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Sample records for feiii-reducing myxobacterium anaeromyxobacter

  1. Characterization and Description of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aryl-Halorespiring Facultative Anaerobic Myxobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Robert A.; Cole, James R.; Tiedje, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Five strains were isolated which form a physiologically and phylogenetically coherent group of chlororespiring microorganisms and represent the first taxon in the Myxobacteria capable of anaerobic growth. The strains were enriched and isolated from various soils and sediments based on their ability to grow using acetate as an electron donor and 2-chlorophenol (2-CPh) as an electron acceptor. They are slender gram-negative rods with a bright red pigmentation that exhibit gliding motility and form spore-like structures. These unique chlororespiring myxobacteria also grow with 2,6-dichlorophenol, 2,5-dichlorophenol, 2-bromophenol, nitrate, fumarate, and oxygen as terminal electron acceptors, with optimal growth occurring at low concentrations (<1 mM) of electron acceptor. 2-CPh is reduced by all strains as an electron acceptor in preference to nitrate, which is reduced to ammonium. Acetate, H2, succinate, pyruvate, formate, and lactate were used as electron donors. None of the strains grew by fermentation. The 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of the five strains form a coherent cluster deeply branching within the family Myxococcaceae within the class Myxobacteria and are mostly closely associated with the Myxococcus subgroup. With the exception of anaerobic growth and lack of a characteristic fruiting body, these strains closely resemble previously characterized myxobacteria and therefore should be considered part of the Myxococcus subgroup. The anaerobic growth and 9.0% difference in 16S rDNA sequence from those of other myxobacterial genera are sufficient to place these strains in a new genus and species designated Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans. The type strain is 2CP-1 (ATCC BAA-258). PMID:11823233

  2. Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Qingzhong Wu; Cornell Gayle; Frank Löffler; Sanford, Robert

    2004-03-17

    Recent findings suggest that Anaeromyxobacter populations play relevant roles in metal and radionuclide reduction and immobilization at contaminated DOE sites. This research effort will characterize Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C as well as other Anaeromyxobacter isolates in hand, and assess their contribution towards metal detoxification and plume stabilization under environmentally relevant conditions.

  3. Nitrous Oxide Respiration in Non-Denitrifying Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Members of the genus Anaeromyxobacter are versatile, facultative microaerophilic myxobacteria isolated from soils, aquifers and freshwater sediments. Anaeromyxobacter spp. grow with nitrate as electron acceptor, which is reduced via nitrite to ammonia. Interestingly, the analysis of the Anaeromyxo...

  4. Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, Frank E.

    2005-06-01

    Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species The overarching goal of this 3-year project is to explore uranium reduction in Anaeromyxobacter species. Specifically, we explore the physiological requirements of available Anaeromyxobacter isolates, design molecular biology tools to detect and quantify Anaeromyxobacter in pure cultures, consortia, and environmental samples, assess their diversity, distribution, and abundance in the environment, including DOE sites, and attempt the isolation of additional Anaeromyxobacter species from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC). The performers on this project include Frank Loeffler (PI), Robert Sanford (Co-PI), Qingzhong Wu (postdoc), Sara Henry (graduate student with fellowship, no charges to NABIR project), Ivy Thomson (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project), and Ryan Wagner (''Special Topics'' bioinformatics undergraduate student, no charges to NABIR project). Exploratory MALDI-TOF MS experiments for the specific detection of Anaeromyxobacter species were performed by Kerry Preston (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project).

  5. Kinetics of DCE and VC mineralization under methanogenic and Fe(III)- reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of anaerobic mineralization of DCE and VC under mathanogenic and Fe(III)-reducing conditions as a function of dissolved contaminant concentration were evaluated. Microorganisms indigenous to creek bed sediments, where groundwater contaminated with chlorinated ethenes continuously discharges, demonstrated significant mineralization of DCE and VC under methanogenic and Fe(III)- reducing conditions. Over 37 days, the recovery of [1,214C]VC radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 5% to 44% and from 8% to 100% under methanogenic and Fe(III)-reducing conditions, respectively. The recovery of [1,2-14C]DCE radioactivity as 14CO2 ranged from 4% to 14% and did not vary significantly between methanogenic and Fe(III)reducing conditions. VC mineralization was described by Michaelis- Menten kinetics. Under methanogenic conditions, V(max) was 0.19 ?? 0.01 ??mol L-1 d-1 and the half-saturation constant, k(m), was 7.6 ?? 1.7 ??M. Under Fe(III)-reducing conditions, V(max) was 0.76 ?? 0.07 ??mol L-1 d-1 and k(m) was 1.3 ?? 0.5 ??M. In contrast, DCE mineralization could be described by first-order kinetics. The first-order degradation rate constant for DCE mineralization was 0.6 ?? 0.2% d-1 under methanogenic and Fe(III)-reducing conditions. The results indicate that the kinetics of chlorinated ethane mineralization can vary significantly with the specific contaminant and the predominant redox conditions under which mineralization occurs.

  6. Biomolecular Mechanisms Controlling Metal and Radionuclide Transformations in Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, Alexander S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Loeffler, Frank E.; Sanford, Robert A.

    2006-06-01

    Microbiological reduction and immobilization of U(VI) and Tc(VII) has been proposed as a strategy for remediating radionuclide-contaminated environments. Numerous studies focusing on the reduction kinetics and speciation of these metals have been carried out using contaminated sediment samples, microbial consortia, and pure bacterial cultures. While previous work with model organisms has increased the general understanding of radionuclide transformation processes, fundamental questions regarding radionuclide reduction mechanisms by indigenous microorganisms are poorly understood, especially under the commonly encountered scenario where multiple electron acceptors are present. Therefore, the overall goal of the proposed research is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of radionuclide biotransformation by Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, a predominant member of indigenous microorganism commonly found in contaminated subsurface environments, and to assess the effects of relevant environmental factors affecting these transformation reactions.

  7. The Mosaic Genome of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Strain 2CP-C Suggests an Aerobic Common Ancestor to the Delta-Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sara H.; Wagner, Ryan D.; Arakaki, Adrian K.; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Kirby, John R.; Shimkets, Lawrence J.; Sanford, Robert A.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2008-01-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C is a versaphilic delta-Proteobacterium distributed throughout many diverse soil and sediment environments. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis groups A. dehalogenans together with the myxobacteria, which have distinguishing characteristics including strictly aerobic metabolism, sporulation, fruiting body formation, and surface motility. Analysis of the 5.01 Mb strain 2CP-C genome substantiated that this organism is a myxobacterium but shares genotypic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria (i.e., the Desulfuromonadales). Reflective of its respiratory versatility, strain 2CP-C possesses 68 genes coding for putative c-type cytochromes, including one gene with 40 heme binding motifs. Consistent with its relatedness to the myxobacteria, surface motility was observed in strain 2CP-C and multiple types of motility genes are present, including 28 genes for gliding, adventurous (A-) motility and 17 genes for type IV pilus-based motility (i.e., social (S-) motility) that all have homologs in Myxococcus xanthus. Although A. dehalogenans shares many metabolic traits with the anaerobic majority of the delta-Proteobacteria, strain 2CP-C grows under microaerophilic conditions and possesses detoxification systems for reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, two gene clusters coding for NADH dehydrogenase subunits and two cytochrome oxidase gene clusters in strain 2CP-C are similar to those in M. xanthus. Remarkably, strain 2CP-C possesses a third NADH dehydrogenase gene cluster and a cytochrome cbb3 oxidase gene cluster, apparently acquired through ancient horizontal gene transfer from a strictly anaerobic green sulfur bacterium. The mosaic nature of the A. dehalogenans strain 2CP-C genome suggests that the metabolically versatile, anaerobic members of the delta-Proteobacteria may have descended from aerobic ancestors with complex lifestyles. PMID:18461135

  8. Microbial reduction of selenium oxyanions by Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Yao, Kai

    2010-05-01

    Selenium oxyanions are toxic to living organisms at excessive levels. The accumulation of selenium in certain environments requires the development of efficient detoxification processes. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of two Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strains to readily convert toxic Se(IV) to less toxic insoluble Se(0), as confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. A. dehalogenans strains have been recently recognized as a group of versatile bacteria ubiquitously distributed in diverse natural environments best known for their bioremediation capacity to immobilize heavy metals and radionuclides. Discovery of the Se(IV)-reducing capacity by these microorganisms adds selenium detoxification to the bioremediation capacities of A. dehalogenans. It is also shown that the Se(IV)-reducing activity by A. dehalogenan could be inhibited by high levels of Se(IV). With Se(IV) reduction being proposed as a detoxification mechanism in other microorganisms, it is likely that the inhibition of Se(IV) reduction by Se(IV) was a result of the severe toxicity of Se(IV) at elevated concentrations. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of Se(IV) reduction and its inhibition by Se(IV) in order to understand the potential roles of these ecologically important microorganisms in the biogeochemical cycling of selenium and the biotransformation of toxic forms of selenium. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, Frank E.

    2004-06-01

    We investigate the physiological requirements of available Anaeromyxobacter isolates, and assess their distribution and abundance in the environment, including DOE sites. The performers on this project include Frank Loeffler (PI), Robert Sanford (Co-PI), Qingzhong Wu (postdoc), Sara Henry (graduate student) and Cornell Gayle (undergraduate student). Year-1 efforts focused on method and tool development to address the research objectives. First, we compared different analytical assays (based on fluorescent light emission and calorimetric methods) to quantify U(VI) in cultures of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C. The assays were optimized to reflect specific culture conditions, and we found that a laser-excited spectrofluorescence assay provided reproducible and accurate information on the amount of U(VI) reduced in bacterial cultures. To demonstrate the ability of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C to reduce U(VI), washed suspensions of fumarate-grown cells were prepared. These experiments confirmed that the rapid reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) depended on the presence of live cells, and no U(VI) reduction occurred in cell-free controls. Additional experiments explored the ability of three different Anaeromyxobacter strains to grow with the mineral hematite, an insoluble form of ferric iron, as electron acceptor. All strain grew equally well with soluble ferric iron (provided as ferric citrate) but distinct differences were observed between strains when grown with hematite. All strains tested shared a 16S rRNA gene similarity of >99.5%, suggesting that closely related strains may differ in their ability to access insoluble forms of ferric iron.

  10. Diversity and distribution of anaeromyxobacter strains in a uranium-contaminated subsurface environment with a nonuniform groundwater flow.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sara H; Padilla-Crespo, Elizabeth; Jardine, Phillip M; Sanford, Robert A; Löffler, Frank E

    2009-06-01

    Versaphilic Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strains implicated in hexavalent uranium reduction and immobilization are present in the fractured saprolite subsurface environment at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site near Oak Ridge, TN. To provide insight into the in situ distribution of Anaeromyxobacter strains in this system with a nonuniform groundwater flow, 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers and linear hybridization (TaqMan) probes were designed for Oak Ridge IFC Anaeromyxobacter isolates FRC-D1 and FRC-W, along with an Anaeromyxobacter genus-targeted probe and primer set. Multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (mqPCR) was applied to samples collected from Oak Ridge IFC site areas 1 and 3, which are not connected by the primary groundwater flow paths; however, transport between them through cross-plane fractures is hypothesized. Strain FRC-W accounted for more than 10% of the total quantifiable Anaeromyxobacter community in area 1 soils, while strain FRC-D1 was not detected. In FeOOH-amended enrichment cultures derived from area 1 site materials, strain FRC-D1 accounted for 30 to 90% of the total Anaeromyxobacter community, demonstrating that this strain was present in situ in area 1. The area 3 total Anaeromyxobacter abundance exceeded that of area 1 by 3 to 5 orders of magnitude, but neither strain FRC-W- nor FRC-D1-like sequences were quantifiable in any of the 33 area 3 groundwater or sediment samples tested. The Anaeromyxobacter community in area 3 increased from <10(5) cells/g sediment outside the ethanol biostimulation treatment zone to 10(8) cells/g sediment near the injection well, and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis revealed that representatives of a novel phylogenetic cluster dominated the area 3 Anaeromyxobacter community inside the treatment loop. The combined applications of genus- and strain-level mqPCR approaches along with clone libraries provided novel information on patterns of microbial

  11. Diversity and Distribution of Anaeromyxobacter Strains in a Uranium-Contaminated Subsurface Environment with a Nonuniform Groundwater Flow▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sara H.; Padilla-Crespo, Elizabeth; Jardine, Phillip M.; Sanford, Robert A.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2009-01-01

    Versaphilic Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strains implicated in hexavalent uranium reduction and immobilization are present in the fractured saprolite subsurface environment at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site near Oak Ridge, TN. To provide insight into the in situ distribution of Anaeromyxobacter strains in this system with a nonuniform groundwater flow, 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers and linear hybridization (TaqMan) probes were designed for Oak Ridge IFC Anaeromyxobacter isolates FRC-D1 and FRC-W, along with an Anaeromyxobacter genus-targeted probe and primer set. Multiplex quantitative real-time PCR (mqPCR) was applied to samples collected from Oak Ridge IFC site areas 1 and 3, which are not connected by the primary groundwater flow paths; however, transport between them through cross-plane fractures is hypothesized. Strain FRC-W accounted for more than 10% of the total quantifiable Anaeromyxobacter community in area 1 soils, while strain FRC-D1 was not detected. In FeOOH-amended enrichment cultures derived from area 1 site materials, strain FRC-D1 accounted for 30 to 90% of the total Anaeromyxobacter community, demonstrating that this strain was present in situ in area 1. The area 3 total Anaeromyxobacter abundance exceeded that of area 1 by 3 to 5 orders of magnitude, but neither strain FRC-W- nor FRC-D1-like sequences were quantifiable in any of the 33 area 3 groundwater or sediment samples tested. The Anaeromyxobacter community in area 3 increased from <105 cells/g sediment outside the ethanol biostimulation treatment zone to 108 cells/g sediment near the injection well, and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis revealed that representatives of a novel phylogenetic cluster dominated the area 3 Anaeromyxobacter community inside the treatment loop. The combined applications of genus- and strain-level mqPCR approaches along with clone libraries provided novel information on patterns of microbial

  12. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-12-18

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 10(6) cells g dry sediment(-1). In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 10(4), 3.1 × 10(2), and 4.4 × 10(4) g dry sediment(-1), respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between them.

  13. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 106 cells g dry sediment−1. In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 104, 3.1 × 102, and 4.4 × 104 g dry sediment−1, respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between them. PMID:26682861

  14. Purification of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca.

    PubMed Central

    Heidelbach, M; Skladny, H; Schairer, H U

    1992-01-01

    The DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) of the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca has been purified. It shows three main polypeptide bands with apparent molecular weights of 146,000, 105,000, and 40,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. beta and beta' subunits of the S. aurantiaca polymerase were shown to migrate in the 146,000-molecular-weight polypeptide band and the main sigma factor was shown to migrate in the 105,000-molecular-weight band by using heterologous antisera. Images PMID:1556092

  15. Salimyxins and enhygrolides: antibiotic, sponge-related metabolites from the obligate marine myxobacterium Enhygromyxa salina.

    PubMed

    Felder, Stephan; Kehraus, Stefan; Neu, Edith; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Schäberle, Till F; König, Gabriele M

    2013-07-22

    Unlike their terrestrial counterparts, marine myxobacteria are hardly investigated for their secondary metabolites. This study describes three new compounds (1-3), named salimyxins and enhygrolides, obtained from the obligate marine myxobacterium Enhygromyxa salina. These are the first natural products obtained from Enhygromyxa species. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, including NMR and CD spectroscopy. Enhygrolides are closely related to the nostoclides, which were initially isolated from a cyanobacterium of the genus Nostoc. The salimyxins, representing structurally most unusual degraded sterols, are close to identical to demethylincisterol from the sponge Homaxinella sp. Salimyxin B and enhygrolide A inhibit the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium Arthrobacter cristallopoietes (MIC salimyxin B, 8 μg mL⁻¹; enhygrolide A, 4 μg mL⁻¹). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A myxobacterium strain Sorangium cellulosum AHB125 producing epothilone B and other anticancer substances.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Jie; Tao, Guan-Jun; Tao, Wen-Yi; Cui, Feng-Jie; Jin, Xian-Chun; Bi, Fang; Xu, Zheng-Hong; Ao, Zong-Hua

    2007-12-01

    A myxobacterium strain AHB125 belonging to genus Sorangium cellulosum was isolated from Anhui area in China and identified with morphological analysis by electron microscopy and phase contrast microscope according to Bergey's manual of systematic bacteriology (8th Ed.). Its high-antitumor bioactivity metabolites was evaluated by bioassay-directed screening technique with B16 tumor cell line etc. Research results showed that it exhibited not only strong antitumor ability bioactivities and broad-spectrum antitumor abilities to B16, Bel7402, H446, SGC7901 cell lines, but also has selectivity and pertinence to B16 and SGC7901 cell lines. The compound was confirmed as epothilone B by HPLC and LC/MS analysis, compared to the epothilone B standard sample. Bioassay indicated that there were other high-bioactive substances in the metabolites.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; ...

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, an Anaerobic, Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Contaminated Subsurface Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Barry, Kerrie W.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, S.; Sims, David R.; Brettin, T.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. C.; Han, Cliff F.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, F.; Land, M.; Hauser, L.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Richardson, P. M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Sanford, Robert A.; Loeffler, Frank E.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2015-01-22

    We report the genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5, isolated from nitrate- and uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) site, Oak Ridge Reservation, TN. The bacterium’s genome sequence will elucidate its physiological potential in subsurface sediments undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation and natural attenuation.

  19. The Myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus Can Sense and Respond to the Quorum Signals Secreted by Potential Prey Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Daniel G.; Whitworth, David E.

    2017-01-01

    The myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a predatory member of the soil microfauna, able to consume bacteria (Gram-negative, Gram-positive), archaea, and fungi. Many potential prey of M. xanthus communicate amongst themselves using acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as quorum signals. M. xanthus cannot itself produce AHLs, but could potentially benefit by responding to exogenous AHLs produced during signaling between proximal prey. Four AHLs of different side chain length were tested and all found to delay sporulation of M. xanthus vegetative cells, and to stimulate germination of myxospores, increasing the proportion of predatory vegetative cells in the population. The predatory activity and expansion rates of M. xanthus colonies were also found to be stimulated by AHLs. Thermally inactivated AHLs had no effect on M. xanthus cells, and the response to AHLs depended (non-linearly) on the length of AHL side chain, suggesting that the effect of AHLs was mediated by specific signaling within M. xanthus, rather than being a consequence of the chemical or physical properties of AHLs. Therefore, it seems that the presence of xenic quorum signaling molecules enhances the predatory activity of M. xanthus. AHLs increase the proportion of the population capable of predation, and stimulate the motility and predatory activity of vegetative cells. We therefore propose that in the wild, M. xanthus uses AHLs as markers of nearby prey, potentially eavesdropping on the conversations between prey organisms. PMID:28352265

  20. Enhygromyxa salina gen. nov., sp. nov., a slightly halophilic myxobacterium isolated from the coastal areas of Japan.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Takashi; Jojima, Yasuko; Fudou, Ryosuke; Tokura, Mitsunori; Hiraishi, Akira; Yamanaka, Shigeru

    2003-06-01

    Six isolates of novel marine myxobacteria, designated strains SHK-1T, SMK-1-1, SMK-1-3, SMK-10, SKK-2, and SMP-6, were obtained from various coastal samples (mud, sands and algae) collected around Japan. All of the isolates had Gram-negative rod-shaped cells, motile by gliding and grew aerobically. They showed bacteriolytic action, fruiting body formation, and NaCl requirement for growth with an optimum concentration of 1.0-2.0% (w/v). In addition, divalent cationic components of seawater, such as Mg2+ or Ca2+, were also needed for growth. The major respiratory quinone was MK-7. The G+C content of genomic DNA ranged from 65.6 to 67.4 mol% (by HPLC). The isolates shared almost identical 16S rDNA sequences, and clustered with a recently described marine myxobacterium, Plesiocystis pacifica, as their closest relative on a phylogenetic tree (95.9-96.0% similarity). Physiological and chemotaxonomic differences between the new strains and strains of the genus Plesiocystis justify the proposal of a new genus. Therefore, we propose to classify the six isolates into a new taxon of marine myxobacteria with the name, Enhygromyxa salina gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is SHK-1(T) (JCM 11769(T) = DSM 15217(T) = AJ 110011(T)).

  1. Electron donor-dependent radionuclide reduction and nanoparticle formation by Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C.

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Thomas, Sara H.; Loffler, F. E.; Sanford, Robert; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2009-01-15

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C can rapidly reduce U(VI) or Tc(VII) to U(IV)O2(s) or Tc(IV)O2(S) using either acetate or H2 as an electron donor source. Kinetic studies reveal that the H2-driven reduction of either U(VI) or Tc(VII) is faster than the acetate-driven reduction. The sub-cellular localization of reduced UO2 is extracellular while TcO2 nanoparticles are both periplasmic and extracellular. While electron donor-specific differences in UO2 nanoparticle aggregate size were observed, the association of UO2 nanoparticles with an exopolymeric substance (EPS) was observed and found to be independent of electron donor source. Electron donor-specific localization differences were not observed in cells incubated with Tc(VII). These finding have direct implications on immobilization strategies for highly soluble radionuclide contaminants in subsurface waters and the development of microbially assisted biostimulation efforts.

  2. Quantitative frame analysis and the annotation of GC-rich (and other) prokaryotic genomes. An application to Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans

    PubMed Central

    Oden, Steve; Brocchieri, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Graphical representations of contrasts in GC usage among codon frame positions (frame analysis) provide evidence of genes missing from the annotations of prokaryotic genomes of high GC content but the qualitative approach of visual frame analysis prevents its applicability on a genomic scale. Results: We developed two quantitative methods for the identification and statistical characterization in sequence regions of three-base periodicity (hits) associated with open reading frame structures. The methods were implemented in the N-Profile Analysis Computational Tool (NPACT), which highlights in graphical representations inconsistencies between newly identified ORFs and pre-existing annotations of coding-regions. We applied the NPACT procedures to two recently annotated strains of the deltaproteobacterium Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans, identifying in both genomes numerous conserved ORFs not included in the published annotation of coding regions. Availability and implementation: NPACT is available as a web-based service and for download at http://genome.ufl.edu/npact. Contact: lucianob@ufl.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26048600

  3. Unique Ecophysiology among U(VI)-Reducing Bacteria as Revealed by Evaluation of Oxygen Metabolism in Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Strain 2CP-C▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sara H.; Sanford, Robert A.; Amos, Benjamin K.; Leigh, Mary Beth; Cardenas, Erick; Löffler, Frank E.

    2010-01-01

    Anaeromyxobacter spp. respire soluble hexavalent uranium, U(VI), leading to the formation of insoluble U(IV), and are present at the uranium-contaminated Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFC) site. Pilot-scale in situ bioreduction of U(VI) has been accomplished in area 3 of the Oak Ridge IFC site following biostimulation, but the susceptibility of the reduced material to oxidants (i.e., oxygen) compromises long-term U immobilization. Following oxygen intrusion, attached Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans cells increased approximately 5-fold from 2.2 × 107 ± 8.6 × 106 to 1.0 × 108 ± 2.2 × 107 cells per g of sediment collected from well FW101-2. In the same samples, the numbers of cells of Geobacter lovleyi, a population native to area 3 and also capable of U(VI) reduction, decreased or did not change. A. dehalogenans cells captured via groundwater sampling (i.e., not attached to sediment) were present in much lower numbers (<1.3 × 104 ± 1.1 × 104 cells per liter) than sediment-associated cells, suggesting that A. dehalogenans cells occur predominantly in association with soil particles. Laboratory studies confirmed aerobic growth of A. dehalogenans strain 2CP-C at initial oxygen partial pressures (pO2) at and below 0.18 atm. A negative linear correlation [μ = (−0.09 × pO2) + 0.051; R2 = 0.923] was observed between the instantaneous specific growth rate μ and pO2, indicating that this organism should be classified as a microaerophile. Quantification of cells during aerobic growth revealed that the fraction of electrons released in electron donor oxidation and used for biomass production (fs) decreased from 0.52 at a pO2 of 0.02 atm to 0.19 at a pO2 of 0.18 atm. Hence, the apparent fraction of electrons utilized for energy generation (i.e., oxygen reduction) (fe) increased from 0.48 to 0.81 with increasing pO2, suggesting that oxygen is consumed in a nonrespiratory process at a high pO2. The ability to tolerate high oxygen concentrations

  4. Identification of a c-Type Cytochrome Specific for Manganese Dioxide (MnO2) Reduction in Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Strain 2CP-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffner, S. M.; Nissen, S.; Liu, X.; Chourey, K.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Hettich, R.; Loeffler, F.

    2014-12-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans is a metabolically versatile Deltaproteobacterium and conserves energy from the reduction of various electron acceptors, including insoluble MnO2 and ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides (FeOOH). The goal of this study was to identify c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to MnO2. The characterization of deletion mutants has revealed a number of c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to solid metal oxides in Shewanella spp. and Geobacter spp; however, a genetic system for Anaeromyxobacter is not available. The A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C genome encodes 68 putative c-type cytochromes, which all lack functional assignments. To identify c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to solid MnO2, protein expression profiles of A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C cells grown with acetate as electron donor and MnO2, ferric citrate, FeOOH, nitrate or fumarate as electron acceptors were compared. Whole cell proteomes were analyzed after trypsin proteolysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Distinct c-type cytochrome expression patterns were observed with cells grown with different electron acceptors. A. dehalogenans str. 2CP-C grown with MnO2 expressed 25 out of the 68 c-type cytochromes encoded on the genome. The c-type cytochrome Adeh_1278 was only expressed in strain 2CP-C grown with MnO2. Reverse transcription PCR confirmed that the Adeh_1278 gene was transcribed in MnO2-grown cells but not in cells grown with other terminal electron acceptors. The expression of the Adeh_1278 gene correlated with Mn(IV) reduction activity. Adeh_1278 has three heme binding motifs and is predicted to be located in the periplasm. The identification of Adeh_1278 as a protein uniquely expressed when MnO2 serves as electron acceptor suggests its utility as a biomarker for MnO2 reduction. This example demonstrates the value of the LC-MS/MS approach for identifying specific proteins of interest and making functional assignments

  5. Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Anaerolineae populations are enriched on anodes of root exudate-driven microbial fuel cells in rice field soil.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Angela; Pommerenke, Bianca; Boon, Nico; Friedrich, Michael W

    2015-06-01

    Plant-based sediment microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) couple the oxidation of root exudates in living rice plants to current production. We analysed the composition of the microbial community on anodes from PMFC with natural rice field soil as substratum for rice by analysing 16S rRNA as an indicator of microbial activity and diversity. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis indicated that the active bacterial community on anodes from PMFCs differed strongly compared with controls. Moreover, clones related to Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly abundant (49% and 21%, respectively) on PMFCs anodes. Geobacter (19%), Anaeromyxobacter (15%) and Anaerolineae (17%) populations were predominant on anodes with natural rice field soil and differed strongly from those previously detected with potting soil. In open circuit (OC) control PMFCs, not allowing electron transfer, Deltaproteobacteria (33%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Chloroflexi (12%), Alphaproteobacteria (10%) and Firmicutes (10%) were detected. The presence of an electron accepting anode also had a strong influence on methanogenic archaea. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active on PMFC (21%) than on OC controls (10%), whereas acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae were more active on OC controls (31%) compared with PMFCs (9%). In conclusion, electron accepting anodes and rice root exudates selected for distinct potential anode-reducing microbial populations in rice soil inoculated PMFC.

  6. A novel cold-active xylanase from the cellulolytic myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So9733-1: gene cloning, expression, and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Yun; Hu, Wei; Lin, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2012-02-01

    The cellulolytic myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum is able to efficiently degrade many kinds of polysaccharides, but none of the enzymes involved have been characterized. In this paper, a xylanase gene (xynA) was cloned from S. cellulosum So9733-1 using thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. The gene is composed of 1,209 bp and has only 52.27% G + C content, which is much lower than that of most myxobacterial DNA reported (67-72%). Gene xynA encodes a 402 amino acid protein that contains a single catalytic domain belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 10. The novel xylanase gene, xynA, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and the recombinant protein (r-XynA) was purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The r-XynA had the optimum temperature of 30-35°C and exhibited 33.3% activity at 5°C and 13.7% activity at 0°C. Approximately 80% activity was lost after 20-min pre-incubation at 50°C. These results indicate that r-XynA is a cold-active xylanase with low thermostability. At 30°C, the K (m) values of r-XynA on beechwood xylan, birchwood xylan, and oat spelt xylan were 25.77 ± 4.16, 26.52 ± 4.78, and 38.13 ± 5.35 mg/mL, respectively. The purified r-XynA displayed optimum activity at pH 7.0. The activity of r-XynA was enhanced by the presence of Ca(2+). The r-XynA hydrolyzed beechwood xylan, birchwood xylan, and xylooligosaccharides (xylotriose, xylotetraose, and xylopentose) to produce primarily xylose and xylobiose. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the characterization of a xylanase from S. cellulosum.

  7. Comparative c-type cytochrome expression analysis in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C grown with soluble and insoluble oxidised metal electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Silke; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Wagner, Darlene D; Pffifner, Susan; Loeffler, Frank E

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C encode 40 and 69 putative c-type cytochrome genes, respectively. Deletion mutant and biochemical studies have assigned specific functions to a few c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to oxidised metals in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Although promising, the genetic approach is limited to gene deletions that produce a distinct phenotype, and organism for which a genetic system is available. To more comprehensively investigate and compare c-type cytochrome expression in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C, proteomic measurements were used to characterise lysates of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) and insoluble Mn(IV) (as MnO2) as electron acceptors. Strain MR-1 expressed 19 and 20, and strain 2CP-C expressed 27 and 25 c-type cytochromes when grown with Fe(III) and Mn(IV), respectively. The majority of c-type cytochromes (77% for strain MR-1 and 63% for strain 2CP-C) were expressed under both growth conditions; however, the analysis also revealed unique c-type cytochromes that were specifically expressed in cells grown with soluble Fe(III) or insoluble Mn(IV). Proteomic characterisation proved to be a promising approach for determining the c-type cytochrome complement expressed under different growth conditions, and will help elucidating the specific functions of more c-type cytochromes that are the basis for Shewanella and Anaeromyxobacter respiratory versatility.

  8. Requirement for a microbial consortium to completely oxidize glucose in Fe(III)- reducing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1989-01-01

    In various sediments in which Fe(III) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process, [14C]glucose was fermented to 14C-fatty acids in a manner similar to that observed in methanogenic sediments. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in Fe(III)-reducing sediments, fermentable substrates are oxidized to carbon dioxide by the combined activity of fermentative bacteria and fatty acid-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  9. Solubilization of Fe(III) oxide-bound trace metals by a dissimilatory Fe(III) reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Smith, Steven C.; Gassman, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    Trace metals associate with Fe(III) oxides as adsorbed or coprecipitated species, and consequently, the biogeochemical cycles of iron and the trace metals are closely linked. This communication investigated the solubilization of coprecipitated Co(III) and Ni(II) from goethite (α-FeOOH) during dissimilatory bacterial iron reduction to provide insights on biogeochemical factors controlling trace-element fluxes in anoxic environments. Suspensions of homogeneously substituted Co-FeOOH (50 mmol/L as Co 0.01Fe 0.99OOH; 57Co-labeled) in eight different buffer/media solutions were inoculated with a facultative, metal-reducing bacteria isolated from groundwater ( Shewanella putrefacians CN32), and incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions for periods up to 32 days. Lactate (30 mmol/L) was provided as an electron donor. Growth and non-growth promoting conditions were established by adding or withholding PO 4 and/or trace metals ( 60Co-labeled) from the incubation media. Anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS; 100 μmol/L) was added to most suspensions as an electron shuttle to enhance bacterial reduction. Solutions were buffered at circumneutral pH with either PIPES or bicarbonate buffers. Solid and liquid samples were analyzed at intermediate and final time points for aqueous and sorbed/precipitated (by HCl extraction) Fe(II) and Co(II). The bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and field-emission electron microscopy at experiment termination. Ni-FeOOH (Ni 0.01Fe 0.99OOH) was used for comparison in select experiments. Up to 45% of the metal containing FeOOH was bioreduced; growth-supporting conditions did not enhance reduction. The biogenic Fe(II) strongly associated with the residual Fe(III) oxide as an undefined sorbed phase at low fractional reduction in PIPES buffer, and as siderite (FeCO 3) in bicarbonate buffer or as vivianite [Fe 3(PO 4) 2 · 8H 2O] when P was present. Cobalt(III) was reduced to Co(II) in proportion to its mole ratio in the solid. The release of bioreduced Co(II) to the aqueous phase showed complex dependency on the media and buffer composition and the fractional reduction of the Co-FeOOH. In most cases Co(II) was solubilized in preference to Fe(II), but in select cases it was not. These differences were rationalized in terms of competitive adsorption reactions on the residual Fe(III) oxide surface and coprecipitation in biogenic Fe(II) solids. The bioreduced Co-FeOOH surface showed unexpectedly high sorption selectivity for the biomobilized Co(II). The bioreductive solubilization of Ni(II) from Ni-FeOOH was comparable to Co-FeOOH. Our results indicate that Fe(III)-oxide-entrained trace metals can be mobilized during bacterial iron reduction leading to a net increase, in most cases, in aqueous metal concentrations. The enhancement in trace-metal aqueous concentration, e.g., in groundwater, may proportionally exceed that of Fe(II).

