2)-forming methylenetetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase) from methanogenic archaea has recently been found to contain one iron associated tightly with an extractable cofactor of yet unknown structure. We report here that Hmd contains intrinsic CO bound to the Fe. Chemical analysis of Hmd revealed the presence of 2.4 +/- 0.2 mol of CO/mol of iron. Fourier transform infrared spectra of the native enzyme showed two bands of almost equal intensity at 2011 and 1944 cm(-)(1), interpreted as the stretching frequencies of two CO molecules bound to the same iron in an angle of 90 degrees . We also report on the effect of extrinsic (12)CO, (13)CO, (12)CN(-), and (13)CN(-) on the IR spectrum of Hmd.

  18. Precursors to [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Models: Syntheses of Fe2(SR)2(CO)6 from CO-Free Iron Sources

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinzhu; Boyke, Christine; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Volkers, Phillip I.; Whaley, C. Matthew; Wilson, Scott R.; Yao, Haijun

    2008-01-01

    This report describes routes to iron dithiolato carbonyls that do not require preformed iron carbonyls. The reaction of FeCl2, Zn, and Q2S2CnH2n (Q+ = Na+, Et3NH+) under an atmosphere of CO affords Fe2(S2CnH2n)(CO)6 (n = 2, 3) in yields >70%. The method was employed to prepare Fe2(S2C2H4)(13CO)6. Treatment of these carbonylated mixtures with tertiary phosphines gave the ferrous species Fe3(S2C3H6)3(CO)4(PR3)2, for R = Et, Bu, and Ph. Like the related complex Fe3(SPh)6(CO)6, these compounds consist of a linear arrangement of three conjoined face-shared octahedral centers. Omitting the phosphine but with an excess of dithiolate, we obtained the related mixed-valence triiron species [Fe3(S2CnH2n)4(CO)4]−. The highly reducing all-ferrous species [Fe3(S2CnH2n)4(CO)4]2− is implicated as an intermediate in this transformation. Reactive forms of iron, prepared by the method of Rieke, also combined with dithiols under a CO atmosphere to give Fe2(S2CnH2n)(CO)6 in modest yields under mild conditions. Studies on the order of addition indicate that ferrous thiolates are formed prior to the onset of carbonylation. Crystallographic characterization demonstrated that the complexes Fe3(S2C3H6)3(CO)4(PEt3)2 and PBnPh3[Fe3(S2C3H6)4(CO)4] feature high spin ferrous and low spin ferric as the central metal, respectively. PMID:18610969

  19. Coordination Chemistry of [HFe(CN)2(CO)3− and Its Derivatives: Toward a Model for the Iron Subsite of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, C. Matthew; Wilson, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    The photoreaction of Fe(CO)5 and cyanide salts in MeCN solution affords the dianion [Fe(CN)2(CO)3]2−, conveniently isolated as [K(18-crown-6)]2[Fe(CN)2(CO)3]. Solutions of [Fe(CN)2(CO)3]2− oxidize irreversibly at −600 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) to give primarily [Fe(CN)3(CO)3]−. Protonation of the dianion affords the hydride [K(18-crown-6)][HFe(CN)2(CO)3] with a pKa ≈ 17 (MeCN). The ferrous hydride exhibits enhanced electrophilicity vs. its dianionic precursor, which resists substitution. Treatment of [K(18-crown-6)][Fe(CN)2(CO)3] with tertiary phosphines and phosphites gives isomeric mixtures of [HFe(CN)2(CO)2L]− (L = P(OPh)3 and PPh3). Carbonyl substitution on [1H(CO)2]− by P(OPh)3 is first-order in both the phosphite and iron (k = 0.18 M−1 s−1 at 22 °C) with ΔH‡ = 51.6 kJ mol−1 and ΔS‡ = −83.0 J K−1 mol−1. These ligands are displaced under an atmosphere of CO. With cis-Ph2PCH=CHPPh2 (dppv), we obtained the monocarbonyl, [HFe(CN)2(CO)(dppv)]−, a highly basic hydride (pKa > 23.3) that rearranges in solution to a single isomer. Treatment of [K(18-crown-6)][HFe(CN)2(CO)3] with Et4NCN resulted in rapid proton transfer to give [Fe(CN)2(CO)3]2− and HCN. The tricyano hydride [HFe(CN)3(CO)2]2− is prepared by the reaction of [HFe(CN)2(CO)2(PPh3)]− and [K(18-crown-6)]CN. Similar to the phosphine and phosphite derivatives, [HFe(CN)3(CO)2]2− exists as a mixture of all three possible isomers. Protonation of the hydrides [HFe(CN)2(CO)(dppv)]− and [HFe(CN)3(CO)2]− in acetonitrile solutions releases H2 and gives the corresponding acetonitrile complexes [K(18-crown-6)][Fe(CN)3(NCMe)(CO)2] and Fe(CN)2(NCMe)(CO)(dppv). Alkylation of [K(18-crown-6)]2[Fe(CN)2(CO)3] with MeOTf gives the thermally-unstable [MeFe(CN)2(CO)3]−, which was characterized spectroscopically at −40 °C. Reaction of dppv with [MeFe(CN)2(CO)3]− gives the acetyl complex, [Fe(CN)2(COMe)(CO)(dppv)]−. Whereas [Fe(CN)2(CO)3]2− undergoes protonation and methylation at Fe, acid chlorides give the iron(0) N-acylisocyanides [Fe(CN)(CO)3(CNCOR)]− (R = Ph, CH3). The solid state structures of [K(18-crown-6)][HFe(CN)2(CO)(dppv)], Fe(CN)2(NCMe)(CO)(dppv), and [K(18-crown-6)]2[HFe(CN)3(CO)2] were confirmed crystallographically. In all three cases, the cyanide ligands are cis to the hydride or acetonitrile ligands. PMID:19374433

