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Sample records for feline leukemia viruses

  1. Uterine adenocarcinoma with feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-A; Hong, Sunhwa; Kim, Okjin

    2011-12-01

    Feline endometrial adenocarcinomas are uncommon malignant neoplasms that have been poorly characterized to date. In this study, we describe a uterine adenocarcinoma in a Persian cat with feline leukemia virus infection. At the time of presentation, the cat, a female Persian chinchilla, was 2 years old. The cat underwent surgical ovariohystectomy. A cross-section of the uterine wall revealed a thickened uterine horn. The cat tested positive for feline leukemia virus as detected by polymerase chain reaction. Histopathological examination revealed uterine adenocarcinoma that had metastasized to the omentum, resulting in thickening and the formation of inflammatory lesions. Based on the histopathological findings, this case was diagnosed as a uterine adenocarcinoma with abdominal metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a uterine adenocarcinoma with feline leukemia virus infection.

  2. AKT capture by feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Maki; Umehara, Daigo; Odahara, Yuka; Miyake, Ariko; Ngo, Minh Ha; Ohsato, Yoshiharu; Hisasue, Masaharu; Nakaya, Masa-Aki; Watanabe, Shinya; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Oncogene-containing retroviruses are generated by recombination events between viral and cellular sequences, a phenomenon called "oncogene capture". The captured cellular genes, referred to as "v-onc" genes, then acquire new oncogenic properties. We report a novel feline leukemia virus (FeLV), designated "FeLV-AKT", that has captured feline c-AKT1 in feline lymphoma. FeLV-AKT contains a gag-AKT fusion gene that encodes the myristoylated Gag matrix protein and the kinase domain of feline c-AKT1, but not its pleckstrin homology domain. Therefore, it differs structurally from the v-Akt gene of murine retrovirus AKT8. AKT may be involved in the mechanisms underlying malignant diseases in cats.

  3. Clinical aspects of feline immunodeficiency and feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with a global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of developing opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia) and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less important as a deadly infectious agent as in the last 20 years prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Are endogenous feline leukemia viruses really endogenous?

    PubMed

    Stewart, H; Jarrett, O; Hosie, M J; Willett, B J

    2011-10-15

    Full length endogenous feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviruses exist within the genomes of many breeds of domestic cat raising the possibility that they may also exist in a transmissible exogenous form. Such viruses would share receptor usage with the recombinant FeLV-B subgroup, a viral subgroup that arises in vivo by recombination between exogenous subgroup A virus (FeLV-A) and endogenous FeLV. Accordingly, all isolates of FeLV-B made to date have contained a "helper" FeLV-A, consistent with their recombinatorial origin. In order to assess whether endogenous viruses are transmitted between cats, we examined primary isolates of FeLV for which the viral subgroup had been determined for the presence of a subgroup B virus that lacked an FeLV-A. Here we describe the identification of two primary field isolates of FeLV (2518 and 4314) that appeared to contain subgroup B virus only by classical interference assays, raising the possibility of between-host transmission of endogenous FeLV. Sequencing of the env gene and U3 region of the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) confirmed that both viral genomes contained endogenous viral env genes. However the viral 3' LTRs appeared exogenous in origin with a putative 3' recombination breakpoint residing at the 3' end of the env gene. Further, the FeLV-2518 virions also co-packaged a truncated FeLV-A genome containing a defective env gene, termed FeLV-2518(A) whilst no helper subgroup A viral genome was detected in virions of FeLV-4314. The acquisition of an exogenous LTR by the endogenous FeLV in 4314 may have allowed a recombinant FeLV variant to outgrow an exogenous FeLV-A virus that was presumably present during first infection. Given time, a similar evolution may also occur within the 2518 isolate. The data suggest that endogenous FeLVs may be mobilised by acquisition of exogenous LTRs yielding novel viruses that type biologically as FeLV-B. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Insertional Polymorphisms of Endogenous Feline Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Alfred L.; Nash, William G.; Menninger, Joan C.; Murphy, William J.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    The number, chromosomal distribution, and insertional polymorphisms of endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) were determined in four domestic cats (Burmese, Egyptian Mau, Persian, and nonbreed) using fluorescent in situ hybridization and radiation hybrid mapping. Twenty-nine distinct enFeLV loci were detected across 12 of the 18 autosomes. Each cat carried enFeLV at only 9 to 16 of the loci, and many loci were heterozygous for presence of the provirus. Thus, an average of 19 autosomal copies of enFeLV were present per cat diploid genome. Only five of the autosomal enFeLV sites were present in all four cats, and at only one autosomal locus, B4q15, was enFeLV present in both homologues of all four cats. A single enFeLV occurred in the X chromosome of the Burmese cat, while three to five enFeLV proviruses occurred in each Y chromosome. The X chromosome and nine autosomal enFeLV loci were telomeric, suggesting that ectopic recombination between nonhomologous subtelomeres may contribute to enFeLV distribution. Since endogenous FeLVs may affect the infectiousness or pathogenicity of exogenous FeLVs, genomic variation in enFeLVs represents a candidate for genetic influences on FeLV leukemogenesis in cats. PMID:15767400

  6. Relevance of feline calicivirus, feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, feline herpesvirus and Bartonella henselae in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis.

    PubMed

    Belgard, Sylvia; Truyen, Uwe; Thibault, Jean-Christophe; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Hartmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Despite its common occurrence, the aetiology of chronic gingivostomatitis in cats remains uncertain. Aetiology is likely multifactorial, and several infectious agents may be associated with chronic gingivostomatitis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of feline calicivirus (FCV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline herpesvirus (FHV), and Bartonella henselae (B. henselae) in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and in an age-matched control group. In addition, other factors, e. g., environmental conditions were investigated. In 52 cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and 50 healthy age-matched control cats, the presence of FCV ribonucleic acid (RNA), and FHV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] from oropharyngeal swabs), and B. henselae DNA (PCR from oropharyngeal swabs and blood), as well as FeLV antigen (serum), and antibodies against FCV, B. henselae, and FIV (serum) were examined. FCV RNA was significantly more common in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis (53.8%, p < 0.001) than in controls (14.0%); a significant difference was also found in the prevalence of antibodies to FCV between the cats with chronic gingivostomatitis (78.8%, p = 0.023) and controls (58.0%). Of the other infectious agents investigated, there was no significant difference in the prevalence between the cats with chronic gingivostomatitis and the controls. The results of this study allow the conclusion that FCV, but no other infectious agents, is commonly associated with chronic gingivostomatitis in cats.

  7. Evaluation of the association of Bartonella species, feline herpesvirus 1, feline calicivirus, feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus with chronic feline gingivostomatitis.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Jessica M; Elston, Thomas; Hawley, Jennifer; Brewer, Melissa; Miller, Arianne; Lappin, Michael R

    2008-02-01

    Gingivostomatitis (GS) is a significant condition in cats because of oral discomfort and associated periodontal disease. Several infectious agents have been associated with the presence of GS, but a causal relationship is unclear. The cats in this study were housed together, had a history of flea exposure, and were vaccinated with a modified live FVRCP product. There were nine cats with active GS and 36 unaffected cats at the time of sample collection. Serum was tested for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen and antibodies against feline immunodeficiency virus, feline calicivirus (FCV), feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), and Bartonella species (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot immunoassay). PCR assays for Bartonella species and FHV-1 and a reverse transcriptase PCR assay for FCV were performed on blood and throat swabs. All cats were negative for FeLV. Assay results failed to correlate to the presence of GS in the group of cats studied.

  8. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in Canada: Recommendations for testing and management

    PubMed Central

    Little, Susan; Bienzle, Dorothee; Carioto, Lisa; Chisholm, Hugh; O’Brien, Elizabeth; Scherk, Margie

    2011-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious disease agents of cats in Canada. Seroprevalence data for FeLV and FIV in various populations of Canadian cats are reviewed and recommendations for testing and management of infections by these viruses in cats in Canada are presented. Retrovirus testing in Canada is infrequent in comparison with the United States, and efforts should be focused on reducing physical and other barriers to testing, and on education of veterinarians, veterinary team members, and cat owners regarding the importance of testing. New test methodologies for FeLV and FIV are emerging, and should be independently evaluated in order to provide practitioners with information on test reliability. Finally, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, and to provide information on disease outcomes. PMID:22294790

  9. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infection among cats in Canada.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan; Sears, William; Lachtara, Jessica; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2009-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection among cats in Canada and to identify risk factors for seropositivity. Signalment, lifestyle factors, and test results for FeLV antigen and FIV antibody were analyzed for 11 144 cats from the 10 Canadian provinces. Seroprevalence for FIV antibody was 4.3% and seroprevalence for FeLV antigen was 3.4%. Fifty-eight cats (0.5%) were seropositive for both viruses. Seroprevalence varied geographically. Factors such as age, gender, health status, and lifestyle were significantly associated with risk of FeLV and FIV seropositivity. The results suggest that cats in Canada are at risk of retrovirus infection and support current recommendations that the retrovirus status of all cats should be known.

  10. Feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in Canada: recommendations for testing and management.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan; Bienzle, Dorothee; Carioto, Lisa; Chisholm, Hugh; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Scherk, Margie

    2011-08-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious disease agents of cats in Canada. Seroprevalence data for FeLV and FIV in various populations of Canadian cats are reviewed and recommendations for testing and management of infections by these viruses in cats in Canada are presented. Retrovirus testing in Canada is infrequent in comparison with the United States, and efforts should be focused on reducing physical and other barriers to testing, and on education of veterinarians, veterinary team members, and cat owners regarding the importance of testing. New test methodologies for FeLV and FIV are emerging, and should be independently evaluated in order to provide practitioners with information on test reliability. Finally, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, and to provide information on disease outcomes.

  11. Association between endogenous feline leukemia virus loads and exogenous feline leukemia virus infection in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Ravi; Cattori, Valentino; Pepin, Andrea C; Riond, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; McDonald, Mike; Doherr, Marcus G; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2008-07-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous feline leukemia virus (enFeLV) loads may vary among cats of different populations and that FeLV-infected cats have higher enFeLV loads than uninfected cats. Thus, we hypothesized that enFeLV might influence the pathogenesis and outcome of FeLV infection. No significant difference in the infection outcome (regressive versus progressive infection) was observed between groups of cats with high or low enFeLV loads following FeLV-A challenge. However, cats with high enFeLV loads showed higher viral replication (plasma viral RNA and p27 antigen levels) than cats with low enFeLV loads in the early phase of the infection. The enFeLV transcription level varied at different time points, but no clear-cut pattern was observed. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an association between enFeLV loads and FeLV replication but not outcome of infection. enFeLV should be considered as an important confounder in experimental FeLV infection or vaccination studies.

  12. A review of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence in cats in Canada.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are common and important infectious diseases of cats in Canada. Prevalence data are necessary to define prophylactic, management, and therapeutic measures for stray, feral and owned cats. Recently, comprehensive data on the seroprevalence of retrovirus infections of cats in Canada have become available and are reviewed. Further investigation into geographic variations in retrovirus seroprevalence within Canada is warranted, and may provide information to improve recommendations for testing and prevention. As well, more information is needed on FIV subtypes in Canada to improve diagnostics and vaccines, as well as to provide information on disease outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalen...

  14. Feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus: frequency and associated factors in cats in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, L C; Silva, A N; Freitas, J S; Cruz, R D S; Said, R A; Munhoz, A D

    2017-05-10

    Our aims were to determine the frequencies of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in owned and stray cats in the northeastern region of Brazil, ascertain the status of FeLV infection, and investigate potential associated factors among the owned cats. Blood samples from 200 asymptomatic owned cats and 30 stray cats were processed using nested PCR and commercial immunochromatographic tests to diagnose infections. To evaluate the factors associated with FIV and/or FeLV in owned cats, a semi-structured interview was conducted with each owner about the animal's environment, and these data were subjected to unconditional logistic regression. The frequencies for owned cats were 6% (12/200) and 3% (6/200) for FIV and FeLV, respectively. No owned cat was positive for both viruses. Stray cats showed frequencies of 6.66% (2/30) and 0% (0/30) for FIV and FeLV, respectively. Contact with other cats and living in peri-urban areas were considered to be risk factors (P < 0.05) for FIV. We did not identify any factors associated with infections with FeLV. Our results confirm the presence of these two retroviruses in the region under study. Our use of different diagnostic techniques allowed us to determine the frequency of retroviruses in the feline population more accurately, particularly with regard to infections by FeLV, which have complex pathogenesis.

  15. Feline leukemia virus immunity induced by whole inactivated virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Torres, Andrea N; O'Halloran, Kevin P; Larson, Laurie J; Schultz, Ronald D; Hoover, Edward A

    2010-03-15

    A fraction of cats exposed to feline leukemia virus (FeLV) effectively contain virus and resist persistent antigenemia/viremia. Using real-time PCR (qPCR) to quantitate circulating viral DNA levels, previously we detected persistent FeLV DNA in blood cells of non-antigenemic cats considered to have resisted FeLV challenge. In addition, previously we used RNA qPCR to quantitate circulating viral RNA levels and determined that the vast majority of viral DNA is transcriptionally active, even in the absence of antigenemia. A single comparison of all USDA-licensed commercially available FeLV vaccines using these modern sensitive methods has not been reported. To determine whether FeLV vaccination would prevent nucleic acid persistence, we assayed circulating viral DNA, RNA, antigen, infectious virus, and virus neutralizing (VN) antibody in vaccinated and unvaccinated cats challenged with infectious FeLV. We identified challenged vaccinates with undetectable antigenemia and viremia concomitant with persistent FeLV DNA and/or RNA. Moreover, these studies demonstrated that two whole inactivated virus (WIV) adjuvanted FeLV vaccines (Fort Dodge Animal Health's Fel-O-Vax Lv-K) and Schering-Plough Animal Health's FEVAXYN FeLV) provided effective protection against FeLV challenge. In nearly every recipient of these vaccines, neither viral DNA, RNA, antigen, nor infectious virus could be detected in blood after FeLV challenge. Interestingly, this effective viral containment occurred despite a weak to undetectable VN antibody response. The above findings reinforce the precept of FeLV infection as a unique model of effective retroviral immunity elicited by WIV vaccination, and as such holds valuable insights into retroviral immunoprevention and therapy.

  16. Apparent feline leukemia virus-induced chronic lymphocytic leukemia and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Kristy N; Wright, Zachary

    2010-04-01

    Chylothorax secondary to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was diagnosed in a feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-positive 8-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair feline. The leukemia resolved following therapy with chlorambucil, prednisone, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and lomustine. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CLL in an FeLV-positive cat. Although a causative relationship cannot be proven, patients diagnosed with either disease may benefit from diagnostics to rule out the presence of the other concurrent condition. Copyright 2009 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genotyping of feline leukemia virus in Mexican housecats.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Hugo; Autran, Marcela; García, M Martha; Carmona, M Ángel; Rodríguez, Cecilia; Martínez, H Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus with variable rates of infection globally. DNA was obtained from cats' peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and proviral DNA of pol and env genes was detected using PCR. Seventy-six percent of cats scored positive for FeLV using env-PCR; and 54 %, by pol-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of both regions identified sequences that correspond to a group that includes endogenous retroviruses. They form an independent branch and, therefore, a new group of endogenous viruses. Cat gender, age, outdoor access, and cohabitation with other cats were found to be significant risk factors associated with the disease. This strongly suggests that these FeLV genotypes are widely distributed in the studied feline population in Mexico.

  18. Focus assay on FeLIX-dependent feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Yuki; Shojima, Takayuki; Hoshino, Shigeki; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    T-lymphotropic feline leukemia virus (FeLV-T) induces immunodeficiency in cats. FeLV-T is fusion-defective and requires a cofactor, termed FeLIX, for infection. FeLIX is a truncated envelope glycoprotein of an endogenous FeLV and mediates infection by binding a phosphate transporter Pit-1. In this study, we established a feline sarcoma-positive leukemia-negative cell line expressing FeLIX, named QN/FeLIX cells. Upon infection, FeLV-T induced prominent foci with syncytia in QN/FeLIX cells and could be titrated by the focus assay. In addition, we established a FeLIX-expressing feline fibroblast cell line, named AH/FeLIX cells. FeLV-T productively infected AH/FeLIX cells and induced severe CPE with syncytia. QN/FeLIX and AH/FeLIX cells will be useful for the study of FeLIX-dependent mutants in FeLV-infected cats.

  19. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, and feline leukemia infections in cats from Grenada, West Indies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Iimmunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevale...

  20. Evaluation of feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus transmembrane peptides for serological diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, J D; Hoover, E A; Elder, J H; Montelaro, R C

    1992-01-01

    The general model for retrovirus transmembrane (TM) proteins proposed by Gallaher et al. (W. R. Gallaher, J. M. Ball, R. F. Garry, M. C. Griffin, and R. C. Montelaro, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 5:431-440, 1989) suggests that all retrovirus TM proteins may contain an immunodominant domain (Imd-TM peptide) located at the apex of the TM polypeptide. Although this Imd-TM peptide has been shown to be immunodominant in a variety of lentivirus infections, there has not been a detailed serological analysis of an oncovirus Imd-TM peptide as a diagnostic agent. We describe here an analysis of the antigenic properties and diagnostic potentials of the predicted Imd-TM peptides of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in serological assays of sera from infected cats. The results of these studies demonstrate that antibodies specific to the FIV Imd-TM peptide are detected within 2 weeks postinfection, are maintained at high levels for extended periods, and are not detectable in uninfected or FeLV-infected cats. In marked contrast, the FeLV Imd-TM peptide displayed only negligible levels of serological reactivity in FeLV-infected cats. These studies indicate that the peptide is a useful reagent for the detection of antibodies to FIV. PMID:1629349

  1. Genetic characterization of feline leukemia virus from Florida panthers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith A; Cunningham, Mark W; Roca, Alfred L; Troyer, Jennifer L; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    From 2002 through 2005, an outbreak of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) occurred in Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi). Clinical signs included lymphadenopathy, anemia, septicemia, and weight loss; 5 panthers died. Not associated with FeLV outcome were the genetic heritage of the panthers (pure Florida vs. Texas/Florida crosses) and co-infection with feline immunodeficiency virus. Genetic analysis of panther FeLV, designated FeLV-Pco, determined that the outbreak likely came from 1 cross-species transmission from a domestic cat. The FeLV-Pco virus was closely related to the domestic cat exogenous FeLV-A subgroup in lacking recombinant segments derived from endogenous FeLV. FeLV-Pco sequences were most similar to the well-characterized FeLV-945 strain, which is highly virulent and strongly pathogenic in domestic cats because of unique long terminal repeat and envelope sequences. These unique features may also account for the severity of the outbreak after cross-species transmission to the panther.

  2. Genetic Characterization of Feline Leukemia Virus from Florida Panthers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith A.; Cunningham, Mark W.; Roca, Alfred L.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Warren E.

    2008-01-01

    From 2002 through 2005, an outbreak of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) occurred in Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi). Clinical signs included lymphadenopathy, anemia, septicemia, and weight loss; 5 panthers died. Not associated with FeLV outcome were the genetic heritage of the panthers (pure Florida vs. Texas/Florida crosses) and co-infection with feline immunodeficiency virus. Genetic analysis of panther FeLV, designated FeLV-Pco, determined that the outbreak likely came from 1 cross-species transmission from a domestic cat. The FeLV-Pco virus was closely related to the domestic cat exogenous FeLV-A subgroup in lacking recombinant segments derived from endogenous FeLV. FeLV-Pco sequences were most similar to the well-characterized FeLV-945 strain, which is highly virulent and strongly pathogenic in domestic cats because of unique long terminal repeat and envelope sequences. These unique features may also account for the severity of the outbreak after cross-species transmission to the panther. PMID:18258118

  3. Overexpression of feline tripartite motif-containing 25 interferes with the late stage of feline leukemia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Koba, Ryota; Oguma, Keisuke; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2015-06-02

    Tripartite motif-containing 25 (TRIM25) regulates various cellular processes through E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Previous studies have revealed that the expression of TRIM25 is induced by type I interferon and that TRIM25 is involved in the host cellular innate immune response against retroviral infection. Although retroviral infection is prevalent in domestic cats, the roles of feline TRIM25 in the immune response against these viral infections are poorly understood. Because feline TRIM25 is expected to modulate the infection of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), we investigated its effects on early- and late-stage FeLV replication. This study revealed that ectopic expression of feline TRIM25 in HEK293T cells reduced viral protein levels leading to the inhibition of FeLV release. Our findings show that feline TRIM25 has a potent antiviral activity and implicate an antiviral mechanism whereby feline TRIM25 interferes with late-stage FeLV replication.

  4. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) infections in pet cats in Bangkok and vicinities, Thailand

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections was examined using serum or plasma samples from 746 pet cats collected between May and July 2009 from clinics and hospitals located in and around ...

  5. Discovery of drugs that possess activity against feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Greggs, Willie M; Clouser, Christine L; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2012-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a gammaretrovirus that is a significant cause of neoplastic-related disorders affecting cats worldwide. Treatment options for FeLV are limited, associated with serious side effects, and can be cost-prohibitive. The development of drugs used to treat a related retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has been rapid, leading to the approval of five drug classes. Although structural differences affect the susceptibility of gammaretroviruses to anti-HIV drugs, the similarities in mechanism of replication suggest that some anti-HIV-1 drugs may also inhibit FeLV. This study demonstrates the anti-FeLV activity of four drugs approved by the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) at non-toxic concentrations. Of these, tenofovir and raltegravir are anti-HIV-1 drugs, while decitabine and gemcitabine are approved to treat myelodysplastic syndromes and pancreatic cancer, respectively, but also have anti-HIV-1 activity in cell culture. Our results indicate that these drugs may be useful for FeLV treatment and should be investigated for mechanism of action and suitability for veterinary use.

  6. Genetic diversity in the feline leukemia virus gag gene.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Maki; Watanabe, Shinya; Odahara, Yuka; Nakagawa, So; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2015-06-02

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) belongs to the Gammaretrovirus genus and is horizontally transmitted among cats. FeLV is known to undergo recombination with endogenous retroviruses already present in the host during FeLV-subgroup A infection. Such recombinant FeLVs, designated FeLV-subgroup B or FeLV-subgroup D, can be generated by transduced endogenous retroviral env sequences encoding the viral envelope. These recombinant viruses have biologically distinct properties and may mediate different disease outcomes. The generation of such recombinant viruses resulted in structural diversity of the FeLV particle and genetic diversity of the virus itself. FeLV env diversity through mutation and recombination has been studied, while gag diversity and its possible effects are less well understood. In this study, we investigated recombination events in the gag genes of FeLVs isolated from naturally infected cats and reference isolates. Recombination and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the gag genes often contain endogenous FeLV sequences and were occasionally replaced by entire endogenous FeLV gag genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions of FeLV gag sequences allowed for classification into three distinct clusters, similar to those previously established for the env gene. Analysis of the recombination junctions in FeLV gag indicated that these variants have similar recombination patterns within the same genotypes, indicating that the recombinant viruses were horizontally transmitted among cats. It remains to be investigated whether the recombinant sequences affect the molecular mechanism of FeLV transmission. These findings extend our understanding of gammaretrovirus evolutionary patterns in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential diagnosis of feline leukemia virus subgroups using pseudotype viruses expressing green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Megumi; Sato, Eiji; Miura, Tomoyuki; Baba, Kenji; Shimoda, Tetsuya; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2010-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is classified into three receptor interference subgroups, A, B and C. In this study, to differentiate FeLV subgroups, we developed a simple assay system using pseudotype viruses expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). We prepared gfp pseudotype viruses, named gfp(FeLV-A), gfp(FeLV-B) and gfp(FeLV-C) harboring envelopes of FeLV-A, B and C, respectively. The gfp pseudotype viruses completely interfered with the same subgroups of FeLV reference strains on FEA cells (a feline embryonic fibroblast cell line). We also confirmed that the pseudotype viruses could differentiate FeLV subgroups in field isolates. The assay will be useful for differential diagnosis of FeLV subgroups in veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the future.

  8. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Danner, Raymond M; Goltz, Daniel M; Hess, Steven C; Banko, Paul C

    2007-04-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands.

  9. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danner, R.M.; Goltz, Dan M.; Hess, S.C.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  10. Effects of preactivated MC540 in the treatment of lymphocytic plasmacytic stomatitis in feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus positive cats.

    PubMed

    Wiggs, R B; Lobprise, H B; Matthews, J L; Gulliya, K S

    1993-03-01

    Photoactive compounds and drugs are used therapeutically as antibacterial, antiviral and antitumor agents. This report examines the use of a photoactive compound, preactivated merocyanine 540 (pMC540), in the treatment of stomatitis in two cats that are both feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) positive. One of the cats was also feline leukemia virus (FeLV) positive. Dramatic short term improvement is reported with the dosage regimen and complications.

  11. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus and heartworm infection among owned cats in tropical Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Pacheco, Antonio; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando J; Colin-Flores, Rafael F; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y; Guzman-Marin, Eugenia; Jimenez-Coello, Matilde

    2014-06-01

    Several infectious agents may be distributed within a healthy population of cats where diverse risk factors predispose them to come into contact with pathogens. Blood samples from 227 owned cats in Merida, Mexico, were collected with the objective of determining the seroprevalence and associated risk factors of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and Dirofilaria immitis antigen, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody. Serological detection of FeLV and D immitis antigens, and FIV antibodies was performed using the commercial kit SNAP Feline Triple Test. The prevalence was found to be 7.5% for FeLV, 2.5% for FIV and 0% for D immitis. Adult cats were at a higher risk of coming into contact with FeLV (P <0.01) than younger cats. Owing to its low prevalence, a risk factor analysis was not performed for FIV. The prevalence of retroviral infections found in this study was low, but within the limits reported in the different geographical areas of the world. Cases of filariosis in the domestic cats of Merida, Mexico, may be absent or very low; however, the low sample size may have influenced these results. © ISFM and AAFP 2013.

  12. T-cell lymphoma of the tympanic bulla in a feline leukemia virus-negative cat.

    PubMed

    de Lorimier, Louis-Philippe; Alexander, Suzanne D; Fan, Timothy M

    2003-12-01

    This report constitutes the first description of a T-cell lymphoma of the tympanic bulla in a cat. This feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-negative cat originally presented with signs referable to middle ear disease; it deteriorated rapidly after definitive diagnosis. Lymphoma of the middle ear is extremely rare in all species.

  13. Detection of Feline leukemia virus in the endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Luaces, Inés; Doménech, Ana; García-Montijano, Marino; Collado, Victorio M; Sánchez, Celia; Tejerizo, J German; Galka, Margarita; Fernández, Pilar; Gómez-Lucía, Esperanza

    2008-05-01

    Feline retroviruses are rarely reported in lynx species. Twenty-one Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) blood and tissue samples collected from Doñana National Park and Los Villares (Sierra Morena) in southern Spain during 1993-2003 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction to amplify nucleic acids from feline retroviruses. Six samples were positive for Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), but no samples tested positive for Feline immunodeficiency virus. The BLAST analysis indicated that 5 of the 6 sequences were closely related to FeLV strain Rickard subgroup A, whereas 1 sequence was identical to FeLV. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of FeLV in the endangered Iberian lynx.

  14. Survey of feline leukemia virus and feline coronaviruses in captive neotropical wild felids from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Ana M S; Brandão, Paulo E; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir S; Santos, Leonilda C; Villarreal, Laura Y B; Robes, Rogério R; Coelho, Fabiana M; Resende, Mauricio; Santos, Renata C F; Oliveira, Rosangela C; Yamaguti, Mauricio; Marques, Lucas M; Neto, Renata L; Buzinhani, Melissa; Marques, Regina; Messick, Joanne B; Biondo, Alexander W; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2009-06-01

    A total of 57 captive neotropical felids (one Leopardus geoffroyi, 14 Leopardus pardalis, 17 Leopardus wiedii, 22 Leopardus tigrinus, and three Puma yagouaroundi) from the Itaipu Binacional Wildlife Research Center (Refúgio Bela Vista, Southern Brazil) were anesthetized for blood collection. Feces samples were available for 44 animals, including one L. geoffroyi, eight L. pardalis, 14 L. wiedii, 20 L. tigrinus, and one P. yagouaroundi. Total DNA and RNA were extracted from blood and feces, respectively, using commercial kits. Blood DNA samples were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviral DNA, whereas reverse transcriptase-PCR was run on fecal samples for detection of coronavirus RNA. None of the samples were positive for coronaviruses. A male L. pardalis and a female L. tigrinus were positive for FeLV proviral DNA, and identities of PCR products were confirmed by sequencing. This is the first evidence of FeLV proviral DNA in these species in Southern Brazil.

  15. Viral diagnostic criteria for Feline immunodeficiency virus and Feline leukemia virus infections in domestic cats from Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Galdo Novo, Sabrina; Bucafusco, Danilo; Diaz, Leandro M; Bratanich, Ana Cristina

    A cross-sectional study was carried out on cats attending the Small Animal Hospital at the Faculty of Veterinary Sciences of the University of Buenos Aires to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Blood samples from 255 cats with symptoms compatible with FIV or FeLV infection, collected between 2009 and 2013 were analyzed by serology (immunochromatography, IA) and by hemi-nested PCR (n-PCR). The IA and n-PCR assays showed similar percentages of positivity for FIV while the n-PCR test was more sensitive for FeLV. Differences between the diagnostic tests and their choice according to the age of the animal are discussed. The clinical histories of ninety of the 255 cats showed blood profiles similar to others previously reported and revealed a higher risk of infection in male adult cats with outdoor access. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus and Bartonella species in stray cats on St Kitts, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick J; Moura, Lenita; Miller, Tanya; Thurk, Jaime; Perreault, Nicole; Weil, Adriana; Maggio, Ricardo; Lucas, Helene; Breitschwerdt, Edward

    2010-06-01

    Stray cats trapped in various areas of Basseterre, the capital of St Kitts in the West Indies, were tested for infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) using commercial kits. Of 99 (51 male and 48 female) cats trapped in 2006/7, 15% (12 males and three females) were positive for FIV while none were positive for FeLV. Of 72 (41 males and 31 females) cats trapped in 2009, 14% (nine males and one female) were positive for FIV while none were positive for FeLV. Polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed DNA of Bartonella species in whole blood collected from 60/95 (63%) cats trapped in 2006/7. Sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of a convenience sample of nine amplicons and the 11 isolates made from 43 blood samples which were cultured using Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria (BAPGM) enrichment medium revealed B henselae (14) and B clarridgeiae (six).

  17. Altered plasma concentrations of sex hormones in cats infected by feline immunodeficiency virus or feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Tejerizo, G; Doménech, A; Illera, J-C; Silván, G; Gómez-Lucía, E

    2012-02-01

    Gender differences may affect human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans and may be related to fluctuations in sex hormone concentration. The different percentage of male and female cats observed to be infected by feline leukemia virus (FeLV) or feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) has been traditionally explained through the transmission mechanisms of both viruses. However, sexual hormones may also play a role in this different distribution. To study this possibility, 17β-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) concentrations were analyzed using a competitive enzyme immunoassay in the plasma of 258 cats naturally infected by FIV (FIV(+)), FeLV (FeLV(+)), or FeLV and FIV (F(-)F(+)) or negative for both viruses, including both sick and clinically healthy animals. Results indicated that the concentrations of 17β-estradiol and testosterone were significantly higher in animals infected with FIV or FeLV (P < 0.05) than in negative cats. Plasma concentrations of DHEA in cats infected by either retrovirus were lower than in negative animals (P < 0.05), and F(-)F(+) cats had significantly lower plasma values than monoinfected cats (P < 0.05). No significant differences were detected in the plasma concentration of progesterone of the four groups. No relevant differences were detected in the hormone concentrations between animal genders, except that FIV(+) females had higher DHEA concentrations than the corresponding males (P < 0.05). In addition, no differences were observed in the hormone concentrations between retrovirus-infected and noninfected animals with and without clinical signs. These results suggest that FIV and FeLV infections are associated with an important deregulation of steroids, possibly from early in the infection process, which might have decisive consequences for disease progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A putative thiamine transport protein is a receptor for feline leukemia virus subgroup A.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Ramon; Anderson, Maria M; Overbaugh, Julie

    2006-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a horizontally transmitted virus that causes a variety of proliferative and immunosuppressive diseases in cats. There are four subgroups of FeLV, A, B, C, and T, each of which has a distinct receptor requirement. The receptors for all but the FeLV-A subgroup have been defined previously. Here, we report the identification of the cellular receptor for FeLV-A, which is the most transmissible form of FeLV. The receptor cDNA was isolated using a gene transfer approach, which involved introducing sequences from a feline cell line permissive to FeLV-A into a murine cell line that was not permissive. The feline cDNA identified by this method was approximately 3.5 kb, and included an open reading frame predicted to encode a protein of 490 amino acids. This feline cDNA conferred susceptibility to FeLV-A when reintroduced into nonpermissive cells, but it did not render these cells permissive to any other FeLV subgroup. Moreover, these cells specifically bound FeLV-A-pseudotyped virus particles, indicating that the cDNA encodes a binding receptor for FeLV-A. The feline cDNA shares approximately 93% amino acid sequence identity with the human thiamine transport protein 1 (THTR1). The human THTR1 receptor was also functional as a receptor for FeLV-A, albeit with reduced efficiency compared to the feline orthologue. On the basis of these data, which strongly suggest the feline protein is the orthologue of human THTR1, we have named the feline receptor feTHTR1. Identification of this receptor will allow more detailed studies of the early events in FeLV transmission and may provide insights into FeLV pathogenesis.

  19. Inhibition of Feline leukemia virus replication by the integrase inhibitor Raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Cattori, Valentino; Weibel, Beatrice; Lutz, Hans

    2011-08-26

    The oncogenic gammaretrovirus Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) has been the leading cause of death among domestic cats until the introduction of efficient diagnostics and vaccines in the late 1980s. So far, no efficient treatment for viremic animals is available. Hence, use of the FeLV model to evaluate antiretroviral therapies applied to HIV is a timely task. The efficacy of the integrase inhibitor Raltegravir, which is widely used for the treatment of HIV in humans, has been assessed in vitro for the FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 strain. EC(50) values for FeLV-A inhibition in feline cell lines are in the range of that observed for HIV and xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related gammaretrovirus. Therefore, Raltegravir may be a potential therapeutical agent for felids with progressive FeLV infection.

  20. Evaluation of a new in-clinic test system to detect feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sand, Christina; Englert, Theresa; Egberink, Herman; Lutz, Hans; Hartmann, Katrin

    2010-06-01

    Many in-house tests for the diagnosis of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection are licensed for use in veterinary practice. A new test with unknown performance has recently appeared on the market. The aims of this study were to define the efficacy of a new in-clinic test system, the Anigen Rapid FIV Ab/FeLV Ag Test, and to compare it with the current leading in-clinic test, the SNAP Kombi Plus FeLV Antigen/FIB Antibody Test. Three-hundred serum samples from randomly selected healthy and diseased cats presented to the Clinic of Small Animal Medicine at Ludwig Maximilian University were tested using both the Anigen Rapid Test and the SNAP Kombi Plus Test. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for both tests using Western blot as the gold standard for verification of FIV infection and PCR as the gold standard for FeLV infection. The presence of antibodies against FIV was confirmed by Western blot in 9/300 samples (prevalence 3%). FeLV DNA was detected by PCR in 15/300 samples (prevalence 5%). For FIV infection the Anigen Rapid Test had a sensitivity of 88.9%, specificity of 99.7%, positive predictive value of 88.9%, and negative predictive value of 99.7%. For FeLV infection, the Anigen Rapid Test had a sensitivity of 40.0%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 96.9%. Diagnostic accuracy was similar to that of the SNAP Kombi Plus Test. The new Anigen Rapid FIV Ab/FeLV Ag Test performed very well and can be recommended for use in veterinary practice.

  1. Light and electron microscopic evaluation of thymuses from feline leukemia virus-infected kittens.

    PubMed

    Pack, F D; Chapman, W L

    1980-01-01

    Light microscopic and electron microscopic findings in thymuses from 4-week old feline leukemia virus-infected and 4- and 9-week old noninfected kittens were evaluated and found to be morphologically similar to each other. Thymuses from 9-week old feline leukemia virusinfected kittens were markedly atrophied and individual lobules within each thymus varied in the severity of atrophy. Loubules having the least severe atrophy had a moderate thinning of the cortex and a heterogeneous thymuses included intense eosinopoiesis at the corticomedullary junction, increased prominence of vasculature, and enlarged Hassal's corpuscles. In addition to these changes lobules of thymus having the most severe atrophy had a marked cortical thymocyte depletion, lobule collapse, and increased numbers of mast cells. Degeneration of epithelial cells in most lobules was indicated by electronlucency of the cytoplasmic matrix and often greatly dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. [Serological survey of feline leukemia virus infection and the outcome of antibody-positive cats].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, T; Tajima, M; Ishiguro, T; Tamura, H; Maejima, K

    1988-04-01

    A serological survey was carried out to examine the presence of antibodies against feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (FOCMA) in 208 cat sera collected at Teikyo University School of Medicine. Seven cats (3.4%) were positive for FeLV antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay whereas no cat was positive for FOCMA antibody by indirect membrane immunofluorescent test. Anemia, leukemia and/or lymphoma formation were not observed in these FeLV antibody-positive cats. But among these seven cats, three were positive for toxoplasma antibodies. One of them was also positive for Chlamydia psittaci antibody and it died in pneumonia. Among the four toxoplasma antibody negative cats, one was died in eosinophilic granuloma. Furthermore, two of three cats, which were used for experiments, had cold and took therapy.

  3. Novel Feline Leukemia Virus Interference Group Based on the env Gene

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Ariko; Watanabe, Shinya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Ngo, Minh Ha; Makundi, Isaac; Kawasaki, Junna; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroups have emerged in infected cats via the mutation or recombination of the env gene of subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A), the primary virus. We report the isolation and characterization of a novel env gene, TG35-2, and report that the TG35-2 pseudotype can be categorized as a novel FeLV subgroup. The TG35-2 envelope protein displays strong sequence identity to FeLV-A Env, suggesting that selection pressure in cats causes novel FeLV subgroups to emerge. PMID:26889025

  4. Novel Feline Leukemia Virus Interference Group Based on the env Gene.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ariko; Watanabe, Shinya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Ngo, Minh Ha; Makundi, Isaac; Kawasaki, Junna; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroups have emerged in infected cats via the mutation or recombination of the env gene of subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A), the primary virus. We report the isolation and characterization of a novel env gene, TG35-2, and report that the TG35-2 pseudotype can be categorized as a novel FeLV subgroup. The TG35-2 envelope protein displays strong sequence identity to FeLV-A Env, suggesting that selection pressure in cats causes novel FeLV subgroups to emerge. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Therapeutic effects of recombinant feline interferon-omega on feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-infected and FeLV/feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-coinfected symptomatic cats.

    PubMed

    de Mari, Karine; Maynard, Laurence; Sanquer, Annaelle; Lebreux, Bernard; Eun, Hyone-Myong

    2004-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of a recombinant feline interferon, rFeIFN-omega, was evaluated for the treatment of cats presented with clinical signs associated with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection and FeLV/feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) coinfection in the field. In this multicentric, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 81 cats meeting the inclusion criteria were randomly placed into 2 groups and treated subcutaneously with rFelFN-omega (1 million [M]U/kg per day) or placebo once daily for 5 consecutive days in 3 series (day 0, 14, 60). The cats were monitored for up to 1 year for clinical signs and mortality. During the initial 4-month period, interferon (IFN)-treated cats (n = 39) had significantly reduced clinical scores compared with placebo (n = 42), with all cats having received concomitant supportive therapies. Compared with the control, the IFN-treated group showed significantly lower rates of mortality: 39% versus 59% (1.7-fold higher risk of death for controls) at the 9-month time point and 47% versus 59% (1.4-fold higher risk of death for controls) at the 12-month time point. The IFN treatment was associated with minor but consistent improvement in abnormal hematologic parameters (red blood cell count, packed cell volume, and white blood cell count), apparently underlying the positive effects of IFN on clinical parameters. These data demonstrate that rFeIFN-omega initially has statistically significant therapeutic effects on clinical signs and later on survival of cats with clinical signs associated with FeLV infection and FeLV/FIV coinfection.

  6. Structural diversity and nuclear protein binding sites in the long terminal repeats of feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, R; Plumb, M; Shield, L; Neil, J C

    1990-01-01

    The long terminal repeat U3 sequences were determined for multiple feline leukemia virus proviruses isolated from naturally occurring T-cell tumors. Heterogeneity was evident, even among proviruses cloned from individual tumors. Proviruses with one, two, or three repeats of the long terminal repeat enhancer sequences coexisted in one tumor, while two proviruses with distinct direct repeats were found in another. The enhancer repeats are characteristic of retrovirus variants with accelerated leukemogenic potential and occur between -155 and -244 base pairs relative to the RNA cap site. The termini of the repeats occur at or near sequence features which have been recognized at other retrovirus recombinational junctions. In vitro footprint analysis of the feline leukemia virus enhancer revealed three major nuclear protein binding sites, located at consensus sequences for the simian virus 40 core enhancer, the nuclear factor 1 binding site, and an indirect repeat which is homologous to the PEA2 binding site in the polyomavirus enhancer. Only the simian virus 40 core enhancer sequence is present in all of the enhancer repeats. Cell type differences in binding activities to the three motifs may underlie the selective process which leads to outgrowth of viruses with specific sequence duplications. Images PMID:2157050

  7. Seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in shelter cats on the island of Newfoundland, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Hannah J.; Berghuis, Lesley; Lang, Andrew S.; Rogers, Laura; Whitney, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are retroviruses found within domestic and wild cat populations. These viruses cause severe illnesses that eventually lead to death. Housing cats communally for long periods of time makes shelters at high risk for virus transmission among cats. We tested 548 cats from 5 different sites across the island of Newfoundland for FIV and FeLV. The overall seroprevalence was 2.2% and 6.2% for FIV and FeLV, respectively. Two sites had significantly higher seroprevalence of FeLV infection than the other 3 sites. Analysis of sequences from the FeLV env gene (envelope gene) from 6 positive cats showed that 4 fell within the FeLV subtype-A, while 2 sequences were most closely related to FeLV subtype-B and endogenous feline leukemia virus (en FeLV). Varying seroprevalence and the variation in sequences at different sites demonstrate that some shelters are at greater risk of FeLV infections and recombination can occur at sites of high seroprevalence. PMID:24688176

  8. Seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in shelter cats on the island of Newfoundland, Canada.

    PubMed

    Munro, Hannah J; Berghuis, Lesley; Lang, Andrew S; Rogers, Laura; Whitney, Hugh

    2014-04-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are retroviruses found within domestic and wild cat populations. These viruses cause severe illnesses that eventually lead to death. Housing cats communally for long periods of time makes shelters at high risk for virus transmission among cats. We tested 548 cats from 5 different sites across the island of Newfoundland for FIV and FeLV. The overall seroprevalence was 2.2% and 6.2% for FIV and FeLV, respectively. Two sites had significantly higher seroprevalence of FeLV infection than the other 3 sites. Analysis of sequences from the FeLV env gene (envelope gene) from 6 positive cats showed that 4 fell within the FeLV subtype-A, while 2 sequences were most closely related to FeLV subtype-B and endogenous feline leukemia virus (en FeLV). Varying seroprevalence and the variation in sequences at different sites demonstrate that some shelters are at greater risk of FeLV infections and recombination can occur at sites of high seroprevalence.

  9. Notch2 transduction by feline leukemia virus in a naturally infected cat.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Kuse, Kyohei; Ochi, Haruyo; Anai, Yukari; Hisasue, Masaharu; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2014-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) induces neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases in cats. The transduction of cellular genes by FeLV is sometimes observed and associated with neoplastic diseases including lymphoma and sarcoma. Here, we report the first natural case of feline Notch2 transduction by FeLV in an infected cat with multicentric lymphoma and hypercalcemia. We cloned recombinant FeLVs harboring Notch2 in the env gene. Notch2 was able to activate expression of a reporter gene, similar to what was previously reported in cats with experimental FeLV-induced thymic lymphoma. Our findings suggest that the transduction of Notch2 strongly correlates with FeLV-induced lymphoma.

  10. Prevalence of feline leukemia virus infection in domestic cats in Rio de Janeiro.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Nadia R; Danelli, Maria G M; da Silva, Lucia H P; Hagiwara, Mitika K; Mazur, Carlos

    2012-08-01

    Peripheral blood smears of 1094 domestic cats were collected and tested by indirect immunofluorescence antibody assay for p27 antigen in cells to study the prevalence and risk factors for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Sex, age, breed, outdoor access, neutering status, type of habitation (household, shelter, veterinary clinics and other places), number of household cats and clinical signs were registered on a form. Among the tested samples, 11.52% were positive. Risk factors for FeLV infection included outdoor access, age range between 1 and 5 years old, and cohabitation with numerous cats.

  11. Characterization of neutrophil extracellular traps in cats naturally infected with feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Wardini, Amanda B; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; Nascimento, Michelle T C; Nadaes, Natalia R; Danelli, Maria G M; Mazur, Carlos; Benjamim, Claudia F; Saraiva, Elvira M; Pinto-da-Silva, Lucia H

    2010-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), a common, naturally occurring gammaretrovirus in domestic cats, is associated with degenerative diseases of the haematopoietic system, immunodeficiency and neoplasia. FeLV infection causes an important suppression of neutrophil function, leading to opportunistic infections. Recently, a new microbicidal mechanism named NETosis was described in human, bovine and fish neutrophils, as well as in chicken heterophils. The purpose of the present study was to characterize NETosis in feline neutrophils, as well as to evaluate neutrophil function in FeLV naturally infected symptomatic and asymptomatic cats through the phagocytosis process, release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The results showed that feline neutrophils stimulated with protozoa parasites released structures comprising DNA and histones, which were characterized as NETs by immunofluorescence. Quantification of NETs after neutrophil stimulation showed a significant increase in NET release by neutrophils from FeLV(-) and FeLV(+) asymptomatic cats compared with FeLV(+) symptomatic cats. Moreover, the number of released NETs and MPO activity in unstimulated neutrophils of FeLV(+) symptomatic cats were higher than those in unstimulated neutrophils from FeLV(-) and FeLV(+) asymptomatic cats. This study reports, for the first time, NET release by feline neutrophils, along with the fact that NET induction may be modulated by a viral infection. The results indicate that the NET mechanism appears to be overactivated in FeLV(+) cats and that this feature could be considered a marker of disease progression in FeLV infection.

  12. Feline Leukemia Virus Infection Requires a Post-Receptor Binding Envelope-Dependent Cellular Component▿

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R.; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S.

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (101 to 102 CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (104 to 106 CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells. PMID:21917946

  13. Feline leukemia virus infection requires a post-receptor binding envelope-dependent cellular component.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2011-12-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (10(1) to 10(2) CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (10(4) to 10(6) CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells.

  14. Broadening the use of antiretroviral therapy: the case for feline leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Greggs, Willie M; Clouser, Christine L; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have saved and extended the lives of millions of individuals infected with HIV. The major classes of anti-HIV drugs include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, and entry/fusion inhibitors. While antiretroviral drug regimens are not commonly used to treat other types of retroviral infections, there are instances where there is a perceived need for re-evaluation of the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. One case in point is that of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), an infection of companion felines. While vaccines exist to prevent FeLV infection and spread, they have not eliminated FeLV infection. For FeLV-infected felines and their human companions, antiretroviral therapy would be desirable and of practical importance if good options were available. Here, we discuss FeLV biology and current treatment options, and propose that there is a need for antiretroviral treatment options for FeLV infection. The comparative use and analysis of antiretroviral therapy can provide new insights into the mechanism of antiretroviral drug action. PMID:21479142

  15. Parameters of disease progression in long-term experimental feline retrovirus (feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus) infections: hematology, clinical chemistry, and lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Holznagel, E; Ossent, P; Lutz, H

    1997-01-01

    After several years of latency, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) cause fatal disease in the cat. The aim of this study was to determine laboratory parameters characteristic of disease progression which would allow a better description of the asymptomatic phase and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the two infections. Therefore, experimentally infected cats (FIV and/or FeLV positive) and control animals were observed over a period of 6.5 years under identical conditions. Blood samples were analyzed for the following: complete hematology, clinical chemistry, serum protein electrophoresis, and determination of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets. The following hematological and clinical chemistry parameters were markedly changed in the FIV-infected animals from month 9 onwards: glucose, serum protein, gamma globulins, sodium, urea, phosphorus, lipase, cholesterol, and triglyceride. In FeLV infection, the markedly changed parameters were mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, aspartate aminotransferase, and urea. In contrast to reports of field studies, neither FIV-positive nor FeLV-positive animals developed persistent leukopenia, lymphopenia, or neutropenia. A significant decrease was found in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in FIV-positive and FIV-FeLV-positive animals mainly due to loss of CD4+ lymphocytes. In FeLV-positive cats, both CD4+ and, to a lesser degree, CD8+ lymphocytes were decreased in long-term infection. The changes in FIV infection may reflect subclinical kidney dysfunction, changes in energy and lipid metabolism, and transient activation of the humoral immune response as described for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The changes in FeLV infection may also reflect subclinical kidney dysfunction and, in addition, changes in erythrocyte and immune function of the animals. No severe clinical signs were observed in the FIV-positive cats, while FeLV had a severe influence on the life

  16. Parameters of disease progression in long-term experimental feline retrovirus (feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus) infections: hematology, clinical chemistry, and lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Holznagel, E; Ossent, P; Lutz, H

    1997-01-01

    After several years of latency, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) cause fatal disease in the cat. The aim of this study was to determine laboratory parameters characteristic of disease progression which would allow a better description of the asymptomatic phase and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the two infections. Therefore, experimentally infected cats (FIV and/or FeLV positive) and control animals were observed over a period of 6.5 years under identical conditions. Blood samples were analyzed for the following: complete hematology, clinical chemistry, serum protein electrophoresis, and determination of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets. The following hematological and clinical chemistry parameters were markedly changed in the FIV-infected animals from month 9 onwards: glucose, serum protein, gamma globulins, sodium, urea, phosphorus, lipase, cholesterol, and triglyceride. In FeLV infection, the markedly changed parameters were mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, aspartate aminotransferase, and urea. In contrast to reports of field studies, neither FIV-positive nor FeLV-positive animals developed persistent leukopenia, lymphopenia, or neutropenia. A significant decrease was found in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in FIV-positive and FIV-FeLV-positive animals mainly due to loss of CD4+ lymphocytes. In FeLV-positive cats, both CD4+ and, to a lesser degree, CD8+ lymphocytes were decreased in long-term infection. The changes in FIV infection may reflect subclinical kidney dysfunction, changes in energy and lipid metabolism, and transient activation of the humoral immune response as described for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The changes in FeLV infection may also reflect subclinical kidney dysfunction and, in addition, changes in erythrocyte and immune function of the animals. No severe clinical signs were observed in the FIV-positive cats, while FeLV had a severe influence on the life

  17. Evaluation of a novel nested PCR for the routine diagnosis of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

    PubMed

    Arjona, Alvaro; Barquero, Nuria; Doménech, Ana; Tejerizo, German; Collado, Victorio M; Toural, Cristina; Martín, Daniel; Gomez-Lucia, Esperanza

    2007-02-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) usually involves both viruses, as the clinical signs are similar and coinfection may occur. Serological methods may not represent an accurate diagnosis: maternal antibodies or cross-reactions may give false positive results to FIV, and false negative results may occur in latent FeLV status, or in certain FIV infection stages. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was designed to detect FeLV, FIV and feline endogenous retrovirus simultaneously. The detection of endogenous sequences was considered indicative of successful DNA extraction. The technique was used to diagnose FIV and FeLV in the blood cells of 179 cats. The kappa value with the serological data was 0.69 for FeLV and 0.87 for FIV. The joint detection of FeLV and FIV by this novel nested PCR is sensitive, specific, fast and convenient, and its applicability for clinical diagnosis is promising, as the direct evidence of the presence of the virus is more realistic than the indirect data provided by the serological detection.

  18. Does a feline leukemia virus infection pave the way for Bartonella henselae infection in cats?

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Alexandra U; Kershaw, Olivia; Kempf, Volkhard A J; Gruber, Achim D

    2010-09-01

    Domestic cats serve as the reservoir hosts of Bartonella henselae and may develop mild clinical symptoms or none after experimental infection. In humans, B. henselae infection can result in self-limiting cat scratch disease. However, immunocompromised patients may suffer from more-severe courses of infection or may even develop the potentially lethal disease bacillary angiomatosis. It was reasoned that cats with immunocompromising viral infections may react similarly to B. henselae infection. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of the most important viruses known to cause immunosuppression in cats-Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV)-on natural B. henselae infection in cats. Accordingly, 142 cats from animal shelters were necropsied and tested for B. henselae and concurrent infections with FeLV, FIV, or FPV by PCR and immunohistochemistry. A significant association was found between B. henselae and FeLV infections (P = 0.00028), but not between B. henselae and FIV (P = 1.0) or FPV (P = 0.756) infection, age (P = 0.392), or gender (P = 0.126). The results suggest that susceptibility to B. henselae infection is higher in cats with concurrent FeLV infections, regardless of whether the infection is latent or progressive. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry for B. henselae failed to identify lesions that could be attributed specifically to B. henselae infection. We conclude that the course of natural B. henselae infection in cats does not seem to be influenced by immunosuppressive viral infections in general but that latent FeLV infection may predispose cats to B. henselae infection or persistence.

  19. Quantification and molecular characterization of the feline leukemia virus A receptor.

    PubMed

    Katrin Helfer-Hungerbuehler, A; Cattori, Valentino; Bachler, Barbara; Hartnack, Sonja; Riond, Barbara; Ossent, Pete; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2011-12-01

    Virus receptors and their expression patterns on the cell surface determine the cell tropism of the virus, host susceptibility and the pathogenesis of the infection. Feline thiamine transport protein 1 (fTHTR1) has been identified as the receptor for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) A. The goal of the present study was to develop a quantitative, TaqMan real-time PCR assay to investigate fTHTR1 mRNA expression in tissues of uninfected and FeLV-infected cats, cats of different ages, in tumor tissues and leukocyte subsets. Moreover, the receptor was molecularly characterized in different feline species. fTHTR1 mRNA expression was detected in all 30 feline tissues investigated, oral mucosa scrapings and blood. Importantly, identification of significant differences in fTHTR1 expression relied on normalization with an appropriate reference gene. The lowest levels were found in the blood, whereas high levels were measured in the oral mucosa, salivary glands and the musculature. In the blood, T lymphocytes showed significantly higher fTHTR1 mRNA expression levels than neutrophil granulocytes. In vitro activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with concanavalin A alone or followed by interleukin-2 led to a transient increase of fTHTR1 mRNA expression. In the blood, but not in the examined tissues, FeLV-infected cats tended to have lower fTHTR1 mRNA levels than uninfected cats. The fTHTR1 mRNA levels were not significantly different between tissues with lymphomas and the corresponding non-neoplastic tissues. fTHTR1 was highly conserved among different feline species (Iberian lynx, Asiatic and Indian lion, European wildcat, jaguarundi, domestic cat). In conclusion, while ubiquitous fTHTR1 mRNA expression corresponded to the broad target tissue range of FeLV, particularly high fTHTR1 levels were found at sites of virus entry and shedding. The differential susceptibility of different species to FeLV could not be attributed to variations in the fTHTR1 sequence.

  20. Re-examination of feline leukemia virus: host relationships using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Torres, Andrea N; Mathiason, Candace K; Hoover, Edward A

    2005-02-05

    The mechanisms responsible for effective vs. ineffective viral containment are central to immunoprevention and therapies of retroviral infections. Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection is unique as a naturally occurring, diametric example of effective vs. ineffective retroviral containment by the host. We developed a sensitive quantitative real-time DNA PCR assay specific for exogenous FeLV to further explore the FeLV-host relationship. By assaying p27 capsid antigen in blood and FeLV DNA in blood and tissues of successfully vaccinated, unsuccessfully vaccinated, and unvaccinated pathogen-free cats, we defined four statistically separable classes of FeLV infection, provisionally designated as abortive, regressive, latent, and progressive. These host-virus relationships were established by 8 weeks post-challenge and could be maintained for years. Real-time PCR methods offer promise in gaining deeper insight into the mechanisms of FeLV infection and immunity.

  1. Molecular pathogenesis of feline leukemia virus-induced malignancies: insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2008-05-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), which is subclassified into three subgroups of A, B and C, is a pathogenic retrovirus in cats. FeLV-A is minimally pathogenic, FeLV-C can cause pure red cell aplasia, and FeLV-B is associated with a variety of pathogenic properties such as lymphoma, leukemia and anemia. FeLV-induced neoplasms are caused, at least in part, by somatically acquired insertional mutagenesis in which the integrated provirus may activate a proto-oncogene or disrupt a tumor suppressor gene. The common integration sites for FeLV have been identified in six loci with feline lymphomas: c-myc, flvi-1, flvi-2 (contains bmi-1), fit-1, pim-1 and flit-1. Oncogenic association of the loci includes that c-myc is known as a proto-oncogene, bmi-1 and pim-1 have been recognized as myc-collaborators, fit-1 appears to be closely linked to myb, and flit-1 insertion is shown to be associated with over-expression of a cellular gene, e.g. ACVRL1. Thus, identification of common integration sites for FeLV is a tenable model to clarify oncogenesis. Recent advances in molecular biology and cytogenetics have developed to rapidly detect numbers of retroviral integration sites by genome-wide large-scale analyses. Especially, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based strategies and chromosome analyses with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) will be applicable for studies on FeLV.

  2. Treatment of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K; Block, A; Ferk, G; Beer, B; Vollmar, A; Lutz, H

    1999-09-01

    FeLV infection is still considered to account for most disease-related deaths in pet cats. Different treatment attempts with various drugs were performed in the past but none resulted in healing or complete virus elimination. Therefore, it caused a sensation when Horber and Mayr [Horber, D., Mayr, B., 1991. Prax. 19, 311-314; Horber, D., Schnabl, W., Mayr, B., 1992. Tierarztl. Umschau 47, 556-560; Mayr, B., Horber, D., 1992. Kleintierprax. 37, 515-518] published that they were able to cure 80 to 100% FeLV-infected cats from viremia by using an immunomodulating compound. Articles in cat breeder and cat owner journals appeared assuming that obviously there is a rescue for FeLV-infected cats suffering from this deadly infection. The immunomodulator [Buttner, M., 1993. Comp. Immun. Microbiol. Infect. Dis. 18, 1-10] used in those studies was the so-called 'paramunity inducer' PIND-ORF (Baypamun, Bayer, Leverkusen, Germany) consisting of inactivated parapox ovis virus. Since that time, Baypamun is the most commonly used drug for treatment of FeLV infection in Germany and other European countries. Four placebo-controlled double-blind trials were performed to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Baypamun and other compounds in naturally FeLV-infected cats under controlled conditions.

  3. Disruption of Thiamine Uptake and Growth of Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus Subgroup A

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Ramon; Miller, A. Dusty

    2013-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in domestic cats and some wild cats despite the availability of relatively effective vaccines against the virus. FeLV subgroup A (FeLV-A) is transmitted in natural infections, and FeLV subgroups B, C, and T can evolve directly from FeLV-A by mutation and/or recombination with endogenous retroviruses in domestic cats, resulting in a variety of pathogenic outcomes. The cell surface entry receptor for FeLV-A is a putative thiamine transporter (THTR1). Here, we have addressed whether FeLV-A infection might disrupt thiamine uptake into cells and, because thiamine is an essential nutrient, whether this disruption might have pathological consequences. First, we cloned the cat ortholog of the other of the two known thiamine transporters in mammals, THTR2, and we show that feline THTR1 (feTHTR1) and feTHTR2 both mediate thiamine uptake, but feTHTR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-A. We found that feTHTR1 is widely expressed in cat tissues and in cell lines, while expression of feTHTR2 is restricted. Thiamine uptake mediated by feTHTR1 was indeed blocked by FeLV-A infection, and in feline fibroblasts that naturally express feTHTR1 and not feTHTR2, this blockade resulted in a growth arrest at physiological concentrations of extracellular thiamine. The growth arrest was reversed at high extracellular concentrations of thiamine. Our results show that FeLV-A infection can indeed disrupt thiamine uptake with pathological consequences. A prediction of these experiments is that raising the plasma levels of thiamine in FeLV-infected cats may ameliorate the pathogenic effects of infection. PMID:23269813

  4. Disruption of thiamine uptake and growth of cells by feline leukemia virus subgroup A.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Ramon; Miller, A Dusty; Overbaugh, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in domestic cats and some wild cats despite the availability of relatively effective vaccines against the virus. FeLV subgroup A (FeLV-A) is transmitted in natural infections, and FeLV subgroups B, C, and T can evolve directly from FeLV-A by mutation and/or recombination with endogenous retroviruses in domestic cats, resulting in a variety of pathogenic outcomes. The cell surface entry receptor for FeLV-A is a putative thiamine transporter (THTR1). Here, we have addressed whether FeLV-A infection might disrupt thiamine uptake into cells and, because thiamine is an essential nutrient, whether this disruption might have pathological consequences. First, we cloned the cat ortholog of the other of the two known thiamine transporters in mammals, THTR2, and we show that feline THTR1 (feTHTR1) and feTHTR2 both mediate thiamine uptake, but feTHTR2 does not function as a receptor for FeLV-A. We found that feTHTR1 is widely expressed in cat tissues and in cell lines, while expression of feTHTR2 is restricted. Thiamine uptake mediated by feTHTR1 was indeed blocked by FeLV-A infection, and in feline fibroblasts that naturally express feTHTR1 and not feTHTR2, this blockade resulted in a growth arrest at physiological concentrations of extracellular thiamine. The growth arrest was reversed at high extracellular concentrations of thiamine. Our results show that FeLV-A infection can indeed disrupt thiamine uptake with pathological consequences. A prediction of these experiments is that raising the plasma levels of thiamine in FeLV-infected cats may ameliorate the pathogenic effects of infection.

  5. Complete genome sequences of two feline leukemia virus subgroup B isolates with novel recombination sites.

    PubMed

    Stewart, H; Jarrett, O; Hosie, M J; Willett, B J

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that all primary isolates of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) contain a subgroup A virus (FeLV-A) that is essential for transmission. In contrast, FeLV-B is thought to arise de novo in the infected animal through RNA recombination events with endogenous FeLV transcripts, presumably through copackaging of RNA from endogenous FeLV and exogenous FeLV-A. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two novel strains of FeLV-B (FeLV-2518 and FeLV-4314) that were isolated in the absence of FeLV-A. The env genes of these isolates have been characterized previously, and the 3' recombination sites have been identified. We describe herein the 5' recombination breakpoints of each virus. These breakpoints were found to be within the signal peptide of the env gene and the reverse transcriptase-coding region, respectively. This is the first report of a recombination site within the pol gene of an FeLV-B genome and the first genetic characterization of multiple independently arising FeLV-B isolates that have been identified without a functional FeLV-A ancestral virus.

  6. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S.; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro. Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV. IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level

  7. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam; Neil, James C

    2017-03-01

    The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV.IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level with the most

  8. Decreased expression of endogenous feline leukemia virus in cat lymphomas: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Krunic, Milica; Ertl, Reinhard; Hagen, Benedikt; Sedlazeck, Fritz J; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; von Haeseler, Arndt; Klein, Dieter

    2015-04-10

    Cats infected with exogenous feline leukemia virus (exFeLV) have a higher chance of lymphoma development than uninfected cats. Furthermore, an increased exFeLV transcription has been detected in lymphomas compared to non-malignant tissues. The possible mechanisms of lymphoma development by exFeLV are insertional mutagenesis or persistent stimulation of host immune cells by viral antigens, bringing them at risk for malignant transformation. Vaccination of cats against exFeLV has in recent years decreased the overall infection rate in most countries. Nevertheless, an increasing number of lymphomas have been diagnosed among exFeLV-negative cats. Endogenous feline leukemia virus (enFeLV) is another retrovirus for which transcription has been observed in cat lymphomas. EnFeLV provirus elements are present in the germline of various cat species and share a high sequence similarity with exFeLV but, due to mutations, are incapable of producing infectious viral particles. However, recombination between exFeLV and enFeLV could produce infectious particles. We examined the FeLV expression in cats that have developed malignant lymphomas and discussed the possible mechanisms that could have induced malignant transformation. For expression analysis we used next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) and for validation reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). First, we showed that there was no expression of exFeLV in all samples, which eliminates the possibility of recombination between exFeLV and enFeLV. Next, we analyzed the difference in expression of three enFeLV genes between control and lymphoma samples. Our analysis showed an average of 3.40-fold decreased viral expression for the three genes in lymphoma compared to control samples. The results were confirmed by RT-qPCR. There is a decreased expression of enFeLV genes in lymphomas versus control samples, which contradicts previous observations for the exFeLV. Our results suggest that a persistent stimulation of host

  9. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats.