  10. Salimabromide: unexpected chemistry from the obligate marine myxobacterium Enhygromxya salina.

    PubMed

    Felder, Stephan; Dreisigacker, Sandra; Kehraus, Stefan; Neu, Edith; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Wright, Patrick R; Menche, Dirk; Schäberle, Till F; König, Gabriele M

    2013-07-08

    Marine myxobacteria (Enhygromyxa, Plesiocystis, Pseudoenhygromyxa, Haliangium) are phylogenetically distant from their terrestrial counterparts. Salimabromide is the first natural product from the Plesiocystis/Enhygromyxa clade of obligatory marine myxobacteria. Salimabromide has a new tetracyclic carbon skeleton, comprising a brominated benzene ring, a furano lactone residue, and a cyclohexane ring, bridged by a seven-membered cyclic moiety. The absolute configuration was deduced from experimental and calculated CD data. Salimabromide revealed antibiotic activity towards Arthrobacter cristallopoietes. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of organic contaminants containing diverse microbial population by combined microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and anaerobic reactor under Fe(III) reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxin; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Afzal, Shahzad

    2013-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) devices are efficient for wastewater treatment, but its application was limited due to low anode oxidation rate. The objective of this study was to improve anode performance of a MEC combined anaerobic reactor (R1) for high concentration industrial wastewater treatment via dosing Fe(OH)3. For the first 53 days without power, the addition of Fe(OH)3 in R1 enhanced the degradation of reactive brilliant red X-3B dye and sucrose. Applying a voltage of 0.8 V in R1 resulted in a higher decolorization and COD removal through driving the redox reactions at electrodes under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Real-time PCR and enzyme activity analysis showed that the abundance and azoreductase activity of bacteria were improved in R1. Pyrosequencing revealed that dominant populations in anode biofilm and R1 were more diverse and abundant than the common anaerobic reactor (R2), and there was a significant distinction among anode film, R1 and R2 in microbial community structure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics of a Novel Myxobacterium Myxococcus hansupus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Narwani, Tarun; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative aerobes, belong to the class δ-proteobacteria and order Myxococcales. Unlike anaerobic δ-proteobacteria, they exhibit several unusual physiogenomic properties like gliding motility, desiccation-resistant myxospores and large genomes with high coding density. Here we report a 9.5 Mbp complete genome of Myxococcus hansupus that encodes 7,753 proteins. Phylogenomic and genome-genome distance based analysis suggest that Myxococcus hansupus is a novel member of the genus Myxococcus. Comparative genome analysis with other members of the genus Myxococcus was performed to explore their genome diversity. The variation in number of unique proteins observed across different species is suggestive of diversity at the genus level while the overrepresentation of several Pfam families indicates the extent and mode of genome expansion as compared to non-Myxococcales δ-proteobacteria.

  13. Cystochromones, Unusual Chromone-Containing Polyketides from the Myxobacterium Cystobacter sp. MCy9104.

    PubMed

    Nadmid, Suvd; Plaza, Alberto; Garcia, Ronald; Müller, Rolf

    2015-08-28

    Seven new chromone-containing polyketides, termed cystochromones A-G, were isolated from the myxobacterial strain Cystobacter sp. MCy9104. Their structures were elucidated using comprehensive NMR spectroscopy and HR-MS/MS. Cystochromones bear a pentadecyl moiety unusually attached at C-5 of the chromone ring. Moreover, isotope-labeled substrate feeding experiments and NMR analysis suggested a hybrid iso-fatty acid and polyketide synthase biosynthetic pathway for these secondary metabolites.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics of a Novel Myxobacterium Myxococcus hansupus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Narwani, Tarun; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative aerobes, belong to the class δ-proteobacteria and order Myxococcales. Unlike anaerobic δ-proteobacteria, they exhibit several unusual physiogenomic properties like gliding motility, desiccation-resistant myxospores and large genomes with high coding density. Here we report a 9.5 Mbp complete genome of Myxococcus hansupus that encodes 7,753 proteins. Phylogenomic and genome-genome distance based analysis suggest that Myxococcus hansupus is a novel member of the genus Myxococcus. Comparative genome analysis with other members of the genus Myxococcus was performed to explore their genome diversity. The variation in number of unique proteins observed across different species is suggestive of diversity at the genus level while the overrepresentation of several Pfam families indicates the extent and mode of genome expansion as compared to non-Myxococcales δ-proteobacteria. PMID:26900859

  15. Genome Analysis of the Fruiting Body-Forming Myxobacterium Chondromyces crocatus Reveals High Potential for Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zaburannyi, Nestor; Bunk, Boyke; Maier, Josef; Overmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the type strain of the myxobacterial genus Chondromyces, Chondromyces crocatus Cm c5. It presents one of the largest prokaryotic genomes featuring a single circular chromosome and no plasmids. Analysis revealed an enlarged set of tRNA genes, along with reduced pressure on preferred codon usage compared to that of other bacterial genomes. The large coding capacity and the plethora of encoded secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters are in line with the capability of Cm c5 to produce an arsenal of antibacterial, antifungal, and cytotoxic compounds. Known pathways of the ajudazol, chondramide, chondrochloren, crocacin, crocapeptin, and thuggacin compound families are complemented by many more natural compound biosynthetic gene clusters in the chromosome. Whole-genome comparison of the fruiting-body-forming type strain (Cm c5, DSM 14714) to an accustomed laboratory strain which has lost this ability (nonfruiting phenotype, Cm c5 fr−) revealed genetic changes in three loci. In addition to the low synteny found with the closest sequenced representative of the same family, Sorangium cellulosum, extensive genetic information duplication and broad application of eukaryotic-type signal transduction systems are hallmarks of this 11.3-Mbp prokaryotic genome. PMID:26773087

  16. Novel iso-branched ether lipids as specific markers of developmental sporulation in the myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Ring, Michael W; Schwär, Gertrud; Thiel, Verena; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Schulz, Stefan; Bode, Helge B

    2006-12-01

    Iso-fatty acids (FAs) are the dominant FA family in all myxobacteria analyzed. Furthermore, it was postulated that iso-FAs or compounds derived thereof are involved in fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus, since mutants with a reduced level of iso-FA due to a reduced level of the precursor isovaleryl-CoA, are delayed in aggregation and produce only few myxospores. To elucidate the function of iso-FAs and their corresponding lipids we have analyzed the developmental phenotype of mutants having different levels of iso-FAs resulting in a clear correlation between the amount of iso-FAs and the delay of aggregation and reduction in spore yield. Addition of either isovalerate or 13-methyltetradecanoic acid resulted in restoration of the wild-type FA profile and normal development. Detailed analysis of the fatty acid (FA) profile during fruiting body formation in Myxococcus xanthus wild-type revealed the specific accumulation of 13-methyltetradecanal and 1-O-13-methyltetradecylglycerol which were produced specifically in the myxospores and which are derived from 1-O-(13-methyl-1-Z-tetradecenyl)-2-O-(13-methyltetradecanoyl)-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (VEPE) and 1,2-di-(13-methyltetradecanoyl)-3-(13-methyltetradecyl)glycerol (TG-1), respectively. The structures of these unusual ether lipids have been determined by spectrometric methods and synthesis (for TG-1). Analysis of several mutants blocked at different stages of development indicated that the biosynthesis of TG-1 is developmentally regulated and that VEPE might be an intermediate in the TG-1 biosynthesis. Finally, addition of TG-1 to mutants blocked in the biosynthesis of isovaleryl-CoA could restore aggregation and sporulation emphasizing the important role of iso-branched lipids for myxobacterial development.

  17. Enumeration and characterization of iron(III)-reducing microbial communities from acidic subsurface sediments contaminated with uranium(VI).

    PubMed

    Petrie, Lainie; North, Nadia N; Dollhopf, Sherry L; Balkwill, David L; Kostka, Joel E

    2003-12-01

    Iron(III)-reducing bacteria have been demonstrated to rapidly catalyze the reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) from contaminated subsurface sediments. Thus, these organisms may aid in the development of bioremediation strategies for uranium contamination, which is prevalent in acidic subsurface sediments at U.S. government facilities. Iron(III)-reducing enrichment cultures were initiated from pristine and contaminated (high in uranium, nitrate; low pH) subsurface sediments at pH 7 and pH 4 to 5. Enumeration of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria yielded cell counts of up to 240 cells ml(-1) for the contaminated and background sediments at both pHs with a range of different carbon sources (glycerol, acetate, lactate, and glucose). In enrichments where nitrate contamination was removed from the sediment by washing, MPN counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria increased substantially. Sediments of lower pH typically yielded lower counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in lactate- and acetate-amended enrichments, but higher counts were observed when glucose was used as an electron donor in acidic enrichments. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences extracted from the highest positive MPN dilutions revealed that the predominant members of Fe(III)-reducing consortia from background sediments were closely related to members of the Geobacteraceae family, whereas a recently characterized Fe(III) reducer (Anaeromyxobacter sp.) and organisms not previously shown to reduce Fe(III) (Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus spp.) predominated in the Fe(III)-reducing consortia of contaminated sediments. Analysis of enrichment cultures by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) strongly supported the cloning and sequencing results. Dominant members of the Fe(III)-reducing consortia were observed to be stable over several enrichment culture transfers by T-RFLP in conjunction with measurements of Fe(III) reduction activity and carbon substrate utilization. Enrichment

  18. Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)-Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Lainie; North, Nadia N.; Dollhopf, Sherry L.; Balkwill, David L.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2003-01-01

    Iron(III)-reducing bacteria have been demonstrated to rapidly catalyze the reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) from contaminated subsurface sediments. Thus, these organisms may aid in the development of bioremediation strategies for uranium contamination, which is prevalent in acidic subsurface sediments at U.S. government facilities. Iron(III)-reducing enrichment cultures were initiated from pristine and contaminated (high in uranium, nitrate; low pH) subsurface sediments at pH 7 and pH 4 to 5. Enumeration of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria yielded cell counts of up to 240 cells ml−1 for the contaminated and background sediments at both pHs with a range of different carbon sources (glycerol, acetate, lactate, and glucose). In enrichments where nitrate contamination was removed from the sediment by washing, MPN counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria increased substantially. Sediments of lower pH typically yielded lower counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in lactate- and acetate-amended enrichments, but higher counts were observed when glucose was used as an electron donor in acidic enrichments. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences extracted from the highest positive MPN dilutions revealed that the predominant members of Fe(III)-reducing consortia from background sediments were closely related to members of the Geobacteraceae family, whereas a recently characterized Fe(III) reducer (Anaeromyxobacter sp.) and organisms not previously shown to reduce Fe(III) (Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus spp.) predominated in the Fe(III)-reducing consortia of contaminated sediments. Analysis of enrichment cultures by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) strongly supported the cloning and sequencing results. Dominant members of the Fe(III)-reducing consortia were observed to be stable over several enrichment culture transfers by T-RFLP in conjunction with measurements of Fe(III) reduction activity and carbon substrate utilization. Enrichment

  19. A Sorangium cellulosum (myxobacterium) gene cluster for the biosynthesis of the macrolide antibiotic soraphen A: cloning, characterization, and homology to polyketide synthase genes from actinomycetes.

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, T; Toupet, C; Cluzel, B; Neff, S; Hill, S; Beck, J J; Ligon, J M

    1995-01-01

    A 40-kb region of DNA from Sorangium cellulosum So ce26, which contains polyketide synthase (PKS) genes for synthesis of the antifungal macrolide antibiotic soraphen A, was cloned. These genes were detected by homology to Streptomyces violaceoruber genes encoding components of granaticin PKS, thus extending this powerful technique for the identification of bacterial PKS genes, which has so far been applied only to actinomycetes, to the gram-negative myxobacteria. Functional analysis by gene disruption has indicated that about 32 kb of contiguous DNA of the cloned region contains genes involved in soraphen A biosynthesis. The nucleotide sequence of a 6.4-kb DNA fragment, derived from the region with homology to granaticin PKS genes, was determined. Analysis of this sequence has revealed the presence of a single large open reading frame beginning and ending outside the 6.4-kb fragment. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates the presence of a domain with a high level of similarity to beta-ketoacyl synthases that are involved in polyketide synthesis. Other domains with high levels of similarity to regions of known polyketide biosynthetic functions were identified, including those for acyl transferase, acyl carrier protein, ketoreductase, and dehydratase. We present data which indicate that soraphen A biosynthesis is catalyzed by large, multifunctional enzymes analogous to other bacterial PKSs of type I. PMID:7601830

  20. Unexpected nondenitrifier nitrous oxide reductase gene diversity and abundance in soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Members of the Anaeromyxobacter genus are versatile, facultative microaerophilic myxobacteria distributed in soils, aquifers and freshwater sediments. Anaeromyxobacter spp. grow with nitrate as electron acceptor via dissimilatory reduction to ammonium. Remarkably, the analysis of four available Anae...

  1. The pathway of leucine to mevalonate in halophilic archaea: efficient incorporation of leucine into isoprenoidal lipid with the involvement of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase in Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Noriaki

    2010-01-01

    The pathway of leucine to mevalonate, which has attracted attention in the study of the biosynthesis of isoprenoid in parasitic protozoa and myxobacterium, was observed in the biosynthesis of the lipid core in halophilic archaea. The involvement of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase was strongly suggested, with stereospecific conversion of the diastereotopic methyl group of leucine to isoprenoidal lipid.

  2. Novel Insights Into Microbial Uranium Reduction and Immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, F. E.; Fletcher, K.; Thomas, S.; Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.; Sanford, R.

    2010-12-01

    Many ferric iron- and manganese oxide-reducing bacteria affect the oxidation state and complexation of toxic radionuclides in subsurface environments. Relevant to uranium (U) speciation are bacteria that reduce predominantly water-soluble and mobile U(VI) to U(IV), which has reduced solubility and typically forms the uraninite (UO2) mineral. Gram-negative model organisms including Shewanella spp., Geobacter spp., and more recently Anaeromyxobacter spp. use U(VI) as growth-supporting electron acceptor; however, the biomass yields are lower than predicted based on the theoretical free energy changes associated with U(VI)-to-U(IV) reduction. Recent findings demonstrated that U(VI) reduction is not limited to Gram-negative bacteria, and members of the genus Desulfitobacterium, which are commonly found in soil and subsurface environments, share the ability to reduce U(VI). Interestingly, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in cultures of five Desulfitobacterium spp. was not UO2 but rather a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms. Since the properties of the reduced product influence U(IV) fate, knowledge of the diversity of U reduction mechanisms and the stability of the end products is desirable for controlling and predicting U fate. For example, UO2 is susceptible to reoxidation by oxidants, and oxic/anoxic interface processes are controlling the stability of the precipitated material. In other words, metal reducers that thrive at the oxic/anoxic interface are likely key players affecting long-term U fate. Anaeromyxobacter spp. are facultative microaerophiles and grow with oxygen as electron acceptor at partial pressures equal to or below 0.18 atm. Thus, Anaeromyxobacter are uniquely adapted to life at the oxic-anoxic interface where they consume oxygen and take advantage of oxidized metal species including U(VI) as electron acceptors. The application of 16S rRNA gene-targeted qPCR approaches

  3. Cruentaren, a new antifungal salicylate-type macrolide from Byssovorax cruenta (myxobacteria) with inhibitory effect on mitochondrial ATPase activity. Fermentation and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Brigitte; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Höfle, Gerhard; Huss, Markus; Wieczorek, Helmut; Reichenbach, Hans

    2006-10-01

    The novel macrolide cruentaren A was produced at levels up to 3.2 mg/liter by cultures of the myxobacterium Byssovorax cruenta. The new compound strongly inhibited the growth of yeasts and filamentous fungi and showed high cytotoxicity against L929 mouse fibroblast cells. A minor co-metabolite of cruentaren A, named cruentaren B, and identified as a six-membered lactone isomer of cruentaren A, showed only marginal cytotoxicity and no antifungal activity. Cruentaren A inhibited F0F1 mitochondrial ATP-hydrolysis in submitochondrial particles of yeasts and beef heart.

  4. Improved Understanding of Microbial Iron and Sulfate Reduction Through a Combination of Bottom-up and Top-down Functional Proteomics Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Ruth

    2016-02-28

    Our overall goal was to improve the understanding of microbial iron and sulfate reduction by evaluating a diverse iron and sulfate reducing organisms utilizing a multi-omics approach combining “top-down” and “bottom-up” omics methodologies. We initiated one of the first combined comparative genomics, shotgun proteomics, RTqPCR, and heterologous expression studies in pursuit of our project objectives. Within the first year of this project, we created a new bioinformatics tool for ortholog identification (“SPOCS”). SPOCS is described in our publication, Curtis et al., 2013. Using this tool we were able to identify conserved orthologous groups across diverse iron and sulfate reducing microorganisms from Firmicutes, gamma-proteobacteria and delta-proteobacteria. For six iron and sulfate reducers we also performed shotgun proteomics (“bottom-up” proteomics including accurate mass and time (AMT) tag and iTRAQ approaches). Cultures include Gram (-) and Gram (+) microbes. Gram (-) were: Geobacter sulfureducens (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Geobacter bemidjiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate), Shewanella oneidiensis (grown on iron citrate and fumarate) and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans (grown on iron citrate and fumarate). Although all cultures grew on insoluble iron, the iron precipitates interfered with protein extraction and analysis; which remains a major challenge for researchers in disparate study systems. Among the Gram (-) organisms studied, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans remains the most poorly characterized. Yet, it is arguably the most versatile organisms we studied. In this work we have used comparative proteomics to hypothesize which two of the dozens of predicted c-type cytochromes within Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans may be directly involved in soluble iron reduction. Unfortunately, heterologous expression of these Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans ctype cytochromes led to poor protein production and/or formation of inclusion bodies

  5. Predominant but Previously-overlooked Prokaryotic Drivers of Reductive Nitrogen Transformation in Paddy Soils, Revealed by Metatranscriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yoko; Itoh, Hideomi; Shiratori, Yutaka; Isobe, Kazuo; Otsuka, Shigeto; Senoo, Keishi

    2017-01-01

    Waterlogged paddy soils possess anoxic zones in which microbes actively induce reductive nitrogen transformation (RNT). In the present study, a shotgun RNA sequencing analysis (metatranscriptomics) of paddy soil samples revealed that most RNT gene transcripts in paddy soils were derived from Deltaproteobacteria, particularly the genera Anaeromyxobacter and Geobacter. Despite the frequent detection of the rRNA of these microbes in paddy soils, their RNT-associated genes have rarely been identified in previous PCR-based studies. This metatranscriptomic analysis provides novel insights into the diversity of RNT microbes present in paddy soils and the ecological function of Deltaproteobacteria predominating in these soils. PMID:28442658

  6. High abundance and diversity of iron-reducing bacteria in wet tropical forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinsky, E. A.; Brodie, E. L.; Andersen, G. L.; Silver, W. L.; Firestone, M. K.

    2005-12-01

    In wet tropical forests, warm and damp conditions promote rapid oxygen consumption in soils that contain high concentrations of iron oxides. Ferric iron is often the most abundant terminal electron acceptor for bacteria in soil during frequent periods of oxygen depletion. Highly-weathered soils of the wet tropics are likely to support large populations of Fe(III) reducing microorganisms whose activity is consequential to soil mineralogy and geochemistry. We studied the diversity and abundance of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria along a 700 m elevation gradient with variable soil redox conditions in northeast Puerto Rico. Culturable iron-reducers were enumerated, isolated and identified using five different media that contained poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides as the terminal electron acceptor. Entire soil microbial communities were characterized along the gradient using high-density 16S rRNA gene microarrays capable of detecting 9000 different bacterial and archaeal taxa and assessing changes in their spatial abundance. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria spanned the Proteobacteria and Firmicutes and included many previously unidentified Fe(III) reducers. Populations of culturable iron reducers numbered 108 to 1010 bacteria per gram soil, some of the highest numbers found in any soils or sediments, and population size increased significantly with elevation. These bacteria were dominated by both unclassified alpha- and gamma proteobacteria not previously known to reduce iron, in addition to delta-proteobacteria, such as the family Geobacteraceae, that are well-known Fe(III) reducers. The activity of this group of bacteria can affect biogeochemical cycles that are linked to iron and fundamental to tropical forest productivity, including phosphorus and carbon cycling.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lonergan, D.J.; Jenter, H.L.; Coates, J.D.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Schmidt, T.M.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among strictly anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)- reducing bacteria obtained from a diversity of sedimentary environments were examined by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Members of the genera Geobacter, Desulfuromonas, Pelobacter, and Desulfuromusa formed a monophyletic group within the delta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. On the basis of their common ancestry and the shared ability to reduce Fe(III) and/or S0, we propose that this group be considered a single family, Geobacteraceae. Bootstrap analysis, characteristic nucleotides, and higher- order secondary structures support the division of Geobacteraceae into two subgroups, designated the Geobacter and Desulfuromonas clusters. The genus Desulfuromusa and Pelobacter acidigallici make up a distinct branch with the Desulfuromonas cluster. Several members of the family Geobacteraceae, none of which reduce sulfate, were found to contain the target sequences of probes that have been previously used to define the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacterium-like microorganisms. The recent isolations of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms distributed throughout the domain Bacteria suggest that development of 16S rRNA probes that would specifically target all Fe(III) reducers may not be feasible. However, all of the evidence suggests that if a 16S rRNA sequence falls within the family Geobacteraceae, then the organism has the capacity for Fe(III) reduction. The suggestion, based on geological evidence, that Fe(III) reduction was the first globally significant process for oxidizing organic matter back to carbon dioxide is consistent with the finding that acetate-oxidizing Fe(III) reducers are phylogenetically diverse.

  8. Role of Humic-Bound Iron as an Electron Transfer Agent in Dissimilatory Fe(III) Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Blunt-Harris, Elizabeth L.

    1999-01-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens reduced Fe(III) bound in humic substances, but the concentrations of Fe(III) in a wide range of highly purified humic substances were too low to account for a significant portion of the electron-accepting capacities of the humic substances. Furthermore, once reduced, the iron in humic substances could not transfer electrons to Fe(III) oxide. These results suggest that other electron-accepting moieties in humic substances, such as quinones, are the important electron-accepting and shuttling agents under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. PMID:10473447

  9. Role of humic-bound iron as an electron transfer agent in dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Blunt-Harris, E L

    1999-09-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens reduced Fe(III) bound in humic substances, but the concentrations of Fe(III) in a wide range of highly purified humic substances were too low to account for a significant portion of the electron-accepting capacities of the humic substances. Furthermore, once reduced, the iron in humic substances could not transfer electrons to Fe(III) oxide. These results suggest that other electron-accepting moieties in humic substances, such as quinones, are the important electron-accepting and shuttling agents under Fe(III)-reducing conditions.

  10. Revealing the macromolecular targets of complex natural products.

    PubMed

    Reker, Daniel; Perna, Anna M; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Reutlinger, Michael; Mönch, Bettina; Koeberle, Andreas; Lamers, Christina; Gabler, Matthias; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Müller, Rolf; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Werz, Oliver; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-12-01

    Natural products have long been a source of useful biological activity for the development of new drugs. Their macromolecular targets are, however, largely unknown, which hampers rational drug design and optimization. Here we present the development and experimental validation of a computational method for the discovery of such targets. The technique does not require three-dimensional target models and may be applied to structurally complex natural products. The algorithm dissects the natural products into fragments and infers potential pharmacological targets by comparing the fragments to synthetic reference drugs with known targets. We demonstrate that this approach results in confident predictions. In a prospective validation, we show that fragments of the potent antitumour agent archazolid A, a macrolide from the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra, contain relevant information regarding its polypharmacology. Biochemical and biophysical evaluation confirmed the predictions. The results obtained corroborate the practical applicability of the computational approach to natural product 'de-orphaning'.

  11. Isolation, biology and chemistry of the disorazoles: new anti-cancer macrodiolides

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Chad D.; Wipf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The disorazoles comprise a family of 29 closely related macrocyclic polyketides isolated in 1994 from the fermentation broth of the gliding myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. Disorazoles A1, E and C1 have shown exceptional biological activities toward inhibiting the proliferation of human cancer cell lines in picomolar and nanomolar concentrations through the disruption of microtubule polymerization. This review gives a brief introduction describing the biosynthesis and the significance of the disorazoles as a new class of microtubulin disruptors. Another portion of the review focuses on the biology of the disorazoles, specifically disorazole A1 and C1, and their antiproliferative efficacy against animal and human tumor cell lines, as well as the available SAR data. The majority of the discussion addresses synthetic efforts, including partial syntheses of various disorazoles and a summary of the total synthesis of disorazole C1. PMID:19387496

  12. Revealing the macromolecular targets of complex natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reker, Daniel; Perna, Anna M.; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Reutlinger, Michael; Mönch, Bettina; Koeberle, Andreas; Lamers, Christina; Gabler, Matthias; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Müller, Rolf; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Werz, Oliver; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-12-01

    Natural products have long been a source of useful biological activity for the development of new drugs. Their macromolecular targets are, however, largely unknown, which hampers rational drug design and optimization. Here we present the development and experimental validation of a computational method for the discovery of such targets. The technique does not require three-dimensional target models and may be applied to structurally complex natural products. The algorithm dissects the natural products into fragments and infers potential pharmacological targets by comparing the fragments to synthetic reference drugs with known targets. We demonstrate that this approach results in confident predictions. In a prospective validation, we show that fragments of the potent antitumour agent archazolid A, a macrolide from the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra, contain relevant information regarding its polypharmacology. Biochemical and biophysical evaluation confirmed the predictions. The results obtained corroborate the practical applicability of the computational approach to natural product ‘de-orphaning’.

  13. Myxotyrosides A and B, Unusual rhamnosides from Myxococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Ohlendorf, Birgit; Lorenzen, Wolfram; Kehraus, Stefan; Krick, Anja; Bode, Helge B; König, Gabriele M

    2009-01-01

    Myxobacteria are gliding bacteria of the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria and known for their unique biosynthetic capabilities. Two examples of a new class of metabolites, myxotyrosides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from a Myxococcus sp. The myxotyrosides have a tyrosine-derived core structure glycosylated with rhamnose and acylated with unusual fatty acids such as (Z)-15-methyl-2-hexadecenoic and (Z)-2-hexadecenoic acid. The fatty acid profile of the investigated Myxococcus sp. (strain 131) is that of a typical myxobacterium with a high similarity to those described for M. fulvus and M. xanthus, with significant concentrations of neither 15-methyl-2-hexadecenoic acid nor 2-hexadecenoic acid being detected.

  14. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  15. Isolation of Geobacter species from diverse sedimentary environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coaxes, J.D.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lonergan, D.J.; Jenter, H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to better understand the microorganisms responsible for Fe(III) reduction in sedimentary environments, Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms were enriched for and isolated from freshwater aquatic sediments, a pristine deep aquifer, and a petroleum-contaminated shallow aquifer. Enrichments were initiated with acetate or toluene as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Isolations were made with acetate or benzoate. Five new strains which could obtain energy for growth by dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction were isolated. All five isolates are gram- negative strict anaerobes which grow with acetate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence of the isolated organisms demonstrated that they all belonged to the genus Geobacter in the delta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Unlike the type strain, Geobacter metallireducens, three of the five isolates could use H2 as an electron donor fur Fe(III) reduction. The deep subsurface isolate is the first Fe(III) reducer shown to completely oxidize lactate to carbon dioxide, while one of the freshwater sediment isolates is only the second Fe(III) reducer known that can oxidize toluene. The isolation of these organisms demonstrates that Geobacter species are widely distributed in a diversity of sedimentary environments in which Fe(III) reduction is an important process.

  16. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteriamore » from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides.« less

  17. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  18. CO2-induced shift in microbial activity affects carbon trapping and water quality in anoxic bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Santillan, Eugenio F. U.; Sanford, Robert A.; Altman, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity is a potentially important yet poorly understood control on the fate and environmental impact of CO2 that leaks into aquifers from deep storage reservoirs. In this study we examine how variation in CO2 abundance affected competition between Fe(III) and SO42--reducers in anoxic bioreactors inoculated with a mixed-microbial community from a freshwater aquifer. We performed two sets of experiments: one with low CO2 partial pressure (∼0.02 atm) in the headspace of the reactors and one with high CO2 partial pressure (∼1 atm). A fluid residence time of 35 days was maintained in the reactors by replacing one-fifth of the aqueous volume with fresh medium every seven days. The aqueous medium was composed of groundwater amended with small amounts of acetate (250 μM), phosphate (1 μM), and ammonium (50 μM) to stimulate microbial activity. Synthetic goethite (1 mmol) and SO42- (500 μM influent concentration) were also available in each reactor to serve as electron acceptors. Results of this study show that higher CO2 abundance increased the ability of Fe(III) reducers to compete with SO42- reducers, leading to significant shifts in CO2 trapping and water quality. Mass-balance calculations and pyrosequencing results demonstrate that SO42- reducers were dominant in reactors with low CO2 content. They consumed 85% of the acetate after acetate consumption reached steady state while Fe(III) reducers consumed only 15% on average. In contrast, Fe(III) reducers were dominant during that same interval in reactors with high CO2 content, consuming at least 90% of the acetate while SO42- reducers consumed a negligible amount (<1%). The higher rate of Fe(III) reduction in the high-CO2 bioreactors enhanced CO2 solubility trapping relative to the low-CO2 bioreactors by increasing alkalinity generation (6X). Hence, the shift in microbial activity we observed was a positive feedback on CO2 trapping. More rapid Fe(III) reduction degraded water quality, however, by leading to high Fe(II) concentration.

  19. pH gradient-induced heterogeneity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in coal mining-associated lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Blothe, M.; Akob, D.M.; Kostka, J.E.; Goschel, K.; Drake, H.L.; Kusel, K.

    2008-02-15

    Lakes formed because of coal mining are characterized by low pH and high concentrations of Fe(II) and sulfate. The anoxic sediment is often separated into an upper acidic zone (pH 3; zone 1) with large amounts of reactive iron and a deeper slightly acidic zone (pH 5.5; zone III) with smaller amounts of iron. In this study, the impact of pH on the Fe(III)-reducing activities in both of these sediment zones was investigated, and molecular analyses that elucidated the sediment microbial diversity were performed. The results demonstrated that the upper acidic sediment was inhabited by acidophiles or moderate acidophiles which can also reduce Fe(III) under slightly acidic conditions. The majority of Fe(III) reducers inhabiting the slightly acidic sediment had only minor capacities to be active under acidic conditions.

  20. Putative Mineral-Specific Proteins Synthesized by a Metal Reducing Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Hochella Jr., Michael F.; Lower, Steven K.

    2006-02-01

    Biological force microscopy (BFM) was combined with two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify outer membrane proteins (OM) from Shewanella oneidensis that are involved in anaerobic Fe(III) reduction. This is the first time that biophysical force measurements have been coupled with protein expression patterns to search for evidence of putative mineral-specific proteins synthesized by bacteria. BFM shows that S. oneidensis possess an affinity towards goethite (FeOOH) but not diaspore (AlOOH) under anaerobic conditions, despite the fact that diaspore is isostructural with goethite and has essentially the same surface charge. The worm-like chain model was used to identify force-signatures in BFM-derived force curves indicative of putative outer membrane (OM) polypeptides synthesized by S. oneidensis to form a bond with goethite. Protein expression patterns from OM extract of cells grown under anaerobic Fe(III) reducing versus aerobic conditions show that approximately 400 protein spots exhibit significant differences in abundance on 2D gels. Peptide mass fingerprinting and tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify several of the protein spots that were significantly more abundant in 2D gels from OM extract of cells grown under anaerobic Fe(III) reducing conditions. Among those identified were proteins involved in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, protein transport and secretion, polysaccharide biosynthesis and export, and hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. Together, the BFM and proteomic data suggest that OM proteins are synthesized by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions to function in iron oxide binding and/or Fe(III) reduction. If this is the case, then it is possible that the evolution of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria like Shewanella, could have been, at least in part, driven by the binding/reduction ability of certain proteins to specific mineral phases.

  1. Synergistic iron reduction and citrate dissimilation by Shewanella alga and Aeromonas veronii

    PubMed

    Knight; Caccavo; Wudyka; Blakemore

    1996-10-17

    Two bacterial isolates from Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, in co-culture carried out anaerobic dissimilation of citric acid with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor. Neither isolate oxidized citrate with Fe(III) anaerobically in axenic culture. The Fe(III) reducer, Shewanella alga strain BrY, did not grow anaerobically with citrate as an energy source. The citrate utilizer, Aeromonas veronii, did not reduce iron axenically with a variety of electron donors including citrate. The onset of iron reduction by the co-culture occurred after initiation of citrate dissimilation and just prior to initiation of growth by either organism (as measured by viable plate counts). Anaerobic culture growth rates and final cell densities of each bacterial strain were greater in co-culture than in axenic cultures. By 48 h of growth, the co-culture had consumed 27 mM citrate as compared with 12 mM dissimilated by the axenic culture of A. veronii. By 48 h the co-culture produced half as much formate (6 mM) and twice as much acetate (40 mM) as did A. veronii grown axenically (12 mM and 20 mM, respectively). Formate produced from citrate by A. veronii appeared to have supported growth and Fe(III) reduction by S. alga.Although not obligatory, nutrient coupling between these two organisms illustrates that fermentative (A. veronii-type) organisms can convert organic compounds such as citrate to those used as substrates by dissimilatory Fe(III) reducers, including S. alga. This synergism broadens the range of substrates available for iron reduction, stimulates the extent and rate of organic electron donor degradation (and that of iron reduction) and enhances the growth of each participant.