  20. Catalytic electron transport in Chromatium vinosum [NiFe]-hydrogenase: application of voltammetry in detecting redox-active centers and establishing that hydrogen oxidation is very fast even at potentials close to the reversible H+/H2 value.

    PubMed

    Pershad, H R; Duff, J L; Heering, H A; Duin, E C; Albracht, S P; Armstrong, F A

    1999-07-13

    The nickel-iron hydrogenase from Chromatium vinosum adsorbs at a pyrolytic graphite edge-plane (PGE) electrode and catalyzes rapid interconversion of H(+)((aq)) and H(2) at potentials expected for the half-cell reaction 2H(+) right arrow over left arrow H(2), i.e., without the need for overpotentials. The voltammetry mirrors characteristics determined by conventional methods, while affording the capabilities for exquisite control and measurement of potential-dependent activities and substrate-product mass transport. Oxidation of H(2) is extremely rapid; at 10% partial pressure H(2), mass transport control persists even at the highest electrode rotation rates. The turnover number for H(2) oxidation lies in the range of 1500-9000 s(-)(1) at 30 degrees C (pH 5-8), which is significantly higher than that observed using methylene blue as the electron acceptor. By contrast, proton reduction is slower and controlled by processes occurring in the enzyme. Carbon monoxide, which binds reversibly to the NiFe site in the active form, inhibits electrocatalysis and allows improved definition of signals that can be attributed to the reversible (non-turnover) oxidation and reduction of redox centers. One signal, at -30 mV vs SHE (pH 7.0, 30 degrees C), is assigned to the [3Fe-4S](+/0) cluster on the basis of potentiometric measurements. The second, at -301 mV and having a 1. 5-2.5-fold greater amplitude, is tentatively assigned to the two [4Fe-4S](2+/+) clusters with similar reduction potentials. No other redox couples are observed, suggesting that these two sets of centers are the only ones in CO-inhibited hydrogenase capable of undergoing simple rapid cycling of their redox states. With the buried NiFe active site very unlikely to undergo direct electron exchange with the electrode, at least one and more likely each of the three iron-sulfur clusters must serve as relay sites. The fact that H(2) oxidation is rapid even at potentials nearly 300 mV more negative than the reduction