    PubMed

    Al-Kappany, Y M; Lappin, M R; Kwok, O C H; Abu-Elwafa, S A; Hilali, M; Dubey, J P

    2011-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLv) are related to human immunodeficiency virus and human leukemia virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii , Bartonella spp., FIV, as well as FeLv and Dirofilaria immitis antigens was determined in sera from feral cats (Felis catus) from Cairo, Egypt. Using a modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 172 (95.5%) of the 180 cats with titers of 1∶5 in 9, 1∶10 in 9, 1∶20 in 3, 1∶40 in 5, 1∶80 in 5, 1∶160 in 15, 1∶320 in 22, and 1∶640 or higher in 104. Thus, 57.4% had high T. gondii titers. Antibodies to Bartonella spp. were found in 105 (59.6%) of 178, with titers of 1∶64 in 45, 1∶128 in 39, 1∶256 in 13, 1∶512 in 3, 1∶1,024 in 4, and 1∶2,048 in 1 cat. Antibodies to FIV were detected in 59 (33.9%) of 174 cats. Of 174 cats tested, antigens to FeLv, and D. immitis were detected in 8 (4.6%) and 6 (3.4%) cats, respectively. The results indicate a high prevalence of T. gondii, Bartonella spp., and FIV infections in cats from Cairo, Egypt. This is the first report of Bartonella spp., and D. immitis infection in cats in Egypt.

  10. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, and feline leukemia virus infections in cats from Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Lappin, M R; Kwok, O C H; Mofya, S; Chikweto, A; Baffa, A; Doherty, D; Shakeri, J; Macpherson, C N L; Sharma, R N

    2009-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLv) are related to human immunodeficiency virus, and human leukemia virus, respectively; all of these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalence of antibodies to T. gondi, Bartonella spp., FIV, as well as FeLv antigen were determined in sera from 75 domestic and 101 feral cats (Felis catus) from the Caribbean island of Grenada, West Indies. Using a modified agglutination test, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 23 (30.6%) of the 75 pet cats with titers of 1:25 in 1, 1:50 in 3, 1:400 in 4, 1:500 in 12, 1:800 in 2, and 1:1,600 in 1, and 28 (27.7%) of 101 feral cats with titers of 1:25 in 4, 1:50 in 7, 1:200 in 4, 1:400 in 1, 1:500 in 3, 1:800 in 2, 1:1,600 in 3, and 1:3,200 in 4. Overall, in both pet and feral cats, the seroprevalence increased with age. Antibodies to Bartonella spp. were found in 38 (50.6%) of the 75 pet cats and 52.4% of 101 feral cats. Antibodies to FIV were found in 6 domestic and 22 feral cats. None of the 176 cats was positive for FeLv antigen. There was no correlation among T. gondii, Bartonella spp., and FIV seropositivity.

  11. [Efficacy of siRNA on feline leukemia virus replication in vitro].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Melanie; Weber, Karin; Rauch, Gisep; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Hosie, Margaret J; Meli, Marina L; Hartmann, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) can lead to severe clinical signs in cats. Until now, there is no effective therapy for FeLV-infected cats. RNA interference-based antiviral therapy is a new concept. Specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) are designed complementary to the mRNA of a target region, and thus inhibit replication. Several studies have proven efficacy of siRNAs in inhibiting virus replication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory potential of siRNAs against FeLV replication in vitro. siRNAs against the FeLV env gene and the host cell surface receptor (feTHTR1) which is used by FeLV-A for entry as well as siRNA that were not complementary to the FeLV or cat genome, were tested. Crandell feline kidney cells (CrFK cells) were transfected with FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. On day 13, infected cells were transfected with siRNAs. As control, cells were mock-transfected or treated with azidothymidine (AZT) (5 μg/ml). Culture supernatants were analyzed for FeLV RNA using quantitative real-time RT-PCR and for FeLV p27 by ELISA every 24 hours for five days. All siRNAs significantly reduced viral RNA and p27 production, starting after 48 hours. The fact that non-complementary siRNAs also inhibited virus replication may lead to the conclusion that unspecific mechanisms rather than specific binding lead to inhibition.

  12. Tumorigenic Potential of a Recombinant Retrovirus Containing Sequences from Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus and Feline Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, C. R.; Lobelle-Rich, P. A.; Granger, S.; Brightman, B. K.; Fan, H.; Levy, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    A recombinant retrovirus, termed MoFe2-MuLV, was constructed in which the U3 region of T-lymphomagenic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) was replaced by that of FeLV-945, a provirus of unique long terminal repeat (LTR) structure identified only in non-T-cell, non-B-cell lymphomas of the domestic cat. The LTR of FeLV-945 is unusual in that it contains only a single copy of the transcriptional enhancer followed 25 bp downstream by a 21-bp sequence in triplicate in tandem. Infectivity of MoFe2-MuLV was demonstrated in vitro in SC-1 cells and in vivo in neonatal NIH-Swiss mice. Tumors occurred in MoFe2-MuLV-infected animals following a latency period of 4 to 10 months (average, 6 months). The results of Southern blot analysis of the T-cell receptor beta locus demonstrated that all tumors were lymphomas of T-cell origin. MoFe2-MuLV LTRs were amplified by PCR from tumor DNA and were characterized by nucleotide sequence analysis. LTRs from the tumors that occurred with relatively shorter latency predominantly retained the original MoFe2-MuLV sequence intact and unaltered. Tumors that occurred with relatively longer latency contained LTRs that also retained the 21-bp sequence triplication characteristic of the original virus but had acquired various duplications of enhancer sequences. The repeated identification of enhancer duplications in late-appearing tumors suggests that the duplication affords a selective advantage, although apparently not in the efficient induction of T-cell lymphoma. Proto-oncogenes known to be targets of insertional mutagenesis in the majority of Mo-MuLV-induced tumors or in feline non-T-cell, non-B-cell lymphomas were shown not to be rearranged in any tumor examined. Mink cell focus-inducing (MCF) proviral DNA was readily detectable in some, but not all, tumors. The presence or absence of MCF did not correlate with the kinetics of tumor induction. These studies indicate that the single-enhancer, triplication-containing FeLV LTR, typical of

  13. Evaluation of rapid diagnostic test kits for feline leukemia virus infection using samples from naturally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiayou; O'Connor, Thomas; Beall, Melissa; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy; Lappin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a potentially life-threatening oncogenic retrovirus. The p27 viral core protein is produced by the virus in infected feline cells, is found in the cytoplasm in several blood cells and can be free in the serum and plasma. ELISA or particle-based immunoassay are commonly used to detect the presence of the p27 core protein in samples obtained from blood. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of several in-clinic tests: the SNAP Feline Triple Test (IDEXX Laboratories), the WITNESS FeLV-FIV Test (Zoetis) and the VetScan Feline FeLV/FIV Rapid Test (Abaxis). The sample population (100 positive, 105 negative samples) consisted of serum and plasma samples submitted to IDEXX's worldwide reference laboratory for feline retrovirus testing. Virus isolation and reverse transcriptase PCR results were not available and so samples were judged to be positive or negative based on the results of the ViraCHEK FeLV (Zoetis) microtiter plate assay. The percentage of samples positive and negative for FeLV p27 antigen using the three in-clinic tests compared with the ViraCHEK method were as follows: IDEXX Feline Triple (positive 98.0%, negative 100%); Zoetis WITNESS (positive 79.0%, negative 97.1%); Abaxis VetScan (positive 73.0%, negative 97.1%). The SNAP Feline Triple Test demonstrated a high level of agreement for FeLV-positive and FeLV-negative samples when assessed in this model. Results of FeLV assays can vary among tests.

  14. Comparative examination of cats with feline leukemia virus-associated enteritis and other relevant forms of feline enteritis.

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; Kremendahl, J; Jackson, M L; Reinacher, M

    2001-07-01

    Cats with feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated enteritis (FAE), enteritis of other known viral etiology (parvovirus [PV], enteric coronavirus [CoV]), and enteritis of unknown etiology with histologic features similar to those of FAE and PV enteritis (EUE) and FeLV-negative and FeLV-positive cats without enterocyte alterations were examined. Amount and types of infiltrating leukocytes in the jejunum and activity and cellular constituents of mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow were determined. PV and CoV infections were confirmed by immunohistologic demonstration of PV and CoV antigen, ultrastructural demonstration of viral particles in the intestinal content, and in situ hybridization for PV genome. FeLV infection was detected by immunohistology for gp70, p27, and p15E. Latent FeLV infection was excluded by polymerase chain reaction methods for exogenous FeLV DNA. Enterocyte lesions involved the crypts in cats with PV enteritis, FAE, and EUE and the villous tips in cats with CoV enteritis. Inflammatory infiltration was generally dominated by mononuclear cells and was moderate in the unaltered intestine and in cats with PV enteritis and marked in cats with FAE, CoV enteritis, and EUE. In cats with EUE, myeloid/histiocyte antigen-positive macrophages were relatively numerous, suggesting recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes. Lymphoid tissues were depleted in cats with PV enteritis and with EUE but were normal or hyperplastic in cats with FAE. Bone marrow activity was decreased in cats with PV enteritis; in cats with FAE or EUE and in FeLV-positive cats without enterocyte alterations, activity was slightly increased. In cats with FAE and PV enteritis, a T-cell-dominated response prevailed. EUE showed some parallels to human inflammatory bowel disease, indicating a potential harmful effect of infiltrating macrophages on the intestinal epithelium.

  15. Coinfection of Leishmania chagasi with Toxoplasma gondii, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) in cats from an endemic area of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Sobrinho, Ludmila Silva Vicente; Rossi, Cláudio Nazaretian; Vides, Juliana Peloi; Braga, Eveline Tozzi; Gomes, Ana Amélia Domingues; de Lima, Valéria Marçal Félix; Perri, Sílvia Helena Venturoli; Generoso, Diego; Langoni, Hélio; Leutenegger, Christian; Biondo, Alexander Welker; Laurenti, Márcia Dalastra; Marcondes, Mary

    2012-06-08

    The aim of the present study was to determine the coinfection of Leishmania sp. with Toxoplasma gondii, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) in a population of cats from an endemic area for zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis. An overall 66/302 (21.85%) cats were found positive for Leishmania sp., with infection determined by direct parasitological examination in 30/302 (9.93%), by serology in 46/302 (15.23%) and by both in 10/302 (3.31%) cats. Real time PCR followed by amplicon sequencing successfully confirmed Leishmania infantum (syn Leishmania chagasi) infection. Out of the Leishmania infected cats, coinfection with FIV was observed in 12/66 (18.18%), with T. gondii in 17/66 (25.75%) and with both agents in 5/66 (7.58%) cats. FeLV was found only in a single adult cat with no Leishmania infection. A positive association was observed in coinfection of Leishmania and FIV (p<0.0001), but not with T. gondii (p>0.05). In conclusion, cats living in endemic areas of visceral leishmaniasis are significantly more likely to be coinfected with FIV, which may present confounding clinical signs and therefore cats in such areas should be always carefully screened for coinfections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus and Toxoplasma gondii in stray and household cats in Kerman-Iran: seroprevalence and correlation with clinical and laboratory findings.

    PubMed

    Akhtardanesh, Baharak; Ziaali, Naser; Sharifi, Hamid; Rezaei, Shirin

    2010-10-01

    This study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection among stray and owned cats in southeastern Iran and to identify the influence of age, sex, lifestyle, health status, and laboratory findings on seropositivity. The overall infection rate for FIV, FeLV, and T. gondii was 19.2%, 14.2%, and 32.1% respectively. Results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that old adults more likely to be seropositive than juveniles for FIV, FeLV, and T. gondii (adjusted odds ratios [ORs], 1.84, 1.56, and 2.57 respectively). Anemic and diseased cats ([ORs], 6.62 and 0.9) were at a greater risk of testing positive for FeLV. Male cats were 4.91 times as likely to have FIV as were female and hyperglobulinemia was significantly more prevalent in FIV-infected cats ([ORs], 3.4). In conclusion, FIV and FeLV seem to be endemic in Iran and retroviral-associated immunosuppression may be a risk factor for active toxoplasmosis in infected cats.

  17. Molecular and clinical study on prevalence of feline herpesvirus type 1 and calicivirus in correlation with feline leukemia and immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Hamideh; Madadgar, Omid; Jamshidi, Shahram; Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Arash; Darzi Lemraski, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract diseases (URTD) are common clinical problem in cats worldwide. Feline calicivirus (FCV) and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) are the main primary pathogens. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are also among the most common infectious diseases of cats which suppress the immunity. Oropharyngeal and conjunctival swabs and blood samples were taken from 16 cats with clinical signs of URTD and 26 clinically healthy cats. PCR and RT-PCR were used to detect FHV/FIV or FCV/FeLV infections, respectively. Feline calicivirus was detected in all cats with URTD and 87.00% and 93.00% of them were positive for FIV and FeLV, respectively. Feline herpesvirus rate of infection was 43.00% in sick cats. In clinically normal cats, prevalence rates of FCV and FHV were about 50.00%, but FIV and FeLV rates (42.00% and 65.00% respectively) were higher compared to other studies. Stomatitis was observed in 50.00% of cats with URTD. The main causative agent of corneal ulcers is FHV-1, but in 50.00% of cats with corneal ulcers, FCV was detected alone. It seems new variants of Caliciviruses are the main causative agents to attack uncommon tissues like cornea, although retroviral infections may be in the background of these various signs. The high retroviral prevalence may be due to existence of large population of stray cats. This is the first molecular study of FeLV and FCV in Iran and seems that FCV and FHV prevalence rates in FIV or FeLV infected cats is more than other non-infected ones.

  18. Molecular and clinical study on prevalence of feline herpesvirus type 1 and calicivirus in correlation with feline leukemia and immunodeficiency viruses

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Hamideh; Madadgar, Omid; Jamshidi, Shahram; Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Arash; Darzi Lemraski, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract diseases (URTD) are common clinical problem in cats worldwide. Feline calicivirus (FCV) and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) are the main primary pathogens. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are also among the most common infectious diseases of cats which suppress the immunity. Oropharyngeal and conjunctival swabs and blood samples were taken from 16 cats with clinical signs of URTD and 26 clinically healthy cats. PCR and RT-PCR were used to detect FHV/FIV or FCV/FeLV infections, respectively. Feline calicivirus was detected in all cats with URTD and 87.00% and 93.00% of them were positive for FIV and FeLV, respectively. Feline herpesvirus rate of infection was 43.00% in sick cats. In clinically normal cats, prevalence rates of FCV and FHV were about 50.00%, but FIV and FeLV rates (42.00% and 65.00% respectively) were higher compared to other studies. Stomatitis was observed in 50.00% of cats with URTD. The main causative agent of corneal ulcers is FHV-1, but in 50.00% of cats with corneal ulcers, FCV was detected alone. It seems new variants of Caliciviruses are the main causative agents to attack uncommon tissues like cornea, although retroviral infections may be in the background of these various signs. The high retroviral prevalence may be due to existence of large population of stray cats. This is the first molecular study of FeLV and FCV in Iran and seems that FCV and FHV prevalence rates in FIV or FeLV infected cats is more than other non-infected ones. PMID:25610576

  19. EPIZOOTIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF FELINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS IN THE FLORIDA PUMA

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Mark W.; Brown, Meredith A.; Shindle, David B.; Terrell, Scott P.; Hayes, Kathleen A.; Ferree, Bambi C.; McBride, R. T.; Blankenship, Emmett L.; Jansen, Deborah; Citino, Scott B.; Roelke, Melody E.; Kiltie, Richard A.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) was not detected in Florida pumas (Puma concolor coryi) in almost 20 yr of surveillance; however, the finding of two FeLV antigen-positive pumas during the 2002–2003 capture season led to an investigation of FeLV in the population. Between January 1990 and April 2007, the proportion of pumas testing FeLV antibody positive increased, with antibody-positive pumas concentrated in the northern portion of puma range. Five of 131 (4%) pumas sampled between July 2000 and April 2007 were viremic, with all cases clustered in Okaloacoochee Slough (OKS). Clinical signs and clinical pathology at capture were absent or included lymphadenopathy, moderate-to-severe anemia, and lymphopenia. All viremic pumas died; causes of death were septicemia (n=2), intraspecific aggression (n=2), and anemia/dehydration (n=1). Outcome after FeLV exposure in pumas was similar to that in domestic cats, with evidence of regressive, latent, and persistent infections. Management of the epizootic included vaccination, and as of April 2007, 52 free-ranging pumas had received one or more inoculations. Vaccinations were concentrated in OKS and in a band between OKS and the remainder of the puma population. There have been no new cases since July 2004; however, the potential for reintroduction of the virus remains. PMID:18689639

  20. Epizootiology and management of feline leukemia virus in the Florida puma.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mark W; Brown, Meredith A; Shindle, David B; Terrell, Scott P; Hayes, Kathleen A; Ferree, Bambi C; McBride, R T; Blankenship, Emmett L; Jansen, Deborah; Citino, Scott B; Roelke, Melody E; Kiltie, Richard A; Troyer, Jennifer L; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-07-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) was not detected in Florida pumas (Puma concolor coryi) in almost 20 yr of surveillance; however, the finding of two FeLV antigen-positive pumas during the 2002-2003 capture season led to an investigation of FeLV in the population. Between January 1990 and April 2007, the proportion of pumas testing FeLV antibody positive increased, with antibody-positive pumas concentrated in the northern portion of puma range. Five of 131 (4%) pumas sampled between July 2000 and April 2007 were viremic, with all cases clustered in Okaloacoochee Slough (OKS). Clinical signs and clinical pathology at capture were absent or included lymphadenopathy, moderate-to-severe anemia, and lymphopenia. All viremic pumas died; causes of death were septicemia (n=2), intraspecific aggression (n=2), and anemia/dehydration (n=1). Outcome after FeLV exposure in pumas was similar to that in domestic cats, with evidence of regressive, latent, and persistent infections. Management of the epizootic included vaccination, and as of April 2007, 52 free-ranging pumas had received one or more inoculations. Vaccinations were concentrated in OKS and in a band between OKS and the remainder of the puma population. There have been no new cases since July 2004; however, the potential for reintroduction of the virus remains.

  1. Evidence of horizontal transmission of feline leukemia virus by the cat flea ( Ctenocephalides felis).

    PubMed

    Vobis, M; D'Haese, J; Mehlhorn, H; Mencke, N

    2003-12-01

    The feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a naturally occurring and widespread retrovirus among domestic cats. The virus is mainly transmitted horizontally through saliva, blood and other body fluids by close contact between cats. Vectors other than cats, e.g. blood-sucking parasites, have not been reported. This study tested the vector potential of the cat flea ( Ctenocephalides felis) for FeLV. In a first feeding, fleas were fed for 24 h with blood from a FeLV-infected cat with persistent viremia. FeLV could be detected in the fleas, as well as in their feces. Fleas were then divided in two populations and fed in a second feeding for 5 h or 24 h with non-infected non-viremic blood. FeLV was again detected in the fleas and their feces. In addition, the two resulting blood samples of the second feeding were subsequently tested for FeLV and both samples were positive for FeLV RNA. The cat flea transmitted the FeLV from one blood sample to another. In a third feeding, the same populations of fleas were fed again with non-infected blood for 5 h or 24 h. This time FeLV was not detected in the fleas, or in the feces or blood samples. Results show that cat fleas are potential vectors for FeLV RNA in vitro and probably also in vivo.

  2. Envelope determinants for dual-receptor specificity in feline leukemia virus subgroup A and T variants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Heather H; Anderson, Maria M; Hankenson, F Claire; Johnston, Lily; Kotwaliwale, Chitra V; Overbaugh, Julie

    2006-02-01

    Gammaretroviruses, including the subgroups A, B, and C of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), use a multiple-membrane-spanning transport protein as a receptor. In some cases, such as FeLV-T, a nonclassical receptor that includes both a transport protein (Pit1) and a soluble cofactor (FeLIX) is required for entry. To define which regions confer specificity to classical versus nonclassical receptor pathways, we engineered mutations found in either FeLV-A/T or FeLV-T, individually and in combination, into the backbone of the transmissible form of the virus, FeLV-A. The receptor specificities of these viruses were tested by measuring infection and binding to cells expressing the FeLV-A receptor or the FeLV-T receptors. FeLV-A receptor specificity was maintained when changes at amino acid position 6, 7, or 8 of the mature envelope glycoprotein were introduced, although differences in infection efficiency were observed. When these N-terminal mutations were introduced together with a C-terminal 4-amino-acid insertion and an adjacent amino acid change, the resulting viruses acquired FeLV-T receptor specificity. Additionally, a W-->L change at amino acid position 378, although not required, enhanced infectivity for some viruses. Thus, we have found that determinants in the N and C termini of the envelope surface unit can direct entry via the nonclassical FeLV-T receptor pathway. The region that has been defined as the receptor binding domain of gammaretroviral envelope proteins determined entry via the FeLV-A receptor independently of the presence of the N- and C-terminal FeLV-T receptor determinants.

  3. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) infections in pet cats in Bangkok and vicinities, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sukhumavasi, Woraporn; Bellosa, Mary L; Lucio-Forster, Araceli; Liotta, Janice L; Lee, Alice C Y; Pornmingmas, Pitcha; Chungpivat, Sudchit; Mohammed, Hussni O; Lorentzen, Leif; Dubey, J P; Bowman, Dwight D

    2012-08-13

    The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections was examined using serum or plasma samples from 746 pet cats collected between May and July 2009 from clinics and hospitals located in and around Bangkok, Thailand. The samples were tested for heartworm, FIV, and FeLV using a commercial ELISA. Of the 746 samples, 4.6% (34/746) were positive for heartworm antigen, 24.5% (183/746) had circulating FeLV antigen, and 20.1% (150/746) had antibodies against FIV. In addition, the first 348 submitted samples were tested for T. gondii antibodies using a modified agglutination test (MAT, cut off 1:25); 10.1% (35/348) were seropositive. Of the 348 cats sampled for all four pathogens, 11, 10, and 1 were positive for T. gondii antibodies and FIV antibodies, FeLV antigen, or D. immitis antigen, respectively. Of the 35 T. gondii-seropositive cats, 42.9% (15/35) were co-infected with at least one of the other three pathogens. The presence of antibodies to FIV was significantly associated with both age and gender, while FeLV antigen presence was only associated with age. In the case of FIV, males were twice as likely to be infected as females, and cats over 10 years of age were 13.5 times more likely to be infected than cats less than 1 year of age. FeLV antigen was more common in younger cats, with cats over 10 years of age being 10 times less likely to be FeLV positive than cats under 1 year of age. This is the first survey for these four pathogens affecting feline health in Thailand. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of feline leukemia virus insertions in cat lymphoid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Satoh, Hitoshi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to map the acquired proviral insertions in the chromosomal genome of feline lymphoid tumors induced by feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Chromosome specimens of the lymphoid tumor-derived cell lines and normal cat lymphocytes were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization and tyramide signal amplification, using an exogenous FeLV-A genome as a probe. Specific hybridization signals were detected only on the metaphase chromosomes of the tumor cells. Poisson's distribution-based statistics indicated that 6 chromosomal loci in each cell line showed FeLV integration. In the examination of metaphase chromosomes of FL-74, FT-1 and KO-1 cells, significant signals were detected on B2p15-p14, B2q11, D1p14, E1p14-p13, E1q12 and F2q16; A2p23-p22, B2p15-p14, B4p15-p14, D4q23-q24, E1p14-p13 and E2p13-p12; and A2p22, A3q22, B1p13, B1q13, D1p13 and D3p15-p14, respectively. Consistently, Southern blot hybridization using an FeLV LTR-U3 probe specific for exogenous FeLV revealed the presence of at least 6 copies of exogenous FeLV proviruses at different integration sites in each cell line. These results indicate that there may be common FeLV integration sites at least in A2p22 and B2p15-p14. The cytogenetic analysis used in this study can promptly screen FeLV insertions and provide tags for identifying the novel common integration site.

  5. Quantification of endogenous and exogenous feline leukemia virus sequences by real-time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Ravi; Cattori, Valentino; Willi, Barbara; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2008-05-15

    Endogenous retroviruses are integrated in the genome of most vertebrates. They represent footprints of ancient retroviral infection and are vertically transmitted from parents to their offspring. In the genome of all domestic cats, sequences closely related to exogenous FeLV known as endogenous feline leukemia virus (enFeLV), are present. enFeLV are incapable of giving rise to infectious virus particles. However, transcription and translation of enFeLV have been demonstrated in tissues of healthy cats and in feline cell lines. The presence of enFeLV-env has been shown in specific embryonic tissues and adult thymic cells. In addition, the enFeLV-env region recombines with FeLV subgroup A giving rise to an infectious FeLV-B virus. enFeLV envelope protein, FeLIX (FeLV infectivity X-essory protein) is also involved in mediating FeLV-T infection. In order to test the hypothesis that the enFeLV loads play a role in exogenous FeLV-A infection and pathogenesis, quantitative real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays were developed. An assay, specific to U3 region of all different subtypes of exogenous FeLV, was designed and applied to quantify exogenous FeLV proviral or viral load in cats, while three real-time PCR assays were designed to quantify U3 and env enFeLV loads (two within U3 amplifying different sequences; one within env). enFeLV loads were investigated in blood samples derived from Swiss privately owned domestic cats, specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats and European wildcats (Felis silvestris silvestris). Significant differences in enFeLV loads were observed between privately owned cats and SPF cats as well as among SPF cats originating from different catteries and among domestic cats of different breeds. When privately owned cats were compared, FeLV-infected cats had higher loads than uninfected cats. In addition, wildcats had higher enFeLV loads than domestic cats. In conclusion, the quantitative real-time PCR assays described herein are important prerequisites to

  6. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Polani, Sagi; Roca, Alfred L.; Rosensteel, Bryan B.; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila

    2010-09-30

    Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

  7. Development and clinical evaluation of a rapid diagnostic kit for feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Shik; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Kim, Hak-Yong; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Jeong, Wooseog; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Lee, Jae-In; Lee, Young-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) causes a range of neoplastic and degenerative diseases in cats. To obtain a more sensitive and convenient diagnosis of the disease, we prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for the FeLV p27 to develop a rapid diagnostic test with enhanced sensitivity and specificity. Among these antibodies, we identified two clones (hybridomas 8F8B5 and 8G7D1) that specifically bound to FeLV and were very suitable for a diagnostic kit. The affinity constants for 8F8B5 and 8G7D1 were 0.35 × 10⁸ and 0.86 × 10⁸, respectively. To investigate the diagnostic abilities of the rapid kit using these antibodies, we performed several clinical studies. Assessment of analytical sensitivity revealed that the detection threshold of the rapid diagnostic test was 2 ng/mL for recombinant p27 and 12.5 × 10⁴ IU/mL for FeLV. When evaluating 252 cat sera samples, the kit was found to have a kappa value of 0.88 compared to polymerase chain reaction (PCR), indicating a significant correlation between data from the rapid diagnostic test and PCR. Sensitivity and specificity of the kit were 95.2% (20/21) and 98.5% (257/261), respectively. Our results demonstrated that the rapid diagnostic test would be a suitable diagnostic tool for the rapid detection of FeLV infection in cats.

  8. Naturally occurring feline leukemia virus subgroup A and B infections in urban domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Fabiana Magalhães; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma; de Andrade Caxito, Fabíola; Ribeiro, Natália Almeida; Luppi, Marcela Miranda; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Oliveira, Maria Emilia; Da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães; Resende, Mauricio

    2008-11-01

    A nested-PCR (n-PCR) was used to detect feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviral DNA in blood samples from 464 sick and 608 healthy domestic cats (Felis catus) selected by convenience, and a significantly high prevalence of FeLV infection was observed. n-PCR results revealed the presence of FeLV proviral DNA in 47.2 % of sick cats and 47.4 % of healthy cats. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that FeLV samples from healthy or sick cats were grouped into separate clades. We determined FeLV subgroups by an n-PCR based on the envelope (env) gene. The partial env gene of FeLV Minas Gerais (MG) samples were compared to various exogenous FeLV isolates and endogenous (enFeLV) provirus from the same region. FeLV-B MG samples were more similar to endogenous sequences and to natural FeLV-B isolates than to either FeLV-A or FeLV-C. The results revealed the circulation of FeLV-B in large populations of urban domestic cats in Brazil.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous feline leukemia virus proliferation among species of the domestic cat lineage.

    PubMed

    Polani, Sagi; Roca, Alfred L; Rosensteel, Bryan B; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Bar-Gal, Gila Kahila

    2010-09-30

    Endogenous feline leukemia viruses (enFeLVs) occur in the germ lines of the domestic cat and related wild species (genus Felis). We sequenced the long terminal repeats and part of the env region of enFeLVs in domestic cats and five wild species. A total of 305 enFeLV sequences were generated across 17 individuals, demonstrating considerable diversity within two major clades. Distinct proliferations of enFeLVs occurred before and after the black-footed cat diverged from the other species. Diversity of enFeLVs was limited for the sand cat and jungle cat suggesting that proliferation of enFeLVs occurred within these species after they diverged. Relationships among enFeLVs were congruent with host species relationships except for the jungle cat, which carried only enFeLVs from a lineage that recently invaded the germline (enFeLV-AGTT). Comparison of wildcat and domestic cat enFeLVs indicated that a distinctive germ line invasion of enFeLVs has not occurred since the cat was domesticated.

  10. Survey of the feline leukemia virus infection status of cats in Southern Germany.

    PubMed

    Englert, Theresa; Lutz, Hans; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Hartmann, Katrin

    2012-06-01

    Most studies that investigate the prevalence of infections with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are based on the detection of p27 antigen in blood, but they do not detect proviral DNA to identify the prevalence of regressive FeLV infections. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and status of FeLV infection in cats in Southern Germany. P27 antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), anti-p45 antibody ELISA, DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of blood and RNA PCR of saliva were performed. Nine out of 495 cats were progressively (persistently) infected (1.8%) and six were regressively (latently) infected (1.2%). Cats with regressive infections are defined as cats that have been able to overcome antigenemia but provirus can be detected by PCR. Twenty-two unvaccinated cats likely had abortive infections (regressor cats), testing FeLV antigen- and provirus-negative but anti-p45 antibody-positive. Most of the FeLV-vaccinated cats did not have anti-FeLV antibodies. Both progressive, as well as regressive infections seem to be rare in Germany today.

  11. Suspected myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm in a feline leukemia virus-negative cat.

    PubMed

    Weeden, Amy L; Taylor, Kyle R; Terrell, Scott P; Gallagher, Alexander E; Wamsley, Heather L

    2016-12-01

    A 10-year-old castrated Domestic Short-Haired cat was presented to a primary care veterinarian for a wellness examination and laboratory examination for monitoring of diabetes mellitus. The CBC revealed marked thrombocytosis, leukopenia and macrocytic, normochromic anemia. The cat tested negative for FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus, but was positive for Mycoplasma haemominutum by PCR. Hematologic abnormalities were not responsive to therapy, so a repeat CBC and a bone marrow aspiration for cytology were performed. Additional blood smear findings included anisocytosis with megaloblastic erythroid precursors, large platelets, eosinophilic myelocytes and metamyelocytes, and rare unidentified blasts. The bone marrow smear was highly cellular, and the cytologic pattern was consistent with myelodysplastic syndrome with an erythroid predominance. At that time, 15% blasts were present. The cat was treated with a vitamin K2 analog, doxycycline, and prednisolone, but without a clinical response. Within 3 months, euthanasia was elected due to declining quality of life, and a necropsy was performed. Postmortem bone marrow smears were highly cellular and dominated by monomorphic blasts of unknown line of origin (52%), persistent marked erythroid and megakaryocytic dysplasia, and ineffective erythropoiesis and granulopoiesis. Immunohistochemical, immunocytochemical, and cytochemical stains resulted in a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia of unclassified type. Additional histologic findings included mixed hepatitis with trematode infestation and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial nephritis with fibrosis. The marked thrombocytosis with myelodysplastic syndrome and the FeLV-negative status of this cat were unusual. The difficulty in classifying the myelodysplasia and subsequent leukemia highlights a need for further reporting and characterization of these types of disease.

  12. Shedding of feline leukemia virus RNA in saliva is a consistent feature in viremic cats.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Keller, M A; Tandon, R; Gönczi, E; Meli, M L; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H

    2006-01-10

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the shedding pattern of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) RNA in saliva, and to correlate it with the proviral load in whole blood, viral load in plasma, levels of p27 in saliva and plasma, the isolation of infectious FeLV from saliva, and the titers of FeLV-specific antibodies of the IgG and IgA isotypes. We evaluated 24 experimentally FeLV-infected cats for these parameters using real-time RT-PCR and PCR, cell culture assay and sandwich ELISA. We observed that shedding of viral RNA in saliva was a consistent feature in viremic cats. Latently FeLV-infected cats, displaying a very low proviral load, did not shed infectious virus in saliva, but occasionally shed viral RNA. Consequently, salivary shedding of FeLV RNA may not necessarily indicate a transmission potential for susceptible cats. This study also confirmed previous results from our laboratory, showing that a negative result for p27 in plasma, or for viral RNA in plasma or saliva does not exclude FeLV infection, considering that blood cells from those cats contained provirus. We also showed that FeLV RNA and DNA were stable for more than 64 days in saliva samples stored at room temperature. We conclude that the detection of FeLV RNA in saliva may be a useful indicator of viremia, and that the detection of salivary viral RNA by RT-PCR could become a reliable tool for the diagnosis of FeLV infection, which is facilitated by the low invasive method of collection of the samples.

  13. No benefit of therapeutic vaccination in clinically healthy cats persistently infected with feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Helfer-Hungerbuehler, A Katrin; Spiri, Andrea M; Riond, Barbara; Grest, Paula; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-03-24

    Therapeutic vaccinations have a potential application in infections where no curative treatment is available. In contrast to HIV, efficacious vaccines for a cat retrovirus, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), are commercially available. However, the infection is still prevalent, and no effective treatment of the infection is known. By vaccinating persistently FeLV-infected cats and presenting FeLV antigens to the immune system of the host, e.g., in the form of recombinant and/or adjuvanted antigens, we intended to shift the balance toward an advantage of the host so that persistent infection could be overcome by the infected cat. Two commercially available FeLV vaccines efficacious in protecting naïve cats from FeLV infection were tested in six experimentally and persistently FeLV-infected cats: first, a canarypox-vectored vaccine, and second, an adjuvanted, recombinant envelope vaccine was repeatedly administered with the aim to stimulate the immune system. No beneficial effects on p27 antigen and plasma viral RNA loads, anti-FeLV antibodies, or life expectancy of the cats were detected. The cats were unable to overcome or decrease viremia. Some cats developed antibodies to FeLV antigens although not protective. Thus, we cannot recommend vaccinating persistently FeLV-infected cats as a means of improving their FeLV status, quality of life or life expectancy. We suggest testing of all cats for FeLV infection prior to FeLV vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Phylogenetic and structural diversity in the feline leukemia virus env gene.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinya; Kawamura, Maki; Odahara, Yuka; Anai, Yukari; Ochi, Haruyo; Nakagawa, So; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) belongs to the genus Gammaretrovirus, and causes a variety of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases in cats. Alteration of viral env sequences is thought to be associated with disease specificity, but the way in which genetic diversity of FeLV contributes to the generation of such variants in nature is poorly understood. We isolated FeLV env genes from naturally infected cats in Japan and analyzed the evolutionary dynamics of these genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions separated our FeLV samples into three distinct genetic clusters, termed Genotypes I, II, and III. Genotype I is a major genetic cluster and can be further classified into Clades 1-7 in Japan. Genotypes were correlated with geographical distribution; Genotypes I and II were distributed within Japan, whilst FeLV samples from outside Japan belonged to Genotype III. These results may be due to geographical isolation of FeLVs in Japan. The observed structural diversity of the FeLV env gene appears to be caused primarily by mutation, deletion, insertion and recombination, and these variants may be generated de novo in individual cats. FeLV interference assay revealed that FeLV genotypes did not correlate with known FeLV receptor subgroups. We have identified the genotypes which we consider to be reliable for evaluating phylogenetic relationships of FeLV, which embrace the high structural diversity observed in our sample. Overall, these findings extend our understanding of Gammaretrovirus evolutionary patterns in the field, and may provide a useful basis for assessing the emergence of novel strains and understanding the molecular mechanisms of FeLV transmission in cats.

  15. Association of gingivitis with dental calculus thickness or dental calculus coverage and subgingival bacteria in feline leukemia virus- and feline immunodeficiency virus-negative cats

    PubMed Central

    Thengchaisri, Naris; Steiner, Jörg M.; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Sattasathuchana, Panpicha

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease in cats. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationships between gingivitis and dental calculus thickness (DCT), or dental calculus coverage (DCC); determine the association of gingivitis scores and types of oral bacteria; and to evaluate bacterial co-infection in cats with periodontal disease. Twelve cats that were not infected with feline leukemia or feline immunodeficiency viruses were enrolled in the study. Gingivitis, DCT, and DCC were scored and recorded. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare scores among canine, 2nd premolar, 3rd premolar, 4th premolar, and 1st molar teeth. The relationship between gingivitis and DCT or DCC scores was determined using the Spearman rank sum test (ρ). Subgingival bacteria were cultured and the association between bacterial species and gingivitis score was evaluated using a Fisher’s exact test. The average gingivitis, DCT, and DCC scores for the caudal maxillary teeth were higher for the caudal mandibular teeth and more severe for the 3rd premolar, 4th premolar, and 1st molar teeth than for the canine teeth. A strong relationship between average DCT or DCC score and average gingivitis score was found (ρ = 0.96 and 1, respectively). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infections were identified in a large number of cats with periodontal disease (71.1% and 28.9%, respectively). In conclusion, severe gingivitis scores were associated with anaerobic bacterial infection. The caudal teeth are affected with more severe gingivitis, DCT, and DCC than the other teeth. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be prescribed in cats with periodontal disease. PMID:28154463

  16. Association of gingivitis with dental calculus thickness or dental calculus coverage and subgingival bacteria in feline leukemia virus- and feline immunodeficiency virus-negative cats.

    PubMed

    Thengchaisri, Naris; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Sattasathuchana, Panpicha

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease in cats. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationships between gingivitis and dental calculus thickness (DCT), or dental calculus coverage (DCC); determine the association of gingivitis scores and types of oral bacteria; and to evaluate bacterial co-infection in cats with periodontal disease. Twelve cats that were not infected with feline leukemia or feline immunodeficiency viruses were enrolled in the study. Gingivitis, DCT, and DCC were scored and recorded. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare scores among canine, 2nd premolar, 3rd premolar, 4th premolar, and 1st molar teeth. The relationship between gingivitis and DCT or DCC scores was determined using the Spearman rank sum test (ρ). Subgingival bacteria were cultured and the association between bacterial species and gingivitis score was evaluated using a Fisher's exact test. The average gingivitis, DCT, and DCC scores for the caudal maxillary teeth were higher for the caudal mandibular teeth and more severe for the 3rd premolar, 4th premolar, and 1st molar teeth than for the canine teeth. A strong relationship between average DCT or DCC score and average gingivitis score was found (ρ = 0.96 and 1, respectively). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infections were identified in a large number of cats with periodontal disease (71.1% and 28.9%, respectively). In conclusion, severe gingivitis scores were associated with anaerobic bacterial infection. The caudal teeth are affected with more severe gingivitis, DCT, and DCC than the other teeth. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be prescribed in cats with periodontal disease.

  17. Multicentric T-cell lymphoma associated with feline leukemia virus infection in a captive namibian cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Marker, Laurie; Munson, Linda; Basson, Peter A; Quackenbush, Sandra

    2003-07-01

    This case report describes a multicentric lymphoma in a 4 yr old female wildborn captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) in Namibia after being housed in an enclosure adjacent to a feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infected cheetah that had previously been in contact with domestic cats. The year prior to the onset of clinical signs, the wild-born cheetah was FeLV antigen negative. The cheetah subsequently developed lymphoma, was found to be infected with FeLV, and then rapidly deteriorated and died. At necropsy, the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and multiple other organs were extensively infiltrated with neoplastic T-lymphocytes. Feline leukemia virus DNA was identified in neoplastic lymphocytes from multiple organs by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Although the outcome of infection in this cheetah resembles that of FeLV infections in domestic cats, the transmission across an enclosure fence was unusual and may indicate a heightened susceptibility to infection in cheetahs. Caution should be exercised in holding and translocating cheetahs where contact could be made with FeLV-infected domestic, feral, or wild felids.

  18. Comparison of the geographical distribution of feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus infections in the United States of America (2000-2011).

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Bimal K; Berke, Olaf; Pearl, David L; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2013-01-05

    Although feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) have similar risk factors and control measures, infection rates have been speculated to vary in geographic distribution over North America. Since both infections are endemic in North America, it was assumed as a working hypothesis that their geographic distributions were similar. Hence, the purpose of this exploratory analysis was to investigate the comparative geographical distribution of both viral infections. Counts of FIV (n=17,108) and FeLV (n=30,017) positive serology results (FIV antibody and FeLV ELISA) were obtained for 48 contiguous states and District of Columbia of the United States of America (US) from the IDEXX Laboratories website. The proportional morbidity ratio of FIV to FeLV infection was estimated for each administrative region and its geographic distribution pattern was visualized by a choropleth map. Statistical evidence of an excess in the proportional morbidity ratio from unity was assessed using the spatial scan test under the normal probability model. This study revealed distinct spatial distribution patterns in the proportional morbidity ratio suggesting the presence of one or more relevant and geographically varying risk factors. The disease map indicates that there is a higher prevalence of FIV infections in the southern and eastern US compared to FeLV. In contrast, FeLV infections were observed to be more frequent in the western US compared to FIV. The respective excess in proportional morbidity ratio was significant with respect to the spatial scan test (p < 0.05). The observed variability in the geographical distribution of the proportional morbidity ratio of FIV to FeLV may be related to the presence of an additional or unique, but yet unknown, spatial risk factor. Putative factors may be geographic variations in specific virus strains and rate of vaccination. Knowledge of these factors and the geographical distributions of these infections can inform

  19. Comparison of risk factors for seropositivity to feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus among cats: a case-case study.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Bimal K; Berke, Olaf; Pearl, David L; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2015-02-10

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are reported to have similar risk factors and similar recommendations apply to manage infected cats. However, some contrasting evidence exists in the literature with regard to commonly reported risk factors. In this study, we investigated whether the known risk factors for FIV and FeLV infections have a stronger effect for either infection. This retrospective study included samples from 696 cats seropositive for FIV and 593 cats seropositive for FeLV from the United States and Canada. Data were collected during two cross sectional studies, where cats were tested using IDEXX FIV/FeLV ELISA kits. To compare the effect of known risk factors for FIV infection compared to FeLV, using a case-case study design, random intercept logistic regression models were fit including cats' age, sex, neuter status, outdoor exposure, health status and type of testing facility as independent variables. A random intercept for testing facility was included to account for clustering expected in testing practices at the individual clinics and shelters. In the multivariable random intercept model, the odds of FIV compared to FeLV positive ELISA results were greater for adults (OR = 2.09, CI: 1.50-2.92), intact males (OR = 3.14, CI: 1.85-3.76), neutered males (OR = 2.68, CI: 1.44- 3.14), cats with outdoor access (OR = 2.58, CI: 1.85-3.76) and lower for cats with clinical illness (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.52-0.90). The variance components obtained from the model indicated clustering at the testing facility level. Risk factors that have a greater effect on FIV seropositivity include adulthood, being male (neutered or not) and having access to outdoors, while clinical illness was a stronger predictor for FeLV seropositivity. Further studies are warranted to assess the implications of these results for the management and control of these infections.

  20. Feline Leukemia Virus DNA Vaccine Efficacy Is Enhanced by Coadministration with Interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-18 Expression Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Linda; Argyle, David; Bain, Derek; Nicolson, Lesley; Dunham, Stephen; Golder, Matthew C.; McDonald, Michael; McGillivray, Christine; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C.; Onions, David E.

    2001-01-01

    The expectation that cell-mediated immunity is important in the control of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection led us to test a DNA vaccine administered alone or with cytokines that favored the development of a Th1 immune response. The vaccine consisted of two plasmids, one expressing the gag/pol genes and the other expressing the env gene of FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The genetic adjuvants were plasmids encoding the feline cytokines interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-18, or gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Kittens were immunized by three intramuscular inoculations of the FeLV DNA vaccine alone or in combination with plasmids expressing IFN-γ, IL-12, or both IL-12 and IL-18. Control kittens were inoculated with empty plasmid. Following immunization, anti-FeLV antibodies were not detected in any kitten. Three weeks after the final immunization, the kittens were challenged by the intraperitoneal inoculation of FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 and were then monitored for a further 15 weeks for the presence of virus in plasma and, at the end of the trial, for latent virus in bone marrow. The vaccine consisting of FeLV DNA with the IL-12 and IL-18 genes conferred significant immunity, protecting completely against transient and persistent viremia, and in five of six kittens protecting against latent infection. None of the other vaccines provided significant protection. PMID:11507187

  1. Identification of a novel common proviral integration site, flit-1, in feline leukemia virus induced thymic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Liao, Chun-Peng; Zhao, Yan Shi; Pan, Judong; Mathes, Lawrence E; Hayes, Kathleen A; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Roy-Burman, Pradip

    2009-03-30

    A new proviral integration site for feline leukemia virus (FeLV), termed flit-1, was identified from feline thymic lymphoma. Among 35 FeLV-related tumors examined, 5 of 25 thymic lymphomas demonstrated proviral insertion within flit-1 locus whereas none of four alimentary and five multicentric lymphomas and one T-lymphoid leukemia examined had rearrangement in this region. Extensive sequence analysis has shown that flit-1, which is noncoding, is conserved on human chromosome 12 and mouse chromosome 15. The human and murine homologs of flit-1 are positioned approximately 30-kb upstream to activin-A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1) gene. Expression of ACVRL1 mRNA was examined in two of five lymphomas with flit-1 rearrangement and detected in both of the two whereas normal thymuses and seven lymphoid tumors without flit-1 rearrangement had no detectable expression. Therefore, flit-1 appears to represent a novel FeLV proviral common integration domain that may influence lymphomagenesis as insertional mutagenesis.

  2. Dominance of highly divergent feline leukemia virus A progeny variants in a cat with recurrent viremia and fatal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Helfer-Hungerbuehler, A Katrin; Cattori, Valentino; Boretti, Felicitas S; Ossent, Pete; Grest, Paula; Reinacher, Manfred; Henrich, Manfred; Bauer, Eva; Bauer-Pham, Kim; Niederer, Eva; Holznagel, Edgar; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2010-02-19

    In a cat that had ostensibly recovered from feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection, we observed the reappearance of the virus and the development of fatal lymphoma 8.5 years after the initial experimental exposure to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The goals of the present study were to investigate this FeLV reoccurrence and molecularly characterize the progeny viruses. The FeLV reoccurrence was detected by the presence of FeLV antigen and RNA in the blood and saliva. The cat was feline immunodeficiency virus positive and showed CD4+ T-cell depletion, severe leukopenia, anemia and a multicentric monoclonal B-cell lymphoma. FeLV-A, but not -B or -C, was detectable. Sequencing of the envelope gene revealed three FeLV variants that were highly divergent from the virus that was originally inoculated (89-91% identity to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1). In the long terminal repeat 31 point mutations, some previously described in cats with lymphomas, were detected. The FeLV variant tissue provirus and viral RNA loads were significantly higher than the FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 loads. Moreover, the variant loads were significantly higher in lymphoma positive compared to lymphoma negative tissues. An increase in the variant provirus blood load was observed at the time of FeLV reoccurrence. Our results demonstrate that ostensibly recovered FeLV provirus-positive cats may act as a source of infection following FeLV reactivation. The virus variants that had largely replaced the inoculation strain had unusually heavily mutated envelopes. The mutations may have led to increased viral fitness and/or changed the mutagenic characteristics of the virus.

  3. Chronic oral infections of cats and their relationship to persistent oral carriage of feline calici-, immunodeficiency, or leukemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, A P; Franti, C E; Madewell, B R; Pedersen, N C

    1991-08-01

    Two hundred and twenty-six cats from the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH), a cat shelter, and a purebred cattery were tested for chronic feline calicivirus (FCV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infections. Chronic oral carriage of FCV was present in about one-fifth of the cats in each of the groups. FIV infection was not present in the purebred cattery, was moderately prevalent (8%) in the pet population of cats examined at the VMTH for various complaints and was rampant in the cat shelter (21%). Unexpectedly high FeLV infection rates were found in the hospital cat population (28%) and in the purebred cattery (36%), but not in the cat shelter (1.4%). FCV and FeLV infections tended to occur early in life, whereas FIV infections tended to occur in older animals. From 43 to 100% of the cats in these environments had oral cavity disease ranging from mild gingivitis (23-46%), proliferative gingivitis (18-20%), periodontitis (3-32%) and periodontitis with involvement of extra-gingival tissues (7-27%). Cats infected solely with FCV did not have a greater likelihood of oral lesions, or more severe oral disease, than cats that were totally virus free. This was also true for cats infected solely with FeLV, or for cats dually infected with FeLV and FCV. Cats infected solely with FIV appeared to have a greater prevalence of oral cavity infections and their oral cavity disease tended to be more severe than cats without FIV infection. FIV-infected cats that were coinfected with either FCV, or with FCV and FeLV, had the highest prevalence of oral cavity infections and the most severe oral lesions.

  4. Identification of a feline leukemia virus variant that can use THTR1, FLVCR1, and FLVCR2 for infection.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Zvi; Duffy, Simon P; Adema, Karen W; Prasad, Rati; Hussain, Naveen; Willett, Brian J; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2009-07-01

    The pathogenic subgroup C feline leukemia virus (FeLV-C) arises in infected cats as a result of mutations in the envelope (Env) of the subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A). To better understand emergence of FeLV-C and potential FeLV intermediates that may arise, we characterized FeLV Env sequences from the primary FY981 FeLV isolate previously derived from an anemic cat. Here, we report the characterization of the novel FY981 FeLV Env that is highly related to FeLV-A Env but whose variable region A (VRA) receptor recognition sequence partially resembles the VRA sequence from the prototypical FeLV-C/Sarma Env. Pseudotype viruses bearing FY981 Env were capable of infecting feline, human, and guinea pig cells, suggestive of a subgroup C phenotype, but also infected porcine ST-IOWA cells that are normally resistant to FeLV-C and to FeLV-A. Analysis of the host receptor used by FY981 suggests that FY981 can use both the FeLV-C receptor FLVCR1 and the feline FeLV-A receptor THTR1 for infection. However, our results suggest that FY981 infection of ST-IOWA cells is not mediated by the porcine homologue of FLVCR1 and THTR1 but by an alternative receptor, which we have now identified as the FLVCR1-related protein FLVCR2. Together, our results suggest that FY981 FeLV uses FLVCR1, FLVCR2, and THTR1 as receptors. Our findings suggest the possibility that pathogenic FeLV-C arises in FeLV-infected cats through intermediates that are multitropic in their receptor use.

  5. Feline Leukemia Virus and Other Pathogens as Important Threats to the Survival of the Critically Endangered Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus)

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Marina L.; Cattori, Valentino; Martínez, Fernando; López, Guillermo; Vargas, Astrid; Simón, Miguel A.; Zorrilla, Irene; Muñoz, Alvaro; Palomares, Francisco; López-Bao, Jose V.; Pastor, Josep; Tandon, Ravi; Willi, Barbara; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is considered the most endangered felid species in the world. In order to save this species, the Spanish authorities implemented a captive breeding program recruiting lynxes from the wild. In this context, a retrospective survey on prevalence of selected feline pathogens in free-ranging lynxes was initiated. Methodology/ Principal Findings We systematically analyzed the prevalence and importance of seven viral, one protozoan (Cytauxzoon felis), and several bacterial (e.g., hemotropic mycoplasma) infections in 77 of approximately 200 remaining free-ranging Iberian lynxes of the Doñana and Sierra Morena areas, in Southern Spain, between 2003 and 2007. With the exception of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), evidence of infection by all tested feline pathogens was found in Iberian lynxes. Fourteen lynxes were feline leukemia virus (FeLV) provirus-positive; eleven of these were antigenemic (FeLV p27 positive). All 14 animals tested negative for other viral infections. During a six-month period in 2007, six of the provirus-positive antigenemic lynxes died. Infection with FeLV but not with other infectious agents was associated with mortality (p<0.001). Sequencing of the FeLV surface glycoprotein gene revealed a common origin for ten of the eleven samples. The ten sequences were closely related to FeLV-A/61E, originally isolated from cats in the USA. Endogenous FeLV sequences were not detected. Conclusions/Significance It was concluded that the FeLV infection most likely originated from domestic cats invading the lynx's habitats. Data available regarding the time frame, co-infections, and outcome of FeLV-infections suggest that, in contrast to the domestic cat, the FeLV strain affecting the lynxes in 2007 is highly virulent to this species. Our data argue strongly for vaccination of lynxes and domestic cats in and around lynx's habitats in order to prevent further spread of the virus as well as reduction the domestic cat

  6. Feline leukemia virus T entry is dependent on both expression levels and specific interactions between cofactor and receptor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Heather H; Anderson, Maria M; Overbaugh, Julie

    2007-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroup T uses both a multiple membrane-spanning receptor, FePit1, and a soluble cofactor, FeLIX, to enter feline cells. FeLIX is expressed from endogenous FeLV-related sequence and resembles the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the viral envelope protein. It remains unclear whether FeLV-T receptor activity requires specific residues within FePit1 and FeLIX and/or a threshold level of receptor/cofactor expression. To address this, we examined FeLV-T infection of cells expressing variable levels of FePit1 and other gammaretroviral receptors in the presence of variable amounts of soluble cofactor, either RBD or the envelope surface subunit (SU). Cofactor-receptor pairs fall into three groups with regard to mediating FeLV-T infection: those that are efficient at all concentrations tested, such as FePit1 and FeLIX; those requiring high expression of both cofactor and receptor; and those that are non-functional as receptors even at high expression. This suggests that both expression levels and specific interactions with receptor and cofactor are critical for mediating entry of FeLV-T.

  7. Feline leukemia virus infection: a threat for the survival of the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Meli, Marina L; Cattori, Valentino; Martínez, Fernando; López, Guillermo; Vargas, Astrid; Palomares, Francisco; López-Bao, José V; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2010-03-15

    The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is considered the most endangered felid species in the world. To date, less than 200 animals remain in the wild. Low numbers and genetic uniformity may contribute to render this species particularly susceptible to infectious diseases. Different pathogens have been identified in Iberian lynxes; including several feline bacterial and viral agents. Within a 6-month period starting in December 2006, 12 lynxes living in the northern part of the Doñana area were found to be infected with feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Eleven of these animals were antigenemic, and four of them died in the wild in less than 6 months since the first infected animal had been discovered. The remaining viremic lynxes were captured and allocated to a quarantine center to stop the spread of the infection. An additional three animals died shortly in the quarantine center due to acute anemic disease. Sequencing of the envelope surface unit gene revealed a common origin for the FeLV found in all lynxes. The sequences were closely related to FeLV-A/61E, originally isolated from cats in the USA. Our data demonstrate that, similarly to FeLV, the introduction of a new or particularly pathogenic infection brought into the small population of Iberian lynxes by other wild carnivores or feral cats and dogs roaming in the same habitats have severe consequences. It could result in epidemics that have the potential to eradicate the entire lynx population.

  8. Epidemiologic survey of feline leukemia virus in domestic cats on Tsushima Island, Japan: Management strategy for Tsushima leopard cats.

    PubMed

    Makundi, Isaac; Koshida, Yushi; Kuse, Kyohei; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Watanabe, Shinya; Kawamura, Maki; Odahara, Yuka; Miyake, Ariko; Yamamoto, Hanae; Kuniyoshi, Sawako; Onuma, Manabu; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2017-08-01

    The Tsushima leopard cat (TLC) Prionailurus bengalensis euptilurus, a subspecies of P. bengalensis, is designated a National Natural Monument of Japan, and lives only on Tsushima Island, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. TLCs are threatened by various infectious diseases. Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) causes a serious infectious disease with a poor prognosis in cats. Therefore, the transmission of FeLV from Tsushima domestic cats (TDCs) to TLCs may threaten the TLC population. We investigated the FeLV infection status of both TDCs and TLCs on Tsushima Island by screening blood samples for FeLV p27 antigen and using PCR to amplify the full-length FeLV env gene. The prevalence of FeLV was 6.4% in TDCs and 0% in TLCs. We also demonstrated that the virus can replicate in the cells of TLCs, suggesting its potential cross-species transmission. The viruses in TDCs were classified as genotype I/clade 3, which is prevalent on a nearby island, based on previous studies of FeLV genotypes and FeLV epidemiology. The FeLV viruses identified on Tsushima Island can be further divided into 2 lineages within genotype I/clade 3, which are geographically separated in Kamijima and Shimojima, indicating that FeLV may have been transmitted to Tsushima Island at least twice. Monitoring FeLV infection in the TDC and TLC populations is highly recommended as part of the TLC surveillance and management strategy.

  9. Comparative Efficacy of Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) Inactivated Whole-Virus Vaccine and Canarypox Virus-Vectored Vaccine during Virulent FeLV Challenge and Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; Carritt, K; Lane, J; Jayappa, H; Stahl, M; Bourgeois, M

    2015-07-01

    Four vaccines for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are available in the United States. This study's purpose was to compare the efficacy of Nobivac feline 2-FeLV (an inactivated, adjuvanted whole-virus vaccine) and PureVax recombinant FeLV (a live, canarypox virus-vectored vaccine) following FeLV challenge. Cats were vaccinated at 9 and 12 weeks with Nobivac feline 2-FeLV (group A, n = 11) or PureVax recombinant FeLV (group B, n = 10). Group C (n = 11) comprised unvaccinated controls. At 3 months postvaccination, cats were immunosuppressed and challenged with FeLV-A/61E. The outcomes measured were persistent antigenemia at 12 weeks postchallenge (PC) and proviral DNA and viral RNA at 3 to 9 weeks PC. Persistent antigenemia was observed in 0 of 11 cats in group A, 5 of 10 cats in group B, and 10 of 11 cats in group C. Group A was significantly protected compared to those in groups B (P < 0.013) and C (P < 0.0001). No difference was found between groups B and C (P > 0.063). The preventable fraction was 100% for group A and 45% for group B. At 9 weeks PC, proviral DNA and viral RNA were detected 1 of 11 cats in group A, 6 of 10 cats in group B, and 9 of 11 cats in group C. Nucleic acid loads were significantly lower in group A than in group C (P < 0.01). Group A had significantly lower proviral DNA loads than group B at weeks 6 to 9 (P < 0.02). The viral RNA loads were significantly lower in group A than in group B at weeks 7 to 9 (P < 0.01). The results demonstrate that Nobivac feline 2-FeLV-vaccinated cats were fully protected against persistent antigenemia and had significantly smaller amounts of proviral DNA and plasma viral RNA loads than PureVax recombinant FeLV-vaccinated cats and unvaccinated controls. Copyright © 2015, Patel et al.

  10. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C phenotype evolves through distinct alterations near the N terminus of the envelope surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Brojatsch, J; Kristal, B S; Viglianti, G A; Khiroya, R; Hoover, E A; Mullins, J I

    1992-01-01

    Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) belonging to the C subgroup induce aplastic anemia in domestic cats and have the ability, unique among FeLV strains, to proliferate in guinea pig fibroblasts in tissue culture. Previous studies have shown that the pathogenic and host range specificity of a prototype molecular clone of FeLV-C [FeLV-Sarma-C (FSC)] colocalize to a region encoding the 3' 73 amino acids of the pol gene product and the N-terminal 241 amino acids of the envelope surface glycoprotein named SU. Here, we amplified, via PCR, cloned, and sequenced the SU coding sequence from three additional anemia-inducing subgroup C FeLV isolates. Chimeric viruses were constructed by replacement of fragments of FeLV-C envelope genes into the FeLV-A prototype virus 61E. Using a modified vesicular stomatitis virus-FeLV pseudotype assay, we demonstrated that the subgroup C receptor specificity for each virus was determined by changes within the N-terminal 87-92 amino acids of SU, in which most changes occurred within the 15- to 20-amino-acid first variable region (V1). Determinants for growth in guinea pig cells colocalized to this region. Despite the consistent localization of biological determinants, the only consistent features that distinguished the deduced FeLV-A and FeLV-C proteins was one lysine-to-arginine change and a structural prediction of an alpha-helix in FeLV-A proteins versus random coil in FeLV-C proteins within V1. However, arginine in equilibrium with lysine substitutions were not sufficient to convert the subgroup A virus to the subgroup C phenotype or vice versa. Thus, certain distinct structural changes within the N-terminal region of FeLV SU can result in convergent viral phenotypes. Images PMID:1326757

  11. Protection against feline leukemia virus infection by use of an inactivated virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hoover, E A; Perigo, N A; Quackenbush, S L; Mathiason-DuBard, C K; Overbaugh, J M; Kloetzer, W S; Elder, J H; Mullins, J I

    1991-11-15

    The protective immunity induced by 3 experimental FeLV vaccines were evaluated: Prototype inactivated FeLV vaccine developed from a molecularly cloned FeLV isolate (FeLV-FAIDS-61E-A); a mixture of immunodominant synthetic peptides corresponding to regions of the FeLV-Gardner-Arnstein-B (FeLV-GA-B) envelope proteins; and an adjuvant-disrupted but non-activated virus prepared from a non-cloned FeLV field isolate comprised of subgroup A and B viruses (FeLV-05821-AB). Included as controls were parallel groups of cats inoculated with adjuvants alone or with an established commercial FeLV vaccine. After each inoculation and after virulent virus challenge exposure, sera from all cats were assayed for ELISA-reactive antibody against purified FeLV, FeLV neutralizing (VN) antibody, and FeLV antigenemia/viremia--viral p27 antigen in serum and within circulating leukocytes. Immunity was challenged by oral/nasal exposure of vaccinated and control cats with FeLV-FAIDS-61E-A or FeLV-05821-AB, an infective, noncloned, tissue-origin, FeLV field isolate containing subgroup-A and -B viruses. Vaccine-induced immunity was assessed by comparing the postchallenge-exposure incidence of persistent viremia and the pre- and postchallenge exposure titers of VN and ELISA antibody in cats of the control and vaccine groups. The percentage of cats, that resisted development of persistent viremia after FeLV challenge exposure and the preventable fraction (PF) for the vaccine groups (which adjusts for the severity of the challenge and the degree of innate resistance in the controls) were as follows: adjuvant controls, 26%; FeLV-FAIDS-61E-A inactivated virus vaccine, 95% (PF = 93.2%); FeLV-GA-B peptide vaccine, 5% (-28.4%); FeLV-05821-AB noninactivated vaccine, 67% (55.4%); and commercial FeLV vaccine, 35% (12.2%). The prechallenge exposure mean VN antibody titer for each group was: less than 1:8 in the adjuvant controls; 1:43 in the FeLV-FAIDS-61E-A-vaccinated cats; less than 1:8 in the peptide

  12. Feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus infection in free-ranging guignas (Leopardus guigna) and sympatric domestic cats in human perturbed landscapes on Chiloé Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mónica; Napolitano, Constanza; Ortega, René; Poulin, Elie; Pizarro-Lucero, José

    2015-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are two of the most common viruses affecting domestic cats (Felis catus). During the last two decades, reports show that both viruses also infect or affect other species of the family Felidae. Human landscape perturbation is one of the main causes of emerging diseases in wild animals, facilitating contact and transmission of pathogens between domestic and wild animals. We investigated FIV and FeLV infection in free-ranging guignas (Leopardus guigna) and sympatric domestic cats in human perturbed landscapes on Chiloé Island, Chile. Samples from 78 domestic cats and 15 guignas were collected from 2008 to 2010 and analyzed by PCR amplification and sequencing. Two guignas and two domestic cats were positive for FIV; three guignas and 26 domestic cats were positive for FeLV. The high percentage of nucleotide identity of FIV and FeLV sequences from both species suggests possible interspecies transmission of viruses, facilitated by increased contact probability through human invasion into natural habitats, fragmentation of guigna habitat, and poultry attacks by guignas. This study enhances our knowledge on the transmission of pathogens from domestic to wild animals in the global scenario of human landscape perturbation and emerging diseases.

  13. Analytical validation of a reference laboratory ELISA for the detection of feline leukemia virus p27 antigen.

    PubMed

    Buch, Jesse S; Clark, Genevieve H; Cahill, Roberta; Thatcher, Brendon; Smith, Peter; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy; Leutenegger, Christian M; O'Connor, Thomas P; Beall, Melissa J

    2017-09-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is an oncogenic retrovirus of cats. Immunoassays for the p27 core protein of FeLV aid in the detection of FeLV infections. Commercial microtiter-plate ELISAs have rapid protocols and visual result interpretation, limiting their usefulness in high-throughput situations. The purpose of our study was to validate the PetChek FeLV 15 ELISA, which is designed for the reference laboratory, and incorporates sequential, orthogonal screening and confirmatory protocols. A cutoff for the screening assay was established with 100% accuracy using 309 feline samples (244 negative, 65 positive) defined by the combined results of FeLV PCR and an independent reference p27 antigen ELISA. Precision of the screening assay was measured using a panel of 3 samples (negative, low-positive, and high-positive). The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was 3.9-7.9%; the inter-assay CV was 6.0-8.6%. For the confirmatory assay, the intra-assay CV was 3.0-4.7%, and the inter-assay CV was 7.4-9.7%. The analytical sensitivity for p27 antigen was 3.7 ng/mL for inactivated whole FeLV and 1.2 ng/mL for purified recombinant FeLV p27. Analytical specificity was demonstrated based on the absence of cross-reactivity to related retroviruses. No interference was observed for samples containing added bilirubin, hemoglobin, or lipids. Based on these results, the new high-throughput design of the PetChek FeLV 15 ELISA makes it suitable for use in reference laboratory settings and maintains overall analytical performance.