  2. Microbially-mediated transformation and mobilization of soil Fe-organic associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggenburg, Christine; Mikutta, Robert; Schippers, Axel; Dohrmann, Reiner; Kaufhold, Stephan; Guggenberger, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) has been proposed to be stabilized in the long term via sorption to iron((oxy)hydr)oxides under aerobic conditions. However, in an anaerobic environment, Fe-organic associations may be subject to microbial reduction and mobilization, which counteract the suggested stabilizing effect of Fe compounds. Desorption of OM can result in its microbial decomposition causing the emission of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O) or release of associated contaminants into the soil solution and groundwater. While the reductive dissolution of pure iron((oxy)hydr)oxides by dissimilatory FeIII reducing bacteria is well established, little is known about the influence of natural OM on microbially mediated mobilization of Fe-organic associations. Therefore, this study aims to elucidate the effect of adsorbed OM on microbial FeIII reduction of Fe-organic associations with regard to (i) the composition of OM, (ii) the carbon loading, and (iii) surface coverage and/or pore blockage by adsorbed OM. Mineral-organic associations with varying carbon contents were synthesized using several iron((oxy)hydr)oxides (Goethite, Lepidocrocite, Ferrihydrite, Hematite, Magnetite) and OM of different origin (dissolved OM extracted from the Oa horizon of a Podzol and Oi horizon of a Cambisol, extracellular polymeric substance extracted from Bacillus subtilis). Incubation experiments under anaerobic conditions were conducted for 16 days using two different strains of dissimilatory FeIII reducing bacteria (Shewanella putrefaciens, Geobacter metallireducens). At five sampling points in time the solution phase was analyzed for pH, Fetotal, and FeII. The initial mineral-organic associations and post-incubation phase were characterized by N2 gas adsorption, FTIR, XRD, and XPS. The results indicate that the composition of OM and carbon loading significantly influence the rate and extend of microbial reduction of Fe-organic associations depending on the type of microbial strain and iron((oxy)hydr)oxide used.

  3. Reactive iron(III) in sediments: Chemical versus microbial extractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyacinthe, C.; Bonneville, S.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2006-08-01

    The availability of particulate Fe(III) to iron reducing microbial communities in sediments and soils is generally inferred indirectly by performing chemical extractions. In this study, the bioavailability of mineral-bound Fe(III) in intertidal sediments of a eutrophic estuary is assessed directly by measuring the kinetics and extent of Fe(III) utilization by the iron reducing microorganism Shewanella putrefaciens, in the presence of excess electron donor. Microbial Fe(III) reduction is compared to chemical dissolution of iron from the same sediments in buffered ascorbate-citrate solution (pH 7.5), ascorbic acid (pH 2), and 1 M HCl. The results confirm that ascorbate at near-neutral pH selectively reduces the reactive Fe(III) pool, while the acid extractants mobilize additional Fe(II) and less reactive Fe(III) mineral phases. Furthermore, the maximum concentrations of Fe(III) reducible by S. putrefaciens correlate linearly with the iron concentrations extracted by buffered ascorbate-citrate solution, but not with those of the acid extractions. However, on average, only 65% of the Fe(III) reduced in buffered ascorbate-citrate solution can be utilized by S. putrefaciens, probably due to physical inaccessibility of the remaining fraction of reactive Fe(III) to the cells. While the microbial and abiotic reaction kinetics further indicate that reduction by ascorbate at near-neutral pH most closely resembles microbial reduction of the sediment Fe(III) pool by S. putrefaciens, the results also highlight fundamental differences between chemical reductive dissolution and microbial utilization of mineral-bound ferric iron.

  4. Genetic engineering and heterologous expression of the disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster via Red/ET recombineering.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qiang; Herrmann, Jennifer; Hu, Shengbiao; Raju, Ritesh; Bian, Xiaoying; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2016-02-15

    Disorazol, a macrocyclic polykitide produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce12 and it is reported to have potential cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cells. The disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster (dis) from Sorangium cellulosum (So ce12) was identified by transposon mutagenesis and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The 58-kb dis core gene cluster was reconstituted from BACs via Red/ET recombineering and expressed in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622. For the first time ever, a myxobacterial trans-AT polyketide synthase has been expressed heterologously in this study. Expression in M. xanthus allowed us to optimize the yield of several biosynthetic products using promoter engineering. The insertion of an artificial synthetic promoter upstream of the disD gene encoding a discrete acyl transferase (AT), together with an oxidoreductase (Or), resulted in 7-fold increase in disorazol production. The successful reconstitution and expression of the genetic sequences encoding for these promising cytotoxic compounds will allow combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel disorazol derivatives for further bioactivity evaluation.

  5. Scrutiny of electrochemically-driven electrocatalysis of C-19 steroid 1α-hydroxylase (CYP260A1) from Sorangium cellulosum So ce56.

    PubMed

    Kuzikov, Alexey V; Masamrekh, Rami A; Khatri, Yogan; Zavialova, Maria G; Bernhardt, Rita; Archakov, Alexander I; Shumyantseva, Victoria V

    2016-11-15

    Direct electrochemistry and bioelectrocatalysis of a newly discovered C-19 steroid 1α-hydroxylase (CYP260A1) from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce56 were investigated. CYP260A1 was immobilized on screen-printed graphite electrodes (SPE) modified with gold nanoparticles, stabilized by didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (SPE/DDAB/Au). Cyclic voltammograms in argon-saturated substrate free 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, and in enzyme-substrate complex with androstenedione demonstrated a redox processes with a single redox couple of E(0') of -299 ± 16 mV and -297.5 ± 21 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. CYP260A1 exhibited an electrocatalytic activity detected by an increase of the reduction current in the presence of dissolved oxygen and upon addition of the substrate (androstenedione) in the air-saturated buffer. The catalytic current of the enzyme correlated with substrate concentration in the electrochemical system and this dependence can be described by electrochemical Michaelis-Menten model. The products of CYP260A1-depended electrolysis at controlled working electrode potential of androstenedione were analyzed by mass-spectrometry. MS analysis revealed a mono-hydroxylated product of CYP260A1-dependent electrocatalytic reaction towards androstenedione. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cruentaren A, a highly cytotoxic benzolactone from Myxobacteria is a novel selective inhibitor of mitochondrial F1-ATPases.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Brigitte; Sasse, Florenz; Wieczorek, Helmut; Huss, Markus

    2007-07-24

    Cruentaren A, a new antifungal benzolactone produced by the myxobacterium Byssovorax cruenta, proved to be highly cytotoxic against various human cell lines. It inhibited the proliferation of different cancer cell lines including a multidrug-resistant KB line at low nanomolar levels. It arrested human histocytic lymphoma cells (U-937) in G(0/1) phase, but did not trigger an apoptotic process. Studies to uncover the molecular target of cruentaren A showed that the novel compound, despite its structural similarity to the benzolactone enamides apicularen and salicylihalamide, was no V-ATPase inhibitor. In contrast, cruentaren specifically inhibited mitochondrial F(O)F(1)-ATPases with IC50 values of 15-30 nM. Although the exact binding site of cruentaren remains undefined, inhibition was shown to occur by interaction with the catalytic F(1) domain. Since mitochondrial ATPases play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of several human disorders including cancer, cruentaren or synthetic derivatives thereof could form the basis of future therapeutic strategies.

  7. Naturally mosaic operons for secondary metabolite biosynthesis: variability and putative horizontal transfer of discrete catalytic domains of the epothilone polyketide synthase locus.

    PubMed

    Lopez, J V

    2003-12-01

    A putative instance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) involving adjacent, discrete beta-ketoacyl synthase (KS), acyl carrier protein (ACP) and nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) domains of the epothilone Type I polyketide biosynthetic gene cluster from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosom was identified using molecular phylogenetics and sequence analyses. The specific KS domain of the module EPO B fails to cluster phylogenetically with other epothilone KS sequences present at this locus, in contrast to what is typically observed in many other Type I polyketide synthase (PKS) biosynthetic loci. Furthermore, the GC content of the epoB KS, epoA ACP and NRPS domains differs significantly from the base composition of other epothilone domain sequences. In addition, the putatively transferred epothilone loci are located near previously identified transposon-like sequences. Lastly, comparison with other KS loci revealed another possible case of horizontal transfer of secondary metabolite genes in the genus Pseudomonas. This study emphasizes the use of several lines of concordant evidence (phylogenetics, base composition, transposon sequences) to infer the evolutionary history of particular gene and enzyme sequences, and the results support the idea that genes coding for adaptive traits, e.g. defensive natural products, may be prone to transposition between divergent prokaryotic taxa and genomes.

  8. Isolated fibrils rescue cohesion and development in the Dsp mutant of Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, B Y; Dworkin, M

    1994-01-01

    Extracellular fibrils are involved in cell cohesion and cell development in Myxococcus xanthus. One group of social motility mutants, Dsp, is unable to produce extracellular fibrils; these mutants also lose the abilities to cohere and to develop. Extracellular fibrils isolated from vegetative wild-type cells and added to Dsp cells fully restored the abilities of these cells to cohere and to undergo normal morphological development. The fibrils thus mimic the ability of intact, wild-type cells to carry out the same rescue. Optimal cohesion rescue by fibrils required calcium and magnesium ions, did not require protein synthesis, but was energy dependent, i.e., sodium azide and sodium cyanide blocked rescue. Cohesion rescue was also blocked by the diazo dye Congo red. Cohesion rescue is genus specific, i.e., isolated fibrils did not cause the cohesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, or the related myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca. Developmental rescue of Dsp by isolated fibrils included aggregation, fruiting body formation, and myxospore morphogenesis. Developmental gene expression in the Dsp mutant was only partially rescued by the isolated fibrils. Images PMID:7961490

  9. Assembly of Robust Bacterial Microcompartment Shells Using Building Blocks from an Organelle of Unknown Function

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, JK; Bernstein, SL; Kinney, JN; Axen, SD; Kerfeld, CA

    2014-05-29

    Bacterial microconnpartnnents (BMCs) sequester enzymes from the cytoplasmic environment by encapsulation inside a selectively permeable protein shell. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that many bacteria encode BMC clusters of unknown function and with diverse combinations of shell proteins. The genome of the halophilic myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum encodes one of the most atypical sets of shell proteins in terms of composition and primary structure. We found that microconnpartnnent shells could be purified in high yield when all seven H. ochraceum BMC shell genes were expressed from a synthetic operon in Escherichia coll. These shells differ substantially from previously isolated shell systems in that they are considerably smaller and more homogeneous, with measured diameters of 39 2 nm. The size and nearly uniform geometry allowed the development of a structural model for the shells composed of 260 hexagonal units and 13 hexagons per icosahedral face. We found that new proteins could be recruited to the shells by fusion to a predicted targeting peptide sequence, setting the stage for the use of these remarkably homogeneous shells for applications such as three-dimensional scaffolding and the construction of synthetic BMCs. Our results demonstrate the value of selecting from the diversity of BMC shell building blocks found in genomic sequence data for the construction of novel compartments. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Machine Learning Estimates of Natural Product Conformational Energies

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Matthias; Bauer, Matthias R.; Wilcken, Rainer; Lange, Andreas; Reutlinger, Michael; Boeckler, Frank M.; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning has been used for estimation of potential energy surfaces to speed up molecular dynamics simulations of small systems. We demonstrate that this approach is feasible for significantly larger, structurally complex molecules, taking the natural product Archazolid A, a potent inhibitor of vacuolar-type ATPase, from the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra as an example. Our model estimates energies of new conformations by exploiting information from previous calculations via Gaussian process regression. Predictive variance is used to assess whether a conformation is in the interpolation region, allowing a controlled trade-off between prediction accuracy and computational speed-up. For energies of relaxed conformations at the density functional level of theory (implicit solvent, DFT/BLYP-disp3/def2-TZVP), mean absolute errors of less than 1 kcal/mol were achieved. The study demonstrates that predictive machine learning models can be developed for structurally complex, pharmaceutically relevant compounds, potentially enabling considerable speed-ups in simulations of larger molecular structures. PMID:24453952

  11. Heterologous production of epothilones B and D in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Ryeol; Park, Je Won; Jung, Won Seok; Han, Ah Reum; Ban, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Eun Ji; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Sim, Sang Jun; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2008-11-01

    Epothilones, produced from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, are potential anticancer agents that stabilize microtubules in a similar manner to paclitaxel. The entire epothilone biosynthetic gene cluster was heterologously expressed in an engineered strain of Streptomyces venezuelae bearing a deletion of pikromycin polyketide synthase gene cluster. The resulting strains produced approximately 0.1 microg/l of epothilone B as a sole product after 4 days cultivation. Deletion of an epoF encoding the cytochrome P450 epoxidase gave rise to a mutant that selectively produces 0.4 microg/l of epothilone D. To increase the production level of epothilones B and D, an additional copy of the positive regulatory gene pikD was introduced into the chromosome of both S. venezuleae mutant strains. The resulting strains showed enhanced production of corresponding compounds (approximately 2-fold). However, deletion of putative transport genes, orf3 and orf14 in the epothilone D producing S. venezuelae mutant strain, led to an approximately 3-fold reduction in epothilone D production. These results introduce S. venezuelae as an alternative heterologous host for the production of these valuable anticancer agents and demonstrate the possibility of engineering this strain as a generic heterologous host for the production of polyketides and hybrid polyketide-nonribosomal peptides.

  12. Enhanced Production of Epothilone by Immobilized Sorangium cellulosum in Porous Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Gong, Guo-Li; Huang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Li-Li; Chen, Xue-Feng; Liu, Huan

    2015-10-01

    Epothilone, which is produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, contributes significant value in medicinal development. However, under submerged culture conditions, S. cellulosum will accumulate to form bacterial clumps, which hinder nutrient and metabolite transportation. Therefore, the production of epothilone by liquid fermentation is limited. In this study, diatomite-based porous ceramics were made from diatomite, paraffin, and poremaking agent (saw dust). Appropriate methods to modify the porous ceramics were also identified. After optimizing the preparation and modification conditions, we determined the optimal prescription to prepare high-performance porous ceramics. The structure of porous ceramics can provide a solid surface area where S. cellulosum can grow and metabolize to prevent the formation of bacterial clumps. S. cellulosum cells that do not form clumps will change their erratic metabolic behavior under submerged culture conditions. As a result, the unstable production of epothilone by this strain can be changed in the fermentation process, and the purpose of increasing epothilone production can be achieved. After 8 days of fermentation under optimized conditions, the epothilone yield reached 90.2 mg/l, which was increased four times compared with the fermentation without porous ceramics.

  13. Origins of Replication in Sorangium cellulosum and Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Zhang, Chun-Ting

    2008-01-01

    The genome of Sorangium cellulosum has recently been completely sequenced, and it is the largest bacterial genome sequenced so far. In their report, Schneiker et al. (in Complete genome sequence of the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum, Nat. Biotechnol., 2007, 25, 1281–1289) concluded that ‘In the absence of the GC-skew inversion typically seen at the replication origin of bacterial chromosomes, it was not possible to discern the location of oriC’. In addition, the complete genome of Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843 has also been recently sequenced, and in this report, Kaneko et al. (in Complete genomic structure of the bloom-forming toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843, DNA Res., 2007, 14, 247–256) concluded that ‘there was no characteristic pattern, according to GC skew analysis’. Therefore, oriC locations of the above genomes remain unsolved. Using Ori-Finder, a recently developed computer program, in both genomes, we have identified candidate oriC regions that have almost all sequence hallmarks of bacterial oriCs, such as asymmetrical nucleotide distributions, being adjacent to the dnaN gene, and containing DnaA boxes and repeat elements. PMID:18477575

  14. Discovery of the rhizopodin biosynthetic gene cluster in Stigmatella aurantiaca Sg a15 by genome mining.

    PubMed

    Pistorius, Dominik; Müller, Rolf

    2012-02-13

    The field of bacterial natural product research is currently undergoing a paradigm change concerning the discovery of natural products. Previously most efforts were based on isolation of the most abundant compound in an extract, or on tracking bioactivity. However, traditional activity-guided approaches are limited by the available test panels and frequently lead to the rediscovery of already known compounds. The constantly increasing availability of bacterial genome sequences provides the potential for the discovery of a huge number of new natural compounds by in silico identification of biosynthetic gene clusters. Examination of the information on the biosynthetic machinery can further prevent rediscovery of known compounds, and can help identify so far unknown biosynthetic pathways of known compounds. By in silico screening of the genome of the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca Sg a15, a trans-AT polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS) gene cluster was identified that could not be correlated to any secondary metabolite known to be produced by this strain. Targeted gene inactivation and analysis of extracts from the resulting mutants by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS), in combination with the use of statistical tools resulted in the identification of a compound that was absent in the mutants extracts. By matching with our in-house database of myxobacterial secondary metabolites, this compound was identified as rhizopodin. A detailed analysis of the rhizopodin biosynthetic machinery is presented in this manuscript.

  15. Complete Genome of the Starch-Degrading Myxobacteria Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria are members of δ-proteobacteria and are typified by large genomes, well-coordinated social behavior, gliding motility, and starvation-induced fruiting body formation. Here, we report the 10.33 Mb whole genome of a starch-degrading myxobacterium Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T that encodes 8,962 proteins, 56 tRNA, and two rRNA operons. Phylogenetic analysis, in silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity reveal its divergence from other myxobacterial species and support its taxonomic characterization into a separate family Sandaracinaceae, within the suborder Sorangiineae. Sequence similarity searches using the Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZyme) database help identify the enzyme repertoire of S. amylolyticus involved in starch, agar, chitin, and cellulose degradation. We identified 16 α-amylases and two γ-amylases in the S. amylolyticus genome that likely play a role in starch degradation. While many of the amylases are seen conserved in other δ-proteobacteria, we notice several novel amylases acquired via horizontal transfer from members belonging to phylum Deinococcus-Thermus, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. No agar degrading enzyme(s) were identified in the S. amylolyticus genome. Interestingly, several putative β-glucosidases and endoglucanases proteins involved in cellulose degradation were identified. However, the absence of cellobiohydrolases/exoglucanases corroborates with the lack of cellulose degradation by this bacteria. PMID:27358428

  16. Complete Genome of the Starch-Degrading Myxobacteria Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668T.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Khatri, Indu; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-08-29

    Myxobacteria are members of δ-proteobacteria and are typified by large genomes, well-coordinated social behavior, gliding motility, and starvation-induced fruiting body formation. Here, we report the 10.33 Mb whole genome of a starch-degrading myxobacterium Sandaracinus amylolyticus DSM 53668(T) that encodes 8,962 proteins, 56 tRNA, and two rRNA operons. Phylogenetic analysis, in silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity reveal its divergence from other myxobacterial species and support its taxonomic characterization into a separate family Sandaracinaceae, within the suborder Sorangiineae. Sequence similarity searches using the Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZyme) database help identify the enzyme repertoire of S. amylolyticus involved in starch, agar, chitin, and cellulose degradation. We identified 16 α-amylases and two γ-amylases in the S. amylolyticus genome that likely play a role in starch degradation. While many of the amylases are seen conserved in other δ-proteobacteria, we notice several novel amylases acquired via horizontal transfer from members belonging to phylum Deinococcus-Thermus, Acidobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. No agar degrading enzyme(s) were identified in the S. amylolyticus genome. Interestingly, several putative β-glucosidases and endoglucanases proteins involved in cellulose degradation were identified. However, the absence of cellobiohydrolases/exoglucanases corroborates with the lack of cellulose degradation by this bacteria.

  17. Genetic engineering and heterologous expression of the disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster via Red/ET recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Herrmann, Jennifer; Hu, Shengbiao; Raju, Ritesh; Bian, Xiaoying; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Disorazol, a macrocyclic polykitide produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce12 and it is reported to have potential cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cells. The disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster (dis) from Sorangium cellulosum (So ce12) was identified by transposon mutagenesis and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The 58-kb dis core gene cluster was reconstituted from BACs via Red/ET recombineering and expressed in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622. For the first time ever, a myxobacterial trans-AT polyketide synthase has been expressed heterologously in this study. Expression in M. xanthus allowed us to optimize the yield of several biosynthetic products using promoter engineering. The insertion of an artificial synthetic promoter upstream of the disD gene encoding a discrete acyl transferase (AT), together with an oxidoreductase (Or), resulted in 7-fold increase in disorazol production. The successful reconstitution and expression of the genetic sequences encoding for these promising cytotoxic compounds will allow combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel disorazol derivatives for further bioactivity evaluation. PMID:26875499

  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Analogues of Ripostatins

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wufeng; Liu, Shuang; Degen, David; Ebright, Richard H.; Prusov, Evgeny V.

    2014-01-01

    Ripostatins are polyene macrolactones isolated from myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. They exhibit antibiotic activity by inhibiting bacterial RNA-polymerase through a binding site and mechanism different from those of current antibacterial drugs and thus serve as starting pointsfor the development of new anti-infective agents with a novel mode of action. In this work, several derivatives of ripostatins were produced. The 15-desoxy-ripostatin A was synthesized using one-pot carboalumination/cross-coupling. The 5,6-dihydro-ripostatin A was constructed utilizing an intramolecular Suzuki cross-coupling macrolactonization approach, and 14,14'-difluroripostatin A and both epimeric 14,14'-difluroripostatins B were synthesized using a Reformatsky-type aldol addition of haloketone, Stille cross-coupling and ring-closing metathesis. RNAP-inhibitrory and antibacterial activities are presented. Structure-activity relationships indicate that that the monocyclic keto-ol form of ripostatin A is the active form of ripostatin A, that the ripostatin 5-6 unsaturation is important for activity, and that C14 geminal difluorination can be introduced into ripostatin B without loss of activity PMID:25112727

  19. Structural basis of head to head polyketide fusion by CorB† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Result of the feeding experiments, synthesis of 1 including 1H NMR and 13C NMR, sequence analysis, X-ray data statistics, topology plot, structure comparison, density representation, primer sequences and strains and plasmids. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc02488a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Zocher, Georg; Vilstrup, Joachim; Heine, Daniel; Hallab, Asis; Goralski, Emilie; Hertweck, Christian; Stahl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Corallopyronin A is a polyketide derived from the myxobacterium Corallococcus coralloides with potent antibiotic features. The gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of corallopyronin A has been described recently, and it was proposed that CorB acts as a ketosynthase to interconnect two polyketide chains in a rare head-to-head condensation reaction. We determined the structure of CorB, the interconnecting polyketide synthase, to high resolution and found that CorB displays a thiolase fold. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the catalytic triad consisting of a cysteine, a histidine and an asparagine is crucial for catalysis, and that this triad shares similarities with the triad found in HMG-CoA synthases. We synthesized a substrate mimic to derivatize purified CorB and confirmed substrate attachment by ESI-MS. Structural analysis of the complex yielded an electron density-based model for the polyketide chain and showed that the unusually wide, T-shaped active site is able to accommodate two polyketides simultaneously. Our structural analysis provides a platform for understanding the unusual head-to-head polyketide-interconnecting reaction catalyzed by CorB. PMID:28757960

  20. Genomic analyses of bacterial porin-cytochrome gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.

    2014-11-26

    In this study, the porin-cytochrome (Pcc) protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c type cytochrome (c-Cyt) and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters) of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr) gene clusters of other Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular

  1. Dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

    PubMed

    Lovley, Derek R; Holmes, Dawn E; Nevin, Kelly P

    2004-01-01

    Dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction has an important influence on the geochemistry of modern environments, and Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms, most notably those in the Geobacteraceae family, can play an important role in the bioremediation of subsurface environments contaminated with organic or metal contaminants. Microorganisms with the capacity to conserve energy from Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction are phylogenetically dispersed throughout the Bacteria and Archaea. The ability to oxidize hydrogen with the reduction of Fe(III) is a highly conserved characteristic of hyperthermophilic microorganisms and one Fe(III)-reducing Archaea grows at the highest temperature yet recorded for any organism. Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to oxidize a wide variety of organic compounds, often completely to carbon dioxide. Typical alternative electron acceptors for Fe(III) reducers include oxygen, nitrate, U(VI) and electrodes. Unlike other commonly considered electron acceptors, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, the most prevalent form of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) in most environments, are insoluble. Thus, Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganisms face the dilemma of how to transfer electrons derived from central metabolism onto an insoluble, extracellular electron acceptor. Although microbiological and geochemical evidence suggests that Fe(III) reduction may have been the first form of microbial respiration, the capacity for Fe(III) reduction appears to have evolved several times as phylogenetically distinct Fe(III) reducers have different mechanisms for Fe(III) reduction. Geobacter species, which are representative of the family of Fe(III) reducers that predominate in a wide diversity of sedimentary environments, require direct contact with Fe(III) oxides in order to reduce them. In contrast, Shewanella and Geothrix species produce chelators that solubilize Fe(III) and release electron-shuttling compounds that transfer electrons from the cell surface to the surface of Fe(III) oxides not in direct contact with the cells. Electron transfer from the inner membrane to the outer membrane in Geobacter and Shewanella species appears to involve an electron transport chain of inner-membrane, periplasmic, and outer-membrane c-type cytochromes, but the cytochromes involved in these processes in the two organisms are different. In addition, Geobacter species specifically express flagella and pili during growth on Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and are chemotactic to Fe(II) and Mn(II), which may lead Geobacter species to the oxides under anoxic conditions. The physiological characteristics of Geobacter species appear to explain why they have consistently been found to be the predominant Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganisms in a variety of sedimentary environments. In comparison with other respiratory processes, the study of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction is in its infancy, but genome-enabled approaches are rapidly advancing our understanding of this environmentally significant physiology.

  2. Biomineralization Associated with Microbial Reduction of Fe3+ and Oxidation of Fe2+ in Solid Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Hailiang; Jiang, Hongchen; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Kim, Jinwook; Eberl, Dennis D.; Xu, Zhiqin

    2009-07-01

    Iron- reducing and oxidizing microorganisms gain energy through reduction or oxidation of iron, and by doing so they play an important role in geochemical cycling of iron in a wide range of environments. This study was undertaken to investigate iron redox cycling in the deep subsurface by taking an advantage of the Chinese Continental Scientific Deep Drilling project. A fluid sample from 2450 m was collected and Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms were enriched using specific media (pH 6.2). Nontronite, an Fe(III)-rich clay mineral, was used in initial enrichments with lactate and acetate as electron donors under strictly anaerobic condition at the in-situ temperature of the fluid sample (65oC). Instead of a monotonic increase in Fe(II) concentration with time as would have been expected if Fe(III) bioreduction was the sole process, Fe(II) concentration initially increased, reached a peak, but then decreased to a minimum level. Continued incubation revealed an iron cycling with a cycling period of five to ten days. These initial results suggested that there might be Fe(III) reducers and Fe(II) oxidizers in the enrichment culture. Subsequently, multiple transfers were made with an attempt to isolate individual Fe(III) reducers and Fe(II) oxidizers. However, iron cycling persisted after multiple transfers. Additional experiments were conducted to ensure that iron reduction and oxidation was indeed biological. Biological Fe(II) oxidation was further confirmed in a series of roll tubes (with a pH gradient) where FeS and siderite were used as the sole electron donor. The oxidation of FeS occurred only at pH 10, and goethite, lepidocrocite, and ferrihydrite formed as oxidation products. Although molecular evidence (16S rRNA gene analysis) collectively suggested that only a single organism (a strain of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus) might be responsible for both Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation, we could not rule out the possibility that Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation may be accomplished by a consortia of organisms. Nonetheless, our data were definitive in showing that iron redox cycling exists in the deep subsurface.

  3. Complex Interactions Between the Macrophyte Acorus Calamus and Microbial Fuel Cells During Pyrene and Benzo[a]Pyrene Degradation in Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zaisheng; Jiang, Helong; Cai, Haiyuan; Zhou, Yanli; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interaction of the macrophyte Acorus calamus and sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFC) during the degradation of high molecular weight-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) in sediments. Over 367-days, the combination of macrophyte and SMFC led to an increase in pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene degradation rates by at least 70% compared to SMFC or macrophyte alone. While either the macrophyte or SMFC increased redox potential in sediments, redox potentials near the anode (approximately 6 cm depth) in the macrophyte-SMFC combination were markedly lower than that in the only macrophyte treatment. Moreover, rhizospheric bacterial communities in macrophyte-SMFC and macrophyte treatments were distinctly different. Aerobic genera (Vogesella, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Rhizobium) and anaerobic genera (Longilinea, Bellilinea, Desulfobacca and Anaeromyxobacter) became dominant in the rhizosphere in macrophyte and macrophyte-SMFC treatments, respectively. In addition, the macrophyte-SMFC combination improved the numbers of not only aerobic but anaerobic PAHs degraders in sediments. So, the SMFC employment facilitated the formation of anoxic zones in sediments with oxygen loss and exudates from the roots. As a result, cooperation of anaerobic/aerobic microbial metabolism for accelerating HMW-PAHs removal occurred within sediments after combining macrophytes with SMFC. PMID:26023748

  4. Complex Interactions Between the Macrophyte Acorus Calamus and Microbial Fuel Cells During Pyrene and Benzo[a]Pyrene Degradation in Sediments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zaisheng; Jiang, Helong; Cai, Haiyuan; Zhou, Yanli; Krumholz, Lee R

    2015-05-29

    This study investigated the interaction of the macrophyte Acorus calamus and sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFC) during the degradation of high molecular weight-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) in sediments. Over 367-days, the combination of macrophyte and SMFC led to an increase in pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene degradation rates by at least 70% compared to SMFC or macrophyte alone. While either the macrophyte or SMFC increased redox potential in sediments, redox potentials near the anode (approximately 6 cm depth) in the macrophyte-SMFC combination were markedly lower than that in the only macrophyte treatment. Moreover, rhizospheric bacterial communities in macrophyte-SMFC and macrophyte treatments were distinctly different. Aerobic genera (Vogesella, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Rhizobium) and anaerobic genera (Longilinea, Bellilinea, Desulfobacca and Anaeromyxobacter) became dominant in the rhizosphere in macrophyte and macrophyte-SMFC treatments, respectively. In addition, the macrophyte-SMFC combination improved the numbers of not only aerobic but anaerobic PAHs degraders in sediments. So, the SMFC employment facilitated the formation of anoxic zones in sediments with oxygen loss and exudates from the roots. As a result, cooperation of anaerobic/aerobic microbial metabolism for accelerating HMW-PAHs removal occurred within sediments after combining macrophytes with SMFC.

  5. Role of nanoparticles in controlling arsenic mobilization from sediments near a realgar tailing.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guowen; Huang, Yaohua; Yu, Qiangqiang; Wang, Yuanpeng; Wang, Haitao; He, Ning; Li, Qingbiao

    2014-07-01

    Microcosm experiments were conducted to investigate the mechanism of microbial-mediated As mobilization from high arsenic tailing sediments amended with nanoparticles (NPs). The addition of SiO2 NPs could substantially stimulate arsenic mobilization in the sodium acetate amendment sediments. However, the addition of Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 NPs restrained arsenic release because these NPs resulted in Fe-As coprecipiate. Moreover, NP additions in sediments amended with sodium acetate as the electron donor clearly promoted microbial dissimilatory iron reduction. Nearly 4 times the Fe(II) (11.67-12.87 mg·L(-1)) from sediments amended with NPs and sodium acetate was released compared to sediments amended with only sodium acetate (3.49 mg·L(-1)). Based on molecular fingerprinting and sequencing analyses, the NP additions could potentially change the sediment bacterial community composition and increase the abundance of Fe(III) and As(V) reduction bacteria. Several potential NP-stimulated bacteria were related to Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Clostridium, and Alicyclobacillus. The findings offer a relatively comprehensive assessment of NP (e.g., Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and SiO2) effects on sediment bacterial communities and As mobilization.

  6. Metagenomic approach to characterize soil microbial diversity of Phumdi at Loktak Lake.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Sampada; Pal, Rajesh Ramavadh; More, Ravi Prabhakar; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-11-01

    Loktak, one of the largest freshwater lakes of India, is known for floating islands (Phumdi), being made up of a heterogeneous biomass of vegetation and soil. This ecological site represents an exclusive environmental habitat wherein the rhizospheric microbial community of Phumdi plays a key role in biogeochemical cycling of nutrients. A culture-independent whole genome shotgun sequencing based metagenomic approach was employed to unravel the composition of the microbial community and its corresponding functional potential at this environmental habitat. Proteobacteria (51%) was found to be the most dominant bacterial phylum followed by Acidobacteria (10%), Actinobacteria (9%) and Bacteroidetes (7%). Furthermore, Loktak metagenome data were compared with available metagenomes from four other aquatic habitats, varying from pristine to highly polluted eutrophic habitats. The comparative metagenomics approach aided by statistical analysis revealed that Candidatus Solibacter, Bradyrhizobium, Candidatus Koribacter, Pedosphaera, Methylobacterium, Anaeromyxobacter, Sorangium, Opitutus and Acidobacterium genera are selectively dominant at this habitat. Correspondingly, 12 different functional categories were found to be exclusively prevalent at Phumdi compared to other freshwater habitats. These differential features have been attributed to the unique habitat at Phumdi and correlated to the phenomenon of bioremediation at Loktak Lake.

