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Sample records for female rat brain

  1. Brain activation by an olfactory stimulus paired with juvenile play in female rats.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Ramos, P; McCarthy, M M; Bowers, J M; Miquel, M; Manzo, J; Coria-Avila, G A

    2014-06-22

    We have previously shown that reward experienced during social play at juvenile age can be paired with artificial odors, and later in adulthood facilitate olfactory conditioned partner preferences (PP) in female rats. Herein, we examined the expression of FOS immunoreactivity (FOS-IR) following exposure to the odor paired with juvenile play (CS+). Starting at day P31 females received daily 30-min periods of social play with lemon-scented (paired group) or unscented females (unpaired group). At day P42, they were tested for play-PP with two juvenile males, one bearing the CS+ (lemon) and one bearing a novel odor (almond). Females were ovariectomized, hormone-primed and at day P55 tested for sexual-PP between two adult stud males scented with lemon or almond. In both tests, females from the paired group displayed conditioned PP (play or sexual) toward males bearing the CS+. In the present experiments females were exposed at day P59 to the CS+ during 60 min and their brains processed for FOS-IR. One group of female rats (Play+Sex) underwent play-PP and sexual-PP, whereas a second group of females (Play-only) underwent exclusively play-PP but not sexual-PP. Results showed that in the Play-only experiment exposure to the CS+ induced more FOS-IR in the medial prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, dorsal striatum, and ventral tegmental area as compared to females from the unpaired group. In the Play+Sex experiment, more FOS-IR was observed in the piriform cortex, dorsal striatum, lateral septum, nucleus accumbens shell, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial amygdala as compared to females from the unpaired group. Taken together, these results indicate mesocorticolimbic brain areas direct the expectation and/or choice of conditioned partners in female rats. In addition, transferring the meaning of play to sex preference requires different brain areas.

  2. Cocaine induces DNA damage in distinct brain areas of female rats under different hormonal conditions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Marilise F; Gonçales, Tierre A; Steinmetz, Aline; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Gomez, Rosane; Barros, Helena M T

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated levels of neuronal DNA damage after acute or repeated cocaine treatment in different brain areas of female rats after ovariectomy or sham surgery. Rats in the control and acute groups were given saline i.p., whereas in the repeated group were given 15 mg/kg, i.p., cocaine for 8 days. After a 10 day washout period, the control group was given saline i.p., whereas rats in the acute and repeated groups were given a challenge dose of 15 mg/kg, i.p., cocaine. After behavioural assessment, rats were killed and the cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and striatum were dissected for the Comet assay. Acute cocaine exposure induced DNA damage in all brain areas. This effect persisted after repeated administration, except in the hypothalamus, where repeated treatment did not cause increased DNA damage. Sexual hormones exhibited a neuroprotective effect, decreasing cocaine-induced DNA damage in cycling rats in all brain areas. PMID:24552452

  3. The androgen-binding protein gene is expressed in male and female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y M; Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Petrusz, P; Joseph, D R

    1990-12-01

    Extracellular androgen-binding proteins (ABP) are thought to modulate the regulatory functions of androgens and the trans-acting nuclear androgen receptor. Testicular ABP and plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which is produced in liver, are encoded by the same gene. We have now found that the ABP-SHBG gene is also expressed in male and female rat brain. Immunoreactive ABP was found to be present in neuronal cell bodies throughout the brain as well as in fibers of the hypothalamic median eminence. The highest concentrations of immunoreactive cell bodies were located in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Likewise, ABP mRNA was present in all brain regions examined. Analysis of cDNA clones representing brain ABP mRNAs revealed amino acid sequence differences in brain and testicular ABPs. The protein encoded by an alternatively processed RNA has sequence characteristics suggesting that the protein could act as a competitior of ABP binding to cell surface receptors. These data and gene-sequencing experiments indicate that a specific ABP gene promoter is used for transcription initiation in brain. ABP may function in brain as an androgen carrier protein; however, in view of the widespread presence of ABP and ABP mRNA in brain, the protein may have a much broader, yet unknown, function. PMID:1701136

  4. Enriched environment increases myelinated fiber volume and length in brain white matter of 18-month female rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu; Lu, Wei; Zhou, De-shan; Tang, Yong

    2015-04-23

    Cognition and memory decline with normal aging, which could be partly attributed to the degeneration of brain white matter. Previous studies demonstrated that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) could protect cognition and memory from aging. However, if or how EE might affect the brain white matter has not been thoroughly investigated. In the current study, 24 middle-aged (14-month-old) female Sprague -Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned to EE or standard environment (SE) for 4 months. At the end of the environment intervention, the Morris water maze tests were performed. Then, 5 rats were randomly selected from each group for stereological assessment of the brain white matter and its myelinated fibers. The results revealed that middle-aged rats living in EE displayed better spatial learning than SE controls. The white matter volume was 124.6 ± 7.8mm(3) in EE rats, which was significantly enlarged compared with 84.8 ± 3.4mm(3) in SE rats. Likewise, the myelinated fiber volume was markedly increased from 56.6 ± 1.7 mm(3) in SE rats to 87.2 ± 9.0mm(3) in EE rats; so was the myelinated fiber length from 83.5 ± 6.6 km in SE rats to 119.0 ± 10.0 km in EE rats. Our data suggested that EE could protect brain white matter and its myelinated fibers of female rats at middle age.

  5. In vivo occupancy of female rat brain estrogen receptors by 17beta-estradiol and tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Pareto, D; Alvarado, M; Hanrahan, S M; Biegon, A

    2004-11-01

    Estrogens or antiestrogens are currently used by millions of women, but the interaction of these hormonal agents with brain estrogen receptors (ER) in vivo has not been characterized to date. Our goal was to assess, in vivo, the extent and regional distribution of brain ER occupancy in rats chronically exposed to 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) or tamoxifen (TAM). For that purpose, female ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with subcutaneous pellets containing either placebo (OVX), E(2), or TAM for 3 weeks. ER occupancy in grossly dissected regions was quantified with 16alpha-[(18)F]fluoroestradiol ([(18)F]FES). Both E(2) and TAM produced significant decreases in radioligand uptake in the brain although the effect of E(2) was larger and more widespread than the effect of TAM. Detailed regional analysis of the interaction was then undertaken using a radioiodinated ligand, 11beta-methoxy-16alpha-[(125)I]iodo-estradiol ([(125)I]MIE(2)), and quantitative ex vivo autoradiography. E(2) treatment resulted in near-complete (86.6 +/- 17.5%) inhibition of radioligand accumulation throughout the brain, while ER occupancy in the TAM group showed a marked regional distribution such that percentage inhibition ranged from 40.5 +/- 15.6 in the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus to 84.6 +/- 4.5 in the cortical amygdala. These results show that exposure to pharmacologically relevant levels of TAM produces a variable, region-specific pattern of brain ER occupancy, which may be influenced by the regional proportion of ER receptor subtypes. These findings may partially explain the highly variable and region-specific effects observed in neurochemical, metabolic, and functional studies of the effects of TAM in the brain of experimental animals as well as human subjects.

  6. Effects of exercise training on brain opioid peptides and serum LH in female rats.

    PubMed

    Blake, M J; Stein, E A; Vomachka, A J

    1984-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of long-term exercise training on brain endorphin systems, and the latter's possible effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, female Wistar rats were subjected to daily treadmill running. A sedentary control group was also employed. After 8 weeks of training, and just prior to sacrifice, one-half of each group received a final fatiguing bout of exercise. Thus the final four groups consisted of a trained-fatigued (TF), trained-nonfatigued (TN), control-fatigued (CF), and control-nonfatigued (CN) group. Regional brain levels of beta-endorphin (beta E), methionine enkephalin and leucine enkephalin (LE) were assayed with independent RIAs from the nucleus accumbens, cortex, caudate-putamen, septum, amygdala, anterior and posterior hypothalamus, substantia nigra and ventral tegmentum. Diestrus serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone and prolactin (PRL) were also determined. Fatiguing resulted in a decrease in serum LH levels as well as an increase in beta E content in the nucleus accumbens, and LE content in the ventral tegmentum. Finally, TF animals exhibited less LE in the amygdala than the TN rats. Taken together, these changes in brain endorphins may indicate an acute, fatigue-running modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  7. Maternal deprivation effects on brain plasticity and recognition memory in adolescent male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Marco, Eva M; Valero, Manuel; de la Serna, Oscar; Aisa, Barbara; Borcel, Erika; Ramirez, Maria Javier; Viveros, María-Paz

    2013-05-01

    Data from both human and animal studies suggest that exposure to stressful life events at neonatal stages may increase the risk of psychopathology at adulthood. In particular, early maternal deprivation, 24 h at postnatal day (pnd) 9, has been associated with persistent neurobehavioural changes similar to those present in developmental psychopathologies such as depression and schizophrenic-related disorders. Most neuropsychiatric disorders first appear during adolescence, however, the effects of MD on adolescent animals' brain and behaviour have been scarcely explored. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the emotional and cognitive consequences of MD in adolescent male and female rats, as well as possible underlying neurobiological mechanisms within frontal cortex and hippocampus. Animals were exposed to a battery of behavioural tasks, from pnd 35 to 42, to evaluate cognitive [spontaneous alternation task (SAT) and novel object test (NOT)] and anxiety-related responses [elevated plus maze (EPM)] during adolescence. Changes in neuronal and glial cells, alterations in synaptic plasticity as well as modifications in cannabinoid receptor expression were investigated in a parallel group of control and adolescent (pnd 40) male and female animals. Notably, MD induced a significant impairment in recognition memory exclusively among females. A generalized decrease in NeuN expression was found in MD animals, together with an increase in hippocampal glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP) expression exclusively among MD adolescent males. In addition, MD induced in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of male and female adolescent rats a significant reduction in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and postsynaptic density (PSD95) levels, together with a decrease in synaptophysin in frontal cortex and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in hippocampus. MD induced, in animals of both sexes, a significant reduction in CB1R expression, but an increase in CB2R that was

  8. Developmental changes in choline acetyltransferase and glutamate decarboxylase activity in various regions of the brain of the male, female, and neonatally androgenized female rat.

    PubMed

    Brown, R; Brooksbank, B W

    1979-04-01

    In attempt to discern effects of sex hormones on the development of neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) have been measured at postnatal days 8, 12, 25, and 60 in five regions (amygdala, anterior hypothalamus, hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, and cerebral cortex) of the brains of normal male, normal female, and neonatally androgen-treated female rats. Essentially no association between sex or of neonatal "androgenization" on either enzymol were found. The data, however, provide new information on the relative rates of development of ChAT and GAD in five regions of the rat brain which supplement the limited information already available in the literature. ChAT activity was highest in amygdala and hypothalamus, but developed most rapidly in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The relative activities and patterns of development of GAD activity were similar to those of ChAT.

  9. The Perimenopausal Aging Transition in the Female Rat Brain: Decline in Bioenergetic Systems and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fei; Yao, Jia; Sancheti, Harsh; Feng, Tao; Melcangi, Roberto C.; Morgan, Todd E.; Finch, Caleb E.; Pike, Christian J.; Mack, Wendy J.; Cadenas, Enrique; Brinton, Roberta D.

    2015-01-01

    The perimenopause is an aging transition unique to the female that leads to reproductive senescence which can be characterized by multiple neurological symptoms. To better understand potential underlying mechanisms of neurological symptoms of perimenopause, the current study determined genomic, biochemical, brain metabolic and electrophysiological transformations that occur during this transition using a rat model recapitulating fundamental characteristics of the human perimenopause. Gene expression analyses indicated two distinct aging programs: chronological and endocrine. A critical period emerged during the endocrine transition from regular to irregular cycling characterized by decline in bioenergetic gene expression, confirmed by deficits in FDG-PET brain metabolism, mitochondrial function, and long-term potentiation. Bioinformatic analysis predicted insulin/IGF1 and AMPK/PGC1α signaling pathways as upstream regulators. Onset of acyclicity was accompanied by a rise in genes required for fatty acid metabolism, inflammation, and mitochondrial function. Subsequent chronological aging resulted in decline of genes required for mitochondrial function and β-amyloid degradation. Emergence of glucose hypometabolism and impaired synaptic function in brain provide plausible mechanisms of neurological symptoms of perimenopause and may be predictive of later life vulnerability to hypometabolic conditions such as Alzheimer’s. PMID:25921624

  10. Ovariectomy augments hypertension through rho-kinase activation in the brain stem in female spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koji; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Kimura, Yoshikuni; Sagara, Yoji; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2006-10-01

    Estrogen protects against increases in arterial pressure (AP) by acting on blood vessels and on cardiovascular centers in the brain. The mechanisms underlying the effects of estrogen in the brain stem, however, are not clear. The aim of the present study was to determine whether ovariectomy affects AP via the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway in the brain stem. We performed bilateral ovariectomy in 12-week-old female spontaneously hypertensive rats. AP and heart rate (HR), measured using radiotelemetry in awake rats, were increased in ovariectomized rats compared with control rats (mean AP: 163+/-3 versus 144+/-4 mm Hg; HR: 455+/-4 versus 380+/-6 bpm). Continuous intracisternal infusion of Y-27632 significantly attenuated the ovariectomy-induced increase in AP and HR (mean AP: 137+/-6 versus 163+/-3 mm Hg; HR: 379+/-10 versus 455+/-4 bpm). In addition, we confirmed the increase of Rho-kinase activity in the brain stem in ovariectomized rats, and the increase was attenuated by intracisternal infusion of Y-27632 via the phosphorylated ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) family, which are Rho-kinase target proteins. Furthermore, angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in the brain stem was significantly greater in ovariectomized rats than in control rats, and the increase was partially reduced by intracisternal infusion of Y-27632. In a separate group of animals, we confirmed that the serum and cerebrospinal fluid 17beta-estradiol concentrations decreased in ovariectomized rats. These results suggest that depletion of endogenous estrogen by ovariectomy, at least in part, induces hypertension in female spontaneously hypertensive rats via activation of the renin-angiotensin system and the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway in the brain stem.

  11. Cocaine alters dendritic spine density in cortical and subcortical brain regions of the postpartum and virgin female rat

    PubMed Central

    Frankfurt, Maya; Salas-Ramirez, Kaliris; Friedman, Eitan; Luine, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine use during pregnancy induces profound neural and behavioral deficits in both mother and offspring. The present study was designed to compare the effects of cocaine exposure on spine density of postpartum and virgin female rat brains. Timed, pregnant, primiparous rats were injected with either cocaine (30 mg/kg) or saline, once daily, from gestational day 8–20. Twenty four hours after giving birth, dam brains were processed for Golgi-impregnation. Since cocaine effects in female rats have not been determined, virgin females were also injected with the same dose of cocaine or saline for 12 days and sacrificed 24h after the last injection for comparison. Pregnant rats had significantly greater spine density in the medial amygdala (MeA) and medial preoptic area (MPOA) and lower spine density in CA1 than virgin females independent of cocaine treatment. Cocaine significantly increased dendritic spine density on the apical branch of pyramidal cells in the prefrontal cortex (PFC, 15%), both apical (13%) and basal (14.8%) branches of CA1 and cells in the MeA (28%) of pregnant rats. In the MPOA, cocaine administration resulted in a decrease in dendritic spine density (14%) in pregnant rats. In virgin females, cocaine had fewer effects but did increase dendritic spine density on both branches of CA1 neurons and in the MeA. The present study is the first to demonstrate that spine density differs between pregnant and virgin females and that pregnancy makes the brain more vulnerable to cocaine, which has important clinical implications. PMID:21480383

  12. Effects of GSM modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on permeability of blood-brain barrier in male & female rats.

    PubMed

    Sırav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    With the increased use of mobile phones, their biological and health effects have become more important. Usage of mobile phones near the head increases the possibility of effects on brain tissue. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of pulse modulated 900MHz and 1800MHz radio-frequency radiation on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of rats. Study was performed with 6 groups of young adult male and female wistar albino rats. The permeability of blood-brain barrier to intravenously injected evans blue dye was quantitatively examined for both control and radio-frequency radiarion exposed groups. For male groups; Evans blue content in the whole brain was found to be 0.08±0.01mg% in the control, 0.13±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.26±0.05mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. In both male radio-frequency radiation exposed groups, the permeability of blood-brain barrier found to be increased with respect to the controls (p<0.01). 1800MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure was found more effective on the male animals (p<0.01). For female groups; dye contents in the whole brains were 0.14±0.01mg% in the control, 0.24±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.14±0.02mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. No statistical variance found between the control and 1800MHz exposed animals (p>0.01). However 900MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency exposure was found effective on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of female animals. Results have shown that 20min pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure of 900MHz and 1800MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of blood-brain barrier of male rats. For females, 900MHz was found effective and it could be concluded that this result may due to the physiological differences between female and male animals. The results of this study suggest that mobile phone radation could lead to increase the permeability of blood-brain barrier under non-thermal exposure levels. More studies are needed

  13. Changes in brain volume in response to estradiol levels, amphetamine sensitization and haloperidol treatment in awake female rats.

    PubMed

    Madularu, Dan; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F; Brake, Wayne G

    2015-08-27

    Estrogen has been shown to further ameliorate symptoms when administered in conjunction with antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia. We have previously shown that chronic haloperidol (HAL) treatment reduces amphetamine (AMPH)-induced locomotor activity in AMPH-sensitized rats, but only when paired with high levels of the estrogen, 17-β estradiol. In addition, we reported estradiol-dependent responses to AMPH in AMPH-sensitized rats as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. It is thus clear that estradiol and antipsychotics both affect the rat brain, however the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. The aim of the current study was to assess this interaction by investigating the effects of estradiol, AMPH and HAL on brain volume changes in awake female rats. Repeated exposure to AMPH resulted in an overall reduction in brain volume, regardless of hormonal status (i.e. no, low or high estradiol). Similarly, chronic HAL treatment further reduced brain volume compared to acute treatment. Hormonal status affected hippocampal volume with rats receiving low estradiol replacement showing larger volume; this difference was no longer significant after repeated exposure to AMPH. Finally, we found changes in volume in response to AMPH throughout hippocampal components (i.e. CA1-CA3 and dentate) as well as components of the mesocortical system. In conclusion, brain volume seems to be influenced by hormonal status, as well as exposure to AMPH and haloperidol treatment. These findings implicate areas where estradiol, amphetamine and antipsychotics may be producing volumetric changes in the brain, pointing the way to where future studies should focus. PMID:26032742

  14. Human chorionic gonadotropin (a luteinizing hormone homologue) decreases spatial memory and increases brain amyloid-β levels in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Anne S.; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Ghiso, Jorge; Thornton, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that estradiol (E) improves spatial memory as female rats with E perform better than those without E. However there is an inverse relationship between E and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels and LH could play a role. We examined whether treatment with the LH homologue human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), would impair spatial memory of adult E-treated female rats. In the Object Location Memory Task, ovariectomized (ovxed) rats treated with E and either a single high dose (400IU/kg) or a lower repeated dose of hCG (75 IU/kg hourly for 8 hours) showed spatial memory disruption compared to ovxed rats treated with estradiol alone. Impairment was attributed to memory disruption as performance improved with shortened delay between task exposure and testing. Tests on another spatial memory task, the Barnes maze, confirmed that hCG (400IU/kg) can impair memory: although E + veh treated animals made significantly fewer hole errors across time, E + hCG treated did not. In humans, high LH levels have been correlated with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Because brain amyloid-beta (Aβ) species have been implicated as a toxic factor thought to cause memory loss in AD, we analyzed whether hCG-treated animals had increased Aβ levels. Levels of Aβ from whole brains or hippocampi were assessed by Western Blot. hCG treatment to E-implanted females significantly increased soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels. These results indicate that high levels of LH/hCG can impair spatial memory, and an increase in brain Aβ species may account for the memory impairment in hCG-treated rats. PMID:18413150

  15. Environmental prenatal stress eliminates brain and maternal behavioral sex differences and alters hormone levels in female rats.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, M C R; Ortega, E; Gómez, F; Segovia, S; Pérez-Laso, C

    2015-07-01

    Environmental prenatal stress (EPS) has effects on fetuses that are long-lasting, altering their hormone levels, brain morphology and behavior when they reach maturity. In previous research, we demonstrated that EPS affects the expression of induced maternal behavior (MB), the neuroendocrine system, and morphology of the sexually dimorphic accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) involved in reproductive behavior patterns. The bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) is another vomeronasal (VN) structure that plays an inhibitory role in rats in the expression of induced maternal behavior in female and male virgins. In the present study, we have ascertained whether the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neuromorphological alterations of the AOB found after EPS also appear in the BAOT. After applying EPS to pregnant rats during the late gestational period, in their female offspring at maturity we tested induced maternal behavior, BAOT morphology and plasma levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), progesterone (P), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (Cpd B). EPS: a) affected the induction of MB, showed a male-like pattern of care for pups, b) elevated plasma levels of Cpd B and reduced E2 in comparison with the controls, and c) significantly increased the number of BAOT neurons compared to the control females and comparable to the control male group. These findings provide further evidence that stress applied to pregnant rats produces long-lasting behavioral, endocrine and neuroanatomical alterations in the female offspring that are evident when they become mature. PMID:26163152

  16. Environmental prenatal stress eliminates brain and maternal behavioral sex differences and alters hormone levels in female rats.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, M C R; Ortega, E; Gómez, F; Segovia, S; Pérez-Laso, C

    2015-07-01

    Environmental prenatal stress (EPS) has effects on fetuses that are long-lasting, altering their hormone levels, brain morphology and behavior when they reach maturity. In previous research, we demonstrated that EPS affects the expression of induced maternal behavior (MB), the neuroendocrine system, and morphology of the sexually dimorphic accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) involved in reproductive behavior patterns. The bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) is another vomeronasal (VN) structure that plays an inhibitory role in rats in the expression of induced maternal behavior in female and male virgins. In the present study, we have ascertained whether the behavioral, neuroendocrine, and neuromorphological alterations of the AOB found after EPS also appear in the BAOT. After applying EPS to pregnant rats during the late gestational period, in their female offspring at maturity we tested induced maternal behavior, BAOT morphology and plasma levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), progesterone (P), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (Cpd B). EPS: a) affected the induction of MB, showed a male-like pattern of care for pups, b) elevated plasma levels of Cpd B and reduced E2 in comparison with the controls, and c) significantly increased the number of BAOT neurons compared to the control females and comparable to the control male group. These findings provide further evidence that stress applied to pregnant rats produces long-lasting behavioral, endocrine and neuroanatomical alterations in the female offspring that are evident when they become mature.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Long-Form Aromatase mRNA in the Male and Female Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tabatadze, Nino; Sato, Satoru M.; Woolley, Catherine S.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro studies show that estrogens acutely modulate synaptic function in both sexes. These acute effects may be mediated in vivo by estrogens synthesized within the brain, which could fluctuate more rapidly than circulating estrogens. For this to be the case, brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens should be capable of synthesizing them. To investigate this question, we used quantitative real-time PCR to measure expression of mRNA for the estrogen-synthesizing enzyme, aromatase, in different brain regions of male and female rats. Importantly, because brain aromatase exists in two forms, a long form with aromatase activity and a short form with unknown function, we targeted a sequence found exclusively in long-form aromatase. With this approach, we found highest expression of aromatase mRNA in the amygdala followed closely by the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and preoptic area (POA); we found moderate levels of aromatase mRNA in the dorsal hippocampus and cingulate cortex; and aromatase mRNA was detectable in brainstem and cerebellum, but levels were very low. In the amygdala, gonadal/hormonal status regulated aromatase expression in both sexes; in the BNST and POA, castration of males down-regulated aromatase, whereas there was no effect of estradiol in ovariectomized females. In the dorsal hippocampus and cingulate cortex, there were no differences in aromatase levels between males and females or effects of gonadal/hormonal status. These findings demonstrate that long-form aromatase is expressed in brain regions that respond acutely to estrogens, such as the dorsal hippocampus, and that gonadal/hormonal regulation of aromatase differs among different brain regions. PMID:25036039

  18. Higher gene expression of CYP1A2, 2B1 and 2D2 in the brain of female compared with male rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, K; Fukuno, S; Suzuki, H; Konishi, H

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) in the brain plays an essential role in the local metabolism of various compounds, including clinically used drugs, toxins, and endogenous substances. In the present study, we compared the expression profiles of mRNAs for several CYP subtypes in the brain between male and female rats. The expression of CYP1A2, CYP2B1, and CYP2D2 in females was significantly higher than that in males. On the other hand, the expression level of the other CYP subtypes examined in the male brain was similar to that in the female brain. These results strongly suggest that marked gender differences exist in the expression profiles of some CYP subtypes in rat brain. PMID:27455552

  19. Higher gene expression of CYP1A2, 2B1 and 2D2 in the brain of female compared with male rats.

    PubMed

    Nagai, K; Fukuno, S; Suzuki, H; Konishi, H

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) in the brain plays an essential role in the local metabolism of various compounds, including clinically used drugs, toxins, and endogenous substances. In the present study, we compared the expression profiles of mRNAs for several CYP subtypes in the brain between male and female rats. The expression of CYP1A2, CYP2B1, and CYP2D2 in females was significantly higher than that in males. On the other hand, the expression level of the other CYP subtypes examined in the male brain was similar to that in the female brain. These results strongly suggest that marked gender differences exist in the expression profiles of some CYP subtypes in rat brain.

  20. Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) epiphyseal proteins counteract arsenic-induced oxidative stress in brain, heart, and liver of female rats.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Vijay K; Srivastava, R S; Sharma, B; Malik, J K

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity through induction of oxidative stress is a well-known mechanism of organ toxicity. To address this problem, buffalo epiphyseal proteins (BEP, at 100 μg/kg BW, i.p. for 28 days) were administered intraperitoneally to female Wistar rats exposed to As (100 ppm sodium arsenite via drinking water for 28 days). Arsenic exposure resulted in marked elevation in lipid peroxidation in brain, cardiac, and hepatic tissues, whereas significant (p < 0.05) adverse change in catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and reduced glutathione level were observed in cardiac, hepatic, and brain tissues of As-administered animals. BEP significantly (p < 0.05) counteracted all the adverse changes in antioxidant defense system brought about by As administration. Based on these results, we consider BEP as a potent antioxidant to be used for protection from arsenic-induced oxidative stress related damage of vital organs.

  1. Fluoxetine elevates allopregnanolone in female rat brain but inhibits a steroid microsomal dehydrogenase rather than activating an aldo-keto reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fry, J P; Li, K Y; Devall, A J; Cockcroft, S; Honour, J W; Lovick, T A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elevates brain concentrations of the neuroactive progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, an effect suggested to underlie its use in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. One report showed fluoxetine to activate the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) component of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), which catalyses production of allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone. However, this action was not observed by others. The present study sought to clarify the site of action for fluoxetine in elevating brain allopregnanolone. Experimental Approach Adult male rats and female rats in dioestrus were treated with fluoxetine and their brains assayed for allopregnanolone and its precursors, progesterone and 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Subcellular fractions of rat brain were also used to investigate the actions of fluoxetine on 3α-HSD activity in both the reductive direction, producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone, and the reverse oxidative direction. Fluoxetine was also tested on these recombinant enzyme activities expressed in HEK cells. Key Results Short-term treatment with fluoxetine increased brain allopregnanolone concentrations in female, but not male, rats. Enzyme assays on native rat brain fractions and on activities expressed in HEK cells showed fluoxetine did not affect the AKR producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone but did inhibit the microsomal dehydrogenase oxidizing allopregnanolone to 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Conclusions and Implications Fluoxetine elevated allopregnanolone in female rat brain by inhibiting its oxidation to 5α-dihydroprogesterone by a microsomal dehydrogenase. This is a novel site of action for fluoxetine, with implications for the development of new agents and/or dosing regimens to raise brain allopregnanolone. PMID:25161074

  2. The accumulation of brain water-free sodium is associated with ischemic damage independent of the blood pressure in female rats.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Manabu; Kitazato, Keiko T; Yagi, Kenji; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Kurashiki, Yoshitaka; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Kinouchi, Tomoya; Kuwayama, Kazuyuki; Satomi, Junichiro; Nagahiro, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    Estrogen deficiency worsens ischemic stroke outcomes. In ovariectomized (OVX(+)) rats fed a high-salt diet (HSD), an increase in the body Na(+)/water ratio, which characterizes water-free Na(+) accumulation, was associated with detrimental vascular effects independent of the blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that an increase in brain water-free Na(+) accumulation is associated with ischemic brain damage in OVX(+)/HSD rats. To test our hypothesis we divided female Wistar rats into 4 groups, OVX(+) and OVX(-) rats fed HSD or a normal diet (ND), and subjected them to transient cerebral ischemia. The brain Na(+)/water ratio was increased even in OVX(+)/ND rats and augmented in OVX(+)/HSD rats. The increase in the brain Na(+)/water ratio was positively correlated with expansion of the cortical infarct volume without affecting the BP. Interestingly, OVX(+) was associated with the decreased expression of ATP1α3, a subtype of the Na(+) efflux pump. HSD increased the expression of brain Na(+) influx-related molecules and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). The pretreatment of OVX(+)/HSD rats with the MR antagonist eplerenone reduced brain water-free Na(+) accumulation, up-regulated ATP1α3, down-regulated MR, and reduced the cortical infarct volume. Our findings show that the increase in the brain Na(+)/water ratio elicited by estrogen deficiency or HSD is associated with ischemic brain damage BP-independently, suggesting the importance of regulating the accumulation of brain water-free Na(+). The up-regulation of ATP1α3 and the down-regulation of MR may provide a promising therapeutic strategy to attenuate ischemic brain damage in postmenopausal women.

  3. Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I Modulates Endothelial Blood-Brain Barrier Function in Ischemic Middle-Aged Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Bake, Shameena; Okoreeh, Andre K; Alaniz, Robert C; Sohrabji, Farida

    2016-01-01

    In comparison with young females, middle-aged female rats sustain greater cerebral infarction and worse functional recovery after stroke. These poorer stroke outcomes in middle-aged females are associated with an age-related reduction in IGF-I levels. Poststroke IGF-I treatment decreases infarct volume in older females and lowers the expression of cytokines in the ischemic hemisphere. IGF-I also reduces transfer of Evans blue dye to the brain, suggesting that this peptide may also promote blood-brain barrier function. To test the hypothesis that IGF-I may act at the blood-brain barrier in ischemic stroke, 2 approaches were used. In the first approach, middle-aged female rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion and treated with IGF-I after reperfusion. Mononuclear cells from the ischemic hemisphere were stained for CD4 or triple-labeled for CD4/CD25/FoxP3 and subjected to flow analyses. Both cohorts of cells were significantly reduced in IGF-I-treated animals compared with those in vehicle controls. Reduced trafficking of immune cells to the ischemic site suggests that blood-brain barrier integrity is better maintained in IGF-I-treated animals. The second approach directly tested the effect of IGF-I on barrier function of aging endothelial cells. Accordingly, brain microvascular endothelial cells from middle-aged female rats were cultured ex vivo and subjected to ischemic conditions (oxygen-glucose deprivation). IGF-I treatment significantly reduced the transfer of fluorescently labeled BSA across the endothelial monolayer as well as cellular internalization of fluorescein isothiocyanate-BSA compared with those in vehicle-treated cultures, Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that IGF-I improves blood-brain barrier function in middle-aged females.

  4. Chronic inhibition of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and body weight gain by brain-directed delivery of estradiol-17 beta in female rats.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, D K; Friedman, S J; Yen, S S; Frautschy, S A

    1989-08-01

    The effect of preferential delivery of estradiol (E2) into the brain on both the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and weight gain was studied in female rats. When E2 was coupled to a lipoidal dihydropyridine-pyridinium carrier, the resulting carrier E2 complex (CE), upon a single intravenous administration to cycling female rats, caused a dose-dependent inhibition of ovulation which lasted 3 times longer than with uncoupled E2. The dose of CE that delayed ovulation for 4 days was one twentieth the amount of E2 needed to produce the same effect. Studies in ovariectomized (OVEX) rats indicated that the prolonged ovulation-blocking action of CE appeared to be related to a sustained storage and release of E2 in the brain, which in turn suppressed the release of hypothalamic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH). Upon single intravenous administration in pubertal female rats, CE caused a dose-dependent reduction of body weight gain for a minimum period of 28 days. The inhibitory action of CE on body weight gain was more potent and longer lasting than that of E2 in pubertal rats. When administered in OVEX rats, CE produced a loss of body weight that lasted significantly longer than that produced by uncoupled E2 in these rats. These results suggest that the biological action of E2 can be potentiated by this novel chemical delivery system.

  5. Prior regular exercise reverses the decreased effects of sleep deprivation on brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus of ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Saadati, Hakimeh; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Darvishzadeh-Mahani, Fatemeh; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main candidate to mediate the beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive function in sleep deprived male rats. In addition, our previous findings demonstrate that female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance and synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise and/or sleep deprivation (SD) on the levels of BDNF mRNA and protein in the hippocampus of female rats. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were used in the present experiment. The exercise protocol was four weeks treadmill running and sleep deprivation was accomplished using the multiple platform method. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblot analysis were used to evaluate the level of BDNF mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus respectively. Our results showed that protein and mRNA expression of BDNF was significantly (p<0.05) decreased after 72 h SD in OVX rats in compared with other groups. Furthermore, sleep deprived OVX rats under exercise conditions had a significant (p<0.05) up-regulation of the BDNF protein and mRNA in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that regular exercise can exert a protective effect against hippocampus-related functions and impairments induced by sleep deprivation probably by inducing BDNF expression.

  6. The effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on cognitive functions in aged female rats: the role of oxidative stress and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Belviranlı, Muaz; Okudan, Nilsel

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) on cognitive functions as well as oxidative stress and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in aged female rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups according to age (young vs. aged) and treatment (GBE vs. vehicle). GBE or vehicle was given for 30 d, and a series of behavioral tests were performed. Following behavioral testing, blood samples and brain tissues were obtained for analysis of BDNF, malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and glutathione levels, and superoxide dismutase activity. Locomotor activity and anxiety levels were lower in the aged rats. Based on Morris water maze probe trial findings, GBE supplementation increased the number of platform crossings in the aged rats. MDA and 8-OHdG levels were lower in the brain tissue, and BDNF levels were higher in plasma in the rates treated with GBE. Based on these findings, we concluded that GBE supplementation improved cognitive functions by decreasing oxidative damage and increasing the BDNF level in aged female rats.