  1. Effect of a C298D Mutation in CaHydA [FeFe]-Hydrogenase: Insights into the Protein-Metal Cluster Interaction by EPR and FTIR Spectroscopic Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Morra, Simone; Maurelli, Sara; Chiesa, Mario; Mulder, David W.; Ratzloff, Michael W.; Giamello, Elio; King, Paul W.; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Valettia, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A conserved cysteine located in the signature motif of the catalytic center (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases functions in proton transfer. This residue corresponds to C298 in Clostridium acetobutylicum CaHydA. Despite the chemical and structural difference, the mutant C298D retains fast catalytic activity, while replacement with any other amino acid caused significant activity loss. Given the proximity of C298 to the H-cluster, the effect of the C298D mutation on the catalytic center was studied by continuous wave (CW) and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies. Comparison of the C298D mutant with the wild type CaHydA by CW and pulse EPR showed that the electronic structure of the center is not altered. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that absorption peak values observed in the mutant are virtually identical to those observed in the wild type, indicating that the H-cluster is not generally affected by the mutation. Significant differences were observed only in the inhibited state Hox-CO: the vibrational modes assigned to the COexo and Fed-CO in this state are shifted to lower values in C298D, suggesting different interaction of these ligands with the protein moiety when C298 is changed to D298. More relevant to the catalytic cycle, the redox equilibrium between the Hox and Hred states is modified by the mutation, causing a prevalence of the oxidized state. This work highlights how the interactions between the protein environment and the H-cluster, a dynamic closely interconnected system, can be engineered and studied in the perspective of designing bio-inspired catalysts and mimics.

  2. Modelling the Thermal History of Asteroid 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, James M.; Kiefer, W. S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The asteroid 4 Vesta is widely thought to be the source of the HED (Howardite, Eucrite and Diogenite) meteorites, with this link supported by spectroscopic and dynamical studies. The availability of the HED meteorites for study and the new data being gained from the Dawn mission provides an excellent opportunity to investigate Vesta s history. In this study, modelling of Vesta has been undertaken to investigate its evolution from an unconsolidated chondritic body to a differentiated body with an iron core. In contrast to previous modelling, both heat and mass transfer are considered as coupled processes. This work draws on models of melt segregation in terrestrial environments to inform the evolution of Vesta into the differentiated body observed today. In order for a core to form in this body, a separation of the metallic iron from the silicates must take place. Temperatures in excess of the solidus temperatures for the Fe-FeS system and the silicates are therefore required. Thermal modelling has shown accretion before 2Myr leads to temperatures in excess of the silicate solidus.

  3. Protein environmental effects on iron-sulfur clusters: A set of rules for constructing computational models for inner and outer coordination spheres.

    PubMed

    Harris, Travis V; Szilagyi, Robert K

    2016-07-01

    The structural properties and reactivity of iron-sulfur proteins are greatly affected by interactions between the prosthetic groups and the surrounding amino acid residues. Thus, quantum chemical investigations of the structure and properties of protein-bound iron-sulfur clusters can be severely limited by truncation of computational models. The aim of this study was to identify, a priori, significant interactions that must be included in a quantum chemical model. Using the [2Fe-2S] accessory cluster of the FeFe-hydrogenase as a demonstrative example with rich electronic structural features, the electrostatic and covalent effects of the surrounding side chains, charged groups, and backbone moieties were systematically mapped through density functional theoretical calculations. Electron affinities, spin density differences, and delocalization indexes from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules were used to evaluate the importance of each interaction. Case studies for hydrogen bonding and charged side-chain interactions were used to develop selection rules regarding the significance of a given protein environmental effect. A set of general rules is proposed for constructing quantum chemical models for iron-sulfur active sites that capture all significant interactions from the protein environment. This methodology was applied to our previously used models in galactose oxidase and the 6Fe-cluster of FeFe-hydrogenase. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117497

  4. Protein environmental effects on iron-sulfur clusters: A set of rules for constructing computational models for inner and outer coordination spheres.