  7. Unique Organic Matter and Microbial Properties in the Rhizosphere of a Wetland Soil.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Daniel I; Xu, Chen; Huang, Shan; Lin, Youmin; Tolić, Nikola; Roscioli-Johnson, Kristyn M; Santschi, Peter H; Jaffé, Peter R

    2016-04-19

    Wetlands attenuate the migration of many contaminants through a wide range of biogeochemical reactions. Recent research has shown that the rhizosphere, the zone near plant roots, in wetlands is especially effective at promoting contaminant attenuation. The objective of this study was to compare the soil organic matter (OM) composition and microbial communities of a rhizosphere soil (primarily an oxidized environment) to that of the bulk wetland soil (primarily a reduced environment). The rhizosphere had elevated C, N, Mn, and Fe concentrations and total bacteria, including Anaeromyxobacter, counts (as identified by qPCR). Furthermore, the rhizosphere contained several organic molecules that were not identified in the nonrhizosphere soil (54% of the >2200 ESI-FTICR-MS identified compounds). The rhizosphere OM molecules generally had (1) greater overall molecular weights, (2) less aromaticity, (3) more carboxylate and N-containing COO functional groups, and (4) a greater hydrophilic character. These latter two OM properties typically promote metal binding. This study showed for the first time that not only the amount but also the molecular characteristics of OM in the rhizosphere may in part be responsible for the enhanced immobilization of contaminants in wetlands. These finding have implications on the stewardship and long-term management of contaminated wetlands.

  8. Eukaryotic-like protein kinases in the prokaryotes and the myxobacterial kinome

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, J.; Castañeda-García, A.; Jenke-Kodama, H.; Müller, R.; Muñoz-Dorado, J.

    2008-01-01

    Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which together comprise a major class of regulatory proteins in eukaryotes, were not believed to play an important role in prokaryotes until recently. However, our analysis of 626 prokaryotic genomes reveals that eukaryotic-like protein kinases (ELKs) are found in nearly two-thirds of the sequenced strains. We have identified 2697 ELKs, most of which are encoded by multicellular strains of the phyla Proteobacteria (Myxococcales), Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Chloroflexi, and 2 Acidobacteria and 1 Planctomycetes. Astonishingly, 7 myxobacterial strains together encode 892 ELKs, with 4 of the strains exhibiting a genomic ELK density similar to that observed in eukaryotes. Most myxobacterial ELKs show a modular organization in which the kinase domain is located at the N terminus. The C-terminal portion of the ELKs is highly diverse and often contains sequences with similarity to characterized domains, most of them involved in signaling mechanisms or in protein–protein interactions. However, many of these architectures are unique to the myxobacteria, an observation that suggests that this group exploits sophisticated and novel signal transduction systems. Phylogenetic reconstruction using the kinase domains revealed many orthologous sequence pairs and a huge number of gene duplications that probably occurred after speciation. Furthermore, studies of the microsynteny in the ELK-encoding regions reveal only low levels of synteny among Myxococcus xanthus, Plesiocystis pacifica, and Sorangium cellulosum. However, extensive similarities between M. xanthus, Stigmatella aurantiaca, and 3 Anaeromyxobacter strains were observed, indicating that they share regulatory pathways involving various ELKs. PMID:18836084

  9. Experimentally determined uranium isotope fractionation during reduction of hexavalent U by bacteria and zero valent iron.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Laura K; Lundstrom, Craig C; Johnson, Thomas M; Sanford, Robert A; Zhao, Juanzho; Zhang, Zhaofeng

    2006-11-15

    Variations in stable isotope ratios of redox sensitive elements are often used to understand redox processes occurring near the Earth's surface. Presented here are measurements of mass-dependent U isotope fractionation induced by U(VI) reduction by zerovalent iron (Fe0) and bacteria under controlled pH and HCO3- conditions. In abiotic experiments, Fe0 reduced U(VI), but the reaction failed to induce an analytically significant isotopic fractionation. Bacterial reduction experiments using Geobacter sulfurreducens and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans reduced dissolved U(VI) and caused enrichment of 238U relative to 235U in the remaining U(VI). Enrichmentfactors (epsilon) calculated using a Rayleigh distillation model are -0.31% per hundred and -0.34% per hundred for G. sulfurreducens and A. dehalogenans, respectively, under identical experimental conditions. Further studies are required to determine the range of possible values for 238U/235U fractionation factors under a variety of experimental conditions before broad application of these results is possible. However, the measurable variations in delta(5238)U show promise as indicators of reduction for future studies of groundwater contamination, geochronology, U ore deposit formation, and U biogeochemical cycling.

  10. Identification of genes conferring arsenic resistance to Escherichia coli from an effluent treatment plant sludge metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nar Singh; Ranjan, Ravi; Purohit, Hemant J; Kalia, Vipin C; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    The majority of bacteria elude culture in the laboratory. A metagenomic approach provides culture-independent access to the gene pool of the whole bacterial community. A metagenomic library was constructed from an industrial effluent treatment plant sludge containing about 1.25 Gb of microbial community DNA. Two arsenic-resistant clones were selected from the metagenomic library. Clones MT3 and MT6 had eight- and 18-fold higher resistance to sodium arsenate in comparison with the parent strain, respectively. The clones also showed increased resistance to arsenite but not to antimony. Sequence analysis of the clones revealed genes encoding for putative arsenate reductases and arsenite efflux pumps. A novel arsenate resistance gene (arsN) encoding a protein with similarity to acetyltransferases was identified from clone MT6. ArsN homologues were found to be closely associated with arsenic resistance genes in many bacterial genomes. ArsN homologues were found fused to putative arsenate reductases in Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-C and with a putative arsenite chaperone in Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4. ArsN alone resulted in an approximately sixfold higher resistance to sodium arsenate in wild-type Escherichia coli W3110.

  11. Survey of Microbial Diversity in Flood Areas during Thailand 2011 Flood Crisis Using High-Throughput Tagged Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Wongwilaiwalin, Sarunyou; Laothanachareon, Thanaporn; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Pattaragulwanit, Kobchai; Punmatharith, Thantip; McEvoy, John; Khan, Eakalak; Rachakornkij, Manaskorn; Champreda, Verawat

    2015-01-01

    The Thailand flood crisis in 2011 was one of the largest recorded floods in modern history, causing enormous damage to the economy and ecological habitats of the country. In this study, bacterial and fungal diversity in sediments and waters collected from ten flood areas in Bangkok and its suburbs, covering residential and agricultural areas, were analyzed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer sequences. Analysis of microbial community showed differences in taxa distribution in water and sediment with variations in the diversity of saprophytic microbes and sulfate/nitrate reducers among sampling locations, suggesting differences in microbial activity in the habitats. Overall, Proteobacteria represented a major bacterial group in waters, while this group co-existed with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria in sediments. Anaeromyxobacter, Steroidobacter, and Geobacter were the dominant bacterial genera in sediments, while Sulfuricurvum, Thiovirga, and Hydrogenophaga predominated in waters. For fungi in sediments, Ascomycota, Glomeromycota, and Basidiomycota, particularly in genera Philipsia, Rozella, and Acaulospora, were most frequently detected. Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were the major fungal phyla, and Rhizophlyctis and Mortierella were the most frequently detected fungal genera in water. Diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria, related to odor problems, was further investigated using analysis of the dsrB gene which indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria of families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, Syntrobacteraceae, and Desulfoarculaceae in the flood sediments. The work provides an insight into the diversity and function of microbes related to biological processes in flood areas. PMID:26020967

  12. Metaproteomic identification of diazotrophic methanotrophs and their localization in root tissues of field-grown rice plants.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Anda, Mizue; Ikeda, Seishi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study by our group, CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation were simultaneously activated in the roots of wild-type rice plants in a paddy field with no N input; both processes are likely controlled by a rice gene for microbial symbiosis. The present study examined which microorganisms in rice roots were responsible for CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation under the field conditions. Metaproteomic analysis of root-associated bacteria from field-grown rice (Oryza sativa Nipponbare) revealed that nitrogenase complex-containing nitrogenase reductase (NifH) and the alpha subunit (NifD) and beta subunit (NifK) of dinitrogenase were mainly derived from type II methanotrophic bacteria of the family Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp. Minor nitrogenase proteins such as Methylocella, Bradyrhizobium, Rhodopseudomonas, and Anaeromyxobacter were also detected. Methane monooxygenase proteins (PmoCBA and MmoXYZCBG) were detected in the same bacterial group of the Methylocystaceae. Because these results indicated that Methylocystaceae members mediate both CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation, we examined their localization in rice tissues by using catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The methanotrophs were localized around the epidermal cells and vascular cylinder in the root tissues of the field-grown rice plants. Our metaproteomics and CARD-FISH results suggest that CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation are performed mainly by type II methanotrophs of the Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp., inhabiting the vascular bundles and epidermal cells of rice roots.

  13. Uranium isotopic fractionation factors during U(VI) reduction by bacterial isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban; Sanford, Robert A.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Löffler, Frank E.

    2014-07-01

    We experimentally determined the magnitude of uranium isotopic fractionation induced by U(VI) reduction by metal reducing bacterial isolates. Our results indicate that microbial U(VI) reduction induces isotopic fractionation; heavier isotopes (i.e., 238U) partition into the solid U(IV) products. The magnitudes of isotopic fractionation (expressed as ε = 1000‰ * (α-1)) for 238U/235U were 0.68‰ ± 0.05‰ and 0.99‰ ± 0.12‰ for Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and strain IFRC-N, respectively. The ε values for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain FRC-W, strain FRC-R5, a novel Shewanella isolate, and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain Viet1 were 0.72‰ ± 0.15‰, 0.99‰ ± 0.12‰, 0.96‰ ± 0.16‰ and 0.86‰ ± 0.06‰, respectively. Our results show that the maximum ε values of ∼1.0‰ were obtained with low biomass (∼107 cells/mL) and low electron donor concentrations (∼500 μM). These results provide an initial assessment of 238U/235U shifts induced by microbially-mediated U(VI) reduction, which is needed as 238U/235U data are increasingly applied as redox indicators in various geochemical settings.

  14. Unique Organic Matter and Microbial Properties in the Rhizosphere of a Wetland Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Xu, Chen; Huang, Shan; Lin, Youmin; Tolic, Nikola; Roscioli, Kristyn M.; Santschi, Peter H.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2016-04-19

    Wetlands attenuate the migration of many contaminants through a wide range of biogeochemical reactions. Recent research has shown that the rhizosphere, the zone near plant roots, in wetlands is especially effective at promoting contaminant attenuation. The objective of this study was to compare the soil organic matter (OM) composition and microbial communities of a rhizosphere soil (primarily an oxidized environment) to that of the bulk wetland soil (primarily a reduced environment). The rhizosphere had elevated C, N, Mn, and Fe concentrations and total bacteria, including Anaeromyxobacter, counts (as identified by qPCR). Furthermore, the rhizosphere contained several organic molecules that were not identified in the nonrhizosphere soil (54% of the >2200 ESI-FTICR-MS identified compounds). The rhizosphere OM molecules generally had (1) greater overall molecular weights, (2) less aromaticity, (3) more carboxylate and N-containing COO functional groups, and (4) a greater hydrophilic character. These latter two OM properties typically promote metal binding. This study showed for the first time that not only the amount but also the molecular characteristics of OM in the rhizosphere may in part be responsible for the enhanced immobilization of contaminants in wetlands. These finding have implications on the stewardship and long-term management of contaminated wetlands

  15. Analysis of nifH-RNA reveals phylotypes related to Geobacter and Cyanobacteria as important functional components of the N2 -fixing community depending on depth and agricultural use of soil.

    PubMed

    Calderoli, Priscila A; Collavino, Mónica M; Behrends Kraemer, Filipe; Morrás, Héctor J M; Aguilar, O Mario

    2017-10-01

    In this survey, a total of 80 787 reads and 28 171 unique NifH protein sequences were retrieved from soil RNA. This dataset extends our knowledge about the structure and diversity of the functional diazotrophic communities in agricultural soils from Argentinean Pampas. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed that nifH phylotypes related to Geobacter and Anaeromyxobacter (44.8%), Rhizobiales (29%), Cyanobacteria (16.7%), and Verrucomicrobiales (8%) are key microbial components of N2 fixation in soils associated with no-till management and soil depth. In addition, quantification of nifH gene copies related to Geobacter and Cyanobacteria revealed that these groups are abundant in soils under maize-soybean rotation and soybean monoculture, respectively. The correlation of physicochemical soil parameters with the diazotrophic diversity and composition showed that soil stability and organic carbon might contribute to the functional signatures of particular nifH phylotypes in fields under no-till management. Because crop production relies on soil-borne microorganism's activities, such as free N2 fixation, the information provided by our study on the diazotrophic population dynamics, associated with the edaphic properties and land-use practices, represents a major contribution to gain insight into soil biology, in which functionally active components are identified. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Microbial community analysis in rice paddy soils irrigated by acid mine drainage contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Xiao, Enzong; Sun, Weimin

    2015-03-01

    Five rice paddy soils located in southwest China were selected for geochemical and microbial community analysis. These rice fields were irrigated with river water which was contaminated by Fe-S-rich acid mine drainage. Microbial communities were characterized by high-throughput sequencing, which showed 39 different phyla/groups in these samples. Among these phyla/groups, Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in all samples. Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Nitrospirae, and Bacteroidetes exhibited higher relative abundances than other phyla. A number of rare and candidate phyla were also detected. Moreover, canonical correspondence analysis suggested that pH, sulfate, and nitrate were significant factors that shaped the microbial community structure. In addition, a wide diversity of Fe- and S-related bacteria, such as GOUTA19, Shewanella, Geobacter, Desulfobacca, Thiobacillus, Desulfobacterium, and Anaeromyxobacter, might be responsible for biogeochemical Fe and S cycles in the tested rice paddy soils. Among the dominant genera, GOUTA19 and Shewanella were seldom detected in rice paddy soils.

  17. The Role of Enriched Microbial Consortium on Iron-Reducing Bioaugmentation in Sediments.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xunan; Xu, Meiying; Sun, Guoping

    2017-01-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process and involved in various engineered processes, including the traditional clay dyeing processes. Bioaugmentation with iron reducing bacteria (IRB) is generally considered as an effective method to enhance the activity of iron reduction. However, limited information is available about the role of IRB on bioaugmentation. To reveal the roles of introduced IRB on bioaugmentation, an IRB consortium enriched with ferric citrate was inoculated into three Fe(II)-poor sediments which served as the pigments for Gambiered Guangdong silk dyeing. After bioaugmentation, the dyeabilities of all sediments met the demands of Gambiered Guangdong silk through increasing the concentration of key agent [precipitated Fe(II)] by 35, 27, and 61%, respectively. The microbial community analysis revealed that it was the minor species but not the dominant ones in the IRB consortium that promoted the activity of iron reduction. Meanwhile, some indigenous bacteria with the potential of iron reduction, such as Clostridium, Anaeromyxobacter, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Geothrix, and Acinetobacter, were also stimulated to form mutualistic interaction with introduced consortium. Interestingly, the same initial IRB consortium led to the different community successions among the three sediments and there was even no common genus increasing or decreasing synchronously among the potential IRB of all bioaugmented sediments. The Mantel and canonical correspondence analysis showed that different physiochemical properties of sediments influenced the microbial community structures. This study not only provides a novel bioremediation method for obtaining usable sediments for dyeing Gambiered Guangdong silk, but also contributes to understanding the microbial response to IRB bioaugmentation.

  18. Effect of the redox dynamics on microbial-mediated As transformation coupled with Fe and S in flow-through sediment columns.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee Sun; Kim, Bo-A; Hyun, Sung Pil; Lee, Yoon-Ho; Shin, Doyun

    2017-05-05

    Arsenic (As) biogeochemistry coupled with iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) was studied using columns packed with As(V)-contaminated sediments under two phases: a reduction phase followed by an oxidation phase. During the reduction phase, four identical columns inoculated with G. sulfurreducens were stimulated with 3mM acetate for 60days. The As(III) in the effluent rapidly increased then gradually decreased. The Fe(II) and sulfate concentration indicated ferrous sulfide precipitation inside the column after day 14 and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra showed that As(III) was enriched at the column outlet. The genera Desulfosporosinus and Anaeromyxobacter as well as the Geobacter inoculum played a primary role in As reduction. During the oxidation phase, dissolved oxygen was consumed by heterotrophic aerobes belonging to the phylum Cloroflexi in the column with acetate, resulting in more As in the effluent. When only nitrate was injected, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria such as Thiobacillus thioparus instantly oxidized the sulfide formed during the first phase, resulting in less As(V) in the aqueous phase compared to the column with dissolved oxygen alone. This study showed that redox gradients and dynamics linked to Fe and S biogeochemistry have an important role in controlling As mobility in subsurface environments.

  19. Microbial Community Structure in the Rhizosphere of Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Breidenbach, Björn; Pump, Judith; Dumont, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    The microbial community in the rhizosphere environment is critical for the health of land plants and the processing of soil organic matter. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which rice plants shape the microbial community in rice field soil over the course of a growing season. Rice (Oryza sativa) was cultivated under greenhouse conditions in rice field soil from Vercelli, Italy and the microbial community in the rhizosphere of planted soil microcosms was characterized at four plant growth stages using quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis and compared to that of unplanted bulk soil. The abundances of 16S rRNA genes in the rice rhizosphere were on average twice that of unplanted bulk soil, indicating a stimulation of microbial growth in the rhizosphere. Soil environment type (i.e., rhizosphere versus bulk soil) had a greater effect on the community structure than did time (e.g., plant growth stage). Numerous phyla were affected by the presence of rice plants, but the strongest effects were observed for Gemmatimonadetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. With respect to functional groups of microorganisms, potential iron reducers (e.g., Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter) and fermenters (e.g., Clostridiaceae, Opitutaceae) were notably enriched in the rhizosphere environment. A Herbaspirillum species was always more abundant in the rhizosphere than bulk soil and was enriched in the rhizosphere during the early stage of plant growth. PMID:26793175

  20. Structural similarities between biogenic uraninites produced by phylogenetically and metabolically diverse bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Jonathan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Mehta, Apurva; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2009-11-01

    While the product of microbial uranium reduction is often reported to be“UO2”, a comprehensive characterization including stoichiometry and unit cell determination is available for only one Shewanella species. Here, we compare the products of batch uranyl reduction by a collection of dissimilatory metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genera Shewanella, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfovibrio under similar laboratory conditions. Our results demonstrate that U(VI) bioreduction by this assortment of commonly studied, environmentally relevant bacteria leads to the precipitation of uraninite with a composition between UO2.00 and UO2.075, regardless of phylogenetic or metabolic diversity. Coupled analyses, including electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and powder diffraction, confirm that structurally and chemically analogous uraninite solids are produced. These biogenic uraninites have particle diameters of about 2-3 nm and lattice constants consistent with UO2.0 and exhibit a high degree of intermediate-range order. Results indicate that phylogenetic and metabolic variability within delta- and gamma-proteobacteria has little effect on nascent biouraninite structure or crystal size under the investigated conditions.

  1. Survey of Microbial Diversity in Flood Areas during Thailand 2011 Flood Crisis Using High-Throughput Tagged Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Wongwilaiwalin, Sarunyou; Laothanachareon, Thanaporn; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Pattaragulwanit, Kobchai; Punmatharith, Thantip; McEvoy, John; Khan, Eakalak; Rachakornkij, Manaskorn; Champreda, Verawat

    2015-01-01

    The Thailand flood crisis in 2011 was one of the largest recorded floods in modern history, causing enormous damage to the economy and ecological habitats of the country. In this study, bacterial and fungal diversity in sediments and waters collected from ten flood areas in Bangkok and its suburbs, covering residential and agricultural areas, were analyzed using high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer sequences. Analysis of microbial community showed differences in taxa distribution in water and sediment with variations in the diversity of saprophytic microbes and sulfate/nitrate reducers among sampling locations, suggesting differences in microbial activity in the habitats. Overall, Proteobacteria represented a major bacterial group in waters, while this group co-existed with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria in sediments. Anaeromyxobacter, Steroidobacter, and Geobacter were the dominant bacterial genera in sediments, while Sulfuricurvum, Thiovirga, and Hydrogenophaga predominated in waters. For fungi in sediments, Ascomycota, Glomeromycota, and Basidiomycota, particularly in genera Philipsia, Rozella, and Acaulospora, were most frequently detected. Chytridiomycota and Ascomycota were the major fungal phyla, and Rhizophlyctis and Mortierella were the most frequently detected fungal genera in water. Diversity of sulfate-reducing bacteria, related to odor problems, was further investigated using analysis of the dsrB gene which indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria of families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, Syntrobacteraceae, and Desulfoarculaceae in the flood sediments. The work provides an insight into the diversity and function of microbes related to biological processes in flood areas.

  2. On the origin of 3-methylglutaconic acid in disorders of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2016-09-01

    3-methylglutaconic acid (3MGA)-uria occurs in numerous inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) associated with compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism. This organic acid arises from thioester cleavage of 3-methylglutaconyl CoA (3MG CoA), an intermediate in leucine catabolism. In individuals harboring mutations in 3MG CoA hydratase (i.e., primary 3MGA-uria), dietary leucine is the source of 3MGA. In secondary 3MGA-uria, however, no leucine metabolism defects have been reported. While others have suggested 3MGA arises from aberrant isoprenoid shunting from cytosol to mitochondria, an alternative route posits that 3MG CoA arises in three steps from mitochondrial acetyl CoA. Support for this biosynthetic route in IEMs is seen by its regulated occurrence in microorganisms. The fungus, Ustilago maydis, the myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus and the marine cyanobacterium, Lyngbya majuscule, generate 3MG CoA (or acyl carrier protein derivative) in the biosynthesis of iron chelating siderophores, iso-odd chain fatty acids and polyketide/nonribosomal peptide products, respectively. The existence of this biosynthetic machinery in these organisms supports a model wherein, under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of acetyl CoA in the inner mitochondrial space as a result of inefficient fuel utilization drives de novo synthesis of 3MG CoA. Since humans lack the downstream biosynthetic capability of the organisms mentioned above, as 3MG CoA levels rise, thioester hydrolysis yields 3MGA, which is excreted in urine as unspent fuel. Understanding the metabolic origins of 3MGA may increase its utility as a biomarker.

  3. Phylogenetic diversity of the bacterial community from a microbial mat at an active, hydrothermal vent system, Loihi Seamount, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Moyer, C L; Dobbs, F C; Karl, D M

    1995-04-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of small-subunit rRNA genes associated with the domain Bacteria was examined (by using previously defined operational taxonomic units [C. L. Moyer, F.C. Dobbs, and D. M. Karl, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:871-879, 1994]; those for Pele's Vents Bacteria are hereafter abbreviated PVB OTUs) with samples from a microbial mat at an active, deep-sea hydrothermal vent system. A cluster of phylogenetically related PVB OTUs (OTUs 2, 3, 6, and 8) was closely affiliated with Thiovulum sp. contained within the epsilon subclass of the class Proteobacteria and accounted for 60.5% of the small-subunit rRNA bacterial clone library from Pele's Vents. A second, smaller cluster of PVB OTUs (OTUs 1 and 11) was closely affiliated with Xanthomonas sp., contained within the gamma subclass of the Proteobacteria and accounted for a total of 27.1% of the bacterial clone library. The remaining five PVB OTUs each accounted for 2.1% of the clones recovered and were affiliated with the following phylogenetic groups: PVB OTU 5 was a member of the Alteromonas group; PVB OTU 12 was a member of the Colwellia assemblage; PVB OTU 4 was loosely determined to be a member of the Thiothrix group, with the endosymbiotic bacteria from Bathymodiolus thermophilus and Calyptogena magnifica as the nearest relatives; PVB OTU 10B was a member of the Myxobacterium group; and PVB OTU 9A was a member of the Paraphyletic assemblage, with the Octopus Spring microbial mat type K clone as the closest known relative.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Investigation of the central carbon metabolism of Sorangium cellulosum: metabolic network reconstruction and quantification of pathway fluxes.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Christoph J; Heinzle, Elmar; Müller, Rolf; Wittmann, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, the metabolic network of primary metabolism of the slow-growing myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum was reconstructed from the annotated genome sequence of the type strain So ce56. During growth on glucose as the carbon source and asparagine as the nitrogen source, So ce56 showed a very low growth rate of 0.23 d-(1), equivalent to a doubling time of 3 days. Based on a complete stoichiometric and isotopomer model of the central metabolism, 13C metabolic flux analysis was carried out for growth with glucose as carbon and asparagine as nitrogen sources. Normalized to the uptake flux for glucose (100%), cells recruited glycolysis (51%) and the pentose phosphate pathway (48%) as major catabolic pathways. The Entner-Doudoroff pathway and glyoxylate shunt were not active. A high flux through the TCA cycle (118%) enabled a strong formation of ATP, but cells revealed a rather low yield for biomass. Inspection of fluxes linked to energy metabolism revealed that S. cellulosum utilized only 10% of the ATP formed for growth, whereas 90% is required for maintenance. This explains the apparent discrepancy between the relatively low biomass yield and the high flux through the energy-delivering TCA cycle. The total flux of NADPH supply (216%) was higher than the demand for anabolism (156%), indicating additional reactions for balancing of NADPH. The cells further exhibited a highly active metabolic cycle, interconverting C3 and C4 metabolites of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. The present work provides the first insight into fluxes of the primary metabolism of myxobacteria, especially for future investigation on the supply of cofactors, building blocks, and energy in myxobacteria, producing natural compounds of biotechnological interest.

  5. A novel cold-adapted lipase from Sorangium cellulosum strain So0157-2: gene cloning, expression, and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Qian, Yun-Kai; Li, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Hong; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Genome sequencing of cellulolytic myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum reveals many open-reading frames (ORFs) encoding various degradation enzymes with low sequence similarity to those reported, but none of them has been characterized. In this paper, a predicted lipase gene (lipA) was cloned from S. cellulosum strain So0157-2 and characterized. lipA is 981-bp in size, encoding a polypeptide of 326 amino acids that contains the pentapeptide (GHSMG) and catalytic triad residues (Ser114, Asp250 and His284). Searching in the GenBank database shows that the LipA protein has only the 30% maximal identity to a human monoglyceride lipase. The novel lipA gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and the recombinant protein (r-LipA) was purified using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The enzyme hydrolyzed the p-nitrophenyl (pNP) esters of short or medium chain fatty acids (≤C(10)), and the maximal activity was on pNP acetate. The r- LipA is a cold-adapted lipase, with high enzymatic activity in a wide range of temperature and pH values. At 4 °C and 30 °C, the K(m) values of r-LipA on pNP acetate are 0.037 ± 0.001 and 0.174 ± 0.006 mM, respectively. Higher pH and temperature conditions promoted hydrolytic activity toward the pNP esters with longer chain fatty acids. Remarkably, this lipase retained much of its activity in the presence of commercial detergents and organic solvents. The results suggest that the r-LipA protein has some new characteristics potentially promising for industrial applications and S. cellulosum is an intriguing resource for lipase screening.

  6. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M; Monty, Chelsea N

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms.

  7. Role of Morphological Growth State and Gene Expression in Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Moberly, James G; Miller, Carrie L; Brown, Steven D; Biswas, Abir; Brandt, Craig C; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemical transformations of mercury are a complex process, with the production of methylmercury, a potent human neurotoxin, repeatedly demonstrated in sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing as well as methanogenic bacteria. However, little is known regarding the morphology, genes or proteins involved in methylmercury generation. Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is a Hg-methylating -proteobacterium with a sequenced genome and has unusual pleomorphic forms. In this study, a relationship between the pleomorphism and Hg methylation was investigated. Proportional increases in the sigmoidal (regular) cell form corresponded with increased net MeHg production, but decreased when the pinched cocci (persister) form became the major morphotype. D. africanus microarrays indicated that the ferrous iron transport genes (feoAB), as well as ribosomal genes and several genes whose products are predicted to have metal binding domains (CxxC), were up-regulated during exposure to Hg in the exponential phase. While no specific methylation pathways were identified, the finding that Hg may interfere with iron transport and the correlation of growth-phase dependent morphology with MeHg production are notable. The identification of these relationships between differential gene expression, morphology, and the growth phase dependence of Hg transformations suggests that actively growing cells are primarily responsible for methylation, and so areas with ample carbon and electron-acceptor concentrations may also generate a higher proportion of methylmercury than more oligotrophic environments. The observation of increased iron transporter expression also suggests that Hg methylation may interfere with iron biogeochemical cycles.

  8. K 3 Fe(CN) 6 under External Pressure: Dimerization of CN – Coupled with Electron Transfer to Fe(III)

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Kuo; Zheng, Haiyan; Wang, Lijuan; ...

    2015-09-14

    The addition polymerization of charged monomers like C≡C2– and C≡N– is scarcely seen at ambient conditions but can progress under external pressure with their conductivity significantly enhanced, which expands the research field of polymer science to inorganic salts. Moreover, the reaction pressures of transition metal cyanides like Prussian blue and K3Fe(CN)6 are much lower than that of alkali cyanides. To figure out the effect of the transition metal on the reaction, the crystal structure and electronic structure of K3Fe(CN)6 under external pressure are investigated by in situ neutron diffraction, in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and neutron pair distributionmore » functions (PDF) up to ~15 GPa. The cyanide anions react following a sequence of approaching–bonding–stabilizing. The Fe(III) brings the cyanides closer which makes the bonding progress at a low pressure (2–4 GPa). At ~8 GPa, an electron transfers from the CN to Fe(III), reduces the charge density on cyanide ions, and stabilizes the reaction product of cyanide. Finally, from this study we can conclude that bringing the monomers closer and reducing their charge density are two effective routes to decrease the reaction pressure, which is important for designing novel pressure induced conductor and excellent electrode materials.« less

  9. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M.; Monty, Chelsea N.

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms. PMID:26824529

  10. K 3 Fe(CN) 6 under External Pressure: Dimerization of CN Coupled with Electron Transfer to Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kuo; Zheng, Haiyan; Wang, Lijuan; Tulk, Christopher A.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Hokwang

    2015-09-14

    The addition polymerization of charged monomers like C≡C2– and C≡N– is scarcely seen at ambient conditions but can progress under external pressure with their conductivity significantly enhanced, which expands the research field of polymer science to inorganic salts. Moreover, the reaction pressures of transition metal cyanides like Prussian blue and K3Fe(CN)6 are much lower than that of alkali cyanides. To figure out the effect of the transition metal on the reaction, the crystal structure and electronic structure of K3Fe(CN)6 under external pressure are investigated by in situ neutron diffraction, in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and neutron pair distribution functions (PDF) up to ~15 GPa. The cyanide anions react following a sequence of approaching–bonding–stabilizing. The Fe(III) brings the cyanides closer which makes the bonding progress at a low pressure (2–4 GPa). At ~8 GPa, an electron transfers from the CN to Fe(III), reduces the charge density on cyanide ions, and stabilizes the reaction product of cyanide. Finally, from this study we can conclude that bringing the monomers closer and reducing their charge density are two effective routes to decrease the reaction pressure, which is important for designing novel pressure induced conductor and excellent electrode materials.

  11. Dissimilatory reduction of FeIII (EDTA) with microorganisms in the system of nitric oxide removal from the flue gas by metal chelate absorption.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bi-yao; Li, Wei; Jing, Guo-hua; Shi, Yao

    2004-01-01

    In the system of nitric oxide removal from the flue gas by metal chelate absorption, it is an obstacle that ferrous absorbents are easily oxidized by oxygen in the flue gas to ferric counterparts, which are not capable of binding NO. By adding iron metal or electrochemical method, FeIII(EDTA) can be reduced to FeII(EDTA). However, there are various drawbacks associated with these techniques. The dissimilatory reduction of FeIII(EDTA) with microorganisms in the system of nitric oxide removal by metal chelate absorption was investigated. Ammonium salt instead of nitrate was used as the nitrogen source, as nitrates inhibited the reduction of FeIII due to the competition between the two electron acceptors. Supplemental glucose and lactate stimulated the formation of FeII more than ethanol as the carbon sources. The microorganisms cultured at 50 degrees C were not very sensitive to the other experimental temperature, the reduction percentage of FeIII varied little with the temperature range of 30-50 degrees C. Concentrated Na2CO3 solution was added to adjust the solution pH to an optimal pH range of 6-7. The overall results revealed that the dissimilatory ferric reducing microorganisms present in the mix-culture are probably neutrophilic, moderately thermophilic FeIII reducers.

  12. Redox transformations of iron in the presence of exudate from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa under conditions typical of natural waters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Garg, Shikha; Waite, T David

    2017-02-24

    Interaction of the exudate secreted by a toxic strain of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa with Fe(II) and Fe(III) was investigated here under both acidic (pH 4) and alkaline (pH 8) conditions. At the concentrations of iron and exudate used, iron was present as dissolved iron (< 0.025 µm) at pH 4 but principally as small (< 0.45 µm) iron oxyhydroxide particles at pH 8 with only ~3-27% present in the dissolved form as a result of iron binding by the organic exudate. The formation of strong Fe(III)-exudate and relatively weak Fe(II)-exudate complexes alters the reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple facilitating more rapid oxidation of Fe(II) at pH 4 and 8 than was the case in the absence of exudate. Our results further show that the organic exudate contains Fe(III) reducing moieties resulting in production of measureable concentrations of Fe(II). However, these reducing moieties are short-lived (with a half-life of 1.9 hours) and easily oxidized in air-saturated environments. A kinetic model was developed that adequately describes the redox transformation of Fe in the presence of exudate both at pH 4 and pH 8.