  7. Both long and brief maternal separation produces persistent changes in tissue levels of brain monoamines in middle-aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Arborelius, L; Eklund, M B

    2007-03-16

    Adverse experiences early in life are associated with an increased incidence of later psychopathology including depression. Based on evidence that dysfunction of central monoaminergic systems is involved in the pathophysiology of depression, we hypothesize that early adversity could negatively affect these systems. To test this we have investigated the effects of maternal separation, which has been suggested to model early-life stress and the development of a depression-like syndrome in the rat, on brain monoaminergic systems. Since depression is more common in women and the risk of developing this disorder appears to increase with age, we have studied such effects in middle-aged female rats. Rat pups were separated for 180 min (long maternal separation; LMS) or 15 min (brief maternal separation; BMS, often referred to as neonatal handling) twice daily for 2 weeks postpartum. An animal facility-reared (AFR) group was also included. At 15 months of age tissue levels of monoamines and their metabolites in several different brain regions were analyzed. In the LMS females tissue levels of both 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) were significantly increased in the dorsal raphe nucleus, and 5-HIAA and homovanillic acid levels were also elevated in the nucleus accumbens as compared with AFR and BMS rats. In the cingulate cortex both LMS and BMS decreased noradrenaline (NA) levels, although this effect was more pronounced in the LMS rats. On the other hand, BMS decreased 5-HT, 5-HIAA, dopamine (DA) as well as NA levels in the amygdala and produced an increase in DA levels in response to acute stress in the hypothalamus, an effect not seen in AFR rats. Our results demonstrate that LMS produced persistent alterations in both serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems in brain regions that have been suggested to be implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. In addition, BMS affected brain monoaminergic levels mainly in the amygdala.

  8. Modulation of gamma-irradiation and carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative stress in the brain of female rats by flaxseed oil.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amel F M; Salem, Asmaa A M; Eassawy, Mamdouh M T

    2016-08-01

    The activity of flaxseed oil (FSO) on gamma-irradiation (7Gy) and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute neurotoxicity in rats' brain was investigated. The results revealed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, reduced glutathione (GSH) and manganese (Mn) contents. Further, a significant elevation (p<0.05) in malondialdehyde, nitric oxide (NO), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) levels were observed. Furthermore, the relative ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression levels were elevated in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. Those effects were augmented due to the effect of CCl4-induced toxicity in γ-irradiated rats. The treatment of FSO displayed significant amendment of the studied parameters in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. FSO has a neuroprotective effect against CCl4-induced brain injury in gamma-irradiated rats. This effect is interrelated to the ability of FSO to scavenges the free radicals, enhances the antioxidant enzymes activity, increases GSH contents, down-regulates the inflammatory responses, ameliorates the iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese levels and inhibiting the gene expression level of XO and iNOS in the brain tissues of intoxicated animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of FSO have the ability to improve the antioxidant status, suppress the inflammatory responses, and regulate the trace elements in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect in intoxicated animals. Consequently, FSO exhibited neuroprotective activity on γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect induced brain injury in

  9. Modulation of gamma-irradiation and carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative stress in the brain of female rats by flaxseed oil.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amel F M; Salem, Asmaa A M; Eassawy, Mamdouh M T

    2016-08-01

    The activity of flaxseed oil (FSO) on gamma-irradiation (7Gy) and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute neurotoxicity in rats' brain was investigated. The results revealed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, reduced glutathione (GSH) and manganese (Mn) contents. Further, a significant elevation (p<0.05) in malondialdehyde, nitric oxide (NO), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) levels were observed. Furthermore, the relative ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression levels were elevated in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. Those effects were augmented due to the effect of CCl4-induced toxicity in γ-irradiated rats. The treatment of FSO displayed significant amendment of the studied parameters in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. FSO has a neuroprotective effect against CCl4-induced brain injury in gamma-irradiated rats. This effect is interrelated to the ability of FSO to scavenges the free radicals, enhances the antioxidant enzymes activity, increases GSH contents, down-regulates the inflammatory responses, ameliorates the iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese levels and inhibiting the gene expression level of XO and iNOS in the brain tissues of intoxicated animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of FSO have the ability to improve the antioxidant status, suppress the inflammatory responses, and regulate the trace elements in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect in intoxicated animals. Consequently, FSO exhibited neuroprotective activity on γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect induced brain injury in

  10. Estradiol prevents ozone-induced increases in brain lipid peroxidation and impaired social recognition memory in female rats.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Guzmán, R; Arriaga, V; Kendrick, K M; Bernal, C; Vega, X; Mercado-Gómez, O F; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2009-03-31

    There is increasing concern about the neurodegenerative and behavioral consequences of ozone pollution in industrialized urban centers throughout the world and that women may be more susceptible to brain neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study we have investigated the effects of chronic (30 or 60 days) exposure to ozone on olfactory perception and memory and on levels of lipid peroxidation, alpha and beta estrogen receptors and dopamine beta-hydroxylase in the olfactory bulb in ovariectomized female rats. The ability of 17beta-estradiol to prevent these effects was then assessed. Results showed that ozone exposure for 30 or 60 days impaired formation/retention of a selective olfactory recognition memory 120 min after exposure to a juvenile stimulus animal with the effect at 60 days being significantly greater than at 30 days. They also showed impaired speed in locating a buried chocolate reward after 60 days of ozone exposure indicating some loss of olfactory perception. These functional impairments could all be prevented by coincident estradiol treatment. In the olfactory bulb, levels of lipid peroxidation were increased at both 30- and 60-day time-points and numbers of cells with immunohistochemical staining for alpha and beta estrogen receptors, and dopamine beta-hydroxylase were reduced as were alpha and beta estrogen receptor protein levels. These effects were prevented by estradiol treatment. Oxidative stress damage caused by chronic exposure to ozone does therefore impair olfactory perception and social recognition memory and may do so by reducing noradrenergic and estrogen receptor activity in the olfactory bulb. That these effects can be prevented by estradiol treatment suggests increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders in aging women may be contributed to by reduced estrogen levels post-menopause.

  11. Failure of Intravenous or Intracardiac Delivery of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Improve Outcomes after Focal Traumatic Brain Injury in the Female Rat

    PubMed Central

    Turtzo, L. Christine; Budde, Matthew D.; Dean, Dana D.; Gold, Eric M.; Lewis, Bobbi K.; Janes, Lindsay; Lescher, Jacob; Coppola, Tiziana; Yarnell, Angela; Grunberg, Neil E.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells secrete a variety of anti-inflammatory factors and may provide a regenerative medicine option for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. The present study investigates the efficacy of multiple intravenous or intracardiac administrations of rat mesenchymal stromal cells or human mesenchymal stromal cells in female rats after controlled cortical impact by in vivo MRI, neurobehavior, and histopathology evaluation. Neither intravenous nor intracardiac administration of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from either rats or humans improved MRI measures of lesion volume or neurobehavioral outcome compared to saline treatment. Few mesenchymal stromal cells (<0.0005% of injected dose) were found within 3 days of last dosage at the site of injury after either delivery route, with no mesenchymal stromal cells being detectable in brain at 30 or 56 days post-injury. These findings suggest that non-autologous mesenchymal stromal cells therapy via intravenous or intracardiac administration is not a promising treatment after focal contusion traumatic brain injury in this female rodent model. PMID:25946089

  12. Electron-microscopic characteristics of neuroendocrine neurons in the amygdaloid body of the brain in male rats and female rats at different stages of the estral cycle.

    PubMed

    Akhmadeev, A V; Kalimullina, L B

    2008-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of neuroendocrine neurons in the dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) of the amygdaloid body of the brain - one of the major zones of sexual dimorphism - in 12 Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were studied in three males and nine females at different stages of the estral cycle. On the basis of ultrastructural characteristics, analysis of the functional states of an average of 50 DMN neurons were studied in each animal. A morphofunctional classification reflecting hormone-dependent variations in neuron activity is proposed. DMN neurons were found to be in different structural-functional states, which could be classified as the states of rest, moderate activity, elevated activity, tension (maximal activity), decreased activity (types 1 and 2, depending on prior history), return to the initial state, and apoptosis. At the estrus stage, there was a predominance of neurons in the states of elevated activity (40% of all cells) and maximal activity (26%). At the metestrus stage, neurons in the state of decreased activity type 1 (with increased nuclear heterochromatin content) predominated (30% of cells), while 25% and 20% of cells were in the states of maximal activity and elevated activity respectively. In diestrus, neurons in the resting state, in moderate and elevated activity, in maximal activity, and in decreased activity type 1 were present in essentially identical proportions (18%, 21%, 18%, 20%, and 16% respectively). In males, 35% and 22% of neurons were in the states of elevated and maximal activity respectively. Neuron death was seen only in males.

  13. Effects of female sex hormones on expression of the Ang-(1-7)/Mas-R/nNOS pathways in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Li, Qiaoying; Zhang, Yidan; Wen, Quan; Zhao, Jianjun

    2015-11-01

    Female sex hormones are considered to reduce the risk of ischemic stroke. As a part of the renin-angiotensin system, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] has recently been reported to play a role in protecting neuronal tissues from ischemic stroke. Thus, we examined the effects of female sex hormones on the levels of Ang-(1-7) and its downstream pathways in the brain. Female rats were ovariectomized and 17β-estradiol (17β-EST), progesterone (PGR), or a combination of 17β-EST plus PGR were administered. Our data demonstrated that lack of female sex hormones significantly decreased the levels of Ang-(1-7) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 area. Also, we observed a linear relationship between cortex levels of Ang-(1-7) and plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels (as an indicator for risk of ischemic stroke). We further showed that lack of female sex hormones decreased the expression of Ang-(1-7), Mas-receptor (Mas-R), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Overall, our findings show for the first time that Ang-(1-7) and Mas-R/nNOS in the cortex are influenced by circulating 17β-EST and (or) PGR, whereas Ang-(1-7) and its pathways in the hippocampal CA1 area are primarily altered by 17β-EST. This suggests that female sex hormones play a role in regulating the expression of Ang-(1-7) and its pathways during ischemic brain injuries.

  14. Effects of insulin and leptin in the ventral tegmental area and arcuate hypothalamic nucleus on food intake and brain reward function in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.; Corrie, Lu W.; Rogers, Jessica A.; Yamada, Hidetaka

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence for a role of insulin and leptin in food intake, but the effects of these adiposity signals on the brain reward system are not well understood. Furthermore, the effects of insulin and leptin on food intake in females are underinvestigated. These studies investigated the role of insulin and leptin in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc) on food intake and brain reward function in female rats. The intracranial self-stimulation procedure was used to assess the effects of insulin and leptin on the reward system. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a decrease in brain reward function. The bilateral administration of leptin into the VTA (15–500 ng/side) or Arc (15–150 ng/side) decreased food intake for 72 h. The infusion of leptin into the VTA or Arc resulted in weight loss during the first 48 (VTA) or 24 h (Arc) after the infusions. The administration of insulin (0.005–5 mU/side) into the VTA or Arc decreased food intake for 24 h but did not affect body weights. The bilateral administration of low, but not high, doses of leptin (15 ng/side) or insulin (0.005 mU/side) into the VTA elevated brain reward thresholds. Neither insulin nor leptin in the Arc affected brain reward thresholds. These studies suggest that a small increase in leptin or insulin levels in the VTA leads to a decrease in brain reward function. A relatively large increase in insulin or leptin levels in the VTA or Arc decreases food intake. PMID:21255613

  15. Brain regional differences in social encounter-induced Fos expression in male and female rats after post-weaning social isolation.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Megan; Goodell, Dayton J; Adams, Jessica; Bland, Sondra T

    2016-01-01

    Early life adversity has been related to a number of psychological disorders including mood and other disorders that can manifest as inappropriate or aggressive responses to social challenges. The present study used post-weaning social isolation (PSI) in rats, a model of early life adversity, to examine its effects on Fos protein expression produced by exposure to a novel social encounter. We have previously reported that the social encounter-induced increase in Fos expression in the medial prefrontal cortex observed in group-housed controls (GRP) was attenuated in rats that had experienced PSI. Here we assessed Fos expression in other brain regions thought to be involved in emotion regulation and social behavior. Male and female rats were housed in same-sex groups or in isolation (ISO) for 4 weeks beginning on postnatal day (P) 21 and were exposed to a single 15 min social encounter with a novel same-sex conspecific on P49. Fos positive cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry in 16 regions within the forebrain. Exposure to a novel conspecific increased Fos expression in the forebrain of GRP rats in a region- and sex-specific fashion. This increase was blunted or absent in ISO rats within many regions including cortical regions, thalamus, habenula, dentate gyrus, lateral septum, and basolateral amygdala. In several regions, the increase in Fos was greater in male than in female group housed rats. Negative relationships were observed between social interactions and Fos in some regions. Forebrain hypofunction produced by early-life adversity may be involved in socially inappropriate behavior.

  16. Brain regional differences in social encounter-induced Fos expression in male and female rats after post-weaning social isolation.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Megan; Goodell, Dayton J; Adams, Jessica; Bland, Sondra T

    2016-01-01

    Early life adversity has been related to a number of psychological disorders including mood and other disorders that can manifest as inappropriate or aggressive responses to social challenges. The present study used post-weaning social isolation (PSI) in rats, a model of early life adversity, to examine its effects on Fos protein expression produced by exposure to a novel social encounter. We have previously reported that the social encounter-induced increase in Fos expression in the medial prefrontal cortex observed in group-housed controls (GRP) was attenuated in rats that had experienced PSI. Here we assessed Fos expression in other brain regions thought to be involved in emotion regulation and social behavior. Male and female rats were housed in same-sex groups or in isolation (ISO) for 4 weeks beginning on postnatal day (P) 21 and were exposed to a single 15 min social encounter with a novel same-sex conspecific on P49. Fos positive cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry in 16 regions within the forebrain. Exposure to a novel conspecific increased Fos expression in the forebrain of GRP rats in a region- and sex-specific fashion. This increase was blunted or absent in ISO rats within many regions including cortical regions, thalamus, habenula, dentate gyrus, lateral septum, and basolateral amygdala. In several regions, the increase in Fos was greater in male than in female group housed rats. Negative relationships were observed between social interactions and Fos in some regions. Forebrain hypofunction produced by early-life adversity may be involved in socially inappropriate behavior. PMID:26562664

  17. Role of steroid hormones and morphine treatment in the modulation of opioid receptor gene expression in brain structures in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Wesley Soares; Pereira, Lucas Assis; Cezar, Luana Carvalho; Camarini, Rosana; Felicio, Luciano Freitas; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Teodorov, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effects of acute treatment with morphine on the expression of the Oprm1, Oprk1, and Oprd1 genes (which encode μ, κ, and δ receptors, respectively) in the striatum, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray (PAG) in ovariectomized female rats treated with estrogen. Ovariectomized female rats were divided into five equal groups. Two groups received estrogen (50 µg/kg, 54 h before testing) and saline (ES group) or 3.5 mg/kg morphine (EM group) 2 h before euthanasia. The SS group received saline solution 54 and 2 h before the experiments. The SM group received saline 54 h and 3.5 mg/kg morphine 2 h before the experiments. The W group remained undisturbed. The genes expression were evaluated. Oprm1 and Oprk1 expression were activated, respectively, in the hypothalamus and PAG and in the striatum and PAG by morphine only in estrogen-treated animals. Oprd1 expression in the hypothalamus and PAG was activated by morphine in both estrogen-treated and -nontreated animals. The Oprm1 and Oprk1 gene response to morphine might depend on estrogen, whereas the Oprd1 gene response to morphine might not depend on estrogen, supporting the hypothesis of a functional role for ovarian hormones in opioid receptor-mediated functional adaptations in the female brain.

  18. Differential Effects of E2 on MAPK Activity in the Brain and Heart of Aged Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shults, Cody L.; Rao, Yathindar S.; Pak, Toni R.

    2016-01-01

    Aging and the coincident loss of circulating estrogens at menopause lead to increased risks for neurological and cardiovascular pathologies. Clinical studies show that estrogen therapy (ET) can be beneficial in mitigating these negative effects, in both the brain and heart, when it is initiated shortly after the perimenopausal transition. However, this same therapy is detrimental when initiated >10 years postmenopause. Importantly, the molecular mechanisms underlying this age-related switch in ET efficacy are unknown. Estrogen receptors (ERs) mediate the neuroprotective and cardioprotective functions of estrogens by modulating gene transcription or, non-genomically, by activating second messenger signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK). These kinases are critical regulators of cell signaling pathways and have widespread downstream effects. Our hypothesis is that age and estrogen deprivation following menopause alters the expression and activation of the MAPK family members p38 and ERK in the brain and heart. To test this hypothesis, we used a surgically induced model of menopause in 18 month old rats through bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) followed by an acute dose of 17β-estradiol (E2) administered at varying time points post-OVX (1 week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, or 12 weeks). Age and E2 treatment differentially regulated kinase activity in both the brain and heart, and the effects were also brain region specific. MAPK signaling plays an integral role in aging, and the aberrant regulation of those signaling pathways might be involved in age-related disorders. Clinical studies show benefits of ET during early menopause but detrimental effects later, which might be reflective of changes in kinase expression and activation status. PMID:27487271

  19. Differential Effects of E2 on MAPK Activity in the Brain and Heart of Aged Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Pinceti, Elena; Shults, Cody L; Rao, Yathindar S; Pak, Toni R

    2016-01-01

    Aging and the coincident loss of circulating estrogens at menopause lead to increased risks for neurological and cardiovascular pathologies. Clinical studies show that estrogen therapy (ET) can be beneficial in mitigating these negative effects, in both the brain and heart, when it is initiated shortly after the perimenopausal transition. However, this same therapy is detrimental when initiated >10 years postmenopause. Importantly, the molecular mechanisms underlying this age-related switch in ET efficacy are unknown. Estrogen receptors (ERs) mediate the neuroprotective and cardioprotective functions of estrogens by modulating gene transcription or, non-genomically, by activating second messenger signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK). These kinases are critical regulators of cell signaling pathways and have widespread downstream effects. Our hypothesis is that age and estrogen deprivation following menopause alters the expression and activation of the MAPK family members p38 and ERK in the brain and heart. To test this hypothesis, we used a surgically induced model of menopause in 18 month old rats through bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) followed by an acute dose of 17β-estradiol (E2) administered at varying time points post-OVX (1 week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, or 12 weeks). Age and E2 treatment differentially regulated kinase activity in both the brain and heart, and the effects were also brain region specific. MAPK signaling plays an integral role in aging, and the aberrant regulation of those signaling pathways might be involved in age-related disorders. Clinical studies show benefits of ET during early menopause but detrimental effects later, which might be reflective of changes in kinase expression and activation status. PMID:27487271

  20. Evaluating the potential role of pomegranate peel in aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological alterations in brain of female rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2012-12-01

    Studies have shown that pomegranate, Punica granatum Linn. (Lythraceae), has remarkable biological and medicinal properties. However, the effects of pomegranate peel methanolic extract (PPME) on the aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological change have not been reported yet. To determine the effect of PPME (200 mg/kg bwt) on the aluminum chloride (AlCl₃; 34 mg/kg bwt)-induced neurotoxicity, aluminum accumulation in brain and oxidant/antioxidant status were determined. The change of brain structure was investigated with hematoxylin and eosin, and anti-apoptosis effects of PPME were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The present study showed an indication of carcinogenicity in the AlCl₃-treated group representing an increase in tissue tumor markers such as tumor necrosis factor-α and angiogenin and inflammation by inducing an increase in prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2α. PPME protected brain through decreasing the aluminum accumulation and stimulating antioxidant activities and anti-apoptotic proteins namely Bcl-2. Therefore, these results indicated that pomegranate peel methanolic extract could inhibit aluminum-induced oxidative stress and histopathological alternations in brain of female rats, and these effects may be related to anti-apoptotic and antioxidants activities. PMID:22945624

  1. Stroke and the female brain.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Cheryl D

    2008-01-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem. The female population carries a higher stroke burden than the male population, both because females have a longer life expectancy and because most stroke deaths occur in women. Differences between the sexes in relation to stroke are increasingly being recognized; for example, among stroke survivors, women tend to have worse outcomes than men, as indicated by more-severe disability and an increased likelihood of institutionalization in women. Women and men with stroke also differ in their risk factor profiles, and they respond differently to primary-prevention and acute stroke treatment. Women experience variations in endogenous estrogens throughout their life cycle and might also be exposed to exogenous estrogens, both of which markedly affect the brain. An understanding of the effects of endogenous and exogenous estrogens on cerebral hemodynamics could guide research into explaining how hormone therapy increases the risk of stroke in postmenopausal women. This Review summarizes the sex differences related to stroke, and the effect of endogenous and exogenous hormones on the cerebrovasculature of the female brain. It also proposes potential research approaches, the results of which could fill in gaps in our knowledge regarding the mechanism of action of estrogen in the brain.

  2. Polychlorinated biphenyls impair blood-brain barrier integrity via disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female Wistar rats: neuropotential role of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, K; Prabha, R Lakshmi; Saranya, K; Bavithra, S; Krishnamoorthy, G; Arunakaran, J

    2013-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) comprise a ubiquitous class of toxic substances associated with carcinogenic and tumor-promoting effects as well as neurotoxic properties. Reactive oxygen species, which is produced from PCBs, alters blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which is paralleled by cytoskeletal rearrangements and redistribution and disappearance of tight junction proteins (TJPs) like claudin-5 and occludin. Quercetin, a potent antioxidant present in onion and other vegetables, appears to protect brain cells against oxidative stress, a tissue-damaging process associated with Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of quercetin on oxidative stress markers and transcription of transmembrane and cytoplasmic accessory TJPs on cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female rats exposed to PCBs. Rats were divided into the following four groups. Group I: received only vehicle (corn oil) intraperitoneally (i.p.); group II: received Aroclor 1254 at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight (bwt)/day (i.p); group III: received Aroclor 1254 (i.p.) and simultaneously quercetin 50 mg/kg bwt/day through gavage and group IV: received quercetin alone gavage. From the experiment, the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were observed to increase significantly in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus as 50%, 25% and 20%, respectively, after exposure to PCB, and the messenger RNA expression of TJP in rats exposed to PCBs is decreased and is retrieved to the normal level simultaneously in quercetin-treated rats. Hence, quercetin can be used as a preventive medicine to PCBs exposure and prevents neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Effect of sibutramine on 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid levels and selected oxidative biomarkers on brain regions of female rats in the presence of zinc.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, David C; García, Ernestina H; Mejía, Gerardo B; Olguín, Hugo J; Jiménez, Francisca T; Soto, Erick B; Del Angel, Daniel S; Aparicio, Liliana C

    2012-05-01

    A number of drugs, like sibutramine, which are used clinically in weight control, act on serotonergic metabolism. However, their relation with zinc and free radical (FR) production in central nervous system remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of sibutramine and zinc on FR production. Female Wistar rats (about 250 g) were used in this study. The animals received 400 μg/kg of zinc and 10 mg/kg of sibutramine intraperitoneally every 36 hr for 15 days. At the end of the study, the rats were killed and their brains used for the measurement of lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH), hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2) ), calcium and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) levels, all by means of validated methods. Corporal weight and food consumption were found to be decreased in the zinc/sibutramine group. TBARS decreased in cortex, hemispheres and medulla oblongata. GSH decreased in cortex, hemispheres and cerebellum in the sibutramine group. Zinc given alone and in combination with sibutramine decreased H(2) O(2) concentration in cortex, hemispheres and cerebellum but increased calcium and 5-HIAA concentration in all brain regions. Our results suggest that sibutramine and zinc are associated with weight loss, an effect that was more pronounced in the group treated with both drugs. Reduction in oxidative stress may be involved in these effects.

  4. Flibanserin, a drug intended for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women, affects spontaneous motor activity and brain neurochemistry in female rats.

    PubMed

    Ferger, Boris; Shimasaki, Makoto; Ceci, Angelo; Ittrich, Carina; Allers, Kelly A; Sommer, Bernd

    2010-06-01

    Flibanserin, a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist and 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist, is being developed for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in pre-menopausal women. Here, we investigated the effects of acute administration of flibanserin (15 and 45 mg/kg, p.o.) and the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (+)-8-OH-DPAT (1 mg/kg, i.p.) on neurotransmitter levels in brain areas of female rats. Specifically, levels of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) and neurotransmitter metabolites were examined in prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus and brain stem using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection. In addition, spontaneous motor activity was determined in an automated motor activity system. Flibanserin (45 mg/kg) but not (+)-8-OH-DPAT significantly reduced motor activity, when compared to vehicle controls. Specifically, the DA turnover was significantly increased (279%) in the PFC after flibanserin treatment but less pronounced (159%) after 8-OH-DPAT administration. Serotonin tissue levels were not altered in any of the investigated brain regions upon flibanserin treatment. However, flibanserin produced a significant decrease of the major serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 5-HT turnover in the PFC, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus and brain stem similar to (+)-8-OH-DPAT. In conclusion, the present study indicates that flibanserin is able to modulate dopaminergic and serotonergic activity in distinct brain areas. The observed effects in the PFC on dopaminergic markers are different from those induced by (+)-8-OH-DPAT and may contribute to its therapeutic efficacy in HSDD. The effects of flibanserin on spontaneous motor behaviour are in agreement with its receptor profile and underscore that flibanserin is devoid of any locomotor hyperactivity inducing properties.

  5. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether there is a differential distribution of PFOS within the brain, and compares adult rats with neonatal rats at an age when formation of the blood-brain barrier is not yet complete (postnatal day 7). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (60-70 day old, 4/...

  6. 17α-estradiol is neuroprotective in male and female rats in a model of early brain injury

    PubMed Central

    McClean, Jacob; Nuñez, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most critical times in the human lifespan is the late embryonic/early postnatal period, due to the careful orchestration of numerous events leading to normal brain development. This period is also characterized by a heightened incidence of harmful events that act via the GABAergic system, including hypoxia-ischemia, seizures and drug exposure from maternal circulation (e.g. alcohol, barbiturates). Unfortunately, there are few effective means of attenuating damage in the immature brain. In the current investigation, we documented the effect of 17α-estradiol, a natural epimer of 17β-estradiol that has potent estrogen receptor-independent actions, on excessive GABAA receptor-induced damage to the neonatal brain. We observed that treatment with 17α-estradiol significantly attenuates the GABAA receptor-induced reduction in hippocampal volume and impaired hippocampal dependent performance on the Morris water maze and radial arm maze. 17α-estradiol mediated neuroprotection is hypothesized to be achieved by attenuating GABAA receptor-induced cell loss, assessed in primary hippocampal cultures using both the lactate dehydrogenase assay and TUNEL, with equivalent prevention of cell loss in the presence or absence of the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI-182,780. These data highlight one of the initial investigations of the neuroprotective potential of 17α-estradiol in an in vivo model of injury to the immature brain. PMID:17997403

  7. Neurobehavioral deficits and brain oxidative stress induced by chronic low dose exposure of persistent organic pollutants mixture in adult female rat.

    PubMed

    Lahouel, Asma; Kebieche, Mohamed; Lakroun, Zohra; Rouabhi, Rachid; Fetoui, Hamadi; Chtourou, Yassine; Djamila, Zama; Soulimani, Rachid

    2016-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are long-lived organic compounds that are considered one of the major risks to ecosystem and human health. Recently, great concerns are raised about POPs mixtures and its potential toxicity even in low doses of daily human exposure. The brain is mostly targeted by these lipophilic compounds because of its important contain in lipids. So, it would be quite interesting to study the effects of exposure to these mixtures and evaluate their combined toxicity on brain cells. The present study was designed to characterize the cognitive and locomotors deficits and brain areas redox status in rat model. An orally chronic exposure to a representative mixture of POPs composed of endosulfan (2.6 μg/kg), chlorpyrifos (5.2 μg/kg), naphthalene (0.023 μg/kg) and benzopyrane (0.002 μg/kg); the same mixture with concentration multiplied by 10 and 100 was also tested. Exposed rats have shown a disturbance of memory and a decrease in learning ability concluded by Morris water maze and the open field tests results and anxiolytic behaviour in the test of light/dark box compared to control. Concerning brain redox homeostasis, exposed rats have shown an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) amount and an alteration in glutathione (GSH) levels in both the brain mitochondria and cytosolic fractions of the cerebellum, striatum and hippocampus. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in levels of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) and a highly significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. The current study suggests that environmental exposure to daily even low doses of POPs mixtures through diet induces oxidative stress status in the brain and especially in the mitochondria with important cognitive and locomotor behaviour variations in the rats.

  8. Neurobehavioral deficits and brain oxidative stress induced by chronic low dose exposure of persistent organic pollutants mixture in adult female rat.

    PubMed

    Lahouel, Asma; Kebieche, Mohamed; Lakroun, Zohra; Rouabhi, Rachid; Fetoui, Hamadi; Chtourou, Yassine; Djamila, Zama; Soulimani, Rachid

    2016-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are long-lived organic compounds that are considered one of the major risks to ecosystem and human health. Recently, great concerns are raised about POPs mixtures and its potential toxicity even in low doses of daily human exposure. The brain is mostly targeted by these lipophilic compounds because of its important contain in lipids. So, it would be quite interesting to study the effects of exposure to these mixtures and evaluate their combined toxicity on brain cells. The present study was designed to characterize the cognitive and locomotors deficits and brain areas redox status in rat model. An orally chronic exposure to a representative mixture of POPs composed of endosulfan (2.6 μg/kg), chlorpyrifos (5.2 μg/kg), naphthalene (0.023 μg/kg) and benzopyrane (0.002 μg/kg); the same mixture with concentration multiplied by 10 and 100 was also tested. Exposed rats have shown a disturbance of memory and a decrease in learning ability concluded by Morris water maze and the open field tests results and anxiolytic behaviour in the test of light/dark box compared to control. Concerning brain redox homeostasis, exposed rats have shown an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) amount and an alteration in glutathione (GSH) levels in both the brain mitochondria and cytosolic fractions of the cerebellum, striatum and hippocampus. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in levels of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) and a highly significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. The current study suggests that environmental exposure to daily even low doses of POPs mixtures through diet induces oxidative stress status in the brain and especially in the mitochondria with important cognitive and locomotor behaviour variations in the rats. PMID:27240828

  9. Comparison of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels of neuroactive steroids with their brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve levels in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Donatella; Pesaresi, Marzia; Abbiati, Federico; Calabrese, Donato; Giatti, Silvia; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2013-10-01

    Physiological changes and pathological alterations in the nervous system of rodents are associated with modifications in the levels of neuroactive steroids in the brain, spinal cord and/or peripheral nerves. Measures of tissue levels of steroids in the nervous system present serious limitations for human studies and for longitudinal studies in animals. In this study we have explored whether levels of neuroactive steroids in plasma and the cerebrospinal fluid reflect their levels in neural tissues. To this aim, we have evaluated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry the levels of several neuroactive steroids in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, spinal cord and sciatic nerve of male and female rats. Data indicate that plasma and cerebrospinal fluid levels of steroids do not fully reflect their tissue levels. However, the interindividual variations in the levels of all the steroids assessed, with the exception of dehydroepiandrosterone, showed a positive correlation in plasma and cerebral cortex. Most steroids also showed a positive correlation in plasma and the cerebellum, the spinal cord and the sciatic nerve. In the hippocampus, the levels of tetrahydroprogesterone, testosterone and testosterone metabolites showed a significant positive correlation with their respective levels in plasma. The cerebrospinal fluid levels of some steroids, such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone, showed a full correlation with tissue levels. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid levels of pregnenolone, progesterone, and 17β-estradiol showed a positive correlation with their corresponding levels in the majority of the neural structures analyzed. These findings suggest that the levels of some neuroactive steroids in cerebrospinal fluid as well as in plasma may be valuable to predict their levels in the nervous system. PMID:23706961

  10. Male or Female? Brains are Intersex

    PubMed Central

    Joel, Daphna

    2011-01-01

    The underlying assumption in popular and scientific publications on sex differences in the brain is that human brains can take one of two forms “male” or “female,” and that the differences between these two forms underlie differences between men and women in personality, cognition, emotion, and behavior. Documented sex differences in brain structure are typically taken to support this dimorphic view of the brain. However, neuroanatomical data reveal that sex interacts with other factors in utero and throughout life to determine the structure of the brain, and that because these interactions are complex, the result is a multi-morphic, rather than a dimorphic, brain. More specifically, here I argue that human brains are composed of an ever-changing heterogeneous mosaic of “male” and “female” brain characteristics (rather than being all “male” or all “female”) that cannot be aligned on a continuum between a “male brain” and a “female brain.” I further suggest that sex differences in the direction of change in the brain mosaic following specific environmental events lead to sex differences in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:21960961

  11. Methamphetamine enhances sexual behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Winland, Carissa; Haycox, Charles; Bolton, Jessica L; Jampana, Sumith; Oakley, Benjamin J; Ford, Brittany; Ornelas, Laura; Burbey, Alexandra; Marquette, Amber; Frohardt, Russell J; Guarraci, Fay A

    2011-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of methamphetamine (MA) on sexual behavior in female rats. In Experiment 1, ovariectomized, hormone-primed rats were injected with MA (1.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline prior to a test for mate choice wherein females could mate with two males simultaneously. Female rats treated with saline returned to their preferred mate faster after receiving intromissions and visited their preferred mate at a higher rate than their non-preferred mate. In contrast, MA-treated female rats spent a similar amount of time with their preferred and non-preferred mate and failed to return to their preferred mate faster than to their non-preferred mate following intromissions. Two weeks later, the females received the same drug treatment but were tested for partner preference wherein females could spend time near a male or female stimulus rat. All subjects spent more time near the male stimulus than the female stimulus. However, the MA-treated rats visited the male stimulus more frequently and spent less time near the female stimulus than the saline-treated rats. Similar to Experiment 1, female rats in Experiment 2 were tested for mate choice and then two weeks later tested for partner preference; however, females received three daily injections of MA (1.0mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. Females treated chronically with MA returned to both males faster following intromissions than females treated with saline, independent of preference (i.e., preferred mate and non-preferred mate). Furthermore, MA-treated rats were more likely to leave either male (i.e., preferred or non-preferred mate) than saline-treated rats after receiving sexual stimulation. Although MA-treated subjects spent more time near the male stimulus than the female stimulus, they spent less time near either when compared to saline-treated subjects. The present results demonstrate that MA affects sexual behavior in female rats partly by increasing locomotion and partly by directly affecting sexual

  12. Placentophagia in Weanling Female Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Kaitlyn M.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    Placentophagia is common in parturient mammals and offers physiological and behavioral advantages for mothers. In natural environments, weanlings are often present during the birth of younger siblings, but it is unknown if weanling rats are placentophagic or prefer placenta over other substances. To examine this, primiparous rats were remated during the postpartum estrus and weanling females remained in the nest during their mother’s next parturition. Continuous observation revealed that 58% of weanlings were placentophagic. To determine if this placentophagia occurs away from parturient mothers, weanling females still living in their natal nest were offered placenta, liver, or cake frosting in a novel chamber. They ingested more placenta and liver than frosting. Thus, many weanling female laboratory rats are placentophagic during birth of younger siblings but do not selectively prefer placenta when tested outside their natal nest. Consequences of placentophagia by weanlings are unknown, but it may promote their alloparenting or postpartum mothering. PMID:24604548

  13. Hypergravity induced prolactin surge in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megory, E.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Acute initial exposure to hypergravity (HG) was previously found to induce prolonged diestrous in rats, which was followed by return to normal estrous cycling upon more prolonged exposure to continuous HG. Bromergocryptine was found to prevent this prolonged diestrous. In this study it is found that in female rats 20 h of 3.14 G exposure (D-1 1200 h until D-2 0800 h) can induce prolactin surge at D-2 1600 h. Shorter exposure time (8 h), or exposure during a different part of the estrous cycle (19 h: from D-1 0700 h until D-2 0200 h) could not elicit this prolactin surge. Similar exposure of male rats of HG did not alter significantly their prolactin levels. It is possible that the hypothalamus of male and female rats responds differently to stimulation by HG.