  14. Presence of a Shared 5'-Leader Sequence in Ancestral Human and Mammalian Retroviruses and Its Transduction into Feline Leukemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Junna; Kawamura, Maki; Ohsato, Yoshiharu; Ito, Jumpei; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2017-10-15

    Recombination events induce significant genetic changes, and this process can result in virus genetic diversity or in the generation of novel pathogenicity. We discovered a new recombinant feline leukemia virus (FeLV) gag gene harboring an unrelated insertion, termed the X region, which was derived from Felis catus endogenous gammaretrovirus 4 (FcERV-gamma4). The identified FcERV-gamma4 proviruses have lost their coding capabilities, but some can express their viral RNA in feline tissues. Although the X-region-carrying recombinant FeLVs appeared to be replication-defective viruses, they were detected in 6.4% of tested FeLV-infected cats. All isolated recombinant FeLV clones commonly incorporated a middle part of the FcERV-gamma4 5'-leader region as an X region. Surprisingly, a sequence corresponding to the portion contained in all X regions is also present in at least 13 endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) observed in the cat, human, primate, and pig genomes. We termed this shared genetic feature the commonly shared (CS) sequence. Despite our phylogenetic analysis indicating that all CS-sequence-carrying ERVs are classified as gammaretroviruses, no obvious closeness was revealed among these ERVs. However, the Shannon entropy in the CS sequence was lower than that in other parts of the provirus genome. Notably, the CS sequence of human endogenous retrovirus T had 73.8% similarity with that of FcERV-gamma4, and specific signals were detected in the human genome by Southern blot analysis using a probe for the FcERV-gamma4 CS sequence. Our results provide an interesting evolutionary history for CS-sequence circulation among several distinct ancestral viruses and a novel recombined virus over a prolonged period.IMPORTANCE Recombination among ERVs or modern viral genomes causes a rapid evolution of retroviruses, and this phenomenon can result in the serious situation of viral disease reemergence. We identified a novel recombinant FeLV gag gene that contains an unrelated

  15. Development and application of a quantitative real-time PCR assay to detect feline leukemia virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Torres, Andrea N; O'Halloran, Kevin P; Larson, Laurie J; Schultz, Ronald D; Hoover, Edward A

    2008-05-15

    We previously defined four categories of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection, designated as abortive, regressive, latent, and progressive. To determine if detectable viral DNA is transcriptionally active in the absence of antigenemia, we developed and validated a real-time viral RNA qPCR assay. This assay proved to be highly sensitive, specific, reproducible, and allowed reliable quantitation. We then applied this methodology, together with real-time DNA qPCR and p27 capsid antigen capture ELISA, to examine cats challenged with FeLV. We found that circulating viral RNA and DNA levels were highly correlated and the assays were almost in perfect agreement. This indicates that the vast majority of viral DNA is transcriptionally active, even in the absence of antigenemia. The real-time qPCR assays are more sensitive than the most commonly used FeLV diagnostic assay, the p27 capsid antigen capture ELISA. Application of qPCR assays may add greater depth in understanding of FeLV-host relationships.

  16. Flow cytometric and radioisotopic determinations of platelet survival time in normal cats and feline leukemia virus-infected cats

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.M.; Boyce, J.T.; Kociba, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of a flow cytometric technique to measure platelet survival time in cats utilizing autologous platelets labeled in vitro with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). When compared with a 51Cr method, no significant differences in estimated survival times were found. Both the 51Cr and FITC-labeling procedures induced similar changes in platelet shape and collagen-induced aggregation. Platelets labeled with FITC had significantly greater volumes compared with those of glutaraldehyde-fixed platelets. These changes were primarily related to the platelet centrifugation and washing procedures rather than the labels themselves. This novel technique potentially has wide applicability to cell circulation time studies as flow cytometry equipment becomes more readily available. Problems with the technique are discussed. In a preliminary study of the platelet survival time in feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-infected cats, two of three cats had significantly reduced survival times using both flow cytometric and radioisotopic methods. These data suggest increased platelet turnover in FeLV-infected cats.

  17. Feline leukemia virus integrase and capsid packaging functions do not change the insertion profile of standard Moloney retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Métais, J-Y; Topp, S; Doty, R T; Borate, B; Nguyen, A-D; Wolfsberg, T G; Abkowitz, J L; Dunbar, C E

    2010-06-01

    Adverse events linked to perturbations of cellular genes by vector insertion reported in gene therapy trials and animal models have prompted attempts to better understand the mechanisms directing viral vector integration. The integration profiles of vectors based on MLV, ASLV, SIV and HIV have all been shown to be non-random, and novel vectors with a safer integration pattern have been sought. Recently, we developed a producer cell line called CatPac that packages standard MoMLV vectors with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) gag, pol and env gene products. We now report the integration profile of this vector, asking if the FeLV integrase and capsid proteins could modify the MoMLV integration profile, potentially resulting in a less genotoxic pattern. We transduced rhesus macaque CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells with CatPac or standard MoMLV vectors, and determined their integration profile by LAM-PCR. We obtained 184 and 175 unique integration sites (ISs) respectively for CatPac and standard MoMLV vectors, and these were compared with 10 000 in silico-generated random IS. The integration profile for CatPac vector was similar to MoMLV and equally non-random, with a propensity for integration near transcription start sites and in highly dense gene regions. We found an IS for CatPac vector localized 715 nucleotides upstream of LMO-2, the gene involved in the acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed by X-SCID patients treated by gene therapy using MoMLV vectors. In conclusion, we found that replacement of MoMLV env, gag and pol gene products with FeLV did not alter the basic integration profile. Thus, there appears to be no safety advantage for this packaging system. However, considering the stability and efficacy of CatPac vectors, further development is warranted, using potentially safer vector backbones, for instance those with a SIN configuration.

  18. Genetic determinants of feline leukemia virus-induced lymphoid tumors: patterns of proviral insertion and gene rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tsatsanis, C; Fulton, R; Nishigaki, K; Tsujimoto, H; Levy, L; Terry, A; Spandidos, D; Onions, D; Neil, J C

    1994-12-01

    The genetic basis of feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-induced lymphoma was investigated in a series of 63 lymphoid tumors and tumor cell lines of presumptive T-cell origin. These were examined for virus-induced rearrangements of the c-myc, flvi-2 (bmi-1), fit-1, and pim-1 loci, for T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements, and for the presence of env recombinant FeLV (FeLV-B). The myc locus was most frequently affected in naturally occurring lymphomas (32%; n = 38) either by transduction (21%) or by proviral insertion (11%). Proviral insertions were also common at flvi-2 (24%). The two other loci were occupied in a smaller number of the naturally occurring tumors (fit-1, 8%; pim-1, 5%). Examination of the entire set of tumors showed that significant numbers were affected at two (19%) or three (5%) of the loci. Occupation of the fit-1 locus was observed most frequently in tumors induced by FeLV-myc strains, while flvi-2 insertions occurred with similar frequency in the presence or absence of obvious c-myc activation. These results suggest a hierarchy of mutational events in the genesis of feline T-cell lymphomas by FeLV and implicate insertion at fit-1 as a late progression step. The strongest links observed were with T-cell development, as monitored by rearrangement status of the TCR beta-chain gene, which was positively associated with activation of myc (P < 0.001), and with proviral insertion at flvi-2 (P = 0.02). This analysis also revealed a genetically distinct subset of thymic lymphomas with unrearranged TCR beta-chain genes in which the known target loci were involved very infrequently. The presence of env recombinant FeLV (FeLV-B) showed a negative correlation with proviral insertion at fit-1, possibly due to the rapid onset of these tumors. These results shed further light on the multistep process of FeLV leukemogenesis and the relationships between lymphoid cell maturation and susceptibility to FeLV transformation.

  19. Use of a subunit feline leukemia virus vaccine in exotic cats.

    PubMed

    Citino, S B

    1988-04-01

    Three adult bengal tigers, 2 immature white tigers, and 3 adult servals were vaccinated IM with three 1-ml doses of a subunit FeLV vaccine with dosage interval guidelines of the manufacturer. All cats had increased antibody titers to FeLV gp 70 capsular antigen and feline oncornavirus cell membrane-associated antigen during the vaccination trial. Three weeks after the third vaccination, 7 of the 8 cats had gp70 antibody titers greater than 0.2 (optical density), and all 8 cats had feline oncornavirus cell membrane-associated antigen antibody titers greater than 1:8.

  20. Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia in cats infected with feline leukemia virus clone33 containing a unique long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Hisasue, Masaharu; Nagashima, Naho; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Fukuzawa, Isao; Ura, Shigeyoshi; Katae, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Ryo; Yamada, Takatsugu; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2009-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) clone33 was obtained from a domestic cat with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The long terminal repeat (LTR) of this virus, like the LTRs present in FeLV from other cats with AML, differs from the LTRs of other known FeLV in that it has 3 tandem direct 47-bp repeats in the upstream region of the enhancer (URE). Here, we injected cats with FeLV clone33 and found 41% developed myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias and dysplastic changes in the bone marrow. Some of the cats with MDS eventually developed AML. The bone marrow of the majority of cats with FeLV clone33 induced MDS produced fewer erythroid and myeloid colonies upon being cultured with erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-SCF) than bone marrow from normal control cats. Furthermore, the bone marrow of some of the cats expressed high-levels of the apoptosis-related genes TNF-alpha and survivin. Analysis of the proviral sequences obtained from 13 cats with naturally occurring MDS reveal they also bear the characteristic URE repeats seen in the LTR of FeLV clone33 and other proviruses from cats with AML. Deletions and mutations within the enhancer elements are frequently observed in naturally occurring MDS as well as AML. These results suggest that FeLV variants that bear URE repeats in their LTR strongly associate with the induction of both MDS and AML in cats.

  1. Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections in stray and pet cats (Felis catus) in northwest China: co-infections and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wei; Meng, Qing-Feng; Blaga, Radu; Villena, Isabelle; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections among stray and pet cats in Lanzhou, northwest China, and to identify the influence of age, gender, and regions on seropositivity. T. gondii antibodies were examined in cat sera by the modified agglutination test (MAT). The circulating antigens of D. immitis and FeLV and specific antibodies to FIV were examined using kits commercially available. The overall prevalence of T. gondii, FIV, FeLV, and D. immitis was 19.34, 9.12, 11.33, and 3.04 %, respectively. For the genetic characterization of T. gondii genotypes in cats, genomic DNA was extracted from the seropositive cats and the T. gondii B1 gene was amplified using a semi-nested PCR. DNA samples giving positive B1 amplification were then genotyped using multilocus PCR-RFLP. Two T. gondii genotypes (ToxoDB#9 and ToxoDB#1) were identified. Results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that older cats are more likely to be seropositive than juveniles for T. gondii, FIV, FeLV, and D. immitis. This is the first report of T. gondii genotypes in cats in northwest China. Moreover, the present study is the first study of retrovirus and D. immitis seroprevalence in cats in China. The results revealed that T. gondii, FIV, and FeLV infections are common in stray and pet cats in northwest China.

  2. Recombination between feline leukemia virus subgroup B or C and endogenous env elements alters the in vitro biological activities of the viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, R; Ghosh, A K; Kumar, D V; Bachman, B A; Shibata, D; Roy-Burman, P

    1991-01-01

    An important question in feline leukemia virus (FeLV) pathogenesis is whether, as in murine leukemia virus infection, homologous recombination between the infecting FeLV and the noninfectious endogenous FeLV-like proviruses serves as a significant base for the generation of proximal pathogens. To begin an analysis of this issue, several recombinant FeLVs were produced by using two different approaches: (i) the regions of the viral envelope (env) gene of a cloned FeLV (subgroup B virus [FeLV-B], Gardner-Arnstein strain) and those of two different endogenous proviral loci were exchanged to create specific FeLV chimeras, and (ii) vectors containing endogenous env and molecularly cloned infectious FeLV-C (Sarma strain) DNA sequences were coexpressed by transfection in nonfeline cells to facilitate recombination. The results of these combined approaches showed that up to three-fourths of the envelope glycoprotein (gp70), beginning from the N-terminal end, could be replaced by endogenous FeLV sequences to produce biologically active chimeric FeLVs. The in vitro replication efficiency or cell tropism of the recombinants appeared to be influenced by the amount of gp70 sequences replaced by the endogenous partner as well as by the locus of origin of the endogenous sequences. Additionally, a characteristic biological effect, aggregation of feline T-lymphoma cells (3201B cell line), was found to be specifically induced by replicating FeLV-C or FeLV-C-based recombinants. Multiple crossover sites in the gp70 protein selected under the conditions used for coexpression were identified. The results of induced coexpression were also supported by rapid generation of FeLV recombinants when FeLV-C was used to infect the feline 3201B cell line that constitutively expresses high levels of endogenous FeLV-specific mRNAs. Furthermore, a large, highly conserved open reading frame in the pol gene of an endogenous FeLV provirus was identified. This observation, particularly in reference to

  3. Establishment of a novel feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-negative B-cell cell line from a cat with B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Ide, Tetsuya; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Watanabe, Shinya; Sato, Hirofumi; Sato, Masahiko; Kotera, Yukiko; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2011-04-15

    We established a novel feline B-cell line, MS4, from the neoplastic pleural effusion of a cat with cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Immunophenotype staining of the MS4 cells was positive for CD20, CD79α, and IgA and negative for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8α, CD18, CD21, CD22, IgM, IgG, Ig light chain, and MHC class II. PCR analysis for immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements revealed a monoclonal rearrangement, whereas no clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor γ gene was detected. Southern blotting with an exogenous feline leukemia virus (FeLV) U3 probe revealed no integration of exogenous FeLV provirus. The MS4 cell line is the first FeLV-negative feline B-cell lymphoma cell line, and may be used to investigate the pathogenesis of spontaneously occurring feline lymphoma and the development of new therapies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tax1-expressing feline 8C cells are useful to monitor the life cycle of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takahisa; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Shinagawa, Masahiko; Tokizawa, Shigemi; Akagi, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2012-03-01

    Extremely low infectivity has hampered direct (cell-free) infection studies of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). In order to break through this barrier, we examined the susceptibility of many kinds of cells to HTLV-I and found a feline kidney cell line, 8C, that is highly susceptible to HTLV-I and produced remarkable amounts of infectious progeny viruses. Tax1 protein encoded by HTLV-I is known as a transcription activator for viral and cellular genes. We found that the 8C cells expressing the Tax1 protein (8C/TaxWT cells) can produce more progeny viruses than 8C cells when the cells were exposed to cell-free HTLV-I. A large number of syncytia were also induced in these cells. Here, we propose 8C/TaxWT cells as a useful tool to study the cell-free HTLV-I infection.

  5. Studies of the effect of acemannan on retrovirus infections: clinical stabilization of feline leukemia virus-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Sheets, M A; Unger, B A; Giggleman, G F; Tizard, I R

    1991-03-01

    Feline leukemia is a disease induced by an oncornavirus infection that inevitably causes clinically affected cats to die. It has been estimated that 40% of cats are dead within 4 weeks and 70% within 8 weeks of the onset of clinical symptoms. Acemannan is a complex carbohydrate with both immunostimulatory and direct antiviral properties. Administration of acemannan for 6 weeks intraperitoneally to clinically symptomatic cats significantly improved both the quality of life and the survival rate. Twelve weeks after initiation of treatment, 71% of treated cats were alive and in good health.

  6. Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the APOBEC3H gene of domestic cats (Felis catus) and their association with the susceptibility to feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus infections.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Fernanda Luz; Junqueira, Dennis Maletich; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; da Silva, Tailene Rabello; Costenaro, Jamile Girardi; Knak, Marcus Braga; de Matos Almeida, Sabrina Esteves; Campos, Fabrício Souza; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2014-10-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are widely distributed retroviruses that infect domestic cats (Felis catus). Restriction factors are proteins that have the ability to hamper retroviruses' replication and are part of the conserved mechanisms of anti-viral immunity of mammals. The APOBEC3 protein family is the most studied class of restriction factors; they are cytidine deaminases that generate hypermutations in provirus DNA during reverse transcription, thus causing hypermutations in the viral genome, hindering virus replication. One of the feline APOBEC3 genes, named APOBEC3H, encodes two proteins (APOBEC3H and APOBEC3CH). In other mammals, APOBEC3H single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can alter the stability and cellular localization of the encoded protein, thus influencing its subcellular localization and reducing its anti-viral effect. In cats, the association of APOBEC3H SNPs with susceptibility to retroviral infections was not yet demonstrated. Therefore, this study aimed the investigation on the variability of APOBEC3H and the possible association with FIV/FeLV infections. DNA obtained from whole blood of fifty FIV- and/or FeLV-infected cats and fifty-nine FIV- and/or FeLV-uninfected cats were used as templates to amplify two different regions of the APOBEC3H, with subsequent sequencing and analysis. The first region was highly conserved among all samples, while in the second, six single-nucleotide variation points were identified. One of the SNPs, A65S (A65I), was significantly correlated with the susceptibility to FIV and/or FeLV infections. On the other hand, the haplotype analysis showed that the combination "GGGGCC" was positively correlated with the lack of FIV and/or FeLV infections. Our results indicate that, as previously shown in other mammals, variability of restriction factors may contribute to susceptibility of domestic cats to retroviral infections; however, these results should be confirmed by more

  7. Prevalence of antibodies to feline parvovirus, calicivirus, herpesvirus, coronavirus, and immunodeficiency virus and of feline leukemia virus antigen and the interrelationship of these viral infections in free-ranging lions in east Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Fehr, D; Grob, M; Elgizoli, M; Packer, C; Martenson, J S; O'Brien, S J; Lutz, H

    1996-01-01

    While viral infections and their impact are well studied in domestic cats, only limited information is available on their occurrence in free-ranging lions. The goals of the present study were (i) to investigate the prevalence of antibodies to feline calicivirus (FCV), herpesvirus (FHV), coronavirus (FCoV), parvovirus (FPV), and immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen in 311 serum samples collected between 1984 and 1991 from lions inhabiting Tanzania's national parks and (ii) to evaluate the possible biological importance and the interrelationship of these viral infections. Antibodies to FCV, never reported previously in free-ranging lions, were detected in 70% of the sera. In addition, a much higher prevalence of antibodies to FCoV (57%) was found than was previously reported in Etosha National Park and Kruger National Park. Titers ranged from 25 to 400. FeLV antigen was not detectable in any of the serum samples. FCoV, FCV, FHV, and FIV were endemic in the Serengeti, while a transient elevation of FPV titers pointed to an outbreak of FPV infection between 1985 and 1987. Antibody titers to FPV and FCV were highly prevalent in the Serengeti (FPV, 75%; FCV, 67%) but not in Ngorongoro Crater (FPV, 27%; FCV, 2%). These differences could be explained by the different habitats and biological histories of the two populations and by the well-documented absence of immigration of lions from the Serengeti plains into Ngorongoro Crater after 1965. These observations indicate that, although the pathological potential of these viral infections seemed not to be very high in free-ranging lions, relocation of seropositive animals by humans to seronegative lion populations must be considered very carefully. PMID:8877134

  8. A Targeted Mutation within the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) Envelope Protein Immunosuppressive Domain To Improve a Canarypox Virus-Vectored FeLV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Mangeney, Marianne; El-Garch, Hanane; Lacombe, Valérie; Poulet, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    We previously delineated a highly conserved immunosuppressive (IS) domain within murine and primate retroviral envelope proteins that is critical for virus propagation in vivo. The envelope-mediated immunosuppression was assessed by the ability of the proteins, when expressed by allogeneic tumor cells normally rejected by engrafted mice, to allow these cells to escape, at least transiently, immune rejection. Using this approach, we identified key residues whose mutation (i) specifically abolishes immunosuppressive activity without affecting the “mechanical” function of the envelope protein and (ii) significantly enhances humoral and cellular immune responses elicited against the virus. The objective of this work was to study the immunosuppressive activity of the envelope protein (p15E) of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and evaluate the effect of its abolition on the efficacy of a vaccine against FeLV. Here we demonstrate that the FeLV envelope protein is immunosuppressive in vivo and that this immunosuppressive activity can be “switched off” by targeted mutation of a specific amino acid. As a result of the introduction of the mutated envelope sequence into a previously well characterized canarypox virus-vectored vaccine (ALVAC-FeLV), the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells was increased, whereas conversely, the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing cells was reduced. This shift in the IFN-γ/IL-10 response was associated with a higher efficacy of ALVAC-FeLV against FeLV infection. This study demonstrates that FeLV p15E is immunosuppressive in vivo, that the immunosuppressive domain of p15E can modulate the FeLV-specific immune response, and that the efficacy of FeLV vaccines can be enhanced by inhibiting the immunosuppressive activity of the IS domain through an appropriate mutation. PMID:24198407

  9. A targeted mutation within the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) envelope protein immunosuppressive domain to improve a canarypox virus-vectored FeLV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Mangeney, Marianne; El-Garch, Hanane; Lacombe, Valérie; Poulet, Hervé; Heidmann, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    We previously delineated a highly conserved immunosuppressive (IS) domain within murine and primate retroviral envelope proteins that is critical for virus propagation in vivo. The envelope-mediated immunosuppression was assessed by the ability of the proteins, when expressed by allogeneic tumor cells normally rejected by engrafted mice, to allow these cells to escape, at least transiently, immune rejection. Using this approach, we identified key residues whose mutation (i) specifically abolishes immunosuppressive activity without affecting the "mechanical" function of the envelope protein and (ii) significantly enhances humoral and cellular immune responses elicited against the virus. The objective of this work was to study the immunosuppressive activity of the envelope protein (p15E) of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and evaluate the effect of its abolition on the efficacy of a vaccine against FeLV. Here we demonstrate that the FeLV envelope protein is immunosuppressive in vivo and that this immunosuppressive activity can be "switched off" by targeted mutation of a specific amino acid. As a result of the introduction of the mutated envelope sequence into a previously well characterized canarypox virus-vectored vaccine (ALVAC-FeLV), the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells was increased, whereas conversely, the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing cells was reduced. This shift in the IFN-γ/IL-10 response was associated with a higher efficacy of ALVAC-FeLV against FeLV infection. This study demonstrates that FeLV p15E is immunosuppressive in vivo, that the immunosuppressive domain of p15E can modulate the FeLV-specific immune response, and that the efficacy of FeLV vaccines can be enhanced by inhibiting the immunosuppressive activity of the IS domain through an appropriate mutation.

  10. Nucleotide Sequence of the Envelope Gene of Gardner-Arnstein Feline Leukemia Virus B Reveals Unique Sequence Homologies with a Murine Mink Cell Focus-Forming Virus

    PubMed Central

    Elder, John H.; Mullins, James I.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene and the adjacent 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) of Gardner-Arnstein feline leukemia virus of subgroup B (GA-FeLV-B) has been determined. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of the gp70-p15E polyprotein to those of several previously reported murine retroviruses revealed striking homologies between GA-FeLV-B gp70 and the gp70 of a Moloney virus-derived mink cell focus-forming virus. These homologies were located within the substituted (presumably xenotropic) portion of the mink cell focus-forming virus envelope gene and comprised amino acid sequences not present in three ecotropic virus gp70s. In addition, areas of insertions and deletions, in general, were the same between GA-FeLV-B and Moloney mink cell focus-forming virus, although the sizes of the insertions and deletions differed. Homologies between GA-FeLV-B and mink cell focus-forming virus gp70s is functionally significant in that they both possess expanded host ranges, a property dictated by gp70. The amino acid sequence of FeLV-B contains 12 Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences, indicating 12 possible sites of N-linked glycosylation as compared with 7 or 8 for its murine counterparts. Comparison of the 3′ LTR of GA-FeLV-B to AKR and Moloney virus LTRs revealed extensive conservation in several regions including the “CCAAT” and Goldberg-Hogness (TATA) boxes thought to be involved in promotion of transcription and in the repeat region of the LTR. The inverted repeats that flanked the LTR of GA-FeLV-B were identical to the murine inverted repeats, but were one base longer than the latter. The region of U3 corresponding to the approximately 75-nucleotide “enhancer sequence” is present in GA-FeLV-B, but contains deletions relative to AKR and Moloney virus and is not repeated. An interesting pallindrome in the repeat region immediately 3′ to the U3 region was noted in all the LTRs, but was particularly pronounced in GA-FeLV-B. Possible roles for this

  11. Cellular and species resistance to murine amphotropic, gibbon ape, and feline subgroup C leukemia viruses is strongly influenced by receptor expression levels and by receptor masking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tailor, C S; Nouri, A; Kabat, D

    2000-10-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are resistant to infections by gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV) unless they are pretreated with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. These viruses use the related sodium-phosphate symporters Pit1 and Pit2, respectively, as receptors in nonhamster cells, and evidence has suggested that the corresponding transporters of CHO cells may be masked by tunicamycin-sensitive secreted inhibitors. Although the E36 line of Chinese hamster cells was reported to secrete the putative Pit2 inhibitor and to be sensitive to the inhibitory CHO factors, E36 cells are highly susceptible to both GALV and A-MLV in the absence of tunicamycin. Moreover, expression of E36 Pit2 in CHO cells conferred tunicamycin-independent susceptibilities to both viruses. Based on the latter results, it was suggested that E36 Pit2 must functionally differ from the endogenous Pit2 of CHO cells. To test these ideas, we analyzed the receptor properties of CHO Pit1 and Pit2 in CHO cells. Surprisingly, and counterintuitively, transfection of a CHO Pit2 expression vector into CHO cells conferred strong susceptibility to both GALV and A-MLV, and similar overexpression of CHO Pit1 conferred susceptibility to GALV. Thus, CHO Pit2 is a promiscuous functional receptor for both viruses, and CHO Pit1 is a functional receptor for GALV. Similarly, we found that the natural resistance of Mus dunni tail fibroblasts to subgroup C feline leukemia viruses (FeLV-C) was eliminated simply by overexpression of the endogenous FeLV-C receptor homologue. These results demonstrate a novel and simple method to unmask latent retroviral receptor activities that occur in some cells. Specifically, resistances to retroviruses that are caused by subthreshold levels of receptor expression or by stoichiometrically limited masking or interference mechanisms can be efficiently overcome simply by overexpressing the endogenous receptors in the same

  12. Feline immunodeficiency virus latency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite highly effective anti-retroviral therapy, HIV is thought to persist in patients within long-lived cellular reservoirs in the form of a transcriptionally inactive (latent) integrated provirus. Lentiviral latency has therefore come to the forefront of the discussion on the possibility of a cure for HIV infection in humans. Animal models of lentiviral latency provide an essential tool to study mechanisms of latency and therapeutic manipulation. Of the three animal models that have been described, the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cat is the most recent and least characterized. However, several aspects of this model make it attractive for latency research, and it may be complementary to other model systems. This article reviews what is known about FIV latency and chronic FIV infection and how it compares with that of other lentiviruses. It thereby offers a framework for the usefulness of this model in future research aimed at lentiviral eradication. PMID:23829177

  13. Feline leukemia virus outbreak in the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus): high-throughput sequencing of envelope variable region A and experimental transmission.

    PubMed

    Geret, C P; Cattori, V; Meli, M L; Riond, B; Martínez, F; López, G; Vargas, A; Simón, M A; López-Bao, J V; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H

    2011-05-01

    The Iberian lynx is the most endangered felid species. During winter/spring 2006/7, a feline leukemia virus (FeLV) outbreak of unexpected virulence killed about 2/3 of the infected Iberian lynxes. All FeLV-positive animals were co-infected with feline hemoplasmas. To further characterize the Iberian lynx FeLV strain and evaluate its potential virulence, the FeLV envelope gene variable region A (VRA) mutant spectrum was analyzed using the Roche 454 sequencing technology, and an in vivo transmission study of lynx blood to specified-pathogen-free cats was performed. VRA mutations indicated weak apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme and catalytic polypeptide-like cytidine deaminase (APOBEC) restriction of FeLV replication, and variants characteristic of aggressive FeLV strains, such as FeLV-C or FeLV-A/61C, were not detected. Cats exposed to FeLV/Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum-positive lynx blood did not show a particularly severe outcome of infection. The results underscore the special susceptibility of Iberian lynxes to infectious diseases.

  14. Mutations within a putative cysteine loop of the transmembrane protein of an attenuated immunodeficiency-inducing feline leukemia virus variant inhibit envelope protein processing.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, C C; Poss, M L; Thomas, E; Overbaugh, J

    1995-01-01

    A replication-defective feline leukemia virus molecular clone, 61B, has been shown to cause immunodeficiency in cats and cytopathicity in T cells after a long latency period when coinfected with a minimally pathogenic helper virus (J. Overbaugh, E. A. Hoover, J. I. Mullins, D. P. W. Burns, L. Rudensey, S. L. Quackenbush, V. Stallard, and P. R. Donahue, Virology 188:558-569, 1992). The long-latency phenotype of 61B has been mapped to four mutations in the extracellular domain of the envelope transmembrane protein, and we report here that these mutations cause a defect in envelope protein processing. Immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that the 61B gp85 envelope precursor was produced but that further processing to generate the surface protein (SU/gp70) and the transmembrane protein (TM/p15E) did not occur. The 61B precursor was not expressed on the cell surface and appeared to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus. Two of the four 61B-specific amino acid changes are located within a putative cysteine loop in a region of TM that is conserved among retroviruses. Introduction of these two amino acid changes into a replication-competent highly cytopathic virus resulted in the production of noninfectious virus that exhibited an envelope-protein-processing defect. This analysis suggests that mutations in a conserved region within a putative cysteine loop affect retroviral envelope protein maturation and viral infectivity. PMID:7884859

  15. Substitution of Feline Leukemia Virus Long Terminal Repeat Sequences into Murine Leukemia Virus Alters the Pattern of Insertional Activation and Identifies New Common Insertion Sites

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chassidy; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia A.; Puetter, Adriane; Levy, Laura S.

    2005-01-01

    The recombinant retrovirus, MoFe2-MuLV (MoFe2), was constructed by replacing the U3 region of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) with homologous sequences from the FeLV-945 LTR. NIH/Swiss mice neonatally inoculated with MoFe2 developed T-cell lymphomas of immature thymocyte surface phenotype. MoFe2 integrated infrequently (0 to 9%) near common insertion sites (CISs) previously identified for either parent virus. Using three different strategies, CISs in MoFe2-induced tumors were identified at six loci, none of which had been previously reported as CISs in tumors induced by either parent virus in wild-type animals. Two of the newly identified CISs had not previously been implicated in lymphoma in any retrovirus model. One of these, designated 3-19, encodes the p101 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase-gamma. The other, designated Rw1, is predicted to encode a protein that functions in the immune response to virus infection. Thus, substitution of FeLV-945 U3 sequences into the M-MuLV long terminal repeat (LTR) did not alter the target tissue for M-MuLV transformation but significantly altered the pattern of CIS utilization in the induction of T-cell lymphoma. These observations support a growing body of evidence that the distinctive sequence and/or structure of the retroviral LTR determines its pattern of insertional activation. The findings also demonstrate the oligoclonal nature of retrovirus-induced lymphomas by demonstrating proviral insertions at CISs in subdominant populations in the tumor mass. Finally, the findings demonstrate the utility of novel recombinant retroviruses such as MoFe2 to contribute new genes potentially relevant to the induction of lymphoid malignancy. PMID:15596801

  16. The frequency of occurrence and nature of recombinant feline leukemia viruses in the induction of multicentric lymphoma by infection of the domestic cat with FeLV-945.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shamim; Levy, Laura S

    2010-08-01

    During feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection in the domestic cat, viruses with a novel envelope gene arise by recombination between endogenous FeLV-related elements and the exogenous infecting species. These recombinant viruses (FeLV-B) are of uncertain disease association, but have been linked to the induction of thymic lymphoma. To assess the role of FeLV-B in the induction of multicentric lymphoma and other non-T-cell disease, the frequency of occurrence and nature of FeLV-B were examined in diseased tissues from a large collection of FeLV-infected animals. Diseased tissues were examined by Southern blot and PCR amplification to detect the presence of FeLV-B. Further analysis was performed to establish the recombination junctions and infectivity of FeLV-B in diseased tissues. The results confirmed the frequent association of FeLV-B with thymic lymphoma but showed infrequent generation, low levels and lack of infectivity of FeLV-B in non-T-cell diseases including multicentric lymphoma.

  17. The C domain in the surface envelope glycoprotein of subgroup C feline leukemia virus is a second receptor-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rey, Michelle A; Prasad, Rati; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2008-01-20

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the surface (SU) subunit of gammaretrovirus envelope glycoprotein is critical for determining the host receptor specificity of the virus. This domain is separated from the carboxy terminal C domain (Cdom) of SU by a proline-rich region. In this study, we show that the Cdom region in the SU from subgroup C feline leukemia virus (FeLV-C) forms a second receptor-binding domain that is distinct from its RBD, and which can independently bind to its host receptor FLVCR1, in the absence of RBD. Furthermore, our results suggest that residues located in the C2 disulfide-bonded loop in FeLV-C Cdom are critical for SU binding to FLVCR1 and for virus infection. We propose that binding of FeLV-C SU to FLVCR1 involves interaction of two receptor-binding domains (RBD and Cdom) with FLVCR1, and that this mechanism of interaction is conserved for other gammaretroviruses. Our results could have important implications for designing gammaretrovirus vectors that can efficiently infect specific target cells.

  18. Ocelots on Barro Colorado Island Are Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus but Not Other Common Feline and Canine Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Samuel P.; Kays, Roland W.; Moreno, Ricardo; TerWee, Julie A.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Transmission of pathogens from domestic animals to wildlife populations (spill-over) has precipitated local wildlife extinctions in multiple geographic locations. Identifying such events before they cause population declines requires differentiating spillover from endemic disease, a challenge complicated by a lack of baseline data from wildlife populations that are isolated from domestic animals. We tested sera collected from 12 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) native to Barro Colorado Island, Panama, which is free of domestic animals, for antibodies to feline herpes virus, feline calicivirus, feline corona virus, feline panleukopenia virus, canine distemper virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), typically a species-specific infection. Samples also were tested for feline leukemia virus antigens. Positive tests results were only observed for FIV; 50% of the ocelots were positive. We hypothesize that isolation of this population has prevented introduction of pathogens typically attributed to contact with domestic animals. The high density of ocelots on Barro Colorado Island may contribute to a high prevalence of FIV infection, as would be expected with increased contact rates among conspecifics in a geographically restricted population. PMID:18689668

  19. Ocelots on Barro Colorado Island are infected with feline immunodeficiency virus but not other common feline and canine viruses.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Samuel P; Kays, Roland W; Moreno, Ricardo; TerWee, Julie A; Troyer, Jennifer L; VandeWoude, Sue

    2008-07-01

    Transmission of pathogens from domestic animals to wildlife populations (spill-over) has precipitated local wildlife extinctions in multiple geographic locations. Identifying such events before they cause population declines requires differentiating spillover from endemic disease, a challenge complicated by a lack of baseline data from wildlife populations that are isolated from domestic animals. We tested sera collected from 12 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) native to Barro Colorado Island, Panama, which is free of domestic animals, for antibodies to feline herpes virus, feline calicivirus, feline corona virus, feline panleukopenia virus, canine distemper virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), typically a species-specific infection. Samples also were tested for feline leukemia virus antigens. Positive tests results were only observed for FIV; 50% of the ocelots were positive. We hypothesize that isolation of this population has prevented introduction of pathogens typically attributed to contact with domestic animals. The high density of ocelots on Barro Colorado Island may contribute to a high prevalence of FIV infection, as would be expected with increased contact rates among conspecifics in a geographically restricted population.

  20. A soluble envelope protein of endogenous retrovirus (FeLIX) present in serum of domestic cats mediates infection of a pathogenic variant of feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Shojima, Takayuki; Fukui, Daisuke; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    T-lymphotropic feline leukemia virus (FeLV-T), a highly pathogenic variant of FeLV, induces severe immunosuppression in cats. FeLV-T is fusion defective because in its PHQ motif, a gammaretroviral consensus motif in the N terminus of an envelope protein, histidine is replaced with aspartate. Infection by FeLV-T requires FeLIX, a truncated envelope protein encoded by an endogenous FeLV, for transactivation of infectivity and Pit1 for binding FeLIX. Although Pit1 is present in most tissues in cats, the expression of FeLIX is limited to certain cells in lymphoid organs. Therefore, the host cell range of FeLV-T was thought to be restricted to cells expressing FeLIX. However, because FeLIX is a soluble factor and is expressed constitutively in lymphoid organs, we presumed it to be present in blood and evaluated its activities in sera of various mammalian species using a pseudotype assay. We demonstrated that cat serum has FeLIX activity at a functional level, suggesting that FeLIX is present in the blood and that FeLV-T may be able to infect cells expressing Pit1 regardless of the expression of FeLIX in vivo. In addition, FeLIX activities in sera were detected only in domestic cats and not in other feline species tested. To our knowledge, this is the first report to prove that a large amount of truncated envelope protein of endogenous retrovirus is circulating in the blood to facilitate the infection of a pathogenic exogenous retrovirus. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. Development of a multiplex amplification refractory mutation system reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the differential diagnosis of Feline leukemia virus vaccine and wild strains.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Fang; Chan, Kun-Wei; Yang, Wei-Cheng; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chung, Yang-Tsung; Kuo, James; Wang, Chi-Young

    2014-07-01

    A multiplex amplification refractory mutation system reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (ARMS RT-PCR) was developed for the differential diagnosis of Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) vaccine and wild-type strains based on a point mutation between the vaccine strain (S) and the wild-type strain (T) located in the p27 gene. This system was further upgraded to obtain a real-time ARMS RT-PCR (ARMS qRT-PCR) with a high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) platform. The genotyping of various strains of FeLV was determined by comparing the HRMA curves with the defined wild-type FeLV (strain TW1), and the results were expressed as a percentage confidence. The detection limits of ARMS RT-PCR and ARMS qRT-PCR combined with HRMA were 100 and 1 copies of transcribed FeLV RNA per 0.5 ml of sample, respectively. No false-positive results were obtained with 6 unrelated pathogens and 1 feline cell line. Twelve FeLV Taiwan strains were correctly identified using ARMS qRT-PCR combined with HRMA. The genotypes of the strains matched the defined FeLV wild-type strain genotype with at least 91.17% confidence. A higher degree of sequence polymorphism was found throughout the p27 gene compared with the long terminal repeat region. In conclusion, the current study describes the phylogenetic relationship of the FeLV Taiwan strains and demonstrates that the developed ARMS RT-PCR assay is able to be used to detect the replication of a vaccine strain that has not been properly inactivated, thus acting as a safety check for the quality of FeLV vaccines.

  2. Feline Tetherin Efficiently Restricts Release of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus but Not Spreading of Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Isabelle; McMonagle, Elizabeth L.; Petit, Sarah J.; Vijayakrishnan, Swetha; Logan, Nicola; Chan, Chi N.; Towers, Greg J.; Hosie, Margaret J.; Willett, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic cats endure infections by all three subfamilies of the retroviridae: lentiviruses (feline immunodeficiency virus [FIV]), gammaretroviruses (feline leukemia virus [FeLV]), and spumaretroviruses (feline foamy virus [FFV]). Thus, cats present an insight into the evolution of the host-retrovirus relationship and the development of intrinsic/innate immune mechanisms. Tetherin (BST-2) is an interferon-inducible transmembrane protein that inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from infected cells. Here, we characterize the feline homologue of tetherin and assess its effects on the replication of FIV. Tetherin was expressed in many feline cell lines, and expression was induced by interferons, including alpha interferon (IFN-α), IFN-ω, and IFN-γ. Like human tetherin, feline tetherin displayed potent inhibition of FIV and HIV-1 particle release; however, this activity resisted antagonism by either HIV-1 Vpu or the FIV Env and “OrfA” proteins. Further, as overexpression of complete FIV genomes in trans could not overcome feline tetherin, these data suggest that FIV lacks a functional tetherin antagonist. However, when expressed stably in feline cell lines, tetherin did not abrogate the replication of FIV; indeed, syncytium formation was significantly enhanced in tetherin-expressing cells infected with cell culture-adapted (CD134-independent) strains of FIV (FIV Fca-F14 and FIV Pco-CoLV). Thus, while tetherin may prevent the release of nascent viral particles, cell-to-cell spread remains efficient in the presence of abundant viral receptors and tetherin upregulation may enhance syncytium formation. Accordingly, tetherin expression in vivo may promote the selective expansion of viral variants capable of more efficient cell-to-cell spread. PMID:21490095

  3. Function of a unique sequence motif in the long terminal repeat of feline leukemia virus isolated from an unusual set of naturally occurring tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Athas, G B; Lobelle-Rich, P; Levy, L S

    1995-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviruses have been characterized from naturally occurring non-B-cell, non-T-cell tumors occurring in the spleens of infected cats. These proviruses exhibit a unique sequence motif in the long terminal repeat (LTR), namely, a 21-bp tandem triplication beginning 25 bp downstream of the enhancer. The repeated finding of the triplication-containing LTR in non-B-cell, non-T-cell lymphomas of the spleen suggests that the unique LTR is an essential participant in the development of tumors of this particular phenotype. The nucleotide sequence of the triplication-containing LTR most closely resembles that of FeLV subgroup C. Studies performed to measure the ability of the triplication-containing LTR to modulate gene expression indicate that the 21-bp triplication provides transcriptional enhancer function to the LTR that contains it and that it substitutes at least in part for the duplication of the enhancer. The 21-bp triplication confers a bona fide enhancer function upon LTR-directed reporter gene expression; however, the possibility of a spacer function was not eliminated. The studies demonstrate further that the triplication-containing LTR acts preferentially in a cell-type-specific manner, i.e., it is 12-fold more active in K-562 cells than is an LTR lacking the triplication. A recombinant, infectious FeLV bearing the 21-bp triplication in U3 was constructed. Cells infected with the recombinant were shown to accumulate higher levels of viral RNA transcripts and virus particles in culture supernatants than did cells infected with the parental type. The triplication-containing LTR is implicated in the induction of tumors of a particular phenotype, perhaps through transcriptional regulation of the virus and/or adjacent cellular genes, in the appropriate target cell. PMID:7745680

  4. Evaluation of the effect of short-term treatment with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isentress) on the course of progressive feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Andrea; Cattori, Valentino; Riond, Barbara; Willi, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Rentsch, Katharina M; Hosie, Margaret J; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2015-02-25

    Cats persistently infected with the gammaretrovirus feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are at risk to die within months to years from FeLV-associated disease, such as immunosuppression, anemia or lymphoma/leukemia. The integrase inhibitor raltegravir has been demonstrated to reduce FeLV replication in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate raltegravir in vivo for its safety and efficacy to suppress FeLV replication. The safety was tested in three naïve specified pathogen-free (SPF) cats during a 15 weeks treatment period (initially 20mg then 40mg orally b.i.d.). No adverse effects were noted. The efficacy was tested in seven persistently FeLV-infected SPF cats attained from 18 cats experimentally exposed to FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. The seven cats were treated during nine weeks (40mg then 80mg b.i.d.). Raltegravir was well tolerated even at the higher dose. A significant decrease in plasma viral RNA loads (∼5×) was found; however, after treatment termination a rebound effect was observed. Only one cat developed anti-FeLV antibodies and viral RNA loads remained decreased after treatment termination. Of note, one of the untreated FeLV-A infected cats developed fatal FeLV-C associated anemia within 5 weeks of FeLV-A infection. Moreover, progressive FeLV infection was associated with significantly lower enFeLV loads prior to infection supporting that FeLV susceptibility may be related to the genetic background of the cat. Overall, our data demonstrate the ability of raltegravir to reduce viral replication also in vivo. However, no complete control of viremia was achieved. Further investigations are needed to find an optimized treatment against FeLV. (250 words). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-term follow up of feline leukemia virus infection and characterization of viral RNA loads using molecular methods in tissues of cats with different infection outcomes.

    PubMed

    Helfer-Hungerbuehler, A Katrin; Widmer, Stefan; Kessler, Yvonne; Riond, Barbara; Boretti, Felicitas S; Grest, Paula; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-02-02

    It is a remarkable feature for a retrovirus that an infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) can result in various outcomes. Whereas some cats contain the infection and show a regressive course, others stay viremic and succumb to the infection within a few years. We hypothesized, that differences in the infection outcome might be causally linked to the viral RNA and provirus loads within the host and these loads therefore may give additional insight into the pathogenesis of the virus. Thus, the goals of the present study were to follow-up on experimentally infected cats and investigate tissues from cats with different infection outcomes using sensitive, specific TaqMan real-time PCR and reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. Nineteen experimentally FeLV-A/Glasgow-1-infected cats were categorized into having regressive, progressive or reactivated FeLV infection according to follow-up of FeLV p27 antigen detection in the blood. Remarkably, regressively infected cats showed detectable provirus and viral RNA loads in almost all of the 27 tested tissues, even many years after virus exposure. Moreover, some regressively infected cats reactivated the infection, and these cats had intermediate to high viral RNA and provirus tissue loads. The highest loads were found in viremic cats, independent of their health status. Tissues that represented sites of virus replication and shedding revealed the highest viral RNA and provirus loads, while the lowest loads were present in muscle and nerve tissues. A supplementary analysis of 20 experimentally infected cats with progressive infection revealed a median survival time of 3.1 years (range from 0.6 to 6.5 years); ∼70% (n=14) of these cats developed lymphoma, while leukemia and non-regenerative anemia were observed less frequently. Our results demonstrate that the different infection outcomes are associated with differences in viral RNA and provirus tissue loads. Remarkably, no complete clearance of FeLV viral RNA or provirus was

  6. Nature and distribution of feline sarcoma virus nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, A E; Gilbert, J H; Porzig, K J; Scolnick, E M; Aaronson, S A

    1979-01-01

    The genomes of three independent isolates of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) were compared by molecular hybridization techniques. Using complementary DNAs prepared from two strains, SM- and ST-FeSV, common complementary DNA'S were selected by sequential hybridization to FeSV and feline leukemia virus RNAs. These DNAs were shown to be highly related among the three independent sarcoma virus isolates. FeSV-specific complementary DNAs were prepared by selection for hybridization by the homologous FeSV RNA and against hybridization by fline leukemia virus RNA. Sarcoma virus-specific sequences of SM-FeSV were shown to differ from those of either ST- or GA-FeSV strains, whereas ST-FeSV-specific DNA shared extensive sequence homology with GA-FeSV. By molecular hybridization, each set of FeSV-specific sequences was demonstrated to be present in normal cat cellular DNA in approximately one copy per haploid genome and was conserved throughout Felidae. In contrast, FeSV-common sequences were present in multiple DNA copies and were found only in Mediterranean cats. The present results are consistent with the concept that each FeSV strain has arisen by a mechanism involving recombination between feline leukemia virus and cat cellular DNA sequences, the latter represented within the cat genome in a manner analogous to that of a cellular gene. PMID:225544

  7. Recombinant feline leukemia virus (FeLV) variants establish a limited infection with altered cell tropism in specific-pathogen-free cats in the absence of FeLV subgroup A helper virus.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, M K; Hayes, K A; Mathes, L E; Pandey, R; Stromberg, P C; Roy-Burman, P

    1999-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B) is commonly associated with feline lymphosarcoma and arises through recombination between endogenous retroviral elements inherited in the cat genome and corresponding regions of the envelope (env) gene from FeLV subgroup A (FeLV-A). In vivo infectivity for FeLV-B is thought to be inefficient in the absence of FeLV-A. Proposed FeLV-A helper functions include enhanced replication efficiency, immune evasion, and replication rescue for defective FeLV-B virions. In vitro analysis of the recombinant FeLV-B-like viruses (rFeLVs) employed in this study confirmed these viruses were replication competent prior to their use in an in vivo study without FeLV-A helper virus. Eight specific-pathogen-free kittens were inoculated with the rFeLVs alone. Subsequent hematology and histology results were within normal limits, however, in the absence of detectable viremia, virus expression, or significant seroconversion, rFeLV proviral DNA was detected in bone marrow tissue of 4/4 (100%) cats at 45 weeks postinoculation (pi), indicating these rFeLVs established a limited but persistent infection in the absence of FeLV-A. Altered cell tropism was also noted. Focal infection was seen in T-cell areas of the splenic follicles in 3/4 (75%) rFeLV-infected cats analyzed, while an FeLV-A-infected cat showed focal infection in B-cell areas of the splenic follicles. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the surface glycoprotein portion of the rFeLV env gene amplified from bone marrow tissue collected at 45 weeks pi showed no sequence alterations from the original rFeLV inocula.

  8. Quantification of the humoral immune response and hemoplasma blood and tissue loads in cats coinfected with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' and feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A; Cattori, Valentino; Geret, Catrina P; Novacco, Marilisa; Meli, Marina L; Riond, Barbara; Boretti, Felicitas S; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2012-08-01

    'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) is a hemotropic mycoplasma (aka hemoplasma) of domestic cats and wild felids. In a transmission study, we exposed eight specified pathogen-free cats to blood from Iberian lynxes (Lynx pardinus) infected with CMhm. The cats were coinfected with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) from an Iberian lynx or with a prototype FeLV. The goal of the present study was to quantify the humoral immune response to CMhm and to identify potential target tissues and sequestration sites. Antibodies were measured by a recombinant antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and blood and tissue loads were quantified using real-time PCR. Seven out of eight cats became CMhm-infected; all of these cats seroconverted between 3 and 13 weeks after inoculation. Antibody levels correlated with the CMhm blood loads. The peak CMhm blood loads were inversely correlated with the incubation period. PCR-positive results were found in all 24 tissues tested but not for all samples. Although all tissues were PCR-positive in one cat euthanized ten weeks after infection, many tissues tested negative in six cats euthanized at week 20 after infection. In several cats, the spleen, lung, liver, heart and aorta contained more copies than expected given the tissue's blood supply, but most tissues contained fewer copies than expected. In conclusion, this is the first study to quantify the humoral immune response and tissue loads in CMhm-FeLV-coinfected cats. The tissue loads appeared to correlate with the duration of infection and with the blood loads, but no evidence of significant CMhm tissue sequestration was found. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. The.... Product: Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. Field Test Locations: Alabama, California...

  10. Amino-terminal domain of the v-fms oncogene product includes a functional signal peptide that directs synthesis of a transforming glycoprotein in the absence of feline leukemia virus gag sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E.F.; Roussel, M.F.; Hampe, A.; Walker, M.H.; Fried, V.A.; Look, A.T.; Rettenmier, C.W.; Sherr, C.J.

    1986-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 5' segment of the human genomic c-fms proto-oncogene suggested that recombination between feline leukemia virus and feline c-fms sequences might have occurred in a region encoding the 5' untranslated portion of c-fms mRNA. The polyprotein precursor gP180/sup gag-fms/ encoded by the McDonough strain of feline sarcoma virus was therefore predicted to contain 34 v-fms-coded amino acids derived from sequences of the c-fms gene that are not ordinarily translated from the proto-oncogene mRNA. The (gP180/sup gag-fms/) polyprotein was cotranslationally cleaved near the gag-fms junction to remove its gag gene-coded portion. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the resulting v-fms-coded glycoprotein, gp120/sup v-fms/, showed that the site of proteolysis corresponded to a predicted signal peptidase cleavage site within the c-fms gene product. Together, these analyses suggested that the linked gag sequences may not be necessary for expression of a biologically active v-fms gene product. The gag-fms sequences of feline sarcoma virus strain McDonough and the v-fms sequences alone were inserted into a murine retroviral vector containing a neomycin resistance gene. The authors conclude that a cryptic hydrophobic signal peptide sequence in v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms gene product within membranous organelles. It seems likely that the proteolytic cleavage of gP180/gag-fms/ is mediated by signal peptidase and that the amino termini of gp140/sup v-fms/ and the c-fms gene product are identical.

  11. Antiretroviral efficacy of a 98% solution of glycerol or ethylene oxide for inactivation of feline leukemia virus in bone.

    PubMed

    Coronado, George S; Swenson, Cheryl L

    2004-04-01

    To determine whether infectious retrovirus was inactivated in bones from FeLV-infected cats after ethylene oxide (ETO) sterilization or preservation in a 98% solution of glycerol in an in vitro cell culture system. Metatarsal bones obtained from 5 FeLV-infected cats and cultured with feline fibroblast cells. Metatarsal bones were treated with 100% ETO, a 98% solution of glycerol, or left untreated. Twenty-five flasks of feline fibroblast cells were assigned to 5 groups: negative control, positive control, ETO-treated bone, glycerol-treated bone, and untreated bone with 5 replicates/group for 4 passages. Media and cell samples were harvested from every flask at each passage to measure FeLV p27 antigen and the number of copies of provirus per 100 ng of DNA, respectively. All negative control and ETO-treated group replicates were negative for FeLV p27 antigen and provirus throughout the study. All positive control group replicates were positive for FeLV p27 antigen and provirus at passages 1 to 4. Untreated bone group replicates were positive for FeLV p27 antigen at passages 3 and 4 and provirus beginning at passage 2. Glycerol-treated group replicates had delayed cell replication and were negative for FeLV p27 antigen and provirus at passages 1 to 4 and 2 to 4, respectively. Ethylene oxide sterilization of bone from FeLV-infected cats appeared to abrogate transmission of infectious retrovirus and effectively sterilized bone allografts. Impact for Human Medicine-Additional studies to confirm effectiveness of ETO treatment of allograft tissues for prevention of pathogen transmission via transplantation are warranted.

  12. The surface glycoprotein of a natural feline leukemia virus subgroup A variant, FeLV-945, as a determinant of disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Lisa L; Ahmad, Shamim; Levy, Laura S

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a natural retrovirus of domestic cats associated with degenerative, proliferative and malignant diseases. Studies of FeLV infection in a cohort of naturally infected cats were undertaken to examine FeLV variation, the selective pressures operative in FeLV infection that lead to predominance of natural variants, and the consequences for infection and disease progression. A unique variant, designated FeLV-945, was identified as the predominant isolate in the cohort and was associated with non-T-cell diseases including multicentric lymphoma. FeLV-945 was assigned to the FeLV-A subgroup based on sequence analysis and receptor utilization, but was shown to differ in sequence from a prototype member of FeLV-A, designated FeLV-A/61E, in the long terminal repeat (LTR) and the surface glycoprotein gene (SU). A unique sequence motif in the FeLV-945 LTR was shown to function as a transcriptional enhancer and to confer a replicative advantage. The FeLV-945 SU protein was observed to differ in sequence as compared to FeLV-A/61E within functional domains known to determine receptor selection and binding. Experimental infection of newborn cats was performed using wild type FeLV-A/61E or recombinant FeLV-A/61E in which the LTR (61E/945L) or LTR and SU (61E/945SL) were exchanged for that of FeLV-945. Infection with either FeLV-A/61E or 61E/945L resulted in T-cell lymphoma of the thymus, although 61E/945L caused disease significantly more rapidly. In contrast, infection with 61E/945SL resulted in the rapid induction of a multicentric lymphoma of B-cell origin, thus recapitulating the outcome of natural infection and implicating FeLV-945 SU as a determinant of disease outcome. Recombinant FeLV-B was detected infrequently and at low levels in multicentric lymphomas, and was thereby not implicated in disease induction. Preliminary studies of receptor interaction indicated that virus particles bearing FeLV-945 SU bind to the FeLV-A receptor more

  13. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii, feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukaemia virus in urban stray cats in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Dorny, P; Speybroeck, N; Verstraete, S; Baeke, M; De Becker, A; Berkvens, D; Vercruysse, J

    2002-11-23

    Three hundred and forty-six serum samples taken between 1998 and 2000 from urban stray cats in the city of Ghent were tested for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and antigens of feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Of these 346 samples, 243 (70.2 per cent) were seropositive for Tgondii. Thirty-nine cats (11.3 per cent) had antibodies against FIV and 13 (3.8 per cent) had circulating antigens of FeLV. Fewer of the female cats had FIV and heavier cats had a higher seroprevalence of FIV. Exact logistic regression showed that cats that were infected with FIV were more likely to be infected with T gondii (P = 0.04), and the cats with FIV had a higher titre of Tgondii antibodies than FIV-negative animals. However, FeLV was not associated with either T gondii or FIV.

  14. Integration Site Choice of a Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yubin; Moressi, Christopher J.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Xie, Litao; Tran, Diane Thi; Casavant, Thomas L.; Ak, Prashanth; Benham, Craig J.; Davidson, Beverly L.; McCray, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    We mapped 226 unique integration sites in human hepatoma cells following gene transfer with a feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentivirus vector. FIV integrated across the entire length of the transcriptional units. Microarray data indicated that FIV integration favored actively transcribed genes. Approximately 21% of FIV integrations within transcriptional units occurred in genes regulated by the LEDGF/p75 transcriptional coactivator. DNA in regions of FIV insertion sites exhibited a “bendable” structure and a pattern of duplex destabilization favoring strand separation. FIV integration preferences are more similar to those of primate lentiviruses and distinct from those of Moloney murine leukemia virus, avian sarcoma leukosis virus, and foamy virus. PMID:16912328

  15. THE VIRUS OF INFECTIOUS FELINE AGRANULOCYTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Syverton, J. T.; Lawrence, J. S.; Ackart, R. J.; Adams, W. S.; Ervin, D. M.; Haskins, A. L.; Saunders, R. H.; Stringfellow, M. B.; Wetrich, R. M.

    1943-01-01

    Thirty-two strains of an infectious filterable agent, with properties that establish it as a virus, have been isolated from a malady of cats. This disease can be readily recognized and differentiated from other feline diseases by blood studies, which make apparent the characteristic profound leucopenia and marked relative lymphocytosis in the absence of thrombopenia and appreciable anemia. (Because the cytological pictures of the bone marrow and blood are essentially similar to those which characterize human agranulocytosis, we have named the disease under study "infectious feline agranulocytosis.") The cytological reaction to the presence of the virus is further characterized by proliferation of the reticuloendothelial cells of the lymph nodes and spleen, and by the formation of intranuclear inclusion bodies in the cells of the gastro-intestinal mucosa, lymph nodes, and bronchial mucosa. The etiological agent, the virus of infectious feline agranulocytosis, is pathogenic for cats when given by the oral, intragastric, cutaneous, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, intravenous, and intranasal routes; it can be recovered at the height of the disease from the blood, spleen, liver, lung, intestinal mucosa, nasal secretions, nasal mucosa and turbinates, feces, and urine. The virus appears to be limited in its pathogenicity to the feline species. We found that a variety of animals, as represented by albino Swiss mice, guinea pigs, domestic rabbits, and ground squirrels (Citellus richardsonii Sabine), failed entirely to react to the injection of massive doses of virus. Repeated attempts at infection of these animals regularly failed when the intranasal, intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular routes of inoculation were employed for single doses. The same was true when from four to six transfers in "blind" serial tissue passages were made. Moreover, attempts to propagate the virus on the chorio-allantoic membrane of the developing chick were unsuccessful. The

  16. Antibody response to vaccines for rhinotracheitis, caliciviral disease, panleukopenia, feline leukemia, and rabies in tigers (Panthera tigris) and lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Risi, Emmanuel; Agoulon, Albert; Allaire, Franck; Le Dréan-Quénec'hdu, Sophie; Martin, Virginie; Mahl, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the results of a study of captive tigers (Panthera tigris) and lions (Panthera leo) vaccinated with a recombinant vaccine against feline leukemia virus; an inactivated adjuvanted vaccine against rabies virus; and a multivalent modified live vaccine against feline herpesvirus, calicivirus, and panleukopenia virus. The aim of the study was to assess the immune response and safety of the vaccines and to compare the effects of the administration of single (1 ml) and double (2 ml) doses. The animals were separated into two groups and received either single or double doses of vaccines, followed by blood collection for serologic response for 400 days. No serious adverse event was observed, with the exception of abortion in one lioness, potentially caused by the incorrect use of the feline panleukopenia virus modified live vaccine. There was no significant difference between single and double doses for all vaccines. The recombinant vaccine against feline leukemia virus did not induce any serologic response. The vaccines against rabies and feline herpesvirus induced a significant immune response in the tigers and lions. The vaccine against calicivirus did not induce a significant increase in antibody titers in either tigers or lions. The vaccine against feline panleukopenia virus induced a significant immune response in tigers but not in lions. This report demonstrates the value of antibody titer determination after vaccination of nondomestic felids.

  17. Pharmacological Inhibition of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hakimeh; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a member of the retroviridae family of viruses and causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in domestic and non-domestic cats worldwide. Genome organization of FIV and clinical characteristics of the disease caused by the virus are similar to those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Both viruses infect T lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and their replication cycle in infected cells is analogous. Due to marked similarity in genomic organization, virus structure, virus replication and disease pathogenesis of FIV and HIV, infection of cats with FIV is a useful tool to study and develop novel drugs and vaccines for HIV. Anti-retroviral drugs studied extensively in HIV infection have targeted different steps of the virus replication cycle: (1) inhibition of virus entry into susceptible cells at the level of attachment to host cell surface receptors and co-receptors; (2) inhibition of fusion of the virus membrane with the cell membrane; (3) blockade of reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA; (4) interruption of nuclear translocation and viral DNA integration into host genomes; (5) prevention of viral transcript processing and nuclear export; and (6) inhibition of virion assembly and maturation. Despite much success of anti-retroviral therapy slowing disease progression in people, similar therapy has not been thoroughly investigated in cats. In this article we review current pharmacological approaches and novel targets for anti-lentiviral therapy, and critically assess potentially suitable applications against FIV infection in cats. PMID:22754645

  18. Inhibitory effects of recombinant feline interferon on the replication of feline enteropathogenic viruses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, M; Nakatani, H; Yoshida, M

    1994-03-01

    Antiviral activities of a recombinant feline interferon (rFeIFN) KT-80 were evaluated against feline enteropathogenic viruses in feline and canine cell lines. Sensitivity to antiviral activities of the rFeIFN varied with cell types; Felis catus whole fetus (fcwf-4) cells were more sensitive than Crandell feline kidney cells, but no sensitivity was found for Madin-Darby canine kidney cells when vesicular stomatitis virus was used as a challenge virus. Reductions were generally IFN dose-dependent and were more consistent when the cells were continuously treated with the rFeIFN than when they were pretreated only before viral challenge. Compared with each virus control culture of fcwf-4 cells, yields of rotavirus, feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV), feline calicivirus and feline infectious peritonitis coronavirus were reduced by ranges of 1.3 to < or = 3.1 log10, 0.6 to 1.6 log2, 0.8 to 3.7 log10 and 0.5 to 0.6 log10, respectively, in the cultures continuously treated with 10 to 10000 U of the rFeIFN. The yield reduction of FPLV was considered to be in part attributable to inhibition of cell growth by the rFeIFN supplemented in the medium.

  19. Cellular Restriction Factors of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jörg; Münk, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Lentiviruses are known for their narrow cell- and species-tropisms, which are determined by cellular proteins whose absence or presence either support viral replication (dependency factors, cofactors) or inhibit viral replication (restriction factors). Similar to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the cat lentivirus Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is sensitive to recently discovered cellular restriction factors from non-host species that are able to stop viruses from replicating. Of particular importance are the cellular proteins APOBEC3, TRIM5α and tetherin/BST-2. In general, lentiviruses counteract or escape their species’ own variant of the restriction factor, but are targeted by the orthologous proteins of distantly related species. Most of the knowledge regarding lentiviral restriction factors has been obtained in the HIV-1 system; however, much less is known about their effects on other lentiviruses. We describe here the molecular mechanisms that explain how FIV maintains its replication in feline cells, but is largely prevented from cross-species infections by cellular restriction factors. PMID:22069525

  20. Detection of Antibodies to the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) Transmembrane Protein p15E: an Alternative Approach for Serological FeLV Detection Based on Antibodies to p15E

    PubMed Central

    Boenzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; Hartnack, Sonja; Huder, Jon; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this report was to investigate whether the diagnosis of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection by serology might be feasible and useful. Among the various viral proteins, the FeLV env-gene product (SU) and the envelope transmembrane protein p15E were considered promising candidates for the serological diagnosis of FeLV infection. Thus, we evaluated p15E and three other FeLV antigens, namely, a recombinant env-gene product, whole FeLV, and a short peptide from the FeLV transmembrane protein, for their potential to detect FeLV infection. To evaluate possible exposure of cats to FeLV, we tested serum and plasma samples from experimentally and naturally infected and vaccinated cats for the presence of antibodies to these antigens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The serological results were compared with the p27 and proviral real-time PCR results. We found that p15E displayed a diagnostic sensitivity of 95.7% and a specificity of 100% in experimentally infected cats. In naturally infected cats, p15E showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 77.1% and a specificity of 85.6%. Vaccinated cats displayed minimal antibody levels to p15E, suggesting that anti-p15E antibodies indicate infection rather than vaccination. The other antigens turned out to be too unspecific. The lower specificity in cats exposed to FeLV under field conditions may be explained by the fact that some cats become infected and seroconvert in the absence of detectable viral nucleic acids in plasma. We conclude that p15E serology may become a valuable tool for diagnosing FeLV infection; in some cases, it may replace PCR. PMID:24696026

  1. The surface glycoprotein of feline leukemia virus isolate FeLV-945 is a determinant of altered pathogenesis in the presence or absence of the unique viral long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Lisa L; Ahmad, Shamim; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia A; Ooms, Tara G; Alvarez-Hernandez, Xavier; Didier, Peter J; Levy, Laura S

    2013-10-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a naturally transmitted gammaretrovirus that infects domestic cats. FeLV-945, the predominant isolate associated with non-T-cell disease in a natural cohort, is a member of FeLV subgroup A but differs in sequence from the FeLV-A prototype, FeLV-A/61E, in the surface glycoprotein (SU) and long terminal repeat (LTR). Substitution of the FeLV-945 LTR into FeLV-A/61E resulted in pathogenesis indistinguishable from that of FeLV-A/61E, namely, thymic lymphoma of T-cell origin. In contrast, substitution of both FeLV-945 LTR and SU into FeLV-A/61E resulted in multicentric lymphoma of non-T-cell origin. These results implicated the FeLV-945 SU as a determinant of pathogenic spectrum. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that FeLV-945 SU can act in the absence of other unique sequence elements of FeLV-945 to determine the disease spectrum. Substitution of FeLV-A/61E SU with that of FeLV-945 altered the clinical presentation and resulted in tumors that demonstrated expression of CD45R in the presence or absence of CD3. Despite the evident expression of CD45R, a typical B-cell marker, T-cell receptor beta (TCRβ) gene rearrangement indicated a T-cell origin. Tumor cells were detectable in bone marrow and blood at earlier times during the disease process, and the predominant SU genes from proviruses integrated in tumor DNA carried markers of genetic recombination. The findings demonstrate that FeLV-945 SU alters pathogenesis, although incompletely, in the absence of FeLV-945 LTR. Evidence demonstrates that FeLV-945 SU and LTR are required together to fully recapitulate the distinctive non-T-cell disease outcome seen in the natural cohort.