  13. Redox conditions and the efficiency of chlorinated ethene biodegradation: Field studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of redox conditions on the efficiency of chlorinated ethene biodegradation was investigated at two field sites. One site (NAS Cecil Field, FL) is characterized by predominantly Fe(III)-reducing conditions in the contaminant source area, grading to predominantly sulfate- reducing conditions downgradient. This sequence of redox conditions led to relatively inefficient biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes, with high concentrations of trichloroethene extending more than 400 meters downgradient of the source area. In contrast, a second site (NBS Kings Bay, GA) characterized by predominantly sulfate-reducing conditions in the source area followed by Fe(III)-reducing conditions downgradient. In this system perchloroethene (PCE) and TCE were rapidly biodegraded and extended less than 100 meters downgradient. Rates of ground- water transport are similar at the two sites (???0.2 m/d) indicating that the succession of redox processes, rather than other hydrologic factors, is the principal control on biodegradation. In particular, redox conditions that favor the initial reduction of highly chlorinated ethenes (methanogenic or sulfate-reducing conditions) followed by more oxidizing conditions (Fe(III)- reducing or oxic conditions) favors efficient biodegradation. Thus, documenting the succession of redox processes is an important step in understanding the efficiency of chlorinated ethene biodegradation in ground-water systems.

  14. Field and laboratory evidence for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in a Fe(III)-reducing aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Wilson, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Intrinsic bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic aquifers previously has not been considered feasible, due, in large part, to 1) the production of vinyl chloride during microbial reductive dechlorination of higher chlorinated contaminants and 2) the apparent poor biodegradability of vinyl chloride under anaerobic conditions. In this study, a combination of field geochemical analyses and laboratory radiotracer ([1,2-14C] vinyl chloride) experiments was utilized to assess the potential for intrinsic biodegradation of vinyl chloride contamination in an Fe(III)-reducing, anaerobic aquifer. Microcosm experiments conducted under Fe(III)-reducing conditions with material from the Fe(III)-reducing, chlorinated-ethene contaminated aquifer demonstrated significant oxidation of [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride to 14CO2 with no detectable production of ethene or other reductive dehalogenation products. Rates of degradation derived from the microcosm experiments (0.9-1.3% d-1) were consistent with field-estimated rates (0.03-0.2% d-1) of apparent vinyl chloride degradation. Field estimates of apparent vinyl chloride biodegradation were calculated using two distinct approaches; 1) a solute dispersion model and 2) a mass balance assessment. These findings demonstrate that degradation under Fe(III) reducing conditions can be an environmentally significant mechanism for intrinsic bioremediation of vinyl chloride in anaerobic ground-water systems.

  15. Biochemical Analyses of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruebush, S. S.; Tien, M.; Icopini, G. A.; Brantley, S. L.

    2002-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis demonstrates respiratory flexibility by the transfer of electrons to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. Researchers postulate that the bacterium utilizes surface proteins to facilitate the respiratory mechanism for dissimilatory iron(III) reduction. Previous genetic and biochemical studies has shown that iron reduction is associated with the outer membrane of the cell. The identity of the terminal reductase is not yet known. S. oneidensis has been shown to use soluble extra-cellular compounds to facilitate iron(III) reduction as well as expression of novel proteins on the cell surface when interacting with iron(III) oxides. Our results show that the outer membrane fraction possess enzymatic activity for converting Fe(III) to Fe(II) as measured by ferrozine complexation. AQDS, extra-cellular organic extracts, and iron(III) both soluble and solid have been assayed for activity with outer membrane fractions. Zymograms of the membrane fractions separated by isoelectric focusing and native PAGE electrophoresis stained using ferrozine have implicated proteins that are directly involved in the Fe(III) reduction process. A proteomics analysis of outer membrane proteins has also been implemented to identify different expression patterns under Fe(III) reducing conditions. Proteins that are unique to Fe(III) reduction have been isolated and identified using N-terminal sequence analysis. We will also attempt to examine the effect of enzymatic iron(III) reduction on isotopic partitioning from in vitro assays.

  16. Naphthalene and benzene degradation under Fe(III)-reducing conditions in petroleum-contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert T.; Lovely, Derek R.

    1999-01-01

    Naphthalene was oxidized anaerobically to CO2 in sediments collected from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in Bemidji, Minnesota in which Fe(III) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process. Naphthalene was not oxidized in sediments from the methanogenic zone at Bemidji or in sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of other petroleum-contaminated aquifers studied. In a profile across the Fe(III)-reducing zone of the Bemidji aquifer, rates of naphthalene oxidation were fastest in sediments with the highest proportion of Fe(III), which was also the zone of the most rapid degradation of benzene, toluene, and acetate. The comparative studies attempted to elucidate factors that might account for the fact that unsubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene were degraded under Fe(III)-reducing conditions at Bemidji, but not at the other aquifers examined. These studies indicated that the ability of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to degrade benzene and naphthalene at the Bemidji site cannot be attributed to groundwater components that make Fe(III) more available for reduction or other potential factors that were evaluated. However, unlike the other aquifers evaluated, uncontaminated sediments at the Bemidji site could be adapted for anaerobic benzene degradation merely with the addition of benzene. These findings indicate that Bemidji sediments naturally contain Fe(III) reducers capable of degradation of unsubstituted aromatic hydrocarbons.

  17. A hydrogen-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing microorganism from the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caccavo, F.; Blakemore, R.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing bacterium was isolated from bottom sediments of the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire. The isolate was a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative rod which did not appear to fit into any previously described genus. It was temporarily designated strain BrY. BrY grew anaerobically in a defined medium with hydrogen or lactate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. BrY required citrate, fumarate, or malate as a carbon source for growth on H2 and Fe(III). With Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, BrY metabolized hydrogen to a minimum threshold at least 60-fold lower than the threshold reported for pure cultures of sulfate reducers. This finding supports the hypothesis that when Fe(III) is available, Fe(III) reducers can outcompete sulfate reducers for electron donors. Lactate was incompletely oxidized to acetate and carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Lactate oxidation was also coupled to the reduction of Mn(IV), U(VI), fumarate, thiosulfate, or trimethylamine n-oxide under anaerobic conditions. BrY provides a model for how enzymatic metal reduction by respiratory metal-reducing microorganisms has the potential to contribute to the mobilization of iron and trace metals and to the immobilization of uranium in sediments of Great Bay Estuary.

  18. Cooked garlic and antioxidant activity: Correlation with organosulfur compound composition.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, D A; Nazareno, M A; Fusari, C M; Camargo, A B

    2017-04-01

    The antioxidant properties and the main beneficial organosulphur compounds of home-cooked garlic samples were studied in order to establish relationships between them. Antioxidant activity was tested by free radical scavenging against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS(+)), Fe(III) reducing ability (FRAP) and linoleic acid co-oxidation initiated by soybean lipoxygenase in a micelle system. DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays showed the highest activity for raw garlic samples, while β-carotene bleaching assay yielded the highest activity for stir-fried garlic. Pure organosulphur compounds tested by DPPH, FRAP and β-carotene bleaching assays showed that allicin had an antiradical action mechanism, as well as iron reducing capacity; while antioxidant activity was the main mechanism for ajoenes and 2-VD. To our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration that home-cooked garlic retains its antioxidant activity, and, at the same time, elucidates the mechanisms involved in this activity.

  19. Enrichment of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria from groundwater of the Siklós BTEX-contaminated site (Hungary).

    PubMed

    Farkas, Milán; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Benedek, Tibor; Révész, Fruzsina; Veres, Péter Gábor; Kriszt, Balázs; Táncsics, András

    2017-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are commonly found in microbial communities of aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface environments where they often play key role in the degradation of the contaminants. The Siklós benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX)-contaminated area is one of the best characterized petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated sites of Hungary. Continuous monitoring of the microbial community in the center of the contaminant plume indicated the presence of an emerging Geobacter population and a Rhodoferax phylotype highly associated with aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface environments. The aim of the present study was to make an initial effort to enrich Rhodoferax-related and other dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria from this environment. Accordingly, four slightly different freshwater media were used to enrich Fe(III) reducers, differing only in the form of nitrogen source (organic, inorganic nitrogen or gaseous headspace nitrogen). Although enrichment of the desired Rhodoferax phylotype was not succeeded, Geobacter-related bacteria were readily enriched. Moreover, the different nitrogen sources caused the enrichment of different Geobacter species. Investigation of the diversity of benzylsuccinate synthase gene both in the enrichments and in the initial groundwater sample indicated that the Geobacter population in the center of the contaminant plume may not play a significant role in the anaerobic degradation of toluene.

  20. Microbial Community Succession During Lactate Amendment of Chromium Contaminated Groundwater Reveals a Predominance of Pelosinus spp.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Jennifer J; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Drake, Meghan M; Campbell, James H; Moberly, James G; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Podar, Mircea; Brown, Steven D; Hazen, Terry; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Faybishenko, Boris A; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community structure and metabolism in contaminated ecosystems are potentially controlled not only by the different populations within the community, but a myriad of dynamic physicochemical parameters as well. The goal of the current work was to determine the impact of organic acid enrichment, in this case lactate, on the succession of the native microbial community from a contaminated groundwater aquifer. Triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow glass reactors were inoculated with Hanford 100-H groundwater and incubated for 95 days to obtain a stable, enriched community. The microbial community experienced a shift in the population dynamics over time to eventually form a community with far less diversity than the original. The final community was dominated by Pelosinus spp. and to a lesser degree, Acetobacterium spp. with small amounts of other bacteria and archaea including methanogens. The resultant diversity was far decreased from 63 genera within 12 phyla to 11 bacterial genera (from three phyla) and 2 archaeal genera (from one phylum). Isolation efforts were successful in attaining new species of Pelosinus and known members of Methanosarcina barkerii along with several sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing consortia members. The continuous-flow reactors allowed for testing physiochemical factors with microbial community dynamics on a smaller, replicable, scale while also facilitating the isolation of several previously uncultured community members. These lab-scale simulations will presumably allow for a deeper understanding of the community metabolism with specific carbon amendments that can inform future in situ efforts.

  1. Improving abiotic reducing ability of hydrothermal biochar by low temperature oxidation under air.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunfeng; Lou, Zhenjun; Yi, Peng; Chen, Junyu; Ma, Xianlong; Wang, Yang; Li, Mi; Chen, Wen; Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhi; Zhang, Jia; Qian, Guangren

    2014-11-01

    Oxidized hydrothermal biochar was prepared by hydrothermal carbonization of Spartina alterniflora biomass (240°C for 4h) and subsequent oxidization (240°C for 10min) under air. Oxidized hydrochar achieved a Fe(III) reducing capacity of 2.15mmol/g at pH 2.0 with 120h, which is 1.2 times higher than un-oxidized hydrochar. Low temperature oxidization increases the contents of carboxyl and carbonyl groups on hydrochar surface. It is supposed that carboxyl groups provide bonding sites for soluble Fe species and carbonyl groups are responsible for Fe(3+) reduction. A Fenton-like process was established with Fe(2+) replaced by oxidized hydrochar and tested for methylene blue (MB) decoloration. Oxidized hydrochar achieved a MB decolorization (200mg/L, pH 7.0) rate of 99.21% within 3h and demonstrates prominent prevail over H2O2 absent control test. This study reveals low temperature oxidization is an effective way to improve and restore abiotic reducing ability of hydrochar.

  2. Detecting Nitrous Oxide Reductase (nosZ) Genes in Soil Metagenomes: Method Development and Implications for the Nitrogen Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, L. H.; Rodriguez-R, L. M.; Higgins, S.; Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Sanford, R. A.; Ritalahti, K. M.; Löffler, F. E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial activities in soils, such as (incomplete) denitrification, represent major sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. The key enzyme for mitigating N2O emissions is NosZ, which catalyzes N2O reduction to N2. We recently described “atypical” functional NosZ proteins encoded by both denitrifiers and nondenitrifiers, which were missed in previous environmental surveys (R. A. Sanford et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109:19709–19714, 2012, doi:10.1073/pnas.1211238109). Here, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of both nosZ types in whole-genome shotgun metagenomes from sandy and silty loam agricultural soils that typify the U.S. Midwest corn belt. First, different search algorithms and parameters for detecting nosZ metagenomic reads were evaluated based on in silico-generated (mock) metagenomes. Using the derived cutoffs, 71 distinct alleles (95% amino acid identity level) encoding typical or atypical NosZ proteins were detected in both soil types. Remarkably, more than 70% of the total nosZ reads in both soils were classified as atypical, emphasizing that prior surveys underestimated nosZ abundance. Approximately 15% of the total nosZ reads were taxonomically related to Anaeromyxobacter, which was the most abundant genus encoding atypical NosZ-type proteins in both soil types. Further analyses revealed that atypical nosZ genes outnumbered typical nosZ genes in most publicly available soil metagenomes, underscoring their potential role in mediating N2O consumption in soils. Therefore, this study provides a bioinformatics strategy to reliably detect target genes in complex short-read metagenomes and suggests that the analysis of both typical and atypical nosZ sequences is required to understand and predict N2O flux in soils. PMID:24895307

  3. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, M.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; He, Z.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Deng, Y.; Luo, J.; Carley, J.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Gentry, T.J.; Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Criddle, C.S.; Zhou, J.

    2010-02-15

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 {micro}gl{sup -1}) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  4. Effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and prokaryotic communities in rice paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Byung-Yong; Lee, Jong-Sik; Song, Jaekyeong; Kim, Gun-Yeob; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2014-08-01

    The effects of water-saving irrigation on emissions of greenhouse gases and soil prokaryotic communities were investigated in an experimental rice field. The water layer was kept at 1-2 cm in the water-saving (WS) irrigation treatment and at 6 cm in the continuous flooding (CF) irrigation treatment. WS irrigation decreased CH(4) emissions by 78 % and increased N(2)O emissions by 533 %, resulting in 78 % reduction of global warming potential compared to the CF irrigation. WS irrigation did not affect the abundance or phylogenetic distribution of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNA genes and the abundance of bacterial/archaeal 16S rRNAs. The transcript abundance of CH(4) emission-related genes generally followed CH(4) emission patterns, but the difference in abundance between mcrA transcripts and amoA/pmoA transcripts best described the differences in CH(4) emissions between the two irrigation practices. WS irrigation increased the relative abundance of 16S rRNAs and functional gene transcripts associated with Anaeromyxobacter and Methylocystis spp., suggesting that their activities might be important in emissions of the greenhouse gases. The N(2)O emission patterns were not reflected in the abundance of N(2)O emission-related genes and transcripts. We showed that the alternative irrigation practice was effective for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from rice fields and that it did not affect the overall size and structure of the soil prokaryotic community but did affect the activity of some groups.

  5. The Role of Enriched Microbial Consortium on Iron-Reducing Bioaugmentation in Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xunan; Xu, Meiying; Sun, Guoping

    2017-01-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process and involved in various engineered processes, including the traditional clay dyeing processes. Bioaugmentation with iron reducing bacteria (IRB) is generally considered as an effective method to enhance the activity of iron reduction. However, limited information is available about the role of IRB on bioaugmentation. To reveal the roles of introduced IRB on bioaugmentation, an IRB consortium enriched with ferric citrate was inoculated into three Fe(II)-poor sediments which served as the pigments for Gambiered Guangdong silk dyeing. After bioaugmentation, the dyeabilities of all sediments met the demands of Gambiered Guangdong silk through increasing the concentration of key agent [precipitated Fe(II)] by 35, 27, and 61%, respectively. The microbial community analysis revealed that it was the minor species but not the dominant ones in the IRB consortium that promoted the activity of iron reduction. Meanwhile, some indigenous bacteria with the potential of iron reduction, such as Clostridium, Anaeromyxobacter, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Geothrix, and Acinetobacter, were also stimulated to form mutualistic interaction with introduced consortium. Interestingly, the same initial IRB consortium led to the different community successions among the three sediments and there was even no common genus increasing or decreasing synchronously among the potential IRB of all bioaugmented sediments. The Mantel and canonical correspondence analysis showed that different physiochemical properties of sediments influenced the microbial community structures. This study not only provides a novel bioremediation method for obtaining usable sediments for dyeing Gambiered Guangdong silk, but also contributes to understanding the microbial response to IRB bioaugmentation. PMID:28373869

  6. Responses of microbial community functional structures to pilot-scale uranium in situ bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiying; Wu, Wei-Min; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Deng, Ye; Luo, Jian; Carley, Jack; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Gentry, Terry J; Gu, Baouhua; Watson, David; Jardine, Philip M; Marsh, Terence L; Tiedje, James M; Hazen, Terry; Criddle, Craig S; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-08-01

    A pilot-scale field test system with an inner loop nested within an outer loop was constructed for in situ U(VI) bioremediation at a US Department of Energy site, Oak Ridge, TN. The outer loop was used for hydrological protection of the inner loop where ethanol was injected for biostimulation of microorganisms for U(VI) reduction/immobilization. After 2 years of biostimulation with ethanol, U(VI) levels were reduced to below drinking water standard (<30 microg l(-1)) in the inner loop monitoring wells. To elucidate the microbial community structure and functions under in situ uranium bioremediation conditions, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip) to examine the microbial functional gene composition of the sediment samples collected from both inner and outer loop wells. Our study results showed that distinct microbial communities were established in the inner loop wells. Also, higher microbial functional gene number, diversity and abundance were observed in the inner loop wells than the outer loop wells. In addition, metal-reducing bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter and Shewanella, and other bacteria, for example, Rhodopseudomonas and Pseudomonas, are highly abundant in the inner loop wells. Finally, the richness and abundance of microbial functional genes were highly correlated with the mean travel time of groundwater from the inner loop injection well, pH and sulfate concentration in groundwater. These results suggest that the indigenous microbial communities can be successfully stimulated for U bioremediation in the groundwater ecosystem, and their structure and performance can be manipulated or optimized by adjusting geochemical and hydrological conditions.

  7. Microbial communities biostimulated by ethanol during uranium (VI) bioremediation in contaminated sediment as shown by stable isotope probing

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, Mary Beth; Wu, Wei -Min; Cardenas, Erick; Uhlik, Ondrej; Carroll, Sue L.; Gentry, Terry J.; Marsh, Terence L.; Zhou, Jizhong; Jardine, Philip M.; Criddle, Craig S.; Tiedje, James M.

    2014-06-24

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify microbes stimulated by ethanol addition in microcosms containing two sediments collected from the bioremediation test zone at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge site, TN, USA. One sample was highly bioreduced with ethanol while another was less reduced. Microcosms with the respective sediments were amended with 13C labeled ethanol and incubated for 7 days for SIP. Ethanol was rapidly converted to acetate within 24 h accompanied with the reduction of nitrate and sulfate. The accumulation of acetate persisted beyond the 7 d period. Aqueous U did not decline in the microcosm with the reduced sediment due to desorption of U but continuously declined in the less reduced sample. Microbial growth and concomitant 13C-DNA production was detected when ethanol was exhausted and abundant acetate had accumulated in both microcosms. This coincided with U(VI) reduction in the less reduced sample. 13C originating from ethanol was ultimately utilized for growth, either directly or indirectly, by the dominant microbial community members within 7 days of incubation. The microbial community was comprised predominantly of known denitrifiers, sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron (III) reducing bacteria including Desulfovibrio, Sphingomonas, Ferribacterium, Rhodanobacter, Geothrix, Thiobacillus and others, including the known U(VI)-reducing bacteria Acidovorax, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfovibrio, Geobacter and Desulfosporosinus. As a result, the findings suggest that ethanol biostimulates the U(VI)-reducing microbial community by first serving as an electron donor for nitrate, sulfate, iron (III) and U(VI) reduction, and acetate which then functions as electron donor for U(VI) reduction and carbon source for microbial growth.

  8. Microbial and genetic ecology of tropical Vertisols under intensive chemical farming.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Jaya; Aparna, K; Dua, Ankita; Sangwan, Naseer; Trimurtulu, N; Rao, D L N; Lal, Rup

    2015-01-01

    There are continued concerns on unscientific usage of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, particularly in many developing countries leading to adverse consequences for soil biological quality and agricultural sustainability. In farmers' fields in tropical Vertisols of peninsular India, "high" fertilizer and pesticide usage at about 2.3 times the recommended rates in black gram (Vigna mungo) did not have a deleterious effect on the abundance of culturable microorganisms, associative nitrogen fixers, nitrifiers, and 16S rRNA gene diversity compared to normal rates. However, "very high" application at about five times the fertilizers and 1.5 times pesticides in chilies (Capsicum annuum) adversely affected the populations of fungi, actinomycetes, and ammonifiers, along with a drastic change in the eubacterial community profile and diversity over normal rates. Actinobacteria were dominant in black gram normal (BG1) (47%), black gram high (BG2) (36%), and chili normal (CH1) (30%) and were least in chili very high (CH2) (14%). Geodermatophilus formed 20% of Actinobacteria in BG1 but disappeared in BG2, CH1, and CH2. Asticcacaulis dominated at "very high" input site (CH2). Diversity of nitrogen fixers was completely altered; Dechloromonas and Anaeromyxobacter were absent in BG1 but proliferated well in BG2. There was reduction in rhizobial nifH sequences in BG2 by 46%. Phylogenetic differences characterized by UniFrac and principal coordinate analysis showed that BG2 and CH2 clustered together depicting a common pattern of genetic shift, while BG1 and CH1 fell at different axis. Overall, there were adverse consequences of "very high" fertilizer and pesticide usage on soil microbial diversity and function in tropical Vertisols.

  9. Metaproteomic Identification of Diazotrophic Methanotrophs and Their Localization in Root Tissues of Field-Grown Rice Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhihua; Okubo, Takashi; Kubota, Kengo; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Anda, Mizue; Ikeda, Seishi

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study by our group, CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation were simultaneously activated in the roots of wild-type rice plants in a paddy field with no N input; both processes are likely controlled by a rice gene for microbial symbiosis. The present study examined which microorganisms in rice roots were responsible for CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation under the field conditions. Metaproteomic analysis of root-associated bacteria from field-grown rice (Oryza sativa Nipponbare) revealed that nitrogenase complex-containing nitrogenase reductase (NifH) and the alpha subunit (NifD) and beta subunit (NifK) of dinitrogenase were mainly derived from type II methanotrophic bacteria of the family Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp. Minor nitrogenase proteins such as Methylocella, Bradyrhizobium, Rhodopseudomonas, and Anaeromyxobacter were also detected. Methane monooxygenase proteins (PmoCBA and MmoXYZCBG) were detected in the same bacterial group of the Methylocystaceae. Because these results indicated that Methylocystaceae members mediate both CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation, we examined their localization in rice tissues by using catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). The methanotrophs were localized around the epidermal cells and vascular cylinder in the root tissues of the field-grown rice plants. Our metaproteomics and CARD-FISH results suggest that CH4 oxidation and N2 fixation are performed mainly by type II methanotrophs of the Methylocystaceae, including Methylosinus spp., inhabiting the vascular bundles and epidermal cells of rice roots. PMID:24928870

  10. Influence of electron donors and copper concentration on geochemical and mineralogical processes under conditions of biological sulphate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Sulphidogenous microorganism communities were isolated from soil polluted by crude oil. The study was focused on determining the influence of 1) copper (II) concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and 2) the applied electron donor on the course and evolution of mineral-forming processes under conditions favouring growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The influence of copper concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and the type of mineral phases formed was determined during experiments in which copper (II) chloride at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 g/L was added to SRB cultures. The experiments were performed in two variants: with ethanol (4 g/L) or lactate (4 g/L) as the sole carbon source. In order to determine the taxonomic composition of the selected microorganism communities, the 16S rRNA method was used. Results of this analysis confirmed the presence of Desulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium, Desulfotalea, Thermotoga, Solibacter, Gramella, Anaeromyxobacter and Myxococcus sp. in the stationary cultures. The post-culture sediments contained covelline (CuS) and digenite (Cu9S5 ). Based on the results, it can be stated that the type of carbon source applied during incubation plays a crucial role in determining the mineral composition of the post-culture sediments. Thus, regardless of the amount of copper ion introduced to a culture with lactate as the sole carbon source, no copper sulphide was observed in the post-culture sediments. Cultures with ethanol as the sole carbon source, on the other hand, yielded covelline or digenite in all post-culture sediments.

  11. Distribution of organohalide-respiring bacteria between solid and aqueous phases.

    PubMed

    Cápiro, Natalie L; Wang, Yonggang; Hatt, Janet K; Lebrón, Carmen A; Pennell, Kurt D; Löffler, Frank E

    2014-09-16

    Contemporary microbial monitoring of aquifers relies on groundwater samples to enumerate nonattached cells of interest. One-dimensional column studies quantified the distribution of bacterial cells in solid and the aqueous phases as a function of microbial species, growth substrate availability and porous medium (i.e., Appling soil versus Federal Fine Ottawa sand with 0.75% and 0.01% [w/w] organic carbon, respectively). Without supplied growth substrates, effluent from columns inoculated with the tetrachloroethene- (PCE-) to-ethene-dechlorinating bacterial consortium BDI-SZ containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (Dhc) strains and Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ (GeoSZ), or inoculated with Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain W (AdehalW), captured 94-96, 81-99, and 73-84% of the Dhc, GeoSZ, and AdehalW cells, respectively. Cell retention was organism-specific and increased in the order Dhc < GeoSZ < AdehalW. When amended with 10 mM lactate and 0.11 mM PCE, aqueous samples accounted for 1.3-27 and 0.02-22% of the total Dhc and GeoSZ biomass, respectively. In Appling soil, up to three orders-of-magnitude more cells were associated with the solid phase, and attachment rate coefficients (katt) were consistently greater compared to Federal Fine sand. Cell-solid interaction energies ranged from -2.5 to 787 kT and were consistent with organism-specific deposition behavior, where GeoSZ and AdehalW exhibited greater attachment than Dhc cells. The observed disparities in microbial cell distributions between the aqueous and solid phases imply that groundwater analysis can underestimate the total cell abundance in the aquifer by orders-of-magnitude under conditions of growth and in porous media with elevated organic carbon content. The implications of these findings for monitoring chlorinated solvent sites are discussed.

  12. Competitive Reduction of Pertechnetate (99TcO4- ) by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria and Biogenic Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Plymale, Andrew E.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Heald, Steve M.; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Chongmin; Resch, Charles T.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2011-01-06

    The fate of pertechnetate (99Tc(VII)O4-) during bioreduction was investigated in the presence of 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh) and various dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) (Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Shewanella) in comparison with TcO4- bioreduction in the absence of Fh. In the presence of Fh, Tc was present primarily as a fine-grained Tc(IV)/Fe precipitate that was distinct from the Tc(IV)O2·nH2O solids produced by direct biological Tc(VII) reduction. Aqueous Tc concentrations (<0.2 μm) in the bioreduced Fh suspensions (1.7 to 3.2 × 10-9 mol L-1) were over 1 order of magnitude lower than when TcO4- was biologically reduced in the absence of Fh (4.0 × 10-8 to 1.0 × 10-7 mol L-1). EXAFS analyses of the bioreduced Fh-Tc products were consistent with variable chain length Tc-O octahedra bonded to Fe-O octahedra associated with the surface of the residual or secondary Fe(III) oxide. In contrast, biogenic TcO2·nH2O had significantly more Tc-Tc second neighbors and a distinct long-range order consistent with small particle polymers of TcO2. In Fe-rich subsurface sediments, the reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) may predominate over direct microbial pathways, potentially leading to lower concentrations of aqueous 99Tc(IV).

  13. Change in bacterial community structure during in situ biostimulation of subsurface sediment cocontaminated with uranium and nitrate.

    PubMed

    North, Nadia N; Dollhopf, Sherry L; Petrie, Lainie; Istok, Jonathan D; Balkwill, David L; Kostka, Joel E

    2004-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that metal-reducing microorganisms can effectively promote the precipitation and removal of uranium from contaminated groundwater. Microbial communities were stimulated in the acidic subsurface by pH neutralization and addition of an electron donor to wells. In single-well push-pull tests at a number of treated sites, nitrate, Fe(III), and uranium were extensively reduced and electron donors (glucose, ethanol) were consumed. Examination of sediment chemistry in cores sampled immediately adjacent to treated wells 3.5 months after treatment revealed that sediment pH increased substantially (by 1 to 2 pH units) while nitrate was largely depleted. A large diversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from subsurface sediments, including species from the alpha, beta, delta, and gamma subdivisions of the class Proteobacteria, as well as low- and high-G+C gram-positive species. Following in situ biostimulation of microbial communities within contaminated sediments, sequences related to previously cultured metal-reducing delta-Proteobacteria increased from 5% to nearly 40% of the clone libraries. Quantitative PCR revealed that Geobacter-type 16S rRNA gene sequences increased in biostimulated sediments by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude at two of the four sites tested. Evidence from the quantitative PCR analysis corroborated information obtained from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, indicating that members of the delta-Proteobacteria subdivision, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans-related and Geobacter-related sequences, are important metal-reducing organisms in acidic subsurface sediments. This study provides the first cultivation-independent analysis of the change in metal-reducing microbial communities in subsurface sediments during an in situ bioremediation experiment.

  14. Microbial Communities in Contaminated Sediments, Associated with Bioremediation of Uranium to Submicromolar Levels▿

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial enumeration, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and chemical analysis were used to evaluate the in situ biological reduction and immobilization of uranium(VI) in a long-term experiment (more than 2 years) conducted at a highly uranium-contaminated site (up to 60 mg/liter and 800 mg/kg solids) of the U.S. Department of Energy in Oak Ridge, TN. Bioreduction was achieved by conditioning groundwater above ground and then stimulating growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria in situ through weekly injection of ethanol into the subsurface. After nearly 2 years of intermittent injection of ethanol, aqueous U levels fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level for drinking water and groundwater (<30 μg/liter or 0.126 μM). Sediment microbial communities from the treatment zone were compared with those from a control well without biostimulation. Most-probable-number estimations indicated that microorganisms implicated in bioremediation accumulated in the sediments of the treatment zone but were either absent or in very low numbers in an untreated control area. Organisms belonging to genera known to include U(VI) reducers were detected, including Desulfovibrio, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfosporosinus, and Acidovorax spp. The predominant sulfate-reducing bacterial species were Desulfovibrio spp., while the iron reducers were represented by Ferribacterium spp. and Geothrix spp. Diversity-based clustering revealed differences between treated and untreated zones and also within samples of the treated area. Spatial differences in community structure within the treatment zone were likely related to the hydraulic pathway and to electron donor metabolism during biostimulation. PMID:18456853

  15. Enhanced bioreduction of iron and arsenic in sediment by biochar amendment influencing microbial community composition and dissolved organic matter content and composition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Wang, Yuanpeng; Xia, Dong; Jiang, Xiuli; Fu, Dun; Shen, Liang; Wang, Haitao; Li, Qing Biao

    2016-07-05

    Biochar derived from the pyrolysis at 500 °C with fresh biogas slurry and residue, was conducted to investigate its potential role in mediating the speciation and mobilization of As(V) and Fe(III) from arsenic-contaminated tailing mine sediment, with consideration of the changes in microbial populations and dissolved organic matter (DOM). The reduction of As(V) (10-13%) and Fe(III) (12-17%) were partly in response to biochar abiotically causing desorption and reduction effect, but were predominantly (87-90% and 83-88% for As(V) and Fe(III)) attributed to biochar stimulating biological reduction. The level of As(III) released from sediment upon biochar amendment (656.35±89.25 μg L(-1)) was significantly higher than the level released without biochar amendment (98.06±19.38 μg L(-1)) after 49 days incubation. Although a low level of Fe(II) (0.81±0.07 mg L(-1)) was determined in the solution when amending with biochar, most of released Fe(II) (166.25±40.25 mg L(-1)) was formed as biochar-Fe(II)minerals composite. More importantly, biochar stimulated the DOM bioavailability in association with bacterial activities mediating As(V) and Fe(III) reduction. High-throughput sequencing results indicated biochar application shifted the soil microbial community and increased the relative abundance of As(V)-/Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, mostly Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfosporosinus and Pedobacter. The discovery of biochar-bacteria-DOM consortium may broaden new understanding into speciation and mobilization of metals, which arouses attention to exploit feasible bioremediation for metal-contaminated sediment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vulgatibacter incomptus gen. nov., sp. nov. and Labilithrix luteola gen. nov., sp. nov., two myxobacteria isolated from soil in Yakushima Island, and the description of Vulgatibacteraceae fam. nov., Labilitrichaceae fam. nov. and Anaeromyxobacteraceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eisaku; Muramatsu, Hideyuki; Nagai, Koji

    2014-10-01

    Two myxobacterial strains (designated B00001(T) and B00002(T)) were isolated from forest soil samples collected from Yakushima Island, Kagoshima, Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains B00001(T) and B00002(T) respectively formed independent branches within the suborders Cystobacterineae and Sorangiineae and were most closely related to Cystobacter armeniaca DSM 14710(T) (90.4% similarity) and Byssovorax cruenta DSM 14553(T) (91.3%). Neither strain showed typical features of myxobacteria such as bacteriolytic action or fruiting body formation, but both had high DNA G+C contents (66.3-68.3 mol%). Swarming motility was observed in strain B00002(T) only. Cells of both strains were vegetative, chemoheterotrophic, mesophilic, strictly aerobic, Gram-negative, motile rods, and both strains exhibited esterase lipase (C8), leucine arylamidase, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and β-galactosidase activities. Strain B00001(T) contained MK-7 as the predominant respiratory quinone and the major fatty acid was iso-C15:0. In contrast, strain B00002(T) contained MK-8 as the major cellular quinone and the major fatty acids were C16 : 1ω5c and iso-C17 : 0. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic data presented, strains B00001(T) and B00002(T) represent novel genera and species, for which we propose the names Vulgatibacter incomptus gen. nov., sp. nov. and Labilithrix luteola gen. nov., sp. nov., respectively. The type strains of Vulgatibacter incomptus and Labilithrix luteola are B00001(T) ( = NBRC 109945(T) = DSM 27710(T)) and B00002(T) ( = NBRC 109946(T) = DSM 27648(T)), respectively. The new genera are assigned to the new families Vulgatibacteraceae fam. nov. and Labilitrichaceae fam. nov., respectively. In addition, Anaeromyxobacteraceae fam. nov., is proposed to accommodate the genus Anaeromyxobacter, which is related to the genus Vulgatibacter.