    PubMed

    Harris, Travis V; Szilagyi, Robert K

    2016-07-01

    The structural properties and reactivity of iron-sulfur proteins are greatly affected by interactions between the prosthetic groups and the surrounding amino acid residues. Thus, quantum chemical investigations of the structure and properties of protein-bound iron-sulfur clusters can be severely limited by truncation of computational models. The aim of this study was to identify, a priori, significant interactions that must be included in a quantum chemical model. Using the [2Fe-2S] accessory cluster of the FeFe-hydrogenase as a demonstrative example with rich electronic structural features, the electrostatic and covalent effects of the surrounding side chains, charged groups, and backbone moieties were systematically mapped through density functional theoretical calculations. Electron affinities, spin density differences, and delocalization indexes from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules were used to evaluate the importance of each interaction. Case studies for hydrogen bonding and charged side-chain interactions were used to develop selection rules regarding the significance of a given protein environmental effect. A set of general rules is proposed for constructing quantum chemical models for iron-sulfur active sites that capture all significant interactions from the protein environment. This methodology was applied to our previously used models in galactose oxidase and the 6Fe-cluster of FeFe-hydrogenase. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nitrosyl Derivatives of Diiron(I) Dithiolates Mimic the Structure and Lewis Acidity of the FeFe-Hydrogenase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Matthew T.; Bruschi, Maurizio; Wilson, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    This study probes the impact of electronic asymmetry of diiron(I) dithiolato carbonyls. Treatment of Fe2(S2CnH2n)(CO)6-x(PMe3)x compounds (n = 2, 3) with NOBF4 gave the derivatives [Fe2(S2CnH2n)(CO)5-x(PMe3)x(NO)]BF4 (x = 1, 2, 3) which are electronically unsymmetrical due to the presence of a single NO+ ligand. Whereas the mono phosphine derivative is largely undistorted, the bis PMe3 derivatives are distorted such that the CO ligand on the Fe(CO)(PMe3)(NO)+ subunit is semibridging. Two isomers of [Fe2(S2C3H6)(CO)3(PMe3)2(NO)]BF4 were characterized spectroscopically and crystallographically. Each isomer features electron-rich [Fe(CO)2PMe3] and electrophilic [Fe(CO)(PMe3)(NO)]+ subunits. These species are in equilibrium with an unobserved isomer that reversibly binds CO (ΔH = −35 kJ/mol, ΔS = −139 J/mol•K) to give the symmetrical adduct [Fe2(S2C3H6)(μ-NO)(CO)4(PMe3)2]BF4. In contrast to Fe2(S2C3H6)(CO)4(PMe3)2, the bis(PMe3) nitrosyls readily undergo CO-substitution to give the (PMe3)3 derivatives. The nitrosyl complexes reduce at potentials that are ~1 V milder than their carbonyl counterparts. DFT calculations, specifically NBO values, reinforce the electronic resemblance of the nitrosyl complexes with the corresponding mixed-valence diiron complexes. Unlike other diiron dithiolato carbonyls, these species undergo reversible reductions at mild conditions. The results show that the novel structural and chemical features associated with mixed valence diiron dithiolates – the so-called Hox models - can be replicated in the absence of mixed-valency by introducing electronic asymmetry. PMID:18700771

  6. Using Stable Isotopes to Trace Microbial Hydrogen Production Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Hill, E.; Bartholomew, R.; Yang, H.; Shi, L.; Ostrom, N. E.; Gandhi, H.; Hegg, E.; Kreuzer, H.

    2010-12-01

    Biological H2 production by hydrogenase enzymes (H2ases) plays an important role in anaerobic microbial metabolism and community structure. Despite considerable progress in elucidating H2 metabolism, the regulation of and flux through key H2 production pathways remain largely undefined. Our goal is to improve understanding of biological H2 production by using H isotope ratios to dissect proton fluxes through different H2ase enzymes and from different substrates. We hypothesized that the isotope ratio of H2 produced by various hydrogenases (H2ase) would differ, and that the H isotope ratios would allow us to define the contribution of different enzymes when more than one is present in vivo. We chose Shewanella oneidensis (S.o.) MR-1, a facultative anaerobe capable of transferring electrons to a variety of terminal acceptors, including protons, as a model system for in vivo studies. S. o. encodes one [FeFe]- and one [NiFe]-H2ase. We purified three [FeFe]-H2ases (S.o., Clostridium pasteurianum, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and two [NiFe]-H2ases (S. o. and Desulfovibrio fructosovorans) to test the isotope fractionation associated with activity by each enzyme in vitro. For in vivo analysis we used wild-type S.o. as well as electron transfer-deficient and H2ase-deficient strains. We employed batch cultures using lactate as an electron donor and O2 as an initial electron acceptor (with H2 production after O2 consumption). The five H2ases we tested all had a unique isotope fractionation. Measurements of H2 produced in vivo showed distinct periods of H2 production having isotope signatures consistent with in vitro results. Isotope data as well as studies of H2 production by mutants in the genes encoding either the [NiFe]-H2ase or the [FeFe]-H2ase, respectively, show that the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]- H2ases became active at different times. The [NiFe]-H2ase both produces and consumes H2 before the [FeFe]-H2ase becomes active. RNA analysis is consistent with up regulation of

  7. Mechanistic modeling of sulfur-deprived photosynthesis and hydrogen production in suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Williams, C R; Bees, M A