  2. Detection of antibodies to the feline leukemia Virus (FeLV) transmembrane protein p15E: an alternative approach for serological FeLV detection based on antibodies to p15E.

    PubMed

    Boenzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; Hartnack, Sonja; Huder, Jon; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this report was to investigate whether the diagnosis of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection by serology might be feasible and useful. Among the various viral proteins, the FeLV env-gene product (SU) and the envelope transmembrane protein p15E were considered promising candidates for the serological diagnosis of FeLV infection. Thus, we evaluated p15E and three other FeLV antigens, namely, a recombinant env-gene product, whole FeLV, and a short peptide from the FeLV transmembrane protein, for their potential to detect FeLV infection. To evaluate possible exposure of cats to FeLV, we tested serum and plasma samples from experimentally and naturally infected and vaccinated cats for the presence of antibodies to these antigens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). The serological results were compared with the p27 and proviral real-time PCR results. We found that p15E displayed a diagnostic sensitivity of 95.7% and a specificity of 100% in experimentally infected cats. In naturally infected cats, p15E showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 77.1% and a specificity of 85.6%. Vaccinated cats displayed minimal antibody levels to p15E, suggesting that anti-p15E antibodies indicate infection rather than vaccination. The other antigens turned out to be too unspecific. The lower specificity in cats exposed to FeLV under field conditions may be explained by the fact that some cats become infected and seroconvert in the absence of detectable viral nucleic acids in plasma. We conclude that p15E serology may become a valuable tool for diagnosing FeLV infection; in some cases, it may replace PCR.

  3. In vitro antiviral efficacy of ribavirin against feline calicivirus, feline viral rhinotracheitis virus, and canine parainfluenza virus.

    PubMed

    Povey, R C

    1978-01-01

    Ribavirin had marked in vitro activity against feline calcivirus, strain 255, and canine parainfluenza virus, but showed only slight antiviral effect on feline viral rhinotracheitis virus. Antiviral activity was manifested by partial to complete suppression of viral cytopathic effect and of viral replication, depending on concentration of ribavirin in the culture medium and dosage of viral inoculum. Concentrations of ribavirin as small as 3.2 microgram/ml and 1.0 microgram/ml showed some activity against feline calcivirus and canine parainfluenza virus, respectively.

  4. Feline fecal virome reveals novel and prevalent enteric viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Mesquita, João Rodrigo; Nascimento, Maria São José; Kondov, Nikola O.; Wong, Walt; Reuter, Gábor; Knowles, Nick J.; Vega, Everardo; Esona, Mathew D.; Deng, Xutao; Vinjé, Jan; Delwart, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Humans keep more than 80 million cats worldwide, ensuring frequent contacts with their viruses. Despite such interactions the enteric virome of cats remains poorly understood. We analyzed a fecal sample from a single healthy cat from Portugal using viral metagenomics and detected five eukaryotic viral genomes. These viruses included a novel picornavirus (proposed genus “Sakobuvirus”) and bocavirus (feline bocavirus 2), a variant of feline astrovirus 2 and sequence fragments of a highly divergent feline rotavirus and picobirnavirus. Feline sakobuvirus A represents the prototype species of a proposed new genus in the Picornaviridae family, distantly related to human salivirus and kobuvirus. Feline astroviruses (mamastrovirus 2) are the closest relatives of the classic human astroviruses (mamastrovirus 1), suggestive of past cross-species transmission. Presence of these viruses by PCR among Portuguese cats was detected in 13% (rotavirus), 7% (astrovirus), 6% (bocavirus), 4% (sakobuvirus), and 4% (picobirnavirus) of 55 feline fecal samples. Co-infections were frequent with 40% (4/10) of cats shedding more than one of these viruses. Our study provides an initial unbiased description of the feline fecal virome indicating a high level of asymptomatic infections. Availability of the genome sequences of these viruses will facilitate future tropism and disease association studies. PMID:24793097

  5. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Bruno M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Cruz, Juliano C. M.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  6. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  7. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  8. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  9. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  10. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  11. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  12. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  13. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  14. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  15. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.211 Section 113.211 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  16. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  17. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  18. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  19. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.210 Section 113.210 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  20. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.203 Section 113.203 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which...

  1. Feline immunodeficiency virus testing in stray, feral, and client-owned cats of Ottawa.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan E

    2005-10-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) seroprevalence is evaluated in 3 groups of cats. Seventy-four unowned urban strays were tested, as well as 20 cats from a small feral cat colony, and 152 client-owned cats. Of the 246 cats tested, 161 (65%) were male and 85 (35%) were female. Seroprevalence for FIV was 23% in the urban strays, 5% in the feral cat colony, and 5.9% in the client-owned cats. Ten cats (4%) were also positive for Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, including 2 cats coinfected with FeLV and FIV. Seroprevalence for FIV in cats from Ottawa is similar to that found in other nonrandom studies of cats in North America.

  2. Feline immunodeficiency virus testing in stray, feral, and client-owned cats of Ottawa

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) seroprevalence is evaluated in 3 groups of cats. Seventy-four unowned urban strays were tested, as well as 20 cats from a small feral cat colony, and 152 client-owned cats. Of the 246 cats tested, 161 (65%) were male and 85 (35%) were female. Seroprevalence for FIV was 23% in the urban strays, 5% in the feral cat colony, and 5.9% in the client-owned cats. Ten cats (4%) were also positive for Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, including 2 cats coinfected with FeLV and FIV. Seroprevalence for FIV in cats from Ottawa is similar to that found in other nonrandom studies of cats in North America. PMID:16454381

  3. Evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Burkala, Evan; Poss, Mary

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the predicted biochemical properties of Gag proteins from a diverse group of feline immunodeficiency viruses (FIV) to determine how different evolutionary histories of virus and host have changed or constrained these important structural proteins. Our data are based on FIV sequences derived from domestic cat (FIVfca), cougar (FIVpco), and lions (FIVple). Analyses consisted of determining the selective forces acting at each position in the protein and the comparing predictions for secondary structure, charge, hydrophobicity and flexibility for matrix, capsid and nucleocapsid, and the C-terminal peptide, which comprise the Gag proteins. We demonstrate that differences among the FIV Gag proteins have largely arisen by neutral evolution, although many neutrally evolving regions have maintained biochemical features. Regions with predicted differences in biochemical features appear to involve intramolecular interactions and structural elements that undergo conformational changes during particle maturation. In contrast, the majority of sites involved in intermolecular contacts on the protein surface are constrained by purifying selection. There is also conservation of sites that interact with host proteins associated with cellular trafficking and particle budding. NC is the only protein with evidence of positive selection, two of which occur in the N-terminal region responsible for RNA binding and interaction with host proteins.

  4. Spatial analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cougars.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, David C; Waller, Lance A; Biek, Roman

    2010-07-01

    The cougar (Puma concolor) is a large predatory feline found widely in the Americas that is susceptible to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a fast-evolving lentivirus found in wild feline species that is analogous to simian immunodeficiency viruses in wild primates and belongs to the same family of viruses as human immunodeficiency virus. FIV infection in cougars can lead to a weakened immune system that creates opportunities for other infecting agents. FIV prevalence and lineages have been studied previously in several areas in the western United States, but typically without spatially explicit statistical techniques. To describe the distribution of FIV in a sample of cougars located in the northern Rocky Mountain region of North America, we first used kernel density ratio estimation to map the log relative risk of FIV. The risk surface showed a significant cluster of FIV in northwestern Montana. We also used Bayesian cluster models for genetic data to investigate the spatial structure of the feline immunodeficiency virus with virus genetic sequence data. A result of the models was two spatially distinct FIV lineages that aligned considerably with an interstate highway in Montana. Our results suggest that the use of spatial information and models adds novel insight when investigating an infectious animal disease. The results also suggest that the influence of landscape features likely plays an important role in the spatiotemporal spread of an infectious disease within wildlife populations.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bande, Faruku; Arshad, Siti Suri; Hassan, Latiffah; Zakaria, Zunita; Sapian, Nurul Asyikin; Rahman, Noor Alimah; Alazawy, Amer

    2012-03-22

    Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are major causes of morbidity and mortality in domestic and wild felids. Despite the clinical importance of feline retroviruses and the growing interest in cats as pets, information about FeLV and FIV in Malaysia is presently insufficient to properly advise veterinarians and pet owners. A cross-sectional study was carried out from January 2010 to December 2010 to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with FeLV and FIV among domestic cats in peninsular Malaysia. Plasma samples were harvested from the blood of 368 domestic cats and screened for evidence of FeLV p27 antigen and FIV antibodies, using an immunochromatographic kit. Additionally, data on cat demographics and health were collected using a structured questionnaire, and were evaluated as potential risk factors for FeLV or FIV status. Of the 368 cats that were evaluated in this study, 12.2% (45/368; 95% CI = 8.88 - 15.58) were positive for FeLV p27 antigen, 31.3%, (115/368; 95% CI = 26.51 - 35.99) were seropositive to FIV antibodies, and 4.3% (16/368; 95% CI = 2.27 - 6.43) had evidence of both viruses. Factors found to significantly increase the risk for FeLV seropositivity include sex, age, behaviour, sickness, and living in a multi-cat household. Seropositive response to FIV was significantly associated with sex, neuter status, age, behaviour, and health status. The present study indicates that FeLV and FIV are common among domestic cats in peninsular Malaysia, and that factors related to cat demographics and health such as age, sex, behaviour, health status and type of household are important predictors for seropositive status to FeLV or FIV in peninsular Malaysia. High prevalence of FeLV or FIV observed in our study is of concern, in view of the immunosuppressive potentials of the two pathogens. Specific measures for control and prevention such as screening and routine vaccination are needed to ensure that FeLV and FIV

  6. Prevalence and risk factors of feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are major causes of morbidity and mortality in domestic and wild felids. Despite the clinical importance of feline retroviruses and the growing interest in cats as pets, information about FeLV and FIV in Malaysia is presently insufficient to properly advise veterinarians and pet owners. A cross-sectional study was carried out from January 2010 to December 2010 to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with FeLV and FIV among domestic cats in peninsular Malaysia. Plasma samples were harvested from the blood of 368 domestic cats and screened for evidence of FeLV p27 antigen and FIV antibodies, using an immunochromatographic kit. Additionally, data on cat demographics and health were collected using a structured questionnaire, and were evaluated as potential risk factors for FeLV or FIV status. Results Of the 368 cats that were evaluated in this study, 12.2% (45/368; 95% CI = 8.88 - 15.58) were positive for FeLV p27 antigen, 31.3%, (115/368; 95% CI = 26.51 - 35.99) were seropositive to FIV antibodies, and 4.3% (16/368; 95% CI = 2.27 - 6.43) had evidence of both viruses. Factors found to significantly increase the risk for FeLV seropositivity include sex, age, behaviour, sickness, and living in a multi-cat household. Seropositive response to FIV was significantly associated with sex, neuter status, age, behaviour, and health status. Conclusions The present study indicates that FeLV and FIV are common among domestic cats in peninsular Malaysia, and that factors related to cat demographics and health such as age, sex, behaviour, health status and type of household are important predictors for seropositive status to FeLV or FIV in peninsular Malaysia. High prevalence of FeLV or FIV observed in our study is of concern, in view of the immunosuppressive potentials of the two pathogens. Specific measures for control and prevention such as screening and routine vaccination are needed

  7. Prevalence of feline calicivirus, feline leukaemia virus and antibodies to FIV in cats with chronic stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Knowles, J O; Gaskell, R M; Gaskell, C J; Harvey, C E; Lutz, H

    1989-04-01

    The prevalence of feline calicivirus (FCV), feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies were assessed in 78 British and 18 North American household cats with chronic stomatitis and in appropriate controls. In British cats, FCV was significantly (P less than 0.005) more prevalent in both hospital (92 per cent) and general practice (79 per cent) cases compared to their controls (19 per cent in both cases). A similar difference in prevalence of FCV was noted in North American cats where 50 per cent of cases were positive compared to 0 per cent of controls (P less than 0.01). FeLV prevalence was low in all chronic stomatitis populations. A significantly higher prevalence of antibody to FIV was found in British hospital cases (81 per cent) compared with time-matched controls (16 per cent) (P less than 0.001): a similar rate was found in the general practice cases (75 per cent) for which no controls were available. In the North American sample, FIV antibody status was similar in cases (54 per cent positive) and their age, sex and breed matched controls (50 per cent). The possible role of FCV and FIV in the pathogenesis of feline chronic stomatitis is discussed.

  8. Isolation and sequencing of infectious clones of feline foamy virus and a human/feline foamy virus Env chimera.

    PubMed

    Hatama, S; Otake, K; Omoto, S; Murase, Y; Ikemoto, A; Mochizuki, M; Takahashi, E; Okuyama, H; Fujii, Y

    2001-12-01

    Full-length DNAs of the Coleman and S7801 strains (pSKY3.0, pSKY5.0) of infectious feline foamy viruses (FFVs) were cloned and sequenced. Parental viruses, designated SKY3.0 and SKY5.0, were secreted following transfection of Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells. Production of the rescued parental viruses was enhanced in the presence of trichostatin A. Amino acid sequence similarities between FFV and human foamy virus (HFV) are extremely low for the envelope protein and capsid antigen, as predicted from the two clones. However, a chimeric FFV clone was constructed with the HFV Env substituted for the FFV Env. The chimeric virus (HFFV, SKY4.0) was able to infect and replicate in CRFK cells as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of cats in vivo. Consequently, the chimeric HFFV may be useful for the creation of FV vectors for gene transfer strategies.

  9. Seroepidemiological and clinical survey of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Peri, E V; Ponti, W; Dall'ara, P; Rocchi, M; Zecconi, A; Bonizzi, L

    1994-04-01

    Four hundred and thirty-nine feline serum samples from cats with different living conditions in the north of Italy were tested for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and for antigen of Feline Leukemia Virus by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A Western blot technique was also used on the positive sera in order to confirm the presence of specific antibodies to FIV. The Western blot enabled the detection of a false positive serum. The prevalence of FIV infection in this population was 12.5% and among the seropositive cats a greater proportion was male (74.5%) than female (25.5%). A correlation between the clinical status and the evolution of the pathology is described together with a score based on the severity of the stomatitis in infected cats. The Western blot patterns of positive samples were then compared with the stage of the pathology. Statistical analysis on the distribution of FIV in stray cats, cats with garden and courtyard access and strictly house-confined cats showed a highly significant risk of the infection in the first group.

  10. Feline leukaemia virus: half a century since its discovery.

    PubMed

    Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2013-01-01

    In the early 1960s, Professor William (Bill) F.H. Jarrett was presented with a time-space cluster of cats with lymphoma identified by a local veterinary practitioner, Harry Pfaff, and carried out experiments to find if the condition might be caused by a virus, similar to lymphomas noted previously in poultry and mice. In 1964, the transmission of lymphoma in cats and the presence of virus-like particles that resembled 'the virus of murine leukaemias' in the induced tumours were reported in Nature. These seminal studies initiated research on feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and launched the field of feline retrovirology. This review article considers the way in which some of the key early observations made by Bill Jarrett and his coworkers have developed in subsequent years and discusses progress that has been made in the field since FeLV was first discovered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality of different in-clinic test systems for feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukaemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Katrin; Griessmayr, Pascale; Schulz, Bianka; Greene, Craig E; Vidyashankar, Anand N; Jarrett, Os; Egberink, Herman F

    2007-12-01

    Many new diagnostic in-house tests for identification of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection have been licensed for use in veterinary practice, and the question of the relative merits of these kits has prompted comparative studies. This study was designed to define the strengths and weaknesses of seven FIV and eight FeLV tests that are commercially available. In this study, 536 serum samples from randomly selected cats were tested. Those samples reacting FIV-positive in at least one of the tests were confirmed by Western blot, and those reacting FeLV-positive were confirmed by virus isolation. In addition, a random selection of samples testing negative in all test systems was re-tested by Western blot (100 samples) and by virus isolation (81 samples). Specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values of each test and the quality of the results were compared.

  12. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vif N-Terminal Residues Selectively Counteract Feline APOBEC3s.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qinyong; Zhang, Zeli; Cano Ortiz, Lucía; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-12-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif protein counteracts feline APOBEC3s (FcaA3s) restriction factors by inducing their proteasomal degradation. The functional domains in FIV Vif for interaction with FcaA3s are poorly understood. Here, we have identified several motifs in FIV Vif that are important for selective degradation of different FcaA3s. Cats (Felis catus) express three types of A3s: single-domain A3Z2, single-domain A3Z3, and double-domain A3Z2Z3. We proposed that FIV Vif would selectively interact with the Z2 and the Z3 A3s. Indeed, we identified two N-terminal Vif motifs (12LF13 and 18GG19) that specifically interacted with the FcaA3Z2 protein but not with A3Z3. In contrast, the exclusive degradation of FcaA3Z3 was regulated by a region of three residues (M24, L25, and I27). Only a FIV Vif carrying a combination of mutations from both interaction sites lost the capacity to degrade and counteract FcaA3Z2Z3. However, alterations in the specific A3s interaction sites did not affect the cellular localization of the FIV Vif protein and binding to feline A3s. Pulldown experiments demonstrated that the A3 binding region localized to FIV Vif residues 50 to 80, outside the specific A3 interaction domain. Finally, we found that the Vif sites specific to individual A3s are conserved in several FIV lineages of domestic cat and nondomestic cats, while being absent in the FIV Vif of pumas. Our data support a complex model of multiple Vif-A3 interactions in which the specific region for selective A3 counteraction is discrete from a general A3 binding domain. Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif proteins counteract their host's APOBEC3 restriction factors. However, these two Vif proteins have limited sequence homology. The molecular interaction between FIV Vif and feline APOBEC3s are not well understood. Here, we identified N-terminal FIV Vif sites that regulate the selective interaction of Vif with either feline APOBEC3Z

  13. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Vif N-Terminal Residues Selectively Counteract Feline APOBEC3s

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Qinyong; Zhang, Zeli; Cano Ortiz, Lucía; Franco, Ana Cláudia; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif protein counteracts feline APOBEC3s (FcaA3s) restriction factors by inducing their proteasomal degradation. The functional domains in FIV Vif for interaction with FcaA3s are poorly understood. Here, we have identified several motifs in FIV Vif that are important for selective degradation of different FcaA3s. Cats (Felis catus) express three types of A3s: single-domain A3Z2, single-domain A3Z3, and double-domain A3Z2Z3. We proposed that FIV Vif would selectively interact with the Z2 and the Z3 A3s. Indeed, we identified two N-terminal Vif motifs (12LF13 and 18GG19) that specifically interacted with the FcaA3Z2 protein but not with A3Z3. In contrast, the exclusive degradation of FcaA3Z3 was regulated by a region of three residues (M24, L25, and I27). Only a FIV Vif carrying a combination of mutations from both interaction sites lost the capacity to degrade and counteract FcaA3Z2Z3. However, alterations in the specific A3s interaction sites did not affect the cellular localization of the FIV Vif protein and binding to feline A3s. Pulldown experiments demonstrated that the A3 binding region localized to FIV Vif residues 50 to 80, outside the specific A3 interaction domain. Finally, we found that the Vif sites specific to individual A3s are conserved in several FIV lineages of domestic cat and nondomestic cats, while being absent in the FIV Vif of pumas. Our data support a complex model of multiple Vif-A3 interactions in which the specific region for selective A3 counteraction is discrete from a general A3 binding domain. IMPORTANCE Both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Vif proteins counteract their host's APOBEC3 restriction factors. However, these two Vif proteins have limited sequence homology. The molecular interaction between FIV Vif and feline APOBEC3s are not well understood. Here, we identified N-terminal FIV Vif sites that regulate the selective interaction of Vif with

  14. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Evolutionarily Acquires Two Proteins, Vif and Protease, Capable of Antagonizing Feline APOBEC3.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Takeuchi, Junko S; Yamada, Eri; Nakano, Yusuke; Misawa, Naoko; Kimura, Yuichi; Ren, Fengrong; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Sato, Kei

    2017-06-01

    The interplay between viral and host proteins has been well studied to elucidate virus-host interactions and their relevance to virulence. Mammalian genes encode apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) proteins, which act as intrinsic restriction factors against lentiviruses. To overcome APOBEC3-mediated antiviral actions, lentiviruses have evolutionarily acquired an accessory protein, viral infectivity factor (Vif), and Vif degrades host APOBEC3 proteins via a ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent pathway. Although the Vif-APOBEC3 interaction and its evolutionary significance, particularly those of primate lentiviruses (including HIV) and primates (including humans), have been well investigated, those of nonprimate lentiviruses and nonprimates are poorly understood. Moreover, the factors that determine lentiviral pathogenicity remain unclear. Here, we focus on feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a pathogenic lentivirus in domestic cats, and the interaction between FIV Vif and feline APOBEC3 in terms of viral virulence and evolution. We reveal the significantly reduced diversity of FIV subtype B compared to that of other subtypes, which may associate with the low pathogenicity of this subtype. We also demonstrate that FIV subtype B Vif is less active with regard to feline APOBEC3 degradation. More intriguingly, we further reveal that FIV protease cleaves feline APOBEC3 in released virions. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that a lentivirus encodes two types of anti-APOBEC3 factors, Vif and viral protease.IMPORTANCE During the history of mammalian evolution, mammals coevolved with retroviruses, including lentiviruses. All pathogenic lentiviruses, excluding equine infectious anemia virus, have acquired the vif gene via evolution to combat APOBEC3 proteins, which are intrinsic restriction factors against exogenous lentiviruses. Here we demonstrate that FIV, a pathogenic lentivirus in domestic cats, antagonizes feline APOBEC3

  15. FELINE IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (FIV) IN WILD PALLAS’ CATS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith A.; Munkhtsog, Bariushaa; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Ross, Steve; Sellers, Rani; Fine, Amanda E.; Swanson, William F.; Roelke, Melody E.; O’Brien1, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a feline lentivirus related to HIV, causes immune dysfunction in domestic and wild cats. The Pallas’ cat is the only species from Asia known to harbor a species-specific strain of FIV designated FIVOma in natural populations. Here, a 25% seroprevalence of FIV is reported from 28 wild Mongolian Pallas’ cats sampled from 2000-2008. Phylogenetic analysis of proviral RT-Pol from eight FIVOma isolates from Mongolia, Russia, China and Kazakhstan reveals a unique monophyletic lineage of the virus within the Pallas’ cat population, most closely related to the African cheetah and leopard FIV strains. Histopathological examination of lymph node and spleen from infected and uninfected Pallas’ cats suggests that FIVOma causes immune depletion in its’ native host. PMID:19926144

  16. Transcriptome analysis of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Harun, Mohammad Syamsul Reza; Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal systemic disease caused by FIP virus (FIPV). There are no effective vaccines or treatment available, and the virus virulence determinants and pathogenesis are not fully understood. Here, we describe the sequencing of RNA extracted from Crandell Rees Feline Kidney (CRFK) cells infected with FIPV using the Illumina next-generation sequencing approach. Bioinformatics analysis, based on Felis catus 2X annotated shotgun reference genome, using CLC bio Genome Workbench is used to map both control and infected cells. Kal's Z test statistical analysis is used to analyze the differentially expressed genes from the infected CRFK cells. In addition, RT-qPCR analysis is used for further transcriptional profiling of selected genes in infected CRFK cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from healthy and FIP-diagnosed cats.

  17. Production of feline leukemia inhibitory factor with biological activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kanegi, R; Hatoya, S; Tsujimoto, Y; Takenaka, S; Nishimura, T; Wijewardana, V; Sugiura, K; Takahashi, M; Kawate, N; Tamada, H; Inaba, T

    2016-07-15

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a cytokine which is essential for oocyte and embryo development, embryonic stem cell, and induced pluripotent stem cell maintenance. Leukemia inhibitory factor improves the maturation of oocytes in the human and the mouse. However, feline LIF (fLIF) cloning and effects on oocytes during IVM have not been reported. Thus, we cloned complete cDNA of fLIF and examined its biological activity and effects on oocytes during IVM in the domestic cat. The aminoacid sequence of fLIF revealed a homology of 81% or 92% with that of mouse or human. The fLIF produced by pCold TF DNA in Escherichia coli was readily soluble and after purification showed bioactivity in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mouse embryonic stem cells and enhancing the proliferation of human erythrocyte leukemia cells. Furthermore, 10- and 100-ng/mL fLIF induced cumulus expansion with or without FSH and EGF (P < 0.05). The rate of metaphase II oocytes was also improved with 100-ng/mL fLIF (P < 0.05). We therefore confirmed the successful production for the first time of biologically active fLIF and revealed its effects on oocytes during IVM in the domestic cat. Feline LIF will further improve reproduction and stem cell research in the feline family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Feline Malignant Lymphoma: A Multiway Frequency Analysis of a Population Involving Sex, Age, Cell Type, and Tumor Location.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV). 2𔃻 2 Since its discovery, two other viruses have come to be recognized as close relatives of FeLV. Feline cellular DNA...W. D., Jr., Essex, M. Association of feline leukemia virus with lymphosarcoma and other disorders in the cat. J.A.V.M.A. 166:449-454, 1975. 3. Dixon...J. Naturally occurring feline leukemia : Clinical, pathologic, and differential diagnostic features. J.A.V.M.A. 158:1013-1025, 1971. 7. Hardy, W. 0

  19. Feline lectin activity is critical for the cellular entry of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Regan, Andrew D; Ousterout, David G; Whittaker, Gary R

    2010-08-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis is a lethal disease of felids caused by systemic infection with a feline coronavirus. Here, we report identification and analysis of the feline homologue to the human lectin DC-SIGN and show that it is a coreceptor for virulent strains of serotype 1 and serotype 2 feline coronaviruses.

  20. LEUKEMIA-ASSOCIATED TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS RELATED TO MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H.; Boyse, E. A.; Aoki, T.; Iritani, C.; Old, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Two BALB radiation leukemias are strongly rejected by hybrids of BALB with certain other mouse strains, although BALB mice themselves exhibit no detectable resistance whatever. Hybrids immunized with progressively increased inocula are resistant to 200 x 106 or more leukemia cells; their serum is cytotoxic for the leukemia cells in vitro and protects BALB mice against challenge with these BALB leukemias. The antigenic system thus identified has been named X.1. In (BALB x B6) hybrids the major determinant of resistance was shown to be a B6 gene in the K region of H-2. This is likely to be the Rgv-1 (Resistance to gross virus) locus of Lilly, which may thus be identified in this case as an Ir (Immune response) allele conferring ability to respond to X.1 antigen on MuLV and leukemia cells, and so responsible for production of X.1 antibody and the rejection of X.1+ leukemia cells by hybrid mice. Immunoelectron microscopy with X.1 antiserum (from immunized hybrids) shows labeling both on the cell surface and on virions produced by the leukemia cells. It is not known whether X.1 comprises only one or more than one antigen. Three radiation-induced BALB leukemias, one A strain radiation-induced leukemia, and 15/15 AKR primary spontaneous leukemias were typed X.1+ by the cytotoxicity test. Several other leukemias, including one induced by passage A Gross virus and one long-transplanted AKR ascites leukemia carried in (B6 x AKR)F1 hybrids, were X.1-. Normal mice of strains with a high incidence of leukemia and one other strain (129) express X.1 antigen, but evidently in amounts too small for certain detection in vitro; by the method of absorption in vivo, however, these strains could be typed X.1+ and other strains X.1-. We ascribe the X.1 antigen system tentatively to a sub-type of MuLV that is not passage A Gross virus and is probably not the dominant sub-type in strains with a high incidence of leukemia. After repeated passage in hybrids, one of the BALB leukemias became

  1. Genetic determinants of pathogenesis by feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith A

    2011-10-15

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, immune-augmented, and progressive viral disease of cats associated with feline coronavirus (FCoV). Viral genetic determinants specifically associated with FIPV pathogenesis have not yet been discovered. Viral gene signatures in the spike, non-structural protein 3c, and membrane of the coronavirus genome have been shown to often correlate with disease manifestation. An "in vivo mutation transition hypothesis" is widely accepted and postulates that de novo virus mutation occurs in vivo giving rise to virulence. The existence of "distinct circulating avirulent and virulent strains" is an alternative hypothesis of viral pathogenesis. It may be possible that viral dynamics from both hypotheses are at play in the occurrence of FIP. Epidemiologic data suggests that the genetic background of the cat contributes to the manifestation of FIP. Further studies exploring both viral and host genetic determinants of disease in FIP offer specific opportunities for the management of this disease.

  2. Epidemiology of Feline Foamy Virus and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Domestic and Feral Cats: a Seroepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, I. G.; Löchelt, M.; Flower, R. L. P.

    1999-01-01

    Although foamy viruses (Spumaviruses) have repeatedly been isolated from both healthy and diseased cats, cattle, and primates, the primary mode of transmission of those common viruses remains undefined. A database of the feline foamy virus (FeFV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody status, age, and sex of 389 domestic cats presented to veterinarians was assembled. A similar database for 66 feral (wild) cats was also assembled. That FeFV antibody status reflects infection was validated by PCR. Both FeFV and FIV infection rates were found to gradually increase with age, and over 70% of cats older than 9 years were seropositive for FeFV. In domestic cats, the prevalence of FeFV infection was similar in both sexes. In feral cats, FeFV infection was more prevalent in female cats than in male cats. Although both FeFV and FIV have been reported to be transmitted by biting, the patterns of infection observed are more consistent with an interpretation that transmission of these two retroviruses is not the same. The prevalence of FIV infection is highest in nondesexed male cats, the animals most likely to display aggressive behavior. The gradual increase in the proportion of FeFV-infected animals is consistent with transmission of foamy viruses by intimate social contact between animals and less commonly by aggressive behavior. PMID:10449463

  3. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-04-30

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  4. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  5. Canine and feline host ranges of canine parvovirus and feline panleukopenia virus: distinct host cell tropisms of each virus in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Truyen, U; Parrish, C R

    1992-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) emerged as an apparently new virus during the mid-1970s. The origin of CPV is unknown, but a variation from feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) or another closely related parvovirus is suspected. Here we examine the in vitro and in vivo canine and feline host ranges of CPV and FPV. Examination of three canine and six feline cell lines and mitogen-stimulated canine and feline peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed that CPV replicates in both canine and feline cells, whereas FPV replicates efficiently only in feline cells. The in vivo host ranges were unexpectedly complex and distinct from the in vitro host ranges. Inoculation of dogs with FPV revealed efficient replication in the thymus and, to some degree, in the bone marrow, as shown by virus isolation, viral DNA recovery, and Southern blotting and by strand-specific in situ hybridization. FPV replication could not be demonstrated in mesenteric lymph nodes or in the small intestine, which are important target tissues in CPV infection. Although CPV replicated well in all the feline cells tested in vitro, it did not replicate in any tissue of cats after intramuscular or intravenous inoculation. These results indicate that these viruses have complex and overlapping host ranges and that distinct tissue tropisms exist in the homologous and heterologous hosts. Images PMID:1323703

  6. Recombinant bacteriophages containing the integrated transforming provirus of Gardner--Arnstein feline sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, L A; Even, J; Garon, C F; Donner, L; Sherr, C J

    1981-01-01

    The integrated DNA provirus of the Gardner-Arnstein (GA) strain of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) was molecularly cloned in a bacteriophage lambda vector. The cloned DNA fragment is 14.4 kilobase pairs long and contains a 6.7-kilobase provirus flanked by cellular sequences derived from nonproductively transformed mink cells. Transfection of mouse NIH/3T3 cells with the cloned DNA fragment induced foci of transformation at efficiencies of 10(4) focus-forming units/pmol of sarcoma virus DNA. Restriction endonuclease mapping and heteroduplex analyses were used to compare the GA-FeSV provirus with that of Snyder-Theilen (ST)-FeSV, a second strain that contains homologous transformation-specific sequences (v-fes). Both viruses have the general structure 5'-gag-fes-env-c region-3', each having retained portions of the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) gag and env genes. In addition to segments shared by the two sarcoma viruses, GA-FeSV contains 1.7 kilobases of extra sequences not found in ST-FeSV. Of these, at least 400-500 base pairs located near the 5' end of v-fes encode a portion of the GA-FeSV polyprotein; the remaining 1.2 kilobases are derived from the FeLV env gene but do not appear to encode any detectable product related to the FeLV envelope glycoprotein. The close homology of the v-fes sequences shows that GA- and ST-FeSV were formed by recombination of FeLV with similar portions of a cat cellular gene (c-fes). Images PMID:6270655

  7. Intriguing interplay between feline infectious peritonitis virus and its receptors during entry in primary feline monocytes.

    PubMed

    Van Hamme, Evelien; Desmarets, Lowiese; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2011-09-01

    Two potential receptors have been described for the feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV): feline aminopeptidase N (fAPN) and feline dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule grabbing non-integrin (fDC-SIGN). In cell lines, fAPN serves as a receptor for serotype II, but not for serotype I FIPV. The role of fAPN in infection of in vivo target cells, monocytes, is not yet confirmed. Both serotype I and II FIPVs use fDC-SIGN for infection of monocyte-derived cells but how is not known. In this study, the role of fAPN and fDC-SIGN was studied at different stages in FIPV infection of monocytes. First, the effects of blocking the potential receptor(s) were studied for the processes of attachment and infection. Secondly, the level of co-localization of FIPV and the receptors was determined. It was found that FIPV I binding and infection were not affected by blocking fAPN while blocking fDC-SIGN reduced FIPV I binding to 36% and practically completely inhibited infection. Accordingly, 66% of bound FIPV I particles co-localized with fDC-SIGN. Blocking fAPN reduced FIPV II binding by 53% and infection by 80%. Further, 60% of bound FIPV II co-localized with fAPN. fDC-SIGN was not involved in FIPV II binding but infection was reduced with 64% when fDC-SIGN was blocked. In conclusion, FIPV I infection of monocytes depends on fDC-SIGN. Most FIPV I particles already interact with fDC-SIGN at the plasma membrane. For FIPV II, both fAPN and fDC-SIGN are involved in infection with only fAPN playing a receptor role at the plasma membrane.

  8. Prevalence of feline leukaemia virus and antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus in cats in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Hosie, M J; Robertson, C; Jarrett, O

    1989-09-09

    A representative sample of the pet cat population of the United Kingdom was surveyed. Blood samples from 1204 sick and 1007 healthy cats of known breed, age and sex were tested for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV). The prevalence of FIV was 19 per cent in sick cats and 6 per cent in healthy cats, and the prevalence of FeLV was 18 per cent in sick cats and 5 per cent in healthy cats; both infections were more common in domestic cats than in pedigree cats. Feline immunodeficiency virus was more prevalent in older cats but FeLV was more prevalent in younger cats. There was no difference between the prevalence of FeLV in male and female cats but male cats were more likely to be infected with FIV than female cats. No interaction was demonstrated between FIV and FeLV infections. Of the cats which were in contact with FIV in households with more than one cat, 21 per cent had seroconverted. The prevalence of FeLV viraemia in cats in contact with FeLV was 14 per cent. The clinical signs associated with FIV were pyrexia, gingivitis/stomatitis and respiratory signs, and with FeLV, pyrexia and anaemia. It was concluded that both viruses were significant causes of disease, and that the cats most likely to be infected with FIV were older, free-roaming male cats and for FeLV, younger, free-roaming cats.

  9. A nonstructural protein of feline panleukopenia virus: expression in Escherichia coli and detection of multiple forms in infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J O; Lynde-Maas, M K; Shen, Z D

    1987-01-01

    Sequences coding for the nonstructural protein NS1 of the autonomous parvovirus feline panleukopenia virus were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins. The fusion proteins were specifically bound by antisera from canine parvovirus-infected dogs. Antisera against one of the fusion proteins bound to several proteins found only in feline panleukopenia virus-infected feline cells. Images PMID:3027392

  10. First molecular characterization of feline immunodeficiency virus in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Oğuzoğlu, Tuba Ciğdem; Timurkan, Mehmet Ozkan; Muz, Dilek; Kudu, Ayşegül; Numanbayraktaroğlu, Başak; Sadak, Seda; Burgu, Ibrahim

    2010-11-01

    In this study, strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), designated TR-D, TR-Mo and TR-Mi, isolated from three cats in Turkey, were characterized. PCR products (859 bp) from the envelope (env) gene region were amplified and sequenced, and possible geographical differences in the env gene region of Turkish FIV strains are discussed. Phylogenetic analysis of two strains showed that FIV subtype B was present in Turkey. Phylogenetic analysis showed that one new Turkish FIV strain occupies a separate branch from known clusters (subtypes A to E) from the USA, Canada, Europe and Japan.

  11. Genetic diversity of Argentine isolates of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, M R; Tomonaga, K; Miyazawa, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sugita, S; Tohya, Y; Kai, C; Etcheverrigaray, M E; Mikami, T

    1996-09-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence and genetic diversity of part of the envelope (env) gene of four strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolated from Argentine domestic cats. The DNA encoding the V3 to V5 regions of the env gene of the FIV isolates were amplified by PCR, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Argentine isolates did not cluster into a single group; one isolate clustered with subtype B FIV isolated in the USA and Japan, whereas the others formed a new cluster of FIV which might represent a prototype sequence for subtype E.

  12. The neuropathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection: Barriers to overcome

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Nicola F.; Meeker, Rick B.; Hudson, Lola C.; Callanan, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, is a neurotropic lentivirus, and both natural and experimental infections are associated with neuropathology. FIV enters the brain early following experimental infection, most likely via the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers. The exact mechanism of entry, and the factors that influence this entry, are not fully understood. As FIV is a recognised model of HIV-1 infection, understanding such mechanisms is important, particularly as HIV enters the brain early in infection. Furthermore, the development of strategies to combat this central nervous system (CNS) infection requires an understanding of the interactions between the virus and the CNS. In this review the results of both in vitro and in vivo FIV studies are assessed in an attempt to elucidate the mechanisms of viral entry into the brain. PMID:20418131

  13. Identification of Inonotus obliquus polysaccharide with broad-spectrum antiviral activity against multi-feline viruses.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jin; Hu, Xiaoliang; Liu, Dafei; Wu, Hongxia; Qu, Liandong

    2017-02-01

    Inonotus obliquus polysaccharides (IOPs) are a potential drug for the prevention and treatment of cancer, cardiopathy, diabetes, AIDs, pancreatitis and other diseases. In this study, we found that IOP can act as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug against feline viruses in the in vitro experiment. Using cell models of feline calicivirus (FCV), we demonstrated that IOP treatment was capable of exhibiting anti-FCV strain F9 activity in cell-based assays and also showed low cytotoxicity. Investigation of the mechanism of action of the compound revealed that IOP treatment induces its inhibitory actions directly on virus particles through blocking viral binding/absorpting. The inhibitory activity against other FCV isolates from China was also identified. More importantly, we found that IOP exhibited broad-spectrum antiviral activity against the feline herpesvirus 1, feline influenza virus H3N2 and H5N6, feline panleukopenia virus and feline infectious peritonitis virus that can contribute to respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases in cats. These findings suggest that IOP may be a potential broad-spectrum antiviral drug against feline viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Model for Designing HIV/AIDS Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Janet K.; Sanou, Missa P.; Abbott, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) discovered in 1986 is a lentivirus that causes AIDS in domestic cats. FIV is classified into five subtypes (A–E), and all subtypes and circulating intersubtype recombinants have been identified throughout the world. A commercial FIV vaccine, consisting of inactivated subtype-A and –D viruses (Fel-O-Vax FIV, Fort Dodge Animal Health), was released in the United States in 2002. The United States Department of Agriculture approved the commercial release of Fel-O-Vax FIV based on two efficacy trials using 105 laboratory cats and a major safety trial performed on 689 pet cats. The prototype and commercial FIV vaccines had broad prophylactic efficacy against global FIV subtypes and circulating intersubtype recombinants. The mechanisms of cross-subtype efficacy are attributed to FIV-specific T-cell immunity. Findings from these studies are being used to define the prophylactic epitopes needed for an HIV-1 vaccine for humans. PMID:20210778

  15. Recombination in feline immunodeficiency virus genomes from naturally infected cougars.

    PubMed

    Bruen, Trevor C; Poss, Mary

    2007-08-01

    Recombination contributes significantly to diversity within virus populations and ultimately to viral evolution. Here we use a recently developed statistical test to perform exploratory analysis of recombination in fourteen feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVpco) genomes derived from a wild population of cougars. We use both the global and local Phi statistical test as an overall guide to predict where recombination may have occurred. Further analyses, including similarity plots and phylogenetic incongruence tests, confirmed that three FIVpco lineages were derived from recombinant events. Interestingly, the regions of mosaic origin were clustered in the area encoding lentiviral accessory genes and largely spared the viral structural genes. Because some of the mosaic strains are currently geographically disparate, our data indicate that the dispersal of cougars infected with these strains was preceded by recombination events. These results suggest that recombination has played an important role in the evolution of FIVpco for this wild population of cougars.

  16. Plasma electrophoretogram in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and/or feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infections.

    PubMed

    Miró, G; Doménech, A; Escolar, E; Collado, V M; Tejerizo, G; De Las Heras, A; Gómez-Lucía, E

    2007-05-01

    The electrophoretogram of 89 cats, including those infected by feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV+), feline leukaemia virus (FeLV+) and non-infected, showed statistically significant differences in several of the fractions. FIV+ cats had very high protein values (mean, 8.10 g/dl), mostly because of hypergammaglobulinemia (mean, 2.81 g/dl) as compared with non-infected animals and FeLV+. In addition, in these FIV+ animals, the albumin/globulins ratio (A/G) was very low (mean, 0.72). Statistically significant differences in A/G and alpha2-globulin fraction were observed in FeLV+ group (A/G mean, 0.88 +/- 0.08; alpha2-globulin, mean, 0.84 +/- 0.07 g/dl) when compared with non-infected group (A/G mean, 1.06 +/- 0.08; alpha2-globulin mean, 0.68 +/- 0.04 g/dl). The alpha1-globulin fraction was higher in double infected animals (FIV and FeLV positive, F-F) (3.55 g/dl), than in FeLV+ or FIV+ cats (3.10 and 3.07 g/dl respectively), but no statistical conclusions may be drawn from this fact because of the low number of F-F animals. This technique may help to assess the initial clinical status of retrovirus-infected cats, and the clinical course of these chronic diseases, specifically during and after suitable therapy.

  17. In Vivo Monocyte Tropism of Pathogenic Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Steven W.; Mathiason, Candace K.; Hoover, Edward A.

    1999-01-01

    Virus-infected monocytes rarely are detected in the bloodstreams of animals or people infected with immunodeficiency-inducing lentiviruses, yet tissue macrophages are thought to be a major reservoir of virus-infected cells in vivo. We have identified feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) clinical isolates that are pathogenic in cats and readily transmitted vertically. We report here that five of these FIV isolates are highly monocytotropic in vivo. However, while FIV-infected monocytes were numerous in the blood of experimentally infected cats, viral antigen was not detectable in freshly isolated cells. Only after a short-term (at least 12-h) in vitro monocyte culture were FIV antigens detectable (by immunocytochemical analysis or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). In vitro experiments suggested that monocyte adherence provided an important trigger for virus antigen expression. In the blood of cats infected with a prototype monocytotropic isolate (FIV subtype B strain 2542), infected monocytes appeared within 2 weeks, correlating with high blood mononuclear-cell-associated viral titers and CD4 cell depletion. By contrast, infected monocytes could not be detected in the blood of cats infected with a less pathogenic FIV strain (FIV subtype A strain Petaluma). We concluded that some strains of FIV are monocytotropic in vivo. Moreover, this property may relate to virus virulence, vertical transmission, and infection of tissue macrophages. PMID:10400783

  18. Feline immunodeficiency virus clade C mucosal transmission and disease courses.

    PubMed

    Obert, L A; Hoover, E A

    2000-05-01

    The transmissibility and pathogenicity of a clade C feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-C) was examined via the oral-nasal, vaginal, or rectal mucosa. FIV-C was transmissible by all three mucosal routes. Vaginal transmission was most efficient (100%), oral exposure resulted in a 80% infection rate, and rectal transmission was least effective (44%). In contrast to previous intravenous passage studies, a broader range of host-virus relationships was observed after mucosal exposure. Three categories of FIV-C infection were defined: (1) rapidly progressive infection marked by high virus burdens and rapid CD4+ cell depletion (43% of vaginally exposed animals); (2) conventional (typical) infection featuring slowly progressive CD4+ cell decline (61% of all exposed animals); and (3) regressive (transient) infection marked by low and then barely detectable virus burdens and no CD4+ cell alterations (22% of rectally inoculated cats). These disease courses appear to have parallels in mucosal HIV and SIV infections, emphasizing the importance of the virus-mucosa interface in lentiviral pathogenesis.

  19. TNF-alpha, produced by feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV)-infected macrophages, upregulates expression of type II FIPV receptor feline aminopeptidase N in feline macrophages.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu; Toda, Ayako; Tanabe, Maki; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2007-07-20

    The pathogenicity of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) is known to depend on macrophage tropism, and this macrophage infection is enhanced by mediation via anti-S antibody (antibody-dependent enhancement, ADE). In this study, we found that TNF-alpha production was increased with viral replication in macrophages inoculated with a mixture of FIPV and anti-S antibody, and demonstrated that this culture supernatant had feline PBMC apoptosis-inducing activity. We also demonstrated that the expression level of the FIPV virus receptor, feline aminopeptidase N (fAPN), was increased in macrophages of FIP cats. For upregulation of TNF-alpha and fAPN in macrophages, viral replication in macrophages is necessary, and their expressions were increased by ADE of FIPV infection. It was demonstrated that a heat-resistant fAPN-inducing factor was present in the culture supernatant of FIPV-infected macrophages, and this factor was TNF-alpha: fAPN expression was upregulated in recombinant feline TNF-alpha-treated macrophages, and FIPV infectivity was increased in these macrophages. These findings suggested that FIPV replication in macrophages increases TNF-alpha production in macrophages, and the produced TNF-alpha acts and upregulates fAPN expression, increasing FIPV sensitivity.

  20. Leukemia Viruses Associated with Mouse Myeloma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J.; Ralph, P.; Sarkar, S.; Cohn, Melvin

    1970-01-01

    Myeloma cells derived from BALB/c and C3H mice show evidence of infection by a murine leumemia virus. The immunoglobulin-producing myelomas secrete an RNA-containing virus with a density of 1.20 to 1.22 gm/cm3. RNA with a sedimentation coefficient of 74 S in 0.1 M sodium sodium chloride has been isolated from secreted virus particles and has a base composition similar to that found for other murine leukemia virus RNA. An intracellular virus particle has been partially purified and has a density of 1.29 to 1.32 gm/cm3. Both extracellular and intracellular virus particles contain the leukemia virus group-specific antigen. Images PMID:4317914

  1. Binding of Recombinant Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Surface Glycoprotein to Feline Cells: Role of CXCR4, Cell-Surface Heparans, and an Unidentified Non-CXCR4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    de Parseval, Aymeric; Elder, John H.

    2001-01-01

    To address the role of CXCR4 in the cell-surface attachment of the feline immunodeficency virus (FIV), a soluble fusion protein, gp95-Fc, consisting of the surface glycoprotein (SU, gp95) of either a primary (PPR) or cell line-adapted (34TF10) FIV strain was fused in frame with the Fc domain of human immunoglobulin G1. The recombinant SU-immunoadhesins were used as probes to investigate the cellular binding of FIV SU. In agreement with the host cell range properties of both viruses, binding of 34TF10 gp95-Fc was observed for all cell lines tested, whereas PPR gp95-Fc bound only to primary feline T cells. 34TF10 gp95-Fc also bound to Jurkat and HeLa cells, consistent with the ability of FIV to use human CXCR4 as a fusion receptor. As expected, 34TF10 gp95-Fc binding to Jurkat cells was blocked by addition of stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α), as was binding to the 3201 feline lymphoma cell line. However, SDF-1α, RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and heparin all failed to inhibit the binding of either gp95-Fc to primary T cells, suggesting that a non-CXCR4 receptor is involved in the binding of FIV SU. In this regard, an unidentified 40-kDa protein species from the surface of primary T cells but not Jurkat and 3201 cells specifically coprecipitated with both gp95-Fc. Yet another type of binding of 34TF10 gp95-Fc to adherent kidney cells was noted. SDF-1α failed to block the binding of 34TF10 gp95-Fc to either HeLa, Crandel feline leukemia, or G355-5 cells. However, binding was severely impaired in the presence of soluble heparin, as well as after enzymatic removal of surface heparans or on cells deficient in heparan expression. These overall findings suggest that in addition to CXCR4, a non-CXCR4 receptor and cell-surface heparans also play an important role in FIV gp95 cell surface interactions on specific target cells. PMID:11312323

  2. [Oncogenes and the origin of leukemia. Acute avian leukemia viruses].

    PubMed

    Graf, T

    1988-03-01

    Oncogenes have been intimately associated with the genesis of human neoplasms. A particularly useful system to study the mechanism of tumorigenesis is a small group of avian retroviruses that carry two oncogenes. These viruses causes acute leukemias and can transform hematopoietic cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which viral oncogenes affect the growth control and differentiation of their target cells is now understood in fair detail for two of these virus strains. In the avian erythroblastosis virus AEV, the v-erbB oncogene deregulates the growth control of erythroid precursors, while verbA blocks their terminal differentiation into erythrocytes. Based on the findings that v-erbB oncogene corresponds to a mutated growth factor receptor gene and that v-erbA corresponds to a mutated hormone receptor gene, models have been developed that explain the function of these two oncogenes on a molecular basis. The myelomonocytic leukemia virus MH2 acts by a completely different mechanism. In this case, the v-myc oncogene stimulates the proliferation of macrophage-like cells, while the v-mil gene stimulates them to produce their own growth factor, thus leading to autocrine growth. It will be interesting to determine whether the type of mechanisms of oncogene cooperativity elucidated for acute leukemia viruses are also operative during leukemogenesis in humans.

  3. In vitro assembly of the feline immunodeficiency virus Gag polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Affranchino, José L; González, Silvia A

    2010-06-01

    The retroviral Gag protein is the only viral product that is necessary for the assembly of virions in mammalian cells. We have established an in vitro assembly system to study the assembly properties of purified feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Gag protein expressed in bacteria. Under fully defined conditions, the FIV Gag protein assembles into spherical particles of 33 nm in diameter which are morphologically similar to authentic immature particles, albeit smaller than virions. The in vitro assembly of FIV Gag into particles was found to be resistant to the addition of Triton X-100 and required the presence of RNA. Notably, we found that an amino acid substitution in the nucleocapsid domain of Gag that impairs RNA binding and blocks virion production in vivo, also abrogates Gag assembly in vitro. The development of an in vitro assembly system for FIV Gag protein will facilitate the study of the mechanisms by which this protein assembles into immature particles.

  4. Methods for assessing feline immunodeficiency virus infection, infectivity and purification.

    PubMed

    Ammersbach, Melanie; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2011-10-15

    Infection of cats with the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) recapitulates many aspects of infection of humans with HIV, including highly activated but ineffectual immune responses. Infected hosts remain seropositive for life, and detection of antibodies is the mainstay of diagnosis. However, to quantify virus for research or prognosis, viral proteins, nucleic acids or enzymes, are typically measured by ELISA, PCR or activity, respectively. While such assays are in wide use, they do not distinguish whole, infectious viral particles from defective or disrupted viruses. Titers of infectious viral particles may be estimated from tissue culture infectious doses or by enumerating cell-associated viral proteins, viral transcriptional activity or formation of syncytia. To analyze the viral proteome and the incorporation of host components into viral envelopes, pure lentiviral preparations are required. Methods for purifying lentiviruses include ultracentrifugation to separate particles by size, mass and/or density; chromatography to separate particles by charge, affinity or size; and additional removal of extraviral proteins and exosomes through subtilisin digestion or immunoaffinity. This article reviews advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to purification of lentiviruses with special reference to suitability for FIV, and highlights effects of purification on immune responses and immune assays.

  5. Cloning and sequence of DNA encoding structural proteins of the autonomous parvovirus feline panleukopenia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J; Rushlow, K; Maxwell, I; Maxwell, F; Winston, S; Hahn, W

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 80% of the genome of feline panleukopenia virus was cloned into pBR322. This DNA included the transcription unit for the major viral mRNA species. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned portion of the genome was determined. Comparison of the feline panleukopenia virus sequence with the sequences of the parvoviruses minute virus of mice and H-1 revealed considerable homology between the three viruses on both the nucleic acid and protein levels. Based on this homology, a model for the generation of the two size classes of viral structural proteins (VP1 and VP2') is proposed. Images PMID:2991581

  6. Early pathogenesis of transmucosal feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Obert, Leslie A; Hoover, Edward A

    2002-06-01

    To identify the early target cells and tissues in transmucosal feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection, cats were exposed to a clade C FIV isolate via the oral-nasal or vaginal mucosa and multiple tissues were examined by virus isolation coculture (VI), DNA PCR, catalyzed tyramide signal-amplified in situ hybridization (TSA-ISH), and immunohistochemistry between days 1 and 12 postinoculation (p.i.). FIV RNA was detected in tonsil and oral or vaginal mucosa as early as 1 day p.i. by TSA-ISH and in retropharyngeal, tracheobronchial, or external iliac lymph nodes and sometimes in spleen or blood mononuclear cells by day 2, indicating that regional and distant spread of virus-infected cells occurred rapidly after mucosal exposure. By day 8, viral RNA, DNA, and culturable virus were uniformly detected in regional and distant tissues, connoting systemic infection. TSA-ISH proved more sensitive than DNA PCR in detecting early FIV-infected cells. In mucosal tissues, the earliest demonstrable FIV-bearing cells were either within or subjacent to the mucosal epithelium or were in germinal centers of regional lymph nodes. The FIV(+) cells were of either of two morphological types, large stellate or small round. Those FIV RNA(+) cells which could be colabeled for a phenotype marker, were labeled for either dendritic-cell-associated protein p55 or T-lymphocyte receptor antigen CD3. These studies indicate that FIV crosses mucous membranes within hours after exposure and rapidly traffics via dendritic and T cells to systemic lymphoid tissues, a pathway similar to that thought to occur in the initial phase of infection by the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses.

  7. Absence of an Immune Response after Oral Administration of Attenuated Feline Panleukopenia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Ronald D.; Scott, Fredric W.

    1973-01-01

    Cats were orally vaccinated with attenuated feline panleukopenia virus to compare this route with parenteral immunization. Cats receiving vaccine virus by mouth did not produce a systemic or local antibody response to the virus. Intranasal and subcutaneous vaccination produced high levels of neutralizing antibodies and provided protection from challenge with virulent virus. The results suggest that virus does not initially infect the tissue of the oral pharynx or gastrointestinal tract as previously suspected. PMID:4762109

  8. The Role of In Vitro-Induced Lymphocyte Apoptosis in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Correlation with Different Markers of Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Holznagel, Edgar; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Allenspach, Karin; Huettner, Silke; Forster, Ursula; Niederer, Eva; Joller, Helen; Willett, Brian J.; Hummel, Urs; Rossi, Giovanni L.; Schüpbach, Jörg; Lutz, Hans

    1998-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection is characterized by a progressive decline in the number of peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocytes, which finally leads to AIDS. This T-cell decline correlates with the degree of in vitro-induced lymphocyte apoptosis. However, such a correlation has not yet been described in feline AIDS, caused by feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection. We therefore investigated the intensity of in vitro-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes from cats experimentally infected with a Swiss isolate of FIV for 1 year and for 6 years and from a number of long-term FIV-infected cats which were coinfected with feline leukemia virus. Purified peripheral blood lymphocytes were either cultured overnight under nonstimulating conditions or stimulated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2 for 60 h. Under stimulating conditions, the isolates from the infected cats showed significantly higher relative counts of apoptotic cells than did those from noninfected controls (1-year-infected cats, P = 0.01; 6-year-infected cats, P = 0.006). The frequency of in vitro-induced apoptosis was inversely correlated with the CD4+ cell count (P = 0.002), bright CD8+ cell count (P = 0.009), and CD4/CD8 ratio (P = 0.01) and directly correlated with the percentage of bright major histocompatibility complex class II-positive peripheral blood lymphocytes (P = 0.004). However, we found no correlation between in vitro-induced apoptosis and the viral load in serum samples. Coinfection with feline leukemia virus enhanced the degree of in vitro-induced apoptosis compared with that in FIV monoinfected cats. We concluded that the degree of in vitro-induced apoptosis was closely related to FIV-mediated T-cell depletion and lymphocyte activation and could be used as an additional marker for disease progression in FIV infection. PMID:9765447

  9. Prevalence of serum antibody titers against feline panleukopenia virus, feline herpesvirus 1, and feline calicivirus in cats entering a Florida animal shelter.

    PubMed

    DiGangi, Brian A; Levy, Julie K; Griffin, Brenda; McGorray, Susan P; Dubovi, Edward J; Dingman, Patricia A; Tucker, Sylvia J

    2012-11-15

    To determine the proportion of cats entering a Florida animal shelter with serum antibody titers against feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV1), and feline calicivirus (FCV) and to identify factors associated with seropositivity. Cross-sectional study. 347 cats admitted to a Florida animal shelter. Within 24 hours after admission to the animal shelter, blood samples were collected from all cats ≥ 8 weeks of age. Serum antibody titers against FPV were determined via a hemagglutination inhibition assay, and those against FHV1 and FCV were determined via virus neutralization assays. Age, sex, environment (urban or rural), source (stray or previously owned), evidence of previous caregiving, health status (healthy or not healthy), and outcome (adoption, transfer, return to owner, or euthanasia) were evaluated as potential factors associated with antibody seropositivity. Of 347 cats, 138 (39.8%), 38 (11.0%), and 127 (36.6%) had antibody titers ≥ 40, ≥ 8, and ≥ 32 (ie, seropositive) against FPV, FHV1, and FCV, respectively. Factors associated with seropositivity included being neutered, age ≥ 6 months, and being relinquished by an owner. On multivariable analysis, health status at shelter admission, environment, vaccination at shelter admission, and outcome were not associated with seropositivity. Most cats were seronegative for antibodies against FPV, FHV1, and FCV at the time of admission to an animal shelter. These findings supported current guidelines that recommend vaccination of all cats immediately after admission to animal shelters, regardless of the source or physical condition.

  10. Construction of a recombinant bovine leukemia virus vector for analysis of virus infectivity.

    PubMed

    Derse, D; Martarano, L

    1990-01-01

    A recombinant bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was constructed in which the X region was replaced with the bacterial neomycin resistance gene controlled by the simian virus 40 early promoter. This virus, termed BLV-SVNEO, is a self-packaging, activator-dependent retroviral vector. Introduction of the plasmid pBLV-SVNEO into mammalian cells resulted in constitutive expression of the neo gene, whereas the BLV structural genes, gag, pol, and env, were expressed only in the presence of the two regulatory proteins, Tax and Rex. The production and release of recombinant virus by cells transfected with pBLV-SVNEO were proportional to the number of G418-resistant colonies that developed after susceptible cells were exposed to the filtered culture medium. BLV-SVNEO was able to infect cell lines of human, bovine, canine, feline, and murine origin. BLV-producing cell lines were resistant to superinfection with BLV-SVNEO. This cell-virus system should facilitate molecular genetic studies of BLV and will provide a rapid, quantitative measure of BLV infectivity in a variety of cell types. These studies also demonstrate the feasibility of using activator-dependent retroviral vectors such as BLV-SVNEO to deliver foreign genes into cells and eventually animals.

  11. Cutaneous lesions associated with coronavirus-induced vasculitis in a cat with feline infectious peritonitis and concurrent feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Martha J; Silkstone, Malcolm A; Kipar, Anja M

    2005-08-01

    This report describes a clinical case of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) with multisystemic involvement, including multiple nodular cutaneous lesions, in a cat that was co-infected with feline coronavirus and feline immunodeficiency virus. The skin lesions were caused by a pyogranulomatous-necrotising dermal phlebitis and periphlebitis. Immunohistology demonstrated the presence of coronavirus antigen in macrophages within these lesions. The pathogenesis of FIP involves a viral associated, disseminated phlebitis and periphlebitis which can arise at many sites. Target organs frequently include the eyes, abdominal organs, pleural and peritoneal membranes, and central nervous tissues, but cutaneous lesions have not previously been reported.

  12. New acute transforming feline retovirus with fms homology specifies a C-terminally truncated version of the c-fms protein that is different from SM-feline sarcoma virus v-fms protein

    SciTech Connect

    Besmer, P.; Lader, E.; George, P.C.; Bergold, P.J.; Qui, F.; Zuckerman, E.E.; Hardy, W.D.

    1986-10-01

    The HZ5-feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) is a new acute transforming feline retrovirus which was isolated from a multicentric fibrosarcoma of a domestic cat. The HZ5-FeSV transforms fibroblasts in vitro and is replication defective. A biologically active integrated HZ5-FeSV provirus was molecularly cloned from cellular DNA of HZ5-FeSV-infected FRE-3A rat cells. The HZ5-FeSV has oncogene homology with the fms sequences of the SM-FeSV. The genome organization of the 8.6-kilobase HZ5-FeSV provirus is 5' ..delta..gag-fms-..delta..pol-..delta..env 3'. The HZ5- and SM-FeSVs display indistinguishable in vitro transformation characteristics, and the structures of the gag-fms transforming genes in the two viruses are very similar. In the HZ5-FeSV and the SM-FeSV, identical c-fms and feline leukemia virus p10 sequences form the 5' gag-fms junction. With regard to v-fms the two viruses are homologous up to 11 amino acids before the C terminus of the SM-FeSV v-fms protein. In HZ5-FeSV a segment of 362 nucleotides then follows before the 3' recombination site with feline leukemia virus pol. The new 3' v-fms sequence encodes 27 amino acids before reaching a TGA termination signal. The relationship of this sequence with the recently characterized human c-fms sequence has been examined. The 3' HZ5-FeSV v-fms sequence is homologous with 3' c-fms sequences. A frameshift mutation (11-base-pair deletion) was found in the C-terminal fms coding sequence of the HZ5-FeSV. As a result, the HZ5-FeSV v-fms protein is predicted to be a C-terminally truncated version of c-fms. This frameshift mutation may determine the oncogenic properties of v-fms in the HZ5-FeSV.

  13. ANTIGENS OF LEUKEMIAS INDUCED BY NATURALLY OCCURRING MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS: THEIR RELATION TO THE ANTIGENS OF GROSS VIRUS AND OTHER MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Geering, Gayla; Old, Lloyd J.; Boyse, Edward A.