  17. Geochip-based functional gene analysis of anodophilic communities in microbial electrolysis cells under different operational modes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzong; Wang, Aijie; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E; Yu, Hao; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy D Van; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-01

    A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a bioelectrochemical system that can produce hydrogen from acetate at high hydrogen recoveries, but the composition and structure of the microbial communities in this system have not been extensively studied. We used a high throughput metagenomics technology (GeoChip) to examine the microbial community functional structure in MECs initially operated under different conditions. We found that startup conditions had little or no effect on reactor performance in terms of Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) and COD removals, somewhat greater effects on CO(2) and CH(4) production, and very large effects on hydrogen production. Hydrogen yields were generally higher for reactors that were always operated as MECs than those initially operated as MFCs. Hydrogen yields were nine times larger for MEC reactors with an applied voltage of 0.7 V (64%∼80% efficiencies) than 0.3 V (<7-8%), independent of startup conditions. GeoChip analysis revealed that the functional and phylogenetic diversity of MEC microbial communities after 4 months was quite high despite the use of only a single substrate (acetate). MECs with the largest hydrogen yields had the highest microbial diversity. Multivariate analyses showed that communities that developed in the MECs were well separated from those present under startup conditions, indicating reactor operation altered microbial community composition. Community shifts based on a Mantel test were significantly related to CEs and COD removals in these reactors, suggesting that there were significant changes in microbial community composition as a result of conditions that affected MEC performance. Common well-known exoelectrogenic bacteria (e.g., Geobacter, Shewanella, Desulfovibrio, and Anaeromyxobacter) were found in these systems, but their importance in determining reactor functional performance was not supported with a high confidence in our statistical analysis.

  18. Bioreduction of U(VI) in the presence of phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanov, M. I.; Mishra, B.; Latta, D. E.; Rui, X.; Kwon, M.-J.; Fletcher, K. E.; Loeffler, F. E.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Kemner, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Phosphate/phosphoryl moieties are ubiquitous in biological and environmental systems and can potentially affect the speciation of uranium during natural attenuation or stimulated bioremediation processes. The reactivity between U(VI) and phosphate has been studied extensively, but the significant influence of phosphate groups on the formation of reduced U(IV) species has only recently been recognized. We will compare and contrast the bioreduction of dissolved and solid-phase U(VI) by Gram-positive and Gram-negative metal-reducing bacteria (Shewanella, Anaeromyxobacter, Geobacter, and Desulfitobacterium) in the presence and absence of phosphate, from the perspective of solid-phase U speciation as determined by U L-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS). In all cases examined, the presence of phosphate at concentrations of P/U > 1 led to the formation of reduced, inner-sphere complexed U(IV)-phosphate species that prevented the lowest-solubility U(IV) mineral uraninite (UO2) from forming over at least several months. In the absence of phosphate, nanoparticulate uraninite or complexed non-uraninite U(IV) species were observed (depending on the system and conditions), suggesting that the interplay between the chemical conditions at the location of electron transfer to U(VI) control the U(IV) product and subsequently the stability of reduced U. The importance of non-uraninite U(IV) species will be discussed in the context of their predominance in biostimulated sediments from the Oak Ridge field site in the United States.

  19. Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland maize impacts the resident and active methanogenic microbial community.

    PubMed

    Breidenbach, Björn; Blaser, Martin B; Klose, Melanie; Conrad, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland crops is a common management scheme allowing the reduction of water consumption along with the reduction of methane emission. The introduction of an upland crop into the paddy rice ecosystem leads to dramatic changes in field conditions (oxygen availability, redox conditions). However, the impact of this practice on the archaeal and bacterial communities has scarcely been studied. Here, we provide a comprehensive study focusing on the crop rotation between flooded rice in the wet season and upland maize (RM) in the dry season in comparison with flooded rice (RR) in both seasons. The composition of the resident and active microbial communities was assessed by 454 pyrosequencing targeting the archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA. The archaeal community composition changed dramatically in the rotational fields indicated by a decrease of anaerobic methanogenic lineages and an increase of aerobic Thaumarchaeota. Members of Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae and Methanocellaceae were equally suppressed in the rotational fields indicating influence on both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. On the contrary, members of soil crenarchaeotic group, mainly Candidatus Nitrososphaera, were higher in the rotational fields, possibly indicating increasing importance of ammonia oxidation during drainage. In contrast, minor effects on the bacterial community were observed. Acidobacteria and Anaeromyxobacter spp. were enriched in the rotational fields, whereas members of anaerobic Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing members of Deltaproteobacteria were found in higher abundance in the rice fields. Combining quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing data revealed increased ribosomal numbers per cell for methanogenic species during crop rotation. This stress response, however, did not allow the methanogenic community to recover in the rotational fields during re-flooding and rice

  20. Differential Assemblage of Functional Units in Paddy Soil Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongkyu; Liesack, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Flooded rice fields are not only a global food source but also a major biogenic source of atmospheric methane. Using metatranscriptomics, we comparatively explored structural and functional succession of paddy soil microbiomes in the oxic surface layer and anoxic bulk soil. Cyanobacteria, Fungi, Xanthomonadales, Myxococcales, and Methylococcales were the most abundant and metabolically active groups in the oxic zone, while Clostridia, Actinobacteria, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Anaerolineae, and methanogenic archaea dominated the anoxic zone. The protein synthesis potential of these groups was about 75% and 50% of the entire community capacity, respectively. Their structure-function relationships in microbiome succession were revealed by classifying the protein-coding transcripts into core, non-core, and taxon-specific transcripts based on homologous gene distribution. The differential expression of core transcripts between the two microbiomes indicated that structural succession is primarily governed by the cellular ability to adapt to the given oxygen condition, involving oxidative stress, nitrogen/phosphorus metabolism, and fermentation. By contrast, the non-core transcripts were expressed from genes involved in the metabolism of various carbon sources. Among those, taxon-specific transcripts revealed highly specialized roles of the dominant groups in community-wide functioning. For instance, taxon-specific transcripts involved in photosynthesis and methane oxidation were a characteristic of the oxic zone, while those related to methane production and aromatic compound degradation were specific to the anoxic zone. Degradation of organic matters, antibiotics resistance, and secondary metabolite production were detected to be expressed in both the oxic and anoxic zones, but by different taxonomic groups. Cross-feeding of methanol between members of the Methylococcales and Xanthomonadales was suggested by the observation that in the oxic zone, they both

  1. Significant Association between Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Uranium-Reducing Microbial Communities as Revealed by a Combined Massively Parallel Sequencing-Indicator Species Approach▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow-field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 μM and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner-loop injection well toward the outer loop and downgradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical-created conditions. Castellaniella and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity, while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. The abundance of these bacteria, as well as the Fe(III) and U(VI) reducer Geobacter, correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to electron donor addition by the groundwater flow path. A false-discovery-rate approach was implemented to discard false-positive results by chance, given the large amount of data compared. PMID:20729318

  2. Change in Bacterial Community Structure during In Situ Biostimulation of Subsurface Sediment Cocontaminated with Uranium and Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    North, Nadia N.; Dollhopf, Sherry L.; Petrie, Lainie; Istok, Jonathan D.; Balkwill, David L.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that metal-reducing microorganisms can effectively promote the precipitation and removal of uranium from contaminated groundwater. Microbial communities were stimulated in the acidic subsurface by pH neutralization and addition of an electron donor to wells. In single-well push-pull tests at a number of treated sites, nitrate, Fe(III), and uranium were extensively reduced and electron donors (glucose, ethanol) were consumed. Examination of sediment chemistry in cores sampled immediately adjacent to treated wells 3.5 months after treatment revealed that sediment pH increased substantially (by 1 to 2 pH units) while nitrate was largely depleted. A large diversity of 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from subsurface sediments, including species from the α, β, δ, and γ subdivisions of the class Proteobacteria, as well as low- and high-G+C gram-positive species. Following in situ biostimulation of microbial communities within contaminated sediments, sequences related to previously cultured metal-reducing δ-Proteobacteria increased from 5% to nearly 40% of the clone libraries. Quantitative PCR revealed that Geobacter-type 16S rRNA gene sequences increased in biostimulated sediments by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude at two of the four sites tested. Evidence from the quantitative PCR analysis corroborated information obtained from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, indicating that members of the δ-Proteobacteria subdivision, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans-related and Geobacter-related sequences, are important metal-reducing organisms in acidic subsurface sediments. This study provides the first cultivation-independent analysis of the change in metal-reducing microbial communities in subsurface sediments during an in situ bioremediation experiment. PMID:15294831

  3. Biogeochemical transformation of Fe minerals in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zachara, John M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Glassman, Paul L.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Anderson, Todd

    2004-01-01

    The Bemidji aquifer in Minnesota, USA is a well-studied site of subsurface petroleum contamination. The site contains an anoxic groundwater plume where soluble petroleum constituents serve as an energy source for a region of methanogenesis near the source and bacterial Fe(III) reduction further down gradient. Methanogenesis apparently begins when bioavailable Fe(III) is exhausted within the sediment. Past studies indicate that Geobacter species and Geothrix fermentens-like organisms are the primary dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria at this site. The Fe mineralogy of the pristine aquifer sediments and samples from the methanogenic (source) and Fe(III) reducing zones were characterized in this study to identify microbiologic changes to Fe valence and mineral distribution, and to identify whether new biogenic mineral phases had formed. Methods applied included X-ray diffraction; X-ray fluorescence (XRF); and chemical extraction; optical, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy; and Mössbauer spectroscopy.All of the sediments were low in total Fe content (≈ 1%) and exhibited complex Fe-mineralogy. The bulk pristine sediment and its sand, silt, and clay-sized fractions were studied in detail. The pristine sediments contained Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases. Ferrous iron represented approximately 50% of FeTOT. The relative Fe(II) concentration increased in the sand fraction, and its primary mineralogic residence was clinochlore with minor concentrations found as a ferroan calcite grain cement in carbonate lithic fragments. Fe(III) existed in silicates (epidote, clinochlore, muscovite) and Fe(III) oxides of detrital and authigenic origin. The detrital Fe(III) oxides included hematite and goethite in the form of mm-sized nodular concretions and smaller-sized dispersed crystallites, and euhedral magnetite grains. Authigenic Fe(III) oxides increased in concentration with decreasing particle size through the silt and clay fraction. Chemical extraction and Mössbauer analysis indicated that this was a ferrihydrite like-phase. Quantitative mineralogic and Fe(II/III) ratio comparisons between the pristine and contaminated sediments were not possible because of textural differences. However, comparisons between the texturally-similar source (where bioavailable Fe(III) had been exhausted) and Fe(III) reducing zone sediments (where bioavailable Fe(III) remained) indicated that dispersed detrital, crystalline Fe(III) oxides and a portion of the authigenic, poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide fraction had been depleted from the source zone sediment by microbiologic activity. Little or no effect of microbiologic activity was observed on silicate Fe(III). The presence of residual “ferrihydrite” in the most bioreduced, anoxic plume sediment (source) implied that a portion of the authigenic Fe(III) oxides were biologically inaccessible in weathered, lithic fragment interiors. Little evidence was found for the modern biogenesis of authigenic ferrous-containing mineral phases, perhaps with the exception of thin siderite or ferroan calcite surface precipitates on carbonate lithic fragments within source zone sediments.

  4. Sediment studies of the biological factors controlling the reduction of U(VI).

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, derek, R.

    2004-08-04

    Studies were conducted primarily with sediments, both in laboratory incubations and in a field experiment, with supporting studies with pure cultures. To our knowledge the sediment studies were the first on microbial U(VI) reduction in actual uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments, under conditions that mimic those found in situ. Important findings included: (1) U(VI) reduction is a biotic process in subsurface sediments. (2) U(VI) reduction can be stimulated most effectively with the addition of acetate. Although it had been speculated that microbial U(VI) reduction might be capable of this type of environmental remediation ever since the discovery of microbial U(VI) reduction, this had not been previously demonstrated under environmentally relevant conditions. (3) U(VI) is reduced concurrently with Fe(III) and prior to sulfate reduction. U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction proceeded concurrently, accompanied by a dramatic enrichment in organisms in the Geobacteraceae. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms do not appear to be important components of the microbial community reducing U(VI) in these subsurface sediments. (4) Nitrate has important influences on U(VI) reduction. Nitrate inhibits the reduction of metals until nitrate is depleted. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter metallireducens and Desulfitobacterium species can oxidize Fe(II) with the reduction of nitrate which is an important consideration because our previous studies have demonstrated that freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides can reoxidize U(IV) to U(VI). The discovery that G. metallireducens can ''run backwards'' and oxidize U(IV) when nitrate is present reveals another mechanism preventing precipitation of U(IV) in the presence of nitrate as well as potential novel strategy for removing uranium from the subsurface after a site has been remediated. (5) Importance of understanding Fe(III) forms available for microbial reduction. Fe(III) is orders of magnitude more abundant than U(VI) as an electron acceptor to support microbial growth. It was demonstrated that poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides and structural Fe(III) in clays are the predominant forms of microbially reducible Fe(III). Such findings are important for the development of models of Fe(III) reduction in similar aquifer environments, such as those found at many UMTRA sites. (6) Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction. It was discovered that phylogenetically distinct Fe(III) reducer have different strategies for reducing Fe(III) and the fact that Geobacter species must directly contact Fe(III) in order to reduce it may help explain its predominance over other Fe(III) reducers in the subsurface. (7) Transfer of laboratory results to the field. Results from laboratory studies were used to design a field experiment in which U(VI) reduction was successfully precipitated from the contaminated water with the injection of acetate.

  5. Anaerobic Oxidation of Toluene, Phenol, and p-Cresol by the Dissimilatory Iron-Reducing Organism, GS-15

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Lonergan, Debra J.

    1990-01-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer, GS-15, is the first microorganism known to couple the oxidation of aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) and the first example of a pure culture of any kind known to anaerobically oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene. In this study, the metabolism of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by GS-15 was investigated in more detail. GS-15 grew in an anaerobic medium with toluene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. Growth coincided with Fe(III) reduction. [ring-14C]toluene was oxidized to 14CO2, and the stoichiometry of 14CO2 production and Fe(III) reduction indicated that GS-15 completely oxidized toluene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Magnetite was the primary iron end product during toluene oxidation. Phenol and p-cresol were also completely oxidized to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, and GS-15 could obtain energy to support growth by oxidizing either of these compounds as the sole electron donor. p-Hydroxybenzoate was a transitory extracellular intermediate of phenol and p-cresol metabolism but not of toluene metabolism. GS-15 oxidized potential aromatic intermediates in the oxidation of toluene (benzylalcohol and benzaldehyde) and p-cresol (p-hydroxybenzylalcohol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). The metabolism described here provides a model for how aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols may be oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III) in contaminated aquifers and petroleum-containing sediments. Images PMID:16348226

  6. Does iron deficiency in pea enhance the activity of the root-plasmalemma iron transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Grusak, M.A.; Welch, R.M.; Kochian, L.V. )

    1990-05-01

    When dicots are subjected to Fe-deficiency stress, the ability of the root system to reduce exogenous Fe is increased. The question remains, however, whether the activity of the root-plasmalemma Fe transport system (which transports Fe{sup 2+}) is similarly enhanced or altered in response to this stress. Since it is currently difficult to supply Fe{sup 2+} to roots in an oxygenated solution, we have indirectly addressed this question by measuring both Fe(III) reduction and short-term Fe{sup 2+} influx (Fe{sup 2+} derived from the reduction of {sup 59}Fe-labelled Fe(III)EDTA) on the same root system. The rate of Fe(III) reduction was used to normalize subsequently determined influx values, such that different treatments could be compared. Measurements at various concentrations of Fe(III)EDTA with excised, primary lateral roots of both iron-deficient and iron-adequate peas (Pisum sativum), showed that the ratio of Fe influx to Fe reduction never exceeded an average value of 0.15 {mu}mol Fe{sup 2+} absorbed/{mu}mol Fe(III) reduced. At high concentrations of Fe(III)EDTA (> 100 {mu}M), the value of this ratio often decreased. Our results suggest that while increased rates of Fe influx can be measured in Fe-deficient peas, this increase is due to an increased production of the transported species Fe{sup 2+}, and the specific activity of the root-plasmalemma Fe transport system is not altered or enhanced in response to Fe-deficiency.

  7. Anaerobic oxidation of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by the dissimilatory iron-reducing organism, GS-15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Lonergan, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer, GS-15, is the first microorganism known to couple the oxidation of aromatic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) and the first example of a pure culture of any kind known to anaerobically oxidize an aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene. In this study, the metabolism of toluene, phenol, and p-cresol by GS-15 was investigated in more detail. GS-15 grew in an anaerobic medium with toluene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. Growth coincided with Fe(III) reduction. [ring-14C]toluene was oxidized to 14CO2, and the stoichiometry of 14CO2 production and Fe(III) reduction indicated that GS-15 completely oxidized toluene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Magnetite was the primary iron end product during toluene oxidation. Phenol and p-cresol were also completely oxidized to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, and GS-15 could obtain energy to support growth by oxidizing either of these compounds as the sole electron donor. p-Hydroxybenzoate was a transitory extracellular intermediate of phenol and p-cresol metabolism but not of toluene metabolism. GS-15 oxidized potential aromatic intermediates in the oxidation of toluene (benzylalcohol and benzaldehyde) and p-cresol (p-hydroxybenzylalcohol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). The metabolism described here provides a model for how aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols may be oxidized with the reduction of Fe(III) in contaminated aquifers and petroleum-containing sediments.

  8. Going Wireless: Fe(III) Oxide Reduction without Pili by Geobacter sulfurreducens Strain JS-1

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L.; Franks, Ashley E.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensively studied DL-1 strain. Deletion of the gene encoding PilA, the structural pilin protein, in strain KN400 inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, low rates of Fe(III) reduction were detected after extended incubation (>30 days) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. After seven consecutive transfers, the PilA-deficient strain adapted to reduce Fe(III) oxide as fast as the wild type. Microarray, whole-genome resequencing, proteomic, and gene deletion studies indicated that this adaptation was associated with the production of larger amounts of the c-type cytochrome PgcA, which was released into the culture medium. It is proposed that the extracellular cytochrome acts as an electron shuttle, promoting electron transfer from the outer cell surface to Fe(III) oxides. The adapted PilA-deficient strain competed well with the wild-type strain when both were grown together on Fe(III) oxide. However, when 50% of the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium every 3 days, the wild-type strain outcompeted the adapted strain. A possible explanation for this is that the necessity to produce additional PgcA, to replace the PgcA being continually removed, put the adapted strain at a competitive disadvantage, similar to the apparent selection against electron shuttle-producing Fe(III) reducers in many anaerobic soils and sediments. Despite increased extracellular cytochrome production, the adapted PilA-deficient strain produced low levels of current, consistent with the concept that long-range electron transport through G. sulfurreducens biofilms is more effective via pili. PMID:24814783

  9. Dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction by the marine microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roden, E.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the marine microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans to reduce Fe(III) was investigated because of its close phylogenetic relationship with the freshwater dissimilatory Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Washed cell suspensions of the type strain of D. acetoxidans reduced soluble Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III) complexed with nitriloacetic acid. The c-type cytochrome(s) of D. acetoxidans was oxidized by Fe(III)- citrate and Mn(IV)-oxalate, as well as by two electron acceptors known to support growth, colloidal sulfur and malate. D. acetoxidans grew in defined anoxic, bicarbonate-buffered medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor. Magnetite (Fe3O4) and siderite (FeCO3) were the major end products of Fe(III) reduction, whereas rhodochrosite (MnCO3) was the end product of Mn(IV) reduction. Ethanol, propanol, pyruvate, and butanol also served as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. In contrast to D. acetoxidans, G. metallireducens could only grow in freshwater medium and it did not conserve energy to support growth from colloidal S0 reduction. D. acetoxidans is the first marine microorganism shown to conserve energy to support growth by coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV). Thus, D. acetoxidans provides a model enzymatic mechanism for Fe(III) or Mn(IV) oxidation of organic compounds in marine and estuarine sediments. These findings demonstrate that 16S rRNA phylogenetic analyses can suggest previously unrecognized metabolic capabilities of microorganisms.

  10. Unique Microbial Community in Drilling Fluids from Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Xu, Z.

    2005-12-01

    Circulating drilling fluid is often regarded as a contamination source in investigations of subsurface microbiology. However, it also provides an opportunity to sample geological fluids at depth and to study contained microbial communities. During our study of deep subsurface microbiology of Chinese Continental Scientific Deep drilling project, we collected 6 drilling fluid samples from a borehole from 2290 to 5100 m below the ground surface. Microbial communities in these samples were characterized with cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the bacterial clone sequences related to Firmicutes became progressively dominant with increased depth. Most sequences were related to anaerobic, thermophilic, halophilic or alkaliphilic bacteria. These habitats were consistent with the measured geochemical characteristics of the drilling fluids that have incorporated geological fluids and partly reflected the in-situ conditions. Several clone types were closely related to Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus, and Anaerobranca gottschalkii, an anaerobic metal-reducer, an extreme thermophile, and an anaerobic chemoorganotroph, respectively. Their optimal growth temperature was between 50-85-aC. Anaerobic, thermophilic Fe(III) reducing bacterial isolates were obtained and they were capable of reducing Fe(III) in iron oxide and clay mineral to produce siderite and vivianite, and illite, respectively. Anaerobic, thermophilic Fe(II) oxidizing bacterial isolate was able to oxidize Fe(II) in clay structure. Biological iron redox cycles may be present in the deep subsurface. The archaeal diversity was low. Most archaeal sequences were not related to known cultivated species, but to environmental clone sequences recovered from subsurface marine environments. We infer that the detected microbes were derived from geological fluids at depth and their growth habitats reflected the deep subsurface environments. These findings have important implications for microbial ecology in the deep subsurface . Analyzing drilling fluid might provide us with a new method to study subsurface microbiology.

  11. Fe(III) reduction-mediated phosphate removal as vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2⋅8H2O) in septic system wastewater.

    PubMed

    Azam, Hossain M; Finneran, Kevin T

    2014-02-01

    Phosphate is a water contaminant from fertilizers, soaps, and detergents that enters municipal and onsite wastewater from households, businesses, and other commercial operations. Phosphate is a limiting nutrient for algae, and is one of the molecules that promotes eutrophication of water bodies. Phosphate is especially problematic in onsite wastewater because there are few removal mechanisms under normal operating conditions; a system must be amended specifically with compounds to bond to or adsorb phosphate in the septic tank or within the leach field. Vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2⋅8H2O) is a stable mineral formed from ferrous iron and phosphate, often as the result of Fe(III) reducing microbial activity. What was unknown was the concentration of phosphate that could be removed by this process, and whether it was relevant to mixed microbial systems like septic tank wastewater. Data presented here demonstrate that significant concentrations of phosphate (12-14mM) were removed as vivianite in growing cultures of Geobacter metallireducens strain GS-15. Vivianite precipitates were identified on the cell surfaces and within multi cell clusters using TEM-EDX; the mineral phases were directly characterized using XRD. Phosphate was also removed in dilute and raw (undiluted) septic wastewater amended with different forms of Fe(III) including solid phase and soluble Fe(III). Vivianite precipitates were recovered and identified using XRD, along with siderite (ferrous carbonate), which was expected given that the systems were likely bicarbonate buffered. These data demonstrate that ferric iron amendments in septic wastewater increase phosphate removal as the mineral vivianite, and this may be a good strategy for phosphate attenuation in the septic tank portion of onsite wastewater systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of Arsenic and Iron Biogeochemical Gradients upon Anaerobiosis at Soil Aggregate Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masue-Slowey, Y.; Pallud, C.; Bedore, P.; Tufano, K.; Fendorf, S.

    2008-12-01

    In aerated soils, As release is limited due to the strong interaction between As(V) and soil minerals. However, under anaerobic conditions, As desorption is stimulated by As(V) reduction to As(III) and reductive dissolution/transformation of Fe (hydr)oxides, common hosts of As. The effect of As(V) and Fe(III) reduction on As release has been extensively studied in laboratory batch and column systems; correlation of apparent Fe and As reduction, with concomitant release to pore water, has also been noted under field conditions. What remains unresolved is the coupling of biogeochemical and physical processes that ultimately control As transport within structured media such as soils. Soils are heterogeneous porous media that are comprised of individual aggregates having pores that are dominated by diffusive (aggregate interiors) or advective (aggregate exteriors) transport. As a consequence of physical and chemical differences in the interior and the exterior of aggregates, As(III,V) and Fe(II,III) chemical gradients develop. Here, we examine As release from constructed aggregates exposed to fluctuating redox conditions. Artificial aggregates were made with As(V) adsorbed ferrihydrite-coated sand homogeneously inoculated with Shewanella sp. ANA-3 (model As(V) and Fe(III) reducer) and then fused using an agarose binder into spheres. Aggregates were placed in a flow reactor and saturated flow of aerobic or anaerobic artificial groundwater media was initiated. Redox fluctuated in select systems to examine changes in chemical gradient under changing aeration status. Our results show that within aerated solutions, oxidized aggregate exteriors provide a "gprotective barrier"h against As release despite anoxia within diffusively constrained aggregate interiors. During a transition to anaerobic conditions in advective zones, however, As is released and transport is promoted. Our study illustrates the microscale variation in biogeoechemical processes within soils and the importance of appreciating the spatial connection between reaction and transport fronts.

  13. Microbial Communities Associated with Anaerobic Benzene Degradation in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Rooney-Varga, Juliette N.; Anderson, Robert T.; Fraga, Jocelyn L.; Ringelberg, David; Lovley, Derek R.

    1999-01-01

    Microbial community composition associated with benzene oxidation under in situ Fe(III)-reducing conditions in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer located in Bemidji, Minn., was investigated. Community structure associated with benzene degradation was compared to sediment communities that did not anaerobically oxidize benzene which were obtained from two adjacent Fe(III)-reducing sites and from methanogenic and uncontaminated zones. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified with bacterial or Geobacteraceae-specific primers indicated significant differences in the composition of the microbial communities at the different sites. Most notable was a selective enrichment of microorganisms in the Geobacter cluster seen in the benzene-degrading sediments. This finding was in accordance with phospholipid fatty acid analysis and most-probable-number–PCR enumeration, which indicated that members of the family Geobacteraceae were more numerous in these sediments. A benzene-oxidizing Fe(III)-reducing enrichment culture was established from benzene-degrading sediments and contained an organism closely related to the uncultivated Geobacter spp. This genus contains the only known organisms that can oxidize aromatic compounds with the reduction of Fe(III). Sequences closely related to the Fe(III) reducer Geothrix fermentans and the aerobe Variovorax paradoxus were also amplified from the benzene-degrading enrichment and were present in the benzene-degrading sediments. However, neither G. fermentans nor V. paradoxus is known to oxidize aromatic compounds with the reduction of Fe(III), and there was no apparent enrichment of these organisms in the benzene-degrading sediments. These results suggest that Geobacter spp. play an important role in the anaerobic oxidation of benzene in the Bemidji aquifer and that molecular community analysis may be a powerful tool for predicting a site’s capacity for anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:10388703

  14. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, Natalia; Visser, Tom; Avramut, Cristina; de Waard, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Mn(II) by viable and inactivated cells of Shewanella putrefaciens, a non-pathogenic, facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium characterised as a Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reducer, was studied under aerobic conditions, as a function of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During a short contact time (3-24 h), the adsorptive behaviour of live and dead bacteria toward Mn(II) was sufficiently similar, an observation that was reflected in the studies on adsorption kinetics at various metal loadings, effects of pH, bacteria density, isotherms and drifting of pH during adsorption. Continuing the experiment for an additional 2-30 days demonstrated that the Mn(II) sorption by suspensions of viable and autoclaved cells differed significantly from one another. The sorption to dead cells was characterised by a rapid equilibration and was described by an isotherm. In contrast, the sorption (uptake) to live bacteria exhibited a complex time-dependent uptake. This uptake began as adsorption and ion exchange processes followed by bioprecipitation, and it was accompanied by the formation of polymeric sugars (EPS) and the release of dissolved organic substances. FTIR, EXAFS/XANES and XPS demonstrated that manganese(II) phosphate was the main precipitate formed in 125 ml batches, which is the first evidence of the ability of microbes to synthesise manganese phosphates. XPS and XANES spectra did not detect Mn(II) oxidation. Although the release of protein-like compounds by the viable bacteria increased in the presence of Mn2+ (and, by contrast, the release of carbohydrates did not change), electrochemical analyses did not indicate any aqueous complexation of Mn(II) by the organic ligands.

  15. [Isolation and characterization of a facultative anaerobe Pantoea agglomerans MFC-3 and its humic substance-and Fe(III) - respiring activity].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Yuan; Li, Fang-Bai; Zhou, Shun-Gui; Zhuang, Li; Wang, Yue-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    A strain of humic substance- and Fe(III)- reducing bacterium was isolated from the subterranean forest sediment and designated as MFC-3. The strain is facultative anaerobic, Gram-negative, motile and rod (1.0-3.0 microm long, 0.5-1.0 microm wide) and identified as Pantoea agglomerans with the 16S rDNA sequence analyses. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate its humic substance-and Fe(III)-respiring activity. The results showed that MFC-3 was capable of anaerobic respiration on anthraquinone-2,6-disulphonate (AQDS) as the sole terminal electron acceptor with glucose as the electron donor. Within 48 h, MFC-3 could reduce 0.3 mmol x L(-1) AQDS at the expense of 4.5 mmol x L(-1) glucose, and the population of bacteria was increased by 7 times. The strain could use sucrose, glucose, citrate, lactate and formate as electron donors for anaerobic respiration, and the reduction rates of AQDS ranked as sucrose (77%) > glucose (66%) > citrate (50%) > lactate (33%) > glycerol (25%) > formate (17%). MFC-3 can also effectively reduce four types of Fe(III) oxides. After 25 d, the total Fe(II) concentration in the tests of using ferrihydrite, alpha-FeOOH, gamma-FeOOH or alpha-Fe2 O3 as electron acceptor reached 2.5, 2.1, 2.3 and 0.8 mmol x L(-1), respectively. As a strain of environmental origin, MFC-3 is quite useful for the study of extracellular respiration and bioremediation of chlorinated organic pollutants in Fe(III)/humic substance-rich environments.

  16. Anaerobic benzene oxidation by Geobacter species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Bain, Timothy S; Nevin, Kelly P; Barlett, Melissa A; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-12-01

    The abundance of Geobacter species in contaminated aquifers in which benzene is anaerobically degraded has led to the suggestion that some Geobacter species might be capable of anaerobic benzene degradation, but this has never been documented. A strain of Geobacter, designated strain Ben, was isolated from sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which there was significant capacity for anaerobic benzene oxidation. Strain Ben grew in a medium with benzene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, additional evaluation of Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that it could also grow in benzene-Fe(III) medium. In both strain Ben and G. metallireducens the stoichiometry of benzene metabolism and Fe(III) reduction was consistent with the oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron acceptor. With benzene as the electron donor, and Fe(III) oxide (strain Ben) or Fe(III) citrate (G. metallireducens) as the electron acceptor, the cell yields of strain Ben and G. metallireducens were 3.2 × 10(9) and 8.4 × 10(9) cells/mmol of Fe(III) reduced, respectively. Strain Ben also oxidized benzene with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as the sole electron acceptor with cell yields of 5.9 × 10(9) cells/mmol of AQDS reduced. Strain Ben serves as model organism for the study of anaerobic benzene metabolism in petroleum-contaminated aquifers, and G. metallireducens is the first anaerobic benzene-degrading organism that can be genetically manipulated.

  17. Going wireless: Fe(III) oxide reduction without pili by Geobacter sulfurreducens strain JS-1.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica A; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Franks, Ashley E; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensively studied DL-1 strain. Deletion of the gene encoding PilA, the structural pilin protein, in strain KN400 inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, low rates of Fe(III) reduction were detected after extended incubation (>30 days) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. After seven consecutive transfers, the PilA-deficient strain adapted to reduce Fe(III) oxide as fast as the wild type. Microarray, whole-genome resequencing, proteomic, and gene deletion studies indicated that this adaptation was associated with the production of larger amounts of the c-type cytochrome PgcA, which was released into the culture medium. It is proposed that the extracellular cytochrome acts as an electron shuttle, promoting electron transfer from the outer cell surface to Fe(III) oxides. The adapted PilA-deficient strain competed well with the wild-type strain when both were grown together on Fe(III) oxide. However, when 50% of the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium every 3 days, the wild-type strain outcompeted the adapted strain. A possible explanation for this is that the necessity to produce additional PgcA, to replace the PgcA being continually removed, put the adapted strain at a competitive disadvantage, similar to the apparent selection against electron shuttle-producing Fe(III) reducers in many anaerobic soils and sediments. Despite increased extracellular cytochrome production, the adapted PilA-deficient strain produced low levels of current, consistent with the concept that long-range electron transport through G. sulfurreducens biofilms is more effective via pili.