    2014-02-01

    The ability of unicellular green algal species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce hydrogen gas via iron-hydrogenase is well known. However, the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase is closely linked to the photosynthetic chain in such a way that hydrogen and oxygen production need to be separated temporally for sustained photo-production. Under illumination, sulfur-deprivation has been shown to accommodate the production of hydrogen gas by partially-deactivating O2 evolution activity, leading to anaerobiosis in a sealed culture. As these facets are coupled, and the system complex, mathematical approaches potentially are of significant value since they may reveal improved or even optimal schemes for maximizing hydrogen production. Here, a mechanistic model of the system is constructed from consideration of the essential pathways and processes. The role of sulfur in photosynthesis (via PSII) and the storage and catabolism of endogenous substrate, and thus growth and decay of culture density, are explicitly modeled in order to describe and explore the complex interactions that lead to H2 production during sulfur-deprivation. As far as possible, functional forms and parameter values are determined or estimated from experimental data. The model is compared with published experimental studies and, encouragingly, qualitative agreement for trends in hydrogen yield and initiation time are found. It is then employed to probe optimal external sulfur and illumination conditions for hydrogen production, which are found to differ depending on whether a maximum yield of gas or initial production rate is required. The model constitutes a powerful theoretical tool for investigating novel sulfur cycling regimes that may ultimately be used to improve the commercial viability of hydrogen gas production from microorganisms.

  8. Mechanistic modeling of sulfur-deprived photosynthesis and hydrogen production in suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Williams, C R; Bees, M A

    2014-02-01

    The ability of unicellular green algal species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce hydrogen gas via iron-hydrogenase is well known. However, the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase is closely linked to the photosynthetic chain in such a way that hydrogen and oxygen production need to be separated temporally for sustained photo-production. Under illumination, sulfur-deprivation has been shown to accommodate the production of hydrogen gas by partially-deactivating O2 evolution activity, leading to anaerobiosis in a sealed culture. As these facets are coupled, and the system complex, mathematical approaches potentially are of significant value since they may reveal improved or even optimal schemes for maximizing hydrogen production. Here, a mechanistic model of the system is constructed from consideration of the essential pathways and processes. The role of sulfur in photosynthesis (via PSII) and the storage and catabolism of endogenous substrate, and thus growth and decay of culture density, are explicitly modeled in order to describe and explore the complex interactions that lead to H2 production during sulfur-deprivation. As far as possible, functional forms and parameter values are determined or estimated from experimental data. The model is compared with published experimental studies and, encouragingly, qualitative agreement for trends in hydrogen yield and initiation time are found. It is then employed to probe optimal external sulfur and illumination conditions for hydrogen production, which are found to differ depending on whether a maximum yield of gas or initial production rate is required. The model constitutes a powerful theoretical tool for investigating novel sulfur cycling regimes that may ultimately be used to improve the commercial viability of hydrogen gas production from microorganisms. PMID:24026984

  9. Mechanistic modeling of sulfur-deprived photosynthesis and hydrogen production in suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C R; Bees, MA

    2014-01-01

    The ability of unicellular green algal species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce hydrogen gas via iron-hydrogenase is well known. However, the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase is closely linked to the photosynthetic chain in such a way that hydrogen and oxygen production need to be separated temporally for sustained photo-production. Under illumination, sulfur-deprivation has been shown to accommodate the production of hydrogen gas by partially-deactivating O2 evolution activity, leading to anaerobiosis in a sealed culture. As these facets are coupled, and the system complex, mathematical approaches potentially are of significant value since they may reveal improved or even optimal schemes for maximizing hydrogen production. Here, a mechanistic model of the system is constructed from consideration of the essential pathways and processes. The role of sulfur in photosynthesis (via PSII) and the storage and catabolism of endogenous substrate, and thus growth and decay of culture density, are explicitly modeled in order to describe and explore the complex interactions that lead to H2 production during sulfur-deprivation. As far as possible, functional forms and parameter values are determined or estimated from experimental data. The model is compared with published experimental studies and, encouragingly, qualitative agreement for trends in hydrogen yield and initiation time are found. It is then employed to probe optimal external sulfur and illumination conditions for hydrogen production, which are found to differ depending on whether a maximum yield of gas or initial production rate is required. The model constitutes a powerful theoretical tool for investigating novel sulfur cycling regimes that may ultimately be used to improve the commercial viability of hydrogen gas production from microorganisms. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 320–335. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24026984