  14. Female brain size and parental care in carnivores.

    PubMed Central

    Gittleman, J L

    1994-01-01

    Comparative studies indicate that species differences in mammalian brain size relate to body size, ecology, and life-history traits. Previous analyses failed to show intrasexual or behavioral patterns of brain size in mammals. Across the terrestrial Carnivora, I find to the contrary. Differences in female, but not male, brain size associate with a fundamental ecological and evolutionary characteristic of female behavior. Other factors equal, females that provide the sole parental care have larger brains than those of biparental or communal species. For females, more parental investment accompanies larger brains. Future comparative studies of mammalian brain size must recognize that some patterns arise independently in the two sexes. PMID:8202515

  15. Effect of DHEA therapy on sexual behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Nicola; Giannini, Andrea; Cela, Vito; Santoro, Anna N; Carnevale, Gianluca; Zavatti, Manuela; Di Viesti, Vittoria; Benelli, Augusta; Genazzani, Andrea R; Zanoli, Paola

    2013-05-01

    Delta-5 androgen therapies seem to enhance the sexual response in experimental animal models and in clinical trial. This study analyzed the influence of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration on receptive and proceptive components of female rat sexual behavior. Ovariectomized (OVX) adult rats were divided in six groups submitted to the following treatments for 4 weeks: DHEA 0.5 and 5 mg/kg, by oral gavage, alone or in combination with estradiol benzoate 3 µg/rat; EB 3 and 10 µg/rat as control groups. All animals received progesterone (500 µg/rat) 4 h before the behavioral tests. All animals were tested for the following: receptivity and proceptivity weekly for 4 weeks; partner preference and paced mating behavior at the end of the treatments. Oral administration of DHEA at 5 mg/kg in EB primed rats was able to significantly increase proceptive behaviors, already after 1 week of treatment. The increase was more marked after 3 and 4 weeks of treatment. Behavioral changes were associated to modifications of circulating and brain level of allopregnanolone and beta-endorphin, although circulating hormonal levels were within a physiological range. Hormonal treatment using physiological doses of delta-5 androgens (DHEA) positively affects sexual motivation in OVX rats.

  16. Deficits in reproductive behaviour in septally lesioned female rats.

    PubMed

    Gogate, M G; Brid, S V; Wingkar, K C

    1991-12-01

    Estrous cycle and sexual behaviour were studied in septally lesioned female albino Wistar rats. In lesioned rats the vaginal smears showed continuous diestrus and the females failed to exhibit sexual receptivity during the postoperative period. Ovarian and uterine weights in lesioned rats were also significantly decreased. The results suggest that the septal nuclei exert a modulatory influence on female sexual behaviour. PMID:1816101

  17. Testosterone and muscle hypertrophy in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, F. E.; Max, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) on compensatory muscle hypertropy in female rats are examined. The 48 female rats were placed in one of four test groups: (1) no overload (synergist removal), no TP, (2) overload, no TP, (3) no overload + TP, and (4) overload + TP. The technique used to administer the TP is described. The preparation of the plantaris muscle, the analysis of pyruvate oxidation and the determination of malate and lactate dehydrogenases and the noncollogen protein are explained. The results which reveal the effect of overload and TP on body weight, noncollogen protein concentration, lactate and malate dehydrogenase activities, and pyruvate oxidation are presented and discussed. It is concluded that in terms of body weight, protein content, pyruvate, glycolysis, and oxidative metabolisms chronic TP treatments do not change compensatory muscle hypertropy.

  18. Curt Richter and the female rat.

    PubMed

    Geary, Nori

    2007-09-01

    Richter fully appreciated the fundamental biological importance of sex differences, in particular the challenges of female reproductive function to the two classes of behavior that most engaged him, endogenous rhythms and "self-regulatory" behaviors. Indeed, his contributions in these areas justify honoring him as one of the founders of behavioral neuroendocrinology. During the 1920s Richter, together with Wang, Kinder and other students, performed elegant phenomenological and mechanistic studies of sex differences in rats' spontaneous locomotor activity, nest building, and food intake. All of these behaviors display rhythms entrained to the ovarian cycle in female rats, and Richter's analyses of them formed the bases of many current areas of behavioral neuroscience. Slightly later, Richter made fundamentally important discoveries related to nutrient self-selection in pregnant and lactating rats, including changes in micronutrient and macronutrient selection. These data played a major role in the development of his concept of behavioral regulation of homeostasis. Unfortunately, some of these discoveries are rarely recalled. This is both historically regrettable and potentially an impediment to contemporary research progress.

  19. [Pituitary function of dysgenesic femal rats. Studies with grafting method].

    PubMed

    Vanhems, E; Busquet, J

    1975-01-01

    Misulban administered to pregnant rats on the 15th day of gestation provoked gonadal dysgenesia in the offspring. Study of the pituitary function of dysgenesic female rats, realized by grafting method, showed gonadotrophic hypersecretion.

  20. [The cognitive disorders and raised free-radical activity of a brain of posterity of rats-females with experimental chronic alcoholic pathology of a liver].

    PubMed

    Vakhnin, V A; Brukhin, G V

    2014-01-01

    It is established, that chronic alcoholic defeat of hepatobiliarity sistems leads to infringement of cognitive functions at posterity. At the given group of animals revealed distress of memory and ability to orientation in space in the conditions of Morris water maze is, the research behavior is oppressed. Besides, the animals, born from mothers with chronic alcoholic defeat of hepatobiliarity systems have raised free-radical activity, which plays an important role in maintenance of adaptive possibilities of a brain.

  1. Neurogenetics: sex and the female brain.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Levine, Joel D

    2014-09-01

    Male flies put on a multimedia show during courtship involving dance, song, perfume and even vibrations; if a female likes it, she pauses to let him know. Recent studies shed new light on how development and experience contribute to neural mechanisms of female sexual receptivity.

  2. Stress-reactive rats (high-avoidance female rats) have a shorter lifespan than stress-nonreactive rats (low-avoidance female rats)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Ryo; Kumagai, Fumiaki; Marumo, Hideki; Usumi, Kenji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Kuwagata, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Although Hatano high-avoidance and low-avoidance rats (HAA and LAA, respectively) have been selectively bred for good versus poor avoidance learning, HAA rats are known to be more reactive to stress than LAA rats. In this study, HAA and LAA female rats were compared during reproductive aging by observing estrous cycles from 8 to 11 months of age. Furthermore, these rats were allowed to live out their natural lifespans, that is, until 24 months of age, in order to compare their survival and to clarify the relationship between reproductive aging and tumor development. At eight months of age, 2 of 35 HAA rats and 20 of 35 LAA rats had abnormal estrous cycles. The median lifespan of the HAA rats (673 days) was shorter than that of the LAA rats (733 days). The incidence of pituitary neoplasia was higher in the HAA rats than in the LAA rats. These results suggest that HAA female rats (i.e., stress-reactive rats) have a shorter lifespan than LAA female rats (i.e., stress-nonreactive rats) and develop pituitary neoplasia, which was one of the causal factors in their accelerated mortality. However, the onset of an age-matched abnormal cycle did not correspond with their lifespan. PMID:27182111

  3. Progesterone Treatment Shows Benefit in Female Rats in a Pediatric Model of Controlled Cortical Impact Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Rastafa I.; Peterson, Bethany L.; Stein, Donald G.; Sayeed, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We recently showed that progesterone treatment can reduce lesion size and behavioral deficits after moderate-to-severe bilateral injury to the medial prefrontal cortex in immature male rats. Whether there are important sex differences in response to injury and progesterone treatment in very young subjects has not been given sufficient attention. Here we investigated progesterone’s effects in the same model of brain injury but with pre-pubescent females. Methods Twenty-eight-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats received sham (n = 14) or controlled cortical impact (CCI) (n = 21) injury, were given progesterone (8 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle injections on post-injury days (PID) 1–7, and underwent behavioral testing from PID 9–27. Brains were evaluated for lesion size at PID 28. Results Lesion size in vehicle-treated female rats with CCI injury was smaller than that previously reported for similarly treated age-matched male rats. Treatment with progesterone reduced the effect of CCI on extent of damage and behavioral deficits. Conclusion Pre-pubescent female rats with midline CCI injury to the frontal cortex have reduced morphological and functional deficits following progesterone treatment. While gender differences in susceptibility to this injury were observed, progesterone treatment produced beneficial effects in young rats of both sexes following CCI. PMID:26799561

  4. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  5. The role of the brain in female reproductive aging.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jodi L; Wise, Phyllis M

    2009-02-01

    In middle-aged women, follicular depletion is a critical factor mediating the menopausal transition; however, all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis contribute to the age-related decline in reproductive function. To help elucidate the complex interactions between the ovary and brain during middle-age that lead to the onset of the menopause, we utilize animal models which share striking similarities in reproductive physiology. Our results show that during middle-age, prior to any overt irregularities in estrous cyclicity, the ability of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) to modulate the cascade of neurochemical events required for preovulatory gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release and a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge is diminished. Middle-aged female rats experience a delay in and an attenuation of LH release in response to E(2). Additionally, although we do not observe a decrease in GnRH neuron number until a very advanced age, E(2)-mediated GnRH neuronal activation declines during the earliest stages of age-related reproductive decline. Numerous hypothalamic neuropeptides and neurochemical stimulatory inputs (i.e., glutamate, norepinephrine (NE), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)) that drive the E(2)-mediated GnRH/LH surge appear to dampen with age or lack the precise temporal coordination required for a specific pattern of GnRH secretion, while inhibitory signals such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and opioid peptides remain unchanged or elevated during the afternoon of proestrus. These changes, occurring at the level of the hypothalamus, lead to irregular estrous cycles and, ultimately, the cessation of reproductive function. Taken together, our studies indicate that the hypothalamus is an important contributor to age-related female reproductive decline.

  6. Estradiol promotes the rewarding effects of nicotine in female rats.

    PubMed

    Flores, Rodolfo J; Pipkin, Joseph A; Uribe, Kevin P; Perez, Adriana; O'Dell, Laura E

    2016-07-01

    It is presently unclear whether ovarian hormones, such as estradiol (E2), promote the rewarding effects of nicotine in females. Thus, we compared extended access to nicotine intravenous self-administration (IVSA) in intact male, intact female, and OVX female rats (Study 1) as well as OVX females that received vehicle or E2 supplementation (Study 2). The E2 supplementation procedure involved a 4-day injection regimen involving 2 days of vehicle and 2 days of E2 administration. Two doses of E2 (25 or 250μg) were assessed in separate groups of OVX females in order to examine the dose-dependent effects of this hormone on the rewarding effects of nicotine. The rats were given 23-hour access to nicotine IVSA using an escalating dose regimen (0.015, 0.03, and 0.06mg/kg/0.1mL). Each dose was self-administered for 4 days with 3 intervening days of nicotine abstinence. The results revealed that intact females displayed higher levels of nicotine intake as compared to males. Also, intact females displayed higher levels of nicotine intake versus OVX females. Lastly, our results revealed that OVX rats that received E2 supplementation displayed a dose-dependent increase in nicotine intake as compared to OVX rats that received vehicle. Together, our results suggest that the rewarding effects of nicotine are enhanced in female rats via the presence of the ovarian hormone, E2.

  7. Female rats are more susceptible to central nervous system oxygen toxicity than male rats.

    PubMed

    Held, Heather E; Pilla, Raffaele; Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Landon, Carol S; Dean, Jay B

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tonic-clonic seizures typify central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT) in humans and animals exposed to high levels of oxygen, as are encountered during scuba diving. We previously demonstrated that high doses of pseudoephedrine (PSE) decrease the latency to seizure (LS) for CNS-OT in young male rats. This study investigated whether female rats respond similarly to PSE and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). We implanted 60 virgin stock (VS) and 54 former breeder (FB) female rats with radio-telemetry devices that measured brain electrical activity. One week later, rats were gavaged with saline or PSE in saline (40, 80, 120, 160, or 320 mg/kg) before diving to five atmospheres absolute in 100% oxygen. The time between reaching maximum pressure and exhibiting seizure was LS. Vaginal smears identified estrus cycle phase. PSE did not decrease LS for VS or FB, primarily because they exhibited low LS for all conditions tested. VS had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (-42, -49, and -57%, respectively). FB also had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (-60, -86, and -73%, respectively). FB were older than VS (286 ± 10 days vs. 128 ± 5 days) and weighed more than VS (299 ± 2.7 g vs. 272 ± 2.1 g). Males tested were younger (88 ± 2 days), heavier (340 ± 4.5 g), and gained more weight postoperatively (7.2 ± 1.6 g) than either VS (-0.4 ± 1.5 g) or FB (-1.6 ± 1.5 g); however, LS correlated poorly with age, body mass, change in body mass, and estrus cycle phase. We hypothesize that differences in sex hormones underlie females' higher susceptibility to CNS-OT than males. PMID:24771690

  8. Female rats are more susceptible to central nervous system oxygen toxicity than male rats.

    PubMed

    Held, Heather E; Pilla, Raffaele; Ciarlone, Geoffrey E; Landon, Carol S; Dean, Jay B

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tonic-clonic seizures typify central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT) in humans and animals exposed to high levels of oxygen, as are encountered during scuba diving. We previously demonstrated that high doses of pseudoephedrine (PSE) decrease the latency to seizure (LS) for CNS-OT in young male rats. This study investigated whether female rats respond similarly to PSE and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). We implanted 60 virgin stock (VS) and 54 former breeder (FB) female rats with radio-telemetry devices that measured brain electrical activity. One week later, rats were gavaged with saline or PSE in saline (40, 80, 120, 160, or 320 mg/kg) before diving to five atmospheres absolute in 100% oxygen. The time between reaching maximum pressure and exhibiting seizure was LS. Vaginal smears identified estrus cycle phase. PSE did not decrease LS for VS or FB, primarily because they exhibited low LS for all conditions tested. VS had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (-42, -49, and -57%, respectively). FB also had shorter LS than males at 0, 40, and 80 mg/kg (-60, -86, and -73%, respectively). FB were older than VS (286 ± 10 days vs. 128 ± 5 days) and weighed more than VS (299 ± 2.7 g vs. 272 ± 2.1 g). Males tested were younger (88 ± 2 days), heavier (340 ± 4.5 g), and gained more weight postoperatively (7.2 ± 1.6 g) than either VS (-0.4 ± 1.5 g) or FB (-1.6 ± 1.5 g); however, LS correlated poorly with age, body mass, change in body mass, and estrus cycle phase. We hypothesize that differences in sex hormones underlie females' higher susceptibility to CNS-OT than males.

  9. Sexual trauma and the female brain.

    PubMed

    Shors, Tracey J; Millon, Emma M

    2016-04-01

    Sexual aggression and violence against women (VAM) are not only social problems; they are mental health problems. Women who experience sexual trauma often express disruptions in emotional and cognitive processes, some of which lead to depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Animal models of neurogenesis and learning suggest that social yet aggressive interactions between a pubescent female and an adult male can disrupt processes of learning related to maternal care, which in turn reduce survival of new neurons in the female hippocampus. Mental and Physical (MAP) Training is a novel clinical intervention that was translated from neurogenesis research. The intervention, which combines meditation and aerobic exercise, is currently being used to help women learn to recover from traumatic life experiences, especially those related to sexual violence and abuse. PMID:27085856

  10. Sexual trauma and the female brain.

    PubMed

    Shors, Tracey J; Millon, Emma M

    2016-04-01

    Sexual aggression and violence against women (VAM) are not only social problems; they are mental health problems. Women who experience sexual trauma often express disruptions in emotional and cognitive processes, some of which lead to depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Animal models of neurogenesis and learning suggest that social yet aggressive interactions between a pubescent female and an adult male can disrupt processes of learning related to maternal care, which in turn reduce survival of new neurons in the female hippocampus. Mental and Physical (MAP) Training is a novel clinical intervention that was translated from neurogenesis research. The intervention, which combines meditation and aerobic exercise, is currently being used to help women learn to recover from traumatic life experiences, especially those related to sexual violence and abuse.

  11. Aspartame and the rat brain monoaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Perego, C; De Simoni, M G; Fodritto, F; Raimondi, L; Diomede, L; Salmona, M; Algeri, S; Garattini, S

    1988-12-01

    A high dose of aspartame (APM) was administered to rats to study possible effects on brain monoaminergic systems. APM and its metabolite phenylalanine (Phe) were given orally at doses of 1000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Significant increases were seen in brain Phe and tyrosine (Tyr) levels. Two different approaches were used to study monoaminergic systems: whole tissue measurements by HPLC-ED and in vivo voltammetry in freely moving rats. Dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were taken as indexes of neuronal activity. In spite of the high dose used, no modification was found in monoamines or their metabolites in striatum, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens.

  12. Primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma with brain metastasis in a female patient.

    PubMed

    Kuno, I; Matsumoto, Y; Kasai, M; Fukuda, T; Hashiguchi, Y; Ichimura, T; Yasui, T; Sumi, T

    2016-01-01

    Nongestational choriocarcinoma is very rare and carries a poor prognosis in female patients. In this report, the authors present a case of nongestational choriocarcinoma with brain metastasis in a female. A 58-year-old female with intermittent back pain was referred to a private hospital. On examination, a mediastinal tumor and a pancreatic tumor were detected. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of the tumor was performed for histological evaluation. Pathological diagnosis was difficult because only a small amount of tissue was collected. Head MRI showed multiple metastatic tumors in the brain. The patient was diagnosed with primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma with brain metastasis. She was treated with one course of an etoposide, methotrexate, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide, and vincristine regimen, but her general condition gradually deteriorated, and she died on day 41. Nongestational choriocarcinoma is drug resistant, whereas gestational choriocarcinoma has better chemotherapeutic sensitivity. PMID:27172760

  13. Estradiol increases salt intake in female normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kensicki, Eric; Dunphy, Gail; Ely, Daniel

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether or not estradiol (E2) alters sodium intake in hypertensive and normotensive female rats. It was hypothesized that higher doses of E2 would increase sodium consumption and that this response would be greater in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) compared with Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. The study involved female SHR and WKY (n = 12/group). All animals were ovariectomized. Six of twelve rats from each strain received three progressively larger doses of beta-estradiol propionate (each dose lasting 2 wk), whereas the other six rats from each strain received sham implants. Blood E2 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay after each 2-wk period, allowing a 10-day washout period before the next E2 dose. Rats had access to 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% NaCl solutions to drink throughout the experiment. There was a significant positive correlation between sodium intake and plasma E2 (r = 0.8, P < 0.001). Both strains avoided the 1.5% NaCl, and the increased sodium intake was achieved by an increase in consumption of the 0.5% NaCl. SHR females consumed more sodium than WKY females, which is similar to what has been observed in males of these strains. In conclusion, E2 was positively correlated with sodium intake in both strains of rat, with the hypertensive rats consuming more sodium than the normotensive rats.

  14. Serotonergic projections from the caudal raphe nuclei to the hypoglossal nucleus in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jessica R.; Thomas, Cathy F.; Behan, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory control system is sexually dimorphic. In many brain regions, including respiratory motor nuclei, serotonin (5HT) levels are higher in females than in males. We hypothesized that there could be sex differences in 5HT input to the hypoglossal nucleus, a region of the brainstem involved in upper airway control. Adult Fischer 344 rats were anesthetized and a retrograde transsynaptic neuroanatomical tracer, Bartha pseudorabies virus (PRV), was injected into the tongue. Sections through the medulla were reacted immunocytochemically for the presence of (i) PRV, (ii) tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH; marker of 5HT neurons), (iii) PRV combined with TPH, and (iv) 5HT. Sex hormone levels were measured in female rats and correlated with TPH immunoreactivity, as hypoglossal 5HT levels vary with the estrous cycle. The number of PRV neurons was comparable in male and female rats. The number and distribution of TPH immunoreactive neurons in the caudal raphe nuclei were similar in male and female rats. The subset of 5HT neurons that innervate hypoglossal motoneurons was also similar in male and female rats. With the exception of the ventrolateral region of the hypoglossal nucleus, 5HT immunoreactivity was similar in male and female rats. These data suggest that sex differences in 5HT modulation of hypoglossal motoneurons in male and female rats are not the result of sex differences in TPH or 5HT, but may result from differences in neurotransmitter release and reuptake, location of 5HT synaptic terminals on hypoglossal motoneurons, pre- and postsynaptic 5HT receptor expression, or the distribution of sex hormone receptors on hypoglossal or caudal raphe neurons. PMID:19073285

  15. "Sexy stimulants": the interaction between psychomotor stimulants and sexual behavior in the female brain.

    PubMed

    Guarraci, Fay A; Bolton, Jessica L

    2014-06-01

    Research indicates gender differences in sensitivity to psychomotor stimulants. Preclinical work investigating the interaction between drugs of abuse and sex-specific behaviors, such as sexual behavior, is critical to our understanding of such gender differences in humans. A number of behavioral paradigms can be used to model aspects of human sexual behavior in animal subjects. Although traditional assessment of the reflexive, lordosis posture of the female rat has been used to map the neuroanatomical and neurochemical systems that contribute to uniquely female copulatory behavior, the additional behavioral paradigms discussed in the current review have helped us expand our description of the appetitive and consummatory patterns of sexual behavior in the female rat. Measuring appetitive behavior is particularly important for assessing sexual motivation, the equivalent of "desire" in humans. By investigating the effects of commonly abused drugs on female sexual motivation, we are beginning to elucidate the role of dopaminergic neurotransmission, a neural system also known to be critical to the neurobiology of drug addiction, in female sexual motivation. A better understanding of the nexus of sex and drugs in the female brain will help advance our understanding of motivation in general and explain how psychomotor stimulants affect males and females differently.

  16. "Sexy stimulants": the interaction between psychomotor stimulants and sexual behavior in the female brain.

    PubMed

    Guarraci, Fay A; Bolton, Jessica L

    2014-06-01

    Research indicates gender differences in sensitivity to psychomotor stimulants. Preclinical work investigating the interaction between drugs of abuse and sex-specific behaviors, such as sexual behavior, is critical to our understanding of such gender differences in humans. A number of behavioral paradigms can be used to model aspects of human sexual behavior in animal subjects. Although traditional assessment of the reflexive, lordosis posture of the female rat has been used to map the neuroanatomical and neurochemical systems that contribute to uniquely female copulatory behavior, the additional behavioral paradigms discussed in the current review have helped us expand our description of the appetitive and consummatory patterns of sexual behavior in the female rat. Measuring appetitive behavior is particularly important for assessing sexual motivation, the equivalent of "desire" in humans. By investigating the effects of commonly abused drugs on female sexual motivation, we are beginning to elucidate the role of dopaminergic neurotransmission, a neural system also known to be critical to the neurobiology of drug addiction, in female sexual motivation. A better understanding of the nexus of sex and drugs in the female brain will help advance our understanding of motivation in general and explain how psychomotor stimulants affect males and females differently. PMID:24269964

  17. Age-related differences in the toxicity of ochratoxin A in female rats.

    PubMed

    Dortant, P M; Peters-Volleberg, G W; Van Loveren, H; Marquardt, R R; Speijers, G J

    2001-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin found in food and feedstuffs of plant and animal origin. OTA exposure is related to nephropathy in humans. Age-related differences, especially in nephro- and immunotoxicity of OTA, were investigated in young adult (aged 12 weeks) and old (aged 27-30 months) female SPF Wag rats, treated by gavage with 0, 0.07, 0.34 or 1.68 mg OTA/kg body weight for 4 weeks. In both age groups, survival was significantly decreased in the highest dose group. Clinical condition, body weight, clinical chemistry parameters (ALAT, ASAT, creatinin and urea) and target organs (as identified by weight and pathology - kidney, liver, adrenals, forestomach and brain) were affected by age and dose, but often more severely in old than in young rats. OTA induced primarily nephropathy. Old rats were more sensitive to induction of tubular karyomegaly and vacuolation/necrosis. In young rats, OTA induced a dose-related thickening of the basement membrane and reduction in splenic T-cell fraction. Decreased IgG levels were seen at 0.34 mg/kg OTA (young and old rats) and 1.68 mg/kg OTA (young rats). Vacuolation of the white brain matter (cerebellar medulla and ventral parts of the brain stem) was significantly increased in young rats at 0.34 and 1.68 mg/kg OTA and in old rats at 0.07 and 0.34 mg/kg OTA. It was concluded that: (1) the profiles of OTA toxicity for both age groups are similar, with the kidney and possibly the brain being primary target organs; (2) based on clinical and pathological data old rats are more sensitive to OTA than young rats; and (3) the immune system is probably not the primary target of OTA toxicity.

  18. High alcohol intake in female Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Loi, Barbara; Colombo, Giancarlo; Maccioni, Paola; Carai, Mauro A M; Franconi, Flavia; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2014-06-01

    Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats have been selectively bred for high alcohol preference and consumption. When exposed to the standard, home cage 2-bottle "alcohol (10%, v/v) vs. water" choice regimen with continuous access, male sP rats consume daily approximately 6 g/kg alcohol. Conversely, when exposed to the intermittent (once every other day) access to 2 bottles containing alcohol (20%, v/v) and water, respectively, male sP rats display marked increases in daily alcohol intake and signs of alcohol intoxication and "behavioral" dependence. The present study was designed to assess alcohol intake in female sP rats exposed, under the 2-bottle choice regimen, to (a) 10% (v/v) alcohol with continuous access (CA10%), (b) 10% (v/v) alcohol with intermittent access (IA10%), (c) 20% (v/v) alcohol with continuous access (CA20%), and (d) 20% (v/v) alcohol with intermittent access (IA20%). Male sP rats (exposed to CA10% and IA20% conditions) were included for comparison. Over 20 daily drinking sessions, daily alcohol intake in female CA10% and IA20% rats averaged 7.0 and 9.6 g/kg, respectively. The rank of alcohol intake was IA20% > IA10% = CA20% > CA10%. Conversely, daily alcohol intake in male CA10% and IA20% rats averaged 6.0 and 8.2 g/kg, respectively. Comparison of female and male rats yielded the following rank of alcohol intake: female IA20% > male IA20% > female CA10% ≥ male CA10%. An additional experiment found that alcohol drinking during the first hour of the drinking session produced mean blood alcohol levels of 35-40 mg% and 85-100 mg% in the CA10% and IA20% rats, respectively. These results (a) extend to female sP rats previous data demonstrating the capacity of the IA20% condition to markedly escalate alcohol drinking, and (b) demonstrate that female sP rats consume more alcohol than male sP rats. This sex difference is more evident under the IA20% condition, suggesting that female sP rats are highly sensitive to the promoting effect

  19. Effects of high frequency noise on female rat's multi-organ histology.

    PubMed

    Xue, Laijun; Zhang, Dajun; Wang, Ting; Shou, Xi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathological damage of high-frequency stable noise exposure on the brain, heart, liver, and spleen of female rat's. Controlled animal intervention study. Twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into experimental and control groups with 10 rats in each group. Rats in the experimental group were exposed to continuous high-frequency stable noise for 2 weeks (3 h/day)followed by the pathological damages in the rat's brain, heart, liver, and spleen were compared with those of the control group. After 2 weeks' continuous exposure to high-frequency stable noise, compared with the control group, the most prominent histopathologic changes in the brain tissue structures of the experimental group included loose disorder, hyperemia, edema, blood vessels expand, glial cell hyperplasia, mild atypia in some areas (hyperchromatic nuclei, irregular karyotype), and no degeneration and necrosis. There were dilatation and congestion of central vein, hepatic sinus, and interlobular veins of liver tissue. The structure of hepatic lobule was destroyed by inflammatory cell infiltration, as well as lymphoid nodule formation. There was hyperemia in spleen, but the structure was clear. There was extravasated blood, and the splenic sinuses were highly expanded by a blood clot. Hyperplasias of the lymphoid of white pulp were also active. There was dilation and congestion in myocardial interstitial vascular, and there was mild degeneration and hyperemia in myocardial cells. No hemorrhage and myocardial necrosis were observed. High-frequency stable noise can cause pathological damage in brain, liver, spleen, and heart tissues of female rat at a various degree.

  20. Environmental enrichment promotes robust functional and histological benefits in female rats after controlled cortical impact injury.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Christina M; Mattiola, Vincent V; Folweiler, Kaitlin A; Tay, Justin K; Yelleswarapu, Narayana K; Curatolo, Lauren M; Matter, Ashley M; Cheng, Jeffrey P; Kline, Anthony E

    2013-09-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) consistently induces marked benefits in male rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but whether similar efficacy extends to females is not well established. Hence, the aim of this study was to reassess the effect of EE on functional and histological outcome in female rats after brain trauma. Twenty-four normal cycling adult female rats underwent verification of estrous stage prior to controlled cortical impact (CCI) or sham injury and then were assigned to EE or standard (STD) housing. Motor function was assessed with beam-balance/beam-walk and rotarod tasks on post-operative days 1-5 and every other day from 1-19, respectively. Spatial learning/memory was evaluated in a Morris water maze on days 14-19. Morphologically intact hippocampal CA(1/3) cells and cortical lesion volume were quantified 3 weeks after injury. No differences were observed between the EE and STD sham groups in any endpoint measure and thus the data were pooled. In the TBI groups, EE improved beam-balance, beam-walk, rotarod, and spatial learning performance vs. STD (p's<0.05). EE also provided significant histological protection as confirmed by increased CA(1/3) cell survival and decreased cortical lesion size vs. STD. These data demonstrate that EE confers robust benefits in female rats after CCI injury, which parallels numerous studies in males and lends further credence for EE as a preclinical model of neurorehabilitation.

  1. Environmental enrichment promotes robust functional and histological benefits in female rats after controlled cortical impact injury.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Christina M; Mattiola, Vincent V; Folweiler, Kaitlin A; Tay, Justin K; Yelleswarapu, Narayana K; Curatolo, Lauren M; Matter, Ashley M; Cheng, Jeffrey P; Kline, Anthony E

    2013-09-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) consistently induces marked benefits in male rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but whether similar efficacy extends to females is not well established. Hence, the aim of this study was to reassess the effect of EE on functional and histological outcome in female rats after brain trauma. Twenty-four normal cycling adult female rats underwent verification of estrous stage prior to controlled cortical impact (CCI) or sham injury and then were assigned to EE or standard (STD) housing. Motor function was assessed with beam-balance/beam-walk and rotarod tasks on post-operative days 1-5 and every other day from 1-19, respectively. Spatial learning/memory was evaluated in a Morris water maze on days 14-19. Morphologically intact hippocampal CA(1/3) cells and cortical lesion volume were quantified 3 weeks after injury. No differences were observed between the EE and STD sham groups in any endpoint measure and thus the data were pooled. In the TBI groups, EE improved beam-balance, beam-walk, rotarod, and spatial learning performance vs. STD (p's<0.05). EE also provided significant histological protection as confirmed by increased CA(1/3) cell survival and decreased cortical lesion size vs. STD. These data demonstrate that EE confers robust benefits in female rats after CCI injury, which parallels numerous studies in males and lends further credence for EE as a preclinical model of neurorehabilitation. PMID:23333563

  2. 17β-estradiol replacement in young, adult and middle-aged female ovariectomized rats promotes improvement of spatial reference memory and an antidepressant effect and alters monoamines and BDNF levels in memory- and depression-related brain areas.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Agata; Delattre, Ana Márcia; Pereira, Sofia I R; Carolino, Ruither G; Szawka, Raphael E; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Zanata, Sílvio M; Ferraz, Anete C

    2012-02-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggest that estrogens have a major impact on cognition, presenting neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions in regions involved in such function. In opposite, some studies indicate that certain hormone therapy regimens may provoke detrimental effects over female cognitive and neurological function. Therefore, we decided to investigate how estrogen treatment would influence cognition and depression in different ages. For that matter, this study assessed the effects of chronic 17β-estradiol treatment over cognition and depressive-like behaviors of young (3 months old), adult (7 months old) and middle-aged (12 months old) reproductive female Wistar rats. These functions were also correlated with alterations in the serotonergic system, as well as hippocampal BDNF. 17β-Estradiol treatment did not influence animals' locomotor activity and exploratory behavior, but it was able to improve the performance of adult and middle-aged rats in the Morris water maze, the latter being more responsive to the treatment. Young and adult rats displayed decreased immobility time in the forced swimming test, suggesting an effect of 17β-estradiol also over such depressive-like behavior. This same test revealed increased swimming behavior, triggered by serotonergic pathway, in adult rats. Neurochemical evaluations indicated that 17β-estradiol treatment was able to increase serotonin turnover rate in the hippocampus of adult rats. Interestingly, estrogen treatment increased BDNF levels from animals of all ages. These findings support the notion that the beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol over spatial reference memory and depressive-like behavior are evident only when hormone therapy occurs at early ages and early stages of hormonal decline.