    1966-01-01

    Leukemias can be induced in W/Fu inbred rats by neonatal inoculation of normal thymus cells of C58 mice. These leukemias are not transplantable to C58 mice or to adult W/Fu rats, but they can be kept in passage in W/Fu rats aged 0 to 7 days. Adult W/Fu rats inoculated repeatedly with these isogenic leukemias produce cytotoxic and precipitating antibodies. These antisera are of particular value in the analysis of the antigens of leukemia cells and of leukemia viruses because their mode of preparation precludes the formation of antibody against any normal constituents of the cell. Analysis based on the cytotoxic test indicates the presence of 2 distinct cell surface antigens in leukemias induced by Passage A Gross virus or occurring spontaneously in mice of high-incidence strains. All leukemias and other tissues known to contain G (Gross) leukemia antigen have both determinants, but certain leukemias of low-incidence strains have only 1 of them and so were previously classified G-. Immunoprecipitation with these antisera reveals the presence of a cellular antigen common to G+ cells and absent from G- cells; the same antigen can be demonstrated in ether-treated Gross virus, but not in intact virus. This antigen is present also in ether-treated preparations of the Friend, Moloney, and Rauscher leukemia viruses, but not in Bittner (mammary tumor) virus. Thus it may be regarded as a group-specific antigen of murine leukemia viruses, in contrast to the type-specific cellular antigens demonstrable by the cytotoxic test. Four additional antigens associated with leukemias induced by wild-type Gross virus have been demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, but their relation to viral and cellular antigens has not been determined. PMID:4288480

  14. Rapid and sensitive detection of Feline immunodeficiency virus using an insulated isothermal PCR-based assay with a point-of-need PCR detection platform.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca Penrose; Kania, Stephen A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiu-Hui; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is an important infectious agent of cats. Clinical syndromes resulting from FIV infection include immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections, and neoplasia. In our study, a 5' long terminal repeat/gag region-based reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) was developed to amplify all known FIV strains to facilitate point-of-need FIV diagnosis. The RT-iiPCR method was applied in a point-of-need PCR detection platform--a field-deployable device capable of generating automatically interpreted RT-iiPCR results from nucleic acids within 1 hr. Limit of detection 95% of FIV RT-iiPCR was calculated to be 95 copies standard in vitro transcription RNA per reaction. Endpoint dilution studies with serial dilutions of an ATCC FIV type strain showed that the sensitivity of lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent was comparable to that of a reference nested PCR. The established reaction did not amplify any nontargeted feline pathogens, including Felid herpesvirus 1, feline coronavirus, Feline calicivirus, Feline leukemia virus, Mycoplasma haemofelis, and Chlamydophila felis. Based on analysis of 76 clinical samples (including blood and bone marrow) with the FIV RT-iiPCR, test sensitivity was 97.78% (44/45), specificity was 100.00% (31/31), and agreement was 98.65% (75/76), determined against a reference nested-PCR assay. A kappa value of 0.97 indicated excellent correlation between these 2 methods. The lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent, deployed on a user-friendly portable device, has potential utility for rapid and easy point-of-need detection of FIV in cats. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Apoptosis transcriptional mechanism of feline infectious peritonitis virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Safi, Nikoo; Haghani, Amin; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Haron, Mohd Syamsul Reza; Tan, Sheau Wei; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis has been postulated to play an important role during feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection; however, its mechanism is not well characterized. This study is focused on apoptosis and transcriptional profiling of FIPV-infected cells following in vitro infection of CRFK cells with FIPV 79-1146 WSU. Flow cytometry was used to determine mode of cell death in first 42 h post infection (hpi). FIPV infected cells underwent early apoptosis at 9 hpi (p < 0.05) followed by late apoptosis at 12 hpi (p < 0.05) and necrosis from 24 hpi (p < 0.05). Then, next generation sequencing was performed on 9 hpi and control uninfected cells by Illumina analyzer. An aggregate of 4546 genes (2229 down-regulated and 2317 up-regulated) from 17 cellular process, 11 molecular functions and 130 possible biological pathways were affected by FIPV. 131 genes from apoptosis cluster (80 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated) along with increase of apoptosis, p53, p38 MAPK, VEGF and chemokines/cytokines signaling pathways were probably involved in apoptosis process. Six of the de-regulated genes expression (RASSF1, BATF2, MAGEB16, PDCD5, TNFα and TRAF2) and TNFα protein concentration were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively, at different time-points. Up-regulations of both pro-apoptotic (i.e. PDCD5) and anti-apoptotic (i.e. TRAF2) were detected from first hpi and continuing to deregulate during apoptosis process in the infected cells.

  16. Feline immunodeficiency virus infection in cats of Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishida, T; Washizu, T; Toriyabe, K; Motoyoshi, S; Tomoda, I; Pedersen, N C

    1989-01-15

    A seroepidemiologic survey for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection was conducted in Japan. Between June and December 1987, individual sera (n = 3,323) were submitted by veterinary practitioners from many parts of the country. Specimens were from 1,739 cats with clinical signs suggestive of FIV infection and from 1,584 healthy-appearing cats seen by the same practitioners. The overall FIV infection rate among cats in Japan was 960/3,323 cats (28.9%). The infection rate was more than 3 times higher in the clinically ill cats, compared with that in the healthy cats of the same cohort (43.9 vs 12.4%). Male cats were 1.5 times as likely to be infected as were females. Almost all FIV-infected cats were domestic cats (as opposed to purebred cats). Complete clinical history was available for 700 of 960 FIV-infected cats. Of these 700 FIV-infected cats, 626 (89.4%) were clinically ill, and the remainder did not have clinical signs of disease. The mean age at the time of FIV diagnosis for the 700 cats was 5.2 years, with younger mean age for males (4.9 years) than for females (5.8 years). Most of the infected cats (94.7%) were either allowed to run outdoors or had lived outdoors before being brought into homes. The mortality for FIV-infected cats during the 6 months after diagnosis was 14.7%, and the mean age at the time of death was 5.7 years. Concurrent FeLV infection was seen in 12.4% of the FIV-infected cats, but this was not much different from the historical incidence of FeLV infection in similar groups of cats not infected with FIV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Feline immunodeficiency virus env gene evolution in experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Kraase, Martin; Sloan, Richard; Klein, Dieter; Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Linda; Biek, Roman; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2010-03-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), an immunosuppressive lentivirus found in cats worldwide, is studied to illuminate mechanisms of lentiviral pathogenesis and to identify key components of protective immunity. During replication, lentiviruses accumulate errors of nucleotide mis-incorporation due to the low-fidelity of reverse transcriptase and recombination between viral variants, resulting in the emergence of a complex viral "quasispecies". In patients infected with HIV-1, env sequences may vary by up to 10% and the detection of quasispecies with greater heterogeneity is associated with higher viral loads and reduced CD4+ T cell numbers [1], indicating that transmission of more complex quasispecies may lead to disease progression. However, little is known about how FIV evolves as disease progresses, or why some cats develop AIDS rapidly while disease progression is slow in others. The aim of this study was to determine whether disease progression may be governed by viral evolution and to examine the diversity of viral variants emerging following infection with an infectious molecular clone. The FIV env gene encoding the envelope glycoprotein (Env) was examined at early (12 weeks) and late (322 weeks) stages of FIV infection in two groups of cats infected experimentally with the FIV-GL8 molecular clone. Viral variants were detected within quasispecies in cats in the late stages of FIV infection that contained differing amino acid compositions in several variable loops of Env, some of which were identified as determinants of receptor usage and resistance to neutralization. Therefore these results indicate that the FIV env gene evolves during the course of infection, giving rise to variants that resist neutralization and likely lead to disease progression.

  18. Molecular characterization and virus neutralization patterns of severe, non-epizootic forms of feline calicivirus infections resembling virulent systemic disease in cats in Switzerland and in Liechtenstein.

    PubMed

    Willi, Barbara; Spiri, Andrea M; Meli, Marina L; Samman, Ayman; Hoffmann, Karolin; Sydler, Titus; Cattori, Valentino; Graf, Felix; Diserens, Kevin A; Padrutt, Isabelle; Nesina, Stefanie; Berger, Alice; Ruetten, Maja; Riond, Barbara; Hosie, Margaret J; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-01-15

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) infections are associated with oral ulceration, chronic stomatitis and a limping syndrome. Epizootic outbreaks of virulent systemic disease (VSD) have been reported in the USA and Europe. Here, the molecular characterization and neutralization patterns of FCV isolates from cases of severe, non-epizootic infection associated with skin ulceration and edema are presented. Samples from eleven symptomatic cats, four in-contact cats and 27 cats with no contact with symptomatic cats were collected and tested for FCV, feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Phylogenetic analyses based on the capsid (VP1) gene of FCV and virus neutralization with antisera raised against four FCV vaccine strains were performed. Nine kittens and two adult cats in two shelters and two veterinary clinics in four geographically distinct locations in Switzerland and Liechtenstein were affected. The cats showed fever, tongue and skin ulceration, head and paw edema, and occasionally jaundice, generalized edema and dyspnea. All symptomatic cats tested FCV-positive but were negative for FHV-1, FeLV and FIV, with the exception of one FIV-positive kitten. All kittens of one litter and both adult cats died. The disease did not spread to cats in the environment. Cats in the environment displayed phylogenetically distinct, but related, FCV strains. Virus neutralization patterns suggested that some cases might have been potentially prevented by vaccination with the optimal vaccine strain. In conclusion, clinicians should be aware of severe, non-epizootic forms of FCV infections with initial clinical presentations similar to VSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. CXCR4 Is Required by a Nonprimate Lentivirus: Heterologous Expression of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Human, Rodent, and Feline Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poeschla, Eric M.; Looney, David J.

    1998-01-01

    A heterologous feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) expression system permitted high-level expression of FIV proteins and efficient production of infectious FIV in human cells. These results identify the FIV U3 element as the sole restriction to the productive phase of replication in nonfeline cells. Heterologous FIV expression in a variety of human cell lines resulted in profuse syncytial lysis that was FIV env specific, CD4 independent, and restricted to cells that express CXCR4, the coreceptor for T-cell-line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus. Stable expression of human CXCR4 in CXCR4-negative human and rodent cell lines resulted in extensive FIV Env-mediated, CXCR4-dependent cell fusion and infection. In feline cells, stable overexpression of human CXCR4 resulted in increased FIV infectivity and marked syncytium formation during FIV replication or after infection with FIV Env-expressing vectors. The use of CXCR4 is a fundamental feature of lentivirus biology independent of CD4 and a shared cellular link to infection and cytopathicity for distantly related lentiviruses that cause AIDS. Their conserved use implicates chemokine receptors as primordial lentivirus receptors. PMID:9658135

  20. New structural arrangement of the extracellular regions of the phosphate transporter SLC20A1, the receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Karen B; Tusnady, Gabor E; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2009-10-23

    Infection of a host cell by a retrovirus requires an initial interaction with a cellular receptor. For numerous gammaretroviruses, such as the gibbon ape leukemia virus, woolly monkey virus, feline leukemia virus subgroup B, feline leukemia virus subgroup T, and 10A1 murine leukemia virus, this receptor is the human type III sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate transporter, SLC20A1, formerly known as PiT1. Understanding the critical receptor functionalities and interactions with the virus that lead to successful infection requires that we first know the surface structure of the cellular receptor. Previous molecular modeling from the protein sequence, and limited empirical data, predicted a protein with 10 transmembrane helices. Here we undertake the biochemical approach of substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to resolve the topology of this receptor in live cells. We discover that there are segments of the protein that are unexpectedly exposed to the outside milieu. By using information determined by substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to set constraints in HMMTOP, a hidden Markov model-based transmembrane topology prediction method, we now propose a comprehensive topological model for SLC20A1, a transmembrane protein with 12 transmembrane helices and 7 extracellular regions, that varies from previous models and should permit approaches that define both virus interaction and transport function.

  1. Adaptation and Study of AIDS Viruses in Animal and Cell Culture Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-30

    category one, e.g , Friend Murine -6- Leukemia Virus (FMuLV), Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV), and the Macaque Type D SAIDS retrovirus (SRV) have been...10). One other animal lentivirus, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), has had some utility in the study of protective immunity and in screening...et al. (58) transplanted RNA mumps virus infected human HeLa cells, or RNA vesicular stomatitis virus-infected hamster BHK cells into nude mice

  2. Feline foamy virus adversely affects feline mesenchymal stem cell culture and expansion: implications for animal model development.

    PubMed

    Arzi, Boaz; Kol, Amir; Murphy, Brian; Walker, Naomi J; Wood, Joshua A; Clark, Kaitlin; Verstraete, Frank J M; Borjesson, Dori L

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising therapeutic option for various immune-mediated and inflammatory disorders due to their potent immunomodulatory and trophic properties. Naturally occurring diseases in large animal species may serve as surrogate animal models of human disease, as they may better reflect the complex genetic, environmental, and physiologic variation present in outbred populations. We work with naturally occurring diseases in large animal species to better understand how MSCs work and to facilitate optimal translation of MSC-based therapies. We are investigating the use of MSC therapy for a chronic oral inflammatory disease in cats. During our efforts to expand fat-derived feline MSCs (fMSCs), we observed that∼50% of the cell lines developed giant foamy multinucleated cells in later passages. These morphologic alterations were associated with proliferation arrest. We hypothesized that the cytopathic effects were caused by infection with a retrovirus, feline foamy virus (FFV). Using transmission electron microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, and in vitro assays, we determined that syncytial cell formation and proliferation arrest in fMSCs were caused by FFV strains that were highly homologous to previously reported FFV strains. We determined that the antiretroviral drug, tenofovir, may be used to support ex vivo expansion and salvage of FFV-infected fMSC lines. MSC lines derived from specific pathogen-free cats do not appear to be infected with FFV and may be a source of allogeneic fMSCs for clinical application. FFV infection of fMSC lines may hinder large-scale expansion of autologous MSC for therapeutic use in feline patients.

  3. Feline Foamy Virus Adversely Affects Feline Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture and Expansion: Implications for Animal Model Development

    PubMed Central

    Kol, Amir; Murphy, Brian; Walker, Naomi J.; Wood, Joshua A.; Clark, Kaitlin; Verstraete, Frank J.M.; Borjesson, Dori L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising therapeutic option for various immune-mediated and inflammatory disorders due to their potent immunomodulatory and trophic properties. Naturally occurring diseases in large animal species may serve as surrogate animal models of human disease, as they may better reflect the complex genetic, environmental, and physiologic variation present in outbred populations. We work with naturally occurring diseases in large animal species to better understand how MSCs work and to facilitate optimal translation of MSC-based therapies. We are investigating the use of MSC therapy for a chronic oral inflammatory disease in cats. During our efforts to expand fat-derived feline MSCs (fMSCs), we observed that∼50% of the cell lines developed giant foamy multinucleated cells in later passages. These morphologic alterations were associated with proliferation arrest. We hypothesized that the cytopathic effects were caused by infection with a retrovirus, feline foamy virus (FFV). Using transmission electron microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, and in vitro assays, we determined that syncytial cell formation and proliferation arrest in fMSCs were caused by FFV strains that were highly homologous to previously reported FFV strains. We determined that the antiretroviral drug, tenofovir, may be used to support ex vivo expansion and salvage of FFV-infected fMSC lines. MSC lines derived from specific pathogen-free cats do not appear to be infected with FFV and may be a source of allogeneic fMSCs for clinical application. FFV infection of fMSC lines may hinder large-scale expansion of autologous MSC for therapeutic use in feline patients. PMID:25404388

  4. Biological and pathological consequences of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection in the cheetah.

    PubMed

    Evermann, J F; Heeney, J L; Roelke, M E; McKeirnan, A J; O'Brien, S J

    1988-01-01

    An epizootic of feline infectious peritonitis in a captive cheetah population during 1982-1983 served to focus attention on the susceptibility of the cheetah (Acinoyx jubatus) to infectious disease. Subsequent observations based upon seroepidemiological surveys and electron microscopy of fecal material verified that cheetahs were indeed capable of being infected by coronaviruses, which were antigenically related to coronaviruses affecting domestic cats, i.e. feline infectious peritonitis virus/feline enteric coronavirus. Coincident with the apparent increased susceptibility of the cheetah to infectious diseases, were observations that the cheetah was genetically unusual insofar as large amounts of enzyme-encoding loci were monomorphic, and that unrelated cheetahs were capable of accepting allogenic skin grafts. These data provided the basis for a hypothesis that the cheetah, through intensive inbreeding, had become more susceptible to viral infections as a result of genetic homogeneity.

  5. Rapid and sensitive insulated isothermal PCR for point-of-need feline leukaemia virus detection.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Anis, Eman; Dunbar, Dawn; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Fu-Chun; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Graham, Elizabeth M

    2017-06-01

    Objectives Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), a gamma retrovirus, causes diseases of the feline haematopoietic system that are invariably fatal. Rapid and accurate testing at the point-of-need (PON) supports prevention of virus spread and management of clinical disease. This study evaluated the performance of an insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR) that detects proviral DNA, and a reverse transcription (RT)-iiPCR that detects both viral RNA and proviral DNA, for FeLV detection at the PON. Methods Mycoplasma haemofelis, feline coronavirus, feline herpesvirus, feline calicivirus and feline immunodeficiency virus were used to test analytical specificity. In vitro transcribed RNA, artificial plasmid, FeLV strain American Type Culture Collection VR-719 and a clinical FeLV isolate were used in the analytical sensitivity assays. A retrospective study including 116 clinical plasma and serum samples that had been tested with virus isolation, real-time PCR and ELISA, and a prospective study including 150 clinical plasma and serum samples were implemented to evaluate the clinical performances of the iiPCR-based methods for FeLV detection. Results Ninety-five percent assay limit of detection was calculated to be 16 RNA and five DNA copies for the RT-iiPCR, and six DNA copies for the iiPCR. Both reactions had analytical sensitivity comparable to a reference real-time PCR (qPCR) and did not detect five non-target feline pathogens. The clinical performance of the RT-iiPCR and iiPCR had 98.82% agreement (kappa[κ] = 0.97) and 100% agreement (κ = 1.0), respectively, with the qPCR (n = 85). The agreement between an automatic nucleic extraction/RT-iiPCR system and virus isolation to detect FeLV in plasma or serum was 95.69% (κ = 0.95) and 98.67% (κ = 0.85) in a retrospective (n = 116) and a prospective (n = 150) study, respectively. Conclusions and relevance These results suggested that both RT-iiPCR and iiPCR assays can serve as reliable tools for PON FeLV detection.

  6. Pathogenicity of molecularly cloned bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rovnak, J; Boyd, A L; Casey, J W; Gonda, M A; Jensen, W A; Cockerell, G L

    1993-01-01

    To delineate the mechanisms of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) pathogenesis, four full-length BLV clones, 1, 8, 9, and 13, derived from the transformed cell line FLK-BLV and a clone construct, pBLV913, were introduced into bovine spleen cells by microinjection. Microinjected cells exhibited cytopathic effects and produced BLV p24 and gp51 antigens and infectious virus. The construct, pBLV913, was selected for infection of two sheep by inoculation of microinjected cells. After 15 months, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these sheep served as inocula for the transfer of infection to four additional sheep. All six infected sheep seroconverted to BLV and had detectable BLV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells after amplification by polymerase chain reaction. Four of the six sheep developed altered B/T-lymphocyte ratios between 33 and 53 months postinfection. One sheep died of unrelated causes, and one remained hematologically normal. Two of the affected sheep developed B lymphocytosis comparable to that observed in animals inoculated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from BLV-infected cattle. This expanded B-lymphocyte population was characterized by elevated expression of B-cell surface markers, spontaneous blastogenesis, virus expression in vitro, and increased, polyclonally integrated provirus. One of these two sheep developed lymphocytic leukemia-lymphoma at 57 months postinfection. Leukemic cells had the same phenotype and harbored a single, monoclonally integrated provirus but produced no virus after in vitro cultivation. The range in clinical response to in vivo infection with cloned BLV suggests an important role for host immune response in the progression of virus replication and pathogenesis. Images PMID:8230433

  7. Apparent posttranscriptional block to anaerobic induction of endogenous leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker-Dowling, P A; Marotti, K R; Anderson, G R

    1979-01-01

    Uninfected Fischer rat cells were induced by anaerobic stress to transcribe high levels of endogenous type C leukemia virus RNA. Complete 35S virus RNA with attached polyadenylic acid sequences was found associated with polysomes, indicating functional mRNA. Since no mature virus was released under these conditions, the presence of a posttranscriptional block to complete virus synthesis is strongly indicated. PMID:232174

  8. Genetics and pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith A; Troyer, Jennifer L; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2009-09-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) is endemic in feral cat populations and cat colonies, frequently preceding outbreaks of fatal feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). FCoV exhibits 2 biotypes: the pathogenic disease and a benign infection with feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Uncertainty remains regarding whether genetically distinctive avirulent and virulent forms coexist or whether an avirulent form mutates in vivo, causing FIP. To resolve these alternative hypotheses, we isolated viral sequences from FCoV-infected clinically healthy and sick cats (8 FIP cases and 48 FECV-asymptomatic animals); 735 sequences from 4 gene segments were generated and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Viral sequences from healthy cats were distinct from sick cats on the basis of genetic distances observed in the membrane and nonstructural protein 7b genes. These data demonstrate distinctive circulating virulent and avirulent strains in natural populations. In addition, 5 membrane protein amino acid residues with functional potential differentiated healthy cats from cats with FIP. These findings may have potential as diagnostic markers for virulent FIP-associated FCoV.

  9. Genetics and Pathogenesis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) is endemic in feral cat populations and cat colonies, frequently preceding outbreaks of fatal feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). FCoV exhibits 2 biotypes: the pathogenic disease and a benign infection with feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Uncertainty remains regarding whether genetically distinctive avirulent and virulent forms coexist or whether an avirulent form mutates in vivo, causing FIP. To resolve these alternative hypotheses, we isolated viral sequences from FCoV-infected clinically healthy and sick cats (8 FIP cases and 48 FECV-asymptomatic animals); 735 sequences from 4 gene segments were generated and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Viral sequences from healthy cats were distinct from sick cats on the basis of genetic distances observed in the membrane and nonstructural protein 7b genes. These data demonstrate distinctive circulating virulent and avirulent strains in natural populations. In addition, 5 membrane protein amino acid residues with functional potential differentiated healthy cats from cats with FIP. These findings may have potential as diagnostic markers for virulent FIP-associated FCoV. PMID:19788813

  10. An investigation into the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) in cats in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tiao, N; Darrington, C; Molla, B; Saville, W J A; Tilahun, G; Kwok, O C H; Gebreyes, W A; Lappin, M R; Jones, J L; Dubey, J P

    2013-05-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) are immunosuppressive viruses of cats that can affect T. gondii oocyst shedding. In this study, the prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii, Bartonella spp., FIV, as well as FeLV antigens were determined in sera from feral cats (Felis catus) from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Using the modified agglutination test, IgG antibodies to T. gondii were found in 41 (85.4%) of the 48 cats with titres of 1:25 in one, 1:50 in one, 1:200 in six, 1:400 in six, 1:800 in six, 1:1600 in eight, and 1:3200 in 13 cats. Toxoplasma gondii IgM antibodies were found in 11/46 cats tested by ELISA, suggesting recent infection. Antibodies to Bartonella spp. were found in five (11%) of 46 cats tested. Antibodies to FIV or FeLV antigen were not detected in any of the 41 cats tested. The results indicate a high prevalence of T. gondii and a low prevalence of Bartonella spp. infection in cats in Ethiopia.

  11. Protection against feline leukemia virus challenge for at least 2 years after vaccination with an inactivated feline leukemia virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jirjis, Faris F; Davis, Tamara; Lane, Jennifer; Carritt, Kari; Sweeney, Diane; Williams, James; Wasmoen, Terri

    2010-01-01

    Twelve cats were vaccinated at 8 and 11 weeks of age with a commercially available inactivated FeLV vaccine (Nobivac FeLV, Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health). Eleven cats served as age-matched, placebo-vaccinated controls. All cats were kept in isolation for 2 years after vaccination and were then challenged with virulent FeLV to evaluate vaccine efficacy and duration of immunity. Cats were monitored for 12 weeks after challenge for development of persistent viremia using a commercial FeLV p27 ELISA. Persistent viremia developed in all 11 (100%) of the control cats, whereas 10 of 12 (83%) vaccinated cats were fully protected from persistent viremia following challenge. The results demonstrate that the vaccine used in this study protects cats from persistent FeLV viremia for at least 2 years after vaccination.

  12. Concurrent infection of a cat with cowpox virus and feline parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Schaudien, D; Meyer, H; Grunwald, D; Janssen, H; Wohlsein, P

    2007-01-01

    Concurrent infection with cowpox and feline parvovirus was diagnosed in a 5-month-old male European Short Hair cat. Microscopical examination of the facial skin, ears and foot pads revealed multifocal to coalescing, ulcerative to necrotizing dermatitis and panniculitis with ballooning epidermal degeneration and eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction testing and virus isolation confirmed infection with a strain of cowpox virus similar to that isolated from a cat in Germany 5 years previously. Lymphoid tissues were depleted and there was catarrhal enteritis caused by feline parvovirus as confirmed by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. This co-infection did not result in a more severe and rapid course of the poxvirus-associated disease.

  13. Effect of bovine lactoferrin on functions of activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells during chronic feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Saori; Sato, Reeko; Aoki, Takako; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Inanami, Osamu; Hankanga, Careen; Yamada, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Jun; Sasaki, Juso

    2008-05-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection is characterized by chronic overactivation of immune and inflammatory system, resulting in anergic state and dysfunction of immune cells. Lactoferrin (LF), a glycoprotein present in exocrine secretions and neutrophils, plays an important role in host defense system. Our previous study showed that oral administration of bovine LF (bLF) suppressed oral inflammation, improved the clinical symptoms and decreased serum gamma-globulin as a marker of inflammation in FIV-infected cats with intractable stomatitis. The anti-inflammatory effect was partly involved in regulation of neutrophil function by bLF. In this study, to clarify the relationship between anti-inflammatory effects of bLF and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we examined the effect of bLF on proliferation, cell cycle progression and cytokine expression in mitogen-activated PBMC. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)- 2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay showed that bLF inhibited the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced cell proliferation in FIV-infected cats with the asymptomatic carrier and AIDS-related complex (ARC) phase. Bovine LF restored ConA-induced cell cycle progression and resulted in suppression of the induced apoptosis in feline PBMC. Real-time RT-PCR showed that bLF suppressed ConA-induced expression of interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 in cells of the ARC group regardless of the time of its addition to the medium. These results suggest the hypothesis that therapy with bLF may have the potential to improve and protect functions of overactivated lymphocytes by modulating the cell proliferation, cell cycle and cytokines expression in cats in terminal stage of FIV infection.

  14. Activation of p38 MAPK by feline infectious peritonitis virus regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in primary blood-derived feline mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Regan, Andrew D; Cohen, Rebecca D; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-02-05

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is an invariably fatal disease of cats caused by systemic infection with a feline coronavirus (FCoV) termed feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). The lethal pathology associated with FIP (granulomatous inflammation and T-cell lymphopenia) is thought to be mediated by aberrant modulation of the immune system due to infection of cells such as monocytes and macrophages. Overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines occurs in cats with FIP, and has been suggested to play a significant role in the disease process. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unknown. Here we show that infection of primary blood-derived feline mononuclear cells by FIPV WSU 79-1146 and FIPV-DF2 leads to rapid activation of the p38 MAPK pathway and that this activation regulates production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta). FIPV-induced p38 MAPK activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production was inhibited by the pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors SB 203580 and SC 409 in a dose-dependent manner. FIPV-induced p38 MAPK activation was observed in primary feline blood-derived mononuclear cells individually purified from multiple SPF cats, as was the inhibition of TNF-alpha production by pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus in feral and companion domestic cats of New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Jessica J; Taylor, John; Rodrigo, Allen G

    2007-03-01

    Nested PCR was used to amplify envelope V3-V6 gene fragments of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) from New Zealand cats. Phylogenetic analyses established that subtypes A and C predominate among New Zealand cats, with clear evidence of intersubtype recombination. In addition, 17 sequences were identified that were distinct from all known FIV clades, and we tentatively suggest these belong to a novel subtype.

  16. Characterization of regionally associated feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Lagana, Danielle M; Lee, Justin S; Lewis, Jesse S; Bevins, Sarah N; Carver, Scott; Sweanor, Linda L; McBride, Roy; McBride, Caleb; Crooks, Kevin R; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) classically infects felid species with highly divergent species-specific FIVs. However, recent studies have detected an FIV strain infecting both bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in California and Florida. To further investigate this observation, we evaluated FIV from bobcats in Florida (n=25) and Colorado (n=80) between 2008 and 2011. Partial viral sequences from five Florida bobcats cluster with previously published sequences from Florida panthers. We did not detect FIV in Colorado bobcats.

  17. In Vitro Activation of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Ramified Microglial Cells from Asymptomatically Infected Cats

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Andreas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Dörries, Rüdiger

    2001-01-01

    Intravenous infection of cats with feline immunodeficiency virus was used as a model system to study activation of virus replication in brain-resident microglial cells in vitro. Virus release by ramified microglial cells isolated from subclinically infected animals was detectable in cell-free tissue culture supernatant only by reverse transcription and nested PCR of gag-specific RNA sequences and not by virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity. In contrast, cocultivation of in vivo-infected microglial cells with mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) regularly allows detection of high virus yields in cell-free tissue culture fluid. Besides uptake and multiplication of microglia-derived virus in PBMC, release of virus from microglia is stimulated by cell contact with PBMC. The data suggest that T lymphocytes patrolling the central nervous system could reactivate the semilatent state of lentiviruses in microglial cells in the course of clinically silent central nervous system infection. PMID:11483754

  18. Seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukaemia virus and Toxoplasma gondii in stray cat colonies in northern Italy and correlation with clinical and laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; della Pepa, Alessandra; Perego, Roberta; Baggiani, Luciana; DeGiorgi, Giada Bagnagatti; Domenichini, Giulia; Ferro, Elisabetta; Cremonesi, Fausto

    2012-06-01

    Stray cat colonies in urban and rural areas of Lombardy, northern Italy, were surveyed for seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) antigen and Toxoplasma gondii IgG. Of 316 cats tested, 6.6% were positive for FIV and 3.8% were positive for FeLV infection; 203 cats were tested for T gondii IgG antibodies and a prevalence of 30.5% was detected. Statistical analysis tested the influence of provenience, age, gender, health status and laboratory results on seroprevalence and found male gender and adult age were risk factors for FIV infection. FIV-infected cats were more likely to have a decreased red blood cell count than FIV seronegative cats. No predictors were significantly associated with FeLV and T gondii seropositivity. Colony cats in this study posed a limited risk for retrovirus infection to pet cats allowed outdoors, whereas toxoplasmosis exposure was comparable with the worldwide data.

  19. Prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukaemia virus among client-owned cats and risk factors for infection in Germany.

    PubMed

    Gleich, Sabine E; Krieger, Stefan; Hartmann, Katrin

    2009-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine prevalence and risk factors for retrovirus infection of infected cats in a large cat population in Germany by evaluation of 17,462 client-owned cats that were tested for the presence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies or feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) antigen. The owners of a subset of 100 cats were contacted to determine their cat's survival times. Prevalence of FIV and FeLV was 3.2% and 3.6%, respectively, remaining stable for FIV, but decreasing for FeLV (6-1%) over 10 years. Median age was 6 years in FIV- and 3 years in FeLV-infected cats. Risk factors for FIV infection were male gender, older age, mixed breed, access to outdoor, aggressive behaviour, and FeLV co-infection; and for FeLV infection contact to other cats, aggressive behaviour, and FIV co-infection. Median survival time of FIV-infected cats was not significantly different to non-infected cats, whereas FeLV-infected cats had significantly shorter median survival times than non-infected cats.

  20. Oral immunization with recombinant listeria monocytogenes controls virus load after vaginal challenge with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Rosemary; Howard, Kristina E; Nordone, Sushila; Burkhard, MaryJo; Dean, Gregg A

    2004-08-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes has many attractive characteristics as a vaccine vector against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Wild-type and attenuated Listeria strains expressing HIV Gag have been shown to induce long-lived mucosal and systemic T-cell responses in mice. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model of HIV we evaluated recombinant L. monocytogenes in a challenge system. Five cats were immunized with recombinant L. monocytogenes that expresses the FIV Gag and delivers an FIV Env-expressing DNA vaccine (LMgag/pND14-Lc-env). Control cats were either sham immunized or immunized with wild-type L. monocytogenes (LM-wt). At 1 year after vaginal challenge, provirus could not be detected in any of the nine tissues evaluated from cats immunized with the recombinant bacteria but was detected in at least one tissue in 8 of 10 control animals. Virus was isolated from bone marrow of four of five LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized cats by use of a stringent coculture system but required CD8(+) T-cell depletion, indicating CD8(+) T-cell suppression of virus replication. Control animals had an inverted CD4:CD8 ratio in mesenteric lymph node and were depleted of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) intestinal epithelial T cells, while LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized animals showed no such abnormalities. Vaginal FIV-specific immunoglobulin A was present at high titer in three LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized cats before challenge and in all five at 1 year postchallenge. This study demonstrates that recombinant L. monocytogenes conferred some control of viral load after vaginal challenge with FIV.

  1. Expression from second-generation feline immunodeficiency virus vectors is impaired in human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Price, Mary A; Case, Scott S; Carbonaro, Denise A; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Petersen, Denise; Sabo, Kathleen M; Curran, Michael A; Engel, Barbara C; Margarian, Hovanes; Abkowitz, Janis L; Nolan, Garry P; Kohn, Donald B; Crooks, Gay M

    2002-11-01

    Vectors based on the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) have been developed as an alternative to those based on another lentivirus, human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), because of theoretical safety advantages. We compared the efficiency of gene transfer and expression in human and feline hematopoietic progenitors using second-generation HIV-1 and FIV-based vectors. Vector pairs were tested using either human cytomegalovirus or murine phospho-glycerate kinase (PGK) internal promoters and were pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G). Vector proviral copy numbers were similar in human and feline hematopoietic primary cells and cell lines transduced by HIV-1 or FIV vectors, demonstrating that both vectors are able to transfer genes efficiently to these cell types. HIV-1 vectors were well expressed in human primary hematopoietic cells and cell lines. However, transgene expression from FIV vectors was almost undetectable in human hematopoietic cells. In contrast, the FIV vector was expressed well in primary hematopoietic feline cells and human non-hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that low transgene expression from the FIV vector is a phenomenon specific to human hematopoietic cells. Northern blot analysis demonstrated decreased vector transcript levels in human CEM cells transduced with FIV relative to cells transduced with HIV-1, despite high vector copy numbers. No evidence of vector transcript instability was seen in studies of transduced CEM cells treated with actinomycin D. We conclude that FIV vectors can transfer genes into human hematopoietic cells as effectively as HIV-1 vectors, but that unknown elements in the current FIV backbone inhibit expression from FIV vectors in human hematopoietic cells.

  2. Diagnosis of feline leukaemia virus infection by semi-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Pinches, Mark D G; Helps, Christopher R; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim J; Egan, Kathy; Jarrett, Oswald; Tasker, Séverine

    2007-02-01

    In this paper the design and use of a semi-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR) for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) provirus is described. Its performance is evaluated against established methods of FeLV diagnosis, including virus isolation and enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) in a population of naturally infected cats. The RT-PCR assay is found to have both a high sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.99) when examined by expectation maximisation methods and is also able to detect a large number of cats with low FeLV proviral loads that were negative by other conventional test methods.

  3. Detection of feline panleukopenia virus using a commercial ELISA for canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Abd-Eldaim, Mohamed; Beall, Melissa J; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2009-01-01

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a significant pathogen of cats. Rapid virus detection is critical for treatment and management, especially in populations in which spread may occur. This study investigated the ability of the SNAP Canine Parvovirus Antigen Test Kit (SNAP Parvo, IDEXX Laboratories) to detect FPV with confirmation of viral identity by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and genetic sequencing on fecal samples (n = 97) from cats with suspected FPV infection. Fifty-five samples were positive by SNAP Parvo; 54 of 55 were also positive by conventional PCR assay and were identified as FPV by genetic sequencing. This study demonstrates that SNAP Parvo can detect FPV in clinical samples.

  4. Early pathological changes in the central nervous system of acutely feline-immunodeficiency-virus-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Hein, Andreas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Dörries, Rüdiger

    2005-12-20

    The animal model of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection of cats was used to dissect the pathogenic role of microglia within the first 6 months of infection. Applying real-time PCR, microglia-associated FIV replication was first detectable at 14 days past inoculation (dpi) and remained at elevated levels throughout the whole observation period. In contrast, FIV RNA levels within paired serum samples declined again after an initial peak between 14 dpi and 28 dpi. Concomitant with the onset of viral reproduction, microglia transiently upregulated expression of MHC class I and class II molecules. Virus-induced microglial activation was followed by a mild infiltration of peripheral leukocytes into the CNS parenchyma. The presented data suggest that microglia is infected by FIV very early after peripheral entry of the virus. Virus replicating microglia withstands eradication by brain-infiltrating leukocytes resulting in formation of a brain-resident virus reservoir, which probably cannot be cleared by peripheral chemotherapy.

  5. Experimental quantification of the feline leukaemia virus in the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) and its faeces.

    PubMed

    Vobis, M; D'Haese, J; Mehlhorn, H; Mencke, N

    2005-10-01

    Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) were fed via artificial membranes and infected with the feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) from cell cultures. After removing the fleas from the blood source, the quantity of virus in the flea and its faeces was measured over a defined period of time. The virus was detectable in the fleas for up to 30 h at room temperature and up to 115 h at 4 degrees C. In the faeces, the amount of virus decreased much more slowly--after 2 weeks half of the initial amount of virus could still be detected. Thus the faeces might be a source of further infections, e.g. for the flea larvae or the cat itself.

  6. First Molecular Characterization of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Domestic Cats from Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jilei; Wang, Liang; Li, Jing; Kelly, Patrick; Price, Stuart; Wang, Chengming

    2017-01-01

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus of the Lentivirus genus that was initially isolated from a colony of domestic cats in California in 1986 and has now been recognized as a common feline pathogen worldwide. To date, there is only one recent serology-based report on FIV in mainland China which was published in 2016. We designed this study to investigate the molecular prevalence and diversity of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in domestic cats from mainland China. We studied the prevalence of FIV in whole blood samples of 615 domestic cats in five cities (Beijing, Guangzhou, Nanjing, Shanghai and Yangzhou) of mainland China and examined them using FRET-PCR (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Polymerase Chain Reaction) and regular PCRs for the gag and env genes. Overall, 1.3% (8/615) of the cats were positive for provirus DNA with nucleotide analysis using PCRs for the gag and env sequences showing the cats were infected with FIV subtype A. This is the first molecular characterization of FIV in mainland China and the first description of subtype A in continental Asia. PMID:28107367

  7. Development of a nested PCR assay for detection of feline infectious peritonitis virus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, D A; Lobbiani, A; Gramegna, M; Moore, L E; Colucci, G

    1997-01-01

    A diagnostic test for feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection based on a nested PCR (nPCR) assay was developed and tested with FIPV, feline enteric coronavirus (FECV), canine coronavirus (CCV), and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and clinical fluid samples from cats with effusive feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The target sequence for the assay is in the S1 region of the peplomer protein E2 gene. A vaccine strain of FIPV and two wild-type FIPV strains tested positive, but FECV, TGEV, and CCV tested negative. Preliminary tests with 12 cats with clinical evidence of effusive FIP and 11 cats with an illness associated with effusions, but attributed to other causes, were performed. Eleven of the 12 cats with effusive FIP tested positive, while 1 was negative. Ten of the 11 cats ill from other causes tested negative, while 1 was positive. On the basis of clinical laboratory and histopathologic criteria, the preliminary sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 91.6 and 94%, respectively. PMID:9041410

  8. Feline panleukopenia virus: its interesting evolution and current problems in immunoprophylaxis against a serious pathogen.

    PubMed

    Truyen, Uwe; Parrish, Colin R

    2013-07-26

    Vaccination of cats against feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) has been a routine part of feline medicine for the past 40 or more years, and many of the same vaccines that were first developed in the 1960s are still in routine use today. However, there has been significant evolution of the virus in the last 40 years, in particular the emergence of canine parvovirus (CPV) in dogs in the late 1970s, which was a host range variant of the FPV-like virus, and the world-wide spread of the CPV-derived viruses since 1978. FPV and the various antigenic types of CPV have been isolated from cats, raccoons, and many different wild and captive carnivores. The consequences of these changes in the viral populations have not been investigated, and the effectiveness of the current vaccine protocols have not been reported. Here we review the recent findings about the evolution of the viruses in carnivores including cats, and describe a study that looks at the efficiency of vaccination of kittens using the standard protocols, which shows that many cats are not protected by those approaches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Suppression of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in vivo by 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine.

    PubMed Central

    Egberink, H; Borst, M; Niphuis, H; Balzarini, J; Neu, H; Schellekens, H; De Clercq, E; Horzinek, M; Koolen, M

    1990-01-01

    The acyclic purine nucleoside analogue 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine [PMEA; formerly referred to as 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine] is a potent and selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and of Moloney murine sarcoma virus-induced tumor formation in mice. In the latter system PMEA has stronger antiretroviral potency and selectivity than 3'-azido-3'-thymidine (AZT). We have now investigated the effect of the drug in cats infected with the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). In vitro, PMEA was found to efficiently block FIV replication in feline thymocytes (50% effective dose, 0.6 microM). When administered to cats at doses of 20, 5, or 2 mg/kg per day, PMEA caused a dose-dependent suppression of FIV replication and virus-specific antibody production. Seropositive field cats with signs of opportunistic infection (gingivitis, stomatitis, and diarrhea) showed clinical improvement during PMEA therapy (5 mg/kg per day) and recurrence of the disease after treatment was discontinued. Thus, FIV infection in cats is an excellent model to test the efficacy of selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents in vivo. Images PMID:2158102

  10. Development of clinical disease in cats experimentally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    English, R V; Nelson, P; Johnson, C M; Nasisse, M; Tompkins, W A; Tompkins, M B

    1994-09-01

    Cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) develop an AIDS-like syndrome whereas experimentally infected cats do not. To investigate the role of cofactors in the development of this disease in cats, 7 specific pathogen-free (SPF) and 12 random-source (RS) cats were infected with FIV. Over 4 years, infected cats developed similar phenotypic and functional immune abnormalities characterized by early and chronic inversion of CD4+:CD8+ cell ratios and significantly decreased mitogen responses compared with controls. Beginning 18-24 months after infection, 10 RS cats developed chronic clinical disease typical of feline AIDS, including stomatitis and recurrent upper respiratory disease; 4 SPF cats also developed chronic clinical disease, 2 with neurologic disease and 2 with B cell lymphomas. Thus, immunologic background is important in the type of disease that develops in cats infected with FIV, and FIV represents a promising animal model for studying the immunopathogenesis of AIDS in humans.

  11. A Naturally Occurring Domestic Cat APOBEC3 Variant Confers Resistance to Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Izumi, Taisuke; Yamada, Eri; Nakano, Yusuke; Misawa, Naoko; Ren, Fengrong; Carpenter, Michael A.; Ikeda, Terumasa; Münk, Carsten; Harris, Reuben S.; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3; A3) DNA cytosine deaminases can be incorporated into progeny virions and inhibit lentiviral replication. On the other hand, viral infectivity factor (Vif) of lentiviruses antagonizes A3-mediated antiviral activities by degrading A3 proteins. It is known that domestic cat (Felis catus) APOBEC3Z3 (A3Z3), the ortholog of human APOBEC3H, potently suppresses the infectivity of vif-defective feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Although a recent report has shown that domestic cat encodes 7 haplotypes (hap I to hap VII) of A3Z3, the relevance of A3Z3 polymorphism in domestic cats with FIV Vif has not yet been addressed. In this study, we demonstrated that these feline A3Z3 variants suppress vif-defective FIV infectivity. We also revealed that codon 65 of feline A3Z3 is a positively selected site and that A3Z3 hap V is subject to positive selection during evolution. It is particularly noteworthy that feline A3Z3 hap V is resistant to FIV Vif-mediated degradation and still inhibits vif-proficient viral infection. Moreover, the side chain size, but not the hydrophobicity, of the amino acid at position 65 determines the resistance to FIV Vif-mediated degradation. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses have led to the inference that feline A3Z3 hap V emerged approximately 60,000 years ago. Taken together, these findings suggest that feline A3Z3 hap V may have been selected for escape from an ancestral FIV. This is the first evidence for an evolutionary “arms race” between the domestic cat and its cognate lentivirus. IMPORTANCE Gene diversity and selective pressure are intriguing topics in the field of evolutionary biology. A direct interaction between a cellular protein and a viral protein can precipitate an evolutionary arms race between host and virus. One example is primate APOBEC3G, which potently restricts the replication of primate lentiviruses (e.g., human immunodeficiency virus type 1

  12. Feline immunodeficiency virus replicates in salivary gland ductular epithelium during the initial phase of infection.

    PubMed

    Park, H S; Kyaw-Tanner, M; Thomas, J; Robinson, W F

    1995-09-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antigen was detected by immunochemistry in salivary glands of cats experimentally inoculated with West Australian isolate T91. Six cats were inoculated subcutaneously with 1.0 ml of tissue culture supernatant fluid from a feline T-lymphoblastoid cell line (MYA-1) infected with T91. FIV antigens were detected in the interlobular ducts of the salivary gland of cats infected with FIV 2, 4 and 6 weeks previously. FIV antigen was not detected in the salivary glands of three FIV negative cats and one naturally infected cat. Further, FIV antigen was located only in interlobular duct epithelial cells. The distribution of FIV in the interlobular ducts confirms the important role of salivary glands as a major reservoir of FIV in the early phase of infection and strengthens suggestions that the salivary route is an important mode of transmission of FIV.

  13. Construction of infectious feline foamy virus genomes: cat antisera do not cross-neutralize feline foamy virus chimera with serotype-specific Env sequences.

    PubMed

    Zemba, M; Alke, A; Bodem, J; Winkler, I G; Flower, R L; Pfrepper, K; Delius, H; Flügel, R M; Löchelt, M

    2000-01-05

    Full-length genomes of the feline foamy virus (FFV or FeFV) isolate FUV were constructed. DNA clone pFeFV-7 stably directed the expression of infectious FFV progeny virus indistinguishable from wild-type, uncloned FFV isolate FUV. The env and bel 1 genes of pFeFV-7 were substituted for by corresponding sequences of the FFV serotype 951 since previous studies implicated a defined part of FFV Env protein as responsible for serotype-specific differences in serum neutralization (I. G. Winkler, R. M. Flügel, M. Löchelt, and R. L. P. Flower, 1998. Virology 247: 144-151). Recombinant virus derived from chimeric plasmid pFeFV-7/951 containing the hybrid env gene and the parental clone pFeFV-7 were used for neutralization studies. By means of a rapid titration assay for FFV infectivity, we show that progeny virus derived from plasmid pFeFV-7 was neutralized by FUV- but not by 951-specific antisera, whereas pFeFV-7/951-derived chimeric virus was neutralized by 951-specific antisera only. Both recombinant proviruses will be useful for repeated delivery of foreign genes for therapeutic gene applications into cats.

  14. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-04-18

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements.

  15. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  16. Vaccination against δ-retroviruses: the bovine leukemia virus paradigm.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodríguez, Sabrina M; de Brogniez, Alix; Gillet, Nicolas; Golime, Ramarao; Burny, Arsène; Jaworski, Juan-Pablo; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2014-06-20

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are closely related d-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia). Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of d-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy.

  17. Chronic eosinophilic dermatitis associated with persistent feline herpes virus infection in cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Munson, L; Wack, R; Duncan, M; Montali, R J; Boon, D; Stalis, I; Crawshaw, G J; Cameron, K N; Mortenson, J; Citino, S; Zuba, J; Junge, R E

    2004-03-01

    A chronic ulcerative and eosinophilic dermatitis occurred in 20 captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with persistent feline herpes virus 1 (FHV1) infection. Affected animals had erythematous, ulcerated plaques primarily on the face and forelegs in sites of contact with lachrymal and salivary secretions. The dermatitis was characterized by dense infiltrates of eosinophils and plasma cells and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. Rare keratinocytes within the lesions had nuclei with marginated chromatin and small eosinophilic inclusions composed of herpes virus nucleocapsids. Virus isolated from lesions was confirmed to be FHV1. Lesions persisted and progressed unless removed by cryoexcision. The occurrence of this unusual reaction to FHV1 in approximately 5% of captive North American cheetahs suggests a species propensity for a Th2-dominant response to herpes virus infection. This atypical immune reaction may indicate a heritable trait or modulation of the immune response by other factors such as chronic stress.

  18. Identification of a novel subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus in a population of naturally infected felines in the Brazilian Federal District.

    PubMed

    Marçola, T G; Gomes, C P C; Silva, P A; Fernandes, G R; Paludo, G R; Pereira, R W

    2013-06-01

    The feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus that is found worldwide, and it can be assigned to six subtypes (A, B, C, D, E, and a putative subtype F) based on sequencing analysis of the env and gag genes. Subtypes A and B are the most common worldwide. In Brazil, several authors have isolated only subtype B, and its prevalence differs markedly among investigated populations. Blood samples from 200 domestic felines from the Federal District in Brazil were analyzed by PCR. Samples that tested positive for FIV were then cloned, sequenced, and analyzed phylogenetically and statistically. The results represent the first description of FIV infection in the Central Region of Brazil and suggest that only 2 % of felines in this region are positive for the virus. In addition, the analysis showed that one out of the four positive samples that we detected could not be assigned to any of the six classical subtypes. This sample was taken as a putative novel subtype of the FIV virus. The remaining three positive samples were assigned to subtype B, with differences existing among these samples.

  19. A lion lentivirus related to feline immunodeficiency virus: epidemiologic and phylogenetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E W; Yuhki, N; Packer, C; O'Brien, S J

    1994-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a novel lentivirus that is genetically homologous and functionally analogous to the human AIDS viruses, human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2. FIV causes immunosuppression in domestic cats by destroying the CD4 T-lymphocyte subsets in infected hosts. A serological survey of over 400 free-ranging African and Asian lions (Panthera leo) for antibodies to FIV revealed endemic lentivirus prevalence with an incidence of seropositivity as high as 90%. A lion lentivirus (FIV-Ple) was isolated by infection of lion lymphocytes in vitro. Seroconversion was documented in two Serengeti lions, and discordance of mother-cub serological status argues against maternal transmission (in favor of horizontal spread) as a major route of infection among lions. A phylogenetic analysis of cloned FIV-Ple pol gene sequences from 27 lions from four African populations (from the Serengeti reserve, Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Manyara, and Kruger Park) revealed remarkably high intra- and interindividual genetic diversity at the sequence level. Three FIV-Ple phylogenetic clusters or clades were resolved with phenetic, parsimony, and likelihood analytical procedures. The three clades, which occurred not only together in the same population but throughout Africa, were as divergent from each other as were homologous pol sequences of lentivirus isolated from distinct feline species, i.e., puma and domestic cat. The FIV-Ple clades, however, were more closely related to each other than to other feline lentiviruses (monophyletic for lion species), suggesting that the ancestors of FIV-Ple evolved in allopatric (geographically isolated) lion populations that converged recently. To date, there is no clear evidence of FIV-Ple-associated pathology, raising the possibility of a historic genetic accommodation of the lion lentivirus and its host leading to a coevolved host-parasite symbiosis (or commensalism) in the population similar to that hypothesized for endemic

  20. Evaluation of an in-house dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect antibodies against feline panleukopenia virus.

    PubMed

    Mende, Katherina; Stuetzer, Bianca; Truyen, Uwe; Hartmann, Katrin

    2014-10-01

    Measuring antibody titres to determine a cat's immunity to core diseases instead of just administering annual vaccinations has not been established in Germany so far. An in-house test kit for the detection of antibodies against feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline herpesvirus-1 and feline calicivirus-- the ImmunoComb Feline VacciCheck--is now available in several European countries. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of the ImmunoComb Feline VacciCheck to determine antibodies by comparing it to a gold standard. The test is aimed for use in practice to assist decision-making when performing an individual health assessment to see whether a cat is potentially unprotected against FPV and requires FPV vaccination. Sera from 347 cats were included in the study. For antibody detection, haemagglutination inhibition (HI) was performed as gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the ImmunoComb Feline VacciCheck were determined for three different HI titre cut-off points (1:20, 1:40, 1:80). In comparison to the HI, the ImmunoComb Feline VacciCheck showed a sensitivity of 79%, 83% and 87%, and a specificity of 89%, 86% and 81%, respectively. Specificity of the ImmunoComb Feline VacciCheck, which was considered the most important parameter, was acceptable in comparison to HI. Especially when considering an antibody titre of 1:20 sufficient for protection (eg, in an adult animal), the ImmunoComb Feline VacciCheck can be recommended for use in veterinary practice.

  1. Identification of feline panleukopenia virus proteins expressed in Purkinje cell nuclei of cats with cerebellar hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Poncelet, Luc; Héraud, Céline; Springinsfeld, Marie; Ando, Kunie; Kabova, Anna; Beineke, Andreas; Peeters, Dominique; Op De Beeck, Anne; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Parvoviruses depend on initiation of host cell division for their replication. Undefined parvoviral proteins have been detected in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum after experimental feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) infection of neonatal kittens and in naturally occurring cases of feline cerebellar hypoplasia. In this study, a parvoviral protein in the nucleus of Purkinje cells of kittens with cerebellar hypoplasia was shown by immunoprecipitation to be the FPV viral capsid protein VP2. In PCR-confirmed, FPV-associated feline cerebellar hypoplasia, expression of the FPV VP2 protein was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in Purkinje cell nuclei in 4/10 cases and expression of the FPV non-structural protein NS1 was demonstrated in Purkinje cell nuclei in 5/10 cases. Increased nuclear ERK1 expression was observed in several Purkinje cells in 1/10 kittens. No expression of the G1 and S mitotic phase marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was evident in Purkinje cell nuclei. These results support the hypothesis that FPV is able to proceed far into its replication cycle in post-mitotic Purkinje cells.

  2. Seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukaemia virus in Australia: risk factors for infection and geographical influences (2011-2013).

    PubMed

    Westman, Mark E; Paul, Amanda; Malik, Richard; McDonagh, Phillip; Ward, Michael P; Hall, Evelyn; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to: (i) determine the current seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) in three large cohorts of cats from Australia; and (ii) investigate potential risk factors for retroviral infection. Cohort 1 (n = 2151 for FIV, n = 2241 for FeLV) consisted of cats surrendered to a shelter on the west coast of Australia (Perth, Western Australia [WA]). Cohort 2 (n = 2083 for FIV, n = 2032 for FeLV) consisted of client-owned cats with outdoor access recruited from around Australia through participating veterinary clinics. Cohort 3 (n = 169 for FIV, n = 166 for FeLV) consisted of cats presenting to Murdoch University Veterinary Hospital for a variety of reasons. Fresh whole blood was collected and tested using a commercially available point-of-care lateral flow ELISA kit that detects p27 FeLV antigen and antibodies to FIV antigens (p15 and p24) (cohorts 1 and 2), or one of two lateral flow immunochromatography kits that detect p27 antigen and antibodies to FIV antigen (p24 and/or gp40) (cohort 3). Data recorded for cats in cohort 2 included signalment, presenting complaint and postcode, allowing investigation of risk factors for FIV or FeLV infection, as well as potential geographical 'hot spots' for infection. The seroprevalence of FIV was 6% (cohort 1), 15% (cohort 2) and 14% (cohort 3), while the seroprevalence of FeLV was 1%, 2% and 4% in the same respective cohorts. Risk factors for FIV infection among cats in cohort 2 included age (>3 years), sex (male), neutering status (entire males) and location (WA had a significantly higher FIV seroprevalence compared with the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Victoria). Risk factors for FeLV infection among cats in cohort 2 included health status ('sick') and location (WA cats were approximately three times more likely to be FeLV-infected compared with the rest of Australia). No geographical hot spots of FIV infection were identified. Both FIV and FeLV remain

  3. Crystal Structure of Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Main Protease in Complex with Synergetic Dual Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenghua; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Xuemeng; Yang, Kailin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses (CoVs) can cause highly prevalent diseases in humans and animals. Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) belongs to the genus Alphacoronavirus, resulting in a lethal systemic granulomatous disease called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), which is one of the most important fatal infectious diseases of cats worldwide. No specific vaccines or drugs have been approved to treat FIP. CoV main proteases (Mpros) play a pivotal role in viral transcription and replication, making them an ideal target for drug development. Here, we report the crystal structure of FIPV Mpro in complex with dual inhibitors, a zinc ion and a Michael acceptor. The complex structure elaborates a unique mechanism of two distinct inhibitors synergizing to inactivate the protease, providing a structural basis to design novel antivirals and suggesting the potential to take advantage of zinc as an adjunct therapy against CoV-associated diseases. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses (CoVs) have the largest genome size among all RNA viruses. CoV infection causes various diseases in humans and animals, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). No approved specific drugs or vaccinations are available to treat their infections. Here, we report a novel dual inhibition mechanism targeting CoV main protease (Mpro) from feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), which leads to lethal systemic granulomatous disease in cats. Mpro, conserved across all CoV genomes, is essential for viral replication and transcription. We demonstrated that zinc ion and a Michael acceptor-based peptidomimetic inhibitor synergistically inactivate FIPV Mpro. We also solved the structure of FIPV Mpro complexed with two inhibitors, delineating the structural view of a dual inhibition mechanism. Our study provides new insight into the pharmaceutical strategy against CoV Mpro through using zinc as an adjuvant therapy to enhance the efficacy of an irreversible

  4. Principles of treatment for feline lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Susan N

    2003-05-01

    Lymphoma is the most commonly diagnosed neoplasm in cats. As feline leukemia virus antigenemia has decreased over the past 15 years, there has been a profound shift in the presence, signalment, and frequency of sites of feline lymphoma in North America. There is variation in anatomic classification systems, but most studies have divided lymphoma into four groups: alimentary, mediastinal, multicentric, or extranodal. Clinical signs and common differential diagnoses for each of the forms are described. Staging allows for evaluation of the extent of disease. As in the dog, lymphoma is a systemic disease in the cat, and chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for most forms. Exceptions are described. In contrast to canine lymphoma, feline lymphoma is generally more challenging and frustrating to treat than canine lymphoma. Response rates are lower, and remission duration is shorter. Fortunately, cats treated with chemotherapy tend to have less toxicity than dogs. Positive prognostic factors are feline leukemia virus-negative, clinically well at time of diagnosis, and response to therapy. Achieving a complete remission is prognostic for survival. Unfortunately, response cannot be predicted before treatment.

  5. Tissue distribution of virus replication in cats experimentally infected with distinct feline calicivirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Truyen, U; Geissler, K; Hirschberger, J

    1999-09-01

    Four specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats were each inoculated with one of two genetically and antigenically well characterized feline caliciviruses originally isolated from cats with acute respiratory disease (FCV-KS100/2), or with chronic stomatitis (FCV-KS20). Two cats of each group were euthanized at day 10 post infection and two cats at day 28. No clear differences between the clinical disease induced by the two isolates could be observed, and no apparent differences in the tissue spectrum were seen between day 10 and 28. No persistent virus shedding was observed over the 4-week period of this experiment.

  6. Holoprosencephaly and Pure Red Cell Aplasia in a Feline Leukaemia Virus-Positive Kitten.

    PubMed

    Southard, T L; Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, J; Priest, H; Stokol, T

    2016-01-01

    A 9-month-old, female, domestic longhair cat with severe anaemia tested positive for feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and was humanely destroyed and submitted for necropsy examination. Gross findings included a non-divided rostral telencephalon, consistent with semilobar holoprosencephaly. Histological examination of the bone marrow revealed an almost complete absence of erythroid precursor cells, consistent with pure red cell aplasia, and mild to moderate myelofibrosis. This case demonstrates a very unusual central nervous system defect, as well as an atypical presentation of pure red cell aplasia, in a FeLV-positive kitten.

  7. Progressive immune dysfunction in cats experimentally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Torten, M; Franchini, M; Barlough, J E; George, J W; Mozes, E; Lutz, H; Pedersen, N C

    1991-01-01

    Within 6 months of infection with the Petaluma isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus, specific-pathogen-free domestic cats exhibited a decrease in the percentage and number of circulating CD4+ lymphocytes and in the CD4+/CD8+ T-cell ratio, along with a marginally significant depression of pokeweed mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. There was no loss of responsiveness to concanavalin A during this stage, and the cats were capable of mounting a satisfactory antibody response to a T-dependent, synthetic polypeptide immunogen. The pokeweed mitogen response deficit became clearly demonstrable by 11 to 12 months postinfection. A decline in the lymphocyte proliferative response to concanavalin A and a diminished ability to mount an in vivo antibody response to the T-dependent immunogen evolved by 25 to 44 months postinfection. Virus infection did not affect the ability of cats to mount an antibody response to a T-independent synthetic polypeptide immunogen. These data indicate that feline immunodeficiency virus produces a slowly progressive deterioration of T-cell function but does not affect the ability of B cells to recognize and respond to a T-independent antigenic stimulus. PMID:1673159

  8. Seroprevalence and Genomic Divergence of Circulating Strains of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus among Felidae and Hyaenidae Species†

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Jennifer L.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E.; Johnson, Warren; VandeWoude, Sue; Vazquez-Salat, Nuria; Brown, Meredith; Frank, Laurence; Woodroffe, Rosie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; Hemson, Graham; Bush, Mitch; Alexander, Kathleen A.; Revilla, Eloy; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects numerous wild and domestic feline species and is closely related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Species-specific strains of FIV have been described for domestic cat (Felis catus), puma (Puma concolor), lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), and Pallas' cat (Otocolobus manul). Here, we employ a three-antigen Western blot screening (domestic cat, puma, and lion FIV antigens) and PCR analysis to survey worldwide prevalence, distribution, and genomic differentiation of FIV based on 3,055 specimens from 35 Felidae and 3 Hyaenidae species. Although FIV infects a wide variety of host species, it is confirmed to be endemic in free-ranging populations of nine Felidae and one Hyaenidae species. These include the large African carnivores (lion, leopard, cheetah, and spotted hyena), where FIV is widely distributed in multiple populations; most of the South American felids (puma, jaguar, ocelot, margay, Geoffroy's cat, and tigrina), which maintain a lower FIV-positive level throughout their range; and two Asian species, the Pallas' cat, which has a species-specific strain of FIV, and the leopard cat, which has a domestic cat FIV strain in one population. Phylogenetic analysis of FIV proviral sequence demonstrates that most species for which FIV is endemic harbor monophyletic, genetically distinct species-specific FIV strains, suggesting that FIV transfer between cat species has occurred in the past but is quite infrequent today. PMID:15956574

  9. Seroprevalence and genomic divergence of circulating strains of feline immunodeficiency virus among Felidae and Hyaenidae species.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Jennifer L; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roelke, Melody E; Johnson, Warren; VandeWoude, Sue; Vazquez-Salat, Nuria; Brown, Meredith; Frank, Laurence; Woodroffe, Rosie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; Hemson, Graham; Bush, Mitch; Alexander, Kathleen A; Revilla, Eloy; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2005-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects numerous wild and domestic feline species and is closely related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Species-specific strains of FIV have been described for domestic cat (Felis catus), puma (Puma concolor), lion (Panthera leo), leopard (Panthera pardus), and Pallas' cat (Otocolobus manul). Here, we employ a three-antigen Western blot screening (domestic cat, puma, and lion FIV antigens) and PCR analysis to survey worldwide prevalence, distribution, and genomic differentiation of FIV based on 3,055 specimens from 35 Felidae and 3 Hyaenidae species. Although FIV infects a wide variety of host species, it is confirmed to be endemic in free-ranging populations of nine Felidae and one Hyaenidae species. These include the large African carnivores (lion, leopard, cheetah, and spotted hyena), where FIV is widely distributed in multiple populations; most of the South American felids (puma, jaguar, ocelot, margay, Geoffroy's cat, and tigrina), which maintain a lower FIV-positive level throughout their range; and two Asian species, the Pallas' cat, which has a species-specific strain of FIV, and the leopard cat, which has a domestic cat FIV strain in one population. Phylogenetic analysis of FIV proviral sequence demonstrates that most species for which FIV is endemic harbor monophyletic, genetically distinct species-specific FIV strains, suggesting that FIV transfer between cat species has occurred in the past but is quite infrequent today.

  10. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M.; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A.; Willett, Brian J.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia. PMID:25613718

  11. The virus–receptor interaction in the replication of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)☆

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2013-01-01

    The feline and human immunodeficiency viruses (FIV and HIV) target helper T cells selectively, and in doing so they induce a profound immune dysfunction. The primary determinant of HIV cell tropism is the expression pattern of the primary viral receptor CD4 and co-receptor(s), such as CXCR4 and CCR5. FIV employs a distinct strategy to target helper T cells; a high affinity interaction with CD134 (OX40) is followed by binding of the virus to its sole co-receptor, CXCR4. Recent studies have demonstrated that the way in which FIV interacts with its primary receptor, CD134, alters as infection progresses, changing the cell tropism of the virus. This review examines the contribution of the virus–receptor interaction to replication in vivo as well as the significance of these findings to the development of vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:23992667

  12. DNA Vaccination Affords Significant Protection against Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection without Inducing Detectable Antiviral Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, Margaret J.; Flynn, J. Norman; Rigby, Mark A.; Cannon, Celia; Dunsford, Thomas; Mackay, Nancy A.; Argyle, David; Willett, Brian J.; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Onions, David E.; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C.