  18. Outer cell surface components essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction by Geobacter metallireducens.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica A; Lovley, Derek R; Tremblay, Pier-Luc

    2013-02-01

    Geobacter species are important Fe(III) reducers in a diversity of soils and sediments. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction have been studied in detail in Geobacter sulfurreducens, but a number of the most thoroughly studied outer surface components of G. sulfurreducens, particularly c-type cytochromes, are not well conserved among Geobacter species. In order to identify cellular components potentially important for Fe(III) oxide reduction in Geobacter metallireducens, gene transcript abundance was compared in cells grown on Fe(III) oxide or soluble Fe(III) citrate with whole-genome microarrays. Outer-surface cytochromes were also identified. Deletion of genes for c-type cytochromes that had higher transcript abundance during growth on Fe(III) oxides and/or were detected in the outer-surface protein fraction identified six c-type cytochrome genes, that when deleted removed the capacity for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Several of the c-type cytochromes which were essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens have homologs in G. sulfurreducens that are not important for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Other genes essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction included a gene predicted to encode an NHL (Ncl-1-HT2A-Lin-41) repeat-containing protein and a gene potentially involved in pili glycosylation. Genes associated with flagellum-based motility, chemotaxis, and pili had higher transcript abundance during growth on Fe(III) oxide, consistent with the previously proposed importance of these components in Fe(III) oxide reduction. These results demonstrate that there are similarities in extracellular electron transfer between G. metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens but the outer-surface c-type cytochromes involved in Fe(III) oxide reduction are different.

  19. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation by Geobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Timothy S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Barlett, Melissa A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of Geobacter species in contaminated aquifers in which benzene is anaerobically degraded has led to the suggestion that some Geobacter species might be capable of anaerobic benzene degradation, but this has never been documented. A strain of Geobacter, designated strain Ben, was isolated from sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which there was significant capacity for anaerobic benzene oxidation. Strain Ben grew in a medium with benzene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, additional evaluation of Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that it could also grow in benzene-Fe(III) medium. In both strain Ben and G. metallireducens the stoichiometry of benzene metabolism and Fe(III) reduction was consistent with the oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron acceptor. With benzene as the electron donor, and Fe(III) oxide (strain Ben) or Fe(III) citrate (G. metallireducens) as the electron acceptor, the cell yields of strain Ben and G. metallireducens were 3.2 × 109 and 8.4 × 109 cells/mmol of Fe(III) reduced, respectively. Strain Ben also oxidized benzene with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as the sole electron acceptor with cell yields of 5.9 × 109 cells/mmol of AQDS reduced. Strain Ben serves as model organism for the study of anaerobic benzene metabolism in petroleum-contaminated aquifers, and G. metallireducens is the first anaerobic benzene-degrading organism that can be genetically manipulated. PMID:23001648

  20. Promoted reduction of tellurite and formation of extracellular tellurium nanorods by concerted reaction between iron and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-08-06

    The reduction of tellurite (Te(IV)) by dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, was promoted in the presence of Fe(III) in comparison with Te(IV) bioreduction in the absence of Fe(III). Electron microscopic analyses revealed that iron promoted Te(IV) reduction led to form exclusively extracellular crystalline Te(0) nanorods, as compared to the mostly intracellular formation of Te(0) nanorods in the absence of Fe(III). The Te K-edge X-ray absorption spectrometric analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis MR-1 in the presence of Fe(III) reduced Te(IV) to less harmful metallic Te(0) nanorods through the precipitation of tellurite (Te(IV)Ox) complex by the bacterial respiration of Fe(III) to Fe(II) under anaerobic conditions. However, Fe(II) ion itself was only able to precipitate the solid tellurite (Te(IV)Ox) complex from the Te(IV) solution, which was not further reduced to Te(0). The results clearly indicated that bacterial S. oneidensis MR-1 plays important roles in the reduction and crystallization of Te(0) nanorods by as yet undetermined biochemical mechanisms. As compared to the slow bacterial Te(IV) reduction in the absence of Fe(III), the rapid reduction of Te(IV) to Te(0) by the concerted biogeochemical reaction between Fe(II) and S. oneidensis MR-1 could be applied for the sequestration and detoxification of Te(IV) in the environments as well as for the preparation of extracellular Te(0) nanorod structures.

  1. Depth-dependent geochemical and microbiological gradients in Fe(III) deposits resulting from coal mine-derived acid mine drainage

    PubMed Central

    Brantner, Justin S.; Haake, Zachary J.; Burwick, John E.; Menge, Christopher M.; Hotchkiss, Shane T.; Senko, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the depth-dependent geochemistry and microbiology of sediments that have developed via the microbially-mediated oxidation of Fe(II) dissolved in acid mine drainage (AMD), giving rise to a 8–10 cm deep “iron mound” that is composed primarily of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide phases. Chemical analyses of iron mound sediments indicated a zone of maximal Fe(III) reducing bacterial activity at a depth of approximately 2.5 cm despite the availability of dissolved O2 at this depth. Subsequently, Fe(II) was depleted at depths within the iron mound sediments that did not contain abundant O2. Evaluations of microbial communities at 1 cm depth intervals within the iron mound sediments using “next generation” nucleic acid sequencing approaches revealed an abundance of phylotypes attributable to acidophilic Fe(II) oxidizing Betaproteobacteria and the chloroplasts of photosynthetic microeukaryotic organisms in the upper 4 cm of the iron mound sediments. While we observed a depth-dependent transition in microbial community structure within the iron mound sediments, phylotypes attributable to Gammaproteobacterial lineages capable of both Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction were abundant in sequence libraries (comprising ≥20% of sequences) from all depths. Similarly, abundances of total cells and culturable Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria were uniform throughout the iron mound sediments. Our results indicate that O2 and Fe(III) reduction co-occur in AMD-induced iron mound sediments, but that Fe(II)-oxidizing activity may be sustained in regions of the sediments that are depleted in O2. PMID:24860562

  2. Long-term Fate of Arsenic under the Oxidation of Ferrous Iron by Nitrate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Prommer, H.; Siade, A. J.; Chillrud, S. N.; Mailloux, B. J.; Bostick, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    In situ precipitation of iron (Fe) minerals can be an effective means of remediating groundwater arsenic (As) contamination. Among different Fe minerals, magnetite is promising as a host-mineral for As in situ immobilization in that it is stable under a wide range of geochemical conditions, including Fe(III) reducing conditions under which As are often mobilized. Our previous laboratory studies suggest that the formation of nanoparticulate magnetite can be achieved by the oxidation of ferrous Fe with nitrate. Magnetite can incorporate As into its structure during formation, in which case desorption and As(V) reduction are less likely. Nanoparticulate magnetite, once formed, can also immobilize As by surface adsorption, and thus serve as a reactive filter when contaminated groundwater migrates through the treatment zone. In this study, a reactive transport model is develop for the magnetite based As immobilization strategy. The initial numerical model development was guided by experimental data and hypothesized processes from the laboratory one-dimensional column studies. Our modeling results suggest that the ratio between Fe(II) and nitrate in the injectant regulates the extent and distribution of magnetite and ferrihydrite formation, and thus regulates the long-term potential of As immobilization. Based on these results, two-dimensional field-scale model scenarios were developed to predict and compare the impact of chemical and operational parameters on the efficiency of the remediation technology. The modeling results, which suggest that long-term groundwater As removal is feasible, favor scenarios that rely on the chromatographic mixing of Fe(II) and nitrate after injection. This study highlights the importance of combining laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling for elucidating the complex hydro-biogeochemical processes that control the fate of As and for up-scaling of the technology.

  3. Microbial communities associated with anaerobic benzene degradation in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Rooney-Varga, J N; Anderson, R T; Fraga, J L; Ringelberg, D; Lovley, D R

    1999-07-01

    Microbial community composition associated with benzene oxidation under in situ Fe(III)-reducing conditions in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer located in Bemidji, Minn., was investigated. Community structure associated with benzene degradation was compared to sediment communities that did not anaerobically oxidize benzene which were obtained from two adjacent Fe(III)-reducing sites and from methanogenic and uncontaminated zones. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA sequences amplified with bacterial or Geobacteraceae-specific primers indicated significant differences in the composition of the microbial communities at the different sites. Most notable was a selective enrichment of microorganisms in the Geobacter cluster seen in the benzene-degrading sediments. This finding was in accordance with phospholipid fatty acid analysis and most-probable-number-PCR enumeration, which indicated that members of the family Geobacteraceae were more numerous in these sediments. A benzene-oxidizing Fe(III)-reducing enrichment culture was established from benzene-degrading sediments and contained an organism closely related to the uncultivated Geobacter spp. This genus contains the only known organisms that can oxidize aromatic compounds with the reduction of Fe(III). Sequences closely related to the Fe(III) reducer Geothrix fermentans and the aerobe Variovorax paradoxus were also amplified from the benzene-degrading enrichment and were present in the benzene-degrading sediments. However, neither G. fermentans nor V. paradoxus is known to oxidize aromatic compounds with the reduction of Fe(III), and there was no apparent enrichment of these organisms in the benzene-degrading sediments. These results suggest that Geobacter spp. play an important role in the anaerobic oxidation of benzene in the Bemidji aquifer and that molecular community analysis may be a powerful tool for predicting a site's capacity for anaerobic benzene degradation.

  4. Structural characterization of the heme-based oxygen sensor, AfGcHK, its interactions with the cognate response regulator, and their combined mechanism of action in a bacterial two-component signaling system.

    PubMed

    Stranava, Martin; Martínek, Václav; Man, Petr; Fojtikova, Veronika; Kavan, Daniel; Vaněk, Ondřej; Shimizu, Toru; Martinkova, Marketa

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen sensor histidine kinase AfGcHK from the bacterium Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw 109-5 forms a two-component signal transduction system together with its cognate response regulator (RR). The binding of oxygen to the heme iron of its N-terminal sensor domain causes the C-terminal kinase domain of AfGcHK to autophosphorylate at His183 and then transfer this phosphate to Asp52 or Asp169 of the RR protein. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that AfGcHK and the RR protein form a complex with 2:1 stoichiometry. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) suggested that the most flexible part of the whole AfGcHK protein is a loop that connects the two domains and that the heme distal side of AfGcHK, which is responsible for oxygen binding, is the only flexible part of the sensor domain. HDX-MS studies on the AfGcHK:RR complex also showed that the N-side of the H9 helix in the dimerization domain of the AfGcHK kinase domain interacts with the helix H1 and the β-strand B2 area of the RR protein's Rec1 domain, and that the C-side of the H8 helix region in the dimerization domain of the AfGcHK protein interacts mostly with the helix H5 and β-strand B6 area of the Rec1 domain. The Rec1 domain containing the phosphorylable Asp52 of the RR protein probably has a significantly higher affinity for AfGcHK than the Rec2 domain. We speculate that phosphorylation at Asp52 changes the overall structure of RR such that the Rec2 area containing the second phosphorylation site (Asp169) can also interact with AfGcHK. Proteins 2016; 84:1375-1389. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Passive methods for quantifying the In Situ Flux of Water, Uranium, and Microbial Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. A.; Peacock, A.; Hatfield, K.; Stucker, V.; Cho, J.; Klammler, H.; Ranville, J. F.; Cabaniss, S.; Annable, M. D.; Perminova, I.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a novel sensor that incorporates field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter (PFM) to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly-sensor principles and design will apply to fluxes of other radionuclides, metals, and co-contaminants. Flux measurements will assist in obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in fluxes of uranium, groundwater and salient electron donor/acceptors are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. Field tests in the La Quinta and Super 8 galleries at the Rifle IFRC site were conducted to assess ambient groundwater, uranium, and microbial biomass fluxes. The latter were determined using a newly designed Baffled Multilevel Sampling (BMLS) device installed in typical screened monitoring wells to provide aqueous concentrations of dissolved or suspended constituents over multiple isolated vertical sections of the well. Biomass mass fluxes were calculated from the product of BMLS data for microbial cell counts from PCR analyses and PFM water fluxes collected from coincident well sections. Expected microbial discharge for Eubacteria in the La Quinta gallery was estimated to be 1.7 x 1012 cells per day. The biomass discharges for Geobacter, Methanogens, and Anaeromyxobacter remain to be determined. Expected uranium discharges predicted from stochastic simulations using PFM measures of flux over the La Quinta gallery transect and the injection-well transect of the Super 8 gallery were 26 mg

  6. Nitrous Oxide Reduction Kinetics Distinguish Bacteria Harboring Clade I NosZ from Those Harboring Clade II NosZ

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Silke; Park, Doyoung; Sanford, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria capable of reduction of nitrous oxide (N2O) to N2 separate into clade I and clade II organisms on the basis of nos operon structures and nosZ sequence features. To explore the possible ecological consequences of distinct nos clusters, the growth of bacterial isolates with either clade I (Pseudomonas stutzeri strain DCP-Ps1, Shewanella loihica strain PV-4) or clade II (Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C) nosZ with N2O was examined. Growth curves did not reveal trends distinguishing the clade I and clade II organisms tested; however, the growth yields of clade II organisms exceeded those of clade I organisms by 1.5- to 1.8-fold. Further, whole-cell half-saturation constants (Kss) for N2O distinguished clade I from clade II organisms. The apparent Ks values of 0.324 ± 0.078 μM for D. aromatica and 1.34 ± 0.35 μM for A. dehalogenans were significantly lower than the values measured for P. stutzeri (35.5 ± 9.3 μM) and S. loihica (7.07 ± 1.13 μM). Genome sequencing demonstrated that Dechloromonas denitrificans possessed a clade II nosZ gene, and a measured Ks of 1.01 ± 0.18 μM for N2O was consistent with the values determined for the other clade II organisms tested. These observations provide a plausible mechanistic basis for why the relative activity of bacteria with clade I nos operons compared to that of bacteria with clade II nos operons may control N2O emissions and determine a soil's N2O sink capacity. IMPORTANCE Anthropogenic activities, in particular fertilizer application for agricultural production, increase N2O emissions to the atmosphere. N2O is a strong greenhouse gas with ozone destruction potential, and there is concern that nitrogen may become the major driver of climate change. Microbial N2O reductase (NosZ) catalyzes N2O reduction to environmentally benign dinitrogen gas and represents the major N2O sink process. The observation that bacterial groups with clade I nosZ versus those

  7. Bioreduction of hydrogen uranyl phosphate: mechanisms and U(IV) products.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xue; Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah; Fein, Jeremy B; Bunker, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M; Boyanov, Maxim I

    2013-06-04

    The mobility of uranium (U) in subsurface environments is controlled by interrelated adsorption, redox, and precipitation reactions. Previous work demonstrated the formation of nanometer-sized hydrogen uranyl phosphate (abbreviated as HUP) crystals on the cell walls of Bacillus subtilis, a non-U(VI)-reducing, Gram-positive bacterium. The current study examined the reduction of this biogenic, cell-associated HUP mineral by three dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain K, Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA, and Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32, and compared it to the bioreduction of abiotically formed and freely suspended HUP of larger particle size. Uranium speciation in the solid phase was followed over a 10- to 20-day reaction period by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) and showed varying extents of U(VI) reduction to U(IV). The reduction extent of the same mass of HUP to U(IV) was consistently greater with the biogenic than with the abiotic material under the same experimental conditions. A greater extent of HUP reduction was observed in the presence of bicarbonate in solution, whereas a decreased extent of HUP reduction was observed with the addition of dissolved phosphate. These results indicate that the extent of U(VI) reduction is controlled by dissolution of the HUP phase, suggesting that the metal-reducing bacteria transfer electrons to the dissolved or bacterially adsorbed U(VI) species formed after HUP dissolution, rather than to solid-phase U(VI) in the HUP mineral. Interestingly, the bioreduced U(IV) atoms were not immediately coordinated to other U(IV) atoms (as in uraninite, UO2) but were similar in structure to the phosphate-complexed U(IV) species found in ningyoite [CaU(PO4)2·H2O]. This indicates a strong control by phosphate on the speciation of bioreduced U(IV), expressed as inhibition of the typical formation of uraninite under phosphate-free conditions.

  8. High-mobility-group a-like CarD binds to a DNA site optimized for affinity and position and to RNA polymerase to regulate a light-inducible promoter in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    García-Heras, Francisco; Abellón-Ruiz, Javier; Murillo, Francisco J; Padmanabhan, S; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    The CarD-CarG complex controls various cellular processes in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus including fruiting body development and light-induced carotenogenesis. The CarD N-terminal domain, which defines the large CarD_CdnL_TRCF protein family, binds to CarG, a zinc-associated protein that does not bind DNA. The CarD C-terminal domain resembles eukaryotic high-mobility-group A (HMGA) proteins, and its DNA binding AT hooks specifically recognize the minor groove of appropriately spaced AT-rich tracts. Here, we investigate the determinants of the only known CarD binding site, the one crucial in CarD-CarG regulation of the promoter of the carQRS operon (P(QRS)), a light-inducible promoter dependent on the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor CarQ. In vitro, mutating either of the 3-bp AT tracts of this CarD recognition site (TTTCCAGAGCTTT) impaired DNA binding, shifting the AT tracts relative to P(QRS) had no effect or marginally lowered DNA binding, and replacing the native site by the HMGA1a binding one at the human beta interferon promoter (with longer AT tracts) markedly enhanced DNA binding. In vivo, however, all of these changes deterred P(QRS) activation in wild-type M. xanthus, as well as in a strain with the CarD-CarG pair replaced by the Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans CarD-CarG (CarD(Ad)-CarG(Ad)). CarD(Ad)-CarG(Ad) is functionally equivalent to CarD-CarG despite the lower DNA binding affinity in vitro of CarD(Ad), whose C-terminal domain resembles histone H1 rather than HMGA. We show that CarD physically associates with RNA polymerase (RNAP) specifically via interactions with the RNAP β subunit. Our findings suggest that CarD regulates a light-inducible, ECF σ-dependent promoter by coupling RNAP recruitment and binding to a specific DNA site optimized for affinity and position.

  9. Water management impacts on arsenic behavior and rhizosphere bacterial communities and activities in a rice agro-ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Das, Suvendu; Chou, Mon-Lin; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-01-15

    Although rice cultivated under water-saturated conditions as opposed to submerged conditions has received considerable attention with regard to reducing As levels in rice grain, the rhizosphere microbiome potentially influencing As-biotransformation and bioavailability in a rice ecosystem has rarely been studied. In this study, the impacts of flooded, non-flooded and alternate wetting and drying (AWD) practices on rhizosphere bacterial composition and activities that could potentially impact As speciation and accumulation in rhizosphere soil and pore water, As fractions in rhizosphere soil and As speciation and distribution in plant parts were assessed. The results revealed that in addition to pore water As concentration, non-specifically sorbed As fraction, specifically sorbed As fraction and amorphous iron oxide bound As fraction in soil were bio-available to rice plants. In the flooded treatment, As(III) in the pore water was the predominant As species, accounting for 87.3-93.6% of the total As, whereas in the non-flooded and AWD treatments, As(V) was the dominant As species, accounting for 89.6-96.2% and 73.0-83.0%, respectively. The genera Ohtaekwangia, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Desulfuromonas, Desulfocapsa, Desulfobulbus, and Lacibacter were found in relatively high abundance in the flooded soil, whereas the genera Acinetobacter, Ignavibacterium, Thiobacillus, and Lysobacter were detected in relatively high abundance in the non-flooded soil. Admittedly, the decrease in As level in rice cultivated under the non-flooded and AWD conditions was mostly linked to a relatively high soil redox potential, low As(III) concentration in the soil pore water, a decrease in the relative abundance of As-, Fe- and sulfur-reducing bacteria and an increase in the relative abundance of As-, Fe- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in the rhizosphere soil of the rice. This study demonstrated that with substantial reduction in grain As levels and higher water productivity, AWD

  10. Biostimulation of Iron Reduction and Uranium Immobilization: Microbial and Mineralogical Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Joel E. Kostka; Lainie Petrie; Nadia North; David L. Balkwill; Joseph W. Stucki; Lee Kerkhof

    2004-03-17

    change in microbial community composition of FRC sediments during in situ biostimulation in single well push-pull tests. Microbial communities were stimulated in the acidic subsurface via pH neutralization and addition of electron donor to wells. Examination of sediment chemistry in cores sampled immediately adjacent to treated wells revealed that sediment pH increased substantially (by 1-2 pH units), while nitrate was largely depleted. Following the in situ biostimulation, previously cultured metal-reducing {delta}-Proteobacteria 16S rRNA gene sequences substantially increased from 5% to nearly 40% of clone libraries. Quantitative PCR revealed that Geobacter-type 16S rRNA gene sequences increased in biostimulated sediments by one to two orders of magnitude at two of the four sites tested, thereby corroborating information obtained from clone libraries, and indicating that members of the {delta}-Proteobacteria (including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans-related and Geobacter-related organisms) are important metal-reducing bacteria in FRC.

  11. A novel Geobacteraceae-specific outer membrane protein J (OmpJ) is essential for electron transport to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Afkar, Eman; Reguera, Gemma; Schiffer, Marianne; Lovley, Derek R

    2005-07-06

    Metal reduction is thought to take place at or near the bacterial outer membrane and, thus, outer membrane proteins in the model dissimilatory metal-reducing organism Geobacter sulfurreducens are of interest to understand the mechanisms of Fe(III) reduction in the Geobacter species that are the predominant Fe(III) reducers in many environments. Previous studies have implicated periplasmic and outer membrane cytochromes in electron transfer to metals. Here we show that the most abundant outer membrane protein of G. sulfurreducens, OmpJ, is not a cytochrome yet it is required for metal respiration. When outer membrane proteins of G. sulfurreducens were separated via SDS-PAGE, one protein, designated OmpJ (outer membrane protein J), was particularly abundant. The encoding gene, which was identified from mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments, is present in other Geobacteraceae, but not in organisms outside this family. The predicted localization and structure of the OmpJ protein suggested that it was a porin. Deletion of the ompJ gene in G. sulfurreducens produced a strain that grew as well as the wild-type strain with fumarate as the electron acceptor but could not grow with metals, such as soluble or insoluble Fe(III) and insoluble Mn(IV) oxide, as the electron acceptor. The heme c content in the mutant strain was ca. 50% of the wild-type and there was a widespread loss of multiple cytochromes from soluble and membrane fractions. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of mutant cells revealed an unusually enlarged periplasm, which is likely to trigger extracytoplasmic stress response mechanisms leading to the degradation of periplasmic and/or outer membrane proteins, such as cytochromes, required for metal reduction. Thus, the loss of the capacity for extracellular electron transport in the mutant could be due to the missing c-type cytochromes, or some more direct, but as yet unknown, role of OmpJ in metal reduction. OmpJ is a putative porin found in the outer membrane of the model metal reducer G. sulfurreducens that is required for respiration of extracellular electron acceptors such as soluble and insoluble metals. The effect of OmpJ in extracellular electron transfer is indirect, as OmpJ is required to keep the integrity of the periplasmic space necessary for proper folding and functioning of periplasmic and outer membrane electron transport components. The exclusive presence of ompJ in members of the Geobacteraceae family as well as its role in metal reduction suggest that the ompJ sequence may be useful in tracking the growth or activity of Geobacteraceae in sedimentary environments.

  12. Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction in Chocolate Pots Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortney, N. W.; Roden, E. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Converse, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work on dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has focused on high temperature, low pH environments where soluble Fe(III) is utilized as an electron acceptor for respiration. Much less attention has been paid to DIR in lower temperature, circumneutral pH environments, where solid phase Fe(III) oxides are the dominant forms of Fe(III). This study explored the potential for DIR in the warm (ca. 40-50°C), circumneutral pH Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) in YNP. Most probable number (MPN) enumerations and enrichment culture studies confirmed the presence of endogenous microbial communities that reduced native CP Fe(III) oxides. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR coupled to acetate and lactate oxidation through repeated transfers over ca. 450 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the dominant organisms in the enrichments were closely affiliated with the well known Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Additional taxa included relatives of sulfate reducing bacterial genera Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfovibrio; however, amendment of enrichments with molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, suggested that sulfate reduction was not a primary metabolic pathway involved in DIR in the cultures. A metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures is underway in anticipation of identifying genes involved in DIR in the less well-characterized dominant organisms. Current studies are aimed at interrogating the in situ microbial community at CP. Core samples were collected along the flow path (Fig. 1) and subdivided into 1 cm depth intervals for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The presence of significant quantities of Fe(II) in the solids indicated that DIR is active in situ. A parallel study investigated in vitro microbial DIR in sediments collected from three of the coring sites. DNA was extracted from samples from both studies for 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing in order to obtain a detailed understanding of the vertical and longitudinal distribution of microbial taxa throughout CP. These studies will provide insight into the operation of the microbial Fe redox cycle, demonstrating how genomic properties relate to and control geochemical conditions with depth and distance in a Fe-rich, neutral pH geothermal environment.

  13. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    'The authors have made considerable progress toward a number of project objectives during the first several months of activity on the project. An exhaustive analysis was made of the growth rate and biomass yield (both derived from measurements of cell protein production) of two representative strains of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Shewanellaalga strain BrY and Geobactermetallireducens) growing with different forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor. These two fundamentally different types of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) showed comparable rates of Fe(III) reduction, cell growth, and biomass yield during reduction of soluble Fe(III)-citrate and solid-phase amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Intrinsic growth rates of the two FeRB were strongly influenced by whether a soluble or a solid-phase source of Fe(III) was provided: growth rates on soluble Fe(III) were 10--20 times higher than those on solid-phase Fe(III) oxide. Intrinsic FeRB growth rates were comparable during reduction of HF0 and a synthetic crystalline Fe(III) oxide (goethite). A distinct lag phase for protein production was observed during the first several days of incubation in solid-phase Fe(III) oxide medium, even though Fe(III) reduction proceeded without any lag. No such lag between protein production and Fe(III) reduction was observed during growth with soluble Fe(III). This result suggested that protein synthesis coupled to solid-phase Fe(III) oxide reduction in batch culture requires an initial investment of energy (generated by Fe(III) reduction), which is probably needed for synthesis of materials (e.g. extracellular polysaccharides) required for attachment of the cells to oxide surfaces. This phenomenon may have important implications for modeling the growth of FeRB in subsurface sedimentary environments, where attachment and continued adhesion to solid-phase materials will be required for maintenance of Fe(III) reduction activity. Despite considerable differences in the rate and pattern of FeRB growth with different Fe(III) forms, a roughly consistent long-term biomass yield of 5 to 15 mg protein per mmol Fe(III) reduced was observed during growth on different forms of Fe(III). These results should prove useful for quantitative modeling of FeRB growth and metabolism in various types of experimental and in situ anaerobic sedimentary systems.'

  14. Influence of Seasonal and Geochemical Changes on the Geomicrobiology of an Iron Carbonate Mineral Water Spring

    PubMed Central

    Hegler, Florian; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Hanselmann, Kurt; Behrens, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Fuschna Spring in the Swiss Alps (Engadin region) is a bicarbonate iron(II)-rich, pH-neutral mineral water spring that is dominated visually by dark green microbial mats at the side of the flow channel and orange iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in the flow channel. Gradients of O2, dissolved iron(II), and bicarbonate establish in the water. Our goals were to identify the dominating biogeochemical processes and to determine to which extent changing geochemical conditions along the flow path and seasonal changes influence mineral identity, crystallinity, and microbial diversity. Geochemical analysis showed microoxic water at the spring outlet which became fully oxygenated within 2.3 m downstream. X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed calcite (CaCO3) and ferrihydrite [Fe(OH)3] to be the dominant minerals which increased in crystallinity with increasing distance from the spring outlet. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis banding pattern cluster analysis revealed that the microbial community composition shifted mainly with seasons and to a lesser extent along the flow path. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that microbial communities differ between the flow channel and the flanking microbial mat. Microbial community analysis in combination with most-probable-number analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that the mat was dominated by cyanobacteria and the channel was dominated by microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (1.97 × 107 ± 4.36 × 106 16S rRNA gene copies g−1 using Gallionella-specific qPCR primers), while high numbers of Fe(III) reducers (109 cells/g) were identified in both the mat and the flow channel. Phototrophic and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers were present as well, although in lower numbers (103 to 104 cells/g). In summary, our data suggest that mainly seasonal changes caused microbial community shifts, while geochemical gradients along the flow path influenced mineral crystallinity. PMID:22865064

  15. Reduction of Fe(III), Mn(IV), and toxic metals at 100 degrees C by Pyrobaculum islandicum.

    PubMed

    Kashefi, K; Lovley, D R

    2000-03-01

    It has recently been noted that a diversity of hyperthermophilic microorganisms have the ability to reduce Fe(III) with hydrogen as the electron donor, but the reduction of Fe(III) or other metals by these organisms has not been previously examined in detail. When Pyrobaculum islandicum was grown at 100 degrees C in a medium with hydrogen as the electron donor and Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor, the increase in cell numbers of P. islandicum per mole of Fe(III) reduced was found to be ca. 10-fold higher than previously reported. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide could also serve as the electron acceptor for growth on hydrogen. The stoichiometry of hydrogen uptake and Fe(III) oxide reduction was consistent with the oxidation of 1 mol of hydrogen resulting in the reduction of 2 mol of Fe(III). The poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide was reduced to extracellular magnetite. P. islandicum could not effectively reduce the crystalline Fe(III) oxide minerals goethite and hematite. In addition to using hydrogen as an electron donor for Fe(III) reduction, P. islandicum grew via Fe(III) reduction in media in which peptone and yeast extract served as potential electron donors. The closely related species P. aerophilum grew via Fe(III) reduction in a similar complex medium. Cell suspensions of P. islandicum reduced the following metals with hydrogen as the electron donor: U(VI), Tc(VII), Cr(VI), Co(III), and Mn(IV). The reduction of these metals was dependent upon the presence of cells and hydrogen. The metalloids arsenate and selenate were not reduced. U(VI) was reduced to the insoluble U(IV) mineral uraninite, which was extracellular. Tc(VII) was reduced to insoluble Tc(IV) or Tc(V). Cr(VI) was reduced to the less toxic, less soluble Cr(III). Co(III) was reduced to Co(II). Mn(IV) was reduced to Mn(II) with the formation of manganese carbonate. These results demonstrate that biological reduction may contribute to the speciation of metals in hydrothermal environments and could account for such phenomena as magnetite accumulation and the formation of uranium deposits at ca. 100 degrees C. Reduction of toxic metals with hyperthermophilic microorganisms or their enzymes might be applied to the remediation of metal-contaminated waters or waste streams.

  16. Use of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor to recover previously uncultured hyperthermophiles: isolation and characterization of Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kashefi, Kazem; Holmes, Dawn E; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Lovley, Derek R

    2002-04-01

    It has recently been recognized that the ability to use Fe(III) as a terminal electron acceptor is a highly conserved characteristic in hyperthermophilic microorganisms. This suggests that it may be possible to recover as-yet-uncultured hyperthermophiles in pure culture if Fe(III) is used as an electron acceptor. As part of a study of the microbial diversity of the Obsidian Pool area in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., hot sediment samples were used as the inoculum for enrichment cultures in media containing hydrogen as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. A pure culture was recovered on solidified, Fe(III) oxide medium. The isolate, designated FW-1a, is a hyperthermophilic anaerobe that grows exclusively by coupling hydrogen oxidation to the reduction of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide. Organic carbon is not required for growth. Magnetite is the end product of Fe(III) oxide reduction under the culture conditions evaluated. The cells are rod shaped, about 0.5 microm by 1.0 to 1.2 microm, and motile and have a single flagellum. Strain FW-1a grows at circumneutral pH, at freshwater salinities, and at temperatures of between 65 and 100 degrees C with an optimum of 85 to 90 degrees C. To our knowledge this is the highest temperature optimum of any organism in the Bacteria. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence of strain FW-1a places it within the Bacteria, most closely related to abundant but uncultured microorganisms whose 16S rDNA sequences have been previously recovered from Obsidian Pool and a terrestrial hot spring in Iceland. While previous studies inferred that the uncultured microorganisms with these 16S rDNA sequences were sulfate-reducing organisms, the physiology of the strain FW-1a, which does not reduce sulfate, indicates that these organisms are just as likely to be Fe(III) reducers. These results further demonstrate that Fe(III) may be helpful for recovering as-yet-uncultured microorganisms from hydrothermal environments and illustrate that caution must be used in inferring the physiological characteristics of at least some thermophilic microorganisms solely from 16S rDNA sequences. Based on both its 16S rDNA sequence and physiological characteristics, strain FW-1a represents a new genus among the Bacteria. The name Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed (ATCC BAA-426).