  3. Social transmission of Pavlovian fear: fear-conditioning by-proxy in related female rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carolyn E; Riha, Penny D; Gore, Andrea C; Monfils, Marie-H

    2014-05-01

    Pairing a previously neutral conditioned stimulus (CS; e.g., a tone) to an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US; e.g., a foot-shock) leads to associative learning such that the tone alone will elicit a conditioned response (e.g., freezing). Individuals can also acquire fear from a social context, such as through observing the fear expression of a conspecific. In the current study, we examined the influence of kinship/familiarity on social transmission of fear in female rats. Rats were housed in triads with either sisters or non-related females. One rat from each cage was fear conditioned to a tone CS+ shock US. On day two, the conditioned rat was returned to the chamber accompanied by one of her cage mates. Both rats were allowed to behave freely, while the tone was played in the absence of the foot-shock. The previously untrained rat is referred to as the fear-conditioned by-proxy (FCbP) animal, as she would freeze based on observations of her cage-mate's response rather than due to direct personal experience with the foot-shock. The third rat served as a cage-mate control. The third day, long-term memory tests to the CS were performed. Consistent with our previous application of this paradigm in male rats (Bruchey et al. in Behav Brain Res 214(1):80-84, 2010), our results revealed that social interactions between the fear conditioned and FCbP rats on day two contribute to freezing displayed by the FCbP rats on day three. In this experiment, prosocial behavior occurring at the termination of the cue on day two was significantly greater between sisters than their non-sister counterparts, and this behavior resulted in increased freezing on day three. Our results suggest that familiarity and/or kinship influences the social transmission of fear in female rats.

  4. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  5. Laser scattering by transcranial rat brain illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2012-06-01

    Due to the great number of applications of Low-Level-Laser-Therapy (LLLT) in Central Nervous System (CNS), the study of light penetration through skull and distribution in the brain becomes extremely important. The aim is to analyze the possibility of precise illumination of deep regions of the rat brain, measure the penetration and distribution of red (λ = 660 nm) and Near Infra-Red (NIR) (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light and compare optical properties of brain structures. The head of the animal (Rattus Novergicus) was epilated and divided by a sagittal cut, 2.3 mm away from mid plane. This section of rat's head was illuminated with red and NIR lasers in points above three anatomical structures: hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal cortex. A high resolution camera, perpendicularly positioned, was used to obtain images of the brain structures. Profiles of scattered intensities in the laser direction were obtained from the images. There is a peak in the scattered light profile corresponding to the skin layer. The bone layer gives rise to a valley in the profile indicating low scattering coefficient, or frontal scattering. Another peak in the region related to the brain is an indication of high scattering coefficient (μs) for this tissue. This work corroborates the use of transcranial LLLT in studies with rats which are subjected to models of CNS diseases. The outcomes of this study point to the possibility of transcranial LLLT in humans for a large number of diseases.

  6. Looking for sexual selection in the female brain.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Molly E

    2012-08-19

    Female mate choice behaviour has significant evolutionary consequences, yet its mechanistic origins are not fully understood. Recent studies of female sensory systems have made great strides in identifying internal mechanisms governing female preferences. Only recently, however, have we begun to identify the dynamic genomic response associated with mate choice behaviour. Poeciliids provide a powerful comparative system to examine genomic responses governing mate choice and female preference behaviour, given the great range of mating systems: from female mate choice taxa with ornamental courting males to species lacking male ornamentation and exhibiting only male coercion. Furthermore, they exhibit laboratory-tractable preference responses without sexual contact that are decoupled from reproductive state, allowing investigators to isolate mechanisms in the brain without physiological confounds. Early investigations with poeciliid species (Xiphophorus nigrensis and Gambusia affinis) have identified putative candidate genes associated with female preference response and highlight a possible genomic pathway underlying female social interactions with males linked functionally with synaptic plasticity and learning processes. This network is positively correlated with female preference behaviour in the female mate choice species, but appears inhibited in the male coercive species. This behavioural genomics approach provides opportunity to elucidate the fundamental building blocks, and evolutionary dynamics, of sexual selection.

  7. Experimental gastritis leads to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in female but not male rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jia; Wang, Tao; Liang, Shan; Hu, Xu; Li, Wei; Jin, Feng

    2013-12-17

    Human and animals studies support the idea that there is a gender-related co-morbidity of pain-related and inflammatory gastrointestinal (GI) diseases with psychological disorders. This co-morbidity is the evidence for the existence of GI-brain axis which consists of immune (cytokines), neural (vagus nerve) and neuroendocrine (HPA axis) pathways. Psychological stress causes disturbances in GI physiology, such as altered GI barrier function, changes in motility and secretion, development of visceral hypersensitivity, and dysfunction of inflammatory responses. Whether GI inflammation would exert impact on psychological behavior is not well established. We examined the effect of experimental gastritis on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, and evaluated potential mechanisms of action. Gastritis was induced by adding 0.1% (w/v) iodoacetamide (IAA) to the sterile drinking water for 7 days. Sucrose preference test assessed the depression-like behavior, open field test and elevated plus maze evaluated the anxiety-like behavior. IAA treatment induced gastric inflammation in rats of either gender. No behavioral abnormality or dysfunction of GI-brain axis was observed in male rats with IAA-induced gastritis. Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors were apparent and the HPA axis was hyperactive in female rats with IAA-induced gastritis. Our results show that gastric inflammation leads to anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in female but not male rats via the neuroendocrine (HPA axis) pathway, suggesting that the GI inflammation can impair normal brain function and induce changes in psychological behavior in a gender-related manner through the GI-to-brain signaling.

  8. Visuospatial asymmetries and interocular transfer in the split-brain rat.

    PubMed

    Adelstein, A; Crowne, D P

    1991-06-01

    Interocular transfer (IOT), hemispheric superiority, and cerebral dominance were examined in split-brain female albino rats. Callosum-sectioned and intact animals were monocularly trained in the Morris water maze and tested in IOT and reversal phases. In the IOT phase, split-brain rats entered more nontarget quadrants and headed less accurately toward the platform than did controls. For both split-brain animals and controls, right-eye training resulted in shorter latencies and fewer nontarget entries than did left-eye training. Analyses of cerebral dominance showed shorter latencies and smaller heading errors over all 3 phases in rats that were trained with the nondominant eye. Right-eye dominant controls were less affected by platform reversal. Split-brain rats were inferior to controls in latency to find the platform and in target quadrant entries. This finding establishes a spatial cognitive deficit from callosum section.

  9. Regulation of sexual odor preference by sex steroids in the posterodorsal medial amygdala in female rats.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masaya; Nitta, Asano; Chiba, Atsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Our previous study in male rats demonstrated that bilateral administration of flutamide, an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, into the posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) increased the time sniffing male odors to as high as that sniffing estrous odors, eliminating the preference for estrous odors over male odors. This made us speculate that under blockade of AR in the MePD, testosterone-derived estrogen acting on the same brain region arouses interest in male odors which is otherwise suppressed by concomitant action of androgen. In cyclic female rats, endogenous androgen has been thought to be involved in inhibitory regulation of estrogen-activated sexual behavior. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the possibility that in female rats the arousal of interest in male odors is also normally regulated by both estrogen and androgen acting on the MePD, as predicted by our previous study in male rats. Implantation of either the estrogen receptor blocker tamoxifen (TX) or a non-aromatizable androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) into the MePD of ovariectomized, estrogen-primed female rats eliminated preference for male odors over estrous odors by significantly decreasing the time sniffing male odors to as low as that sniffing estrous odors. The subsequent odor discrimination tests confirmed that the DHT and TX administration did not impair the ability to discriminate between male and estrous odors. These results suggest that in estrous female rats estrogen action in the MePD plays critical roles in the expression of the preference for male odors while androgen action in the same brain region interferes with the estrogen action. PMID:27178578

  10. Possible mechanism for accelerated atherogenesis in male versus female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Staprans, I.; Felts, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    Dietary fat and cholesterol enter the circulation as chylomicrons. They are removed from the circulation by attachment to lipoprotein lipase located on the endothelial surfaces. As the result of lipoprotein lipase action, chylomicrons are partially hydrolyzed and then reenter the circulation as remnants, which are rapidly cleared by the liver. We investigated the fate of /sup 3/H-retinol- and /sup 14/C-cholesterol-labeled chylomicrons injected into male and female rats. The disappearance curves of chylomicrons from the circulation were not significantly different in males and females, which suggests that translocation from plasma to endothelium is similar for both sexes. However, in male rats, the dwell time of chylomicrons on the endothelium was significantly prolonged. At 10 and 20 minutes after chylomicron injection, more label was found in the livers of female than male rats. The opposite was true for hearts. Male hearts contained significantly more endothelium-bound chylomicrons when compared with female hearts. This increase in dwell time may allow greater cholesterol deposition in the endothelium of male rats. The more rapid processing of chylomicrons was associated with a 300% greater postheparin lipoprotein lipase in female rats, which suggests a greater enzyme density at chylomicron attachment points on endothelium.

  11. Exposure to PCB 77 affects partner preference but not sexual behavior in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J A; Clemens, L G; Nunez, A A

    2008-10-20

    In rats, exposure to the polychlorinated biphenyl congener 3, 4, 3', 4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77) affects the brain and behavior of the offspring as well as the maternal behavior of the dams. In the present study, a cross-fostering design was used to examine the effects of pre- and/or postnatal exposure to PCB 77 on sexual behavior and partner preference in female rats, and to determine the role of altered maternal behavior in the mediation of these effects. Pregnant rats were treated with oil or PCB dissolved in oil (2 mg/kg b.w.) on gestation days 6-18 and then given pups that had been exposed to either the oil vehicle or PCB during gestation. As adults, the female offspring were tested for partner preference (that is, whether they preferred to spend time with a sexually receptive female or a sexually active male) and sexual behavior. None of the treatments affected female sexual behavior. However, both double exposure and postnatal exposure diminished the animals' preference for a male over a female stimulus, but partner preference was not affected by prenatal exposure alone. There were no significant correlations between the changes in partner preferences due to PCB exposure and the amount of maternal grooming and licking received by the treated litters. Thus, female partner preference is affected by early PCB exposure, and the effects depend upon whether the exposure is in utero or via lactation and may be independent of any effects of the PCB on maternal care.

  12. Sexual experience modulates partner preference and mPOA nitric oxide synthase in female rats.

    PubMed

    Meerts, Sarah H; Park, Jin Hong; Sekhawat, Ria

    2016-10-01

    Sexually experienced female rats return to the male more quickly after intromissions, exhibit shorter interintromission intervals, and spend more time with the male rat during a test of paced mating behavior in comparison to naïve rats. The present study tested whether these changes reflect heightened sexual motivation independent of receipt of vaginocervical stimulation and/or neurochemical changes in the medial preoptic area (mPOA). Ovariectomized, female rats were given estradiol benzoate and progesterone, and then received either 6 paced mating encounters (experienced) or 6 control exposures to an empty paced mating arena (naïve). Experienced and naïve rats received a no-contact partner preference test under oil vehicle and then under hormone on a different day. Hormonal status and sexual experience led to significantly higher preference for the male. Brains were collected 1 hr after both experienced and naïve rats received paced mating to compare mPOA levels of Fos, a marker of neural activity, in response to copulation and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for production of nitric oxide (NO). Expression of NOS was higher in experienced relative to naïve rats, whereas Fos was comparable between the groups. The data are consistent with the idea that both sexual motivation and changes to the mPOA contribute to the shift in paced mating behavior induced by sexual experience. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Sexual experience modulates partner preference and mPOA nitric oxide synthase in female rats.

    PubMed

    Meerts, Sarah H; Park, Jin Hong; Sekhawat, Ria

    2016-10-01

    Sexually experienced female rats return to the male more quickly after intromissions, exhibit shorter interintromission intervals, and spend more time with the male rat during a test of paced mating behavior in comparison to naïve rats. The present study tested whether these changes reflect heightened sexual motivation independent of receipt of vaginocervical stimulation and/or neurochemical changes in the medial preoptic area (mPOA). Ovariectomized, female rats were given estradiol benzoate and progesterone, and then received either 6 paced mating encounters (experienced) or 6 control exposures to an empty paced mating arena (naïve). Experienced and naïve rats received a no-contact partner preference test under oil vehicle and then under hormone on a different day. Hormonal status and sexual experience led to significantly higher preference for the male. Brains were collected 1 hr after both experienced and naïve rats received paced mating to compare mPOA levels of Fos, a marker of neural activity, in response to copulation and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for production of nitric oxide (NO). Expression of NOS was higher in experienced relative to naïve rats, whereas Fos was comparable between the groups. The data are consistent with the idea that both sexual motivation and changes to the mPOA contribute to the shift in paced mating behavior induced by sexual experience. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27657310

  14. Biotransformation of norcocaine to norcocaine nitroxide by rat brain microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kloss, M W; Rosen, G M; Rauckman, E J

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 1970's, norcocaine was identified as a metabolite of cocaine in rat brain tissue. We extend these studies by demonstrating that rat brain FAD-containing monooxygenase metabolizes norcocaine to N-hydroxynorcocaine. This hydroxylamine is then further oxidized to the nitroxyl free radical norcocaine nitroxide by rat brain cytochrome P-450. Brain microsomal reduction of norcocaine nitroxide leads to the generation of superoxide. Finally, incubation of rat brain microsomes with either N-hydroxynorcocaine or norcocaine nitroxide leads to significant lipid peroxidation as monitored by spin-trapping techniques.

  15. Juvenile play conditions sexual partner preference in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Ramos, Pedro; Miquel, Marta; Manzo, Jorge; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2011-10-24

    Rats can display a conditioned partner preference for individuals that bear an odor previously associated with sexual reward. Herein we tested the possibility that odors associated with the reward induced by social play in prepubescent rats would induce a conditioned partner preference in adulthood. Two groups of 31-day-old, single-housed female rats were formed, and were given daily 30-min periods of social play with scented females. In one group, almond scent was paired with juvenile play during conditioning trials, whereas lemon scent functioned as a novel odor in the final test. The counterbalanced group received the opposite association. At age 42, females were tested for play partner preference with two males, one almond-scented and one lemon-scented. In both groups females displayed a play partner preference only for males scented with the paired odor. They were ovariectomized, hormone-primed, and at age 55 were tested for sexual partner preference with two scented stud males. Females displayed a sexual preference towards males scented with the paired odor as observed with more visits, solicitations, hops and darts, intromissions and ejaculations. These results indicate that olfactory stimuli paired with juvenile play affects later partner choice for play as well as for sex in female rats.

  16. Binge drinking differentially affects adolescent male and female brain morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Squeglia, Lindsay M.; Sorg, Scott F.; Schweinsburg, Alecia Dager; Wetherill, Reagan R.; Pulido, Carmen; Tapert, Susan F.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Adolescent binge drinking is concerning, as important neurodevelopments occur during this stage. Previous research suggests that binge drinking may disrupt typical brain development, and females may be particularly vulnerable. Objectives We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine cortical thickness in adolescent females and males with and without histories of binge drinking. Methods Participants (N=59) were 16–19-year-old adolescents recruited from local schools. Recent binge drinkers (n=29, 48% female) were matched to non-drinkers (n=30, 50% female) on age, gender, pubertal development, and familial alcoholism. Participants completed a neuropsychological battery and MRI session. Cortical surfaces were reconstructed with FreeSurfer. Results Binge × gender interactions (p<.05) were seen for cortical thickness in four left frontal regions: frontal pole, pars orbitalis, medial orbital frontal, and rostral anterior cingulate. For all interactions, female bingers had thicker cortices than female controls, while male bingers had thinner cortices than male controls. Thicker left frontal cortices corresponded with poorer visuospatial, inhibition, and attention performances for female bingers (r=−0.69 to 0.50, p<0.05) and worse attention for male bingers (r=−0.69, p=0.005). Conclusions Adolescent females with recent binge drinking showed ~8% thicker cortices in left frontal regions than demographically similar female non-drinkers, which was linked to worse visuospatial, inhibition, and attention performances. In contrast, adolescent binge-drinking males showed ~7% thinner cortices in these areas than non-drinking males. These cross-sectional data suggest either different gray matter risk factors for males as for females toward developing heavy drinking, or differential adverse sequelae. PMID:21952669

  17. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  18. Regional Volume Decreases in the Brain of Pax6 Heterozygous Mutant Rats: MRI Deformation-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Kotaro; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kikkawa, Takako; Kawashima, Ryuta; Osumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Pax6 is a transcription factor that pleiotropically regulates various developmental processes in the central nervous system. In a previous study, we revealed that Pax6 heterozygous mutant (rSey2/+) adult rats exhibit abnormalities in social interaction. However, the brain malformations underlying the behavioral abnormality are unknown. To elucidate the brain malformations in rSey2/+ rats, we morphometrically analyzed brains of rSey2/+ and wild type rats using small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixty 10-week-old rats underwent brain MRI (29 rSey2/+ rats and 31 wild type rats). SPM8 software was used for image preprocessing and statistical image analysis. Normalized maps of the Jacobian determinant, a parameter for the expansion and/or contraction of brain regions, were obtained for each rat. rSey2/+ rats showed significant volume decreases in various brain regions including the neocortex, corpus callosum, olfactory structures, hippocampal formation, diencephalon, and midbrain compared to wild type rats. Among brain regions, the anterior commissure showed significant interaction between genotype and sex, indicating the effect of genotype difference on the anterior commissure volume was more robust in females than in males. The rSey2/+ rats exhibited decreased volume in various gray and white matter regions of the brain, which may contribute to manifestation of abnormal social behaviors. PMID:27355350

  19. Prenatal stimulation and postnatal testosterone affects infanticide in female rats.

    PubMed

    Miley, W M; Blustein, J; Kennedy, K

    1982-04-01

    Prenatal handling, prenatal stress, and early postnatal exogeneous testosterone were examined in female rats for their effects on rat pup-killing and pup retrieval. During each of the last 5 days of pregnancy. Long-Evans rats received either 3 minutes of handling, 45 minutes of restraint and intense illumination or remained untouched. Half of the offspring of each group received testosterone from Day 1 after birth to Day 30. In adulthood, animals that received handling prenatally and testosterone postnatally killed pups more rapidly than any other group and a larger proportion did so than in the control groups. Animals not manipulated at any time retrieved pups more rapidly and a larger proportion did so than the combined other groups. The study suggests that prenatal handling interacts with testosterone presented immediately postnatally to increase infanticide in female rats. A variety of perinatal manipulations seem to suppress pup retrieval. PMID:7200619

  20. Fos expression in brain stem nuclei of pregnant rats after hydralazine-induced hypotension.

    PubMed

    Curtis, K S; Cunningham, J T; Heesch, C M

    1999-08-01

    Fos and dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity were evaluated in the brain stems of 21-day pregnant and virgin female rats injected with either hydralazine (HDZ; 10 mg/kg iv) or vehicle. HDZ produced significant hypotension in both groups, although baseline blood pressure was lower in pregnant rats (96 +/- 2.5 mmHg) than in virgin female rats (121 +/- 2.8 mmHg). There were no differences in Fos immunoreactivity in the brain stems of pregnant and virgin female rats after vehicle treatment. HDZ-induced hypotension significantly increased Fos expression in both groups; however, the magnitude of the increases differed in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVL), the area postrema (AP), and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL). Fos expression after HDZ in pregnant rats was augmented in noncatecholaminergic neurons of the CVL but was attenuated in the AP and in noncatecholaminergic neurons in the RVL. These results are consistent with differences in the sympathetic response to hypotension between pregnant and virgin female rats and indicate that the central response to hypotension may be different in pregnant rats.

  1. Ovariectomy does not attenuate aggression by primiparous lactating female rats.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1992-12-01

    Nulliparous female hooded rats were allowed to cohabit with a sexually active male in a large living cage. Aggression toward an unfamiliar female was assessed during the second and third week of pregnancy. Within 12 to 24 h following parturition females were ovariectomized (n = 7) or sham-ovariectomized (n = 6) in a manner that balanced previous aggression scores. Aggression was assessed at 48 h following ovariectomy and at three weekly intervals thereafter. Ovariectomized and sham-ovariectomized females did not differ in the number of attacks, number of bites, duration of on-top, or frequency of piloerection on any test day following parturition. These results indicate that circulating levels of ovarian steroids do not influence the level of aggression by a primiparous lactating female toward an unfamiliar female conspecific.

  2. The influence of sleep deprivation and obesity on DNA damage in female Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio, Neuli M.; Ribeiro, Daniel A.; Alvarenga, Tathiana A.; Fracalossi, Ana Carolina C.; Carlin, Viviane; Hirotsu, Camila; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate overall genetic damage induced by total sleep deprivation in obese, female Zucker rats of differing ages. METHOD: Lean and obese Zucker rats at 3, 6, and 15 months old were randomly distributed into two groups for each age group: home-cage control and sleep-deprived (N = 5/group). The sleep-deprived groups were deprived sleep by gentle handling for 6 hours, whereas the home-cage control group was allowed to remain undisturbed in their home-cage. At the end of the sleep deprivation period, or after an equivalent amount of time for the home-cage control groups, the rats were brought to an adjacent room and decapitated. The blood, brain, and liver tissue were collected and stored individually to evaluate DNA damage. RESULTS: Significant genetic damage was observed only in 15-month-old rats. Genetic damage was present in the liver cells from sleep-deprived obese rats compared with lean rats in the same condition. Sleep deprivation was associated with genetic damage in brain cells regardless of obesity status. DNA damage was observed in the peripheral blood cells regardless of sleep condition or obesity status. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these results suggest that obesity was associated with genetic damage in liver cells, whereas sleep deprivation was associated with DNA damage in brain cells. These results also indicate that there is no synergistic effect of these noxious conditions on the overall level of genetic damage. In addition, the level of DNA damage was significantly higher in 15-month-old rats compared to younger rats. PMID:23644860

  3. Perinatal iron deficiency affects locomotor behavior and water maze performance in adult male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Stephane L; Iqbal, Umar; Reynolds, James N; Adams, Michael A; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2008-05-01

    Iron deficiency during early growth and development adversely affects multiple facets of cognition and behavior in adult rats. The purpose of this study was to assess the nature of the learning and locomotor behavioral deficits observed in male and female rats in the absence of depressed brain iron levels at the time of testing. Adult female Wistar rats were fed either an iron-enriched diet (>225 mg/kg Fe) or an iron-restricted diet (3 mg/kg Fe) for 2 wk prior to and throughout gestation, and a nonpurified diet (270 mg/kg Fe) thereafter. Open-field (OF) and Morris water maze (MWM) testing began when the offspring reached early adulthood (12 wk). At birth, perinatal iron-deficient (PID) offspring had reduced (P < 0.001) hematocrits (-33%), liver iron stores (-83%), and brain iron concentrations (-38%) compared with controls. Although there were no differences in iron status in adults, the PID males and females exhibited reduced OF exploratory behavior, albeit only PID males had an aversion to the center of the apparatus (2.5 vs. 6.9% in controls, P < 0.001). Additionally, PID males required greater path lengths to reach the hidden platform in the MWM, had reduced spatial bias for the target quadrant, and had a tendency for greater thigmotactic behavior in the probe trials (16.5 vs. 13.0% in controls; P = 0.06). PID females had slower swim speeds in all testing phases (-6.2%; P < 0.001). These results suggest that PID has detrimental programming effects in both male and female rats, although the behaviors suggest different mechanisms may be involved in each sex.

  4. Acute predator stress impairs the consolidation and retrieval of hippocampus-dependent memory in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Collin R.; Zoladz, Phillip R.; Conrad, Cheryl D.; Fleshner, Monika; Diamond, David M.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of an acute predator stress experience on spatial learning and memory in adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. All rats were trained to learn the location of a hidden escape platform in the radial-arm water maze (RAWM), a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory task. In the control (non-stress) condition, female rats were superior to the males in the accuracy and consistency of their spatial memory performance tested over multiple days of training. In the stress condition, rats were exposed to the cat for 30 min immediately before or after learning, or before the 24-h memory test. Predator stress dramatically increased corticosterone levels in males and females, with females exhibiting greater baseline and stress-evoked responses than males. Despite these sex differences in the overall magnitudes of corticosterone levels, there were significant sex-independent correlations involving basal and stress-evoked corticosterone levels, and memory performance. Most importantly, predator stress impaired short-term memory, as well as processes involved in memory consolidation and retrieval, in male and female rats. Overall, we have found that an intense, ethologically relevant stressor produced a largely equivalent impairment of memory in male and female rats, and sex-independent corticosterone-memory correlations. These findings may provide insight into commonalities in how traumatic stress affects the brain and memory in men and women. PMID:18391188

  5. Ethanol effects on rat brain phosphoinositide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in acidic phospholipids in brain plasma and synaptic plasma membranes upon chronic ethanol administration was observed. Chronic ethanol administration resulted in an increase in {sup 32}P{sub i} incorporation into the acidic phospholipids in synaptosomes. Postdecapitative ischemic treatment resulted rapid degradation of poly-PI in rat brain. However, there was a rapid appearance of IP{sub 2} in ethanol group which indicated a more rapid turnover of IP{sub 3} in the ethanol-treated rats. Carbachol stimulated accumulation of labeled inositol phosphates in brain slices and synaptosomes. Carbachol-stimulated release of IP and IP{sub 2} was calcium dependent and was inhibited by EGTA and atropine. Adenosine triphosphates and 1 mM further enhanced carbachol-induced formation of IP and IP{sub 2}, but showed an increase and a decrease in IP{sub 3} at 1 mM and 0.01 mM, respectively. Guanosine triphosphate at 0.1 mM did not change in labeled IP, but there was a significant increase in labeled IP{sub 2} and decrease in IP{sub 3}. Mn and CMP greatly enhanced incorporation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol into PI, but not into poly-PI labeling in brain synaptosomes. Incubation of brain synaptosomes resulted in a Ca{sup 2+}, time-dependent release of labeled IP. However, the pool of PI labeled through this pathway is not susceptible to carbachol stimulation. When saponin permeabilized synaptosomal preparations were incubated with ({sup 3}H)-inositol-PI or ({sup 14}C)-arachidonoyl-PI, ATP enhanced the formation of labeled IP and DG.

  6. Tumorigenic effects of dichloroacetic acid in female F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a halogenated organic acid produced during oxidant disinfection of drinking water. Prior studies indicate that DCA may increase liver tumors in mice. Here we evaluated the hepatic tumorigenicity of DCA in female rats when given alone ...

  7. Estrogen Abolishes Latent Inhibition in Ovariectomized Female Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nofrey, Barbara S.; Ben-Shahar, Osnat M.; Brake, Wayne G.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen is frequently prescribed as a method of birth control and as hormone replacement therapy for post-menopausal women with varied effects on cognition. Here the effects of estrogen on attention were examined using the latent inhibition (LI) behavioral paradigm. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were given either estrogen benzoate (EB, 10 or…

  8. Tickling in juvenile but not adult female rats conditions sexual partner preference.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Ramos, Pedro; Miquel, Marta; Manzo, Jorge; Pfaus, James G; López-Meraz, Maria Leonor; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2012-08-20

    Female rats display a conditioned partner preference for males that bear odors paired with different types of rewarding unconditioned stimuli (UCS). Here we examined whether tickling constitutes a rewarding UCS that supports the development of partner preferences. In Experiment 1, we tested the possibility that odors associated with a tickling UCS in prepubescent rats would induce a conditioned partner preference in adulthood. Two groups were formed with 31-day-old, single-housed females, tickled for 6 min daily for 10 days, by a hand that wore a scented glove (almond or lemon). At 47 days of age, females were ovariectomized (OVX), hormone-primed (EB+P), and tested for sexual partner preference with two scented stud males (one almond and one lemon). In each group, females displayed a sexual preference toward males bearing the odor paired with tickling, as observed with longer visits, more solicitations, hops & darts, and receiving more intromissions and ejaculations from the preferred male. In Experiment 2, we used 3-month old, OVX, hormone-primed rats conditioned every 4 days for 10 trials. In contrast to juvenile females, adult females failed to prefer males that bore the odor paired with tickling but instead preferred the novel male. These results suggest that tickling has opposite age-dependent effects in the conditioning of partner preference. Tickling in juvenile females appears to act as a rewarding UCS, whereas in adult females it may act as an aversive UCS. Further research is needed to understand brain mechanisms that might account for such differences.

  9. Aggression by ovariectomized female rats with testosterone implants: competitive experience activates aggression toward unfamiliar females.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1990-04-01

    Female hooded rats (250 to 325 g) were ovariectomized and bilaterally implanted with testosterone-filled or empty Silastic tubes. The testosterone-filled space in each tube was 10 mm long and this should produce a serum testosterone concentration 4 to 5 times that of an intact female, but well below that of a male. Three weeks following surgery, half of the animals with testosterone implants were housed with an animal with an empty implant and left for 6 weeks. The remaining animals were placed on a 23-hr food deprivation schedule, housed in testosterone implant/empty implant pairs, and then subjected to a series of food competition tests. Following the competition tests, all animals were individually tested in their living cage for aggression toward an unfamiliar female. In food competition, females with testosterone implants were more successful and more aggressive than their cagemates with empty implants. When tested for aggression toward an unfamiliar intruder, females with testosterone implants given competitive experience were more aggressive toward an intruder than were their cagemates with empty implants or females with testosterone implants not given the competitive experience. Females with testosterone implants but without competitive experience were not more aggressive toward an unfamiliar female than were their cagemates with empty implants. These results suggest that, in ovariectomized females with testosterone implants, hormone-dependent aggression fostered by a competitive situation is displayed toward unfamiliar females.

  10. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Protein purification and cloning of diacylglycerol lipase from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Aso, Chizu; Araki, Mari; Ohshima, Noriyasu; Tatei, Kazuaki; Hirano, Tohko; Obinata, Hideru; Kishi, Mikiko; Kishimoto, Koji; Konishi, Akimitsu; Goto, Fumio; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Diacylglycerol (DG) lipase, which hydrolyses 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycerol to produce an endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, was purified from the soluble fraction of rat brain lysates. DG lipase was purified about 1,200-fold by a sequential column chromatographic procedure. Among proteins identified by mass spectrometry analysis in the partially purified DG lipase sample, only DDHD domain containing two (DDHD2), which was formerly regarded as a phospholipase A1, exhibited significant DG lipase activity. Rat DDHD2 expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed similar enzymatic properties to partially purified DG lipase from rat brain. The source of DG lipase activity in rat brain was immunoprecipitated using anti-DDHD2 antibody. Thus, we concluded that the DG lipase activity in the soluble fraction of rat brain is derived from DDHD2. DDHD2 is distributed widely in the rat brain. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that DDHD2 is expressed in hippocampal neurons, but not in glia.

  12. Dietary arginine deprivation and delayed puberty in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Pau, M Y; Milner, J A

    1984-01-01

    Dietary arginine deprivation was found to delay puberty in the female rat. Physiological pinealectomy by exposing to constant light suggests this gland is not involved in this delay. Compensatory ovarian hypertrophy (COH) was used to test the hypothalamic sensitivity to negative steroid feedback. COH occurred in hemiovariectomized immature rats ad libitum fed the control or arginine-deficient diet but failed to occur in hemiovariectomized, underfed, growth-matched control rats, which suggests that feed restriction and arginine deficiency do not exert identical effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Puberty, as defined by vaginal opening, first ovulation and the initiation of estrous cycles, was advanced by a week in the immature female rat fed a control diet after treatment with estradiol benzoate, 0.05 microgram/(100 g body weight X day) starting at 26 days of age. The time of first estrus and the first ovulation was not advanced in arginine-deficient rats by the same dosage of estrogen when administration began at 26 days of age. Treatment at an older age (40 or 54 days) or with a higher dosage [0.25 microgram/(100 g body weight X day)] at 26 days of age did advance puberty. The failure of estrogen to induce a vaginal cyclicity suggests an insufficient amount of endogenous estrogen to trigger a gonadotropin surge to cause the onset of puberty in the rat fed an arginine-deficient diet.

  13. Diphenyl diselenide supplemented diet reduces depressive-like behavior in hypothyroid female rats.

    PubMed

    Dias, Glaecir Roseni Mundstock; de Almeida, Tielle Moraes; Sudati, Jéssie Haigert; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Pavin, Sandra; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Barbosa, Nilda Berenice Vargas

    2014-01-30

    Hypothyroidism has been associated to psychiatric disorder development and tissue oxidative damage. In this study, we evaluated the effect of diphenyl diselenide supplementation on depressive-like behavior triggered by methimazole exposure in female rats. Additionally, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and non-protein thiol (NP-SH) levels were analyzed in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum structures of rats. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity was evaluated in total brain. Firstly, female rats received methimazole (MTZ) 20mg/100ml in the drinking water for 30days and were evaluated in open-field and forced swimming tests (FST). In this set of experiments, the rats exposed to MTZ presented a depressive-like behavior, which was evidenced by a significant increase in the immobility time when compared to control group. Thereafter, MTZ-induced hypothyroid rats received either a standard or a diet containing 5ppm of diphenyl diselenide, and then they were evaluated monthly in open-field and FST tests during 3months. No alteration on the locomotor performance was observed among the groups. The depressive-like behavior of hypothyroid rats was blunted by diphenyl diselenide supplementation during all experimental periods. The levels of thyroid hormones remained low in MTZ exposed groups until the end of experimental period. The MTZ group had an increase in TBARS and ROS levels that were restored by diphenyl diselenide supplementation. NP-SH content of cerebral structures was not modified by MTZ exposure and/or diphenyl diselenide supplementation. Diphenyl diselenide supplementation restored the MAO B activity that was decreased in MTZ group. In summary, our results show that hypothyroidism induced by MTZ methimazole triggers a depressive-like behavior in female rats and that dietary diphenyl diselenide was able to reduce this effect.