    1998-01-01

    To test the potential of a multigene DNA vaccine against lentivirus infection, we generated a defective mutant provirus of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) with an in-frame deletion in pol (FIVΔRT). In a first experiment, FIVΔRT DNA was administered intramuscularly to 10 animals, half of which also received feline gamma interferon (IFN-γ) DNA. The DNA was administered in four 100-μg doses at 0, 10, and 23 weeks. Immunization with FIVΔRT elicited cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to FIV Gag and Env in the absence of a serological response. After challenge with homologous virus at week 26, all 10 of the control animals became seropositive and viremic but 4 of the 10 vaccinates remained seronegative and virus free. Furthermore, quantitative virus isolation and quantitative PCR analysis of viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed significantly lower virus loads in the FIVΔRT vaccinates than in the controls. Immunization with FIVΔRT in conjunction with IFN-γ gave the highest proportion of protected cats, with only two of five vaccinates showing evidence of infection following challenge. In a second experiment involving two groups (FIVΔRT plus IFN-γ and IFN-γ alone), the immunization schedule was reduced to 0, 4, and 8 weeks. Once again, CTL responses were seen prior to challenge in the absence of detectable antibodies. Two of five cats receiving the proviral DNA vaccine were protected against infection, with an overall reduction in virus load compared to the five infected controls. These findings demonstrate that DNA vaccination can elicit protection against lentivirus infection in the absence of a serological response and suggest the need to reconsider efficacy criteria for lentivirus vaccines. PMID:9696827

  13. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to feline immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a widespread pathogen of the domestic cat and an important animal model for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) research. In contrast to HIV, only limited information is available on the transcriptional host cell response to FIV infections. This study aims to identify FIV-induced gene expression changes in feline T-cells during the early phase of the infection. Illumina RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was used identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at 24 h after FIV infection. Results After removal of low-quality reads, the remaining sequencing data were mapped against the cat genome and the numbers of mapping reads were counted for each gene. Regulated genes were identified through the comparison of FIV and mock-infected data sets. After statistical analysis and the removal of genes with insufficient coverage, we detected a total of 69 significantly DEGs (44 up- and 25 down-regulated genes) upon FIV infection. The results obtained by RNA-seq were validated by reverse transcription qPCR analysis for 10 genes. Discussion and conclusion Out of the most distinct DEGs identified in this study, several genes are already known to interact with HIV in humans, indicating comparable effects of both viruses on the host cell gene expression and furthermore, highlighting the importance of FIV as a model system for HIV. In addition, a set of new genes not previously linked to virus infections could be identified. The provided list of virus-induced genes may represent useful information for future studies focusing on the molecular mechanisms of virus-host interactions in FIV pathogenesis. PMID:24642186

  14. Accessory genes confer a high replication rate to virulent feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Ryan M; Thompson, Jesse; Elder, John H; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes AIDS in domestic cats, similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS in humans. The FIV accessory protein Vif abrogates the inhibition of infection by cat APOBEC3 restriction factors. FIV also encodes a multifunctional OrfA accessory protein that has characteristics similar to HIV Tat, Vpu, Vpr, and Nef. To examine the role of vif and orfA accessory genes in FIV replication and pathogenicity, we generated chimeras between two FIV molecular clones with divergent disease potentials: a highly pathogenic isolate that replicates rapidly in vitro and is associated with significant immunopathology in vivo, FIV-C36 (referred to here as high-virulence FIV [HV-FIV]), and a less-pathogenic strain, FIV-PPR (referred to here as low-virulence FIV [LV-FIV]). Using PCR-driven overlap extension, we produced viruses in which vif, orfA, or both genes from virulent HV-FIV replaced equivalent genes in LV-FIV. The generation of these chimeras is more straightforward in FIV than in primate lentiviruses, since FIV accessory gene open reading frames have very little overlap with other genes. All three chimeric viruses exhibited increased replication kinetics in vitro compared to the replication kinetics of LV-FIV. Chimeras containing HV-Vif or Vif/OrfA had replication rates equivalent to those of the virulent HV-FIV parental virus. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of feline APOBEC3 genes resulted in equalization of replication rates between LV-FIV and LV-FIV encoding HV-FIV Vif. These findings demonstrate that Vif-APOBEC interactions play a key role in controlling the replication and pathogenicity of this immunodeficiency-inducing virus in its native host species and that accessory genes act as mediators of lentiviral strain-specific virulence.

  15. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine efficacy and FIV neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, James K.; Pu, Ruiyu; Martin, Marcus M.; Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Zwijnenberg, Raphael; Yamamoto, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    A HIV-1 tier system has been developed to categorize the various subtype viruses based on their sensitivity to vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies (NAbs): tier 1 with greatest sensitivity, tier 2 being moderately sensitive, and tier 3 being the least sensitive to NAbs (Mascola et al., J Virol 2005; 79:10103-7). Here, we define an FIV tier system using two related FIV dual-subtype (A+D) vaccines: the commercially available inactivated infected-cell vaccine (Fel-O-Vax® FIV) and its prototype vaccine solely composed of inactivated whole viruses. Both vaccines afforded combined protection rates of 100% against subtype-A tier-1 FIVPet, 89% against subtype-B tier-3 FIVFC1, 61% against recombinant subtype-A/B tier-2 FIVBang, 62% against recombinant subtype-F′/C tier-3 FIVNZ1, and 40% against subtype-A tier-2 FIVUK8 in short-duration (37–41 weeks) studies. In long-duration (76–80 weeks) studies, the commercial vaccine afforded a combined protection rate of at least 46% against the tier-2 and tier-3 viruses. Notably, protection rates observed here are far better than recently reported HIV-1 vaccine trials (Sanou et al., The Open AIDS 2012; 6:246-60). Prototype vaccine protection against two tier-3 and one tier-2 viruses was more effective than commercial vaccine. Such protection did not correlate with the presence of vaccine-induced NAbs to challenge viruses. This is the first large-scale (228 laboratory cats) study characterizing short- and long-duration efficacies of dual-subtype FIV vaccines against heterologous subtype and recombinant viruses, as well as FIV tiers based on in vitro NAb analysis and in vivo passive-transfer studies. These studies demonstrate that not all vaccine protection is mediated by vaccine-induced NAbs. PMID:23800540

  16. Nucleotide Sequence of the Hantaan Virus S RNA Segment and Expression of Encoded Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-03

    stomatitis virus and influenza virus) has been shown to be important in generating cytotoxic T cells in response to viral infection (Townsend et al...termination-polyadenylation signal common to other negative-strand RNA viruses (Sendai virus: 5’-TAAGAAAA and vesicular stomatitis virus: TATGAAAA...codon also occurs in the two retroviruses, murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus, to produce a precursor polyprotein larger than normal 191

  17. Moloney murine leukemia virus activates NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Pak, J; Faller, D V

    1996-01-01

    Nonacutely transforming retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV), differ from transforming viruses in their mechanisms of tumor induction. While the transforming viruses cause tumors by transduction of oncogenes, the leukemia retroviruses, lacking oncogenes, employ other mechanisms, including promoter insertion and enhancer activation. Although these two mechanisms occur in many tumors induced by leukemia viruses, a substantial proportion of such tumors do not show site-specific proviral insertions. Thus, other, unidentified virus-driven mechanisms may participate in tumorigenesis. In these studies, we show that infection of cells by M-MuLV activates expression of Rel family transcription factors. In murine cells chronically infected with M-MuLV, gel shift analyses with kappaB DNA-binding motifs from the murine immunoglobulin kappa light chain enhancer demonstrated induction of at least two distinct kappaB enhancer-binding complexes. Supershifting and immunoblotting analyses defined p50, p52, RelB, and c-Rel subunits as constituents of these virus-induced protein complexes. Transient transfections performed with kappaB-dependent reporter plasmids showed transcriptional activation in M-MuLV-infected cells relative to uninfected cells. Induction of Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factor activity by M-MuLV infection may prove relevant to the mechanism of M-MuLV-induced leukemia. PMID:8648762

  18. Development of leukemia in mice transgenic for the tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, W J; Kimata, J T; Wong, F H; Zutter, M; Ley, T J; Ratner, L

    1995-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax protein trans-activates several cellular genes implicated in T-cell replication and activation. To investigate its leukemogenic potential, Tax was targeted to the mature T-lymphocyte compartment in transgenic mice by using the human granzyme B promoter. These mice developed large granular lymphocytic leukemia, demonstrating that expression of Tax in the lymphocyte compartment is sufficient for the development of leukemia. Furthermore, these observations suggest that human T-cell leukemia virus infection may be involved in the development of large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7862633

  19. Proteome analysis of sheep B lymphocytes in the course of bovine leukemia virus-induced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michal

    2017-07-01

    Presented are the results of a study of the expression pattern of different proteins in the course of bovine leukemia virus-induced leukemia in experimental sheep and I discuss how the obtained data may be useful in gaining a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, diagnosis, and for the selection of possible therapeutic targets. In cattle, the disease is characterized by life-long persistent lymphocytosis leading to leukemia/lymphoma in about 5% of infected animals. In sheep, as opposed to cattle, the course of the disease is always fatal and clinical symptoms usually occur within a three-year period after infection. For this reason, sheep are an excellent experimental model of retrovirus-induced leukemia. This model can be useful for human pathology, as bovine leukemia virus is closely related to human T-lymphotropic virus type 1. The data presented here provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of the bovine leukemia virus-induced tumorigenic process and indicate the potential marker proteins both for monitoring progression of the disease and as possible targets of pharmacological intervention. A study of the proteome of B lymphocytes from four leukemic sheep revealed 11 proteins with altered expression. Among them, cytoskeleton and intermediate filament proteins were the most abundant, although proteins belonging to the other functional groups, i.e. enzymes, regulatory proteins, and transcription factors, were also present. It was found that trypsin inhibitor, platelet factor 4, thrombospondin 1, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, fibrinogen alpha chain, zyxin, filamin-A, and vitamin D-binding protein were downregulated, whereas cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 5, non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein and small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha were upregulated. Discussed are the possible mechanisms of their altered expression and its significance in the bovine

  20. Markers of feline leukaemia virus infection or exposure in cats from a region of low seroprevalence.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Julia A; Tasker, Séverine; Jarrett, Oswald; Lam, Amy; Gibson, Stephanie; Noe-Nordberg, Alice; Phillips, Angela; Fawcett, Anne; Barrs, Vanessa R

    2011-12-01

    Molecular techniques have demonstrated that cats may harbour feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) provirus in the absence of antigenaemia. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), p27 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), anti-feline oncornavirus-associated cell-membrane-antigen (FOCMA) antibody testing and virus isolation (VI) we investigated three groups of cats. Among cats with cytopenias or lymphoma, 2/75 were transiently positive for provirus and anti-FOCMA antibodies were the only evidence of exposure in another. In 169 young, healthy cats, all tests were negative. In contrast, 3/4 cats from a closed household where FeLV was confirmed by isolation, had evidence of infection. Our results support a role for factors other than FeLV in the pathogenesis of cytopenias and lymphoma. There was no evidence of exposure in young cats. In regions of low prevalence, where the positive predictive value of antigen testing is low, qPCR may assist with diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential effects of viroporin inhibitors against feline infectious peritonitis virus serotypes I and II.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Nakano, Kenta; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIP virus: FIPV), a feline coronavirus of the family Coronaviridae, causes a fatal disease called FIP in wild and domestic cat species. The genome of coronaviruses encodes a hydrophobic transmembrane protein, the envelope (E) protein. The E protein possesses ion channel activity. Viral proteins with ion channel activity are collectively termed "viroporins". Hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), a viroporin inhibitor, can inhibit the ion channel activity of the E protein and replication of several coronaviruses. However, it is not clear whether HMA and other viroporin inhibitors affect replication of FIPV. We examined the effect of HMA and other viroporin inhibitors (DIDS [4,4'-disothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulphonic acid] and amantadine) on infection by FIPV serotypes I and II. HMA treatment drastically decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2 in a dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146. In contrast, DIDS treatment decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146 in dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2. We investigated whether there is a difference in ion channel activity of the E protein between viral serotypes using E. coli cells expressing the E protein of FIPV serotypes I and II. No difference was observed, suggesting that a viroporin other than the E protein influences the differences in the actions of HMA and DIDS on FIPV serotypes I and II.

  2. Establishment of a GFP-based indicator cell line to quantitate feline foamy virus.

    PubMed

    Phung, Hang T T; Tohya, Yukinobu; Shimojima, Masayuki; Kato, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2003-05-01

    To quantitate infectious feline foamy virus (FeFV), Crandell feline kidney (CRFK) cells were transfected with the gfp gene under the control of the FeFV long terminal repeat (LTR) for establishing an indicator cell line named FFG cells. The FeFV activates promoter activity of the LTR to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) upon infection. The titers determined by GFP-positive FFG cells (GFP-based assay) were higher than those determined by the cytopathic effects-positive CRFK cells (CPE-based assay). The titers determined by the GFP-based assay reached a plateau at 3-4 days post infection (d.p.i.), while those by the CPE-based assay reached 6-8 d.p.i. When stock viruses of various FeFV strains were titrated by both assays, titers determined by both assays correlated well with each other. The results show that the GFP-based assay is simpler and more rapid and sensitive than the CPE-based assay. Using the GFP-based assay, we examined the in vitro host range of FeFV. It was found that FeFV can productively infect various cell lines derived from cats, dogs, chickens, a human and a bat.

  3. Contrastive prevalence of feline retrovirus infections between northern and southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Miyazawa, T; Ikeda, Y; Sato, E; Nishimura, Y; Nguyen, N T; Takahashi, E; Mochizuki, M; Mikami, T

    2000-08-01

    The prevalence of infections with three feline retroviruses; feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline foamy virus (FeFV), was examined in domestic cats (Felis catus) and leopard cats (Felis bengalensis) in southern Vietnam in 1998. We then compared this data with our previous study in northern Vietnam in 1997. None of the cats had FeLV antigens in both the northern and southern areas. In contrast, there is a great distinction in the seropositivity of FIV. Twenty-two percent of domestic cats had FIV antibodies whereas no FIV positive cats were detected in northern area. FIV may have entered southern Vietnam recently and spread rapidly. FeFV infections were found in both areas, suggesting that FeFV might be present in the cat populations in Vietnam from the earliest time.

  4. Feline immunodeficiency virus can be experimentally transmitted via milk during acute maternal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, R K; Jordan, H L; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S; Tompkins, M B; Tompkins, W A

    1994-01-01

    Postnatal transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in neonates nursed by acutely infected mothers and infection resulting from oral inoculation of kittens with FIV were evaluated. Ten of 16 kittens nursed by four queens with FIV infection established immediately postpartum developed FIV infection. Five of 11 neonates orally administered cell-free FIV culture supernatant developed FIV infection. Kittens that developed FIV infection had greater proportions of CD4+ and Pan-T+ lymphocytes at birth than negative kittens. Infectious virus was recovered from the milk of acutely infected mothers. We conclude that FIV may be experimentally transmitted via milk from queens with acute infections and that oral administration of FIV to neonatal kittens results in infection. Images PMID:8151797

  5. Fatal infection with feline panleukopenia virus in two captive wild carnivores (Panthera tigris and Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Duarte, Margarida D; Barros, Sílvia C; Henriques, Margarida; Fernandes, Teresa Lobo; Bernardino, Rui; Monteiro, Madalena; Fevereiro, Miguel

    2009-06-01

    Two cases of fatal infection caused by parvovirus in a white tiger (Panthera tigris) and an African lion (Panthera leo) at the Lisbon Zoo (Portugal) are described. Gross findings at necropsy were catharral enteritis in the tiger and severe hemorrhagic enteritis in the lion. Histopathologic examination revealed, in both animals, intestinal crypt necrosis and lymphocyte depletion in the germinal centers of the mesenteric lymph nodes. Bacteriologic examination was negative for common bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella. Amplification of the parvovirus VP2 complete gene was achieved in both cases and sequencing analysis identified these isolates as feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV). The nucleotide sequences obtained from these two viruses were genetically indistinguishable. The phylogenetic analysis of FPLV strains from domestic cats obtained in the Lisbon area revealed the circulation of FPLV strains highly similar to those isolated from the tiger and lion, which strongly suggests that stray cats may have been the source of infection.

  6. Structural analysis of the principal immunodominant domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Pancino, G; Camoin, L; Sonigo, P

    1995-01-01

    In the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (TM) of lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), two cysteine residues, conserved in most retroviruses, are thought to form a loop containing five to seven amino acids. These elements make up a B-cell epitope recognized by nearly 100% of sera from infected patients or animals, designated the principal immunodominant domain (PID). The PID amino acid sequences are highly conserved between isolates of the same lentivirus but are unrelated, except for the two cysteines, when divergent lentiviruses are compared. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between amino acid sequence in the PID and envelope function. We introduced two kinds of mutations in the PID of FIV: mutations which impeded the formation of a loop and mutations which substituted the sequence of FIV with the corresponding sequences from other lentiviruses, HIV-1, visna virus, and equine infectious anemia virus. We analyzed antibody recognition, processing, and fusogenic properties of the modified envelopes, using two methods of Env expression: a cell-free expression system and transfection of a feline fibroblast cell line with gag-pol-deleted FIV proviruses. Most mutations in the PID of FIV severely affected envelope processing and abolished syncytium formation. Only the chimeric envelope containing the HIV-1 PID sequence was correctly processed and maintained the capacity to induce syncytium formation, although less efficiently than the wild-type envelope. We computed three-dimensional structural models of the PID, which were consistent with mutagenesis data and confirmed the similarity of FIV and HIV-1 PID structures, despite their divergence in amino acid sequence. Considering these results, we discussed the respective importance of selection exerted by functional requirements or host antibodies to explain the observed variations of the PIDs in lentiviruses. PMID:7884857

  7. Eradication of bovine leukemia virus infection in commercial dairy herds using the agar gel immunodiffusion test.

    PubMed Central

    Shettigara, P T; Samagh, B S; Lobinowich, E M

    1986-01-01

    Demands for bovine leukemia virus test negative breeding cattle and for semen from bovine leukemia virus test negative bulls by several countries have encouraged the eradication of bovine leukemia virus infection from selected herds in Canada. This project was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of the agar gel immunodiffusion test, standardized to detect anti-bovine leukemia virus glycoprotein antibodies, for eradication of bovine leukemia virus from commercial dairy herds. Of nine participating herds, the prevalence rate of bovine leukemia virus infection was low (less than 10%) in three, medium (11-30%) in four and high (greater than 30%) in two. The herds were tested by the agar gel immunodiffusion test, reactors were removed and the herds were then retested at regular intervals. The results indicate that it is possible to eliminate bovine leukemia virus infection from the herds after two to three cycles of agar gel immunodiffusion tests and prompt removal of the reactors. PMID:3019498

  8. Antibodies to canine and feline viruses in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in the Masai Mara National Reserve.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tara M; Mazet, Jonna K; Holekamp, Kay E; Dubovi, Edward; Engh, Anne L; Nelson, Keith; Van Horn, Russell C; Munson, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) are abundant predators in the Serengeti ecosystem and interact with other species of wild carnivores and domestic animals in ways that could encourage disease transmission. Hyenas also have a unique hierarchical social system that might affect the flow of pathogens. Antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline panleukopenia virus/canine parvovirus (FPLV/CPV), feline coronavirus/ feline infectious peritonitis virus (FECV/IPV), feline calicivirus (FCV), and feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV1) have been detected in other Serengeti predators, indicating that these viruses are present in the ecosystem. The purpose of this study was to determine whether spotted hyenas also had been infected with these viruses and to assess risk factors for infection. Serum samples were collected between 1993 and 2001 from 119 animals in a single clan for which behavioral data on social structure were available and from 121 hyenas ill several other clans. All animals resided in the Masai Mara National Reserve. Antibodies to CDV, FIV, FPLV/CPV, FECV/FIPV, FCV, and FHV1 were present in 47%, 3.5%, 81%, 36%, 72%, and 0.5% of study hyenas, respectively. Antibody prevalence was greater in adults for FIV and FECV/FIPV, and being a female of high social rank was a risk factor for FIV. Hyenas near human habitation appeared to be at lower risk to have CDV, FIV, and FECV/FIPV antibodies, whereas being near human habitation increased the risk for FPLV/CPV antibodies. Canine (distemper virus and FECV/FIPV antibody prevalence varied considerably over time, whereas FIV, FPLV/CPV, and FCV had a stable, apparently endemic temporal pattern. These results indicate that hyenas might play a role in the ecology of these viruses in the Serengeti ecosystem. The effect of these viruses on hyena health should be further investigated. The lower prevalence of CDV antibody-positive hyenas near human habitation suggests that reservoirs for CDV other

  9. Comparison and interpretation of diagnostic tests for feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Barr, M C; Pough, M B; Jacobson, R H; Scott, F W

    1991-11-15

    Feline sera were submitted to the Cornell Feline Health Center (n = 497) or to the New York State Diagnostic Laboratory (n = 1,565) for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) testing. Some sera (n = 166) were submitted for confirmation of previous FIV-positive results; 151 of these sera had been tested at the referring veterinary practice or laboratory, using an in-house ELISA. Excluding the samples submitted for confirmation, a total of 173 samples (9.1%) were FIV-positive; 11.6% of the clinically ill or high-risk cats and 0.49% of the healthy, low risk cats were positive for FIV antibody. A commercially available ELISA for detection of antibody to FIV was evaluated in relation to the immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) test and the immunoblot assay. The ELISA was interpreted according to the manufacturer's instructions, with the ratio of sample optical density to positive control optical density (S/P) determining a positive or negative result. The ELISA results based on the S/P interpretation were compared with a kinetics-based (KELA) interpretation of the ELISA. The KELA values were reported as positive, negative, or equivocal. Using the immunoblot as the standard, ELISA (S/P interpretation) had sensitivity of 0.93 and specificity of 0.98, whereas the IFA test had sensitivity of 0.95 and specificity of 0.98. However, the sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA (S/P interpretation) were markedly reduced for sample results falling in the KELA equivocal range, indicating that equivocal results were valid interpretations for some sera. A high number (22.5%) of the samples submitted for confirmation of a positive result from use of the in-house ELISA were determined to be negative for FIV antibody.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. [Liberation into the wild of wild felines--danger of the release of virus infections].

    PubMed

    Lutz, H; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Fehr, D; Leutenegger, C; Hartmann, M; Ossent, P; Grob, M; Elgizoli, M; Weilenmann, P

    1996-01-01

    There are several felidae amongst the numerous endangered species. Means of aiding survival are the reintroduction to the wild of animals bred under the auspices of man and their relocation from densely populated to thinly populated areas. It is unlikely that the dangers of such reintroduction or relocation projects have been examined sufficiently in respect to the risks of virus infections confronting individuals kept in zoos or similar situations. This report presents three examples to illustrate that accidental virus infections may be expected to occur when relocating and reintroducing wild cats. The first example is the reintroduction of captive snow leopards. Zoo bred snow leopards may be infected with FIV, a virus infection that is highly unlikely to occur in the original himalayan highlands of Tibet and China. A second example is of several cases of FIP that occurred in European wild cats bred in groups in captivity. The third example mentioned is the relocation of lions from East Africa where all the commonly known feline viruses are wide-spread to the Etosha National Park. In the latter, virus infections such as FIV, FCV and FPV do not occur. The indiscriminate relocation and reintroduction of the wild cats mentioned here harbours a potential of undesirable consequences.

  11. Dynamics of a feline virus with two transmission modes within exponentially growing host populations.

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, K; Langlais, M; Auger, P; Pontier, D

    2000-01-01

    Feline panleucopenia virus (FPLV) was introduced in 1977 on Marion Island (in the southern Indian Ocean) with the aim of eradicating the cat population and provoked a huge decrease in the host population within six years. The virus can be transmitted either directly through contacts between infected and healthy cats or indirectly between a healthy cat and the contaminated environment: a specific feature of the virus is its high rate of survival outside the host. In this paper, a model was designed in order to take these two modes of transmission into account. The results showed that a mass-action incidence assumption was more appropriate than a proportionate mixing one in describing the dynamics of direct transmission. Under certain conditions the virus was able to control the host population at a low density. The indirect transmission acted as a reservoir supplying the host population with a low but sufficient density of infected individuals which allowed the virus to persist. The dynamics of the infection were more affected by the demographic parameters of the healthy hosts than by the epidemiological ones. Thus, demographic parameters should be precisely measured in field studies in order to obtain accurate predictions. The predicted results of our model were in good agreement with observations. PMID:11416908

  12. Retroviral DNA--the silent winner: blood transfusion containing latent feline leukemia provirus causes infection and disease in naïve recipient cats.

    PubMed

    Nesina, Stefanie; Katrin Helfer-Hungerbuehler, A; Riond, Barbara; Boretti, Felicitas S; Willi, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Grest, Paula; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-12-21

    The feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a gamma-retrovirus of domestic cats that was discovered half a century ago. Cats that are infected with FeLV may develop a progressive infection resulting in persistent viremia, immunodeficiency, tumors, anemia and death. A significant number of cats mount a protective immune response that suppresses viremia; these cats develop a regressive infection characterized by the absence of viral replication and the presence of low levels of proviral DNA. The biological importance of these latter provirus carriers is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ten cats that received a transfusion of blood from aviremic provirus carriers developed active FeLV infections, some with a progressive outcome and the development of fatal FeLV-associated disease. The infection outcome, disease spectrum and evolution into FeLV-C in one cat mirrored those of natural infection. Two cats developed persistent antigenemia; six cats were transiently antigenemic. Reactivation of infection occurred in some cats. One recipient developed non-regenerative anemia associated with FeLV-C, and four others developed a T-cell lymphoma, one with secondary lymphoblastic leukemia. Five of the ten recipient cats received provirus-positive aviremic blood, whereas the other five received provirus- and viral RNA-positive but aviremic blood. Notably, the cats that received blood containing only proviral DNA exhibited a later onset but graver outcome of FeLV infection than the cats that were transfused with blood containing proviral DNA and viral RNA. Leukocyte counts and cytokine analyses indicated that the immune system of the latter cats reacted quicker and more efficiently. Our results underline the biological and epidemiological relevance of FeLV provirus carriers and the risk of inadvertent FeLV transmission via blood transfusion and demonstrate the replication capacity of proviral DNA if uncontrolled by the immune system. Our results have implications not only for

  13. Sleep patterns are disturbed in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Prospéro-García, O; Herold, N; Phillips, T R; Elder, J H; Bloom, F E; Henriksen, S J

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related sleep disturbances have been reported early in AIDS. Likewise, the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a natural lentivirus pathogen of cats, produces a similar immunodeficiency syndrome with neurological sequelae. To identify the neurophysiological substrate of FIV infection in brain, pathogen-free cats were infected with the Maryland strain of FIV. Eight weeks after inoculation, all FIV-infected cats seroconverted and virus was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and in the mononuclear cells of peripheral blood. Ten to 12 months after the FIV inoculation, inoculated and control cats were surgically implanted with electrodes to record the sleep/wake cycle. These sleep recordings were obtained under conditions controlling for environmental variables and instrumental adaptation. FIV-infected cats spent 50% more time awake than the sham-inoculated controls and exhibited many more sleep/waking stage shifts--i.e., 40% more than controls. In addition, FIV-infected cats showed approximately 30% of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep reduction compared to controls. The latency to sleep and REM sleep onset was also significantly delayed in FIV-infected cats. In addition, a remarkable increase in cortically recorded spindle activity (8-13 Hz) was observed during slow-wave sleep in some infected subjects, similar to changes described in HIV-infected humans. Moreover, infected cats exhibited no overt signs of systemic morbidity, such as hyperpyrexia or body weight loss. These results indicate that FIV-infected cats exhibit sleep abnormalities similar to the sleep disturbances previously described in AIDS patients and further support the feline preparation as a valuable animal model of HIV infection of the central nervous system. PMID:7809152

  14. Feline Calicivirus, Murine Norovirus, Porcine Sapovirus, and Tulane Virus Survival on Postharvest Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Esseili, Malak A; Saif, Linda J; Farkas, Tibor; Wang, Qiuhong

    2015-08-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses, with an increasing number of outbreaks associated with leafy greens. Because HuNoV cannot be routinely cultured, culturable feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), porcine sapovirus (SaV), and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates. These viruses are generated in different cell lines as infected cell lysates, which may differentially affect their stability. Our objective was to uniformly compare the survival of these viruses on postharvest lettuce while evaluating the effects of cell lysates on their survival. Viruses were semipurified from cell lysates by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation followed by resuspension in sterile water. Virus survival was examined before and after semipurification: in suspension at room temperature (RT) until day 28 and on lettuce leaves stored at RT for 3 days or at 4°C for 7 and 14 days. In suspension, both methods significantly enhanced the survival of all viruses. On lettuce, the survival of MNV in cell lysates was similar to that in water, under all storage conditions. In contrast, the survival of FCV, SaV, and TV was differentially enhanced, under different storage conditions, by removing cell lysates. Following semipurification, viruses showed similar persistence to each other on lettuce stored under all conditions, with the exception of ultracentrifugation-purified FCV, which showed a higher inactivation rate than MNV at 4°C for 14 days. In conclusion, the presence of cell lysates in viral suspensions underestimated the survivability of these surrogate viruses, while viral semipurification revealed similar survivabilities on postharvest lettuce leaves.

  15. Feline Calicivirus, Murine Norovirus, Porcine Sapovirus, and Tulane Virus Survival on Postharvest Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Esseili, Malak A.; Saif, Linda J.; Farkas, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses, with an increasing number of outbreaks associated with leafy greens. Because HuNoV cannot be routinely cultured, culturable feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), porcine sapovirus (SaV), and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates. These viruses are generated in different cell lines as infected cell lysates, which may differentially affect their stability. Our objective was to uniformly compare the survival of these viruses on postharvest lettuce while evaluating the effects of cell lysates on their survival. Viruses were semipurified from cell lysates by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation followed by resuspension in sterile water. Virus survival was examined before and after semipurification: in suspension at room temperature (RT) until day 28 and on lettuce leaves stored at RT for 3 days or at 4°C for 7 and 14 days. In suspension, both methods significantly enhanced the survival of all viruses. On lettuce, the survival of MNV in cell lysates was similar to that in water, under all storage conditions. In contrast, the survival of FCV, SaV, and TV was differentially enhanced, under different storage conditions, by removing cell lysates. Following semipurification, viruses showed similar persistence to each other on lettuce stored under all conditions, with the exception of ultracentrifugation-purified FCV, which showed a higher inactivation rate than MNV at 4°C for 14 days. In conclusion, the presence of cell lysates in viral suspensions underestimated the survivability of these surrogate viruses, while viral semipurification revealed similar survivabilities on postharvest lettuce leaves. PMID:26002891

  16. Molecular detection and sequence analysis of feline Torque teno virus (TTV) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, C X; Shan, T L; Cui, L; Luo, X N; Liu, Z J; Tang, S D; Liu, Z W; Yuan, C L; Lan, D L; Zhao, W; Hua, X G

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, two isolates (SH-F1 and SH-F2) of Torque teno felis virus (feline TTV) were detected in 16 (12.5%) serum samples collected from cats in China. Their full length genomes were cloned and sequenced. The results showed that they were 2063bp in length and contained three open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF1: nt438-1748, ORF2: nt268-585 and ORF3: nt268-581, 1461-1842). Phylogenetic analysis showed that they were clustered with the strain of Japan (Fc-TTV4, AB076003) and the strain of France (PRA4, EF538878). Sequence analysis indicated that SH-F1 had high (97.5% and 93.3%) identity with the strain of Japan and the strain of France, and SH-F2 shared 94.5% and 92.1% homology with them, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that feline TTV is present in China.

  17. Immunopathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in the fetal and neonatal cat

    PubMed Central

    Kolenda-Roberts, Holly M.; Kuhnt, Leah A.; Jennings, Ryan N.; Mergia, Ayalew; Gengozian, Nazareth; Johnson, Calvin M.

    2008-01-01

    The global incidence of pediatric HIV infection is estimated at 2.3 million children, most acquiring the infection from their mothers in utero, peripartum, or postpartum. Pediatric HIV infection typically causes a rapidly progressive disease when compared with adult infection, due in part to the profound susceptibility of the neonatal thymus to productive infection or degenerative changes. Failed production of naïve T-lymphocytes further limits the success of antiviral therapy to restore immunologic function. In this review, we explore the use of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection of domestic cats as an animal model for pediatric HIV infection. Cats infected with FIV represent the smallest host of a naturally occurring lentivirus, and the immunodeficiency syndrome elicited by FIV infection is similar to that of HIV-AIDS. The feline-FIV model uniquely reproduces several key aspects of immunosuppressive lentivirus infection of the thymus, allowing investigators to define viral determinants of pathogenicity, influence of host age on disease outcome, and therapeutic strategies to restore thymus function. PMID:17485330

  18. Changes in prevalence of progressive feline leukaemia virus infection in cats with lymphoma in Germany.

    PubMed

    Meichner, K; Kruse, D B; Hirschberger, J; Hartmann, K

    2012-10-06

    Progressive infection with feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is considered one of the major risk factors for development of feline lymphoma. The aim of this study was to compare cats with lymphoma between 1980 and 1994 (first period) and between 1995 and 2009 (second period) concerning FeLV antigenaemia and age distribution. In addition, differences between FeLV antigen-positive and antigen-negative cats with lymphoma regarding patients' characteristics, tumour location and outcome were evaluated. There was a significant decrease in the percentage of lymphoma cases associated with progressive FeLV infection from the first (59 per cent) to the second (13 per cent) observation period. FeLV antigen-positive cats were significantly younger (median 3.7 v 11.3 years), and had significantly shorter response duration (median 25 days v 472 days) with therapy. In the cats of the second period, gastrointestinal and extranodal lymphomas were the most common anatomical sites, and the majority of those cats were FeLV antigen-negative. Thus, other aetiologies than progressive FeLV infection must have a greater impact on cancerogenesis among affected cats with lymphoma to date.

  19. Incidence of persistent viraemia and latent feline leukaemia virus infection in cats with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stützer, Bianca; Simon, Karin; Lutz, Hans; Majzoub, Monir; Hermanns, Walter; Hirschberger, Johannes; Sauter-Louis, Carola; Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-02-01

    In the past, feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection, and also latent FeLV infection, were commonly associated with lymphoma and leukaemia. In this study, the prevalence of FeLV provirus in tumour tissue and bone marrow in FeLV antigen-negative cats with these tumours was assessed. Seventy-seven diseased cats were surveyed (61 antigen-negative, 16 antigen-positive). Blood, bone marrow, and tumour samples were investigated by two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences of the long terminal repeats (LTR) and the envelope (env) region of the FeLV genome. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed in bone marrow and tumour tissue. None of the antigen-negative cats with lymphoma was detectably infected with latent FeLV. The prevalence of FeLV viraemia in cats with lymphoma was 20.8%. This suggests that causes other than FeLV play a role in tumorigenesis, and that latent FeLV infection is unlikely to be responsible for most feline lymphomas and leukaemias. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. PMID:20881168

  1. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats.

  2. The molecular biology and evolution of feline immunodeficiency viruses of cougars.

    PubMed

    Poss, Mary; Ross, Howard; Rodrigo, Allen; Terwee, Julie; Vandewoude, Sue; Biek, Roman

    2008-05-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that has been identified in many members of the family Felidae but domestic cats are the only FIV host in which infection results in disease. We studied FIVpco infection of cougars (Puma concolor) as a model for asymptomatic lentivirus infections to understand the mechanisms of host-virus coexistence. Several natural cougar populations were evaluated to determine if there are any consequences of FIVpco infection on cougar fecundity, survival, or susceptibility to other infections. We have sequenced full-length viral genomes and conducted a detailed analysis of viral molecular evolution on these sequences and on genome fragments of serially sampled animals to determine the evolutionary forces experienced by this virus in cougars. In addition, we have evaluated the molecular genetics of FIVpco in a new host, domestic cats, to determine the evolutionary consequences to a host-adapted virus associated with cross-species infection. Our results indicate that there are no significant differences in survival, fecundity or susceptibility to other infections between FIVpco-infected and uninfected cougars. The molecular evolution of FIVpco is characterized by a slower evolutionary rate and an absence of positive selection, but also by proviral and plasma viral loads comparable to those of epidemic lentiviruses such as HIV-1 or FIVfca. Evolutionary and recombination rates and selection profiles change significantly when FIVpco replicates in a new host.

  3. Epidemiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of endemic feline immunodeficiency virus in a population of wild cougars.

    PubMed

    Biek, Roman; Rodrigo, Allen G; Holley, David; Drummond, Alexei; Anderson, Charles R; Ross, Howard A; Poss, Mary

    2003-09-01

    Within the large body of research on retroviruses, the distribution and evolution of endemic retroviruses in natural host populations have so far received little attention. In this study, the epidemiology, genetic diversity, and molecular evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus specific to cougars (FIVpco) was examined using blood samples collected over several years from a free-ranging cougar population in the western United States. The virus prevalence was 58% in this population (n = 52) and increased significantly with host age. Based on phylogenetic analysis of fragments of envelope (env) and polymerase (pol) genes, two genetically distinct lineages of FIVpco were found to cooccur in the population but not in the same individuals. Within each of the virus lineages, geographically nearby isolates formed monophyletic clusters of closely related viruses. Sequence diversity for env within a host rarely exceeded 1%, and the evolution of this gene was dominated by purifying selection. For both pol and env, our data indicate mean rates of molecular evolution of 1 to 3% per 10 years. These results support the premise that FIVpco is well adapted to its cougar host and provide a basis for comparing lentivirus evolution in endemic and epidemic infections in natural hosts.

  4. Detection of feline immunodeficiency virus in saliva and plasma by cultivation and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, D; Baldinotti, F; Mazzetti, P; Pistello, M; Bandecchi, P; Ghilarducci, R; Poli, A; Tozzini, F; Bendinelli, M

    1993-03-01

    The rates of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolation from saliva, plasma, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of infected cats were compared; isolation rates were 18, 14, and 81%, respectively, in naturally infected cats and 25, 57, and 100%, respectively, in experimentally infected animals. There was no obvious relationship between isolation rate and clinical stage or between isolation rate and the titer of neutralizing antibody in serum. Virus could be isolated from one salivary gland as early as 1 week postinfection and, on a more regular basis, starting at 3 weeks postinfection, when, however, most other tissues were also positive. Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that FIV genomes are present in saliva and plasma more frequently than expected on the basis of isolation data. Saliva was also found to contain viral DNA, indicating that it may harbor virus-infected cells as well as free virus. The addition of plasma but not of saliva to PBMC cultures delayed FIV growth. Isolation from plasma may be hampered by FIV neutralizing antibody and by the cytotoxic activity of this fluid for the PBMC used as a cell substrate.

  5. Frequent perinatal transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus by chronically infected cats.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, L L; Burkhard, M J; Hoover, E A

    1996-01-01

    Vertical transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was studied in cats infected with either of two FIV clinical isolates (FIV-B-2542 or FIV-AB-2771) prior to breeding and conception. Queens infected 4 to 30 months (mean = 14 months) prior to conception transmitted FIV to 59 of 83 (71%) kittens; 50.6% were virus positive on the day of birth. To examine potential routes of FIV transmission from mother to offspring, kittens were delivered via either vaginal or cesarean birth and nursed by either their virus-infected natural mothers or uninfected surrogate mothers. Comparison of FIV infection rates at birth with those at 6 months of age in kittens delivered by cesarean and surrogate raised demonstrated that late in utero transmission occurred in approximately 20% of kittens. Comparison of kittens nursed by FIV mothers with those by uninfected surrogate mothers demonstrated a 13.5% increase in infection rate of kittens exposed to milk-borne virus. Isolation of virus from 40% of maternal vaginal wash samples and the slightly greater infection rate in vaginally versus cesarean-delivered surrogate-nursed kittens suggested that intrapartum transmission may occur. In addition, we found that low maternal CD4 count (<200 cells per microl), longer duration of maternal infection (>15 months), and maternal symptoms of clinical immunodeficiency correlated with increased rates of mother-to-kitten FIV transmission, paralleling observations in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women. We conclude that FIV infection provides a model in which to explore aspects of human immunodeficiency virus vertical transmission and intervention difficult to address in human patients. PMID:8627764

  6. Nucleolin interacts with the feline calicivirus 3' untranslated region and the protease-polymerase NS6 and NS7 proteins, playing a role in virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cancio-Lonches, Clotilde; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Galvan-Mendoza, Iván; Ureña, Luis; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian; Salas-Benito, Juan; Gutiérrez-Escolano, Ana Lorena

    2011-08-01

    Cellular proteins play many important roles during the life cycle of all viruses. Specifically, host cell nucleic acid-binding proteins interact with viral components of positive-stranded RNA viruses and regulate viral translation, as well as RNA replication. Here, we report that nucleolin, a ubiquitous multifunctional nucleolar shuttling phosphoprotein, interacts with the Norwalk virus and feline calicivirus (FCV) genomic 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Nucleolin can also form a complex in vitro with recombinant Norwalk virus NS6 and -7 (NS6/7) and can be copurified with the analogous protein from feline calicivirus (p76 or NS6/7) from infected feline kidney cells. Nucleolin RNA levels or protein were not modified during FCV infection; however, as a consequence of the infection, nucleolin was seen to relocalize from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm, as well as to the perinuclear area where it colocalizes with the feline calicivirus NS6/7 protein. In addition, antibodies to nucleolin were able to precipitate viral RNA from feline calicivirus-infected cells, indicating a direct or indirect association of nucleolin with the viral RNA during virus replication. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of nucleolin resulted in a reduction of the cytopathic effect and virus yield in CrFK cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nucleolin is a nucleolar component that interacts with viral RNA and NS6/7 and is required for feline calicivirus replication.

  7. Nucleolin Interacts with the Feline Calicivirus 3′ Untranslated Region and the Protease-Polymerase NS6 and NS7 Proteins, Playing a Role in Virus Replication ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cancio-Lonches, Clotilde; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Galvan-Mendoza, Iván; Ureña, Luis; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian; Salas-Benito, Juan; Gutiérrez-Escolano, Ana Lorena

    2011-01-01

    Cellular proteins play many important roles during the life cycle of all viruses. Specifically, host cell nucleic acid-binding proteins interact with viral components of positive-stranded RNA viruses and regulate viral translation, as well as RNA replication. Here, we report that nucleolin, a ubiquitous multifunctional nucleolar shuttling phosphoprotein, interacts with the Norwalk virus and feline calicivirus (FCV) genomic 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Nucleolin can also form a complex in vitro with recombinant Norwalk virus NS6 and -7 (NS6/7) and can be copurified with the analogous protein from feline calicivirus (p76 or NS6/7) from infected feline kidney cells. Nucleolin RNA levels or protein were not modified during FCV infection; however, as a consequence of the infection, nucleolin was seen to relocalize from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm, as well as to the perinuclear area where it colocalizes with the feline calicivirus NS6/7 protein. In addition, antibodies to nucleolin were able to precipitate viral RNA from feline calicivirus-infected cells, indicating a direct or indirect association of nucleolin with the viral RNA during virus replication. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of nucleolin resulted in a reduction of the cytopathic effect and virus yield in CrFK cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nucleolin is a nucleolar component that interacts with viral RNA and NS6/7 and is required for feline calicivirus replication. PMID:21680514

  8. An updated nation-wide epidemiological survey of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Nakamura, Yuichi; Ura, Asami; Hirata, Momoko; Sakuma, Masato; Sakata, Yoshimi; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Setoguchi, Asuka; Endo, Yasuyuki

    2010-08-01

    An updated nation-wide epidemiological survey of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection was conducted in Japan. Blood samples were collected from 1,770 outdoor accessing cats from March to October 2008. Serologically, 410 cats (23.2%) were positive for anti-FIV antibody. Proviral DNA of the FIV env V3-V5 region isolated from 348 cases could be phylogenetically analyzed. The present study disclosed a geographic distribution of four subtypes (A, B, C and D) of FIV in Japan. Even though an FIV vaccine was introduced in Japan, we do not currently know whether this vaccine is effective against all strains of FIV in Japan or not. Therefore, close attention still has to be paid to epidemic and genotypic trends of FIV.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the long terminal repeat of feline immunodeficiency viruses from Japan, Argentina and Australia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Miyazawa, T; Tomonaga, K; Kawaguchi, Y; Maeda, K; Castellano, M C; Kai, C; Tohya, Y; Mikami, T

    1995-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the long terminal repeat of five Japanese, five Argentine and three Australian isolates of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) were determined and compared with those of isolates previously described. The results revealed that the Japanese isolates were found to cluster with nucleotide sequence similarity of 95.6%-99.4%. The Australian isolates also clustered with nucleotide sequence similarity of 97.2%-99.4%. The Argentine isolates formed two groups; the LP9 isolate is closely related to the Japanese isolates, whereas the LP1, LP3, LP20 and LP24 isolates are distant from both the Japanese and Australian isolates. From these results, FIV can be divided into three groups, namely: (I) the Californian, Australian and British isolates; (II) the Japanese isolates and one Argentine LP9 isolate; (III) the other Argentine isolates.

  10. In vitro antiviral activity of circular triple helix forming oligonucleotide RNA towards Feline Infectious Peritonitis virus replication.

    PubMed

    Choong, Oi Kuan; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) is a severe fatal immune-augmented disease in cat population. It is caused by FIP virus (FIPV), a virulent mutant strain of Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV). Current treatments and prophylactics are not effective. The in vitro antiviral properties of five circular Triple-Helix Forming Oligonucleotide (TFO) RNAs (TFO1 to TFO5), which target the different regions of virulent feline coronavirus (FCoV) strain FIPV WSU 79-1146 genome, were tested in FIPV-infected Crandell-Rees Feline Kidney (CRFK) cells. RT-qPCR results showed that the circular TFO RNAs, except TFO2, inhibit FIPV replication, where the viral genome copy numbers decreased significantly by 5-fold log10 from 10(14) in the virus-inoculated cells to 10(9) in the circular TFO RNAs-transfected cells. Furthermore, the binding of the circular TFO RNA with the targeted viral genome segment was also confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The strength of binding kinetics between the TFO RNAs and their target regions was demonstrated by NanoITC assay. In conclusion, the circular TFOs have the potential to be further developed as antiviral agents against FIPV infection.

  11. Stimulation with a class A CpG oligonucleotide enhances resistance to infection with feline viruses from five different families

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Domestic cats are commonly affected by viral pathogens that induce lengthy infections with fatal outcomes. Prevention of viral propagation is of primordial importance in shelters and catteries, where cats from different backgrounds have narrow contacts. Oligonucleotides (ODN) containing cytosine-phosphate-guanosine motifs of class A (CpG-A) are highly potent synthetic inducers of innate antiviral mechanisms. The aim of this study was to test their ability to modulate innate immune responses and prevent viral replication as stand-alone agents in the domestic cat. CpG-A stimulation of feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) enhanced their proliferation, increased the presence of co-stimulatory molecules on their surface and influenced their gene expression profiles in an antiviral orientation. Incubation of the supernatants of CpG-A stimulated PBMCs with feline cell lines of epithelial and fibroblastic origin induced expression of the antiviral myxovirus resistance (Mx) gene in these target cells, which also showed enhanced resistance to feline viruses from five distinct families, namely Coronaviridae, Herpesviridae, Caliciviridae, Parvoviridae, and Retroviridae. Most importantly, subcutaneous administration of CpG-A in domestic cats systemically increased the expression of Mx, reaching maximal levels within 24 h. Plasma from treated cats could furthermore inhibit viral replication in vitro. Altogether, our data highlight the promising potential of CpG-A to induce a preventive antiviral state in the cat and to protect feline populations against a broad range of virus infections. PMID:22906110

  12. Feline immunodeficiency virus: an interesting model for AIDS studies and an important cat pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Bendinelli, M; Pistello, M; Lombardi, S; Poli, A; Garzelli, C; Matteucci, D; Ceccherini-Nelli, L; Malvaldi, G; Tozzini, F

    1995-01-01

    The lentivirus feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a widespread pathogen of the domestic cat that is mainly transmitted through bites, although other means of transmission are also possible. Its prevalence ranges from 1 to 10% in different cat populations throughout the world, thus representing a large reservoir of naturally infected animals. FIV resembles the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in many respects. Similarities include the structural features of the virion, the general organization and great variability of the genome, the life cycle in the infected host, and most importantly, the pathogenic potential. Infection is associated with laboratory signs of immunosuppression as well as with a large variety of superinfections, tumors, and neurological manifestations. Our understanding of FIV is steadily improving and is providing important clues to the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency-inducing lentiviruses. The cellular receptor for FIV is different from the feline equivalent of the human CD4 molecule used by HIV; nevertheless, the major hallmark of infection is a progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes as in HIV infection. The mechanisms by which FIV escapes the host's immune responses are being actively investigated. FIV causes lysis of infected T cells and also appears to predispose these cells to apoptosis. Infection of macrophages and other cell types has also been documented. For reasons yet to be understood, antibody-mediated neutralization of fresh FIV isolates is very inefficient both in vitro and in vivo. Vaccination studies have provided some encouraging results, but the difficulties encountered appear to match those met in HIV vaccine development. FIV susceptibility to antiviral agents is similar to that of HIV, thus providing a valuable system for in vivo preclinical evaluation of therapies. It is concluded that in many respects FIV is an ideal model for AIDS studies. PMID:7704896

  13. Prevalence and risk factors for cats testing positive for feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukaemia virus infection in cats entering an animal shelter in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Gates, M C; Vigeant, S; Dale, A

    2017-11-01

    AIMS To estimate the prevalence of cats testing positive for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) antigens in domestic cats entering a New Zealand animal shelter, based on a commercial point-of-care ELISA, to identify risk factors associated with cats testing positive, and to compare the results obtained from the ELISA with those obtained using PCR-based testing. METHOD A cross-sectional study was performed on 388 cats entering the Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals animal shelter in Auckland, New Zealand between 7 February 2014 and 30 May 2014. Whole blood samples were collected from each cat and tested for FIV antibody and FeLV antigen using a commercial point-of-care ELISA. Information on the signalment and health status of the cat at the time of entry was also recorded. Blood and saliva samples from a subset of cats were tested for FIV and FeLV proviral DNA using a real-time PCR assay. RESULTS Of the 388 cats in the study sample, 146 (37.6%) had been relinquished by owners, 237 (62.4%) were strays, and 5 (1.3%) were of unknown origin. Overall, 53/388 (13.7%) cats tested positive for FIV antibodies and 4/388 (1.0%) were positive for FeLV antigen. Stray cats had a higher FIV seroprevalence than relinquished cats (42/237 (17.8%) vs. 11/146 (7.5%); p=0.008). Of 53 cats that were FIV-seropositive, 51 (96%) tested positive for FIV proviral DNA using PCR testing of blood. Of these 51 cats, 28 (55%) were positive by PCR testing of saliva. Of the four cats that were FeLV antigen-positive by ELISA, two (50%) were positive for FeLV proviral DNA by PCR testing of blood. The odds of a cat being seropositive for FIV were greater for intact compared to desexed cats (OR=3.3; 95% CI=1.6-7.4) and for male compared to female cats (OR=6.5; 95% CI=3.2-14.0). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The seroprevalence for FIV was 14% among cats entering an animal shelter in Auckland, whereas the prevalence of

  14. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins antagonize tetherin through a distinctive mechanism that requires virion incorporation.

    PubMed

    Morrison, James H; Guevara, Rebekah B; Marcano, Adriana C; Saenz, Dyana T; Fadel, Hind J; Rogstad, Daniel K; Poeschla, Eric M

    2014-03-01

    BST2/tetherin inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from cells. Primate lentiviruses have evolved specific antagonists (Vpu, Nef, and Env). Here we characterized tetherin proteins of species representing both branches of the order Carnivora. Comparison of tiger and cat (Feliformia) to dog and ferret (Caniformia) genes demonstrated that the tiger and cat share a start codon mutation that truncated most of the tetherin cytoplasmic tail early in the Feliformia lineage (19 of 27 amino acids, including the dual tyrosine motif). Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induced tetherin and blocked feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication in lymphoid and nonlymphoid feline cells. Budding of bald FIV and HIV particles was blocked by carnivore tetherins. However, infectious FIV particles were resistant, and spreading FIV replication was uninhibited. Antagonism mapped to the envelope glycoprotein (Env), which rescued FIV from carnivore tetherin restriction when expressed in trans but, in contrast to known antagonists, did not rescue noncognate particles. Also unlike the primate lentiviral antagonists, but similar to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, FIV Env did not reduce intracellular or cell surface tetherin levels. Furthermore, FIV-enveloped FIV particles actually required tetherin for optimal release from cells. The results show that FIV Envs mediate a distinctive tetherin evasion. Well adapted to a phylogenetically ancient tetherin tail truncation in the Felidae, it requires functional virion incorporation of Env, and it shields the budding particle without downregulating plasma membrane tetherin. Moreover, FIV has evolved dependence on this protein: particles containing FIV Env need tetherin for optimal release from the cell, while Env(-) particles do not. HIV-1 antagonizes the restriction factor tetherin with the accessory protein Vpu, while HIV-2 and the filovirus Ebola use their envelope (Env) glycoproteins for this purpose. It turns out that the FIV tetherin antagonist is

  15. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Antagonize Tetherin through a Distinctive Mechanism That Requires Virion Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rebekah B.; Marcano, Adriana C.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Fadel, Hind J.; Rogstad, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BST2/tetherin inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from cells. Primate lentiviruses have evolved specific antagonists (Vpu, Nef, and Env). Here we characterized tetherin proteins of species representing both branches of the order Carnivora. Comparison of tiger and cat (Feliformia) to dog and ferret (Caniformia) genes demonstrated that the tiger and cat share a start codon mutation that truncated most of the tetherin cytoplasmic tail early in the Feliformia lineage (19 of 27 amino acids, including the dual tyrosine motif). Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induced tetherin and blocked feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication in lymphoid and nonlymphoid feline cells. Budding of bald FIV and HIV particles was blocked by carnivore tetherins. However, infectious FIV particles were resistant, and spreading FIV replication was uninhibited. Antagonism mapped to the envelope glycoprotein (Env), which rescued FIV from carnivore tetherin restriction when expressed in trans but, in contrast to known antagonists, did not rescue noncognate particles. Also unlike the primate lentiviral antagonists, but similar to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, FIV Env did not reduce intracellular or cell surface tetherin levels. Furthermore, FIV-enveloped FIV particles actually required tetherin for optimal release from cells. The results show that FIV Envs mediate a distinctive tetherin evasion. Well adapted to a phylogenetically ancient tetherin tail truncation in the Felidae, it requires functional virion incorporation of Env, and it shields the budding particle without downregulating plasma membrane tetherin. Moreover, FIV has evolved dependence on this protein: particles containing FIV Env need tetherin for optimal release from the cell, while Env− particles do not. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 antagonizes the restriction factor tetherin with the accessory protein Vpu, while HIV-2 and the filovirus Ebola use their envelope (Env) glycoproteins for this purpose. It turns out that the FIV

  16. Risk factors for exposure to feline pathogens in California mountain lions (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Foley, Janet E; Swift, Pamela; Fleer, Katryna A; Torres, Steve; Girard, Yvette A; Johnson, Christine K

    2013-04-01

    The primary challenge to mountain lion population viability in California is habitat loss and fragmentation. These habitat impacts could enhance disease risk by increasing contact with domestic animals and by altering patterns of exposure to other wild felids. We performed a serologic survey for feline pathogens in California mountain lions (Puma concolor) using 490 samples from 45 counties collected from 1990 to 2008. Most mountain lions sampled were killed because of depredation or public safety concerns and 75% were adults. Pathogens detected by serosurvey in sampled mountain lions included feline panleukopenia virus (39.0%), feline calicivirus (33.0%), feline coronavirus (FCoV, 15.1%), feline herpesvirus (13.0%), heartworm (12.4%), feline leukemia virus (5.4%), and canine distemper virus (3%). An outbreak of heartworm exposure occurred from 1995 to 2003 and higher than expected levels of FCoV-antibody-positive mountain lions were observed from 2005 to 2008, with foci in southern Mendocino and eastern Lake counties. We show that the majority of mountain lions were exposed to feline pathogens and may be at risk of illness or fatality, particularly kittens. Combined with other stressors, such as ongoing habitat loss, infectious disease deserves recognition for potential negative impact on mountain lion health and population viability.

  17. A feline immunodeficiency virus vif-deletion mutant remains attenuated upon infection of newborn kittens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoying; Leutenegger, Christian M; Stefano Cole, Kelly; Pedersen, Niels C; Sparger, Ellen E

    2007-10-01

    This report characterizes lentivirus attenuation associated with a vif mutation by inoculation of newborn kittens with a vif-deleted feline immunodeficiency virus provirus plasmid (FIV-pPPRDeltavif). Virus in peripheral blood, antiviral antibody or CD4 T-cell count alterations were not detected in kittens inoculated with FIV-pPPRDeltavif plasmid, with the exception of one kitten that demonstrated FIV Gag antibody production at 42 weeks after inoculation. In contrast, wild-type FIV-pPPR-infected kittens were viraemic, seropositive and exhibited a decrease in the CD4 T-cell subset in peripheral blood. Interestingly, FIV-specific T-cell proliferative responses detected at 32 and 36 weeks after infection were comparable for both FIV-pPPRDeltavif- and wild-type FIV-pPPR-inoculated kittens and suggested the possibility of a discreet tissue reservoir supporting sustained FIV-pPPRDeltavif expression or replication. Overall, these findings confirmed that the severe virus attenuation for both replication and pathogenicity exhibited by a vif-deleted FIV mutant is similar for both neonatal and adult hosts.

  18. Peripheral immunophenotype and viral promoter variants during the asymptomatic phase of feline immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, B.; Hillman, C.; McDonnel, S.

    2014-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats enter a clinically asymptomatic phase during chronic infection. Despite the lack of overt clinical disease, the asymptomatic phase is characterized by persistent immunologic impairment. In the peripheral blood obtained from cats experimentally infected with FIV-C for approximately 5 years, we identified a persistent inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio. We cloned and sequenced the FIV-C long terminal repeat containing the viral promoter from cells infected with the inoculating virus and from in vivo-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4 T cells isolated at multiple time points throughout the asymptomatic phase. Relative to the inoculating virus, viral sequences amplified from cells isolated from all of the infected animals demonstrated multiple single nucleotide mutations and a short deletion within the viral U3, R and U5 regions. A transcriptionally inactivating proviral mutation in the U3 promoter AP-1 site was identified at multiple time points from all of the infected animals but not within cell-associated viral RNA. In contrast, no mutations were identified within the sequence of the viral dUTPase gene amplified from PBMC isolated at approximately 5 years post-infection relative to the inoculating sequence. The possible implications of these mutations to viral pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:24291288

  19. Feline panleukopaenia virus in captive non-domestic felids in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Lane, Emily P; Brettschneider, Helene; Caldwell, Peter; Oosthuizen, Almero; Dalton, Desiré L; du Plessis, Liza; Steyl, Johan; Kotze, Antoinette

    2016-06-09

    An outbreak of feline panleukopaenia virus (FPLV) infection was diagnosed by pathology, electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in vaccinated captive-bred subadult cheetahs in South Africa. Subsequent to this disease outbreak, 12 cases of FPLV diagnosed on histology were confirmed by PCR in captive African black-footed cat, caracal, cheetah, lion, ocelot and serval. Phylogenetic analyses of the viral capsid protein gene on PCR-positive samples, vaccine and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) reference strains identified a previously unknown strain of FPLV, present since at least 2006, that differs from both the inactivated and the modified live vaccine strains. A previously described South African strain from domestic cats and cheetahs was identified in a serval. Surveys of FPLV strains in South African felids are needed to determine the geographical and host species distribution of this virus. Since non-domestic species may be reservoirs of parvoviruses, and since these viruses readily change host specificity, the risks of FPLV transmission between captive-bred and free-ranging carnivores and domestic cats and dogs warrant further research.

  20. Relationship of lymphoid lesions to disease course in mucosal feline immunodeficiency virus type C infection.

    PubMed

    Obert, L A; Hoover, E A

    2000-09-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection typically has a prolonged and variable disease course in cats, which can limit its usefulness as a model for human immunodeficiency virus infection. A clade C FIV isolate (FIV-C) has been associated with high viral burdens and rapidly progressive disease in cats. FIV-C was transmissible via oral-nasal, vaginal, or rectal mucosal exposure, and infection resulted in one of three disease courses: rapid, conventional/slow, or regressive. The severity of the pathologic changes paralleled the disease course. Thymic depletion was an early lesion and was correlated with detection of FIV RNA in thymocytes by in situ hybridization. The major changes in thymic cell populations were depletion of p55+/S100+ dendritic cells, CD3- cells, CD4+/CD8- cells, and CD4+/CD8+ cells and increases in apoptosis, CD45R+ B cells, and lymphoid follicles. In contrast to thymic depletion, peripheral lymphoid tissues often were hyperplastic. Mucosally transmitted FIV-C is thymotropic and induces a spectrum of lymphoid lesions and disease mirroring that seen with the human and simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

  1. Fusion-defective gibbon ape leukemia virus vectors can be rescued by homologous but not heterologous soluble envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Karen B; Ting, Yuan-Tsang; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2002-05-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV)-derived envelope proteins containing alterations in or adjacent to the highly conserved PHQ motif present at the N terminus of the envelope surface subunit (SU) are incorporated into vector particles but are not infectious due to a postbinding block to viral entry. These mutants can be rendered infectious by the addition of soluble receptor-binding domain (RBD) proteins in the culture medium. The RBD proteins that rescue the infectivity of these defective MLV vectors can be derived from the same MLV or from other MLVs that use distinct receptors to mediate entry. We have now constructed functional immunologically reactive gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) envelope proteins, tagged with a feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-derived epitope tag, which are efficiently incorporated into infectious particles. Tagged GALV envelope proteins bind specifically to cells expressing the phosphate transporter protein Pit1, demonstrating for the first time that Pit1 is the binding receptor for GALV and not a coreceptor or another type of GALV entry factor. We have also determined that GALV particles bearing SU proteins with an insertion C-terminal to the PHQ motif (GALV I(10)) bind Pit1 but fail to infect cells. Incubation with soluble GALV RBD renders GALV I(10) particles infectious, whereas incubation with soluble RBDs from MLV or FeLV-B does not. This finding is consistent with the results obtained by Lauring et al. using FeLV-T, a virus that employs Pit1 as a receptor but requires soluble FeLV RBD for entry. MLV and GALV RBDs are not able to render FeLV-T infectious (A. S. Lauring, M. M. Anderson, and J. Overbaugh, J. Virol. 75:8888-8898, 2001). Together, these results suggest that fusion-defective FeLV-T and GALV are restricted to homologous RBD rescue of infectivity.

  2. Development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to feline interferon (fIFN)-γ as tools to evaluate cellular immune responses to feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Ryoichi; Kaku, Ayumi; Satomura, Megumi; Kohori, Michiyo; Noura, Kanako; Furukawa, Tomoko; Kotake, Masako; Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) can cause a lethal disease in cats, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of FIPV infection has been recognised in experimentally infected cats, and cellular immunity is considered to play an important role in preventing the onset of FIP. To evaluate the importance of cellular immunity for FIPV infection, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against feline interferon (fIFN)-γ were first created to establish fIFN-γ detection systems using the MAbs. Six anti-fIFN-γ MAbs were created. Then, the difference in epitope which those MAbs recognise was demonstrated by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IFN-γ neutralisation tests. Detection systems for fIFN-γ (sandwich ELISA, ELISpot assay, and two-colour flow cytometry) were established using anti-fIFN-γ MAbs that recognise different epitopes. In all tests, fIFN-γ production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from cats experimentally infected with an FIPV isolate that did not develop the disease was significantly increased by heat-inactivated FIPV stimulation in comparison with medium alone. Especially, CD8(+)fIFN-γ(+) cells, but not CD4(+)fIFN-γ(+) cells, were increased. In contrast, fIFN-γ production from PBMCs isolated from cats that had developed FIP and specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats was not increased by heat-inactivated FIPV stimulation. These results suggest that cellular immunity plays an important role in preventing the development of FIP. Measurement of fIFN-γ production with the anti-fIFN-γ MAbs created in this study appeared to be useful in evaluating cellular immunity in cats.

  3. Gene profiling of Graffi murine leukemia virus-induced lymphoid leukemias: identification of leukemia markers and Fmn2 as a potential oncogene.

    PubMed

    Charfi, Cyndia; Voisin, Véronique; Levros, Louis-Charles; Edouard, Elsy; Rassart, Eric

    2011-02-10

    The Graffi murine leukemia virus induces a large spectrum of leukemias in mice and thus provides a good model to compare the transcriptome of all types of leukemias. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of both T and B leukemias induced by the virus with DNA microarrays. Given that we considered that a 4-fold change in expression level was significant, 388 probe sets were associated to B, to T, or common to both leukemias. Several of them were not yet associated with lymphoid leukemia. We confirmed specific deregulation of Fmn2, Arntl2, Bfsp2, Gfra2, Gpm6a, and Gpm6b in B leukemia, of Nln, Fbln1, and Bmp7 in T leukemias, and of Etv5 in both leukemias. More importantly, we show that the mouse Fmn2 induced an anchorage-independent growth, a drastic modification in cell shape with a concomitant disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, we found that human FMN2 is overexpressed in approximately 95% of pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the highest expression levels in patients with a TEL/AML1 rearrangement. These results, surely related to the role of FMN2 in meiotic spindle maintenance, suggest its important role in leukemogenesis. Finally, we propose a new panel of genes potentially involved in T and/or B leukemias.

  4. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  5. Intranasal immunization with inactivated feline calicivirus particles confers robust protection against homologous virus and suppression against heterologous virus in cats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroaki; Sehata, Go; Okada, Nobutaka; Iwamoto, Kayo; Masubuchi, Katsuo; Kainuma, Risa; Noda, Tatsuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Sawada, Takuo; Noro, Taichi; Oishi, Eiji

    2017-07-01

    The protective efficacy of intranasal (IN) administration of inactivated feline calicivirus (FCV) vaccine against homologous or heterologous FCV infection was investigated. Groups of cats immunized with the experimental inactivated, non-adjuvanted FCV vaccine via either the IN or subcutaneous (SC) route were exposed to homologous or highly heterologous FCV. Both the IN and SC immunization protocols established robust protection against homologous FCV infection. Although neither immunization regimen conferred protection against the heterologous strain, clinical scores and virus titres of oral swabs were lower in cats in the IN group compared to those in the SC group, accompanying a faster neutralizing antibody response against the heterologous virus in cats in the IN group. The IN group secreted more IgA specific to FCV proteins in oral washes (lavage fluids from the oral cavity) than the SC group. IN immunization with an inactivated whole FCV particle, which protects cats from homologous virus exposure and shortens the period of heterologous virus shedding, may serve as a better platform for anti-FCV vaccine.