  10. Photoactive Metal-Organic Framework and Its Film for Light-Driven Hydrogen Production and Carbon Dioxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengyan; Guo, Xiangyang; Cheng, Linjuan; He, Cheng; Wang, Jian; Duan, Chunying

    2016-08-15

    The design of a new photocatalytic system and integrating the essential components in a structurally controlled manner to create artificially photosynthetic systems is high desirable. By incorporating a photoactive triphenylamine moiety to assemble a Gd-based metal-organic framework as a heterogeneous photosensitizer, new artificial systems were constructed for the proton and carbon dioxide reduction under irradiation. The assembled MOFs exhibited a one-dimensional metal-oxygen pillar that was connected together by the depronated TCA(3-) ligands to form a three-dimensional noninterpenetrating porous framework. The combining of proton reduction and/or the carbon dioxide reduction catalysts, i.e., the Fe-Fe hydrogenase active site models and the Ni(Cyclam) complexes, initiated a photoinduced single electron transfer from its excited state to the substrate. The system exhibited an initial TOF of 320 h(-1) of hydrogen per catalyst and an overall quantum yield of about 0.21% and is able to reduce carbon dioxide under irradiation. The deposit of the photoactive Gd-TCA into the film of an α-Al2O3 plate provided a platform for the practical applications through prolonging the lifetime of the artifical system and allowed the easily operated devices being recyclable as a promising photocatalytic system. PMID:27479135

  11. Contributing factors in the improvement of cellulosic H2 production in Clostridium thermocellum/Thermoanaerobacterium co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Zhao, Qi; Li, Ling; Niu, Kangle; Li, Yi; Wang, Fangzhong; Jiang, Baojie; Liu, Kuimei; Jiang, Yi; Fang, Xu

    2016-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biohydrogen is a promising renewable energy source that could be a potential alternative to the unsustainable fossil fuel-based energy. Biohydrogen production could be performed by Clostridium thermocellum that is the fastest known cellulose-degrading bacterium. Previous investigations have shown that the co-culture of C. thermocellum JN4 and a non-cellulolytic bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum GD17 produces more hydrogen than the C. thermocellum JN4 mono-culture, but the mechanism of this improvement is unknown. In this work, we carried out genomic and evolutionary analysis of hydrogenase-coding genes in C. thermocellum and T. thermosaccharolyticum, identifying one Ech-type [NiFe] hydrogenase complex in each species, and, respectively, five and four monomeric or multimeric [FeFe] hydrogenases in the two species. Further transcriptional analysis showed hydrogenase-coding genes in C. thermocellum are regulated by carbon sources, while hydrogenase-coding genes in T. thermosaccharolyticum are not. However, comparison between transcriptional abundance of hydrogenase-coding genes in mono- and co-cultures showed the co-culturing condition leads to transcriptional changes of hydrogenase-coding genes in T. thermosaccharolyticum but not C. thermocellum. Further metabolic analysis showed T. thermosaccharolyticum produces H2 at a rate 4-12-fold higher than C. thermocellum. These findings lead to the suggestion that the improvement of H2 production in the co-culture over mono-culture should be attributed to changes in T. thermosaccharolyticum but not C. thermocellum. Further suggestions can be made that C. thermocellum and T. thermosaccharolyticum perform highly specialized tasks in the co-culture, and optimization of the co-culture for more lignocellulosic biohydrogen production should be focused on the improvement of the non-cellulolytic bacterium.

  12. Contributing factors in the improvement of cellulosic H2 production in Clostridium thermocellum/Thermoanaerobacterium co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyu; Zhao, Qi; Li, Ling; Niu, Kangle; Li, Yi; Wang, Fangzhong; Jiang, Baojie; Liu, Kuimei; Jiang, Yi; Fang, Xu