  14. Prereproductive stress in adolescent female rats affects behavior and corticosterone levels in second-generation offspring.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, Hiba; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna

    2015-08-01

    Human and animal studies indicate that vulnerability to stress may be heritable. We have previously shown that chronic, mild prereproductive stress (PRS) in adolescent female rats affects behavior and corticotropin releasing factor 1 (CRF1) expression in the brain of first-generation (F1) offspring. Here, we investigated the effects of PRS on anxiogenic behavior and CRF1 expression in male and female second-generation (F2) offspring. Furthermore, we assessed levels of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT), a direct marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, in PRS females and their F1 and F2 progeny. F2 offspring demonstrated decreased CRF1 mRNA expression at birth, and alterations in anxiogenic behavior in adulthood. CORT levels were elevated in PRS females and in their F1 female, but not male, offspring. In F2, CORT levels in PRS offspring also varied in a sex-dependent manner. These findings indicate that PRS in adolescent females leads to behavioral alterations that extend to second-generation offspring, and has transgenerational effects on endocrine function. Together with our previous findings, these data indicate that PRS to adolescent females affects behavior and HPA axis function across three generations, and highlight the importance of examining the transgenerational effects of stress in both male and female offspring.

  15. Reproductive alterations in hyperinsulinemic but normoandrogenic MSG obese female rats.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Benevides, Renata Ohana Alves; Fontelles, João Lucas de Lima; Vale, Caroline Castro; França, Lucas Martins; Barros, Paulo de Tarso Silva; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are the common causes of reproductive and fertility disorders in women. In particular, polycystic ovary syndrome, which is clinically characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo/anovulation, and polycystic ovarian morphology, has been increasingly associated with metabolic disorders. However, given the broad interplay between metabolic and reproductive functions, this remains a field of intense research. In this study, we investigated the effect of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity on reproductive biology of female rats. Newborn female rats were subcutaneously injected with MSG (4g/kg/day) or equiosmolar saline (CTR) each 2 days up to postnatal day (pnd) 10. On pnd 60, estrous cycle was evaluated using vaginal smears twice a day for 15 days, which showed MSG rats to be oligocyclic. Thereafter, animals were killed on estrous phase for blood and tissue collection. MSG rats had increased body mass, accumulation of retroperitoneal and visceral fat pads, and visceral adipocyte hypertrophy compared with CTR rats. MSG rats were also dyslipidemic and hyperinsulinemic but were normoglycemic and normoandrogenic. Ovarian morphology analysis showed that MSG rats had a two-fold decrease in oocyte count but a six-fold increase on ovarian follicular cysts, along with a higher number of total primordial and atretic follicles. Moreover, MSG rats had a four-fold increase in anti-Müllerian hormone immunohistochemical staining on antral follicles. Taken together, data presented here characterize MSG obesity as a unique model to study the metabolic pathways underlying reproductive disorders in the absence of overactivated hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  16. Reproductive alterations in hyperinsulinemic but normoandrogenic MSG obese female rats.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Benevides, Renata Ohana Alves; Fontelles, João Lucas de Lima; Vale, Caroline Castro; França, Lucas Martins; Barros, Paulo de Tarso Silva; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are the common causes of reproductive and fertility disorders in women. In particular, polycystic ovary syndrome, which is clinically characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo/anovulation, and polycystic ovarian morphology, has been increasingly associated with metabolic disorders. However, given the broad interplay between metabolic and reproductive functions, this remains a field of intense research. In this study, we investigated the effect of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity on reproductive biology of female rats. Newborn female rats were subcutaneously injected with MSG (4g/kg/day) or equiosmolar saline (CTR) each 2 days up to postnatal day (pnd) 10. On pnd 60, estrous cycle was evaluated using vaginal smears twice a day for 15 days, which showed MSG rats to be oligocyclic. Thereafter, animals were killed on estrous phase for blood and tissue collection. MSG rats had increased body mass, accumulation of retroperitoneal and visceral fat pads, and visceral adipocyte hypertrophy compared with CTR rats. MSG rats were also dyslipidemic and hyperinsulinemic but were normoglycemic and normoandrogenic. Ovarian morphology analysis showed that MSG rats had a two-fold decrease in oocyte count but a six-fold increase on ovarian follicular cysts, along with a higher number of total primordial and atretic follicles. Moreover, MSG rats had a four-fold increase in anti-Müllerian hormone immunohistochemical staining on antral follicles. Taken together, data presented here characterize MSG obesity as a unique model to study the metabolic pathways underlying reproductive disorders in the absence of overactivated hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:26952035

  17. Endocannabinoid influence on partner preference in female rats.

    PubMed

    Memos, Nicoletta K; Vela, Rebekah; Tabone, Courtney; Guarraci, Fay A

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the role of the endocannabinoid system on sexual motivation in the female rat. In Experiment 1, gonadally intact female rats were first tested for partner preference after a vehicle injection. Approximately 2 weeks later, all rats were tested again after an injection of the endocannabinoid antagonist, SR141716 (SR; also known as Rimonabant; 1.0mg/kg). During the first 10 min of each partner preference test, subjects could spend time near either a male or female stimulus animal that was placed behind a wire mesh (No-Contact). During the second 10 min of each partner preference test, subjects had unrestricted access to both stimulus animals (Contact). When the female subjects were treated with SR, they made fewer visits to either stimulus animal during the no-contact phase of the partner preference test compared to when they were treated with vehicle. In Experiment 2, ovariectomized (OVX) subjects primed with estrogen were administered SR or vehicle and tested for partner preference (Experiment 2A). Approximately 2 weeks later, the subjects from the control group were tested again after an injection of SR (Experiment 2B). In contrast to Experiment 1, treatment with SR reduced the number of visits specifically to the male stimulus during the contact phase of the test in Experiment 2. Experiment 3 tested the effects of SR on general locomotion and found no effect of SR on line crossings in an open field. Finally, in Experiment 4, OVX estrogen- and progesterone-primed subjects were administered the endocannabinoid agonist anandamide (AEA: 1.0mg/kg) or vehicle and tested for partner preference. AEA-treated subjects made more visits to the male stimulus than vehicle-treated subjects during the contact phase of the test. The results of the present study suggest that the endocannabinoid system may contribute to sexual motivation in female rats by specifically altering approach behavior.

  18. The effect of exercise on carbohydrate preference in female rats.

    PubMed

    Keeley, R J; Zelinski, E L; Fehr, L; McDonald, R J

    2014-02-01

    Exercise has a myriad of health benefits, including positive effects against heart disease, diabetes, and dementia. Cognitive performance improves following chronic exercise, both in animal models and humans. Studies have examined the effect of exercise on feeding, demonstrating a preference towards increased food consumption. Further, sex differences exist such that females tend to prefer carbohydrates over other macronutrients following exercise. However, no clear effect of exercise on macronutrient or carbohydrate selection has been described in animal or human studies. This research project sought to determine the effect of voluntary exercise on carbohydrate selection in female rats. Preference for a complex (starch) versus a simple (dextrose) carbohydrate was assessed using a discriminative preference to context paradigm in non-exercising and voluntarily exercising female rats. In addition, fasting blood glucose and performance in the Morris water task was examined in order to verify the effects of exercise on performance in this task. Female rats given access to running wheels preferred a context previously associated with starch, whereas females with no running wheel access preferred a context previously associated with dextrose. No changes in blood glucose were observed. However, cognitive differences in the Morris water task were observed such that voluntary exercise allowed rats to find a new location of a hidden platform following 4 days of training to an old platform location. These results suggest that voluntary exercise may decrease preservative behaviors in a spatial navigation task through the facilitation of plasticity mechanisms. This study is the first of its kind to demonstrate the influence of exercise on taste preference for complex and simple carbohydrates with this context conditioning paradigm. PMID:24406468

  19. The effect of exercise on carbohydrate preference in female rats.

    PubMed

    Keeley, R J; Zelinski, E L; Fehr, L; McDonald, R J

    2014-02-01

    Exercise has a myriad of health benefits, including positive effects against heart disease, diabetes, and dementia. Cognitive performance improves following chronic exercise, both in animal models and humans. Studies have examined the effect of exercise on feeding, demonstrating a preference towards increased food consumption. Further, sex differences exist such that females tend to prefer carbohydrates over other macronutrients following exercise. However, no clear effect of exercise on macronutrient or carbohydrate selection has been described in animal or human studies. This research project sought to determine the effect of voluntary exercise on carbohydrate selection in female rats. Preference for a complex (starch) versus a simple (dextrose) carbohydrate was assessed using a discriminative preference to context paradigm in non-exercising and voluntarily exercising female rats. In addition, fasting blood glucose and performance in the Morris water task was examined in order to verify the effects of exercise on performance in this task. Female rats given access to running wheels preferred a context previously associated with starch, whereas females with no running wheel access preferred a context previously associated with dextrose. No changes in blood glucose were observed. However, cognitive differences in the Morris water task were observed such that voluntary exercise allowed rats to find a new location of a hidden platform following 4 days of training to an old platform location. These results suggest that voluntary exercise may decrease preservative behaviors in a spatial navigation task through the facilitation of plasticity mechanisms. This study is the first of its kind to demonstrate the influence of exercise on taste preference for complex and simple carbohydrates with this context conditioning paradigm.

  20. A Method for Recording Urethral Pressure Profiles in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengfei; Li, Xiaohui; Xu, Lei; Chen, Biao; Tan, Huibing; Du, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Aims Urethral pressure profile (UPP) and leak-point pressure (LPP) measurements as well as external urethral sphincter (EUS) electromyography (EMG) and videourodynamic analyses are the primary methods for evaluating urethral function in humans. However, UPP recording in female rats, a widely used animal model, is challenging due to their small body sizes. This study reports a novel method for recording UPP in female rats. Materials and Methods Seventeen anesthetized female rats were studied. LPP data for 14 rats were included. The other 3 rats were excluded because of death or abnormal urogenital organs. UPP curves were recorded using a modified water-perfusion catheter system, with the lateral hole facing the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o’clock positions in a randomized sequence. LPP, functional urethral length (FUL) and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) were analyzed. Results The mean LPP was 64.39 ± 20.29 cm H2O. The mean FUL and MUCP values at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o’clock positions were 12.90 ± 1.20, 16.70 ± 1.95, 13.90 ± 2.42, and 11.60 ± 0.97 mm, respectively, and 38.70 ± 11.85, 33.90 ± 11.82, 37.40 ± 11.95, and 71.90 ± 23.01 cm H2O, respectively. The FUL at the 6-o’clock position and MUCP at the 12-o’clock position were significantly greater than those at the other 3 positions. The FUL and MUCP of repeated UPP recordings were not significantly different than those of the first recordings. Conclusions UPP recording using a modified method based on a water-perfusion catheter system is feasible and replicable in female rats. It produces UPP curves that sensitively and appreciably reflect detailed pressure changes at different points within the urethra and thus provides opportunity to evaluate urethral structures, especially the urethral sphincter, in detail. These results may enhance the utility of female rat models in research of urinary sphincter mechanisms. PMID:26502072

  1. Changes in LH and prolactin in arteriosclerotic femal breeder rats.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B K; Wexler, B C

    1975-01-01

    Serum levels of LH and prolactin were measured in repeatedly-bred, arteriosclerotic female rats. Serum LH was abnormally decreased on the afternoon of proestrus and estrus. The extent of the depression of circulating LH levels parallels the severity of the arteriosclerosis. Serum prolactin was significantly increased above normal at proestrus, and the degree of prolactin increase was also correlated with the degree of severity of arteriosclerosis. It is suggested that frequent and repeated pregnancies affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis leading to hormonal and metabolic imbalance, which may play a causal role in the pathogenesis of the spontaneous arteriosclerosis which appears in repeatedly-bred rats.

  2. Factors influencing fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in female rats.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sarah; Heckard, Danyeal; Hassell, James; Uphouse, Lynda

    2012-11-01

    Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, produces sexual side effects with low sexual desire being the most prevalent effect in females. In few studies have preclinical models for such antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction been fruitful. In the current manuscript, the effects of fluoxetine on multiple measures of female sexual motivation and sexual receptivity were examined. Ovariectomized, Fischer rats were primed with 10 μg estradiol benzoate and 500 μg progesterone. Partner preference, active investigation of the male, and measures of sexual behavior were examined after injection with 15 mg/kg fluoxetine. Factors (pretesting for sexual behavior, size of the test arena, non-contact time with a male) that differ among experiments designed to study antidepressant-induced female rat sexual dysfunction were studied. The male preference ratio was not affected by fluoxetine treatment but active investigation of the male was reduced; lordosis behavior was inhibited and pretesting for sexual receptivity amplified fluoxetine's inhibition; size of the testing arena or non-contact experience with the male had no effect. Regardless of test condition, when given the opportunity to escape from the male, fluoxetine-treated females displayed escape behavior. Measures of male preference and active investigation, but not lordosis behavior, appeared to be affected by fluoxetine's impact on activity. The collective data provided a behavioral profile of fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. These findings reinforce the value of multiple measures when attempting to model antidepressant-induced female sexual dysfunction.

  3. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  4. Behavioural and neurotoxic effects of ayahuasca infusion (Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis) in female Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Pic-Taylor, Aline; da Motta, Luciana Gueiros; de Morais, Juliana Alves; Junior, Willian Melo; Santos, Alana de Fátima Andrade; Campos, Leandro Ambrósio; Mortari, Marcia Renata; von Zuben, Marcus Vinicius; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2015-09-01

    Ayahuasca, a psychoactive beverage used by indigenous and religious groups, is generally prepared by the coction of Psychotria viridis and Banisteriopsis caapi plants containing N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and β-carboline alkaloids, respectively. To investigate the acute toxicity of ayahuasca, the infusion was administered by gavage to female Wistar rats at doses of 30X and 50X the dose taken during a religious ritual, and the animals observed for 14 days. Behavioural functions were investigated one hour after dosing at 15X and 30X using the open field, elevated plus maze, and forced swimming tests. Neuronal activation (c-fos marked neurons) and toxicity (Fluoro-Jade B and Nissl/Cresyl staining) were investigated in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN), amygdaloid nucleus, and hippocampal formation brain areas of rats treated with a 30X ayahuasca dose. The actual lethal oral dose in female Wistar rats could not be determined in this study, but was shown to be higher than the 50X (which corresponds to 15.1mg/kg bw DMT). The ayahuasca and fluoxetine treated groups showed a significant decrease in locomotion in the open field and elevated plus-maze tests compared to controls. In the forced swimming test, ayahuasca treated animals swam more than controls, a behaviour that was not significant in the fluoxetine group. Treated animals showed higher neuronal activation in all brain areas involved in serotoninergic neurotransmission. Although this led to some brain injury, no permanent damage was detected. These results suggest that ayahuasca has antidepressant properties in Wistar female at high doses, an effect that should be further investigated.

  5. Resveratrol attenuates peripheral and brain inflammation and reduces ischemic brain injury in aged female mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sae Im; Shin, Jin A; Cho, Sunghee; Kim, Hye Won; Lee, Ji Yoon; Kang, Jihee Lee; Park, Eun-Mi

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol is known to improve metabolic dysfunction associated with obesity. Visceral obesity is a sign of aging and is considered a risk factor for ischemic stroke. In this study, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on inflammation in visceral adipose tissue and the brain and its effects on ischemic brain injury in aged female mice. Mice treated with resveratrol (0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) for 10 days showed reduced levels of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, as well as a reduction in the size of adipocytes in visceral adipose tissue. Resveratrol also reduced interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α protein levels and immunoglobulin G extravasation in the brain. Mice treated with resveratrol demonstrated smaller infarct size, improved neurological function, and blunted peripheral inflammation at 3 days postischemic stroke. These results showed that resveratrol counteracted inflammation in visceral adipose tissue and in the brain and reduced stroke-induced brain injury and peripheral inflammation in aged female mice. Therefore, resveratrol administration can be a valuable strategy for the prevention of age-associated and disease-provoked inflammation in postmenopausal women.

  6. Dietary protein, fat, and minerals in nephrocalcinosis in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, H; Johnson, R E

    1976-01-01

    Young female rats fed semipurified diets containing casein or a soy protein isolate had extensive nephrocalcinosis at the junction between the outer and inner stripe of the outer medullary zone after 5 wk on the diets, whereas rats fed a diet containing a lactalbumin concentrate did not. Although the percentages of actual protein and of total ash were similar in all three diets, the concentrations of individual minerals were not, owing to methods used in isolating the proteins. Comparison of the individual mineral contents of these diets with those in other laboratories as compiled from the literature suggested that factors other than minerals, including protein, are also implicated. Dietary fat appeared to be another such factor in a series of experiments in which saturated medium-chain triglycerides and corn oil were included in diets containing soy protein isolate. Although these diets had identical mineral compositions, the rats fed medium-chain triglycerides had less severe lesions.

  7. Reproductive aspects in female rats exposed prenatally to hydrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Piffer, R C; Pereira, O C M

    2004-10-01

    We investigated the effects of hydrocortisone during the prenatal period and its later repercussion on reproductive aspects of female rats. Pregnant rats were treated (s.c.) with hydrocortisone acetate, at 1.5 mg/day on the 17th, 18th, and 19th days of pregnancy. Although the present study was not intended to identify mechanisms of toxicity, the treatment with hydrocortisone in the last period of pregnancy presented no signs of toxicity. The efficacy of the hydrocortisone in reducing the adrenal wet mass and plasma corticosterone levels immediately after delivery in both the treated mothers and in respective pups at birth may indicate impairment of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. In addition, the treatment with hydrocortisone did not interfere in the development of the female descendants until puberty. However, it affected the estrous cycle and fertility. Probably, the prenatal exposure to corticosteroids had altered at least partially the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, resulting in the damages observed in adult life. These results indicate that the use of the hydrocortisone at a dose that apparently does not endanger the neonate led to undesirable effects in the adult reproductive phase, resulting in later deleterious alteration of the reproductive physiology in female rats.

  8. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  9. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation.

  10. Neonatal Maternal Separation Augments Carotid Body Response to Hypoxia in Adult Males but Not Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soliz, Jorge; Tam, Rose; Kinkead, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to adverse experiences disrupts brain development, including the brainstem network that regulates breathing. At adulthood, rats previously subjected to stress (in the form of neonatal maternal separation; NMS) display features reported in patients suffering from sleep disordered breathing, including an increased hypoxic ventilatory response and hypertension. This effect is also sex-specific (males only). Based on these observations, we hypothesized that NMS augments the carotid body's O2-chemosensitivity. Using an isolated and perfused ex vivo carotid body preparation from adult rats we compared carotid sinus nerve (CSN) responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in carotid bodies harvested from adult rats that either experienced control conditions (no experimental manipulation) or were subjected to NMS (3 h/day from postnatal days 3 to 12). In males, the CSN response to hypoxia measured in preparations from NMS males was 1.5 fold higher than controls. In control rats, the female's response was similar to that of males; however, the increase in CSN activity measured in NMS females was 3.0 times lower than controls. The CSN response to hypercapnia was not influenced by stress or sex. We conclude that NMS is sufficient to have persistent and sex-specific effects on the carotid body's response to hypoxia. Because NMS also has sex-specific effects on the neuroendocrine response to stress, we propose that carotid body function is influenced by stress hormones. This, in turn, leads to a predisposition toward cardio-respiratory disorders. PMID:27729873

  11. Sexual reward induces Fos in the cerebellum of female rats.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Ramos, Pedro; Pfaus, James G; Miquel, Marta; Manzo, Jorge; Coria-Avila, Genaro A

    2011-02-01

    The cerebellum is generally considered a neural structure specialized in motor control and recent imaging data suggest its role in sexual behavior. Herein, we analyzed the pattern of Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in the cerebellum of female rats allowed to pace copulation as a model of sexual reward in rodents. Ovariectomized, hormone-primed, sexually naïve females formed three groups: Pacing, Nonpacing and Control. Pacing occurred in arenas bisected by a middle divider that allowed only females to control sexual interaction with stud males. For nonpaced copulation the divider was removed, and control females were allowed to pace in chambers without a male. Fos-IR was analyzed in granule and Purkinje layers of the 10 cerebellar lobules, and in the fastigial deep nucleus (FDN). Results indicated that Pacing females expressed more Fos-IR in the granule layer compared to Nonpacing and Controls, and more Fos-IR in Purkinje compared to Nonpacing. No differences were observed in FDN. Such response cannot be explained with motor activity because Pacing females moved less in general. We discuss the role of the cerebellum and its connections in the sexual reward induced by pacing. PMID:21059365

  12. Female Flinders Sensitive Line rats show estrous cycle-independent depression-like behavior and altered tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eskelund, Amanda; Budac, David P; Sanchez, Connie; Elfving, Betina; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-08-01

    Clinical studies suggest a link between depression and dysfunctional tryptophan (TRP) metabolism. Even though depression is twice as prevalent in women as men, the impact of the estrous cycle on TRP metabolism is not well-understood. Here we investigated 13 kynurenine and serotonin metabolites in female Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic rat model of depression. FSL rats and controls (Flinders Resistant Line rats), 12-20weeks old, were subject to the forced swim test (FST), a commonly used measure of depression-like behavior. Open field was used to evaluate locomotor ability and agoraphobia. Subsequently, plasma and hemispheres were collected and analyzed for their content of TRP metabolites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Vaginal saline lavages were obtained daily for ⩾2 cycles. To estimate the effects of sex and FST we included plasma from unhandled, naïve male FSL and FRL rats. Female FSL rats showed a depression-like phenotype with increased immobility in the FST, not confounded by anxiety. In the brain, 3-hydroxykynurenine was increased whereas anthranilate and 5-hydroxytryptophan were decreased. In plasma, anthranilate and quinolinate levels were lower in FSL rats compared to the control line, independent of sex and FST. The estrous cycle neither impacted behavior nor TRP metabolite levels in the FSL rat. In conclusion, the female FSL rat is an interesting preclinical model of depression with altered TRP metabolism, independent of the estrous cycle. The status of the pathway in brain was not reflected in the plasma, which may indicate that an inherent local, cerebral regulation of TRP metabolism occurs. PMID:27210075

  13. Chronic mild stressors and diet affect gene expression differently in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuwen; Byers, Donna M; Irwin, Louis N

    2007-01-01

    While depression is reportedly more prevalent in women than men, a neurobiological basis for this difference has not been documented. Chronic mild stress (CMS) is a widely recognized animal model, which uses mild and unpredictable environmental stressors to induce depression. Studies of chronic stress, mainly in males, have reported an increase in the relative intake of "comfort food" as a means of counteracting the effects of stress. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that genes for certain neurotrophic factors, stress markers, and appetite regulators would be expressed differentially in male and female rats exposed to chronic, mild stressors with access to a preferred diet. Gene expression for neuropeptide Y was upregulated in females purely in response to stressors, whereas that for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) in males and fatty acid synthase (FASN) in females responded primarily to diet. Genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), AVP, and the cocaine-amphetamine regulator of transcription (CART) in males, and leptin in females, showed a significant response to the interaction between stressors and diet. Every affected gene showed a different pattern of expression in males and females. This study confirms the intimate relationship between dietary intake and response to stress at the molecular level, and emphasizes the sex- and gene-specific nature of those interactions. Therefore, it supports a neurobiological basis for differences in the affective state response to stress in males and females. PMID:17917078

  14. The effects of prenatal PCBs on adult female paced mating reproductive behaviors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Rebecca M.; Juenger, Thomas E.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a family of toxicants that persist in measurable quantities in human and wildlife tissues, despite their ban in production in 1977. Some PCB mixtures can act as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by mimicking or antagonizing the actions of hormones in the brain and periphery. When exposure to hormonally active substances such as PCBs occurs during vulnerable developmental periods, particularly prenatally or in early postnatal life, they can disrupt sex-specific patterning of the brain, inducing permanent changes that can later be manifested as improper sexual behaviors. Here, we investigated the effects of prenatal exposure to the PCB mixture Aroclor (A) 1221 on adult female reproductive behaviors in a dose-response model in the Sprague-Dawley rat. Using a paced mating paradigm that permits the female to set the timing of mating and control contact with the male during copulation, we were able to uncover significant differences in female-typical sexual activities in A1221-exposed females. Specifically, A1221 causes significant effects on mating trial pacing, vocalizations, ambulation and the female’s likelihood to mate. The results further demonstrate that the intermediate treatment group has the greatest number of disrupted endpoints, suggestive of non-linear dose responses to A1221. These data demonstrate that the behavioral phenotype in adulthood is disrupted by low, ecologically relevant exposures to PCBs, and the results have implications for reproductive success and health in wildlife and women. PMID:17274994

  15. Incidence of brain tumors in rats fed aspartame.

    PubMed

    Ishii, H

    1981-03-01

    The brain tumorigenicity of aspartame (APM) and of its diketopiperazine (DKP) was studied in 860 SCL Wistar rats. APM at dietary levels of 1 g/kg, 2 gK/, 4 g/kg or APM + DKP (3:1) 4 g/kg was fed for 104 weeks. One atypical astrocytoma was found in a control rat and 2 astrocytomas, 2 oligodendrogliomas and 1 ependymoma were scattered among the 4 test groups. There was no significant difference in the incidence of brain tumors between control and test groups. It is concluded that neither AMP nor DKP caused brain tumors in rats in this study.

  16. Testosterone supports hormone-dependent aggression in female rats.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L; Petrovic, D M

    1989-08-01

    Female hooded rats were ovariectomized and implanted with a single testosterone-filled Silastic tube or an empty tube. The tube size was one which allowed a release of testosterone at the high end of the mean normal serum testosterone concentration for intact females. Following a 7-day recovery period, all rats were placed on a 23-hr food-deprivation schedule and adapted to a highly palatable liquid food over a 5-day period. Each animal with a testosterone implant was then housed with an animal of similar weight but an empty implant. The pairs were subjected to a series of 3 restricted-access competition tests (1/day) followed 4 days later by a series of 3 free-access competition tests. The animals were then separated, adapted to a bland liquid food, and paired with new partners. They were then subjected to the restricted- and free-access food-competition tests but with bland food as the incentive. During the first 6 competition tests there were no significant differences between groups in aggression or in time spent licking at the food spout. During the second series of tests, females with testosterone implants were more aggressive and more successful at maintaining access to the food than were their competitors with empty implants. The difference between groups occurred during the free- as well as the restricted-access tests. The effectiveness of physiological levels of testosterone in supporting aggression is attributed to the use of a test situation that activates as well as elicits hormone-dependent aggression. These results suggest that testosterone may be the hormonal substrate for hormone-dependent aggression in female rats.

  17. Creatine kinase reaction rates in rat brain during chronic ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mlynárik, V; Kasparová, S; Liptaj, T; Dobrota, D; Horecký, J; Belan, V

    1998-12-01

    Creatine kinase reaction rates were measured by magnetisation transfer technique in the brain of healthy adult and aged rats and in the rats with mild or severe chronic cerebral ischemia. These measurements indicated that the rate constant of the creatine kinase reaction is significantly reduced in the case of chronic brain ischemia in aged rats. In contrast, occlusion of both carotid arteries in adult rats produced a slight increase in the reaction rate 4 weeks after occlusion. At the same time, corresponding conventional phosphorus magnetic resonance spectra showed negligible changes in signal intensities. PMID:10050942

  18. Somatomotor and sensory urethral control of micturition in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Yolanda; Pastelín, César; Balog, Brian M.; Zaszczurynski, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    In rats, axons of external urethral sphincter (EUS) motoneurons travel through the anastomotic branch of the pudendal nerve (ABPD) and anastomotic branch of the lumbosacral trunk (ABLT) and converge in the motor branch of the sacral plexus (MBSP). The aim of the present study was to determine in female rats the contribution of these somatomotor pathways and urethral sensory innervation from the dorsal nerve of the clitoris on urinary continence and voiding. EUS electromyographic (EMG) activity during cystometry, leak point pressure (LPP), and voiding efficiency (VE) were assessed in anesthetized virgin Sprague-Dawley female rats before and after transection of the above nerve branches. Transection of the MBSP eliminated EUS EMG, decreased LPP by 50%, and significantly reduced bladder contraction duration, peak pressure, intercontraction interval, and VE. Transection of the ABPD or ABLT decreased EUS EMG discharge and LPP by 25% but did not affect VE. Transection of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris did not affect LPP but reduced contraction duration, peak pressure, intercontraction interval, and VE. We conclude that somatomotor control of micturition is provided by the MBSP with axons travelling through the ABPD and ABLT. Partial somatomotor urethral denervation induces mild urinary incontinence, whereas partial afferent denervation induces voiding dysfunction. ABPD and ABLT pathways could represent a safeguard ensuring innervation to the EUS in case of upper nerve damage. Detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and functional innervation of the urethra will enable more accurate animal models of neural development, disease, and dysfunction in the future. PMID:25339694

  19. Hypobaric hypoxia induces depression-like behavior in female Sprague-Dawley rats, but not in males.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Shami; Bogdanova, Olena V; Olson, Paul R; Sung, Young-Hoon; D'Anci, Kristen E; Renshaw, Perry F

    2015-03-01

    Rates of depression and suicide are higher in people living at altitude, and in those with chronic hypoxic disorders like asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), and smoking. Living at altitude exposes people to hypobaric hypoxia, which can lower rat brain serotonin levels, and impair brain bioenergetics in both humans and rats. We therefore examined the effect of hypobaric hypoxia on depression-like behavior in rats. After a week of housing at simulated altitudes of 20,000 ft, 10,000 ft, or sea level, or at local conditions of 4500 ft (Salt Lake City, UT), Sprague Dawley rats were tested for depression-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST). Time spent swimming, climbing, or immobile, and latency to immobility were measured. Female rats housed at altitude display more depression-like behavior in the FST, with significantly more immobility, less swimming, and lower latency to immobility than those at sea level. In contrast, males in all four altitude groups were similar in their FST behavior. Locomotor behavior in the open field test did not change with altitude, thus validating immobility in the FST as depression-like behavior. Hypobaric hypoxia exposure therefore induces depression-like behavior in female rats, but not in males.

  20. Enhanced learning deficits in female rats following lifetime pb exposure combined with prenatal stress.

    PubMed

    Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; Stern, Sander; Weston, Doug; Allen, Joshua L; Liu, Sue

    2010-10-01

    Pb (lead) exposure and stress are co-occurring risk factors (particularly in low socioeconomic communities) that also act on common biological substrates and produce common adverse outcomes, including cognitive impairments. This study sought to determine whether lifetime Pb exposure combined with prenatal stress would enhance the cognitive deficits independently associated with each of these risk factors and to explore associated mechanisms of any observed impairments. Learning was evaluated using a multiple schedule of repeated learning and performance in female rats subjected to lifetime Pb exposure (0 or 50 ppm Pb in drinking water beginning in dams 2 months prior to breeding; blood Pb levels ∼10 μg/dl), to prenatal restraint stress on gestational days 16 and 17, or to both. Blood Pb, corticosterone levels, brain monoamines, and hippocampal nerve growth factor levels were also measured. Sequence-specific learning deficits produced by Pb, particularly the number of responses to correctly learn response sequences, were further enhanced by stress, whereas performance measures were unimpaired. Statistical analyses indicated significant relationships among corticosterone levels, frontal cortex dopamine (DA), nucleus accumbens dopamine turnover, and total responses required to learn sequences. This study demonstrates that Pb and stress can act together to produce selective and highly condition-dependent deficits in learning in female rats that may be related to glucocorticoid-mediated interactions with mesocorticolimbic regions of brain. These findings also underscore the critical need to evaluate toxicants in the context of other risk factors pertinent to human diseases and disorders.

  1. 26Al uptake and accumulation in the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Imamura, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Hayashi, K.; Masuda, A.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohashi, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), 26Al incorporation in the rat brain was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). When 26Al was injected into healthy rats, a considerable amount of 26Al entered the brain (cerebrum) through the blood-brain barrier 5 days after a single injection, and the brain 26Al level remained almost constant from 5 to 270 days. On the other hand, the level of 26Al in the blood decreased remarkably 75 days after injection. Approximately 89% of the 26Al taken in by the brain cell nuclei bound to chromatin. This study supports the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium (Al) in the brain, and brain cell nuclei.

  2. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  3. Depressive behavior induced by social isolation of predisposed female rats.

    PubMed

    Zanier-Gomes, Patrícia Helena; de Abreu Silva, Tomaz Eugênio; Zanetti, Guilherme Cia; Benati, Évelyn Raquel; Pinheiro, Nanci Mendes; Murta, Beatriz Martins Tavares; Crema, Virgínia Oliveira

    2015-11-01

    Depression is a mood disorder that is more prevalent in women and has been closely associated with chronic stress. Many models of depression have been suggested that consider different forms of stress. In fact, stress is present in the life of every human being, but only a few develop depression. Accordingly, it seems wrong to consider all stressed animals to be depressed, emphasizing the importance of predisposition for this mood disorder. Based on this finding, we evaluated a predisposition to depressive behavior of female rats on the forced swim test (FST), and the more immobile the animal was during the FST, the more predisposed to depression it was considered to be. Then, animals were subjected to the stress of social isolation for 21 days and were re-evaluated by the FST. The Predisposed/Isolated rats presented higher immobility times. Once all the rats had prior experience in the FST, we calculated an Index of Increase by Isolation, confirming the previous results. Based on this result, we considered the Predisposed/Isolated group as presenting depressive behavior ('Depressed') and the Nonpredisposed/Nonisolated group as the control group ('Nondepressed'). The animals were distributed into 4 new groups: Nondepressed/Vehicle, Nondepressed/Amitriptyline, Depressed/Vehicle, Depressed/Amitriptyline. After 21 days of treatment, only the Depressed/Vehicle group differed from the other 3 groups, demonstrating the efficacy of amitriptyline in treating the depressive behavior of the Depressed animals, validating the model. This study shows that conducting an FST prior to any manipulation can predict predisposition to depressive behavior in female rats and that the social isolation of predisposed animals for 21 days is effective in inducing depressive behavior. This behavior can be considered real depressive behavior because it takes into account predisposition, chronic mild stress, and the prevalent gender.