  17. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction in sedimentary environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    Although it was previously considered that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms must come into direct contact with Fe(III) oxides in order to reduce them, recent studies have suggested that electron-shuttling compounds and/or Fe(III) chelators, either naturally present or produced by the Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms themselves, may alleviate the need for the Fe(III) reducers to establish direct contact with Fe(III) oxides. Studies with Shewanella alga strain BrY and Fe(III) oxides sequestered within microporous beads demonstrated for the first time that this organism releases a compound(s) that permits electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides which the organism cannot directly contact. Furthermore, as much as 450 w M dissolved Fe(III) was detected in cultures of S. alga growing in Fe(III) oxide medium, suggesting that this organism releases compounds that can solublize Fe(III) from Fe(III) oxide. These results contrast with previous studies, which demonstrated that Geobacter metallireducens does not produce electron-shuttles or Fe(III) chelators. Some freshwater aquatic sediments and groundwaters contained compounds, which could act as electron shuttles by accepting electrons from G. metallireducens and then transferring the electrons to Fe(III). However, other samples lacked significant electron-shuttling capacity. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the electron-shuttling capacity of the waters was not only associated with the presence of humic substances, but water extracts of walnut, oak, and maple leaves contained electron-shuttling compounds did not appear to be humic substances. Porewater from a freshwater aquatic sediment and groundwater from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer contained dissolved Fe(III) (4-16 w M), suggesting that soluble Fe(III) may be available as an electron acceptor in some sedimentary environments. These results demonstrate that in order to accurately model the mechanisms for Fe(III) reduction in sedimentary environments it will be necessary to have information on the concentrations of electron-shuttling compounds and possibly Fe(III) ligands. Furthermore, as it is now apparent that different genera of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms may reduce Fe(III) via different mechanisms, knowledge of which Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms predominate in the environment of interest is essential in order to model this process appropriately.

  18. Reduction of Fe(III), Mn(IV), and Toxic Metals at 100°C by Pyrobaculum islandicum

    PubMed Central

    Kashefi, Kazem; Lovley, Derek R.

    2000-01-01

    It has recently been noted that a diversity of hyperthermophilic microorganisms have the ability to reduce Fe(III) with hydrogen as the electron donor, but the reduction of Fe(III) or other metals by these organisms has not been previously examined in detail. When Pyrobaculum islandicum was grown at 100°C in a medium with hydrogen as the electron donor and Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor, the increase in cell numbers of P. islandicum per mole of Fe(III) reduced was found to be ca. 10-fold higher than previously reported. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide could also serve as the electron acceptor for growth on hydrogen. The stoichiometry of hydrogen uptake and Fe(III) oxide reduction was consistent with the oxidation of 1 mol of hydrogen resulting in the reduction of 2 mol of Fe(III). The poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide was reduced to extracellular magnetite. P. islandicum could not effectively reduce the crystalline Fe(III) oxide minerals goethite and hematite. In addition to using hydrogen as an electron donor for Fe(III) reduction, P. islandicum grew via Fe(III) reduction in media in which peptone and yeast extract served as potential electron donors. The closely related species P. aerophilum grew via Fe(III) reduction in a similar complex medium. Cell suspensions of P. islandicum reduced the following metals with hydrogen as the electron donor: U(VI), Tc(VII), Cr(VI), Co(III), and Mn(IV). The reduction of these metals was dependent upon the presence of cells and hydrogen. The metalloids arsenate and selenate were not reduced. U(VI) was reduced to the insoluble U(IV) mineral uraninite, which was extracellular. Tc(VII) was reduced to insoluble Tc(IV) or Tc(V). Cr(VI) was reduced to the less toxic, less soluble Cr(III). Co(III) was reduced to Co(II). Mn(IV) was reduced to Mn(II) with the formation of manganese carbonate. These results demonstrate that biological reduction may contribute to the speciation of metals in hydrothermal environments and could account for such phenomena as magnetite accumulation and the formation of uranium deposits at ca. 100°C. Reduction of toxic metals with hyperthermophilic microorganisms or their enzymes might be applied to the remediation of metal-contaminated waters or waste streams. PMID:10698770

  19. Microbial processes associated with roots of bulbous rush coated with iron plaques.

    PubMed

    Küsel, K; Chabbi, A; Trinkwalter, T

    2003-10-01

    Bulbous rush (Juncus bulbosus) is a pioneer species in acidic, iron-rich, coal mining lakes in the eastern part of Germany. Juncus roots are coated with iron plaques, and it has been suggested that microbial processes under the iron plaques might be supportive for Juncus plant growth. The objectives of this work were to enumerate the microbes involved in the turnover of iron and organic root exudates in the rhizoplane, to investigate the effect of oxygen and pH on the utilization of these exudates by the rhizobacteria, and to study the ability of the root-colonizing microbiota to reduce sulfate. Enumeration studies done at pH 3 demonstrated that 10(6) Fe(III) reducers and 10(7) Fe(II) oxidizers g (fresh wt root)(-1) were associated with Juncus roots. When roots were incubated in goethite-containing medium without and with supplemental glucose, Fe(II) was formed at rates approximating 1.1 mmol g (fresh wt root) (-1) d(-1) and 3.6 mmol g (fresh wt root)(-1) d(-1) under anoxic conditions, respectively. These results suggest that a rapid microbially mediated cycling of iron occurs in the rhizosphere of Juncus roots under changing redox conditions. Most-probable-number estimates of aerobes and anaerobes capable of consuming root exudates at pH 3 were similar in the rhizosphere sediment and in Juncus roots, but numbers of aerobes were significantly higher than those of anaerobes. At pH 3, supplemental organic exudates were primarily subject to aerobic oxidation to CO2 and not subject to fermentation. However, at pH 4.5, root exudates were also rapidly utilized under anoxic conditions. Root-associated sulfate reduction was not observed at pH 3 to 4.5 but was observed at pH 4.9. The pH increased during all root-incubation studies both under oxic and anoxic conditions. Thus, as result of the microbial turnover of organic root exudates, pH and CO2 levels might be elevated at the root surface and favor Juncus plants to colonize acidic habitats.

  20. pH gradient-induced heterogeneity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in coal mining-associated lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Blöthe, Marco; Akob, Denise M; Kostka, Joel E; Göschel, Kathrin; Drake, Harold L; Küsel, Kirsten

    2008-02-01

    Lakes formed because of coal mining are characterized by low pH and high concentrations of Fe(II) and sulfate. The anoxic sediment is often separated into an upper acidic zone (pH 3; zone I) with large amounts of reactive iron and a deeper slightly acidic zone (pH 5.5; zone III) with smaller amounts of iron. In this study, the impact of pH on the Fe(III)-reducing activities in both of these sediment zones was investigated, and molecular analyses that elucidated the sediment microbial diversity were performed. Fe(II) was formed in zone I and III sediment microcosms at rates that were approximately 710 and 895 nmol cm(-3) day(-1), respectively. A shift to pH 5.3 conditions increased Fe(II) formation in zone I by a factor of 2. A shift to pH 3 conditions inhibited Fe(II) formation in zone III. Clone libraries revealed that the majority of the clones from both zones (approximately 44%) belonged to the Acidobacteria phylum. Since Acidobacterium capsulatum reduced Fe oxides at pHs ranging from 2 to 5, Acidobacteria might be involved in the cycling of iron [corrected]. PCR products specific for species related to Acidiphilium revealed that there were higher numbers of phylotypes related to cultured Acidiphilium or Acidisphaera species in zone III than in zone I. From the PCR products obtained for bioleaching-associated bacteria, only one phylotype with a level of similarity to Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans of 99% was obtained. Using primer sets specific for Geobacteraceae, PCR products were obtained in higher DNA dilutions from zone III than from zone I. Phylogenetic analysis of clone libraries obtained from Fe(III)-reducing enrichment cultures grown at pH 5.5 revealed that the majority of clones were closely related to members of the Betaproteobacteria, primarily species of Thiomonas. Our results demonstrated that the upper acidic sediment was inhabited by acidophiles or moderate acidophiles which can also reduce Fe(III) under slightly acidic conditions. The majority of Fe(III) reducers inhabiting the slightly acidic sediment had only minor capacities to be active under acidic conditions.

  1. pH Gradient-Induced Heterogeneity of Fe(III)-Reducing Microorganisms in Coal Mining-Associated Lake Sediments▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Blöthe, Marco; Akob, Denise M.; Kostka, Joel E.; Göschel, Kathrin; Drake, Harold L.; Küsel, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Lakes formed because of coal mining are characterized by low pH and high concentrations of Fe(II) and sulfate. The anoxic sediment is often separated into an upper acidic zone (pH 3; zone I) with large amounts of reactive iron and a deeper slightly acidic zone (pH 5.5; zone III) with smaller amounts of iron. In this study, the impact of pH on the Fe(III)-reducing activities in both of these sediment zones was investigated, and molecular analyses that elucidated the sediment microbial diversity were performed. Fe(II) was formed in zone I and III sediment microcosms at rates that were approximately 710 and 895 nmol cm−3 day−1, respectively. A shift to pH 5.3 conditions increased Fe(II) formation in zone I by a factor of 2. A shift to pH 3 conditions inhibited Fe(II) formation in zone III. Clone libraries revealed that the majority of the clones from both zones (approximately 44%) belonged to the Acidobacteria phylum. Since moderately acidophilic Acidobacteria species have the ability to oxidize Fe(II) and since Acidobacterium capsulatum reduced Fe oxides at pHs ranging from 2 to 5, this group appeared to be involved in the cycling of iron. PCR products specific for species related to Acidiphilium revealed that there were higher numbers of phylotypes related to cultured Acidiphilium or Acidisphaera species in zone III than in zone I. From the PCR products obtained for bioleaching-associated bacteria, only one phylotype with a level of similarity to Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans of 99% was obtained. Using primer sets specific for Geobacteraceae, PCR products were obtained in higher DNA dilutions from zone III than from zone I. Phylogenetic analysis of clone libraries obtained from Fe(III)-reducing enrichment cultures grown at pH 5.5 revealed that the majority of clones were closely related to members of the Betaproteobacteria, primarily species of Thiomonas. Our results demonstrated that the upper acidic sediment was inhabited by acidophiles or moderate acidophiles which can also reduce Fe(III) under slightly acidic conditions. The majority of Fe(III) reducers inhabiting the slightly acidic sediment had only minor capacities to be active under acidic conditions. PMID:18083864

  2. A novel Geobacteraceae-specific outer membrane protein J (OmpJ) is essential for electron transport to Fe (III) and Mn (IV) oxides in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Afkar, Eman; Reguera, Gemma; Schiffer, Marianne; Lovley, Derek R

    2005-01-01

    Background Metal reduction is thought to take place at or near the bacterial outer membrane and, thus, outer membrane proteins in the model dissimilatory metal-reducing organism Geobacter sulfurreducens are of interest to understand the mechanisms of Fe(III) reduction in the Geobacter species that are the predominant Fe(III) reducers in many environments. Previous studies have implicated periplasmic and outer membrane cytochromes in electron transfer to metals. Here we show that the most abundant outer membrane protein of G. sulfurreducens, OmpJ, is not a cytochrome yet it is required for metal respiration. Results When outer membrane proteins of G. sulfurreducens were separated via SDS-PAGE, one protein, designated OmpJ (outer membrane protein J), was particularly abundant. The encoding gene, which was identified from mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments, is present in other Geobacteraceae, but not in organisms outside this family. The predicted localization and structure of the OmpJ protein suggested that it was a porin. Deletion of the ompJ gene in G. sulfurreducens produced a strain that grew as well as the wild-type strain with fumarate as the electron acceptor but could not grow with metals, such as soluble or insoluble Fe (III) and insoluble Mn (IV) oxide, as the electron acceptor. The heme c content in the mutant strain was ca. 50% of the wild-type and there was a widespread loss of multiple cytochromes from soluble and membrane fractions. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of mutant cells revealed an unusually enlarged periplasm, which is likely to trigger extracytoplasmic stress response mechanisms leading to the degradation of periplasmic and/or outer membrane proteins, such as cytochromes, required for metal reduction. Thus, the loss of the capacity for extracellular electron transport in the mutant could be due to the missing c-type cytochromes, or some more direct, but as yet unknown, role of OmpJ in metal reduction. Conclusion OmpJ is a putative porin found in the outer membrane of the model metal reducer G. sulfurreducens that is required for respiration of extracellular electron acceptors such as soluble and insoluble metals. The effect of OmpJ in extracellular electron transfer is indirect, as OmpJ is required to keep the integrity of the periplasmic space necessary for proper folding and functioning of periplasmic and outer membrane electron transport components. The exclusive presence of ompJ in members of the Geobacteraceae family as well as its role in metal reduction suggest that the ompJ sequence may be useful in tracking the growth or activity of Geobacteraceae in sedimentary environments. PMID:16000176

  3. Detecting nitrous oxide reductase (NosZ) genes in soil metagenomes: method development and implications for the nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Orellana, L H; Rodriguez-R, L M; Higgins, S; Chee-Sanford, J C; Sanford, R A; Ritalahti, K M; Löffler, F E; Konstantinidis, K T

    2014-06-03

    Microbial activities in soils, such as (incomplete) denitrification, represent major sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. The key enzyme for mitigating N2O emissions is NosZ, which catalyzes N2O reduction to N2. We recently described "atypical" functional NosZ proteins encoded by both denitrifiers and nondenitrifiers, which were missed in previous environmental surveys (R. A. Sanford et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109:19709-19714, 2012, doi:10.1073/pnas.1211238109). Here, we analyzed the abundance and diversity of both nosZ types in whole-genome shotgun metagenomes from sandy and silty loam agricultural soils that typify the U.S. Midwest corn belt. First, different search algorithms and parameters for detecting nosZ metagenomic reads were evaluated based on in silico-generated (mock) metagenomes. Using the derived cutoffs, 71 distinct alleles (95% amino acid identity level) encoding typical or atypical NosZ proteins were detected in both soil types. Remarkably, more than 70% of the total nosZ reads in both soils were classified as atypical, emphasizing that prior surveys underestimated nosZ abundance. Approximately 15% of the total nosZ reads were taxonomically related to Anaeromyxobacter, which was the most abundant genus encoding atypical NosZ-type proteins in both soil types. Further analyses revealed that atypical nosZ genes outnumbered typical nosZ genes in most publicly available soil metagenomes, underscoring their potential role in mediating N2O consumption in soils. Therefore, this study provides a bioinformatics strategy to reliably detect target genes in complex short-read metagenomes and suggests that the analysis of both typical and atypical nosZ sequences is required to understand and predict N2O flux in soils. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas with ozone layer destruction potential. Microbial activities control both the production and the consumption of N2O, i.e., its conversion to innocuous dinitrogen gas (N

  4. Carbon Mineralization Pathways and Early Diagenesis in Lake Erie Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O Neill, A. H.; Crowe, S. A.; Song, Z.; Mucci, A.; Sundby, B.; Fryer, B. J.; Fowle, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    to render solid phase Fe (III) bioavailable. Mn2+ voltammetric peaks were shifted to potentials more negative than the -1.53 to -1.55 mV commonly observed in marine pore waters. This shift is consistent with previous studies in freshwaters and has been ascribed to Mn2+ complexation by organic ligands (e.g. Luther et al, 2003). However, this shift may be due to analytical artifacts associated with using a solid state Ag/AgCl reference electrode in low ionic strength solutions. Measurable sulphide in the first 5 cm below the sediment-water interface is sporadic which suggests that sulphate reduction occurs in micro-environments locally enriched in organic carbon. Preliminary cultivation-independent, microbiological analyses have revealed 16s rDNA clones that are closely related to known species capable of enzymatic reduction of Fe(III) and the dechlorination of organic compounds (e.g. Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans). These organisms were vertically dispersed within several different core sections suggestive of an intriguing tie between diagenetic reactions and anthropogenic organic compound degradation in these sediments. Coupling high-resolution voltammetry and spatially resolved genomic tools to investigate the controls on sediment pore water chemistry holds a promising future for elucidating the controls on early diagenesis in freshwater ecosystems.

  5. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, Susan M.; Löffler, Frank; Ritalahti, Kirsti; Sayler, Gary; Layton, Alice; Hettich, Robert

    2015-08-31

    analyses, and gene expression studies to support the metaproteomics characterizations. Growth experiments of target microorganisms (Anaeromyxobacter, Shewanella, Geobacter) revealed tremendous respiratory versatility, as evidenced by the ability to utilize a range of electron donors (e.g. acetate, hydrogen, pyruvate, lactate, succinate, formate) and electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate, fumarate, halogenated phenols, ferric iron, nitrous oxide, etc.). In particular, the dissimilatory metabolic reduction of metals, including radionuclides, by target microorganisms spurred interest for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils and sediments. Distinct c-type cytochrome expression patterns were observed in target microorganisms grown with the different electron acceptors. For each target microorganism, the core proteome covered almost all metabolic pathways represented by their corresponding pan-proteomes. Unique proteins were detected for each target microorganism, and their expression and possible functionalities were linked to specific growth conditions through proteomics measurements. Optimization of the proteomic tools included in-depth comprehensive metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses on a limited number of samples. The optimized metaproteomic analyses were then applied to Oak Ridge IFRC field samples from the slow-release substrate biostimulation. Metaproteomic analysis and pathway mapping results demonstrated the distinct effects of metal and non-metal growth conditions on the proteome expression. With these metaproteomic tools, we identified which previously hypothetical metabolic pathways were active during the analyzed time points of the slow release substrate biostimulation. Thus, we demonstrated the utility of these tools for site assessment, efficient implementation of bioremediation and long-term monitoring. This research of detailed protein analysis linked with metal reduction activity did (1) show that c-type cytochrome isoforms, previously associated with

  6. Iron in the aquifer system of Suffolk County, New York, 1990-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Craig J.; Walter, Donald A.; Colabufo, Steven

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved iron in ground water contribute to the biofouling of public-supply wells, and the treatment and remediation of biofouling are costly. Water companies on Long Island, N.Y., spend several million dollars annually to recondition, redevelop, and replace supply wells and distribution lines; treat dissolved iron with sequestering agents or by filtration; and respond to iron-related complaints by customers. This report summarizes the results of studies done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Suffolk County Water Authority, to characterize the geochemistry and microbiology of iron in the aquifer system of Suffolk County. This information should be helpful for the siting and operation of supply wells. Concentrations of dissolved iron in Long Island?s ground water, and the frequency of iron biofouling of wells, are highest in ground-water-discharge zones, particularly near the south shore. Ground water along a deep north-south flowpath of the Magothy aquifer in southwestern Suffolk County becomes anaerobic (oxygen deficient) and Fe(III) reducing at a distance of 8 to 10 kilometers south of the ground-water divide, and this change coincides with the downgradient increase in dissolved iron concentrations. The distribution of organic carbon, and the distribution and local variations in reactivity of Fe(III), in Magothy aquifer sediments have resulted in localized differences in redox microenvironments. For example, Fe(III)-reducing zones are associated with anaerobic conditions, where relatively large amounts of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide grain coatings are present, whereas sulfate-reducing zones are associated with lignite-rich lenses of silt and clay and appear to have developed in response to the depletion of available Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. The sulfate-reducing zones are characterized by relatively low concentrations of dissolved iron (resulting from iron-disulfide precipitation) and may be large enough to warrant water-supply development. Specific-capacity and water-quality data from wells screened in the Magothy aquifer indicate that water from biofouled wells contains higher median concentrations of total and dissolved iron and manganese, total phosphate, and dissolved sulfate, and lower median concentrations of dissolved oxygen and alkalinity, and lower pH, than does water from unaffected wells. Corresponding data from wells screened in the upper glacial aquifer indicate that water from biofouled wells contains higher median concentrations of total and dissolved manganese and dissolved sulfate, and lower pH, than does water from unaffected wells. Filamentous bacteria were detected in 31 (or 72 percent) of the 43 biofilm samples obtained from biofouled wells during reconditioning. The predominant filamentous organism was Gallionella ferruginea, a major biofouling agent in the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers throughout Suffolk County. Mineral-saturation indices indicate that most of the well-encrusting material is deposited when the wells are shut down. Furthermore, the use of treated water (which has a high pH and sometimes high concentrations of dissolved iron) for pump prelubrication when wells are shut down could greatly increase the rate of iron oxidation.

  7. Biogenic arsenic volatilisation from an acidic wetland soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgen, Gunter; Huang, Jen-How; Lu, Shipeng; Tian, Liyan; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic arsenic (As) volatilisation was budgeted at 26000 t yr-1as the largest input of the global As release into the atmosphere, thereby playing an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of As in the surface environment. In order to quantify As volatilisation from wetland soils and to elucidate the geochemical and microbiological factors governing As volatilisation, a series of incubations with an acidic wetland soil collected in NE-Bavaria in Germany were performed at 15oC for 4 months with addition of NaN3, arsenite (As(III)), FeCl3, NaSO4 and NaOAc with N2 and air in the headspace. Speciation of gaseous As in the headspace using GC-ICP-MS/ ESI-MS coupling showed the predominance of either arsine (AsH3) or trimethylarsine ((CH3)3As) in all treatments during the time course of incubation. Monomethylarsine ((CH3)AsH2) and dimethylarsine ((CH3)2AsH) could be only detected in trace amounts. Arsenic speciation in porewater with HPLC-ICP-MS revealed the predominance of As(III) and methylated As was never detectable. Arsenic volatilisation summed to 2.3 ng As (88% as AsH3) in the control incubations, which accounted for ~0.25 % of the total As storage in the wetland soil. Treatments with 10 mM NaN3 resulted in emission of only 0.03 ng As. In contrast, addition of 10 mM NaOAc stimulated microbial activities in wetland soils and subsequently rose As volatilisation to 8.5 ng As. It could be therefore concluded that As volatilisation from the wetland soils was mainly biological. Spiking 67 μM As(III) increased 10 times of As volatilisation and the proportion of methylated arsines increased to 66%, which is supposed to be caused by the largely enhanced As availability in porewater for microbes (480 ppb, ~65 times higher than those in the controls). Adding 10 mM FeCl3 stimulated microbial Fe(III) reducing activities but suppressed other microbial activities by lowering soil pH from 5 to 3.6, decreasing consequently As volatilisation to 0.3 ng As. The much lower redox potential (-250 mV) than the other incubations (-50-50 mV) caused by microbial sulphidisation may benefit microbial As methylation. However, incubations manipulated with 10 mM NaSO4 decreased As volatilisation to 0.8 ng As in accompany with the very low As concentrations in porewater (~1 ppb), since sulphidisation may trap solution As by forming AsS precipitates. In addition, the presence of O2 in headspace had no significant influence on the amounts and speciation of As volatilisation. This study evidenced the strong linkage between the microorganism and As volatilisation from wetland soils and furthermore highlighted the potential utilising microbial As volatilisation to remediate As polluted soils. Further studies will focus on investigating the correlations between As volatilisation and microbial As methylation by quantifying the arsenite methyltransferase (arsM) gene-containing microbial communities in treatments mentioned above, using quantitative PCR assay with arsM-specific primer set.

  8. Sulfur Biogeochemistry of Athabasca Oilsands Composite Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. A.; Kendra, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands tailings are important, globally relevant, S reservoirs, known to contain active and diverse microbial communities. As evidenced by increasing S emissions from the oil sands, active biogeochemical S cycling within composite tailings (CT, a mixture of tailings, post-processed sand and gypsum, used for dry reclamation), is likely; however the S biogeochemistry of these residues has not been investigated to date. With surface mining of Alberta's oil sands spanning over 142,000 square km and accelerated production, these tailings-based landscapes will become increasingly prevalent with the potential for significant environmental impacts. The objectives here, were thus to characterize depth dependent S biogeochemistry of a 40 meter CT deposit (Fort McMurray, AB, CANADA). Drill samples were collected in December of 2012 from 5 depths spanning 36 m in the CT deposit, for geochemical, metagenomic and functional enrichment analyses. Results establish widespread microbial S biogeochemical cycling within the CT deposit. Porewater H2S was detected extensively throughout the deposit with background levels ranging from 14-23 μM and a concentrated pocket of 300 μM occurring at depth. Porewater Fe(II) (1-40 μM) was detected only within surficial depth samples. Current Fe(II) concentrations are not sufficient to sequester the levels of H2S generated by CT, indicating CT may become a net source of S emissions, as generated H2S at depth migrates to the surface, in untreated CT deposits. Metagenomic (454 pyrosequencing) characterization revealed highly diverse CT microbial communities, with 21 different phyla encountered overall and 1/3 of these presenting as candidate divisions. The cultivation independent identification of several known IRB and sulphate (SRB) reducing bacteria within these communities was consistent with observed positive growth in IRB and SRB functional metabolic enrichments. Furthermore, two depth dependent structurally distinct communities emerged: a surficial CT zone of Fe(III) reduction and an underlying zone of sulphate reduction, from multivariate statistical analyses of phylogenetic data (UniFrac http://bmf.colorado.edu/unifrac). The emergence of a distinct IRB surficial zone, despite ~65% of the total bacterial community putatively having the capacity for Fe(III) reduction over the entire deposit depth and evident and increasing Fe(III) sources down core, suggests limitation of Fe(III) reducing bacteria (IRB) through some other factor. Indeed UniFrac analyses identified that the differentiation in microbial communities occurring in these Fe and S zones was driven by environmental parameters of DOC, ORP and salinity; revealing that IRB may be unable to access the more complex OC constituents of these materials. Pilot reclamation for CT is currently focusing on capping CT with a freshwater fen, which may provide a more labile OC source for CT associated IRB, potentially stimulating greater H2S sequestration through FeS formation. These processes will be evaluated in the on-going assessment of S biogeochemistry within untreated and treated CT as pilot reclamation proceeds.

  9. Recovery of Elemental Palladium by Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, S.; Xia, X.; Sawada, K.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Ohnuki, T.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial reduction of metals plays an important role in environmental behavior and provides a technique for the recovery of metals from industrial wastewater. Recently, demand for platinum group metals (PGMs) increases by their catalytic properties. The extreme rarity of PGMs have led to a growing interest in their recovery. Palladium, one of PGMs, has different oxidation states of Pd(II) and Pd(0). The oxidized form of Pd(II) is soluble, while the reduced form of Pd(0) is insoluble. In this study, microbial reduction of palladium by Fe(III)- reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaceins was conducted. This bacterium is known to be capable of reducing metals, such as Mn(IV), U(VI), or Tc(VII) with organic C or H2 as an electron donor. In order to investigate the potential of S. putrefaciens to reduce Pd(II) in solution, resting cells or heat-killed cells were suspended under anaerobic conditions with lactate or H2 as an electron donor. The cells of S. putrefaciens (NBRC3908) were grown in aerobic medium, harvested by centrifugation, and then washed with 25 mmol/dm3 HEPES and 100 mmol/dm3 NaCl (HEPES-NaCl) solution (pH 7.0). The heat-killed cells were autoclaved for 20 min at 121 degrees C. The cell suspension (21.5 mg in dry weight) was resuspended in the HEPES-NaCl solution which contained 1.0 mmol/dm3 Na2PdCl4 (Wako Pure chemical Industries, Ltd). The suspensions were bubbled with N2 for 15 min before 10 mmol/dm3 lactate or 4.8 v/v% H2 was added. The suspensions were then incubated at 30 degrees C. Redox potential (Eh) and pH of the solutions were measured in an inert glove box with Ar gas. Concentration of Pd(II) was measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). Deposited Pd and cells were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Approximately 86% of Pd(II) of the initial concentration was removed from solution by the resting cells within 24 h when lactate was used as an electron donor. A black precipitates were observed in the solution, that was confirmed as Pd(0) by XRD analysis. SEM and EDS analyses identified that Pd bearing precipitates were present on and/or in the cells. The size of the precipitates associated with cells was approximately 100 nm in diameter. Approximately 23% of Pd(II) was removed by the heat-killed cells within 24 h. The precipitates between 200 and 300 nm in diameter were observed to be associated with the heat-killed cells by SEM and EDS analyses. No removal of Pd(II) was obtained without cells. On the contrary, complete removal of Pd(II) was occurred within 4 h after exposure of the resting cells to Pd(II) solution when H2 was used as an electron donor. Approximately 88 and 80% of Pd(II) was removed within 4 h with the heat-killed cells and without cells, respectively. The measured Eh and pH values were plotted in the Eh-pH diagram calculated for Pd-Cl-H2O system indicated that chemical conditions in the solutions were saturated with respect to Pd(0) at 24 or 4 h of incubation regardless the electron donor. These findings indicate that S. putrefaciens is capable to enhance the precipitation of palladium from solution by reducing Pd(II) to Pd(0) with lactate or H2 as an electron donor.

  10. Iron in the aquifer system of Suffolk County, New York, 1990–98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Craig J.; Walter, Donald A.; Colabufo, Steven

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved iron in ground water contribute to the biofouling of public-supply wells, and the treatment and remediation of biofouling are costly. Water companies on Long Island, N.Y., spend several million dollars annually to recondition, redevelop, and replace supply wells and distribution lines; treat dissolved iron with sequestering agents or by filtration; and respond to iron-related complaints by customers. This report summarizes the results of studies done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Suffolk County Water Authority, to characterize the geochemistry and microbiology of iron in the aquifer system of Suffolk County. This information should be helpful for the siting and operation of supply wells.Concentrations of dissolved iron in Long Island's ground water, and the frequency of iron biofouling of wells, are highest in ground-water-discharge zones, particularly near the south shore. Ground water along a deep north-south flowpath of the Magothy aquifer in southwestern Suffolk County becomes anaerobic (oxygen deficient) and Fe(III) reducing at a distance of 8 to 10 kilometers south of the ground-water divide, and this change coincides with the downgradient increase in dissolved iron concentrations. The distribution of organic carbon, and the distribution and local variations in reactivity of Fe(III), in Magothy aquifer sediments have resulted in localized differences in redox microenvironments. For example, Fe(III)-reducing zones are associated with anaerobic conditions, where relatively large amounts of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide grain coatings are present, whereas sulfate-reducing zones are associated with lignite-rich lenses of silt and clay and appear to have developed in response to the depletion of available Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. The sulfate-reducing zones are characterized by relatively low concentrations of dissolved iron (resulting from iron-disulfide precipitation) and may be large enough to warrant water-supply development.Specific-capacity and water-quality data from wells screened in the Magothy aquifer indicate that water from biofouled wells contains higher median concentrations of total and dissolved iron and manganese, total phosphate, and dissolved sulfate, and lower median concentrations of dissolved oxygen and alkalinity, and lower pH, than does water from unaffected wells. Corresponding data from wells screened in the upper glacial aquifer indicate that water from biofouled wells contains higher median concentrations of total and dissolved manganese and dissolved sulfate, and lower pH, than does water from unaffected wells.Filamentous bacteria were detected in 31 (or 72 percent) of the 43 biofilm samples obtained from biofouled wells during reconditioning. The predominant filamentous organism was Gallionella ferruginea, a major biofouling agent in the upper glacial and Magothy aquifers throughout Suffolk County. Mineral-saturation indices indicate that most of the well-encrusting material is deposited when the wells are shut down. Furthermore, the use of treated water (which has a high pH and sometimes high concentrations of dissolved iron) for pump prelubrication when wells are shut down could greatly increase the rate of iron oxidation.

  11. Importance of different physiological groups of iron reducing microorganisms in an acidic mining lake remediation experiment.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Katharina; Meier, Jutta; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Wendt-Potthoff, Katrin

    2009-05-01

    Iron- and sulfate-reducing microorganisms play an important role for alkalinity-generating processes in mining lakes with low pH. In the acidic mining lake 111 in Lusatia, Germany, a passive in situ remediation method was tested in a large scale experiment, in which microbial iron and sulfate reduction are stimulated by addition of Carbokalk (a mixture of the nonsugar compounds of sugar beets and lime) and straw. The treated surface sediment consisted of three layers of different pH and geochemical composition. The top layer was acidic and rich in Fe(III), the second and third layer both showed moderately acidic to circum-neutral pH values, but only the second was rich in organics, strongly reduced and sulfidic. Aim of the study was to elucidate the relative importance of neutrophilic heterotrophic, acidophilic heterotrophic, and acidophilic autotrophic iron-reducing microorganisms in each of the three layers. In order to distinguish between them, the effect of their respective characteristic electron donors acetate, glucose, and elemental sulfur on potential iron reduction rates was investigated. Limitation of iron reduction by the availability of Fe(III) was revealed by the addition of Fe(OH)(3). The three groups of iron-reducing microorganisms were quantified by most probable number (MPN) technique and their community composition was analyzed by cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. In the acidic surface layer, none of the three electron donors stimulated iron reduction; acetate even had an inhibiting effect. In agreement with this, no decrease of the added electron donors was observed. Iron reduction rates were low in comparison to the other layers. Iron reduction in layers 2 and 3 was enhanced by glucose and acetate, accompanied by a decrease of these electron donors. Addition of elemental sulfur did not enhance iron reduction in either layer. Layer 2 exhibited the highest iron reduction rate (4.08 mmol dm(-3) d(-1)) and the highest cell numbers in MPN media. In MPN enrichments from all layers, Acidithiobacillus-like sequences were frequent. In addition to these, sequences related to Fulvimonas and Clostridium dominated in layer 1. MPN enrichments of layer 2 were diverse, containing Rhodocyclaceae-related sequences and surprisingly low numbers of Geobacteraceae. In layer 3, Sulfobacillus and Trichococcus spp. were also important. It was concluded that in the surface layer mainly acidophilic, probably autotrophic and heterotrophic, iron reducers were active, whereas in layers 2 and 3 mainly neutrophilic heterotrophs were important for iron reduction. These differ from well-studied Fe(III) reducers in other environments, so they deserve further study. The potential for acid-producing sulfur-driven Fe(III) reduction seemed not to be critical for in situ remediation.