    2016-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biohydrogen is a promising renewable energy source that could be a potential alternative to the unsustainable fossil fuel-based energy. Biohydrogen production could be performed by Clostridium thermocellum that is the fastest known cellulose-degrading bacterium. Previous investigations have shown that the co-culture of C. thermocellum JN4 and a non-cellulolytic bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum GD17 produces more hydrogen than the C. thermocellum JN4 mono-culture, but the mechanism of this improvement is unknown. In this work, we carried out genomic and evolutionary analysis of hydrogenase-coding genes in C. thermocellum and T. thermosaccharolyticum, identifying one Ech-type [NiFe] hydrogenase complex in each species, and, respectively, five and four monomeric or multimeric [FeFe] hydrogenases in the two species. Further transcriptional analysis showed hydrogenase-coding genes in C. thermocellum are regulated by carbon sources, while hydrogenase-coding genes in T. thermosaccharolyticum are not. However, comparison between transcriptional abundance of hydrogenase-coding genes in mono- and co-cultures showed the co-culturing condition leads to transcriptional changes of hydrogenase-coding genes in T. thermosaccharolyticum but not C. thermocellum. Further metabolic analysis showed T. thermosaccharolyticum produces H2 at a rate 4-12-fold higher than C. thermocellum. These findings lead to the suggestion that the improvement of H2 production in the co-culture over mono-culture should be attributed to changes in T. thermosaccharolyticum but not C. thermocellum. Further suggestions can be made that C. thermocellum and T. thermosaccharolyticum perform highly specialized tasks in the co-culture, and optimization of the co-culture for more lignocellulosic biohydrogen production should be focused on the improvement of the non-cellulolytic bacterium. PMID:27538932

  13. Integrated analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data of Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Zero-Inflated Poisson regression models to predict abundance of undetected proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-04

    Abstract Advances in DNA microarray and proteomics technologies have enabled high-throughput measurement of mRNA expression and protein abundance. Parallel profiling of mRNA and protein on a global scale and integrative analysis of these two data types could provide additional insight into the metabolic mechanisms underlying complex biological systems. However, because protein abundance and mRNA expression are affected by many cellular and physical processes, there have been conflicting results on the correlation of these two measurements. In addition, as current proteomic methods can detect only a small fraction of proteins present in cells, no correlation study of these two data types has been done thus far at the whole-genome level. In this study, we describe a novel data-driven statistical model to integrate whole-genome microarray and proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions. Based on the Poisson distribution pattern of proteomic data and the fact that a large number of proteins were undetected (excess zeros), Zero-inflated Poisson models were used to define the correlation pattern of mRNA and protein abundance. The models assumed that there is a probability mass at zero representing some of the undetected proteins because of technical limitations. The models thus use abundance measurements of transcripts and proteins experimentally detected as input to generate predictions of protein abundances as output for all genes in the genome. We demonstrated the statistical models by comparatively analyzing D. vulgaris grown on lactate-based versus formate-based media. The increased expressions of Ech hydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh)-periplasmic Fe-only hydrogenase (Hyd) pathway for ATP synthesis were predicted for D. vulgaris grown on formate.

  14. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  15. Cluster molecular orbital description of the electronic structures of mixed-valence iron oxides and silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1986-01-01

    A molecular orbital description, based on spin-unrestricted X??-scattered wave calculations, is given for the electronic structures of mixed valence iron oxides and silicates. The cluster calculations show that electron hopping and optical intervalence charge-transger result from weak FeFe bonding across shared edges of FeO6 coordination polyhedra. In agreement with Zener's double exchange model, FeFe bonding is found to stabilize ferromagnetic coupling between Fe2+ and Fe3+ cations. ?? 1986.

  16. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loth, E.; Tryggvason, G.; Tsuji, Y.; Elghobashi, S. E.; Crowe, Clayton T.; Berlemont, A.; Reeks, M.; Simonin, O.; Frank, Th; Onishi, Yasuo; Van Wachem, B.

    2005-09-01

    Slurry flows occur in many circumstances, including chemical manufacturing processes, pipeline transfer of coal, sand, and minerals; mud flows; and disposal of dredged materials. In this section we discuss slurry flow applications related to radioactive waste management. The Hanford tank waste solids and interstitial liquids will be mixed to form a slurry so it can be pumped out for retrieval and treatment. The waste is very complex chemically and physically. The ARIEL code is used to model the chemical interactions and fluid dynamics of the waste.