  4. Thermoregulatory ability of female rats during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Knecht, E A; Toraason, M A; Wright, G L

    1980-11-01

    Thermoregulatory ability of female rats was examined before pregnancy, during gestation, and during lactation. Thermoregulatory pattern, colonic temperature, evaporative water loss, and survival time were monitored during terminal heating (39.5 +/- 0.9 degrees C) designed to allow prolonged survival (3-4 h) with a sustained thermoregulatory effort. Results confirmed our previously reported observation of decreased thermoregulatory ability in lactating dams, with evidence suggesting thermoregulatory impairment during late gestation. Lactating dams displayed a type III thermoregulatory pattern, and established a rate of evaporative water loss effective for thermostasis at an elevated colonic temperature. However, survival time was significantly decreased compared to nonreproducing females. In contrast, prior heat acclimation tended to increase the survival time of lactating dams. It was concluded that the reduction in thermoregulatory ability observed in lactating dams was related to their inability to maintain a rate of evaporative water loss effective for thermostasis at an elevated colonic temperature. PMID:7192056

  5. Regional dependence of morphine-induced mu-opiate receptor down-regulation in perinatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hammer, R P; Seatriz, J V; Ricalde, A R

    1991-12-17

    The effect of perinatal morphine administration was examined in various brain regions using in vitro receptor autoradiography. Morphine was administered by continuous s.c. infusion of 10 mg/kg per day; brains of offspring were examined at five days of age. Morphine exposure reduced mu-receptor binding density in the preoptic area of hypothalamus, but not in the primary somatosensory cortex. mu-Receptor density was greater in the medial preoptic area of females than males, and in superficial layers of cortex in males than females. The results suggest that morphine has selective regional effects on mu-receptor ontogeny in rat brain. PMID:1665797

  6. N-acetylcysteine attenuates nicotine-induced kindling in female periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Adriana Mary Nunes Costa; Gomes, Patrícia Xavier L; de Oliveira, Gersilene V; de Araújo, Fernanda Yvelize R; Tomaz, Viviane S; Chaves Filho, Adriano José Maia; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa F; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Lucena, David Freitas; Macêdo, Danielle

    2016-06-01

    Kindling is a form of behavioral sensitization that is related to the progression of several neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder. We recently demonstrated that female periadolescent rats are more vulnerable to nicotine (NIC)-induced kindling than their male counterparts. Furthermore, we evidenced that decreases in brain antioxidative defenses may contribute to this gender difference. Here we aimed to determine the preventive effects of the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) against NIC-kindling in female periadolescent rats. To do this female Wistar rats at postnatal day 30 received repeated injections of NIC 2mg/kg, i.p. every weekday for up to 19 days. NAC90, 180 or 270 mg/kg, i.p. was administered 30 min before NIC. The levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, lipid peroxidation (LP) and nitrite were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST). The development of kindling occurred at a median time of 16.5 days with 87.5% of NIC animals presenting stage 5 seizures in the last day of drug administration. NAC270 prevented the occurrence of kindling. NIC-kindled animals presented decreased levels of GSH and increased LP in the PFC, HC and ST, while SOD activity was decreased in the ST. NAC180 or 270 prevented the alterations in GSH induced by NIC, but only NAC270 prevented the alterations in LP. Nitrite levels increased in the ST of NAC270 pretreated NIC-kindled animals. Taken together we demonstrated that NAC presents anti-kindling effects in female animals partially through the restoration of oxidative alterations.

  7. Effects of maternal separation, early handling, and gonadal sex on regional metabolic capacity of the preweanling rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Jaclyn M; Padilla, Eimeira; Shumake, Jason D; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study to assess the effects of mother-infant separation on regional metabolic capacity in the preweanling rat brain. Mother-infant separation is generally known to be stressful for rat pups. Holtzman adolescent rats show a depressive-like behavioral phenotype after maternal separation during the preweanling period. However, information is lacking on the effects of maternal separation on the brains of rat pups. We addressed this issue by mapping the brains of preweanling Holtzman rat pups using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, which reflects long-term changes in brain metabolic capacity, following two weeks of repeated, prolonged maternal separation, and compared this to both early handled and non-handled pups. Quantitative image analysis revealed that maternal separation reduced cytochrome oxidase activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens shell. Maternal separation reduced prefrontal cytochrome oxidase to a greater degree in female pups than in males. Early handling reduced cytochrome oxidase activity in the posterior parietal cortex, ventral tegmental area, and subiculum, but increased cytochrome oxidase activity in the lateral frontal cortex. The sex-dependent effects of early handling on cytochrome oxidase activity were limited to the medial prefrontal cortex. Regardless of separation group, females had greater cytochrome oxidase activity in the habenula and ventral tegmental area compared to males. These findings suggest that early life mother-infant separation results in dysfunction of prefrontal and mesolimbic regions in the preweanling rat brain that may contribute to behavioral changes later in life.

  8. Behavior and the cholinergic parameters in olfactory bulbectomized female rodents: Difference between rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Stepanichev, Mikhail; Markov, Daniil; Pasikova, Natalia; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2016-01-15

    Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) in rodents induces a wide spectrum of functional disturbances, including behavioral, neurochemical, and neuromorphological alterations. We have examined the effects of OBX on behavior and the parameters of the cholinergic system in female rats and mice. In rats, OBX resulted in the appearance of some depressive-like behavioral marks, such as the decreased sucrose consumption, hyperactivity, impaired short-term memory and anxiety-like behavioral features, such as shortened presence in the center of the open field arena or open arms of the elevated plus-maze and an enhancement of avoidance behavior. These behavioral abnormalities could be associated with disturbances in hippocampal function, this suggestion being supported by the presence of cellular changes in this brain structure. No effect of OBX on the number of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band as well as on the acetylcholine content and acetylcholinesterase activity in the septum, hippocampus, and neocortex could be detected. In contrast, in mice, OBX impaired spontaneous alternation behavior and decreased the number of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band. These data demonstrate that rats and mice differently respond to OBX, in particular, OBX does not significantly affect the cholinergic system in rats. PMID:26431763

  9. Behavior and the cholinergic parameters in olfactory bulbectomized female rodents: Difference between rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Stepanichev, Mikhail; Markov, Daniil; Pasikova, Natalia; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2016-01-15

    Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) in rodents induces a wide spectrum of functional disturbances, including behavioral, neurochemical, and neuromorphological alterations. We have examined the effects of OBX on behavior and the parameters of the cholinergic system in female rats and mice. In rats, OBX resulted in the appearance of some depressive-like behavioral marks, such as the decreased sucrose consumption, hyperactivity, impaired short-term memory and anxiety-like behavioral features, such as shortened presence in the center of the open field arena or open arms of the elevated plus-maze and an enhancement of avoidance behavior. These behavioral abnormalities could be associated with disturbances in hippocampal function, this suggestion being supported by the presence of cellular changes in this brain structure. No effect of OBX on the number of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band as well as on the acetylcholine content and acetylcholinesterase activity in the septum, hippocampus, and neocortex could be detected. In contrast, in mice, OBX impaired spontaneous alternation behavior and decreased the number of cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band. These data demonstrate that rats and mice differently respond to OBX, in particular, OBX does not significantly affect the cholinergic system in rats.

  10. Differential mesocorticolimbic responses to palatable food in binge eating prone and binge eating resistant female rats.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Elaine B; Culbert, Kristen M; Gradl, Dana R; Richardson, Kimberlei A; Klump, Kelly L; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2015-12-01

    Binge eating is a key symptom of many eating disorders (e.g. binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa binge/purge type), yet the neurobiological underpinnings of binge eating are poorly understood. The mesocorticolimbic reward circuit, including the nucleus accumbens and the medial prefrontal cortex, is likely involved because this circuit mediates the hedonic value and incentive salience of palatable foods (PF). Here we tested the hypothesis that higher propensity for binge eating is associated with a heightened response (i.e., Fos induction) of the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex to PF, using an animal model that identifies binge eating prone (BEP) and binge eating resistant (BER) rats. Forty adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were given intermittent access to PF (high fat pellets) 3×/week for 3 weeks. Based on a pattern of either consistently high or consistently low PF consumption across these feeding tests, 8 rats met criteria for categorization as BEP, and 11 rats met criteria for categorization as BER. One week after the final feeding test, BEP and BER rats were either exposed to PF in their home cages or were given no PF in their home cages for 1h prior to perfusion, leading to three experimental groups for the Fos analysis: BEPs given PF, BERs given PF, and a No PF control group. The total number of Fos-immunoreactive (Fos-ir) cells in the nucleus accumbens core and shell, and the cingulate, prelimbic, and infralimbic regions of the medial prefrontal cortex was estimated by stereological analysis. PF induced higher Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens shell and core and in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex of BEP rats compared to No PF controls. Throughout the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex, PF induced higher Fos expression in BEP than in BER rats, even after adjusting for differences in PF intake. Differences in the neural activation pattern between BEP and BER rats were more robust in prefrontal cortex

  11. Actin purification from a gel of rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Peron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Actin, 99% pure, has been recovered from rat brain with a high yield (greater than 15 mg/100 g brain). We have shown that: 1. a low ionic strength extract from rat brain tissue is capable of giving rise to a gel; 2. actin is the main gel component and its proportion is one order of magnitude higher than in the original extract; 3. actin can be isolated from this extract by a three-step procedure involving gelation, dissociation of the gel in 0.6 M KCl, followed by one or two depolymerization-polymerization cycles. PMID:6529588

  12. Estradiol modulates medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala activity during fear extinction in women and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Mohamed A.; Igoe, Sarah A.; Linnman, Clas; Vitalo, Antonia; Levine, John B.; Klibanski, Anne; Goldstein, Jill M.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Men and women differ in their ability to extinguish fear. Fear extinction requires the activation of brain regions including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and amygdala. Could estradiol modulate the activity of these brain regions during fear extinction? Methods All rat experiments were conducted in naturally cycling females. Rats underwent fear conditioning on day 1. On day 2, they underwent extinction training during the metestrus phase of the cycle (low estrogen and progesterone). Extinction recall was assessed on day 3. Systemic injections of estrogen-receptor beta and alpha agonists, and estradiol were administered at different time points to assess their influence on extinction consolidation and c-fos expression in the vmPFC and amygdala. In parallel, healthy naturally cycling women underwent an analogous fear conditioning extinction training while in a 3T fMRI scanner. Measurement of their estradiol levels and skin conductance responses were obtained throughout the experiment. Results In female rats, administration of the estrogen-receptor beta (but not alpha) agonist facilitated extinction recall. Immediate (but not delayed) post-extinction training administration of estradiol facilitated extinction memory consolidation and increased c-fos expression in the vmPFC while reducing it in the amygdala. In parallel, natural variance in estradiol in pre-menopausal cycling women modulated vmPFC and amygdala reactivity and facilitated extinction recall. Conclusion We provide translational evidence that demonstrates the influence of endogenous and exogenous estradiol on the fear extinction network. Our data suggest that women’s endogenous hormonal status should be considered in future neurobiological research related to anxiety and mood disorders. PMID:21762880

  13. Effects of photoradiation therapy on normal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.K.; McKean, J.; Boisvert, D.; Tulip, J.; Mielke, B.W.

    1984-12-01

    Laser photoradiation of the brain via an optical fiber positioned 5 mm above a burr hole was performed after the injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in 33 normal rats and 6 rats with an intracerebral glioma. Normal rats received HpD, 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight, followed by laser exposure at various doses or were exposed to a fixed laser dose after the administration of HpD, 2.5 to 20 mg/kg. One control group received neither HpD nor laser energy, and another was exposed to laser energy only. The 6 rats bearing an intracranial 9L glioma were treated with HpD, 5 mg/kg, followed by laser exposure at various high doses. The temperature in the cortex or tumor was measured with a probe during laser exposure. The rats were killed 72 hours after photoradiation, and the extent of necrosis of cerebral tissue was measured microscopically. In the normal rats, the extent of brain damage correlated with increases in the dose of both the laser and the HpD. In all 6 glioma-bearing rats, the high laser doses produced some focal necrosis in the tumors but also damaged adjacent normal brain tissue. The authors conclude that damage to normal brain tissue may be a significant complication of high dose photoradiation therapy for intracranial tumors.

  14. Alterations in the molecular weight distribution of proteins in rat brain synaptosomes during aging and centrophenoxine treatment of old rats.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Nagy, I

    1984-12-01

    Properly prepared membrane proteins of brain synaptosomes of 2-, 12- and 24-month-old CFY female rats were filtrated on a Sepharose 2B gel. The molecular weight distribution showed an age-dependence: there was a clear shift toward the higher molecular weights in the adult and old rats. The observed alterations reflect an increased cross-linking of the proteins during aging due most probably to the OH free radical damage of the cell components. Centrophenoxine treatment for 2 months reversed this phenomenon in the old animals: the high molecular weight fractions decreased and the lower ones increased in the treated animals as compared to the old, untreated rats. The results support the membrane hypothesis of aging and contribute to a better understanding of the biological effects of centrophenoxine.

  15. Brain uptake of ketoprofen-lysine prodrug in rats.

    PubMed

    Gynther, Mikko; Jalkanen, Aaro; Lehtonen, Marko; Forsberg, Markus; Laine, Krista; Ropponen, Jarmo; Leppänen, Jukka; Knuuti, Johanna; Rautio, Jarkko

    2010-10-31

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of xenobiotics into the brain. Often the development of central nervous system drugs needs to be terminated because of their poor brain uptake. We describe a way to achieve large neutral amino acid transporter (LAT1)-mediated drug transport into the rat brain. We conjugated ketoprofen to an amino acid l-lysine so that the prodrug could access LAT1. The LAT1-mediated brain uptake of the prodrug was demonstrated with in situ rat brain perfusion technique. The ability of the prodrug to deliver ketoprofen into the site of action, the brain intracellular fluid, was determined combining in vivo and in vitro experiments. A rapid brain uptake from blood and cell uptake was seen both in in situ and in vivo experiments. Therefore, our results show that a prodrug approach can achieve uptake of drugs via LAT1 into the brain intracellular fluid. The distribution of the prodrug in the brain parenchyma and the site of parent drug release in the brain were shown with in vivo and in vitro studies. In addition, our results show that although lysine or ketoprofen are not LAT1-substrates themselves, by combining these molecules, the formed prodrug has affinity for LAT1. PMID:20727958

  16. In vitro comparison of rat and chicken brain neurotoxic esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, R.; Padilla, S.

    1986-04-01

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases showed that rat esterases were more sensitive than chicken to paraoxon inhibition at concentrations less than or equal to microM and superimposable with chicken esterases at concentrations of 2.5-1000 microM. Mipafox titration of the paraoxon-resistant esterases at a fixed paraoxon concentration of 100 microM (mipafox concentration: 0-1000 microM) resulted in a mipafox I50 of 7.3 microM for chicken brain NTE and 11.6 microM for rat brain NTE. NTE (i.e., paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive esterase activity) comprised 80% of chicken and 60% of rat brain paraoxon-resistant activity with the specific activity of chicken brain NTE approximately twice that of rat brain NTE. The pH maxima for NTE from both species was similar showing broad, slightly alkaline optima from pH 7.9 to 8.6. (/sup 3/H)Diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP)-labeled NTE from the brains of both species had an apparent mol wt of 160,000 measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, NTE from both species was very similar, with the mipafox I50 for rat NTE within the range of reported values for chicken and human NTE, and the inhibitor parameters of the chicken NTE assay were applicable for the rat NTE assay.

  17. Neonatal injections of methoxychlor decrease adult rat female reproductive behavior.

    PubMed

    Bertolasio, Jennifer; Fyfe, Susanne; Snyder, Ben W; Davis, Aline M

    2011-12-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), a commonly used pesticide, has been labeled as an endocrine disruptor. To evaluate the impact of neonatal exposure to MXC on female reproduction, female Sprague-Dawley rats were given subcutaneous injections on postnatal days 1, 3, and 5. The injections contained 1.0mg MXC, 2.0mg MXC, 10 μg 17β-estradiol benzoate (positive control), or sesame oil (vehicle). The injections of MXC had no effect on anogenital distance or day of vaginal opening. Treatment with either 2.0mg MXC or estradiol significantly increased the total number of days with vaginal keratinization. Treatment with MXC had no effect on ability to exhibit a mating response as an adult female, although the high dose MXC (2.0) and the positive control (estradiol) animals demonstrated a decrease in degree of receptivity, a decrease in proceptive behavior and an increase in rejection behavior. These data suggest that higher doses of MXC given directly to pups during the neonatal period can act as an estrogen and alter aspects of the nervous system, impacting adult reproductive characteristics.

  18. Female Mice are Resistant to Fabp1 Gene Ablation-Induced Alterations in Brain Endocannabinoid Levels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Chung, Sarah; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Dangott, Lawrence J; Peng, Xiaoxue; Kaczocha, Martin; Murphy, Eric J; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2016-09-01

    Although liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1, L-FABP) is not detectable in the brain, Fabp1 gene ablation (LKO) markedly increases endocannabinoids (EC) in brains of male mice. Since the brain EC system of females differs significantly from that of males, it was important to determine if LKO differently impacted the brain EC system. LKO did not alter brain levels of arachidonic acid (ARA)-containing EC, i.e. arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but decreased non-ARA-containing N-acylethanolamides (OEA, PEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG) that potentiate the actions of AEA and 2-AG. These changes in brain potentiating EC levels were not associated with: (1) a net decrease in levels of brain membrane proteins associated with fatty acid uptake and EC synthesis; (2) a net increase in brain protein levels of cytosolic EC chaperones and enzymes in EC degradation; or (3) increased brain protein levels of EC receptors (CB1, TRVP1). Instead, the reduced or opposite responsiveness of female brain EC levels to loss of FABP1 (LKO) correlated with intrinsically lower FABP1 level in livers of WT females than males. These data show that female mouse brain endocannabinoid levels were unchanged (AEA, 2-AG) or decreased (OEA, PEA, 2-OG) by complete loss of FABP1 (LKO). PMID:27450559

  19. Estrous cycle affects the neurochemical and neurobehavioral profile of carvacrol-treated female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trabace, L.; Zotti, M.; Morgese, M.G.; Tucci, P.; Colaianna, M.; Schiavone, S.; Avato, P.; Cuomo, V.

    2011-09-01

    Carvacrol is the major constituent of essential oils from aromatic plants. It showed antimicrobial, anticancer and antioxidant properties. Although it was approved for food use and included in the chemical flavorings list, no indication on its safety has been estimated. Since the use of plant extracts is relatively high among women, aim of this study was to evaluate carvacrol effects on female physiology and endocrine profiles by using female rats in proestrus and diestrus phases. Serotonin and metabolite tissue content in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, after carvacrol administration (0.15 and 0.45 g/kg p.o.), was measured. Drug effects in behavioral tests for alterations in motor activity, depression, anxiety-related behaviors and endocrine alterations were also investigated. While in proestrus carvacrol reduced serotonin and metabolite levels in both brain areas, no effects were observed in diestrus phase. Only in proestrus phase, carvacrol induced a depressive-like behavior in forced swimming test, without accompanying changes in ambulation. The improvement of performance in FST after subchronic treatment with fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) suggested a specific involvement of serotonergic system. No differences were found across the groups with regard to self-grooming behavior. Moreover, in proestrus phase, carvacrol reduced only estradiol levels without binding hypothalamic estradiol receptors. Our study showed an estrous-stage specific effect of carvacrol on depressive behaviors and endocrine parameters, involving serotonergic system. Given the wide carvacrol use not only as feed additive, but also as cosmetic essence and herbal remedy, our results suggest that an accurate investigation on the effects of its chronic exposure is warranted. - Highlights: > Carvacrol induced a depressive-like phenotype in rats, depending on ovarian cyclicity. > Carvacrol selectively reduced serotonin content in female rats in proestrus phase. > Carvacrol reduced serotonin levels

  20. Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

    PubMed Central

    van der Bijl, Wouter; Thyselius, Malin; Kotrschal, Alexander; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    Large brains are thought to result from selection for cognitive benefits, but how enhanced cognition leads to increased fitness remains poorly understood. One explanation is that increased cognitive ability results in improved monitoring and assessment of predator threats. Here, we use male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata), artificially selected for large and small brain size, to provide an experimental evaluation of this hypothesis. We examined their behavioural response as singletons, pairs or shoals of four towards a model predator. Large-brained females, but not males, spent less time performing predator inspections, an inherently risky behaviour. Video analysis revealed that large-brained females were further away from the model predator when in pairs but that they habituated quickly towards the model when in shoals of four. Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males. We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response. Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion. Our results provide experimental support for the general idea that predation pressure is likely to be important for the evolution of brain size in prey species. PMID:26203003

  1. Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, Wouter; Thyselius, Malin; Kotrschal, Alexander; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-08-01

    Large brains are thought to result from selection for cognitive benefits, but how enhanced cognition leads to increased fitness remains poorly understood. One explanation is that increased cognitive ability results in improved monitoring and assessment of predator threats. Here, we use male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata), artificially selected for large and small brain size, to provide an experimental evaluation of this hypothesis. We examined their behavioural response as singletons, pairs or shoals of four towards a model predator. Large-brained females, but not males, spent less time performing predator inspections, an inherently risky behaviour. Video analysis revealed that large-brained females were further away from the model predator when in pairs but that they habituated quickly towards the model when in shoals of four. Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males. We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response. Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion. Our results provide experimental support for the general idea that predation pressure is likely to be important for the evolution of brain size in prey species.

  2. Brain size affects the behavioural response to predators in female guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, Wouter; Thyselius, Malin; Kotrschal, Alexander; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-08-01

    Large brains are thought to result from selection for cognitive benefits, but how enhanced cognition leads to increased fitness remains poorly understood. One explanation is that increased cognitive ability results in improved monitoring and assessment of predator threats. Here, we use male and female guppies (Poecilia reticulata), artificially selected for large and small brain size, to provide an experimental evaluation of this hypothesis. We examined their behavioural response as singletons, pairs or shoals of four towards a model predator. Large-brained females, but not males, spent less time performing predator inspections, an inherently risky behaviour. Video analysis revealed that large-brained females were further away from the model predator when in pairs but that they habituated quickly towards the model when in shoals of four. Males stayed further away from the predator model than females but again we found no brain size effect in males. We conclude that differences in brain size affect the female predator response. Large-brained females might be able to assess risk better or need less sensory information to reach an accurate conclusion. Our results provide experimental support for the general idea that predation pressure is likely to be important for the evolution of brain size in prey species. PMID:26203003

  3. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects. We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model. Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males. PMID:26678032

  4. Repeated ethanol exposure affects the acquisition of spatial memory in adolescent female rats.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Ratna; Basak, Ashim K; Sircar, Debashish

    2009-09-14

    Ethanol has been reported to disrupt spatial learning and memory in adolescent male rats. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of ethanol on the acquisition of spatial memory in adolescent female rats. Adolescent female rats were subjected to repeated ethanol or saline treatments, and spatial learning was tested in the Morris water maze. For comparison, adult female rats were subjected to similar ethanol treatment and behavioral assessments as for adolescent rats. Ethanol-treated adolescent rats took longer and swam greater distances to find the hidden platform than saline controls. In the probe trial, ethanol-treated adolescent rats showed a trend towards reduced time spent in the target quadrant, and made significantly fewer target location crossings than saline-treated controls. Adult saline-treated control rats did not learn the spatial memory task as well as the adolescent saline-treated rats. Although ethanol in adult rats increased both latency and swim distance to find the platform, in the probe trial there was no difference between ethanol-treated adult rats and age-matched saline controls. Ethanol did not alter swim speed or performance in the cued visual task at either age. Together, these data suggest that ethanol specifically impairs the acquisition of spatial memory in adolescent female rats. Since adult females did not learn the task, ethanol-induced alterations in water maze performance may not reflect true learning and memory dysfunction. PMID:19463705

  5. Brain glucose content in fetuses of ethanol-fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, G.; Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Hoffen, B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated impaired placental glucose transfer and fetal hypoglycemia in association with ethanol ingestion by pregnant rats. The present study examines the relationship between glucose availability and fetal brain growth under the same conditions. Rats (EF) were fed ethanol (30% of caloric intake) in liquid diet throughout gestation. Controls received isocaloric diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation fetuses were obtained by cesarean section. Fetal brains were removed and freeze-clamped. Brain weight was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) by maternal ethanol ingestion (206 +/- 2, 212 +/- 4 and 194 +/- 2 mg in AF, FP and EF fetuses respectively). Similarly, fetal brain glucose content was lower (p < 0.05) in the EF group (14.3 +/- 0.9 mmoles/g dry weight) than in the PF (18.6 +/- 1.0) or the AF (16.2 +/- 0.9) groups. The protein: DNA ratio, an indicator of cell size, correlated positively (r = 0.371, p < 0.005) with brain glucose content. In conclusion, maternal ethanol ingestion resulted in lower brain weight and reduced brain glucose content. Glucose availability may be a significant factor in the determination of cell size in the fetal rat brain.

  6. Brain size affects female but not male survival under predation threat

    PubMed Central

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Buechel, Séverine D; Zala, Sarah M; Corral-Lopez, Alberto; Penn, Dustin J; Kolm, Niclas; Sorci, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    There is remarkable diversity in brain size among vertebrates, but surprisingly little is known about how ecological species interactions impact the evolution of brain size. Using guppies, artificially selected for large and small brains, we determined how brain size affects survival under predation threat in a naturalistic environment. We cohoused mixed groups of small- and large-brained individuals in six semi-natural streams with their natural predator, the pike cichlid, and monitored survival in weekly censuses over 5 months. We found that large-brained females had 13.5% higher survival compared to small-brained females, whereas the brain size had no discernible effect on male survival. We suggest that large-brained females have a cognitive advantage that allows them to better evade predation, whereas large-brained males are more colourful, which may counteract any potential benefits of brain size. Our study provides the first experimental evidence that trophic interactions can affect the evolution of brain size. PMID:25960088

  7. Brain size affects female but not male survival under predation threat.

    PubMed

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Buechel, Séverine D; Zala, Sarah M; Corral-Lopez, Alberto; Penn, Dustin J; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-07-01

    There is remarkable diversity in brain size among vertebrates, but surprisingly little is known about how ecological species interactions impact the evolution of brain size. Using guppies, artificially selected for large and small brains, we determined how brain size affects survival under predation threat in a naturalistic environment. We cohoused mixed groups of small- and large-brained individuals in six semi-natural streams with their natural predator, the pike cichlid, and monitored survival in weekly censuses over 5 months. We found that large-brained females had 13.5% higher survival compared to small-brained females, whereas the brain size had no discernible effect on male survival. We suggest that large-brained females have a cognitive advantage that allows them to better evade predation, whereas large-brained males are more colourful, which may counteract any potential benefits of brain size. Our study provides the first experimental evidence that trophic interactions can affect the evolution of brain size. PMID:25960088

  8. A microanalysis of wheel running in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Eikelboom, R; Mills, R

    1988-01-01

    The pattern of ad lib wheel running was studied in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Wheel turns per 20 seconds were recorded for 5 days. Females ran more than males but both ran chiefly at night, with a peak at the beginning and a decline to low levels by daytime. Log-survivor plots showed running occurred in distinct episodes separated by long periods of nonrunning. Both the nightly decrease and the sex difference in running were due to changes in duration of episodes and the running speed. Initiation of running, as reflected in the length of nonrunning periods was similar in both sexes and remained constant over the night. Running was discussed in terms of independent initiation and termination factors and its parallels to eating patterns.

  9. Persistent genital hyperinnervation following progesterone administration to adolescent female rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhaohui; Smith, Peter G

    2014-12-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia, a female pelvic pain syndrome affecting substantial numbers of women, is characterized by genital hypersensitivity and sensory hyperinnervation. Previous studies have shown that the risk of developing provoked vestibulodynia is markedly elevated following adolescent use of oral contraceptives with high progesterone content. We hypothesized that progesterone, a steroid hormone with known neurotropic properties, may alter genital innervation through direct or indirect actions. Female Sprague Dawley rats received progesterone (20 mg/kg subcutaneously) from Days 20-27; tissue was removed for analysis in some rats on Day 28, while others were ovariectomized on Day 43 and infused for 7 days with vehicle or 17beta estradiol. Progesterone resulted in overall increases in vaginal innervation at both Day 28 and 50 due to proliferation of peptidergic sensory and sympathetic (but not parasympathetic) axons. Estradiol reduced innervation in progesterone-treated and untreated groups. To assess the mechanisms of sensory hyperinnervation, we cultured dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons and found that progesterone increases neurite outgrowth by small unmyelinated (but not myelinated) sensory neurons, it was receptor mediated, and it was nonadditive with NGF. Pretreatment of ganglion with progesterone also increased neurite outgrowth in response to vaginal target explants. However, pretreatment of vaginal target with progesterone did not improve outgrowth. We conclude that adolescent progesterone exposure may contribute to provoked vestibulodynia by eliciting persistent genital hyperinnervation via a direct effect on unmyelinated sensory nociceptor neurons and that estradiol, a well-documented therapeutic, may alleviate symptoms in part by reducing progesterone-induced sensory hyperinnervation. PMID:25359899

  10. Effects of Extended Exposure to the Antibacterial Triclosan in the the Adult Female Rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclosan (TCS), an antibacterial, has been shown to have endocrine disrupting activity in the rat. We reported previously that TCS advanced puberty in the female rat in the female pubertal assay and potentiated the estrogenic effect of ethinyl estradiol (EE) on uterine growth i...

  11. Ulinastatin attenuates brain edema after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Tao; Zhu, Gangyi

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains the leading cause of injury-related death and disability. Brain edema, one of the most major complications of TBI, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure, and poor prognosis following TBI. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Ulinastatin (UTI), a serine protease inhibitor, attenuates brain edema following TBI. Our results showed that treatment with UTI at a dose of 50,000 U/kg attenuated the brain edema, as assayed by water content 24 h after TBI induction. This attenuation was associated with a significant decrease of the expression level of aquaporin-4. In addition, we showed that UTI treatment also markedly inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β and TNF-α as well as activity of NF-κB. Collectively, our findings suggested that UTI may be a promising strategy to treat brain edema following TBI.

  12. Central injection of ketone body suppresses luteinizing hormone release via the catecholaminergic pathway in female rats.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kinuyo; Kinoshita, Mika; Susaki, Naoki; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-ichiro

    2011-06-01

    Ketosis is found in various pathophysiological conditions, including diabetes and starvation, that are accompanied by suppression of gonadal activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of ketone body in the brain in regulating pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in female rats. Injection of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), a ketone body, into the fourth cerebroventricle (4V) induced suppression of pulsatile LH secretion in a dose-dependent manner in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with an estradiol (E2) implant producing diestrus plasma E2 levels. Plasma glucose and corticosterone levels increased immediately after the 4V 3HB injection, suggesting that the treatment caused a hunger response. The 3HB-induced suppression of LH pulses might be mediated by noradrenergic inputs to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) because a local injection of α-methyl- p-tyrosine, a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor, into the PVN blocked 3HB-induced suppression of LH pulses and PVN noradrenaline release was increased by 4V 3HB injection in E2-primed OVX rats. These results suggest that ketone body sensed by a central energy sensor in the hindbrain may suppress gonadotropin release via noradrenergic inputs to the PVN under ketosis.

  13. Hydrogen-rich water attenuates brain damage and inflammation after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Runfa; Hou, Zonggang; Hao, Shuyu; Wu, Weichuan; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaogang; Lu, Te; Liu, Baiyun

    2016-04-15

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are the two major causes of apoptosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Most previous studies of the neuroprotective effects of hydrogen-rich water on TBI primarily focused on antioxidant effects. The present study investigated whether hydrogen-rich water (HRW) could attenuate brain damage and inflammation after traumatic brain injury in rats. A TBI model was induced using a controlled cortical impact injury. HRW or distilled water was injected intraperitoneally daily following surgery. We measured survival rate, brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and neurological dysfunction in all animals. Changes in inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells and Cho/Cr metabolites in brain tissues were also detected. Our results demonstrated that TBI-challenged rats exhibited significant brain injuries that were characterized by decreased survival rate and increased BBB permeability, brain edema, and neurological dysfunction, while HRW treatment ameliorated the consequences of TBI. HRW treatment also decreased the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and HMGB1), inflammatory cell number (Iba1) and inflammatory metabolites (Cho) and increased the levels of an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the brain tissues of TBI-challenged rats. In conclusion, HRW could exert a neuroprotective effect against TBI and attenuate inflammation, which suggests HRW as an effective therapeutic strategy for TBI patients. PMID:26826009

  14. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  15. Aggression by a female rat cohabiting with a sterile male declines within 27 h following ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1993-02-01

    Females that had become aggressive as a result of cohabiting with a sterile male were ovariectomized and implanted with empty Silastic tubes. Control groups were either sham ovariectomized or ovariectomized and implanted with Silastic tubes providing replacement levels of estradiol and testosterone. Twenty-seven hours following surgery, all animals were tested for aggressiveness toward an unfamiliar female rat. The aggression of ovariectomized females without hormone replacement declined to a minimal level postoperatively and was significantly lower than that of sham-ovariectomized females or ovariectomized females with estradiol and testosterone replacement. Both sham-ovariectomized females and ovariectomized females given hormone replacement displayed a level of aggression close to that observed preoperatively. The aggression of a female rat cohabiting with a sterile male appears to be highly sensitive to the removal of gonadal hormones. This corresponds with observations made on pregnant females and contrasts with those made on lactating females.