  6. First evidence of feline herpesvirus, calicivirus, parvovirus, and Ehrlichia exposure in Brazilian free-ranging felids.

    PubMed

    Filoni, Claudia; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Bay, Gert; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Jorge, Rodrigo Silva Pinto; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2006-04-01

    Serum samples from 18 pumas (Puma concolor), one ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), and two little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus) collected from free-ranging animals in Brazil between 1998 and 2004 were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) for antibodies to feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV 1), calicivirus (FCV), coronavirus (FCoV), parvo-virus (FPV), Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma pha-gocytophilum, and Bartonella henselae. Serum samples also were tested, by Western blot and ELISA, for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) specific antibodies and antigen, respectively, by Western blot for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and by indirect ELISA for antibodies to puma lentivirus (PLV). Antibodies to FHV 1, FCV, FCoV, FPV, FeLV, FIV, PLV or related viruses, and to B. henselae were detected. Furthermore, high-titered antibodies to E. canis or a closely related agent were detected in a puma for the first time.

  7. [Feline immunodeficiency virus in Switzerland: clinical aspects and epidemiology in comparison with feline leukemia virus and coronaviruses].

    PubMed

    Lutz, H; Lehmann, R; Winkler, G; Kottwitz, B; Dittmer, A; Wolfensberger, C; Arnold, P

    1990-01-01

    Serum samples from 1421 domestic cats (561 healthy, 860 sick) were tested for FIV-, FeLV- and coronavirus infection. The results were stored in a computer data base and compared with epidemiologic data and clinical findings. All 3 infections were significantly more prevalent in sick than healthy cats: FIV was found in 0.7% of healthy and 3.4% of sick cats. For FeLV the prevalence was 3.0% and 13.0% and for coronavirus 21% and 36.2%, respectively. FIV-infected cats were mostly male (73%); no sex predilection was observed in FeLV- and coronavirus infection. In sick cats FIV-infection was significantly more prevalent in cats greater than 2 years of age; no age-dependence was found in FeLV- and coronavirus infections. The prevalence of FIV-infection increased significantly with the number of animals per household. In contrast, the frequency of FeLV infection decreased with the number of animals per household. Prevalence of coronavirus infection did not vary with group size or living conditions. The following clinical symptoms were associated with infection: FIV: general depression, diseases of the urinary tract; FeLV: general depression, fever, rough hair coat, lymphadenopathy, impaired functions of heart and circulation and muscle atrophy; coronavirus: lymphadenopathy and alterations in the abdomen. It was concluded that based on the clinical symptoms alone FIV-infection could not be diagnosed nor differentiated from the other 2 infections.

  8. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  9. Bovine leukemia virus DNA in human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Buehring, Gertrude Case; Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M; Choi, K Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease.

  10. Inhibition of activity of the protease from bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Ménard, A; Leonard, R; Llido, S; Geoffre, S; Picard, P; Berteau, F; Precigoux, G; Hospital, M; Guillemain, B

    1994-06-13

    In view of the close similarity between bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) we investigated the possibility of developing specific inhibitors of the proteases of these retroviruses using the purified enzyme from BLV. We tested the ability of this protease to specifically cleave various short oligopeptide substrates containing cleavage sites of BLV and HTLV-I proteases, as well as a recombinant BLV Gag precursor. The best substrate, a synthetic decapeptide bearing the natural cleavage site between the matrix and the capsid proteins of BLV Gag precursor polyprotein, was used to develop an inhibition assay. We determined the relative inhibitory effect of synthetic Gag precursor-like peptides in which the cleavable site was replaced by a non-hydrolyzable moiety. The encouraging inhibitory effect of these compounds indicates that potent non-peptidic inhibitors for retroviral proteases are not unattainable.

  11. 2008 American Association of Feline Practitioners' feline retrovirus management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Levy, Julie; Crawford, Cynda; Hartmann, Katrin; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Little, Susan; Sundahl, Eliza; Thayer, Vicki

    2008-07-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are among the most common infectious diseases of cats. Although vaccines are available for both viruses, identification and segregation of infected cats form the cornerstone for preventing new infections. Guidelines in this report have been developed for diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and management of FeLV and FIV infections. All cats should be tested for FeLV and FIV infections at appropriate intervals based on individual risk assessments. This includes testing at the time of acquisition, following exposure to an infected cat or a cat of unknown infection status, prior to vaccination against FeLV or FIV, prior to entering group housing, and when cats become sick. No test is 100% accurate at all times under all conditions; results should be interpreted along with the patient's health and risk factors. Retroviral tests can diagnose only infection, not clinical disease, and cats infected with FeLV or FIV may live for many years. A decision for euthanasia should never be based solely on whether or not the cat is infected. Vaccination against FeLV is highly recommended in kittens. In adult cats, antiretroviral vaccines are considered non-core and should be administered only if a risk assessment indicates they are appropriate. Few large controlled studies have been performed using antiviral or immunomodulating drugs for the treatment of naturally infected cats. More research is needed to identify best practices to improve long-term outcomes following retroviral infections in cats.

  12. Characterization of a highly pathogenic molecular clone of feline immunodeficiency virus clade C.

    PubMed

    de Rozières, Sohela; Mathiason, Candace K; Rolston, Matthew R; Chatterji, Udayan; Hoover, Edward A; Elder, John H

    2004-09-01

    We have derived and characterized a highly pathogenic molecular isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus subtype C (FIV-C) CABCpady00C. Clone FIV-C36 was obtained by lambda cloning from cats that developed severe immunodeficiency disease when infected with CABCpady00C (Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada). Clone FIV-C36 Env is 96% identical to the noninfectious FIV-C isolate sequence deposited in GenBank (FIV-Cgb; GenBank accession number AF474246) (A. Harmache et al.) but is much more divergent in Env when compared to the subgroup A clones Petaluma (34TF10) and FIV-PPR (76 and 78% divergence, respectively). Clone FIV-C36 was able to infect freshly isolated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary T-cell lines but failed to productively infect CrFK cells, as is typical of FIV field isolates. Two-week-old specific-pathogen-free cats infected with FIV-C36 tissue culture supernatant became PCR positive and developed severe acute immunodeficiency disease similar to that caused by the uncloned CABCpady00C parent. At 4 to 5 weeks postinfection (PI), 3 of 4 animals developed CD4(+)-T-cell depletion, fever, weight loss, diarrhea, and opportunistic infections, including ulcerative stomatitis and tonsillitis associated with abundant bacterial growth, pneumonia, and pyelonephritis, requiring euthanasia. Histopathology confirmed severe thymic and systemic lymphoid depletion. Interestingly, the dam also became infected with a high viral load at 5 weeks PI of the kittens and developed a similar disease syndrome, requiring euthanasia at 11 weeks PI of the kittens. This constitutes the first report of a replication-competent, infectious, and pathogenic molecular clone of FIV-C. Clone FIV-C36 will facilitate dissection of the pathogenic determinants of FIV.

  13. Typing of feline calicivirus isolates from different clinical groups by virus neutralisation tests.

    PubMed

    Dawson, S; McArdle, F; Bennett, M; Carter, M; Milton, I P; Turner, P; Meanger, J; Gaskell, R M

    1993-07-03

    One hundred and thirteen isolates of feline calicivirus originating from seven different clinical groups were typed by virus neutralisation tests using eight different cat antisera. The clinical groups comprised 'healthy' cats, cases of acute oral/respiratory disease, chronic stomatitis, acute febrile lameness syndrome, vaccine reactions (clinical disease seen within 21 days of vaccination) and vaccine breakdowns (clinical disease seen more than 21 days after but within one year of vaccination). Isolates from the vaccine reaction cases were grouped into those associated with acute oral/respiratory disease alone and those associated with the lameness syndrome, and the latter group was further subdivided according to the vaccine used. Two groups appeared significantly different from others with some of the antisera. Thus the lameness vaccine reaction isolates associated with vaccine B were significantly different from the isolates from all the other clinical groups, including other lameness isolates, with a number of the antisera. In addition, the chronic stomatitis isolates were significantly different from those from the 'healthy' and the acute oral/respiratory disease groups with one or two of the antisera. Eighty-five to 88 per cent of the isolates were neutralised by antisera raised against F9 or F9-like vaccine strains at a dilution of 1 in 2. Twenty antibody units of such antisera neutralised 42 to 80 per cent of the isolates. A bivalent antiserum raised against a vaccine F9 strain and field strain LS015 neutralised 96 per cent of the isolates at a dilution of 1 in 2, and 20 antibody units neutralised 68 per cent of isolates. Antisera to field strain F65 neutralised all the remaining isolates at a dilution of 1 in 2 and 44 per cent of the remaining isolates at a dilution of 20 antibody units. Therefore, strains LS015 and F65 may be of use in the production of a polyvalent feline calicivirus vaccine, together with the widely used strain F9.

  14. The oral and conjunctival microbiotas in cats with and without feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Weese, Scott J; Nichols, Jamieson; Jalali, Mohammad; Litster, Annette

    2015-03-03

    The oral and conjunctival microbiotas likely play important roles in protection from opportunistic infections, while also being the source of potential pathogens. Yet, there has been limited investigation in cats, and the impact of comorbidities such as feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection has not been reported. Oral and conjunctival swabs were collected from cats with FIV infection and FIV-uninfected controls, and subjected to 16S rRNA gene (V4) PCR and next generation sequencing. 9,249 OTUs were identified from conjunctival swabs, yet the most common 20 (0.22%) OTUs accounted for 76% of sequences. The two most abundant OTUs both belonged to Staphylococcus, and accounted for 37% of sequences. Cats with FIV infection had significantly lower relative abundances of Verrucomicrobia, Fibrobacteres, Spirochaetes, Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes, and a higher relative abundance of Deinococcus-Thermus. There were significant differences in both community membership (P = 0.006) and community structure (P = 0.02) between FIV-infected and FIV-uninfected cats. FIV-infected cats had significantly higher relative abundances of Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria in the oral cavity, and significantly higher relative abundances of several bacterial classes including Fusobacteria (0.022 vs 0.007, P = 0.006), Actinobacteria (0.017 vs 0.003, P = 0.003), Sphingobacteria (0.00015 vs 0.00003, P = 0.0013) and Flavobacteria (0.0073 vs 0.0034, P = 0.030). The feline conjunctival and oral microbiotas are complex polymicrobial communities but dominated by a limited number of genera. There is an apparent impact of FIV infection on various components of the microbiota, and assessment of the clinical relevance of these alterations in required.

  15. Domestic cat microsphere immunoassays: detection of antibodies during feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wood, Britta A; Carver, Scott; Troyer, Ryan M; Elder, John H; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-10-31

    Microsphere immunoassays (MIAs) allow rapid and accurate evaluation of multiple analytes simultaneously within a biological sample. Here we describe the development and validation of domestic cat-specific MIAs for a) the quantification of total IgG and IgA levels in plasma, and b) the detection of IgG and IgA antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) capsid (CA) and surface (SU) proteins, and feline CD134 in plasma. These assays were used to examine the temporal antibody response of domestic cats infected with apathogenic and pathogenic FIVs, and domestic cats infected with parental and chimeric FIVs of varying pathogenicity. The results from these studies demonstrated that a) total IgG antibodies increase over time after infection; b) α-CA and α-SU IgG antibodies are detectable between 9 and 28 days post-infection and increase over time, and these antibodies combined represent a fraction (1.8 to 21.8%) of the total IgG increase due to infection; c) measurable α-CD134 IgG antibody levels vary among individuals and over time, and are not strongly correlated with viral load; d) circulating IgA antibodies, in general, do not increase during the early stage of infection; and e) total IgG, and α-CA and α-SU IgG antibody kinetics and levels vary with FIV viral strain/pathogenicity. The MIAs described here could be used to screen domestic cats for FIV infection, and to evaluate the FIV-specific or total antibody response elicited by various FIV strains/other diseases.

  16. Frequent detection of papillomavirus DNA in clinically normal skin of cats infected and noninfected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Witham, Adrian I

    2010-06-01

    Feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) often contain felis domesticus papillomavirus type 2 (FdPV-2) DNA. While this may suggest FdPV-2 causes feline SCC development, the proportion of cats that are asymptomatically infected by this PV is unknown. Infection by feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is associated with high rates of cutaneous SCC development, possibly due to increased PV infection. This study examines the frequency of cutaneous asymptomatic FdPV-2 infections in cats and compares the rate of FdPV-2 infection in 22 FIV-positive cats with that in 22 FIV-negative cats. FdPV-2 sequences were detected in 39% of skin swabs. One or both swabs contained FdPV-2 DNA from 52% of the cats. FIV status, age or sex of the cat did not significantly influence FdPV-2 infection. Cats that shared a household with a PV-infected cat could remain uninfected suggesting infection depends more on host factors than exposure to the PV. These results indicate that asymptomatic FdPV-2 infections are common in cats, but do not provide evidence that FdPV-2 causes feline SCC development.

  17. Mechanisms of pathogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus as a model for human T-cell leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Yoko; Murakami, Hironobu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) make up a unique retrovirus family. Both viruses induce chronic lymphoproliferative diseases with BLV affecting the B-cell lineage and HTLV-1 affecting the T-cell lineage. The pathologies of BLV- and HTLV-induced infections are notably similar, with an absence of chronic viraemia and a long latency period. These viruses encode at least two regulatory proteins, namely, Tax and Rex, in the pX region located between the env gene and the 3′ long terminal repeat. The Tax protein is a key contributor to the oncogenic potential of the virus, and is also the key protein involved in viral replication. However, BLV infection is not sufficient for leukemogenesis, and additional events such as gene mutations must take place. In this review, we first summarize the similarities between the two viruses in terms of genomic organization, virology, and pathology. We then describe the current knowledge of the BLV model, which may also be relevant for the understanding of leukemogenesis caused by HTLV-1. In addition, we address our improved understanding of Tax functions through the newly identified BLV Tax mutants, which have a substitution between amino acids 240 and 265. PMID:24265629

  18. In vitro inhibition of feline leukaemia virus infection by synthetic peptides derived from the transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Boenzli, Eva; Robert-Tissot, Céline; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Cattori, Valentino; Meli, Marina Luisa; Gutte, Bernd; Rovero, Paolo; Flynn, Norman; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a gammaretrovirus commonly affecting cats. Infection with this virus often leads to fatal outcomes and, so far, no cure is available for this disease. Synthetic peptides with structures mimicking the transmembrane protein of the viral surface proteins hold the potential to effectively interfere with viral entry by hampering the fusion of viral and host cell membranes and constitute a novel approach for the treatment of infections with retroviruses. We identified and synthetically produced 11 FeLV peptides and evaluated their potential to block FeLV infection in vitro. Cell cultures were exposed to FeLV subgroup A prior to the addition of the peptides. The inhibitory effect of the peptides was assessed by measuring FeLV gag protein in the supernatant of peptide versus mock-treated cell cultures using an ELISA. A peptide (EPK364) of 37 amino acids in length, with sequence homology to the HIV fusion inhibitor T-20, significantly suppressed viral replication by 88%, whereas no effects were found for shorter peptides. Two structurally modified variants of EPK364 also inhibited viral replication by up to 58% (EPK397) and 27% (EPK398). Our data support the identification of synthetic FeLV peptides that have the potential for a curative short-term therapy of viraemic cats. In addition, these peptides might become an important tool in xenotransplantation, where endogenous gammaretroviruses of the donor species might be able to infect the host. © 2011 International Medical Press

  19. Molecular epidemiology of feline immunodeficiency virus in the domestic cat (Felis catus)

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Jessica J; Rodrigo, Allen G

    2009-01-01

    Studying the evolutionary mechanisms of feline immunodeficiency virus in the domestic cat (Felis catus), FIVFca, provides a good comparison to other lentiviruses, such as HIV and FIVPco in the cougar (Puma concolor). We review the current epidemiological and evolutionary findings of FIVFca,. In addition to the five accepted FIVFca, subtypes, several recent phylogenetic studies have found strains that form separate clades, indicative of novel subtypes. In New Zealand cats, these strains of unknown subtype have been found to be involved in complex patterns of intergenic recombination, and whole genome sequences are required to resolve these. Evidence of recombination events has been documented with the highest levels in the env gene, the region involved in host cell receptor recognition. Several cases of FIVFca, multiple infection, both inter- and intra-subtype, have been reported. The findings of both unknown subtypes and relatively high levels of recombination suggest the need for further testing of the current vaccine. Limited studies on the evolutionary rate of FIVFca, document a value twice to three times that of FIV in the cougar, a result suggesting the different levels of co-adaptation between the viruses and their respective hosts. We studied the tissue distribution of FIVFca, in feral domestic cats, finding the first case of FIV compartmentalisation, a phenomenon well-documented in HIV-1 patients. PMID:19896220

  20. [Preparation of the vaccine with inactivated Feline Panleukopenia Virus isolated from tiger and the preliminary application].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yali; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Jin; Hua, Yuping; Wang, Ligang; Liu, Yinan; Liu, Dan; Xia, Xianzhu

    2009-05-01

    To prepare a vaccine with inactivated Feline Panleukopenia Virus (FPV) isolated from Siberian tigers and to evaluate its immunological effect. FPV-HLJ, an FPV strain previously isolated from Siberian tiger in our lab was used to inoculate cat kidney cell line F81 with dose 1/10(v/v) using the synchronizing inoculation method. Inoculated F81 cell line was cultured at 37 degrees C and collected when cytopathic effect was up to 75%. Viral suspension was inactivated by using formaldehyde for 24 h and inactive vaccine preapred by adding aluminium hydroxide gel as adjuvant to the suspension. The inactive vaccine was applied to 2-month-old kitten tigers of hypodermically after protection effect was proved in 2-month-old nonimmunized cats by using the same vaccination procedure. Antibody level in vaccinated cats revealed an increasing trend that the valence of antibody reached 1:1024-2048 after three times of vaccination. All vaccinated cats survived challenges of virulent FPV virus. The valence of antibody reached 1:1024 in most vaccinated tigers 15 days after the third vaccination. The results indicated that the inactivated vaccine can produce immunoprotection for tigers.

  1. RNase H activity associated with reverse transcriptase from feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Cronn, R C; Whitmer, J D; North, T W

    1992-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes requires the action of an RNase H for template switching and primer generation. In this report, we compare enzymatic properties of the RNase H associated with the reverse transcriptase (RT) from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and that from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Both enzymes displayed substrate preference for poly[3H](rG) . poly(dC) hybird over poly[3H](rA) . poly(dT) and cation preference for Mg2+ over Mn2+. Activity of the FIV RNase H upon poly(rG) . poly(dC) produced hydrolysis products from 1 to 6 nucleotides in length, similar to that reported for HIV. Dextran sulfates were effective inhibitors of both the FIV and HIV RNase H and RT activities. Nearly identical inhibition constants (0.12 nM) were obtained for all enzyme activities with dextran sulfate 500,000, while different inhibition constants were observed with dextran sulfate 8,000. Our results suggest that FIV and HIV RTs contain a conserved region that is sensitive to the larger dextran sulfate and that dextran sulfate 8,000 may interact at a different site or by a different mechanism. Images PMID:1370549

  2. Molecular epidemiology of feline immunodeficiency virus in the domestic cat (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Hayward, Jessica J; Rodrigo, Allen G

    2010-03-15

    Studying the evolutionary mechanisms of feline immunodeficiency virus in the domestic cat (Felis catus), FIV(Fca), provides a good comparison to other lentiviruses, such as HIV and FIV(Pco) in the cougar (Puma concolor). We review the current epidemiological and evolutionary findings of FIV(Fca). In addition to the five accepted FIV(Fca), subtypes, several recent phylogenetic studies have found strains that form separate clades, indicative of novel subtypes. In New Zealand cats, these strains of unknown subtype have been found to be involved in complex patterns of intergenic recombination, and whole genome sequences are required to resolve these. Evidence of recombination events has been documented with the highest levels in the env gene, the region involved in host cell receptor recognition. Several cases of FIV(Fca) multiple infections, both inter- and intra-subtype, have been reported. The findings of both unknown subtypes and relatively high levels of recombination suggest the need for further testing of the current vaccine. Limited studies on the evolutionary rate of FIV(Fca) document a value twice to three times that of FIV in the cougar, a result suggesting the different levels of co-adaptation between the viruses and their respective hosts. We studied the tissue distribution of FIV(Fca) in feral domestic cats, finding the first case of FIV compartmentalisation, a phenomenon well documented in HIV-1 patients.

  3. Persistent gene expression in mouse nasal epithelia following feline immunodeficiency virus-based vector gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Patrick L; Burnight, Erin R; Hickey, Melissa A; Blissard, Gary W; McCray, Paul B

    2005-10-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 10(6) transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 10(7) to 10(9) TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (approximately 10(9) TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for approximately 1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity.

  4. Pilot study of the effect of acemannan in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Yates, K M; Rosenberg, L J; Harris, C K; Bronstad, D C; King, G K; Biehle, G A; Walker, B; Ford, C R; Hall, J E; Tizard, I R

    1992-12-01

    Acemannan, a complex carbohydrate shown to stimulate interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha and prostaglandin E2 production by macrophages, has also demonstrated antiviral activity in vitro against human immunodeficiency virus, Newcastle disease virus and influenza virus. A pilot study was undertaken to determine acemannan's effect in 49 feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infected cats with clinical signs of disease (Stage 3, 4 or 5), 23 of which had severe lymphopenia. Cats received acemannan either by intravenous (Group 1) or subcutaneous (Group 2) injection once weekly for 12 weeks, or by daily oral (Group 3) administration for 12 weeks. Upon entry into the study, cats were randomly assigned to one of the three groups. Laboratory analyses were performed at the beginning of the study and at Weeks 6 and 12. Cats were allowed to continue with a predetermined maintenance regimen of acemannan after completing the 12-week study. Thirteen cats died during the course of treatment. Upon necropsy, the most frequent histopathologic findings were neoplastic, kidney and pancreatic disease. Friedman's two-way ANOVA test showed no significant differences in efficacy among groups administered acemannan by the different routes. Therefore, groups were combined and a signed-ranks test was used to determine changes over time. A significant increase was seen in lymphocyte counts (P < 0.001). Neutrophil counts decreased significantly (P = 0.007), as did incidence of sepsis (P = 0.008). When cats entering with lymphopenia were analyzed separately, a much greater increase in lymphocyte counts was noted (235%) compared with non-lymphopenic cats (42%). A survival rate of 75% was found for all three groups. Thirty-six of 49 animals are alive 5-19 months post-entry. These results suggest that acemannan therapy may be of significant benefit in FIV-infected cats exhibiting clinical signs of disease.

  5. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a combination of genetic and environmental factors. How leukemia forms In general, leukemia is thought to occur ... causing the signs and symptoms of leukemia. How leukemia is classified Doctors classify leukemia based on its ...

  6. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  7. Shared usage of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 by primary and laboratory-adapted strains of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Richardson, J; Pancino, G; Merat, R; Leste-Lasserre, T; Moraillon, A; Schneider-Mergener, J; Alizon, M; Sonigo, P; Heveker, N

    1999-05-01

    Strains of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) presently under investigation exhibit distinct patterns of in vitro tropism. In particular, the adaptation of FIV for propagation in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells results in the selection of strains capable of forming syncytia with cell lines of diverse species origin. The infection of CrFK cells by CrFK-adapted strains appears to require the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and is inhibited by its natural ligand, stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha). Here we found that inhibitors of CXCR4-mediated infection by human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), such as the bicyclam AMD3100 and short peptides derived from the amino-terminal region of SDF-1alpha, also blocked infection of CrFK by FIV. Nevertheless, we observed differences in the ranking order of the peptides as inhibitors of FIV and HIV-1 and showed that such differences are related to the species origin of CXCR4 and not that of the viral envelope. These results suggest that, although the envelope glycoproteins of FIV and HIV-1 are substantially divergent, FIV and HIV-1 interact with CXCR4 in a highly similar manner. We have also addressed the role of CXCR4 in the life cycle of primary isolates of FIV. Various CXCR4 ligands inhibited infection of feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by primary FIV isolates in a concentration-dependent manner. These ligands also blocked the viral transduction of feline PBMC by pseudotyped viral particles when infection was mediated by the envelope glycoprotein of a primary FIV isolate but not by the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus, indicating that they act at an envelope-mediated step and presumably at viral entry. These findings strongly suggest that primary and CrFK-adapted strains of FIV, despite disparate in vitro tropisms, share usage of CXCR4.

  8. Evaluation of the antiviral activity of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Sanekata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Morino, Hirofumi; Lee, Cheolsung; Maeda, Ken; Araki, Kazuko; Otake, Toru; Kawahata, Takuya; Shibata, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the antiviral activity of a chlorine dioxide gas solution (CD) and sodium hypochlorite (SH) against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus. CD at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ppm produced potent antiviral activity, inactivating >or= 99.9% of the viruses with a 15 sec treatment for sensitization. The antiviral activity of CD was approximately 10 times higher than that of SH.

  9. Vaccination with Inactivated Virus but Not Viral DNA Reduces Virus Load following Challenge with a Heterologous and Virulent Isolate of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, Margaret J.; Dunsford, Thomas; Klein, Dieter; Willett, Brian J.; Cannon, Celia; Osborne, Robert; MacDonald, Julie; Spibey, Norman; Mackay, Nancy; Jarrett, Oswald; Neil, James C.

    2000-01-01

    It has been shown that cats can be protected against infection with the prototypic Petaluma strain of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVPET) using vaccines based on either inactivated virus particles or replication-defective proviral DNA. However, the utility of such vaccines in the field is uncertain, given the absence of consistent protection against antigenically distinct strains and the concern that the Petaluma strain may be an unrepresentative, attenuated isolate. Since reduction of viral pathogenicity and dissemination may be useful outcomes of vaccination, even in the absence of complete protection, we tested whether either of these vaccine strategies ameliorates the early course of infection following challenge with heterologous and more virulent isolates. We now report that an inactivated virus vaccine, which generates high levels of virus neutralizing antibodies, confers reduced virus loads following challenge with two heterologous isolates, FIVAM6 and FIVGL8. This vaccine also prevented the marked early decline in CD4/CD8 ratio seen in FIVGL8-infected cats. In contrast, DNA vaccines based on either FIVPET or FIVGL8, which induce cell-mediated responses but no detectable antiviral antibodies, protected a fraction of cats against infection with FIVPET but had no measurable effect on virus load when the infecting virus was FIVGL8. These results indicate that the more virulent FIVGL8 is intrinsically more resistant to vaccinal immunity than the FIVPET strain and that a broad spectrum of responses which includes virus neutralizing antibodies is a desirable goal for lentivirus vaccine development. PMID:11000209

  10. Prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in domesticated and feral cats in eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Norris, Jacqueline M; Bell, Erin T; Hales, Louise; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L; White, Joanna D; Wigney, Denise I; Baral, Randolph M; Malik, Richard

    2007-08-01

    Serum samples from 340 pet cats presented to three inner city clinics in Sydney Australia, 68 feral cats from two separate colonies in Sydney, and 329 cattery-confined pedigree and domestic cats in eastern Australia, were collected over a 2-year period and tested for antibodies directed against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) using immunomigration (Agen FIV Rapid Immunomigration test) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods (Snap Combo feline leukaemia virus antigen/FIV antibody test kit, IDEXX Laboratories). Western blot analysis was performed on samples in which there was discrepancy between the results. Information regarding breed, age, gender, housing arrangement and health status were recorded for all pet and cattery-confined cats, while the estimated age and current physical condition were recorded for feral cats. The FIV prevalence in the two feral cat populations was 21% and 25%. The majority of FIV-positive cats were male (60-80%). The FIV prevalence in cattery-confined cats was nil. The prevalence of FIV in the pet cat sample population was 8% (27/340) with almost equal prevalence in 'healthy' (13/170) and 'systemically unwell' (14/170) cats. The age of FIV-positive pet cats ranged from 3 to 19 years; all FIV-positive cats were domestic shorthairs with outside access. The median age of FIV-positive pet cats (11 years) was significantly greater than the median age of FIV-negative pet cats (7.5 years: P<0.05). The prevalence of FIV infection in male pet cats (21/172; 12%) was three times that in female pet cats (6/168; 4%; P<0.05). With over 80% of this pet cat population given outside access and continued FIV infection present in the feral population, this study highlights the need to develop rapid, accurate and cost-effective diagnostic methods that are not subject to false positives created by concurrent vaccination against FIV. This is especially important in re-homing stray cats within animal shelters and monitoring the efficacy of the new

  11. Successive deaths of a captive snow leopard (Uncia uncia) and a serval (Leptailurus serval) by infection with feline panleukopenia virus at Sapporo Maruyama Zoo.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Mochizuki, Masami; Umemura, Takashi; Horiuchi, Motohiro; Ishiguro, Naotaka; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2011-04-01

    Feline parvoviruses were isolated from frozen samples of intestines taken from a snow leopard (Uncia uncia) and a serval (Leptailurus serval) that died successively at Sapporo Maruyama Zoo in Hokkaido, Japan. Isolates possessed an antigenic epitope for both the feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) and mink enteritis virus, identified with a hemagglutination inhibition test. Sequencing analyses of the VP2 region of the isolates revealed that the two isolates were identical and of the FPLV-type. These results suggested that FPLV was introduced from a feral cat which entered the zoo and transmitted the virus inside the zoo.

  12. The kinetics of feline leukaemia virus shedding in experimentally infected cats are associated with infection outcome.

    PubMed

    Cattori, Valentino; Tandon, Ravi; Riond, Barbara; Pepin, Andrea C; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2009-01-13

    Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) infection in felids results mainly from oronasal exposure to infectious saliva and nasal secretions, but the potential for viral transmission through faeces and urine has not been completely characterized. In order to assess and compare potential FeLV transmission routes, we determined the viral kinetics in plasma, saliva, faeces and urine during early experimental FeLV infection (up to week 15 post-exposure) in specific pathogen-free cats. In addition to monitoring p27 antigen levels measured by ELISA, we evaluated the presence of infectious particles by cell culture assays and quantified viral RNA loads by a quantitative real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. RNA load was associated with infection outcome (high load-progressive infection; low load-regressive infection) not only in plasma, but also in saliva, faeces and urine. Infectious virus was isolated from the saliva, faeces and urine of infected cats with progressive infection as early as 3-6 weeks post-infection, but usually not in cats with regressive infection. In cats with progressive infection, therefore, not only saliva but also faeces and to some extent urine might represent potential FeLV transmission routes. These results should be taken into account when modelling FeLV-host interactions and assessing FeLV transmission risk. Moreover, during early FeLV infection, detection of viral RNA in saliva may be used as an indicator of recent virus exposure, even in cats without detectable antigenaemia/viraemia. To determine the clinically relevant outcome of FeLV infection in exposed cats, however, p27 antigen levels in the peripheral blood should be measured.

  13. Comparative analysis of radiation- and virus-induced leukemias in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, E.W.; Binari, R.; Fleissner, E.

    1985-01-15

    Endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) proviral copies were analyzed in thymomas induced in normal BALB/c (Fv-1b) and in Fv-1n congenic mice by X-irradiation. Both strains of mice developed leukemia with similar kinetics, indicating that N-tropism of endogenous MuLV was not a rate-limiting factor in development of disease. Southern blot analysis, using a probe specific for ecotropic virus and for ecotropic-specific sequences retained in pathogenic, env-recombinant viruses, showed that the majority of radiation leukemias lacked newly acquired, clonally integrated, proviruses. This was in contrast to virus-induced leukemias, which routinely exhibited several new proviral integration sites. When an internal proviral DNA restriction fragment was monitored, some radiation leukemias showed evidence of nonclonal infection, accounting for more frequent isolation of infectious virus from such leukemias. Differences in expression of T-cell surface antigens were found in X-ray-induced and virus-induced leukemias. All radiation leukemias were TL positive, whereas virus-induced leukemias were primarily negative for TL. Some differences were also found in Lyt-1 and Lyt-2 expression. The data as a whole suggest that, in the majority of cases, radiation leukemogenesis is not initiated by a viral route--that is, the sort of viral mechanism for which exogenous infection by known pathogenic MuLV is the paradigm.

  14. Acute monoblastic leukemia in a FeLV-positive cat.

    PubMed

    Prihirunkit, Kreangsak; Narkkong, Nual Anong; Apibal, Suntaree

    2008-03-01

    A 1.6-year-old male domestic short hair cat was brought to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Kasetsart University, with signs of severe anemia, depression, and general lymph node enlargement. Complete blood count revealed leukocytosis and massive undifferentiated blasts. Testing for antibodies specific to feline leukemia virus (FeLV) was positive, and FeLV nucleic acid was confirmed by nested polymerase chain reaction. Base on cytochemistry and ultrastructure, the cat was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia.

  15. Transcriptional profiling of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection in CRFK cells and in PBMCs from FIP diagnosed cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal systemic disease, caused by the FIP Virus (FIPV); a virulent mutant of Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV). Currently, the viruses virulence determinants and host gene expressions during FIPV infection are not fully understood. Methods RNA sequencing of Crandell Rees Feline Kidney (CRFK) cells, infected with FIPV strain 79–1146 at 3 hours post infection (h.p.i), were sequenced using the Illumina next generation sequencing approach. Bioinformatic’s analysis, based on Felis catus 2X annotated shotgun reference genome, using CLC bio Genome Workbench mapped both control and infected cell reads to 18899 genes out of 19046 annotated genes. Kal’s Z test statistical analysis was used to analyse the differentially expressed genes from the infected CRFK cells. Real time RT-qPCR was developed for further transcriptional profiling of three genes (PD-1, PD-L1 and A3H) in infected CRFK cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from healthy and FIP-diseased cats. Results Based on Kal’s Z-test, with False Discovery Rate (FDR) <0.05 and >1.99 fold change on gene expressions, a total of 61 genes were differentially expressed by both samples, where 44 genes were up-regulated and the remainder were down-regulated. Most genes were closely clustered together, suggesting a homogeneous expression. The majority of the genes that were significantly regulated, were those associated with monocytes-macrophage and Th1 cell functions, and the regulation of apoptosis. Real time RT-qPCR developed focusing on 2 up-regulated genes (PD-L1 and A3H) together with an apoptosis associated gene PD-1 expressions in FIPV infected CRFK cells and in PBMCs from healthy and FIP diagnosed cats produced concordant results with transcriptome data. Conclusion The possible roles of these genes, and their importance in feline coronaviruses infection, are discussed. PMID:24209771

  16. Vif of feline immunodeficiency virus from domestic cats protects against APOBEC3 restriction factors from many felids.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Jörg; Marino, Daniela; Hofmann, Henning; Yuhki, Naoya; Löchelt, Martin; Münk, Carsten

    2010-07-01

    To get more insight into the role of APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases in the species-specific restriction of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) of the domestic cat, we tested the A3 proteins present in big cats (puma, lion, tiger, and lynx). These A3 proteins were analyzed for expression and sensitivity to the Vif protein of FIV. While A3Z3s and A3Z2-Z3s inhibited Deltavif FIV, felid A3Z2s did not show any antiviral activity against Deltavif FIV or wild-type (wt) FIV. All felid A3Z3s and A3Z2-Z3s were sensitive to Vif of the domestic cat FIV. Vif also induced depletion of felid A3Z2s. Tiger A3s showed a moderate degree of resistance against the Vif-mediated counter defense. These findings may imply that the A3 restriction system does not play a major role to prevent domestic cat FIV transmission to other Felidae. In contrast to the sensitive felid A3s, many nonfelid A3s actively restricted wt FIV replication. To test whether Vif(FIV) can protect also the distantly related human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a chimeric HIV-1.Vif(FIV) was constructed. This HIV-1.Vif(FIV) was replication competent in nonpermissive feline cells expressing human CD4/CCR5 that did not support the replication of wt HIV-1. We conclude that the replication of HIV-1 in some feline cells is inhibited only by feline A3 restriction factors and the absence of the appropriate receptor or coreceptor.

  17. Vif of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus from Domestic Cats Protects against APOBEC3 Restriction Factors from Many Felids▿

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Jörg; Marino, Daniela; Hofmann, Henning; Yuhki, Naoya; Löchelt, Martin; Münk, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    To get more insight into the role of APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases in the species-specific restriction of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) of the domestic cat, we tested the A3 proteins present in big cats (puma, lion, tiger, and lynx). These A3 proteins were analyzed for expression and sensitivity to the Vif protein of FIV. While A3Z3s and A3Z2-Z3s inhibited Δvif FIV, felid A3Z2s did not show any antiviral activity against Δvif FIV or wild-type (wt) FIV. All felid A3Z3s and A3Z2-Z3s were sensitive to Vif of the domestic cat FIV. Vif also induced depletion of felid A3Z2s. Tiger A3s showed a moderate degree of resistance against the Vif-mediated counter defense. These findings may imply that the A3 restriction system does not play a major role to prevent domestic cat FIV transmission to other Felidae. In contrast to the sensitive felid A3s, many nonfelid A3s actively restricted wt FIV replication. To test whether VifFIV can protect also the distantly related human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a chimeric HIV-1.VifFIV was constructed. This HIV-1.VifFIV was replication competent in nonpermissive feline cells expressing human CD4/CCR5 that did not support the replication of wt HIV-1. We conclude that the replication of HIV-1 in some feline cells is inhibited only by feline A3 restriction factors and the absence of the appropriate receptor or coreceptor. PMID:20444897

  18. Evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus in Felidae: Implications for human health and wildlife ecology

    PubMed Central

    Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Warren E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic analyses of feline immunodeficiency viruses provide significant insights on the worldwide distribution and evolutionary history of this emerging pathogen. Large-scale screening of over 3000 samples from all species of Felidae indicates that at least some individuals from most species possess antibodies that cross react to FIV. Phylogenetic analyses of genetic variation in the pol-RT gene demonstrate that FIV lineages are species-specific and suggest that there has been a prolonged period of viral-host co-evolution. The clinical effects of FIV specific to species other than domestic cat are controversial. Comparative genomic analyses of all full-length FIV genomes confirmed that FIV is host specific. Recently sequenced lion subtype E is marginally more similar to Pallas cat FIV though env is more similar to that of domestic cat FIV, indicating a possible recombination between two divergent strains in the wild. Here we review global patterns of FIV seroprevalence and endemnicity, assess genetic differences within and between species-specific FIV strains, and interpret these with patterns of felid speciation to propose an ancestral origin of FIV in Africa followed by interspecies transmission and global dissemination to Eurasia and the Americas. Continued comparative genomic analyses of full-length FIV from all seropositive animals, along with whole genome sequence of host species, will greatly advance our understanding of the role of recombination, selection and adaptation in retroviral emergence. PMID:18359092

  19. A neutron study of the feline leukaemia virus fusion peptide: Implications for biological fusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah M. A.; Darkes, Malcolm J. M.; Bradshaw, Jeremy P.

    Neutron diffraction studies were performed on stacked phospholipid bilayers to determine the effects of the feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) fusion peptide on membrane structure. Bilayers were composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with 50% (mol) dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol. Neutron scattering profiles with peptide present showed an increase in scattering density in the lipid-tails region, whilst scattering by the lipid headgroup region was decreased. This is interpreted as a lowering of the packing density of the lipid headgroups and an increase in the packing density of the lipid tails. Modelling studies and experimental evidence have suggested that fusion peptides catalyse fusion by increasing the negative curvature of the target membrane's outer monolayer. Our results presented here add support to this hypothesis for the fusion mechanism. The 2H 2O scattering profile was also slightly perturbed in the lipid headgroup region with 1% (mol)FeLV fusion peptide present. The FeLV peptide had no significant effect on the organisation of bilayers containing only dioleoylphosphatidylcholine.

  20. Gene transfer to the nonhuman primate retina with recombinant feline immunodeficiency virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Lotery, Andrew J; Derksen, Todd A; Russell, Stephen R; Mullins, Robert F; Sauter, Sybille; Affatigato, Louisa M; Stone, Edwin M; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-04-10

    We hypothesize that recombinant feline immunodeficiency viral (rFIV) vectors may be useful for gene transfer to the nonhuman primate retina. We performed vitrectomies and subretinal injections in the right eyes of 11 cynomolgus monkeys. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped rFIV that expressed the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene was injected into eight eyes. Sham vehicle or lactose buffer injections were also performed in two of these eight study eyes. rFIV pseudotyped with an amphotropic envelope was used in two eyes, and in one animal injections of lactose buffer only were given. After surgery the animals were clinically evaluated by retinal photography and electroretinography. beta-Galactosidase expression was evaluated, at a final end point, in histological sections. We found photoreceptor and Müller cells to have the greatest transgene expression. Focal inflammatory responses localized to the injection site were seen histologically in all eyes. No difference in transduction efficiency was seen between injections near the macula and more peripheral injections. Visual function as assessed by electroretinography was not significantly affected by vector or vehicle injections. We conclude that rFIV vectors administered beneath the retina can transduce a variety of retinal cells in the nonhuman primate retina. rFIV vectors have therapeutic potential and could be exploited to develop gene therapy for the human eye.

  1. Feline immunodeficiency virus and puma lentivirus in Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi): epidemiology and diagnostic issues.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Taylor, S K; Rotstein, D S; Pough, M B; Barr, M C; Baldwin, C A; Cunningham, M; Roelke, M; Ingram, D

    2006-04-01

    This study documents the seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and puma lentivirus (PLV) in free-ranging and captive Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi) (n = 51) and translocated Texas cougars (P. concolor stanleyana) (n = 10) from 1985 to 1998. The sera were tested for anti-FIV antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot tests. The ELISAs were read kinetically (KELA) and the sera were retrospectively examined by PLV peptide ELISA. Eleven panthers and one cougar were positive by KELA; 4 panthers and 4 cougars were equivocal; 35 panthers and 5 cougars were negative; and 1 panther had no data. Seven of the 11 KELA-positive panthers were also positive by Western blot tests and all but one were positive by PLV peptide ELISA. Ten KELA-negative and Western blot-negative cats, were positive by PLV peptide ELISA. KELA results varied within cats from one sample period to the next, but PLV peptide ELISA results were consistent. Territorial sympatry and mating behaviour, noted from radiotelemetry location data on the cats, may have contributed to viral transmission between seropositive animals. These findings suggest that Florida panthers and the introduced Texas cougars have been exposed to FIV and/or PLV.

  2. Evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus in Felidae: implications for human health and wildlife ecology.

    PubMed

    Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Troyer, Jennifer L; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-05-15

    Genetic analyses of feline immunodeficiency viruses provide significant insights on the worldwide distribution and evolutionary history of this emerging pathogen. Large-scale screening of over 3000 samples from all species of Felidae indicates that at least some individuals from most species possess antibodies that cross react to FIV. Phylogenetic analyses of genetic variation in the pol-RT gene demonstrate that FIV lineages are species-specific and suggest that there has been a prolonged period of viral-host co-evolution. The clinical effects of FIV specific to species other than domestic cat are controversial. Comparative genomic analyses of all full-length FIV genomes confirmed that FIV is host specific. Recently sequenced lion subtype E is marginally more similar to Pallas cat FIV though env is more similar to that of domestic cat FIV, indicating a possible recombination between two divergent strains in the wild. Here we review global patterns of FIV seroprevalence and endemnicity, assess genetic differences within and between species-specific FIV strains, and interpret these with patterns of felid speciation to propose an ancestral origin of FIV in Africa followed by interspecies transmission and global dissemination to Eurasia and the Americas. Continued comparative genomic analyses of full-length FIV from all seropositive animals, along with whole genome sequence of host species, will greatly advance our understanding of the role of recombination, selection and adaptation in retroviral emergence.

  3. A survey of feline leukaemia virus infection of domestic cats from selected areas in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Muchaamba, Francis; Mutiringindi, Takudzwa H; Tivapasi, Musavenga T; Dhliwayo, Solomon; Matope, Gift

    2014-11-14

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to detect the feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) p27 antigen and to determine risk factors and the haematological changes associated with infection in domestic cats in Zimbabwe. Sera were collected for detection of the p27 antigen, urea, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels, whilst whole blood was collected for haematology. FeLV p27 antigen was detected using a rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test kit. Data on risk factors were analysed using a logistic regression model. Of the 100 cats tested, 41% (95% CI: 31.19% - 50.81%) (41/100) were positive for the FeLV p27 antigen. Sex and health status of cats were not significantly (p > 0.05) associated with infection. Intact cats (OR = 9.73), those living in multicat housing (OR = 5.23) and cats that had access to outdoor life (OR = 35.5) were found to have higher odds of infection compared with neutered cats, those living in single-cat housing, and without access to outdoor life, respectively. Biochemistry and haematology revealed no specific changes. The results showed that FeLV infection was high in sampled cats, providing evidence of active infection. Thus, it would be prudent to introduce specific control measures for FeLV infection in Zimbabwe.

  4. The rectal microbiota of cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus infection and uninfected controls.

    PubMed

    Weese, J S; Nichols, J; Jalali, M; Litster, A

    2015-10-22

    Rectal swabs were collected from 31 cats, 16 with FIV infection and 15 uninfected controls, to evaluate and compare the rectal bacterial microbiota in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection and uninfected controls. The rectal microbiota was characterized via next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene (V4 region) polymerase chain reaction products. Eighteen different phyla were identified. Firmicutes dominated in both groups, followed by Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, but there were no significant differences between groups. When predominant orders are compared, FIV-infected cats had significant higher median relative abundances of Bifidobacteriales (P=0.022), Lactobacillales (P=0.022) and Aeromonadales (P=0.043). No differences were identified in the 50 most common genera when adjusted for false discovery rate. There were significant differences in community membership (Jaccard index, unifrac P=0.008, AMOVA P<0.001) and community structure (Yue&Clayton index, unifrac P=0.03, AMOVA P=0.005) between groups. However, only one metacommunity (enterotype) was identified. The rectal microbiota differed between cats with FIV infection and uninfected controls. Some of the changes that were noted have been associated with 'dysbiosis' and proinflammatory states in other species, so it is possible that subclinical alteration in the intestinal microbiota could influence the health of FIV-infected cats. Evaluation of the reasons for microbiota alteration and the potential impact on cat health is required.

  5. First description of Mycobacterium heckeshornense infection in a feline immunodeficiency virus-positive cat.

    PubMed

    Elze, Julia; Grammel, Lukas; Richter, Elvira; Aupperle, Heike

    2013-12-01

    A 13-year-old cat was presented to the veterinary clinic with poor condition, vomiting and a reduced appetite. A painful abdomen was diagnosed because of tension and defence reactions on palpation. Diagnostic laparotomy showed a thickening of the colon and caecal intestinal wall. Histopathological investigation of intestinal biopsies revealed focal severe granulomatous inflammation with numerous acid-fast bacilli in the tela submucosa. The complete blood count test showed a severe lymphopenia and anaemia, and the cat tested positive for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cat was euthanased and necropsied. Multifocal granulomatous nodules were present in the intestines, liver and kidneys. The gastric lymph node was markedly enlarged and showed a caseous cut surface. Histopathology revealed a systemic mycobacteriosis affecting intestine, lymph nodes, liver and kidneys. The mycobacterial strain was cultured and determined by its unique 16S rRNA gene sequence as Mycobacterium heckeshornense. This is the first reported case of M heckeshornense in a cat. It was suspected that the disseminated mycobacteriosis was supported by the FIV infection.

  6. A door-to-door prevalence study of feline immunodeficiency virus in an Australian suburb.

    PubMed

    Chang-Fung-Martel, Janine; Gummow, Bruce; Burgess, Graham; Fenton, Eloise; Squires, Richard

    2013-12-01

    A door-to-door survey was conducted within the limits of the suburb of Douglas in northern Queensland, Australia, to determine the prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in the overall population of domestic cats. Previous FIV prevalence studies have relied on convenience sampling strategies, leaving out an important group of pet cats that do not receive regular veterinary attention. Saliva was selected for testing because collection was non-invasive and was likely to achieve a high rate of participation. Ninety-six cats were surveyed and tested for salivary antibodies against FIV and with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR was considered to be the gold standard and a cat was considered to be FIV-positive if sequencing results on a PCR product of appropriate size matched previously published FIV genome sequences available in GenBank. Results showed 10/96 cats to be infected with FIV subtype A, indicating a prevalence of 10.4% (95% confidence interval: 4.4-16.4) in the area studied. High risk associations were established with the roaming lifestyle of the cat (P <0.002), presence of abscesses (P <0.03) and occurrence of bite wounds (P <0.10). This is the first known cross-sectional study of a population of urban northern Australian cats living in an affluent suburb and presenting saliva as a potential non-invasive sample for large-scale epidemiological surveys on FIV.

  7. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Cross-Species Transmission: Implications for Emergence of New Lentiviral Infections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin; Malmberg, Jennifer L; Wood, Britta A; Hladky, Sahaja; Troyer, Ryan; Roelke, Melody; Cunningham, Mark; McBride, Roy; Vickers, Winston; Boyce, Walter; Boydston, Erin; Serieys, Laurel; Riley, Seth; Crooks, Kevin; VandeWoude, Sue

    2017-03-01

    Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emergence following human exposures to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an understanding of processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) for a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study, we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- versus intraspecies transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analyses of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrate that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to that in bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but we did not detect selection among 20 PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support the hypothesis that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals that intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers (Puma concolor coryi) in Florida following the initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to the emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates.IMPORTANCE Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine which outcome

  8. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Cross-Species Transmission: Implications for Emergence of New Lentiviral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Malmberg, Jennifer L.; Wood, Britta A.; Hladky, Sahaja; Troyer, Ryan; Roelke, Melody; Cunningham, Mark; McBride, Roy; Vickers, Winston; Boyce, Walter; Boydston, Erin; Serieys, Laurel; Riley, Seth; Crooks, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emergence following human exposures to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), an understanding of processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) for a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study, we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- versus intraspecies transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analyses of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrate that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to that in bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but we did not detect selection among 20 PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support the hypothesis that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals that intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers (Puma concolor coryi) in Florida following the initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to the emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates. IMPORTANCE Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine

  9. Mutagenesis of N-terminal residues of feline foamy virus Gag reveals entirely distinct functions during capsid formation, particle assembly, Gag processing and budding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Betts, Matthew J; Lei, Janet; Wei, Guochao; Bao, Qiuying; Kehl, Timo; Russell, Robert B; Löchelt, Martin

    2016-08-22

    Foamy viruses (FVs) of the Spumaretrovirinae subfamily are distinct retroviruses, with many features of their molecular biology and replication strategy clearly different from those of the Orthoretroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency, murine leukemia, and human T cell lymphotropic viruses. The FV Gag N-terminal region is responsible for capsid formation and particle budding via interaction with Env. However, the critical residues or motifs in this region and their functional interaction are currently ill-defined, especially in non-primate FVs. Mutagenesis of N-terminal Gag residues of feline FV (FFV) reveals key residues essential for either capsid assembly and/or viral budding via interaction with the FFV Env leader protein (Elp). In an in vitro Gag-Elp interaction screen, Gag mutations abolishing particle assembly also interfered with Elp binding, indicating that Gag assembly is a prerequisite for this highly specific interaction. Gradient sedimentation analyses of cytosolic proteins indicate that wild-type Gag is mostly assembled into virus capsids. Moreover, proteolytic processing of Gag correlates with capsid assembly and is mostly, if not completely, independent from particle budding. In addition, Gag processing correlates with the presence of packaging-competent FFV genomic RNA suggesting that Pol encapsidation via genomic RNA is a prerequisite for Gag processing. Though an appended heterogeneous myristoylation signal rescues Gag particle budding of mutants unable to form capsids or defective in interacting with Elp, it fails to generate infectious particles that co-package Pol, as evidenced by a lack of Gag processing. Changes in proteolytic Gag processing, intracellular capsid assembly, particle budding and infectivity of defined N-terminal Gag mutants highlight their essential, distinct and only partially overlapping roles during viral assembly and budding. Discussion of these findings will be based on a recent model developed for Gag

  10. Amino acid changes in the spike protein of feline coronavirus correlate with systemic spread of virus from the intestine and not with feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Emily; Tasker, Séverine; Day, Michael J; Harley, Ross; Kipar, Anja; Siddell, Stuart G; Helps, Christopher R

    2014-04-25

    Recent evidence suggests that a mutation in the spike protein gene of feline coronavirus (FCoV), which results in an amino acid change from methionine to leucine at position 1058, may be associated with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Tissue and faecal samples collected post mortem from cats diagnosed with or without FIP were subjected to RNA extraction and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect FCoV RNA. In cats with FIP, 95% of tissue, and 81% of faecal samples were PCR-positive, as opposed to 22% of tissue, and 60% of faecal samples in cats without FIP. Relative FCoV copy numbers were significantly higher in the cats with FIP, both in tissues (P < 0.001) and faeces (P = 0.02). PCR-positive samples underwent pyrosequencing encompassing position 1058 of the FCoV spike protein. This identified a methionine codon at position 1058, consistent with the shedding of an enteric form of FCoV, in 77% of the faecal samples from cats with FIP, and in 100% of the samples from cats without FIP. In contrast, 91% of the tissue samples from cats with FIP and 89% from cats without FIP had a leucine codon at position 1058, consistent with a systemic form of FCoV. These results suggest that the methionine to leucine substitution at position 1058 in the FCoV spike protein is indicative of systemic spread of FCoV from the intestine, rather than a virus with the potential to cause FIP.

  11. Identification of the feline foamy virus Bet domain essential for APOBEC3 counteraction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background APOBEC3 (A3) proteins restrict viral replication by cytidine deamination of viral DNA genomes and impairing reverse transcription and integration. To escape this restriction, lentiviruses have evolved the viral infectivity factor (Vif), which binds A3 proteins and targets them for proteolytic degradation. In contrast, foamy viruses (FVs) encode Bet proteins that allow replication in the presence of A3, apparently by A3 binding and/or sequestration, thus preventing A3 packaging into virions and subsequent restriction. Due to a long-lasting FV-host coevolution, Bet proteins mainly counteract restriction by A3s from their cognate or highly related host species. Results Through bioinformatics, we identified conserved motifs in Bet, all localized in the bel2 exon. In line with the localization of these conserved motifs within bel2, this part of feline FV (FFV) Bet has been shown to be essential for feline A3 (feA3) inactivation and feA3 protein binding. To study the function of the Bet motifs in detail, we analyzed the ability of targeted deletion, substitution, and chimeric FFV-PFV (prototype FV) Bet mutants to physically bind and/or inactivate feA3. Binding of Bet to feA3Z2b is sensitive to mutations in the first three conserved motifs and N- and C-terminal deletions and substitutions across almost the complete bel2 coding sequence. In contrast, the Bel1 (also designated Tas) domain of Bet is dispensable for basal feA3Z2b inactivation and binding but mainly increases the steady state level of Bet. Studies with PFV Bel1 and full-length FFV Bel2 chimeras confirmed the importance of Bel2 for A3 inactivation indicating that Bel1 is dispensable for basal feA3Z2b inactivation and binding but increases Bet stability. Moreover, the bel1/tas exon may be required for expression of a fully functional Bet protein from a spliced transcript. Conclusions We show that the Bel2 domain of FV Bet is essential for the inactivation of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminase restriction

  12. Fine definition of the CXCR4-binding region on the V3 loop of feline immunodeficiency virus surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiong-Ying; Fink, Elizabeth; Hong, Yang; Wang, Cathy; Grant, Chris K; Elder, John H

    2010-05-18

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is shared by primary and laboratory-adapted strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) for viral entry. Our previous studies implicated a contiguous nine-amino-acid region of the V3 loop of the FIV envelope surface as important in CXCR4 binding and virus entry. The binding is specific for CXCR4 since it can be inhibited by AMD3100, a selective CXCR4 inhibitor. Additional site-directed mutagenesis was used to further reveal the key residues. Binding studies indicated that basic residues R395, K397, R399 as well as N398 are critical for CXCR4 binding. The effect of other amino acid residues on receptor binding depends on the type of amino acid residue substituted. The binding study results were confirmed on human CXCR4-expressing SupT1 cells and correlated with entry efficiency using a virus entry assay. Amino acid residues critical for CXCR4 are not critical for interactions with the primary binding receptor CD134, which has an equivalent role as CD4 for HIV-1 binding. The ELISA results show that W394 and W400 are crucial for the recognition by neutralizing anti-V3 antibodies. Since certain strains of HIV-1 also use CXCR4 as the entry receptor, the findings make the feline model attractive for development of broad-based entry antagonists and for study of the molecular mechanism of receptor/virus interactions.

  13. PATHOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF FELINE IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (FIV) INFECTION IN WILD AFRICAN LIONS

    PubMed Central

    Roelke, Melody E.; Brown, Meredith A.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Winterbach, Hanlie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Hemson, Graham; Smith, Dahlem; Johnson, Randall C.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roca, Alfred L.; Alexander, Katherine; Klein, Lin; Martinelli, Paulo; Krishnasamu, Karthiuani; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes AIDS in the domestic cat (Felis catus) but has not been explicitly associated with AIDS pathology in any of the eight free-ranging species of Felidae that are endemic with circulating FIV strains. African lion (Panthera leo) populations are infected with lion-specific FIV strains (FIVple), yet there remains uncertainty about the degree to which FIV infection impacts their health. Reported CD4+ T-lymphocyte depletion in FIVple infected lions and anecdotal reports of lion morbidity associated with FIV sero-prevalence emphasize the concern as to whether FIVple is innocuous or pathogenic. Here we monitored clinical, biochemical, histological and serological parameters among FIVple-positive (N=47) as compared to FIVple negative (N=17) lions anesthetized and sampled on multiple occasions between 1999 and 2006 in Botswana. Relative to uninfected lions, FIVple infected lions displayed a significant elevation in the prevalence of AIDS defining conditions: lymphandenopathy, gingivitis, tongue papillomas, dehydration, and poor coat condition, as well as displaying abnormal red blood cell parameters and elevated liver enzymes and serum proteins. Spleen and lymph node laparoscopic biopsies from free-ranging FIVple infected lions (N=8) revealed evidence of lymphoid depletion, the hallmark pathology documented in immunodefieciency virus infections of humans (HIV-1), macaques, and domestic cats. We conclude that over time FIVple infections in free-ranging lions can lead to adverse clinical, immunological, and pathological outcomes in some individuals that parallel sequelae caused by lentivirus infection in humans (HIV), Asian macaques (SIV) and domestic cats (FIVfca). PMID:19464039

  14. Rapid evolution of the env gene leader sequence in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Hughes, Joseph; Biek, Roman; Litster, Annette; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-04-01

    Analysing the evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) at the intra-host level is important in order to address whether the diversity and composition of viral quasispecies affect disease progression. We examined the intra-host diversity and the evolutionary rates of the entire env and structural fragments of the env sequences obtained from sequential blood samples in 43 naturally infected domestic cats that displayed different clinical outcomes. We observed in the majority of cats that FIV env showed very low levels of intra-host diversity. We estimated that env evolved at a rate of 1.16×10(-3) substitutions per site per year and demonstrated that recombinant sequences evolved faster than non-recombinant sequences. It was evident that the V3-V5 fragment of FIV env displayed higher evolutionary rates in healthy cats than in those with terminal illness. Our study provided the first evidence that the leader sequence of env, rather than the V3-V5 sequence, had the highest intra-host diversity and the highest evolutionary rate of all env fragments, consistent with this region being under a strong selective pressure for genetic variation. Overall, FIV env displayed relatively low intra-host diversity and evolved slowly in naturally infected cats. The maximum evolutionary rate was observed in the leader sequence of env. Although genetic stability is not necessarily a prerequisite for clinical stability, the higher genetic stability of FIV compared with human immunodeficiency virus might explain why many naturally infected cats do not progress rapidly to AIDS. © 2015 The Authors.

  15. Genetic and phylogenetic divergence of feline immunodeficiency virus in the puma (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M A; Brown, E W; Culver, M; Johnson, W E; Pecon-Slattery, J; Brousset, D; O'Brien, S J

    1996-10-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus which causes an AIDS-like disease in domestic cats (Felis catus). A number of other felid species, including the puma (Puma concolor), carry a virus closely related to domestic cat FIV. Serological testing revealed the presence of antibodies to FIV in 22% of 434 samples from throughout the geographic range of the puma. FIV-Pco pol gene sequences isolated from pumas revealed extensive sequence diversity, greater than has been documented in the domestic cat. The puma sequences formed two highly divergent groups, analogous to the clades which have been defined for domestic cat and lion (Panthera leo) FIV. The puma clade A was made up of samples from Florida and California, whereas clade B consisted of samples from other parts of North America, Central America, and Brazil. The difference between these two groups was as great as that reported among three lion FIV clades. Within puma clades, sequence variation is large, comparable to between-clade differences seen for domestic cat clades, allowing recognition of 15 phylogenetic lineages (subclades) among puma FIV-Pco. Large sequence divergence among isolates, nearly complete species monophyly, and widespread geographic distribution suggest that FIV-Pco has evolved within the puma species for a long period. The sequence data provided evidence for vertical transmission of FIV-Pco from mothers to their kittens, for coinfection of individuals by two different viral strains, and for cross-species transmission of FIV from a domestic cat to a puma. These factors may all be important for understanding the epidemiology and natural history of FIV in the puma.

  16. Contrasting clinical outcomes in two cohorts of cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)

    PubMed Central

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M.; Litster, Annette; Lin, Tsang Long; Mellor, Dominic J.; Willett, Brian J.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 25 years of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) research, relatively little is known about the longitudinal course of FIV infection following natural infection. In contrast to published reports of experimental infections using lethal strains of the virus, clinical signs of naturally acquired FIV infection can be mild or inapparent, rather than life-threatening. In this prospective, longitudinal controlled study, based in Chicago, IL (n = 17) and Memphis, TN (n = 27), we investigated two cohorts of privately owned, naturally infected cats kept under different housing conditions. Cats in the Chicago cohort (Group 1) were kept in households of ≤2 cats, while the Memphis cohort (Group 2) comprised part of a large multi-cat household of over 60 cats kept indoors only, with unrestricted access to one another. The majority of cats from Group 1 did not display clinical signs consistent with immunodeficiency during the 22-month observation period. In contrast, the outcome of infection in Group 2 was dramatically different; 17/27 (63%) of cats lost a median of 51.3% of their bodyweight (P < 0.0005) and died during the study period, with lymphoma being the most common cause of mortality. Although the decrease in CD4+ T cell count between enrolment and terminal disease was significant (P = 0.0017), the CD4:CD8 ratio at the time of enrolment did not reliably distinguish FIV-positive cats classified as ‘healthy’ and ‘not healthy’ at either cohort. FIV load at enrolment was significantly lower in Group 1 than in Group 2 (P < 0.0001), but there were no significant differences at enrolment between healthy and not healthy cats at either group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that management and housing conditions impact on disease progression and survival times of FIV-positive cats. PMID:25595267

  17. Rapid evolution of the env gene leader sequence in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Joseph; Biek, Roman; Litster, Annette; Willett, Brian J.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Analysing the evolution of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) at the intra-host level is important in order to address whether the diversity and composition of viral quasispecies affect disease progression. We examined the intra-host diversity and the evolutionary rates of the entire env and structural fragments of the env sequences obtained from sequential blood samples in 43 naturally infected domestic cats that displayed different clinical outcomes. We observed in the majority of cats that FIV env showed very low levels of intra-host diversity. We estimated that env evolved at a rate of 1.16×10−3 substitutions per site per year and demonstrated that recombinant sequences evolved faster than non-recombinant sequences. It was evident that the V3–V5 fragment of FIV env displayed higher evolutionary rates in healthy cats than in those with terminal illness. Our study provided the first evidence that the leader sequence of env, rather than the V3–V5 sequence, had the highest intra-host diversity and the highest evolutionary rate of all env fragments, consistent with this region being under a strong selective pressure for genetic variation. Overall, FIV env displayed relatively low intra-host diversity and evolved slowly in naturally infected cats. The maximum evolutionary rate was observed in the leader sequence of env. Although genetic stability is not necessarily a prerequisite for clinical stability, the higher genetic stability of FIV compared with human immunodeficiency virus might explain why many naturally infected cats do not progress rapidly to AIDS. PMID:25535323

  18. Assessing the impact of feline immunodeficiency virus and bovine tuberculosis co-infection in African lions

    PubMed Central

    Maas, M.; Keet, D. F.; Rutten, V. P. M. G.; Heesterbeek, J. A. P.; Nielen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a disease that was introduced relatively recently into the Kruger National Park (KNP) lion population. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVple) is thought to have been endemic in lions for a much longer time. In humans, co-infection between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus increases disease burden. If BTB were to reach high levels of prevalence in lions, and if similar worsening effects would exist between FIVple and BTB as for their human equivalents, this could pose a lion conservation problem. We collected data on lions in KNP from 1993 to 2008 for spatio-temporal analysis of both FIVple and BTB, and to assess whether a similar relationship between the two diseases exists in lions. We found that BTB prevalence in the south was higher than in the north (72 versus 19% over the total study period) and increased over time in the northern part of the KNP (0–41%). No significant spatio-temporal differences were seen for FIVple in the study period, in agreement with the presumed endemic state of the infection. Both infections affected haematology and blood chemistry values, FIVple in a more pronounced way than BTB. The effect of co-infection on these values, however, was always less than additive. Though a large proportion (31%) of the lions was co-infected with FIVple and M. bovis, there was no evidence for a synergistic relation as in their human counterparts. Whether this results from different immunopathogeneses remains to be determined. PMID:22915673

  19. Assessing the impact of feline immunodeficiency virus and bovine tuberculosis co-infection in African lions.

    PubMed

    Maas, M; Keet, D F; Rutten, V P M G; Heesterbeek, J A P; Nielen, M

    2012-10-22

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a disease that was introduced relatively recently into the Kruger National Park (KNP) lion population. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV(ple)) is thought to have been endemic in lions for a much longer time. In humans, co-infection between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus increases disease burden. If BTB were to reach high levels of prevalence in lions, and if similar worsening effects would exist between FIV(ple) and BTB as for their human equivalents, this could pose a lion conservation problem. We collected data on lions in KNP from 1993 to 2008 for spatio-temporal analysis of both FIV(ple) and BTB, and to assess whether a similar relationship between the two diseases exists in lions. We found that BTB prevalence in the south was higher than in the north (72 versus 19% over the total study period) and increased over time in the northern part of the KNP (0-41%). No significant spatio-temporal differences were seen for FIV(ple) in the study period, in agreement with the presumed endemic state of the infection. Both infections affected haematology and blood chemistry values, FIV(ple) in a more pronounced way than BTB. The effect of co-infection on these values, however, was always less than additive. Though a large proportion (31%) of the lions was co-infected with FIV(ple) and M. bovis, there was no evidence for a synergistic relation as in their human counterparts. Whether this results from different immunopathogeneses remains to be determined.