  17. Hydrogen Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Meshulam-Simon, Galit; Behrens, Sebastian; Choo, Alexander D.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative sediment microorganism which uses diverse compounds, such as oxygen and fumarate, as well as insoluble Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as electron acceptors. The electron donor spectrum is more limited and includes metabolic end products of primary fermenting bacteria, such as lactate, formate, and hydrogen. While the utilization of hydrogen as an electron donor has been described previously, we report here the formation of hydrogen from pyruvate under anaerobic, stationary-phase conditions in the absence of an external electron acceptor. Genes for the two S. oneidensis MR-1 hydrogenases, hydA, encoding a periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, and hyaB, encoding a periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase, were found to be expressed only under anaerobic conditions during early exponential growth and into stationary-phase growth. Analyses of ΔhydA, ΔhyaB, and ΔhydA ΔhyaB in-frame-deletion mutants indicated that HydA functions primarily as a hydrogen-forming hydrogenase while HyaB has a bifunctional role and represents the dominant hydrogenase activity under the experimental conditions tested. Based on results from physiological and genetic experiments, we propose that hydrogen is formed from pyruvate by multiple parallel pathways, one pathway involving formate as an intermediate, pyruvate-formate lyase, and formate-hydrogen lyase, comprised of HydA hydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, and a formate-independent pathway involving pyruvate dehydrogenase. A reverse electron transport chain is potentially involved in a formate-hydrogen lyase-independent pathway. While pyruvate does not support a fermentative mode of growth in this microorganism, pyruvate, in the absence of an electron acceptor, increased cell viability in anaerobic, stationary-phase cultures, suggesting a role in the survival of S. oneidensis MR-1 under stationary-phase conditions. PMID:17189435

  18. First-principles study of point defects in an fcc Fe-10Ni-20Cr model alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piochaud, J. B.; Klaver, T. P. C.; Adjanor, G.; Olsson, P.; Domain, C.; Becquart, C. S.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the local environment on vacancy and self-interstitial formation energies has been investigated in a face-centered-cubic (fcc) Fe-10Ni-20Cr model alloy by analyzing an extensive set of first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. Chemical disorder has been considered by designing special quasirandom structures and four different collinear magnetic structures have been investigated in order to determine a relevant reference state to perform point defect calculations at 0 K. Two different convergence methods have also been used to characterize the importance of the method on the results. Although our fcc Fe-10Ni-20Cr would be better represented in terms of applications by the paramagnetic state, we found that the antiferromagnetic single-layer magnetic structure was the most stable at 0 K and we chose it as a reference state to determine the point defect properties. Point defects have been introduced in this reference state, i.e., vacancies and Fe-Fe, Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr, Cr-Cr, Ni-Ni, and Ni-Cr dumbbell interstitials oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the single layer antiferromagnetic planes. Each point defect studied was introduced at different lattice sites to consider a sufficient variety of local environments and analyze its influence on the formation energy values. We have estimated the point defect formation energies with linear regressions using variables which describe the local environment surrounding the point defects. The number and the position of Ni and Cr first nearest neighbors to the point defects were found to drive the evolution of the formation energies. In particular, Ni is found to decrease and Cr to increase the vacancy formation energy of the model alloy, while the opposite trends are found for the dumbbell interstitials. This study suggested that, to a first approximation, the first nearest atoms to point defects can provide reliable estimates of point defect formation energies.

  19. Geochemical modeling of low melt-fraction anatexis in a peraluminous system: The Pena Negra complex (central Spain)

    SciTech Connect

    Bea, F. )

    1991-07-01

    A study was made of the chemical fractionation associated with four cases of anatectic segregation of low melt-fraction cordieritic granites from migmatized meta-greywackes. The aims of the study were to (1) reveal the fractionation patterns of major and trace elements, (2) compare the major element chemistry of leucogranites and the quantitative behavior of source minerals during anatexis - inferred by mass-balance adjustment - with available experimental data for peraluminous systems, and (3) discuss the behavior of trace elements in crustal melting by comparing the chemically determined composition of leucogranites with the results of three fractionation models. Two of these assume a perfect diffusive behavior of trace elements within residual solids, but they use a different set of distribution coefficients. The third assumes a perfect nondiffusive behavior. In relation to their source rocks, the leucogranites are strongly depleted in Li, Transition Elements, and Light Rare Earth Elements, but enriched in K{sub 2}O, SiO{sub 2}, and Ba. Mass balance analysis using the Anatexis Mixing Model shows that the chemistry of cordierite leucogranites is compatible with its having originated by closed-system, water-undersaturated anatexis on previously migmatized meta-greywackes, leaving a residue enriched in cordierite plus biotite and exhausted in K-feldspar. Biotite melts congruently unless important amounts of sillimanite were also present in the source. Compared with experimental metals obtained from sources with the same chemical composition but with a different femic mineralogy (biotite + sillimanite, instead of cordierite + biotite), the Pena Negra leu