  16. Prevention of spontaneous tumours in female rats by fadrozole hydrochloride, an aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Gunson, D. E.; Steele, R. E.; Chau, R. Y.

    1995-01-01

    Mammary tumours are oestrogen dependent in female Sprague-Dawley rats and in a significant proportion of women, so pharmacological treatment to inhibit oestrogen production is a valuable therapeutic measure to prevent or slow the progression of disease. Here we show that a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor, which competitively inhibits the conversion of androstenedione to oestrone, prevents the development of both benign and malignant spontaneous mammary neoplasms in female Sprague-Dawley ats. It also slows the spontaneous development of pituitary pars distalis adenomas in female rats, and reduces the incidence of spontaneous hepatocellular tumours in male and female rats. PMID:7639848

  17. Trans fat intake across gestation and lactation increases morphine preference in females but not in male rats: Behavioral and biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Roversi, Karine; Pase, Camila Simonetti; Roversi, Katiane; Vey, Luciana Taschetto; Dias, Verônica Tironi; Metz, Vinícia Garzella; Burger, Marilise Escobar

    2016-10-01

    The abuse of morphine has risen considerably in recent years, mainly due to the increase of its prescription in clinical medicine. Also, increased consumption of processed foods, rich in trans fatty acids (TFA), has caused concerns about human health. Thus, the aim of our study was to determine whether trans fat consumption in the perinatal period may affect preference for morphine in adolescent female and male rats. Dams were orally supplemented with water (C-control) or hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF-rich in TFA) during gestation and lactation periods. On post-natal day 43, pups were exposed to morphine (4mg/kg i.p., for 4 days) and assessed in the conditioned place preference paradigm. Anxiety-like symptoms were assessed, and oxidative status of the brain was estimated by reactive species (RS) generation. Female rats with HVF supplementation showed increased morphine preference and less anxiety-like symptoms. Additionally, both male and female rats from HVF-supplementation showed increased RS generation in the ventral tegmental area, whose level was similar in morphine-conditioned female rats. RS generation was increased in the hippocampus of morphine-conditioned female rats, regardless of the supplementation of their dams. We may infer that gender is a predictive factor to opioid preference, since adolescent female rats showed more susceptibility to addiction than males. Furthermore, trans fat consumption across the perinatal period is able to modify parameters of opioid preference in female rats, possibly due to TFA incorporation in phospholipid membranes, modifying the endogenous opioid system and the oxidative status in brain areas related to drug addiction. PMID:27341999

  18. Trans fat intake across gestation and lactation increases morphine preference in females but not in male rats: Behavioral and biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Roversi, Karine; Pase, Camila Simonetti; Roversi, Katiane; Vey, Luciana Taschetto; Dias, Verônica Tironi; Metz, Vinícia Garzella; Burger, Marilise Escobar

    2016-10-01

    The abuse of morphine has risen considerably in recent years, mainly due to the increase of its prescription in clinical medicine. Also, increased consumption of processed foods, rich in trans fatty acids (TFA), has caused concerns about human health. Thus, the aim of our study was to determine whether trans fat consumption in the perinatal period may affect preference for morphine in adolescent female and male rats. Dams were orally supplemented with water (C-control) or hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF-rich in TFA) during gestation and lactation periods. On post-natal day 43, pups were exposed to morphine (4mg/kg i.p., for 4 days) and assessed in the conditioned place preference paradigm. Anxiety-like symptoms were assessed, and oxidative status of the brain was estimated by reactive species (RS) generation. Female rats with HVF supplementation showed increased morphine preference and less anxiety-like symptoms. Additionally, both male and female rats from HVF-supplementation showed increased RS generation in the ventral tegmental area, whose level was similar in morphine-conditioned female rats. RS generation was increased in the hippocampus of morphine-conditioned female rats, regardless of the supplementation of their dams. We may infer that gender is a predictive factor to opioid preference, since adolescent female rats showed more susceptibility to addiction than males. Furthermore, trans fat consumption across the perinatal period is able to modify parameters of opioid preference in female rats, possibly due to TFA incorporation in phospholipid membranes, modifying the endogenous opioid system and the oxidative status in brain areas related to drug addiction.

  19. Nicotinic acid increases the lipid content of rat brain synaptosomes. [Ethanol effects

    SciTech Connect

    Basilio, C.; Flores, M.

    1989-02-09

    Chronic administration of nicotinic acid (NA) increase hepatic lipids and potentiates a similar effect induced by ethanol. The amethystic properties of NA promoted us to study its effects on the lipid content of brain synaptosomes of native and ethanol treated rats. Groups of 10 Sprague-Dawley female rats received i.p. either saline, ethanol (4g/kg), NA (50mg/kg), or a mixture of both compounds once a week during 3 weeks. The sleeping time (ST) of the animals receiving ethanol was recorded, brain synaptosomes of all groups were prepared and total lipids (TL) and cholesterol (Chol) content were determined. NA, ethanol and ethanol + NA markedly increased both TL and Chol of synaptosomes. Animals treated with ethanol or ethanol + NA developed tolerance. The group treated with ethanol-NA showed the highest Chol content and slept significantly less than the one treated with ethanol alone indicating that the changes induced by NA favored the appearance of tolerance.

  20. Does repetitive Ritalin injection produce long-term effects on SD female adolescent rats?

    PubMed

    Lee, Min J; Yang, Pamela B; Wilcox, Victor T; Burau, Keith D; Swann, Alan C; Dafny, Nachum

    2009-09-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD), or Ritalin, is a psychostimulant that is prescribed for an extended period of time to children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Adolescence is a time of critical brain maturation and development, and the drug exposure during this time could lead to lasting changes in the brain that endure into the adulthood. Circadian rhythms are 24 h rhythms of physiological processes that are synchronized by the master-clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, to keep the body stable in a changing environment. The aim of present study is to observe the effect of repeated MPD exposure on the locomotor diurnal rhythm activity patterns of female adolescent Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats using the open field assay. 31 female adolescent SD rats were divided into four groups: control, 0.6 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, and 10 mg/kg MPD group. On experimental day 1, all groups were given an injection of saline. On experimental days 2-7, animals were injected once a day with either saline, 0.6 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, or 10 mg/kg MPD, and experimental days 8-10 were the washout period. A re-challenge injection was given to each animal on experimental day 11 with the similar dose as the experimental days 2-7. The locomotor movements were counted by the computerized animal activity monitoring system. The data were analyzed statistically to find out whether the diurnal rhythm activity patterns were altered. The obtained data showed that repeated administrations of 2.5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg MPD were able to change the locomotor diurnal rhythm patterns, which suggests that these MPD doses exerts long-term effects.

  1. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of {sup 3}H-inulin and {sup 14}C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients.

  2. The cAMP response element-binding protein in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulates the formalin-induced pain behavior in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Hiroko; Ishida, Maho; Arita, Jun; Mitsushima, Dai; Takahashi, Takuya; Kimura, Fukuko; Funabashi, Toshiya

    2009-12-01

    Abstract Differences in male and female responses to pain are widely recognized in many species, including humans, but the cerebral mechanisms that generate these responses are unknown. Using the formalin test, we confirmed that proestrus female rats showed nociceptive behavior, modulated by estrogen that was distinct from male rats, particularly during the interphase period. We then explored the brain areas, which were involved in the female pattern of nociceptive behavior. We found that, after a formalin injection and at the time corresponding to the behavioral interphase, the number of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB)-immunoreactive neurons observed by immunocytochemistry increased in the dorsolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTLD) in female but not male rats. There were no significant sex differences in pCREB expression following formalin in any region other than the BSTLD. The increased pCREB in female rats was eliminated after an ovariectomy and restored with 17beta-estradiol treatment. Neither an orchidectomy nor 17beta-estradiol treatment affected the pCREB response in male rats. The increase in pCREB expression in the BSTLD in female rats after formalin injection was confirmed with immunoblotting. To determine the role of CREB in the BSTLD, adenovirus-mediated expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (mCREB) was carried out. The nociceptive behavior during interphase was significantly attenuated by injection of virus carrying mCREB into the BSTLD in female rats but not in male rats. These results suggest a novel role for CREB in the BSTLD as a modulator of the pain response in a female-specific, estrogen-dependent manner.

  3. [DYNAMICS OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHASE ACTIVITY IN RAT BRAIN IN PRENATAL HYPOXIA MODEL].

    PubMed

    Khairova, V R; Safarov, M I

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal ontogenesis is a period of high sensitivity to stressful impact, so any stressor can lead to changes of physiological, biochemical indicators, behavioral and cognitive functions. The most common and clinically significant stress factor, which the embryo may be exposed during embryonic development, is hypoxia. In this case pathological changes in the central nervous system depend on the duration and severity of hypoxic exposure, individual tolerance and the stage of prenatal development, at each of which in the brain take place the basic histogenetic processes. By activating energetically disadvantageous anaerobic glycolysis hypoxia leads to excess of glutamate emission and cell apoptosis. Glutamine synthase is a basic enzyme that regulates metabolism of glutamate, catalyzing conversion of glutamate to glutamine with ammonia detoxification. The aim of the presented work was to reveal changes in the activity of one of the key enzyme of glutamate metabolism- glutamine synthetase in the brain of offspring of white rats undergone to hypoxia at different stages of prenatal ontogenesis. Hypoxia was created by placing female rats at stages of the pregnancy, corresponding to progestation period of organogenesis and fetal period of prenatal development, in the hypobaric chamber with exposure to 5% oxygen and 95% nitrogen gas mixture during 30 minutes per day. The offspring obtained from females of control and experimental groups were used for biochemical determinations in the age of 1 and 3 month. It has been established that hypoxia exposed to pregnant females during embryonic organogenesis causes significant changes in enzyme activity, particularly pronounced in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, as compared with progestational and fetal hypoxia. Enzyme activity decreased in a greater degree in one-month-old rats undergone to prenatal hypoxia, than three- month-old animals. Thus, stress during intensive processes of proliferation and migration of cells of the

  4. POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT AND GENDER DEPENDENT EXPRESSION OF TIP39 IN THE RAT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Wang, Jing; Irwin, Sarah; Usdin, Ted Björn

    2008-01-01

    Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) is a selective agonist of the parathyroid hormone 2 (PTH2) receptor. The topographical distributions of TIP39 and the PTH2 receptor in the brain, described in young male rats, suggested that TIP39 has limbic and endocrine functions. In the present study, we investigated the expression of TIP39 and the PTH2 receptor in male and female rat brain during postnatal development by means of in situ hybridization histochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TIP39’s distribution and expression levels are similar in young female and male brains. TIP39 mRNA levels peak at postnatal day 14 and subsequently decline both in the subparafascicular area and the medial paralemniscal nucleus, the two major sites where TIP39 is synthesized. A greater developmental decrease in TIP39 expression in males leads to greater levels in older females than older males. The decrease is partially reversed by pre-pubertal but not post-pubertal gonadectomy. TIP39 peptide levels in cell bodies change in parallel with mRNA levels, while TIP39 appears and disappears somewhat later in nerve fibers. In addition, TIP39 peptide levels are also sexually dimorphic in older rats. In contrast, PTH2 receptor expression in the brain does not decrease during puberty and is not sexually dimorphic even in old animals. The appearance of TIP39 during early, and decline during late, postnatal development together with the gender dependent levels in mature animals suggest that TIP39 may play a role in sexual maturation or gender specific functions. PMID:16871538

  5. Exercise in obese female rats has beneficial effects on maternal and male and female offspring metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Claudia C; Reyes-Castro, Luis A; Bautista, Claudia J; Larrea, Fernando; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Zambrano, Elena

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Maternal obesity (MO) impairs maternal and offspring health. Mechanisms and interventions to prevent adverse maternal and offspring outcomes need to be determined. Human studies are confounded by socio-economic status providing the rationale for controlled animal data on effects of maternal exercise (MEx) intervention on maternal (F0) and offspring (F1) outcomes in MO. HYPOTHESIS MO produces metabolic and endocrine dysfunction, increases maternal and offspring glucocorticoid exposure, oxidative stress and adverse offspring outcomes by postnatal day (PND) 36. MEx prevents these outcomes. METHODS F0 female rats ate either control or obesogenic diet from weaning through lactation. Half of each group wheel ran (from day ninety of life through pregnancy beginning day 120) providing four groups (n=8/group) – i) controls, ii) obese, iii) exercised controls and iv) exercised obese. After weaning, PND 21, F1 offspring ate a control diet. Metabolic parameters of F0 prepregnancy and end of lactation and F1 offspring at PND 36 were analyzed. RESULTS Exercise did not change maternal weight. Before breeding, MO elevated F0 glucose, insulin, triglycerides, cholesterol, leptin, fat and oxidative stress. Exercise completely prevented the triglyceride rise and partially glucose, insulin, cholesterol and oxidative stress increases. MO decreased fertility, recovered by exercise. At the end of lactation, exercise returned all metabolic variables except leptin to control levels. Exercise partially prevented MO elevated corticosterone. F1 Offspring weights were similar at birth. At PND 36 MO increased F1 male but not female offspring leptin, triglycerides and fat mass. In controls exercise reduced male and female offspring glucose, prevented the offspring leptin increase and partially the triglyceride rise. CONCLUSIONS MEx before and during pregnancy has beneficial effects on maternal and offspring metabolism and endocrine function occurring with no weight change in mothers

  6. The Posterodorsal Medial Amygdala Regulates the Timing of Puberty Onset in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, X. F.; Hu, M. H.; Hanley, B. P.; Lin, Y. S.; Poston, L.; Lightman, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is the major risk factor for early puberty, but emerging evidence indicates other factors including psychosocial stress. One key brain region notable for its role in controlling calorie intake, stress, and behavior is the amygdala. Early studies involving amygdala lesions that included the medial nucleus advanced puberty in rats. More recently it was shown that a critical site for lesion-induced hyperphagia and obesity is the posterodorsal subnucleus of the medial amygdala (MePD), which may explain the advancement of puberty. Glutamatergic activity also increases in the MePD during puberty without a corresponding γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic change, suggesting an overall activation of this brain region. In the present study, we report that neurotoxic lesioning of the MePD advances puberty and increases weight gain in female rats fed a normal diet. However, MePD lesioned rats fed a 25% nonnutritive bulk diet also showed the dramatic advancement of puberty but without the increase in body weight. In both dietary groups, MePD lesions resulted in an increase in socialization and a decrease in play fighting behavior. Chronic GABAA receptor antagonism in the MePD from postnatal day 21 for 14 days also advanced puberty, increased socialization, and decreased play fighting without altering body weight, whereas glutamate receptor antagonism delayed puberty and decreased socialization without affecting play fighting. In conclusion, our results suggest the MePD regulates the timing of puberty via a novel mechanism independent of change in body weight and caloric intake. MePD glutamatergic systems advance the timing of puberty whereas local GABAergic activation results in a delay. PMID:26252061

  7. Anti-oxidative effects produced by environmental enrichment in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Mármol, Frederic; Rodríguez, Clara A; Sánchez, Juan; Chamizo, Victoria D

    2015-07-10

    Both physical and intellectual activity may reduce the incidence of neurodegenerative disorders. There is evidence that environmental enrichment (EE) can induce profound behavioral, neurochemical and neuroanatomical changes, thus producing lasting improvements in memory and learning tasks. In this study we evaluated the anti-oxidative effects produced by EE in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex of male and female rats. The animals had been reared in either EE or control conditions. The parameters studied were: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein oxidation, total radical antioxidant parameter, catalase, superoxide dismutase and superoxide anion activity. The results showed that our EE protocol reduced markers of oxidative stress in the hippocampus and in the cerebral cortex. Overall, the measures taken in the two cerebral regions revealed that EE rats showed higher values for antioxidant measures and lower values for oxidative stress parameters than control animals. More importantly, a consistent sex difference was found, indicating that in female rats the hippocampus and cerebral cortex are plastic brain regions receptive to external stimulation such as EE. Although EE males have higher levels for antioxidant capacity, catalase and SOD, it is likely that females do not need to activate all the antioxidant defenses since they have a greater capacity to assimilate external stimuli. This is suggested by the similarity of protein oxidation and TBARS levels in hippocampus in both sexes, and the even lower levels of protein oxidation and superoxide anion activity in the cerebral cortex in EE females.

  8. Localizing Brain Regions Associated with Female Mate Preference Behavior in a Swordtail

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ryan Y.; Ramsey, Mary E.; Cummings, Molly E.

    2012-01-01

    Female mate choice behavior is a critical component of sexual selection, yet identifying the neural basis of this behavior is largely unresolved. Previous studies have implicated sensory processing and hypothalamic brain regions during female mate choice and there is a conserved network of brain regions (Social Behavior Network, SBN) that underlies sexual behaviors. However, we are only beginning to understand the role this network has in pre-copulatory female mate choice. Using in situ hybridization, we identify brain regions associated with mate preference in female Xiphophorus nigrensis, a swordtail species with a female choice mating system. We measure gene expression in 10 brain regions (linked to sexual behavior, reward, sensory integration or other processes) and find significant correlations between female preference behavior and gene expression in two telencephalic areas associated with reward, learning and multi-sensory processing (medial and lateral zones of the dorsal telencephalon) as well as an SBN region traditionally associated with sexual response (preoptic area). Network analysis shows that these brain regions may also be important in mate preference and that correlated patterns of neuroserpin expression between regions co-vary with differential compositions of the mate choice environment. Our results expand the emerging network for female preference from one that focused on sensory processing and midbrain sexual response centers to a more complex coordination involving forebrain areas that integrate primary sensory processing and reward. PMID:23209722

  9. Activity-based anorexia is associated with reduced hippocampal cell proliferation in adolescent female rats.

    PubMed

    Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Fornal, Casimir A; Takase, Luiz F; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Arner, Candice; Walsh, B Timothy; Hoebel, Bartley G; Jacobs, Barry L

    2013-01-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is an animal model of anorexia nervosa that mimics core features of the clinical psychiatric disorder, including severe food restriction, weight loss, and hyperactivity. The ABA model is currently being used to study starvation-induced changes in the brain. Here, we examined hippocampal cell proliferation in animals with ABA (or the appropriate control conditions). Adolescent female Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 4 groups: control (24h/day food access), food-restricted (1h/day food access), exercise (24h/day food and wheel access), and ABA (1h/day food access, 24h/day wheel access). After 3 days of ABA, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 200mg/kg, i.p.) was injected and the rats were perfused 2h later. Brains were removed and subsequently processed for BrdU and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. The acute induction of ABA reduced cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus. This effect was significant in the hilus region of the dentate gyrus, but not in the subgranular zone, where adult neurogenesis occurs. Marked decreases in cell proliferation were also observed in the surrounding dorsal hippocampus and in the corpus callosum. These results indicate a primary effect on gliogenesis rather than neurogenesis following 3 days of ABA. For each brain region studied (except SGZ), there was a strong positive correlation between the level of cell proliferation and body weight/food intake. Future studies should examine whether these changes are maintained following long-term weight restoration and whether alterations in neurogenesis occur following longer exposures to ABA.

  10. Genetics of alcoholism: rapid development of a new high-ethanol-preferring (HEP) strain of female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Myers, R D; Robinson, D E; West, M W; Biggs, T A; McMillen, B A

    1998-11-01

    A genetically based animal model of alcoholism has been developed in a relatively short period of 3 years. The new strain is characterized by an intense preference for ethanol over water as well as unique behavioral, neurochemical and other attributes. This new strain, termed high-ethanol-preferring (HEP) rats, was derived initially from selective cross-breeding of a variant strain of female Harlan Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with the outbred Wistar line of male ethanol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, drinking patterns of both genders were obtained over 10 days by presenting water and ethanol in concentrations ranging from 3% to 30%. To expedite the development of the new strain, only three to five female and male rats served as breeders, which were chosen from all litters on the basis of their maximum g/kg intake integrated with proportion of ethanol to total fluid values. Profiles of intake of preferred concentrations of ethanol were obtained over 24 h of unlimited access as well as during 2-h intervals of limited access to ethanol. Levels of blood ethanol were measured in both female and male HEP animals during bouts of ethanol drinking in the limited access paradigm. By the sixth generation of HEP rats, ethanol consumption of the females often exceeded that of any other rat genetically bred to drink ethanol (e.g., at a concentration of 15.7%, 10.3 g/kg per day). Seven additional characteristics are notable: 1) the HEP rats prefer ethanol in the presence of a nutritious chocolate drink or nonnutrient sweetened solution (aspartame); 2) high levels of blood ethanol are associated with their drinking; 3) females drink significantly greater g/kg amounts of ethanol than HEP males and prefer a higher percent concentration of ethanol; 4) the drinking of ethanol by the female HEP animals does not fluctuate during the estrous cycle; 5) neurochemical assays show differential profiles of 5-HT, dopamine, and their metabolites in different regions of the brain; 6) measures

  11. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  12. Male Japanese quails with female brains do not show male sexual behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Gahr, Manfred

    2003-01-01

    During embryonic development, gonadal steroid hormones (androgens and estrogens) are thought to organize the sexual differentiation of the brain in the heterogametic sexes of higher vertebrates (males in mammals, females in birds). Brain differentiation of the homogametic sexes is thought to proceed by default, not requiring sex hormones for sex-specific organization. In gallinaceous birds such as the Japanese quail, female brain organization is thought to develop via estrogen-dependent demasculinization of a default male brain phenotype. We performed male donor-to-female host (MF), female-to-male (FM), male-to-male (MM), and female-to-female (FF) isotopic, isochronic transplantation of the forebrain primordium in Japanese quail embryos before gonadal differentiation had occurred; brain chimeras had a forebrain (including the hypothalamus) originating exclusively from donor cells. MM, FF, and MF chimeras all showed sexual behavior governed by the genetic sex of the host. In contrast, FM chimeras (genetically female forebrain, all other tissues genetically male) showed no mounting and only rudimentary crowing behavior. Although MM, FF, MF, and FM chimeras all showed host-typical production of steroid hormones during embryonic life, only FM chimeras were hypogonadal, had atypical low levels of circulating testosterone in adulthood, and showed reduction (crowing) or absence (mounting) of reproductive behaviors. Morphological features of the medial preoptic nucleus (a sexually dimorphic brain area) also were not male-like in FM males. These data demonstrate a brain-intrinsic, genetically determined component that organizes the sex-typical production of gonadal hormones in adulthood and call for a reevaluation of the mechanisms underlying brain sexual differentiation in other higher-vertebrate species. PMID:12802009

  13. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Tianlu; Zhao, Aihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Guoxiang; Huang, Fengjie; Liu, Jiajian; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Shouli; Wang, Chongchong; Zhou, Mingmei; Panee, Jun; He, Zhigang; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and amino acids accounted for the largest proportions of the brain metabolome, and their concentrations varied across the lifespan. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids were higher in infancy (week 1 to week 3) compared with later ages, and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids increased in the aged brain (week 56 to week 111). Importantly, a panel of 20 bile acids were quantitatively measured, most of which have not previously been documented in the brain metabolome. This study extends the breadth of the mammalian brain metabolome as well as our knowledge of functional brain development, both of which are critically important to move the brain science forward. PMID:27063670

  14. Androgens drive divergent responses to salt stress in male versus female rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Gerhold, David; Bagchi, Ansuman; Lu, Meiqing; Figueroa, David; Keenan, Kevin; Holder, Dan; Wang, Yuhong; Jin, Hong; Connolly, Brett; Austin, Christopher; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena

    2007-06-01

    Dahl-Iwai (DI) salt-sensitive rats were studied using microarrays to identify sex-specific differences in the kidney, both basal differences and differences in responses to a high-salt diet. In DI rat kidneys, gene expression profiles demonstrated inflammatory and fibrotic responses selectively in females. Gonadectomy of DI rats abrogated sex differences in gene expression. Gonadectomized female and gonadectomized male DI rats both responded to high salt with the same spectrum of gene expression changes as intact female DI rats. Androgens dominated the sex-selective responses to salt. Several androgen-responsive genes with roles potentiating the differential responses to salt were identified, including increased male expression of angiotensin-vasopressin receptor and prolactin receptor, decreased 5 alpha-reductase, and mixed increases and decreases in expression of Cyp4a genes that can produce eicosanoid hormones. These sex differences potentiate sodium retention by males and increase kidney function during gestation in females.

  15. C/EBPβ Isoforms Expression in the Rat Brain during the Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor expressed in different areas of the brain that regulates the expression of several genes involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. This protein has three isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, and LIP) with different transcription activation potential. The role of female sex hormones in the expression pattern of C/EBPβ isoforms in the rat brain has not yet been described. In this study we demonstrate by western blot that the expression of the three C/EBPβ isoforms changes in different brain areas during the estrous cycle. In the cerebellum, LAP2 content diminished on diestrus and proestrus and LIP content diminished on proestrus and estrus days. In the prefrontal cortex, LIP content was higher on proestrus and estrus days. In the hippocampus, LAP isoforms presented a switch on diestrus day, since LAP1 content was the highest while that of LAP2 was the lowest. The LAP2 isoform was the most abundant one in all the three brain areas. The LAP/LIP ratio changed throughout the cycle and was tissue specific. These results suggest that C/EBPβ isoforms expression changes in a tissue-specific manner in the rat brain due to the changes in sex steroid hormone levels presented during the estrous cycle. PMID:26064112

  16. C/EBPβ Isoforms Expression in the Rat Brain during the Estrous Cycle.

    PubMed

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor expressed in different areas of the brain that regulates the expression of several genes involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. This protein has three isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, and LIP) with different transcription activation potential. The role of female sex hormones in the expression pattern of C/EBPβ isoforms in the rat brain has not yet been described. In this study we demonstrate by western blot that the expression of the three C/EBPβ isoforms changes in different brain areas during the estrous cycle. In the cerebellum, LAP2 content diminished on diestrus and proestrus and LIP content diminished on proestrus and estrus days. In the prefrontal cortex, LIP content was higher on proestrus and estrus days. In the hippocampus, LAP isoforms presented a switch on diestrus day, since LAP1 content was the highest while that of LAP2 was the lowest. The LAP2 isoform was the most abundant one in all the three brain areas. The LAP/LIP ratio changed throughout the cycle and was tissue specific. These results suggest that C/EBPβ isoforms expression changes in a tissue-specific manner in the rat brain due to the changes in sex steroid hormone levels presented during the estrous cycle. PMID:26064112

  17. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  18. Changes in the uptake of tritiated estradiol in the hypothalamus and adenohypophysis of old female rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, M T; Peng, Y M

    1973-07-01

    The dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of 32 old female rats was elucidated. Old rats were over 20 months of age; young rats were only several months old. Rats were divided into 3 groups according to vaginal smears and ovarian and uterine findings during laparotomy: 1) prolonged vaginal cornification with polyfollicular ovaries (PVC), 2) anestrus with atropic ovaries and uterus (ANE), and 3) prolonged diestrus with hyperluteinized ovaries and hypertropic uterus (pseudopregnancy, PSP). Even 1 week after ovariectomy the uteri of old rats with PVC (11) or PSP (5) were heavier than the uteri of young adults oq old rats with ANE (20). The pituitaries of young rats (32) were lighter than those of old rats (32). In vitro tritiated estradiol uptakes of anterior hypothalamus, adenohypophysis and uterus of old rats with PVC; anterior and posterior hypothalamus, adenohypophysisand uterus of old rats with ANE (10) and adenohypophysis of old rats with PSP were each significantly lower than the corresponding uptakes in the young rats. Further investigation using young rats with induced PSP, indicated that the decreased tritiated estradiol uptake in the adenohypophysis of old PSP rats was due to old age and unrelated to PSP. In vivo tritiated estradiol uptakes of anterior hypothalamus and adenohypophysis of old rats with PVC or ANE and of uterus of old rats with PVC were significantly lower than the corresponding uptakes in the young rats.

  19. Interaction of dimethylbenzanthracene and diethylstilbestrol on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; McKnight, B.; Stone, J.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1980-06-01

    It has been reported that x-irradiation and diethylstilbestrol (DES) act synergistically on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats. The physical carcinogen, x-irradiation, was replaced by a chemical carcinogen, dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), and their interaction was studied in this system. Thirty-three female ACI rats were given 13.3 mg of DMBA per 100 grams of body weight. A total of 10 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 8 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 2 in a single rat, over a 266-day study period. Twenty-nine rats were implanted with a cholesterol pellet containing 5 mg of DES, and a total of 47 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 5 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 42 in 5 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. Twenty-four rats were given a combined treatment of both compounds, DES 2 days before DMBA, and a total of 126 mammary adenocarcinomas were found, 2 in rats with a single mammary adenocarcinoma and 124 in 18 rats with 2 or more mammary adenocarcinomas. The interaction between DMBA and DES was interpreted to be synergistic in regard to the proportion of rats with one or more mammary adenocarcinomas, and the median times of appearance of both first and second mammary adenocarcinomas. These interactions between DMBA and DES resemble the previously reported synergistic interactions between radiation and DES on mammary adenocarcinoma formation in female ACI rats.

  20. Regional differences in mu and kappa opioid receptor G-protein activation in brain in male and female prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Martin, T J; Sexton, T; Kim, S A; Severino, A L; Peters, C M; Young, L J; Childers, S R

    2015-12-17

    Prairie voles are unusual mammals in that, like humans, they are capable of forming socially monogamous pair bonds, display biparental care, and engage in alloparental behaviors. Both mu and kappa opioid receptors are involved in behaviors that either establish and maintain, or result from pair bond formation in these animals. Mu and kappa opioid receptors both utilize inhibitory G-proteins in signal transduction mechanisms, however the efficacy by which these receptor subtypes stimulate G-protein signaling across the prairie vole neuraxis is not known. Utilizing [(35)S]GTPγS autoradiography, we characterized the efficacy of G-protein stimulation in coronal sections throughout male and female prairie vole brains by [D-Ala2,NMe-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and U50,488H, selective mu and kappa opioid agonists, respectively. DAMGO stimulation was highest in the forebrain, similar to that found with other rodent species. U-50,488H produced greater stimulation in prairie voles than is typically seen in mice and rats, particularly in select forebrain areas. DAMGO produced higher stimulation in the core versus the shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in females, while the distribution of U-50,488H stimulation was the opposite. There were no gender differences for U50,488H stimulation of G-protein activity across the regions examined, while DAMGO stimulation was greater in sections from females compared to those from males for NAc core, entopeduncular nucleus, and hippocampus. These data suggest that the kappa opioid system may be more sensitive to manipulation in prairie voles compared to mice and rats, and that female prairie voles may be more sensitive to mu agonists in select brain regions than males.

  1. Regional differences in mu and kappa opioid receptor G-protein activation in brain in male and female prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Martin, T J; Sexton, T; Kim, S A; Severino, A L; Peters, C M; Young, L J; Childers, S R

    2015-12-17

    Prairie voles are unusual mammals in that, like humans, they are capable of forming socially monogamous pair bonds, display biparental care, and engage in alloparental behaviors. Both mu and kappa opioid receptors are involved in behaviors that either establish and maintain, or result from pair bond formation in these animals. Mu and kappa opioid receptors both utilize inhibitory G-proteins in signal transduction mechanisms, however the efficacy by which these receptor subtypes stimulate G-protein signaling across the prairie vole neuraxis is not known. Utilizing [(35)S]GTPγS autoradiography, we characterized the efficacy of G-protein stimulation in coronal sections throughout male and female prairie vole brains by [D-Ala2,NMe-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and U50,488H, selective mu and kappa opioid agonists, respectively. DAMGO stimulation was highest in the forebrain, similar to that found with other rodent species. U-50,488H produced greater stimulation in prairie voles than is typically seen in mice and rats, particularly in select forebrain areas. DAMGO produced higher stimulation in the core versus the shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in females, while the distribution of U-50,488H stimulation was the opposite. There were no gender differences for U50,488H stimulation of G-protein activity across the regions examined, while DAMGO stimulation was greater in sections from females compared to those from males for NAc core, entopeduncular nucleus, and hippocampus. These data suggest that the kappa opioid system may be more sensitive to manipulation in prairie voles compared to mice and rats, and that female prairie voles may be more sensitive to mu agonists in select brain regions than males. PMID:26523979

  2. Ovariectomy ameliorates dextromethorphan--induced memory impairment in young female rats.

    PubMed

    Jahng, Jeong Won; Cho, Hee Jeong; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Nam Youl; Lee, Seoul; Lee, Yil Seob

    2006-01-01

    We have previously found that dextromethorphan (DM), over-the-counter cough suppressant, impairs memory retention in water maze task, when it is repeatedly administrated to adolescent female rats at high doses. In this study we examined first if ovariectomy ameliorates the DM-induced memory impairment in female rats, and then whether or not the DM effect is revived by estrogen replacement in ovariectomized female rats. Female rat pups received bilateral ovariectomy or sham operation on postnatal day (PND) 21, and then intraperitoneal DM (40 mg/kg) daily during PND 28-37. Rats were subjected to the Morris water maze task from PND 38, approximately 24 h after the last DM injection. In probe trial, goal quadrant dwell time was significantly reduced by DM in the sham operated group, however, the reduction by DM did not occur in the ovariectomy group. When 17beta-estradiol was supplied to ovariectomized females during DM treatment, the goal quadrant dwell time was significantly decreased, compared to the vehicle control group. Furthermore, a major effect of estrogen replacement was found in the escape latency during the last 3 days of initial learning trials. These results suggest that ovariectomy may ameliorate the adverse effect of DM treatment on memory retention in young female rats, and that estrogen replacement may revive it, i.e. estrogen may take a major role in DM-induced memory impairment in female rats. PMID:16563229

  3. Opium can differently alter blood glucose, sodium and potassium in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Karam, Gholamreza Asadi; Rashidinejad, Hamid Reza; Aghaee, Mohammad Mehdi; Ahmadi, Jafar; Rahmani, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodi, Mehdi; Azin, Hosein; Mirzaee, Mohammad Reza; Khaksari, Mohammad

    2008-04-01

    To determine the effects of opium on serum glucose, potassium and sodium in male and female Wistar rat, opium solution (60 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally and the same volume of distilled water was used as control (7 rats in each group). Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 360 minutes after injection from orbit cavity and the values of serum glucose, sodium (Na(+)) and potassium (K(+)) were measured. The data were then analyzed by the repeated measure ANOVA based on sex and case-control group. P < 0.05 considered as significant difference. Serum glucose increased significantly at 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes after opium solution injection, in female rats compared to a control group. However, the male rats had this rise at 30, 60 and 120 minutes after opium solution injection compared to control group. While serum glucose in male rats was significantly higher than females at 30, 60 and 120 minutes, this value was higher in the female rats at 360 minutes. Therefore, serum glucose alterations following opium injection was significantly different in groups and in the sexes at different times. Sodium (Na(+)) rose at 60, 240 and 360 minutes significantly in all rats compared to control group. However, sodium alteration following opium injection was significantly different only between treated and control groups but sex-independent at all times. Potassium (K(+)) increased significantly at 60, 120, 240 and 360 minutes in male rats, compared to a control group. In female rats K(+) significantly raised at 30, 120, 240 and 360 minutes. Therefore, the alteration of K(+) in male and female rats was found time dependent and sex independent. According to our results, opium increased serum glucose in male and female rats differently, and it interferes with metabolic pathways differently on a gender dependent basis. Opium raised serum Na(+) and K(+), thus it interfere with water regulation and blood pressure via different mechanism.