  20. Pathological manifestations of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in wild African lions.

    PubMed

    Roelke, Melody E; Brown, Meredith A; Troyer, Jennifer L; Winterbach, Hanlie; Winterbach, Christiaan; Hemson, Graham; Smith, Dahlem; Johnson, Randall C; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Roca, Alfred L; Alexander, Kathleen A; Klein, Lin; Martelli, Paolo; Krishnasamy, Karthiyani; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2009-07-20

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes AIDS in the domestic cat (Felis catus) but has not been explicitly associated with AIDS pathology in any of the eight free-ranging species of Felidae that are endemic with circulating FIV strains. African lion (Panthera leo) populations are infected with lion-specific FIV strains (FIVple), yet there remains uncertainty about the degree to which FIV infection impacts their health. Reported CD4+ T-lymphocyte depletion in FIVple-infected lions and anecdotal reports of lion morbidity associated with FIV seroprevalence emphasize the concern as to whether FIVple is innocuous or pathogenic. Here we monitored clinical, biochemical, histological and serological parameters among FIVple-positive (N=47) as compared to FIVple-negative (N=17) lions anesthetized and sampled on multiple occasions between 1999 and 2006 in Botswana. Relative to uninfected lions, FIVple-infected lions displayed a significant elevation in the prevalence of AIDS-defining conditions: lymphadenopathy, gingivitis, tongue papillomas, dehydration, and poor coat condition, as well as displaying abnormal red blood cell parameters, depressed serum albumin, and elevated liver enzymes and gamma globulin. Spleen and lymph node biopsies from free-ranging FIVple-infected lions (N=9) revealed evidence of lymphoid depletion, the hallmark pathology documented in immunodeficiency virus infections of humans (HIV-1), macaques, and domestic cats. We conclude that over time FIVple infections in free-ranging lions can lead to adverse clinical, immunological, and pathological outcomes in some individuals that parallel sequelae caused by lentivirus infection in humans (HIV), Asian macaques (SIV) and domestic cats (FIVfca).

  1. Genetic and phylogenetic divergence of feline immunodeficiency virus in the puma (Puma concolor).

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, M A; Brown, E W; Culver, M; Johnson, W E; Pecon-Slattery, J; Brousset, D; O'Brien, S J

    1996-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus which causes an AIDS-like disease in domestic cats (Felis catus). A number of other felid species, including the puma (Puma concolor), carry a virus closely related to domestic cat FIV. Serological testing revealed the presence of antibodies to FIV in 22% of 434 samples from throughout the geographic range of the puma. FIV-Pco pol gene sequences isolated from pumas revealed extensive sequence diversity, greater than has been documented in the domestic cat. The puma sequences formed two highly divergent groups, analogous to the clades which have been defined for domestic cat and lion (Panthera leo) FIV. The puma clade A was made up of samples from Florida and California, whereas clade B consisted of samples from other parts of North America, Central America, and Brazil. The difference between these two groups was as great as that reported among three lion FIV clades. Within puma clades, sequence variation is large, comparable to between-clade differences seen for domestic cat clades, allowing recognition of 15 phylogenetic lineages (subclades) among puma FIV-Pco. Large sequence divergence among isolates, nearly complete species monophyly, and widespread geographic distribution suggest that FIV-Pco has evolved within the puma species for a long period. The sequence data provided evidence for vertical transmission of FIV-Pco from mothers to their kittens, for coinfection of individuals by two different viral strains, and for cross-species transmission of FIV from a domestic cat to a puma. These factors may all be important for understanding the epidemiology and natural history of FIV in the puma. PMID:8794304

  2. Rectal transmission of bovine leukemia virus in cattle and sheep.

    PubMed

    Henry, E T; Levine, J F; Coggins, L

    1987-04-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was transmitted by rectal inoculation of BLV-infective whole blood into cattle and sheep. Two cows and 2 sheep each were given 500 ml and 50 ml of blood, respectively, by rectal infusion. Two sheep which served as positive controls each were given 1 ml of the same blood, IV. All animals became seropositive to BLV by postinoculation week 5. Although relatively large volumes of blood were used for rectal inoculation, a base line for infectivity was established for the rectal route.

  3. Interspecies Transmission of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus from the Domestic Cat to the Tsushima Cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura) in the Wild

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Goto, Yuko; Yoneda, Kumiko; Endo, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Takuya; Hamachi, Masaharu; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Hirotoshi; Koga, Susumu; Komori, Mitsuru; Fushuku, Seigo; Ushinohama, Kanji; Akuzawa, Masao; Watari, Toshihiro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was isolated from a wild-caught Tsushima cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura), an endangered Japanese nondomestic subspecies of leopard cat (F. bengalensis). Phylogenetic analysis of the env gene sequences indicated that the FIV from the Tsushima cat belonged to a cluster of subtype D FIVs from domestic cats. FIVs from both the Tsushima cat and the domestic cat showed similar levels of replication and cytopathicity in lymphoid cell lines derived from these two species. The results indicated the occurrence of interspecies transmission of FIV from the domestic cat to the Tsushima cat in the wild. PMID:10438892

  4. Interspecies transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus from the domestic cat to the Tsushima cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura) in the wild.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Y; Goto, Y; Yoneda, K; Endo, Y; Mizuno, T; Hamachi, M; Maruyama, H; Kinoshita, H; Koga, S; Komori, M; Fushuku, S; Ushinohama, K; Akuzawa, M; Watari, T; Hasegawa, A; Tsujimoto, H

    1999-09-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was isolated from a wild-caught Tsushima cat (Felis bengalensis euptilura), an endangered Japanese nondomestic subspecies of leopard cat (F. bengalensis). Phylogenetic analysis of the env gene sequences indicated that the FIV from the Tsushima cat belonged to a cluster of subtype D FIVs from domestic cats. FIVs from both the Tsushima cat and the domestic cat showed similar levels of replication and cytopathicity in lymphoid cell lines derived from these two species. The results indicated the occurrence of interspecies transmission of FIV from the domestic cat to the Tsushima cat in the wild.

  5. Regulated expression of the feline panleukopenia virus P38 promoter on extrachromosomal FPV/EBV chimeric plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, D L; Carlson, J O

    1989-01-01

    Feline panleukopenia virus/Epstein-Barr virus (FPV/EBV) chimeric expression plasmids were constructed to study regulation of the structural protein gene of the parvovirus, FPV, in a homologous cell culture system. Detection and quantitation of activity from the native FPV promoter, P38, was facilitated by fusing the Escherichia coli lacZ gene with the FPV structural protein gene. Feline cell lines which stably maintained these plasmids extrachromosomally were established. Constitutive beta-galactosidase activity was low but increased up to 40-fold after infection with FPV. Expression of beta-galactosidase was only detected when the FPV/lacZ gene was oriented in the same transcriptional direction as the Epstein-Barr virus gene coding for EBNA-1. When a small open reading frame upstream of the FPV/lacZ initiation codon was deleted, beta-galactosidase expression increased another 4.7- to 26-fold. These changes in beta-galactosidase activity indicate that expression of the FPV structural protein gene is regulated both transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Images PMID:2542586

  6. Feline immunodeficiency virus cross-species transmission: Implications for emergence of new lentiviral infections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Justin; Malmberg, Jennifer L.; Wood, Britta A.; Hladky, Sahaja; Troyer, Ryan; Roelke, Melody; Cunningham, Mark W.; McBride, Roy; Vickers, Winston; Boyce, Walter; Boydston, Erin E.; Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Riley, Seth P D; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Owing to a complex history of host-parasite coevolution, lentiviruses exhibit a high degree of species specificity. Given the well-documented viral archeology of HIV emergence following human exposures to SIV, understanding processes that promote successful cross-species lentiviral transmissions is highly relevant. We have previously reported natural cross-species transmission of a subtype of feline immunodeficiency virus, puma lentivirus A (PLVA), between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in a small number of animals in California and Florida. In this study we investigate host-specific selection pressures, within-host viral fitness, and inter- vs. intra-species transmission patterns among a larger collection of PLV isolates from free-ranging bobcats and mountain lions. Analysis of proviral and viral RNA levels demonstrates that PLVA fitness is severely restricted in mountain lions compared to bobcats. We document evidence of diversifying selection in three of six PLVA genomes from mountain lions, but did not detect selection among twenty PLVA isolates from bobcats. These findings support that PLVA is a bobcat-adapted virus, which is less fit in mountain lions and under intense selection pressure in the novel host. Ancestral reconstruction of transmission events reveals intraspecific PLVA transmission has occurred among panthers (Puma concolor coryi) in Florida following initial cross-species infection from bobcats. In contrast, interspecific transmission from bobcats to mountain lions predominates in California. These findings document outcomes of cross-species lentiviral transmission events among felids that compare to emergence of HIV from nonhuman primates.IMPORTANCE Cross-species transmission episodes can be singular, dead-end events or can result in viral replication and spread in the new species. The factors that determine which outcome will occur are complex, and the risk of new virus emergence is therefore difficult to predict. Here

  7. A Multicenter Blinded Analysis Indicates No Association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and either Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus or Polytropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Harvey J.; Mikovits, Judy A.; Switzer, William M.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Klimas, Nancy; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Montoya, Jose G.; Bateman, Lucinda; Levine, Susan; Peterson, Daniel; Levin, Bruce; Hanson, Maureen R.; Genfi, Afia; Bhat, Meera; Zheng, HaoQiang; Wang, Richard; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lee, Li Ling; Sameroff, Stephen; Heneine, Walid; Coffin, John; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disabling disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) has been linked in two independent studies to infection with xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV). Although the associations were not confirmed in subsequent studies by other investigators, patients continue to question the consensus of the scientific community in rejecting the validity of the association. Here we report blinded analysis of peripheral blood from a rigorously characterized, geographically diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects by the investigators describing the original association. This analysis reveals no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection. PMID:22991430

  8. Immunocytochemical demonstration of feline infectious peritonitis virus within cerebrospinal fluid macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ives, Edward J; Vanhaesebrouck, An E; Cian, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    A 4-month-old female entire domestic shorthair cat presented with an acute onset of blindness, tetraparesis and subsequent generalised seizure activity. Haematology and serum biochemistry demonstrated a moderate, poorly regenerative anaemia, hypoalbuminaemia and hyperglobulinaemia with a low albumin:globulin ratio. Serology for feline coronavirus antibody was positive with an elevated alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. Analysis of cisternal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) demonstrated markedly elevated protein and a mixed, predominately neutrophilic pleocytosis. Immunocytochemistry for feline coronavirus was performed on the CSF, with positive staining observed inside macrophages. The cat was subsequently euthanased, and both histopathology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with a diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis. This is the first reported use of immunocytochemistry for detection of feline coronavirus within CSF macrophages. If this test proves highly specific, as for identification of feline coronavirus within tissue or effusion macrophages, it would be strongly supportive of an ante-mortem diagnosis of feline infectious peritonitis in cats with central nervous system involvement without the need for biopsy.

  9. Detection and molecular characterization of bovine leukemia viruses from Jordan.

    PubMed

    Ababneh, Mustafa M; Al-Rukibat, Raida K; Hananeh, Wael M; Nasar, Abdelrahman T; Al-Zghoul, Mohammad B

    2012-12-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is distributed worldwide. BLV has many effects on the health status and productivity of infected animals and is a potential risk for humans. In this study, we aimed to investigate the presence of and genotype bovine leukemia viruses on Jordanian dairy farms. Nested PCR coupled with RFLP and direct sequencing of a partial fragment of the env gene were carried out. Two BLV genotypes were found, genotypes 1 and 6. These genotypes were identified by nested PCR-RFLP of 444 bp of the env gene by restriction digestion with HaeIII, Bcl I and Pvu II. However, BLV-Jordan-10 seems to represent an entirely new genotype in our phylogenetic analysis. The nucleotide sequence identity between these two Jordanian BLV genotypes (1 and 6) was 96.2 %. The nucleotide sequence identity between Jordanian BLV genotype 1 and other reference BLV genotype 1 strains ranged from 99 % to 99.5 %. The nucleotide sequence similarity of the Jordanian BLV genotype 6 to other BLV genotypes ranged from 90 % to 96.7 %. A neutralizing motif and CD8(+) T-cell epitope were found in the env protein of both Jordanian isolates. In this study, we documented the presence of two BLV genotypes (1 and 6) on Jordanian dairy farms.

  10. Bovine leukemia virus: purification and characterization of the aspartic protease.

    PubMed

    Menard, A; Mamoun, R Z; Geoffre, S; Castroviejo, M; Raymond, S; Precigoux, G; Hospital, M; Guillemain, B

    1993-04-01

    To develop efficient bovine leukemia virus (BLV) protease (PR) inhibitors, pure enzyme is required. For this, we have developed a two-step chromatographic nondenaturing purification protocol of PR from virions. As expected, the purified protein presents a molecular weight (14 kDa) and a NH2 terminal end fitting with previously reported data. The enzymatic activity of BLV PR was characterized using a synthetic peptide containing a potential cleavage site of the BLV gag-pro polypeptide precursor as substrate. The protease was most active at pH 6, 40 degrees, and high salt concentration (1-2 M NaCl or ammonium sulfate). In contrast, using a natural substrate such as a human T-cell leukemia virus recombinant gag precursor, BLV PR activity was higher at a low salt concentration (0.5 M NaCl). Besides, the use of different potentially cleavable molecules revealed that PR activity may be influenced by the substrate conformational structure around the cleavage site. Replacement of the two amino acids of a synthetic substrate cleavable site by a statin residue completely inhibited the enzymatic activity of the BLV PR.

  11. Vaccination with inactivated virus but not viral DNA reduces virus load following challenge with a heterologous and virulent isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hosie, M J; Dunsford, T; Klein, D; Willett, B J; Cannon, C; Osborne, R; Macdonald, J; Spibey, N; Mackay, N; Jarrett, O; Neil, J C

    2000-10-01

    It has been shown that cats can be protected against infection with the prototypic Petaluma strain of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV(PET)) using vaccines based on either inactivated virus particles or replication-defective proviral DNA. However, the utility of such vaccines in the field is uncertain, given the absence of consistent protection against antigenically distinct strains and the concern that the Petaluma strain may be an unrepresentative, attenuated isolate. Since reduction of viral pathogenicity and dissemination may be useful outcomes of vaccination, even in the absence of complete protection, we tested whether either of these vaccine strategies ameliorates the early course of infection following challenge with heterologous and more virulent isolates. We now report that an inactivated virus vaccine, which generates high levels of virus neutralizing antibodies, confers reduced virus loads following challenge with two heterologous isolates, FIV(AM6) and FIV(GL8). This vaccine also prevented the marked early decline in CD4/CD8 ratio seen in FIV(GL8)-infected cats. In contrast, DNA vaccines based on either FIV(PET) or FIV(GL8), which induce cell-mediated responses but no detectable antiviral antibodies, protected a fraction of cats against infection with FIV(PET) but had no measurable effect on virus load when the infecting virus was FIV(GL8). These results indicate that the more virulent FIV(GL8) is intrinsically more resistant to vaccinal immunity than the FIV(PET) strain and that a broad spectrum of responses which includes virus neutralizing antibodies is a desirable goal for lentivirus vaccine development.

  12. Friend leukemia virus integration-1 (FLI-1) expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaygusuz, Gülşah; Kuzu, Işinsu

    2009-06-01

    Friend leukemia virus integration-1 expression has been shown in a variety of tumors, including vascular tumors, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, Merkel cell carcinoma, and lymphoblastic lymphoma, in addition to Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor. The aim of the current study was to examine Friend leukemia virus integration-1 protein expression in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and also to assess if Friend leukemia virus integration-1 has any role in the disease process. It is the first study analyzing Friend leukemia virus integration-1 expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the English literature. A tissue microarray block containing 52 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors was done. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for Friend leukemia virus integration-1 polyclonal antibody. Immunohistochemically, Friend leukemia virus integration-1 was negative in all cases. Friend leukemia virus integration-1 can be expressed in a variety of tumors, and is helpful in making the diagnosis of Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor. We think that this protein is not expressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors and it is not a part of the pathogenesis of this disease.

  13. Efficacy of three ethanol-based hand rubs against feline calicivirus, a surrogate virus for norovirus.

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Grotheer, D; Steinmann, J

    2005-06-01

    We investigated the efficacy of three ethanol-based hand rubs (Sterillium Virugard, 95% ethanol; Sterillium Rub, 80% ethanol; Desderman N, 75.1% ethanol) against feline calicivirus (FCV), the surrogate virus for norovirus, on artificially contaminated hands of healthy volunteers. The ASTM E 1838-02 standard was used. Experiments were controlled with 70% ethanol and 70% propan-1-ol which were previously found to have maximal efficacy against FCV. In the first step, three different organic loads (5% fetal bovine serum, 5% faecal suspension and the tripartite ASTM load) were compared. A significant influence of the type of organic load was found (P<0.001, ANOVA). In the second step, the hand rubs were investigated with a 5% faecal suspension as a challenging organic load. The hand rub based on 95% ethanol was more effective than those based on 70% ethanol (mean log10 reduction factor: 2.17 vs. 1.56; P=0.17) and 70% propan-1-ol (mean RF: 1.63 vs. 0.95; P=0.0003). The hand rub based on 80% ethanol was also more effective than those based on 70% ethanol (mean RF: 1.25 vs. 1.03: P=0.20) and 70% propan-1-ol (mean RF: 1.43 vs. 1.09; P=0.03). The hand rub based on 75.1% ethanol was less effective than those based on 70% ethanol (mean RF: 1.07 vs. 1.27; P=0.47) and 70% propan-1-ol (mean RF: 0.78 vs. 0.97; P=0.35). Based on our data, ethanol has superior efficacy against FCV than propan-1-ol. In addition, a higher ethanol concentration in three commercially available hand rubs was associated with better efficacy against FCV.

  14. Recombination in feline immunodeficiency virus from feral and companion domestic cats

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Jessica J; Rodrigo, Allen G

    2008-01-01

    Background Recombination is a relatively common phenomenon in retroviruses. We investigated recombination in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus from naturally-infected New Zealand domestic cats (Felis catus) by sequencing regions of the gag, pol and env genes. Results The occurrence of intragenic recombination was highest in env, with evidence of recombination in 6.4% (n = 156) of all cats. A further recombinant was identified in each of the gag (n = 48) and pol (n = 91) genes. Comparisons of phylogenetic trees across genes identified cases of incongruence, indicating intergenic recombination. Three (7.7%, n = 39) of these incongruencies were found to be significantly different using the Shimodaira-Hasegawa test. Surprisingly, our phylogenies from the gag and pol genes showed that no New Zealand sequences group with reference subtype C sequences within intrasubtype pairwise distances. Indeed, we find one and two distinct unknown subtype groups in gag and pol, respectively. These observations cause us to speculate that these New Zealand FIV strains have undergone several recombination events between subtype A parent strains and undefined unknown subtype strains, similar to the evolutionary history hypothesised for HIV-1 "subtype E". Endpoint dilution sequencing was used to confirm the consensus sequences of the putative recombinants and unknown subtype groups, providing evidence for the authenticity of these sequences. Endpoint dilution sequencing also resulted in the identification of a dual infection event in the env gene. In addition, an intrahost recombination event between variants of the same subtype in the pol gene was established. This is the first known example of naturally-occurring recombination in a cat with infection of the parent strains. Conclusion Evidence of intragenic recombination in the gag, pol and env regions, and complex intergenic recombination, of FIV from naturally-infected domestic cats in New Zealand was found. Strains of unknown subtype were

  15. Deep and superficial skin scrapings from a feline immunodeficiency virus-positive cat.

    PubMed

    Neel, Jennifer A; Tarigo, Jaime; Tater, Kathy C; Grindem, Carol B

    2007-03-01

    An 8-year-old, neutered male, domestic shorthair cat housed at the North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Laboratory Animal Research facility as part of a research colony was examined because of mulifocal skin lesions. The lesions consisted of patchy alopecia with mild crusting of the periauricular region, neck, and dorsum; periauricular excoriations; marked dorsal seborrhea and scaling; and generalized erythematous papules. A moderate amount of ceruminous exudate was present in both ear canals. Results of testing for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) were positive. An ear swab specimen and superficial and deep skin scrapings were obtained, mounted with oil on glass slides, and coverslipped for microscopic examination. Two populations of mites were observed: a large population of slender, long (approximately 200 microm), adult mites with long, tapering abdomens that comprised two-thirds of the total body length; and a smaller population of more translucent and shorter mites (approximately 100 microm) with wide, blunt abdomens that had prominent transverse ridges. The interpretation was demodicosis, with Demodex cati and D gatoi co-infection. Histologic sections of biopsies from skin lesions on the neck, dorsum, and periauricular area contained a mild perivascular and perifollicular inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of histiocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells. Diffusely within the follicular lumina and occasionally within the superficial keratin, a myriad of Demodex organisms were observed. Intrafollicular mites were compatible in appearance with D cati whereas those in the corneal layer were suggestive of D gatoi. Demodicosis is an uncommon disease of cats, and rare cases of dual infection have been documented, occasionally in FIV-infected cats. The dual infection emphasizes the importance of doing both superficial and deep skin scrapings and of recognizing the unique microscopic features of different Demodex mites.

  16. Recombination in feline immunodeficiency virus from feral and companion domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Jessica J; Rodrigo, Allen G

    2008-06-17

    Recombination is a relatively common phenomenon in retroviruses. We investigated recombination in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus from naturally-infected New Zealand domestic cats (Felis catus) by sequencing regions of the gag, pol and env genes. The occurrence of intragenic recombination was highest in env, with evidence of recombination in 6.4% (n = 156) of all cats. A further recombinant was identified in each of the gag (n = 48) and pol (n = 91) genes. Comparisons of phylogenetic trees across genes identified cases of incongruence, indicating intergenic recombination. Three (7.7%, n = 39) of these incongruencies were found to be significantly different using the Shimodaira-Hasegawa test.Surprisingly, our phylogenies from the gag and pol genes showed that no New Zealand sequences group with reference subtype C sequences within intrasubtype pairwise distances. Indeed, we find one and two distinct unknown subtype groups in gag and pol, respectively. These observations cause us to speculate that these New Zealand FIV strains have undergone several recombination events between subtype A parent strains and undefined unknown subtype strains, similar to the evolutionary history hypothesised for HIV-1 "subtype E".Endpoint dilution sequencing was used to confirm the consensus sequences of the putative recombinants and unknown subtype groups, providing evidence for the authenticity of these sequences. Endpoint dilution sequencing also resulted in the identification of a dual infection event in the env gene. In addition, an intrahost recombination event between variants of the same subtype in the pol gene was established. This is the first known example of naturally-occurring recombination in a cat with infection of the parent strains. Evidence of intragenic recombination in the gag, pol and env regions, and complex intergenic recombination, of FIV from naturally-infected domestic cats in New Zealand was found. Strains of unknown subtype were identified in all three gene

  17. In Vivo Assessment of Natural Killer Cell Responses during Chronic Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Rita D.; Howard, Kristina E.; Dean, Gregg A.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that natural killer (NK) cells may have an important role in HIV-1 disease pathogenesis; however, in vivo studies are lacking. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection of cats provides a valuable model to study NK cell function in vivo. The immune response against Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is well characterized, allowing its use as an innate immune probe. We have previously shown that locally delivered IL-15 can improve Lm clearance in FIV-infected animals, and this correlated with an increase in NK cell number. In the present study, chronically FIV-infected and SPF-control cats were challenged with Lm by unilateral subcutaneous injection next to the footpad and then treated with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). The Lm draining and contralateral control lymph nodes were evaluated for NK, NKT, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell number, proliferation, apoptosis, and NK cell function. Listeria monocytogenes burden was also assessed in both control and Lm draining lymph nodes. NK, NKT, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells in the Lm-challenged lymph node of FIV-infected cats did not increase in number. In addition, after Lm challenge, NK cells from FIV-infected cats did not increase their proliferation rate, apoptosis was elevated, and perforin expression was not upregulated when compared to SPF-control cats. The failure of the NK cell response against Lm challenge in the draining lymph node of FIV-infected cats correlates with the delayed control and clearance of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. PMID:22701523

  18. Circulating immune complexes and analysis of renal immune deposits in feline immunodeficiency virus-infected cats.

    PubMed Central

    Poli, A; Falcone, M L; Bigalli, L; Massi, C; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lombardi, S; Bendinelli, M; Lutz, H

    1995-01-01

    Total immunoglobulin content and concentration of immune complexes (IC) were determined in the sera of 51 cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and of 40 controls. IgG and IgM were quantified by radial immunodiffusion and circulating IC (CIC) by the CIC-conglutinin assay. IgG fractions were obtained by acid elution from kidney tissues of 15 FIV-infected and five negative control cats to investigate the possible role of IC in the genesis of renal damage observed in infected animals. Mean concentrations of IgG and circulating IC were higher in FIV-infected cats than in controls (29.6 +/- 6.7 versus 23.0 +/- 1.9 mg/dl (mean +/- s.d.) P < 0.001; and 66.5 +/- 17.0 versus 27.4 +/- 19.9% I, P < 0.001, respectively), while IgM levels were only slightly increased (0.9 +/- 0.05 versus 0.87 +/- 0.04 mg/dl, P < 0.02). Immunoglobulin fractions were eluted from 10 of the 15 renal tissue samples from FIV-infected cats and were found to be polyclonal and at least partly specific for FIV antigens. These findings confirm the presence of a B cell activation in FIV-infected cats and demonstrate the presence of high levels of CIC in their sera. The presence of immune deposits in renal tissues suggests that IC might play a role in the pathogenesis of the renal damage observed in FIV-infected cats. Images Fig. 5 PMID:7648709

  19. Transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) among cohabiting cats in two cat rescue shelters.

    PubMed

    Litster, Annette L

    2014-08-01

    Conflicting accounts have been published in the veterinary literature regarding transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) between cohabiting cats in mixed households, and the mechanics of possible casual transmission, if it occurs, are poorly understood. Similarly, there are conflicting reports of vertical transmission of FIV. The aim of the present study was to document the FIV serological status of cats taken into two rescue shelters. At rescue shelter 1 (Rescue 1), cats cohabited in a multi-cat household of FIV-negative and naturally-infected, FIV-positive cats. A study was performed that combined a retrospective review of records of FIV serological status at intake (Test 1) and prospective FIV serological testing (Tests 2 and 3). Retrospective records were analyzed at rescue shelter 2 (Rescue 2), where FIV-positive queens with litters of nursing kittens were taken into the shelter, before being rehomed. FIV serology was performed on all kittens after weaning. Initial test results (Test 1) for 138 cohabiting cats from Rescue 1 showed that there were 130 FIV-negative cats and eight FIV-positive cats (six male neutered and two female spayed). A second test (Test 2), performed in 45 of the FIV-negative and five of the FIV-positive cats at median 28 months after Test 1 (range, 1 month to 8.8 years) showed that results were unchanged. Similarly, a third test (Test 3), performed in four of the original FeLV-negative cats and one remaining FIV-positive cat at median 38 months after Test 1 (range, 4 months to 4 years), also showed that results were unchanged. These results show a lack of evidence of FIV transmission, despite years of exposure to naturally-infected, FIV-positive cats in a mixed household. At Rescue 2, records were available from five FIV-positive queens with 19 kittens. All 19 kittens tested FIV-negative, suggesting that vertical transmission had not occurred.

  20. Pattern of seroreactivity against feline foamy virus proteins in domestic cats from Germany.

    PubMed

    Bleiholder, Anne; Mühle, Michael; Hechler, Torsten; Bevins, Sarah; vandeWoude, Sue; Denner, Joachim; Löchelt, Martin

    2011-10-15

    The prevalence of feline foamy virus (FFV, spumaretrovirinae) in naturally infected domestic cats ranges between 30 and 80% FFV positive animals depending on age, sex and geographical region analyzed. Two serotypes have been reported for FFV designated FUV7-like and F17/951-like. Serotype-specific neutralization has been shown to correlate with sequence divergence in the surface (SU) domain of the envelope protein (Env). We analyzed a serum collection of 262 domestic cat sera from Germany using a GST-capture ELISA setup screening for Gag and Bet specific antibodies and identified 39% FFV positive animals. Due to the heterogeneity of the serological samples, cut-offs for Gag and Bet reactivity had to be experimentally determined since application of calculated cut-off values yielded some false-positive results; the new cut-off values turned out to be also fully applicable to a previous study. Using the already established FUV7 ElpSU antigen and the newly cloned and produced F17/951 ElpSU antigen, both consisting of the corresponding ectodomains of the envelope leader protein (Elp) and SU protein, we aimed at the detection of Env-specific antibodies and discrimination between the two known FFV serotypes within the diagnostic FFV ELISA. We validated the ElpSU antigens using cat reference sera of known serotype and screened with this assay domestic cat sera from Germany. Use of the FUV7- and F17/951 ElpSU antigens in ELISA resulted in the detection of Env-specific antibodies in both cat reference sera and sera from domestic cats in Germany, but failed to allow serotyping at the same time.

  1. Phylogenetic characterisation of naturally occurring feline immunodeficiency virus in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Samman, A; McMonagle, E L; Logan, N; Willett, B J; Biek, R; Hosie, M J

    2011-06-02

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a significant pathogen of domestic and non-domestic felids worldwide. In domestic cats, FIV is classified into five distinct subtypes (A-E) with subtypes A and B distributed most widely. However, little is known about the degree of intrasubtype viral diversity and this may prove critical in determining whether monovalent vaccines are likely to protect against FIV strains within a single subtype. Here, we characterise novel env sequences from 47 FIV strains recovered from infected cats in the United Kingdom and its environs. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all bar one sequence belonged to subtype A, the predominant subtype in Western Europe. A single sequence was identified as a likely subtype A/C recombinant, intriguing given that subtype C does not appear to exist in either the UK or North Western Europe and suggestive of a recombination event predating its introduction into the UK. Subtype A strains from the UK were not significantly differentiated from representative subtype A isolates found elsewhere suggesting multiple introductions of FIV into the country. Divergence among isolates was comparable to that observed for subtype A isolates worldwide, indicating that FIV in the UK covers the full spectrum of subtype A diversity seen globally. This study demonstrates that while subtype A is predominant in the UK, novel introductions may result in the emergence of novel subtypes or intersubtype recombinants, potentially circumventing vaccine strategies. However, the dominance of subtype A suggests that the development of a regional or subtype-specific protective vaccine for the UK could be achievable.

  2. Evaluation of Hepatitis B Virus Photoinactivation in Serum and Cellular Blood Components by the Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    stomatitis virus (VSV) and other model viruses in platelet suspensions with reduced plasma concentration. However, the MC540 method showed considerable damage...photoinactivation have used model virus systems to measure the effectiveness of the inactivation procedure. These viruses include feline leukemia...virus (FeLV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). Only a relative few studies have used HIV or HBV in their studies

  3. Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus infections in cats in the Pisa district of Tuscany, and attempts to control FeLV infection in a colony of domestic cats by vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bandecchi, P; Dell'Omodarme, M; Magi, M; Palamidessi, A; Prati, M C

    2006-04-22

    The seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in 203 apparently healthy domestic cats living in the district of Pisa, central Italy, was 11.3 per cent, and the prevalence of feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) was 8.4 per cent. The prevalence of FIV depended significantly on the lifestyle and age of the cats; cats living outdoors were more likely to be FIV-positive than cats living indoors, and the proportion of FIV-positive cats increased with age. In contrast, there was no significant relationship between these variables and the prevalence of FeLV. There was no significant relationship between the cats' seropositivity for FIV and FeLV. The results of a five-year field study to control FeLV infection by vaccination in a colony of 30 domestic adult cats naturally exposed to the infection suggest that the vaccination was effective in FIV-negative cats, but failed to protect FIV-positive cats against FeLV.

  4. The role of accessory proteins in the replication of feline infectious peritonitis virus in peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Vermeulen, Ben L; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-03-23

    The ability to productively infect monocytes/macrophages is the most important difference between the low virulent feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and the lethal feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). In vitro, the replication of FECV in peripheral blood monocytes always drops after 12h post inoculation, while FIPV sustains its replication in the monocytes from 45% of the cats. The accessory proteins of feline coronaviruses have been speculated to play a prominent role in virulence as deletions were found to be associated with attenuated viruses. Still, no functions have been ascribed to them. In order to investigate if the accessory proteins of FIPV are important for sustaining its replication in monocytes, replication kinetics were determined for FIPV 79-1146 and its deletion mutants, lacking either accessory protein open reading frame 3abc (FIPV-Δ3), 7ab (FIPV-Δ7) or both (FIPV-Δ3Δ7). Results showed that the deletion mutants FIPV-Δ7 and FIPV-Δ3Δ7 could not maintain their replication, which was in sharp contrast to wt-FIPV. FIPV-Δ3 could still sustain its replication, but the percentage of infected monocytes was always lower compared to wt-FIPV. In conclusion, this study showed that ORF7 is crucial for FIPV replication in monocytes/macrophages, giving an explanation for its importance in vivo, its role in the development of FIP and its conservation in field strains. The effect of an ORF3 deletion was less pronounced, indicating only a supportive role of ORF3 encoded proteins during the infection of the in vivo target cell by FIPVs.

  5. Detection and genetic characterization of feline kobuviruses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joon-Yee; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2013-12-01

    In order to survey for feline kobuviruses infection, fecal samples (n = 39) of cats with diarrhea were collected during 2011-2012. Six (14.5%) of the fecal samples tested were positive for feline kobuviruses. The partial nucleotide sequences of feline kobuviruses based on the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene were compared to those of other species. Feline kobuviruses were most closely related to canine kobuvirus in terms of their amino acid and nucleotide levels. In a phylogenetic tree, feline kobuviruses were also closely clustered with canine kobuvirus, Aichi virus (human), and mouse kobuvirus. This is the first report of the detection and genetic characterization of feline kobuviruses.

  6. Dynein Regulators Are Important for Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Tenney, Roger; Opazo, Tatiana; Cancino, Jorge; Goff, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the early steps of infection, retroviruses must direct the movement of the viral genome into the nucleus to complete their replication cycle. This process is mediated by cellular proteins that interact first with the reverse transcription complex and later with the preintegration complex (PIC), allowing it to reach and enter the nucleus. For simple retroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), the identities of the cellular proteins involved in trafficking of the PIC in infection are unknown. To identify cellular proteins that interact with the MLV PIC, we developed a replication-competent MLV in which the integrase protein was tagged with a FLAG epitope. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we established that the microtubule motor dynein regulator DCTN2/p50/dynamitin interacts with the MLV preintegration complex early in infection, suggesting a direct interaction between the incoming viral particles and the dynein complex regulators. Further experiments showed that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of either DCTN2/p50/dynamitin or another dynein regulator, NudEL, profoundly reduced the efficiency of infection by ecotropic, but not amphotropic, MLV reporters. We propose that the cytoplasmic dynein regulators are a critical component of the host machinery needed for infection by the retroviruses entering the cell via the ecotropic envelope pathway. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses must access the chromatin of host cells to integrate the viral DNA, but before this crucial event, they must reach the nucleus. The movement through the cytoplasm—a crowded environment where diffusion is slow—is thought to utilize retrograde transport along the microtubule network by the dynein complex. Different viruses use different components of this multisubunit complex. We found that the preintegration complex of murine leukemia virus (MLV) interacts with the dynein complex and that regulators of this complex are essential for

  7. Genomic organization, sequence divergence, and recombination of feline immunodeficiency virus from lions in the wild.

    PubMed

    Pecon-Slattery, Jill; McCracken, Carrie L; Troyer, Jennifer L; VandeWoude, Sue; Roelke, Melody; Sondgeroth, Kerry; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-02-05

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) naturally infects multiple species of cat and is related to human immunodeficiency virus in humans. FIV infection causes AIDS-like disease and mortality in the domestic cat (Felis catus) and serves as a natural model for HIV infection in humans. In African lions (Panthera leo) and other exotic felid species, disease etiology introduced by FIV infection are less clear, but recent studies indicate that FIV causes moderate to severe CD4 depletion. In this study, comparative genomic methods are used to evaluate the full proviral genome of two geographically distinct FIV subtypes isolated from free-ranging lions. Genome organization of FIVPle subtype B (9891 bp) from lions in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania and FIVPle subtype E (9899 bp) isolated from lions in the Okavango Delta in Botswana, both resemble FIV genome sequence from puma, Pallas cat and domestic cat across 5' LTR, gag, pol, vif, orfA, env, rev and 3'LTR regions. Comparative analyses of available full-length FIV consisting of subtypes A, B and C from FIVFca, Pallas cat FIVOma and two puma FIVPco subtypes A and B recapitulate the species-specific monophyly of FIV marked by high levels of genetic diversity both within and between species. Across all FIVPle gene regions except env, lion subtypes B and E are monophyletic, and marginally more similar to Pallas cat FIVOma than to other FIV. Sequence analyses indicate the SU and TM regions of env vary substantially between subtypes, with FIVPle subtype E more related to domestic cat FIVFca than to FIVPle subtype B and FIVOma likely reflecting recombination between strains in the wild. This study demonstrates the necessity of whole-genome analysis to complement population/gene-based studies, which are of limited utility in uncovering complex events such as recombination that may lead to functional differences in virulence and pathogenicity. These full-length lion lentiviruses are integral to the advancement of comparative

  8. Genomic organization, sequence divergence, and recombination of feline immunodeficiency virus from lions in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Pecon-Slattery, Jill; McCracken, Carrie L; Troyer, Jennifer L; VandeWoude, Sue; Roelke, Melody; Sondgeroth, Kerry; Winterbach, Christiaan; Winterbach, Hanlie; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Background Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) naturally infects multiple species of cat and is related to human immunodeficiency virus in humans. FIV infection causes AIDS-like disease and mortality in the domestic cat (Felis catus) and serves as a natural model for HIV infection in humans. In African lions (Panthera leo) and other exotic felid species, disease etiology introduced by FIV infection are less clear, but recent studies indicate that FIV causes moderate to severe CD4 depletion. Results In this study, comparative genomic methods are used to evaluate the full proviral genome of two geographically distinct FIV subtypes isolated from free-ranging lions. Genome organization of FIVPle subtype B (9891 bp) from lions in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania and FIVPle subtype E (9899 bp) isolated from lions in the Okavango Delta in Botswana, both resemble FIV genome sequence from puma, Pallas cat and domestic cat across 5' LTR, gag, pol, vif, orfA, env, rev and 3'LTR regions. Comparative analyses of available full-length FIV consisting of subtypes A, B and C from FIVFca, Pallas cat FIVOma and two puma FIVPco subtypes A and B recapitulate the species-specific monophyly of FIV marked by high levels of genetic diversity both within and between species. Across all FIVPle gene regions except env, lion subtypes B and E are monophyletic, and marginally more similar to Pallas cat FIVOma than to other FIV. Sequence analyses indicate the SU and TM regions of env vary substantially between subtypes, with FIVPle subtype E more related to domestic cat FIVFca than to FIVPle subtype B and FIVOma likely reflecting recombination between strains in the wild. Conclusion This study demonstrates the necessity of whole-genome analysis to complement population/gene-based studies, which are of limited utility in uncovering complex events such as recombination that may lead to functional differences in virulence and pathogenicity. These full-length lion lentiviruses are integral to

  9. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  10. Unknown age in health disorders: A method to account for its cumulative effect and an application to feline viruses interactions.

    PubMed

    Hellard, Eléonore; Pontier, Dominique; Siberchicot, Aurélie; Sauvage, Frank; Fouchet, David

    2015-06-01

    Parasite interactions have been widely evidenced experimentally but field studies remain rare. Such studies are essential to detect interactions of interest and access (co)infection probabilities but face methodological obstacles. Confounding factors can create statistical associations, i.e. false parasite interactions. Among them, host age is a crucial covariate. It influences host exposition and susceptibility to many infections, and has a mechanical effect, older individuals being more at risk because of a longer exposure time. However, age is difficult to estimate in natural populations. Hence, one should be able to deal at least with its cumulative effect. Using a SI type dynamic model, we showed that the cumulative effect of age can generate false interactions theoretically (deterministic modeling) and with a real dataset of feline viruses (stochastic modeling). The risk to wrongly conclude to an association was maximal when parasites induced long-lasting antibodies and had similar forces of infection. We then proposed a method to correct for this effect (and for other potentially confounding shared risk factors) and made it available in a new R package, Interatrix. We also applied the correction to the feline viruses. It offers a way to account for an often neglected confounding factor and should help identifying parasite interactions in the field, a necessary step towards a better understanding of their mechanisms and consequences. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. HTLV-1 (Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus 1) Seroconversion Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-17

    block number) FIELD GROUP SUB_-GROUP RA 1: IITLV- I .croccnversion;--tpidemiology; Leukemia ; 06 03 Okinawa; texually Transmitted Disease". 06 13 19... Leukemia Virus 1 (HTLV-I) transmission is occurring in active duty forces stationed on Okinawa, Japan. HTLV-I, the first human retrovirus isolated, has been...identified as the etiologic agent for Adult T-Cell Leukemia /Lymphoma (ATLL). In addition, HTLV-I has been linked etioloyically to a subset of patients

  12. Biochemical analysis of murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced leukemias of strain BALB/c

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.W.; Hopkins, N.; Fleissner, E.

    1980-02-01

    Murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias were characterized with respect to viral proteins and RNA. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral structural proteins revealed that for p12, p15, p30, and gp70, three to four electrophoretic variants of each could be detected. There was no correlation found between any of these mobilities and N- or B-tropism of the viruses. Proteins of all xenotropic viral isolates were identical in their gel electrophoretic profiles. The similar phenotypes of multiple viral clones from individual leukemias and of isolates grown in different cells suggest that the polymorphism of ecotropic viruses was generated in vivo rather than during in vitro virus growth. By two-dimensional fingerprinting of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 70S viral RNA, the previously reported association of N- and B-tropism with two distinct oligonucleotides was confirmed. The presence of two other oligonucleotides was correlated with positive and negative phenotypes of the virus-coded G/sub IX/ cell surface antigen. The RNAs of two B-tropic isolates with distinctive p15 and p12 phenotypes differed from the RNA of a prototype N-tropic virus by the absence of three oligonucleotides mapping in the 5' portion (gag region) of the prototype RNA. In addition, one small-plaque B-tropic virus displayed extensive changes in the RNA sequences associated with the env region of the prototype.

  13. Clinical Aspects of Feline Retroviruses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia), and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less commonly diagnosed than in the previous 20 years; prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. However, FeLV importance may be underestimated as it has been shown that regressively infected cats (that are negative in routinely used FeLV tests) also can develop clinical signs. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. This article provides a review of clinical syndromes in progressively and regressively FeLV-infected cats as well as in FIV-infected cats. PMID:23202500

  14. Safety and Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis {Delta}lysA {Delta}panCD Vaccine in Domestic Cats Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)+ and FIV- cats (n = 4/group) received 2 x 10**6 cfu Mycobacterium tuberculosis Delta-lysA Delta-panCD intramuscularly. Vaccination elicited antibody responses; albeit, at lower levels in FIV+ cats as compared to FIV- cats. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses ...

  15. Limits in virus filtration capability? Impact of virus quality and spike level on virus removal with xenotropic murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Roush, David J; Myrold, Adam; Burnham, Michael S; And, Joseph V; Hughes, Joseph V

    2015-01-01

    Virus filtration (VF) is a key step in an overall viral clearance process since it has been demonstrated to effectively clear a wide range of mammalian viruses with a log reduction value (LRV) > 4. The potential to achieve higher LRV from virus retentive filters has historically been examined using bacteriophage surrogates, which commonly demonstrated a potential of > 9 LRV when using high titer spikes (e.g. 10(10) PFU/mL). However, as the filter loading increases, one typically experiences significant decreases in performance and LRV. The 9 LRV value is markedly higher than the current expected range of 4-5 LRV when utilizing mammalian retroviruses on virus removal filters (Miesegaes et al., Dev Biol (Basel) 2010;133:3-101). Recent values have been reported in the literature (Stuckey et al., Biotech Progr 2014;30:79-85) of LRV in excess of 6 for PPV and XMuLV although this result appears to be atypical. LRV for VF with therapeutic proteins could be limited by several factors including process limits (flux decay, load matrix), virus spike level and the analytical methods used for virus detection (i.e. the Limits of Quantitation), as well as the virus spike quality. Research was conducted using the Xenotropic-Murine Leukemia Virus (XMuLV) for its direct relevance to the most commonly cited document, the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) Q5A (International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use, Geneva, Switzerland, 1999) for viral safety evaluations. A unique aspect of this work is the independent evaluation of the impact of retrovirus quality and virus spike level on VF performance and LRV. The VF studies used XMuLV preparations purified by either ultracentrifugation (Ultra 1) or by chromatographic processes that yielded a more highly purified virus stock (Ultra 2). Two monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) with markedly different filtration characteristics and with similar levels of

  16. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  17. Differential Susceptibility of Spleen Focus-Forming Virus and Murine Leukemia Viruses to Ansamycin Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Horoszewicz, Julius S.; Leong, Susan S.; Carter, William A.

    1977-01-01

    The streptovaricin complex (SvCx) and rifamycin SV derivatives display potent antiviral activity against the polycythemic strain of Friend leukemia virus (FV-P), as measured by a reduction in the number of spleen foci produced in mice. Such reductions may be explained by inactivation of functions of (i) the spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV), (ii) its “helper” murine leukemia virus (MuLV), or (iii) both viruses normally present in FV-P. We noted that preincubation of FV-P with fractionation products of SvCx, or derivatives of rifamycin SV, at low concentrations (3 to 5 μg/ml) reduces the number of spleen foci 80 to 97%, whereas titers of MuLV (from the same inoculum) remain unaffected (MuLV titers were measured by XC, S+L−, and “helper activity” assays). Our findings indicate a remarkable biological selectivity of ansamycins, as well as nonansamycin components of SvCx, against the transforming and defective spleen focus-forming virus as compared to MuLV. Thus, the drugs might be useful in distinguishing other types of oncornaviruses. PMID:18986

  18. Suppression of infectious murine leukemia virus in wild mice (Mus musculus) by passive immunization.

    PubMed

    Gardner, M B; Klement, V; Estes, J D; Gilden, R V; Toni, R; Huebner, R J

    1977-06-01

    Passive immunization with heterologous antivirus antiserum beginning at birth successfully suppressed infectious murine leukemia virus expression in Lake Casitas wild mice (Musmusculus) at 5-7 weeks of age.

  19. Molecularly cloned feline immunodeficiency virus NCSU1 JSY3 induces immunodeficiency in specific-pathogen-free cats.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J S; English, R V; Ritchey, J W; Davidson, M G; Wasmoen, T; Levy, J K; Gebhard, D H; Tompkins, M B; Tompkins, W A

    1996-01-01

    A full-length feline immunodeficiency virus NCSU1 (FIV-NCSU1) genome (JSY3) was cloned directly from FIV-NCSU1-infected feline CD4+ lymphocyte (FCD4E) genomic DNA and identified by PCR amplification with 5' long terminal repeat, gag, env, and 3' long terminal repeat primer sets. Supernatant from FCD4E cells cocultured with JSY3-transfected Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells was used as an inoculum. Cell-free JSY3 virus was cytopathogenic for FCD4E lymphocytes but did not infect CrFK cells in vitro. To determine in vivo infectivity and pathogenesis, six young adult specific-pathogen-free cats were inoculated with cell-free JSY3 virus. Provirus was detected at 2 weeks postinfection (p.i.) and was still detectable at 25 weeks p.i. as determined by gag region PCR-Southern blot analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cell lysates. Infectious virus was recovered from peripheral blood mononuclear cells at 6 and 25 weeks p.i., and an antibody response to FIV was detected by 4 weeks. In the acute phase of infection, JSY3 provirus was found only in the CD4+ lymphocyte subset; however, by 14 weeks p.i., the greatest provirus burden was detected in B lymphocytes. All six cats were panlymphopenic at 2 weeks p.i., CD4+/CD8+ ratios were inverted by 6 weeks p.i., and five of the six cats developed lymphadenopathy by 10 weeks p.i. To determine if the JSY3 molecular clone caused immunodeficiency similar to that of the parental wild-type FIV-NCSU1, the cats were challenged with the low-virulence ME49 strain of Toxoplasma gondii at 29 weeks p.i. Five of six cats developed clinical signs consistent with generalized toxoplasmosis, and three of six cats developed acute respiratory distress and required euthanasia. Histopathologic examination of the severely affected cats revealed generalized inflammatory reactions and the presence of T. gondii tachyzoites in multiple tissues. None of the six age- and sex-matched specific-pathogen-free cats inoculated with only T. gondii developed

  20. Sequences responsible for erythroid and lymphoid leukemia in the long terminal repeats of Friend-mink cell focus-forming and Moloney murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, A; Takimoto, M; Adachi, A; Kakuyama, M; Kato, S; Kakimi, K; Fukuoka, K; Ogiu, T; Matsuyama, M

    1987-01-01

    Despite the high degree of homology (91%) between the nucleotide sequences of the Friend-mink cell focus-forming (MCF) and the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomic long terminal repeats (LTRs), the pathogenicities determined by the LTR sequences of the two viruses are quite different. Friend-MCF MuLV is an erythroid leukemia virus, and Moloney MuLV is a lymphoid leukemia virus. To map the LTR sequences responsible for the different disease specificities, we constructed nine viruses with LTRs recombinant between the Friend-MCF and Moloney MuLVs. Analysis of the leukemia induced with the recombinant viruses showed that a 195-base-pair nucleotide sequence, including a 75-base-pair nucleotide Moloney enhancer, is responsible for the tissue-specific leukemogenicity of Moloney MuLV. However, not only the enhancer but also its downstream sequences appear to be necessary. The Moloney virus enhancer and its downstream sequence exerted a dominant effect over that of the Friend-MCF virus, but the enhancer sequence alone did not. The results that three of the nine recombinant viruses induced both erythroid and lymphoid leukemias supported the hypothesis that multiple viral genetic determinants control both the ability to cause leukemia and the type of leukemia induced. PMID:3033317

  1. Biophysical characterization and crystal structure of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus p15 matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Serrière, Jennifer; Robert, Xavier; Perez, Magali; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2013-06-24

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a viral pathogen that infects domestic cats and wild felids. During the viral replication cycle, the FIV p15 matrix protein oligomerizes to form a closed matrix that underlies the lipidic envelope of the virion. Because of its crucial role in the early and late stages of viral morphogenesis, especially in viral assembly, FIV p15 is an interesting target in the development of potential new therapeutic strategies. Our biochemical study of FIV p15 revealed that it forms a stable dimer in solution under acidic conditions and at high concentration, unlike other retroviral matrix proteins. We determined the crystal structure of full-length FIV p15 to 2 Å resolution and observed a helical organization of the protein, typical for retroviral matrix proteins. A hydrophobic pocket that could accommodate a myristoyl group was identified, and the C-terminal end of FIV p15, which is mainly unstructured, was visible in electron density maps. As FIV p15 crystallizes in acidic conditions but with one monomer in the asymmetric unit, we searched for the presence of a biological dimer in the crystal. No biological assembly was detected by the PISA server, but the three most buried crystallographic interfaces have interesting features: the first one displays a highly conserved tryptophan acting as a binding platform, the second one is located along a 2-fold symmetry axis and the third one resembles the dimeric interface of EIAV p15. Because the C-terminal end of p15 is involved in two of these three interfaces, we investigated the structure and assembly of a C-terminal-truncated form of p15 lacking 14 residues. The truncated FIV p15 dimerizes in solution at a lower concentration and crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The EIAV-like dimeric interface is the only one to be retained in the new crystal form. The dimeric form of FIV p15 in solution and its extended C-terminal end are characteristic among lentiviral matrix proteins

  2. An update on feline infectious peritonitis: virology and immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Niels C

    2014-08-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) continues to be one of the most researched infectious diseases of cats. The relatively high mortality of FIP, especially for younger cats from catteries and shelters, should be reason enough to stimulate such intense interest. However, it is the complexity of the disease and the grudging manner in which it yields its secrets that most fascinate researchers. Feline leukemia virus infection was conquered in less than two decades and the mysteries of feline immunodeficiency virus were largely unraveled in several years. After a half century, FIP remains one of the last important infections of cats for which we have no single diagnostic test, no vaccine and no definitive explanations for how virus and host interact to cause disease. How can a ubiquitous and largely non-pathogenic enteric coronavirus transform into a highly lethal pathogen? What are the interactions between host and virus that determine both disease form (wet or dry) and outcome (death or resistance)? Why is it so difficult, and perhaps impossible, to develop a vaccine for FIP? What role do genetics play in disease susceptibility? This review will explore research conducted over the last 5 years that attempts to answer these and other questions. Although much has been learned about FIP in the last 5 years, the ultimate answers remain for yet more studies.

  3. Response of mink, skunk, red fox and raccoon to inoculation with mink virus enteritis, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus and prevalence of antibody to parvovirus in wild carnivores in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, I K; Povey, R C; Voigt, D R

    1983-01-01

    Mink virus enteritis, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus-2 were inoculated separately into groups of raccoon, mink, red fox and striped skunk. Raccoons were highly susceptible to mink virus enteritis and feline panleukopenia, with animals developing clinical illness, and several dying within six to ten days of inoculation with lesions typical of parvovirus infection. Both viruses were shed in high titre in the feces of infected raccoons, and high antibody titres were stimulated. Raccoons inoculated with canine parvovirus-2 showed no signs; shedding of virus was sporadic though moderate titres of antibody developed. Mink inoculated with mink virus enteritis and feline panleukopenia developed signs and lesions of early parvovirus infection. No signs or significant lesions followed canine parvovirus-2 inoculation. Shedding of virus was heavy (mink virus enteritis) or sporadic (feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus-2), though good serological responses were elicited to all three viruses. Red fox showed no signs of infection, shed all three viruses only sporadically, and the serological response was strong only to feline panleukopenia. Skunks developed low antibody titres, but no signs, and did not shed virus. Antibody to parvovirus was found in 79.2% of 144 wild red foxes; 22.3% of 112 wild raccoons; 1.3% of 157 wild skunks and 6/7 coyotes in southern Ontario. The likely significance of these viruses to wild and captive individuals and populations of these carnivores is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6309349

  4. Molecular Characterization of Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Strain DF-2 and Studies of the Role of ORF3abc in Viral Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Farsang, Attila; Zádori, Zoltán; Hornyák, Ákos; Dencső, László; Almazán, Fernando; Enjuanes, Luis; Belák, Sándor

    2012-01-01

    The full-length genome of the highly lethal feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) strain DF-2 was sequenced and cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) to study the role of ORF3abc in the FIPV-feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) transition. The reverse genetic system allowed the replacement of the truncated ORF3abc of the original FIPV DF-2 genome with the intact ORF3abc of the canine coronavirus (CCoV) reference strain Elmo/02. The in vitro replication kinetics of these two viruses was studied in CrFK and FCWF-4 cell lines, as well as in feline peripheral blood monocytes. Both viruses showed similar replication kinetics in established cell lines. However, the strain with a full-length ORF3 showed markedly lower replication of more than 2 log10 titers in feline peripheral blood monocytes. Our results suggest that the truncated ORF3abc plays an important role in the efficient macrophage/monocyte tropism of type II FIPV. PMID:22438554

  5. Molecular characterization of feline infectious peritonitis virus strain DF-2 and studies of the role of ORF3abc in viral cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Ádám; Farsang, Attila; Zádori, Zoltán; Hornyák, Ákos; Dencso, László; Almazán, Fernando; Enjuanes, Luis; Belák, Sándor

    2012-06-01

    The full-length genome of the highly lethal feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) strain DF-2 was sequenced and cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) to study the role of ORF3abc in the FIPV-feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) transition. The reverse genetic system allowed the replacement of the truncated ORF3abc of the original FIPV DF-2 genome with the intact ORF3abc of the canine coronavirus (CCoV) reference strain Elmo/02. The in vitro replication kinetics of these two viruses was studied in CrFK and FCWF-4 cell lines, as well as in feline peripheral blood monocytes. Both viruses showed similar replication kinetics in established cell lines. However, the strain with a full-length ORF3 showed markedly lower replication of more than 2 log(10) titers in feline peripheral blood monocytes. Our results suggest that the truncated ORF3abc plays an important role in the efficient macrophage/monocyte tropism of type II FIPV.

  6. Evaluation of a New Recombinant Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus Strain GLV-5b451 for Feline Mammary Carcinoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weibel, Stephanie; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Härtl, Barbara; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Nolte, Ingo; Chen, Nanhai G.; Aguilar, Richard J.; Yu, Yong A.; Zhang, Qian; Frentzen, Alexa; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) infection is a promising approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of a new preclinical model of feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) using a recently established cancer cell line, DT09/06. In addition, we evaluated a recombinant vaccinia virus strain, GLV-5b451, expressing the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) single-chain antibody (scAb) GLAF-2 as an oncolytic agent against FMC. Cell culture data demonstrate that GLV-5b451 virus efficiently infected, replicated in and destroyed DT09/06 cancer cells. In the selected xenografts of FMC, a single systemic administration of GLV-5b451 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in comparison to untreated tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, tumor-specific virus infection led to overproduction of functional scAb GLAF-2, which caused drastic reduction of intratumoral VEGF levels and inhibition of angiogenesis. In summary, here we have shown, for the first time, that the vaccinia virus strains and especially GLV-5b451 have great potential for effective treatment of FMC in animal model. PMID:25093734

  7. Upregulation of endothelial cell adhesion molecules characterizes veins close to granulomatous infiltrates in the renal cortex of cats with feline infectious peritonitis and is indirectly triggered by feline infectious peritonitis virus-infected monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Acar, Delphine D; Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Roukaerts, Inge D M; Baetens, Wendy; Van Bockstael, Sebastiaan; De Gryse, Gaëtan M A; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2016-10-01

    One of the most characteristic pathological changes in cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a multifocal granulomatous phlebitis. Although it is now well established that leukocyte extravasation elicits the inflammation typically associated with FIP lesions, relatively few studies have aimed at elucidating this key pathogenic event. The upregulation of adhesion molecules on the endothelium is a prerequisite for stable leukocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion that necessarily precedes leukocyte diapedesis. Therefore, the present work focused on the expression of the EC adhesion molecules and possible triggers of EC activation during the development of FIP. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the endothelial expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) was elevated in veins close to granulomatous infiltrates in the renal cortex of FIP patients compared to non-infiltrated regions and specimens from healthy cats. Next, we showed that feline venous ECs become activated when exposed to supernatant from feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV)-infected monocytes, as indicated by increased adhesion molecule expression. Active viral replication seemed to be required to induce the EC-stimulating activity in monocytes. Finally, adhesion assays revealed an increased adhesion of naive monocytes to ECs treated with supernatant from FIPV-infected monocytes. Taken together, our results strongly indicate that FIPV activates ECs to increase monocyte adhesion by an indirect route, in which proinflammatory factors released from virus-infected monocytes act as key intermediates.

  8. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A. . E-mail: Wayne_Tompkins@ncsu.edu

    2004-12-20

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function.

  9. Lectin Enzyme Assay Detection of Viruses, Tissue Culture, and a Mycotoxin Simulant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Deconinek, I., "A State of Lymphocyte Activation Detected by Susceptibility to Vesicular Stomatitis Virus," Immunol. Let. Vol. 2, pp 291-296 (1981). 11...44, pp 1689-1691 (1980). 17 12. Rice, J.B., Schaller, J.P., Lewis, M.G., Mathes, L.E., Hoover, E.A., and Olsen, R.G., "Infection of Feline Embryo...Adherent Cells with Feline Leukemia Virus: Feline Oncornavirus- Associated Cell Membrane Antigen Expression and Morphologic Transformation," J. Natl

  10. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Prassolov, Vladimir; Just, Ursula; Stockschläder, Marcus; Stocking, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed. PMID:9159161

  11. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  12. Antibodies against Gag are diagnostic markers for feline foamy virus infections while Env and Bet reactivity is undetectable in a substantial fraction of infected cats.

    PubMed

    Romen, Fabian; Pawlita, Michael; Sehr, Peter; Bachmann, Silke; Schröder, Johannes; Lutz, Hans; Löchelt, Martin

    2006-02-20

    Spumaretroviruses or foamy viruses constitute a distinct subfamily of retroviruses. The biology of foamy viruses within the authentic host, their mode of transmission, and disease potential in the authentic host or after zoonotic transmission into human or other species are almost unknown. Using feline foamy virus (FFV) as model system, we established modular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) suited to determine feline IgG and IgM antibody responses against structural and non-structural FFV proteins. We validated the ELISAs with standard reference sera. In 99 cats admitted to a Swiss veterinary hospital, overall FFV Gag antibody prevalence was 36%, reactivity against Env and the non-structural protein Bet each was about 25%, and 19% of the sera were directed against all three FFV antigens. With one exception, all Bet- and/or Env-positive sera were also positive for Gag. In this small epidemiological pilot study, FFV antibodies were not significantly associated with clinical disease.

  13. Adaptation and Study of AIDS Viruses in Animal and Cell Culture Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-28

    experimentation. II. BACKGROUND OF PREVIOUS WORK Murine leukemia (MuLV) and feline immunodeficiency (FIV) virus models have been extensively studied2,3 and are...or vesicular stomatitis virus infected hamster BHK cells into nude mice. Tumors were produced, but at decreased size and incidence when infected with

  14. Vaccination against δ−Retroviruses: The Bovine Leukemia Virus Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodríguez, Sabrina M.; de Brogniez, Alix; Gillet, Nicolas; Golime, Ramarao; Burny, Arsène; Jaworski, Juan-Pablo; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are closely related δ-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia). Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of δ-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy. PMID:24956179

  15. Quantification of Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVpco) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymph nodes and plasma of naturally infected cougars.

    PubMed

    Blake, David J; Graham, Jon; Poss, Mary

    2006-04-01

    Infection of domestic cats with Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) results in a fatal immunodeficiency disease, similar to Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) in humans. Elevated plasma viral loads in domestic cats are correlated to decreased survival time and disease progression. However, FIV is also maintained as an apathogenic infection in other members of the family Felidae including cougars, Puma concolour (FIVpco). It is not known whether the lack of disease in cougars is a result of diminished virus replication. A real-time PCR assay was developed to quantify both FIVpco proviral and plasma viral loads in naturally infected cougars. Proviral loads quantified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) ranged from 2.90 x 10(1) to 6.72 x 10(4) copies per 10(6) cells. Plasma viral loads ranged from 2.30 x 10(3) to 2.81 x 10(6) RNA copies ml(-1). These data indicate that FIVpco viral loads are comparable to viral loads observed in endemic and epidemic lentivirus infections. Thus, the lack of disease in cougars is not due to low levels of virus replication. Moreover, significant differences observed among cougar PBMC proviral loads correlated to viral lineage and cougar age (P=0.014), which suggests that separate life strategies exist within FIVpco lineages. This is the first study to demonstrate that an interaction of lentivirus lineage and host age significantly effect proviral loads.

  16. Low-molecular- weight Rauscher leukemia virus protein with preferential binding for single-stranded RNA and DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J; Scherer, M; Tsai, W P; Long, C

    1976-01-01

    A sensitive nitrocellulose filter assay that measures the retention of 125I single-stranded calf thymus DNA has been used to detect and purify DNA-binding proteins that retain a biological function from Rauscher murine leukemia virus. By consecutive purification on oligo (dT)- cellulose and DEAE-Bio-Gel columns and centrifugation in 10 to 30% glycerol gradients, RNA-dependent DNA polymerase has been separated from a second virion DNA-binding protein. The binding of this protein to DNA was strongly affected by NaCl concentration but showed little change in activity over a wide range of temperature or pH. After glycerol gradient purification, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of this protein showed one major band with a molecular weight of approximately 9,800. This protein binds about as well as to single-stranded Escherichia coli or calf thymus DNA or 70S type C viral RNA. The binding to 125I single-stranded calf thymus DNA is very efficiently inhibited by unlabeled single-stranded DNA from either E. coli or calf thymus and by 70S murine or feline viral RNA. Much larger amounts of double-stranded DNA are required to produce an equivalent percentage o