  4. Thyroid insufficiency in developing rat brain: A genomic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency in the Developing Rat Brain: A Genomic Analysis. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption (ED) is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Severe deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels have bee...

  5. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) is an environmentally persistent chemical that has been detected in humans and wildlife. PFOS is primarily distributed in liver and blood. The current study evaluated the level of PFOS in the adult and neonatal rat brain and determined whether t...

  6. EFFECTS OF ESTROGEN AND AGING ON THE SYNAPTIC DISTRIBUTION OF PHOSPHORYLATED AKT-IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN THE CA1 REGION OF THE FEMALE RAT HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Murat; Janssen, William G.M.; Lou, W.Y. Wendy; Akama, Keith T.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Milner, Teresa A.; Morrison, John H.

    2013-01-01

    The estrogen 17β-estradiol (E) increases the axospinous synaptic density and plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region of young female rats but fails to do so in aged female rats. This E stimulus on synaptic plasticity is associated with the phosphorylation-dependent activation of Akt kinase. Our previous findings demonstrated that increased estrogen levels subsequently increase phosphorylated Akt (pAkt)-immunoreactivity (-IR) within the dendritic shafts and spines of pyramidal neurons in young female rats. Therefore, because Akt can promote cell survival and growth, we tested the hypothesis that the less plastic synapses of aged female rats would contain less E-stimulated pAkt-IR. Here, young (3-4 months) and aged (22-23 months) female rats were ovariectomized seven days prior to a 48-hour administration of either vehicle or E. The pAkt-IR synaptic distribution was then analyzed using post-embedding electron microscopy. In both young and aged rats, pAkt-IR was found in dendritic spines and terminals, and pAkt-IR was particularly abundant at the post-synaptic density. Quantitative analyses revealed that the percentage of pAkt-labeled synapses was significantly greater in young rats compared to aged rats. Nonetheless, E treatment significantly increased pAkt-IR in pre- and post-synaptic profiles of both young and aged rats, although the stimulus in young rats was notably more widespread. These data support the evidence that hormone-activated signaling associated with cell growth and survival is diminished in the aged brain. However, the observation that E can still increase pAkt-IR in aged synapses presents this signaling component as a candidate target for hormone replacement therapies. PMID:20709039

  7. Effects of acute ethanol exposure on hepatic metallothionein, zinc and glutathione in male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Harrell, B. )

    1991-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the simultaneous responses of hepatic metallothionein (MT), zinc (Zn) and glutathione (GSH) in male and female rats to an acute ethanol dose. In male rats, hepatic MT has been shown to be induced by an acute ethanol dose. The Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the Lieber-DeCarli control diet for a five day period and then divided into 6 groups: baseline females and males, ethanol-treated females and males, pair-fed females and males. At t=0, baseline rats were killed, ethanol-treated rats were given ethanol by intragastric tube, and pair-fed rats were given ethanol by intragastric tube, and pair-fed rats were given an isocaloric sucrose solution by intragastric tube. At t=24 h, the ethanol-treated and pair-fed rats were killed. Livers were assayed for MT. Zn and GSH. Concentrations of blood ethanol (BEC) were significantly greater for male than female rats. A two way ANOVA with the independent variables being time and sex was performed to analyze differences for hepatic MT, Zn and GSH. For rats dosed with ethanol and killed 24 h later compared with rats at baseline, hepatic MT was significantly greater and hepatic Zn and GSH were not significantly different. Hepatic MT, Zn and GSH were not significantly different by sex. A significant correlation existed between hepatic Zn/g and MT/g. In conclusion, 24 h after an acute dose of ethanol, female as well as male rats responded with the induction of hepatic MT; and enough cysteine was available for the induction of hepatic MT and the maintenance of hepatic GSH levels. The measurement of Zn bound to hepatic MT rather than total hepatic Zn would be desirable to discern if changes in Zn distribution occur.

  8. Spirulina or dandelion-enriched diet of mothers alleviates lead-induced damages in brain and cerebellum of newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Manel; Ghorbel-Koubaa, Fatma; Bonenfant-Magné, Michèle; Magné, Christian; Dauvergne, Xavier; Ksouri, Riadh; Krichen, Yousef; Abdelly, Chedly; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2012-07-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the toxic effects of a prenatal exposure to lead acetate on brain tissues of newborn rats, and potent protective effects of spirulina (Arthropira platensis) or dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) added to rat diet. Female rats were given a normal diet (control) or a diet enriched with spirulina or dandelion. Additionally, lead acetate was administered to one half of these rats through drinking water from the 5th day of gestation, to day 14 postpartum. Lead toxicity was assessed by measuring blood lead levels, brain weight, tissue damage, as well as protein content, lipid peroxidation and activities of antioxidant enzymes in brain tissues of neonates. Lead poisoning of mothers caused lead deposition in the brain and cerebellum of newborns and cerebellum tissue damages. Moreover, a significant decrease in weight and protein content of these tissues was found. Oxidative stress and changes in antioxidant enzyme activities in brain tissues were also recorded. Conversely, no such damages or biochemical changes were found in neonates from plant fed lead-poisoned mothers. These results strongly suggest that beneficial effects of spirulina- or dandelion-added diet on lead-intoxicated rats proceeded through the reduction of the lead-induced oxidative stress and related damages.

  9. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Increases Brain Cholesterol Content in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Wold, Loren E.; Ren, Jun; Murphy, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most severe expression of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Although alterations in fetal and neonate brain fatty acid composition and cholesterol content is known to change in animal models of FASD, the persistence of these alterations into adulthood is unknown. To address this question, we determined the effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on individual phospholipid class fatty acid composition, individual phospholipid class mass, and cholesterol mass in brains from 25-week-old rats that were exposed to ethanol during gestation beginning at gestational day 2. While total phospholipid mass was unaffected, phosphatidylinositol and cardiolipin mass was decreased 14 and 43%, respectively. Exposure to prenatal ethanol modestly altered brain phospholipid fatty acid composition, and the most consistent change was a significant 1.1-fold increase in total PUFA, in the n-3/n-6 ratio, and in the 22:6 n-3 content in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and in phosphatidylserine. In contrast, prenatal ethanol consumption significantly increased brain cholesterol mass 1.4-fold and the phospholipid to cholesterol ratio was significantly increased 1.3-fold. These results indicate that brain cholesterol mass was significantly increased in adult rats exposed prenatally to ethanol, but changes in phospholipid mass and phospholipid fatty acid composition were extremely limited. Importantly, suppression of post-natal ethanol consumption was not sufficient to reverse the large increase in cholesterol observed in the adult rats. PMID:23996454

  10. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Brain Serotonergic Neurons of Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tews, Björn; Bartsch, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP), in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system. PMID:22140568

  11. Autoradiographic localization of (3H) gepirone in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.E.; Matheson, G.K. )

    1990-02-26

    Gepirone is an anxiolytic compound active at the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor site. The purpose of this study was to locate the ({sup 3}H)gepirone in the rat brain and to determine the quantity of gepirone in these locations. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with (3H)gepirone (200 {mu}Ci/kg, i.v.) and decapitated 10 minutes later. To determine specific binding some animals were pretreated with cold gepirone (1 mg/kg) 15 minutes before the (3H)gepirone treatment. The brains were removed, frozen, sectioned, and fixed in formaldehyde vapors. Tritium sensitive film was exposed to the sections for 106 days. Using computerized imaging technology data were obtained from 104 brain sites. Overall, the quantity of (3H)gepirone in each site correlated proportionally with known 5-HT{sub 1A} (in vitro) receptor binding.

  12. Enzyme markers of maternal malnutrition in fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Shambaugh, G E; Mankad, B; Derecho, M L; Koehler, R R

    1987-01-01

    The impact of maternal starvation in late gestation on development of some enzymatic mechanisms concerned with neurotransmission and polyamine synthesis was studied in fetal rat brain. Between 17 and 20 d, acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase activity increased in fetal brains of fed dams, whereas maternal starvation from day 17 to day 20 resulted in heightened acetylcholinesterase but not choline acetyltransferase activity. Ornithine decarboxylase activity on a per-gram wet-weight basis fell between 17 and 20 d in fetal brain from fed dams. Increasing the duration of maternal starvation resulted in a progressive increase in fetal brain ornithine decarboxylase. Arginine and putrescine levels in the brain were lower in fetuses of starved mothers while spermidine and spermine concentrations were unchanged. Since the Km of ornithine decarboxylase for ornithine was found to vary directly with levels of putrescine in fetal brain, lower concentrations of putrescine and greater ornithine decarboxylase activity in fetal brains from starved mothers suggested that levels of this enzyme may be controlled in part by putrescine. Changes in the maternal nutritional state had no effect on the activity of glutamate decarboxylase in fetal brain, and tissue levels of the product, gamma-aminobutyric acid, were unchanged. Thus changes in ornithine decarboxylase and acetylcholinesterase activity in fetal brain may uniquely reflect biochemical alterations consequent to maternal starvation.

  13. Pharmacological modulation of blood-brain barrier increases permeability of doxorubicin into the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; la Marca, Giancarlo; Cardellicchio, Stefania; Giunti, Laura; Malvagia, Sabrina; Genitori, Lorenzo; Massimino, Maura; de Martino, Maurizio; Giovannini, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    Our group recently demonstrated in a rat model that pretreatment with morphine facilitates doxorubicin delivery to the brain in the absence of signs of increased acute systemic toxicity. Morphine and other drugs such as dexamethasone or ondansetron seem to inhibit MDR proteins localized on blood-brain barrier, neurons and glial cells increasing the access of doxorubicin to the brain by efflux transporters competition. We explored the feasibility of active modification of the blood-brain barrier protection, by using morphine dexamethasone or ondansetron pretreatment, to allow doxorubicin accumulation into the brain in a rodent model. Rats were pretreated with morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) or ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.) before injection of doxorubicin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Quantitative analysis of doxorubicin was performed by mass spectrometry. Acute hearth and kidney damage was analyzed by measuring doxorubicin accumulation, LDH activity and malondialdehyde plasma levels. The concentration of doxorubicin was significantly higher in all brain areas of rats pretreated with morphine (P < 0.001) or ondansetron (P < 0.05) than in control tissues. The concentration of doxorubicin was significantly higher in cerebral hemispheres and brainstem (P < 0.05) but not in cerebellum of rats pretreated with dexamethasone than in control tissues. Pretreatment with any of these drugs did not increase LDH activity or lipid peroxidation compared to controls. Our data suggest that morphine, dexamethasone or ondansetron pretreatment is able to allow doxorubicin penetration inside the brain by modulating the BBB. This effect is not associated with acute cardiac or renal toxicity. This finding might provide the rationale for clinical applications in the treatment of refractory brain tumors and pave the way to novel applications of active but currently inapplicable chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:23977451

  14. Short term, low dose fluoxetine blocks estrous cycle-linked changes in responsiveness to diazepam in female rats.

    PubMed

    Soares-Rachetti, Vanessa de P; de Sousa Pinto, Ícaro A; Santos, Raliny O; André, Eunice; Gavioli, Elaine C; Lovick, Thelma

    2016-10-01

    Anxiety behavior in female Wistar rats was assessed at different stages of the estrous cycle using the elevated plus maze (EPM). No differences were observed at any cycle stage. Pretreatment with diazepam (1 mg kg(-1) intraperitoneal (i.p.)) 30 min before testing produced an anxiolytic effect (significant increase in percentage of time in the open arms compared to control group in the same cycle phase) in animals in proestrus, estrus, and early diestrus but had no effect in rats in late diestrus. Locomotor activity (total arm entries) was unchanged at any cycle phase. When rats in the late diestrus phase were pretreated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (1.75 mg kg(-1) i.p. on the afternoon of early diestrus and again in the morning of late diestrus) diazepam produced an anxiolytic effect (increase percentage time in the open arms). This dose is sufficient to raise brain allopregnanolone concentration without affecting 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) systems. We propose that insensitivity to diazepam in late diestrus is due to increased expression of benzodiazepine insensitive α4 subunit-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors triggered by a sharp decrease in brain allopregnanolone concentration. Pretreatment with fluoxetine to raise brain allopregnanolone concentration during late diestrus prevents the withdrawal effect.

  15. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A; Grant, Samuel C; Gold, Mark S; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  16. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J.; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A.; Grant, Samuel C.; Gold, Mark S.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  17. General Dissection of Female Ant Reproductive System and Brain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissection of the reproductive system of ant workers and queens can be useful for answering many questions. Observations of ovarian status in both female castes can be used to identify relationships between other factors and the ovaries, determine whether an individual has laid eggs, and, with more ...

  18. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  19. Correlation of brain levels of progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone with neurological recovery after traumatic brain injury in female mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Acaz-Fonseca, Estefania; Giatti, Silvia; Caruso, Donatella; Viveros, Maria-Paz; Melcangi, Roberto C; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of disability in humans. Neuroactive steroids, such as progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), are neuroprotective in TBI models. However in order to design potential neuroprotective strategies based on neuroactive steroids it is important to determine whether its brain levels are altered by TBI. In this study we have used a weight-drop model of TBI in young adult female mice to determine the levels of neuroactive steroids in the brain and plasma at 24h, 72 h and 2 weeks after injury. We have also analyzed whether the levels of neuroactive steroids after TBI correlated with the neurological score of the animals. TBI caused neurological deficit detectable at 24 and 72 h, which recovered by 2 weeks after injury. Brain levels of progesterone, tetrahydroprogesterone (THP), isopregnanolone and 17β-estradiol were decreased 24h, 72 h and 2 weeks after TBI. DHEA and brain testosterone levels presented a transient decrease at 24h after lesion. Brain levels of progesterone and DHEA showed a positive correlation with neurological recovery. Plasma analyses showed that progesterone was decreased 72 h after lesion but, in contrast with brain progesterone, its levels did not correlate with neurological deficit. These findings indicate that TBI alters the levels of neuroactive steroids in the brain with independence of its plasma levels and suggest that the pharmacological increase in the brain of the levels of progesterone and DHEA may result in the improvement of neurological recovery after TBI.

  20. Role of Endogenous Vitamin E in Renal Ischemic Preconditioning Process: Differences between Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Aryamanesh, Simin; Ebrahimi, Seyyed Meisam; Abotaleb, Nahid; Nobakht, Maliheh; Rahimi-Moghaddam, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidants such as α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and β-carotene (vitamin A) play an important role in protective effect of repeated brief periods of ischemia, namely ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Values of these antioxidants were investigated and compared after induction of ischemia reperfusion (IR) and kidney IPC in both male and female rats. Methods: Forty eight Wistar rats were divided randomly into six groups of 8: groups A and B (male and female controls, respectively), group C (male IR or IR cases), group D (female IR cases) and groups E and F (male and female IPC cases, respectively). In groups C and D, ischemia was induced by clamping of left renal arteries for 45 min. In groups E and F, rats underwent four cycles of 4 min of arterial clamping and 11 min of de-clamping before final 45 min ischemia induction. Afterward, serum was collected to assess the blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and vitamins E and A values. Renal tissues were obtained for histological assessments. Results: α-tocopherol levels in male and female rats showed a significant increase in IPC compared with IR group (P<0.01) and also in female IPC compared with male IPC group. β-carotene levels had no significant variations. Histological evaluation showed that IR-induced renal injuries were less in female rats. Also, protective effects of IPC were more in female rats (P<0.01). Conclusions: Renal IPC reduced damages in both male and female rats, but tissue injuries in females were decreased much more along with the increase of endogenous vitamin E. PMID:22562032

  1. [Mechanism of inhibition of hypothalamic pituitary-ovarian function in streptozotocin-diabetic mature female rats].

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Igarashi, M

    1984-04-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of the failure of reproductive function in diabetic rats, the hypothalamic pituitary-ovarian function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mature female rats was investigated. Estrous cycle patterns were disturbed in diabetic rats and these rats showed constant diestrus. In diabetic rats no preovulatory LH or FSH-surge were observed on presumed proestrus, and the number of ovulated ova and the weights of ovary and uterus were significantly less than those seen in control rats on presumed estrus. The response of the pituitary gland to LH-RH in diabetic rats and diabetic castrated rats was not significantly different from that in control rats on diestrous day and castrated control rats, respectively. However, the response of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to steroidal feedback in diabetic castrated rats was significantly less than that in castrated control rats. The number of ovulated ova and ovarian growth induced by hCG in diabetic rats were also significantly lower than those in control rats. These results indicate that the impaired site in streptozotocin diabetic rats is not the pituitary gland, but the ovary and hypothalamic-pituitary function.

  2. Integration of neural networks activated by amphetamine in females with different estrogen levels: a functional imaging study in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Madularu, Dan; Yee, Jason R; Kenkel, William M; Moore, Kelsey A; Kulkarni, Praveen; Shams, Waqqas M; Ferris, Craig F; Brake, Wayne G

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that schizophrenia symptomatology in women is dependent upon estrogen levels. Estrogen has beneficial properties when administered in conjunction with antipsychotics, and estrogen also alters, in rats, dopamine neurotransmission, which is a common target of all antipsychotic medications, suggesting a possible interaction between the two. The aim of the current study was to investigate this possible interaction using functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake, female rats. Amphetamine-sensitized, ovariectomized rats receiving no, chronic low, or phasic high levels of estradiol replacement were used, and changes in blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal were recorded over time in response to an acute amphetamine injection. Increasing levels of estradiol enhanced BOLD activation in pathways previously known to be implicated in schizophrenia symptomatology, such as the mesocorticolimbic, habenular and olfactory pathways, as well as more widespread areas. We propose here the first comprehensive "amphetamine activation map" integrating brain regions where amphetamine-related BOLD activity is influenced by estrogen levels in sensitized female rats. PMID:25827963

  3. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain water content after surgical brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Sherchan, Prativa; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2015-09-01

    Brain edema is a major contributor to poor outcome and reduced quality of life after surgical brain injury (SBI). Although SBI pathophysiology is well-known, the correlation between cerebral edema and neurological deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the rat model of SBI. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between brain edema and deficits in standard sensorimotor neurobehavior tests for rats subjected to SBI. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or surgical brain injury via partial frontal lobectomy. All animals were tested for neurological deficits 24 post-SBI and fourteen were also tested 72 h after surgery using seven common behavior tests: modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), beam walking, corner turn test, forelimb placement test, adhesive removal test, beam balance test, and foot fault test. After assessing the functional outcome, animals were euthanized for brain water content measurement. Surgical brain injury resulted in significantly elevated frontal lobe brain water content 24 and 72 h after surgery compared to that of sham animals. In all behavior tests, significance was observed between sham and SBI animals. However, a correlation between brain water content and functional outcome was observed for all tests except Neuroscore. The selection of behavior tests is critical to determine the effectiveness of therapeutics. Based on this study's results, we recommend using beam walking, the corner turn test, the beam balance test, and the foot fault test since correlations with brain water content were observed at both 24 and 72 h post-SBI. PMID:25975171

  4. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  5. Sex steroid regulation of the inflammatory response: sympathoadrenal dependence in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Green, P G; Dahlqvist, S R; Isenberg, W M; Strausbaugh, H J; Miao, F J; Levine, J D

    1999-05-15

    To investigate the role of sex steroids in sex differences in the response of rats to the potent inflammatory mediator bradykinin (BK), we evaluated the effect of sex steroid manipulation on the magnitude of BK-induced synovial plasma extravasation (PE). The magnitude of BK-induced PE is markedly less in females. Ovariectomy of female rats increased BK-induced PE, and administration of 17beta-estradiol to ovariectomized female rats reconstituted the female phenotype. Castration in male rats decreased BK-induced PE, and administration of testosterone or its nonmetabolizable analog dihydrotestosterone reconstituted the male phenotype. The results of these experiments strongly support the role of both male and female sex steroids in sex differences in the inflammatory response. Because the stress axes are sexually dimorphic and are important in the regulation of the inflammatory response, we evaluated the contribution of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and the sympathoadrenal axes to sex differences in BK-induced PE. Neither hypophysectomy nor inhibition of corticosteroid synthesis affected BK-induced PE in female or male rats. Adrenal denervation in females produced the same magnitude increase in BK-induced PE as adrenalectomy or ovariectomy, suggesting that the adrenal medullary factor(s) in females may account for the female sex steroid effect on BK-induced PE. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in female but not male rats, estrogen receptor alpha immunoreactivity is present on medullary but not cortical cells in the adrenal gland. These data suggest that regulation of the inflammatory response by female sex steroids is strongly dependent on the sympathoadrenal axis, possibly by its action on estrogen receptors on adrenal medullary cells.

  6. Regional differences in the pituitary distribution of luteinizing hormone in the gonadectomized and proestrous female rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous data have shown regional differences in the presence of anterior pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) that generally correlate with comparable disparities in the distribution of gonadotropes throughout the gland. In female rats, the differences are apparent over the estro...

  7. A cognitive rehabilitation paradigm effective in male rats lacks efficacy in female rats.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Kristopher D; Granter-Button, Shirley; Harley, Carolyn W; Moody-Corbett, Frances; Peeling, James; Corbett, Dale

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive dysfunction, as a consequence of dementia, is a significant cause of morbidity lacking efficacious treatment. Females comprise at least half of this demographic but have been vastly underrepresented in preclinical studies. The current study addressed this gap by assessing the protective efficacy of physical exercise and cognitive activity on learning and memory outcomes in a rat model of vascular dementia. Forty ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats (∼6 months old) were exposed to either a diet high in saturated fats and refined sugars or standard laboratory chow and underwent either chronic bilateral carotid occlusion or Sham surgery. Learning and memory abilities were evaluated using standard cognitive outcomes over the ensuing 6 months, followed by histologic analyses of hippocampal CA1 neurons. In Experiment 1, we confirmed hypoperfusion-induced cognitive dysfunction using a 2 × 2 (Surgery × Diet) experimental design, without alterations in hippocampal architecture. In Experiment 2, hypoperfused animals were either exposed to alternating days of physical (wheel running) and cognitive activity (modified Hebb-Williams maze) or sedentary housing. In contrast to males, this combination rehabilitation paradigm did not improve cognition or histopathologic outcomes in hypoperfused animals. These findings, highlighting differences between female and male animals, show the necessity of including both sexes in preclinical experimentation.

  8. Transgenerational effects of adolescent nicotine exposure in rats: Evidence for cognitive deficits in adult female offspring.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Samantha M; Fountain, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent nicotine exposure in one generation of rats would impair the cognitive capacity of a subsequent generation. Male and female rats in the parental F0 generation were given twice-daily i.p. injections of either 1.0mg/kg nicotine or an equivalent volume of saline for 35days during adolescence on postnatal days 25-59 (P25-59). After reaching adulthood, male and female nicotine-exposed rats were paired for breeding as were male and female saline control rats. Only female offspring were used in this experiment. Half of the offspring of F0 nicotine-exposed breeders and half of the offspring of F0 saline control rats received twice-daily i.p. injections of 1.0mg/kg nicotine during adolescence on P25-59. The remainder of the rats received twice-daily saline injections for the same period. To evaluate transgenerational effects of nicotine exposure on complex cognitive learning abilities, F1 generation rats were trained to perform a highly structured serial pattern in a serial multiple choice (SMC) task. Beginning on P95, rats in the F1 generation were given either 4days of massed training (20patterns/day) followed by spaced training (10 patterns/day) or only spaced training. Transgenerational effects of adolescent nicotine exposure were observed as greater difficulty in learning a "violation element" of the pattern, which indicated that rats were impaired in the ability to encode and remember multiple sequential elements as compound or configural cues. The results indicated that for rats that received massed training, F1 generation rats with adolescent nicotine exposure whose F0 generation parents also experienced adolescent nicotine exposure showed poorer learning of the violation element than rats that experienced adolescent nicotine exposure only in the F1 generation. Thus, adolescent nicotine exposure in one generation of rats produced a cognitive impairment in the next generation.

  9. Irradiation to the young mouse brain impaired white matter growth more in females than in males.

    PubMed

    Roughton, K; Boström, M; Kalm, M; Blomgren, K

    2013-10-31

    Modern therapy cures 80% of all children with brains tumors, but may also cause long-lasting side effects, so called late effects. Radiotherapy is particularly prone to cause severe late effects, such as intellectual impairment. The extent and nature of the resulting cognitive deficits may be influenced by age, treatment and gender, where girls suffer more severe late effects than boys. The reason for this difference between boys and girls is unknown, but very few experimental studies have addressed this issue. Our aim was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on the corpus callosum (CC) in both male and female mice. We found that a single dose of 8 Gray (Gy) to the brains of postnatal day 14 mice induced apoptosis in the CC and reduced the number of proliferating cells by one third, as judged by the number of phospho-histone H3 positive cells 6 h after irradiation (IR). BrdU incorporation was reduced (62% and 42% lower in females and males, respectively) and the number of oligodendrocytes (Olig2(+) cells) was lower (43% and 21% fewer in females and males, respectively) 4 months after IR, so the lack of developing and differentiated cells was more pronounced in females. The number of microglia was unchanged in females but increased in males at this late time point. The density of microvessel profiles was unchanged by IR. This single, moderate dose of 8 Gy impaired the brain growth to some extent (8.1% and 0.4% lower brain/body weight ratio in females and males, respectively) but the CC growth was even more impaired (31% and 19% smaller in females and males, respectively) 4 months after IR compared with non-irradiated mice. In conclusion, this is the first study to our knowledge demonstrating that IR to the young rodent brain affects white matter development more in females than in males.

  10. Alterations of Amino Acid Level in Depressed Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei; Li, Xuechun; Tian, Jingchen; Jing, Fu; Qu, Changhai; Lin, Longfei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Amino-acid neurotransmitter system dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of depression. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of amino acids as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers could be used in future diagnosis of depression. Only partial amino acids such as glycine and asparagine were determined from certain parts of rats' brain included hippocampi and cerebral cortex in previous studies. However, according to systematic biology, amino acids in different area of brain are interacted and interrelated. Hence, the determination of 34 amino acids through entire rats' brain was conducted in this study in order to demonstrate more possibilities for biomarkers of depression by discovering other potential amino acids in more areas of rats' brain. As a result, 4 amino acids (L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine and γ-amino-n-butyric acid) among 34 were typically identified as potentially primary biomarkers of depression by data statistics. Meanwhile, an antidepressant called Fluoxetine was employed to verify other potential amino acids which were not identified by data statistics. Eventually, we found L-α-amino-adipic acid could also become a new potentially secondary biomarker of depression after drug validation. In conclusion, we suggested that L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine, γ-amino-n-butyric acid and L-α-amino-adipic acid might become potential biomarkers for future diagnosis of depression and development of antidepressant. PMID:25352755

  11. Rat brain acetylcholinesterase visualized with [11C]physostigmine.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Crouzel, C; Hinnen, F; Jobert, A; Né, F; DiGiamberardino, L; Tavitian, B

    1994-06-01

    Physostigmine, a powerful cholinesterase inhibitor, has recently been labelled with 11C in view of its potential application for in vivo imaging of cerebral acetylcholinesterase (AChE) using positron emission tomography. Here we carried out autoradiography of the rat brain using [11C]physostigmine in order to characterize the cerebral targets of this ligand. Autoradiograms were obtained using phosphor storage plates which, compared to autoradiographic films, greatly improved the quality of 11C images. Following autoradiography, brain sections were stained for AChE activity, allowing a direct comparison of autoradiographic and histoenzymatic localizations. The distributions of 11C label and of AChE activity were found to be essentially super-imposable, both after in vivo injection of and after in vitro incubation with [11C]physostigmine. Densitometric analysis showed that radioactivity and enzymatic activity distributions were regionally correlated. The fixation of [11C]physostigmine to cerebral tissue was abolished after incubation of the rat brain sections with BW 284C51, a specific AChE inhibitor, but not after incubation with iso-OMPA, a specific inhibitor of butyrylcholinesterase. Unilateral excitotoxic lesions of the striatum that eliminated local AChE expression concomitantly reduced the binding of the ligand in the lesioned area. These results indicate that autoradiographic images of the rat brain obtained with [11C]physostigmine reflect AChE distribution, thus supporting the use of this radioligand to trace cerebral AChE activity in humans with positron emission tomography.

  12. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  13. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism. PMID:26551768

  14. Alcohol induced changes in phosphoinositide signaling system in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S.; Piano, M.; Schwertz, D.; Davis, J.; Pandey, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide break down functions as a signal generating system in a manner similar to the C-AMP system. In order to examine if the changes produced by chronic ethanol treatment on membrane lipid composition and metabolism effect the cellular functions of the neuron, the authors have examined the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on norepinephrine (NE) serotonin (5HT) and calcium ionophore (CI) stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat cortical slices. Rats were maintained on liber-decarli diet alcohol and control liquid diet containing isocaloric sucrose substitute for two months. They were then sacrificed and brain was removed for determination of PI turnover. 5HT stimulated {sup 3}H- inositol monophosphate ({sup 3}H-IPI) formation was significantly lower in the cortex of alcohol treated rats as compared to control rats. However, neither CI nor NE stimulated IP1 formation was significantly different from control rats. The results thus indicate that chronic exposure to ethanol decreases 5HT induced PI breakdown in rat cortex. In order to examine if this decrease is related to a decrease in 5HT2 receptors, or decreased in coupling of receptor to the effector pathway, the authors are currently determining the number and affinity of 5HT2 receptors in alcohol treated rats.

  15. Abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive brain nuclei in rats.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    Abdominal surgery-induced postoperative gastric ileus is well established to induce Fos expression in specific brain nuclei in rats within 2-h after surgery. However, the phenotype of activated neurons has not been thoroughly characterized. Nesfatin-1 was recently discovered in the rat hypothalamus as a new anorexigenic peptide that also inhibits gastric emptying and is widely distributed in rat brain autonomic nuclei suggesting an involvement in stress responses. Therefore, we investigated whether abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Two hours after abdominal surgery with cecal palpation under short isoflurane anesthesia or anesthesia alone, rats were transcardially perfused and brains processed for double immunohistochemical labeling of Fos and nesfatin-1. Abdominal surgery, compared to anesthesia alone, induced Fos expression in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Double Fos/nesfatin-1 labeling showed that of the activated cells, 99% were nesfatin-1-immunoreactive in the SON, 91% in the LC, 82% in the rRPa, 74% in the EW and VLM, 71% in the anterior parvicellular PVN, 47% in the lateral magnocellular PVN, 41% in the medial magnocellular PVN, 14% in the NTS and 9% in the medial parvicellular PVN. These data established nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem as part of the neuronal response to abdominal surgery and suggest a possible implication of nesfatin-1 in the alterations of food intake and gastric transit associated with such a stressor. PMID:19944727

  16. Human and rat brain lipofuscin proteome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of an autofluorescent pigment called lipofuscin in neurons is an invariable hallmark of brain aging. So far, this material has been considered to be waste material without particular relevance for cellular pathology. However, two lines of evidence argue that lipofuscin may have yet ...

  17. Nerve growth factor receptor molecules in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.; Schweitzer, J.B.; Johnson, E.M. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have developed a method to immunoprecipitate rat nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor proteins and have applied the method to detect NGF receptor molecules in the rat brain. Crosslinking /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to either PC12 cells or cultured rat sympathetic neurons yielded two radiolabeled molecules (90 kDa and 220 kDa) that were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibody 192-IgG. Further, 192-IgG precipitated two radiolabeled proteins, with the expected sizes (80 kDa and 210 kDa) of noncrosslinked NGF receptor components, from among numerous surface-iodinated PC12 cell proteins. These results demonstrate the specific immunoprecipitation of NGF receptor molecules by 192-IgG. They applied the /sup 125/I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG-mediated immunoprecipitation procedures to plasma membrane preparations of rat brain: NGF receptor molecules of the same molecular masses as the peripheral receptor components were consistently detected in all regions and in preparations from whole brains. Removal of the peripheral sympathetic innervation of the brain did not eliminate these NGF receptor proteins, indicating that the receptor is endogenous to central nervous system tissues. They also observed retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-labeled 192-IgG from the parietal cortex to the nucleus basalis and from the hippocampus to the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and the medial septal nucleus. These findings demonstrate the presence in brain of NGF receptor molecules indistinguishable from those of the peripheral nervous system.

  18. Evaluation of developmental toxicity of guaifenesin using pregnant female rats

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Arham; Shamsi, Sadia; Shahzad, Muhammad; Butt, Hajra Ikram; Aamir, Khurram; Iqbal, Javed

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Guaifenesin possesses expectorant, muscle relaxant, and anticonvulsive properties. To the best of our knowledge, the promising data regarding the developmental toxicity of guaifenesin are scarce. The current study investigates the developmental toxic effects of guaifenesin in detail using female rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five dams were divided into five groups. Group 1 served as a control, while Group-2, -3, -4, and -5 were administered with 250, 350, 500, and 600 (mg/kg b.w.) doses of guaifenesin, respectively, starting from gestation day 6 to day 17. Half of the total recovered fetuses was subjected to morphologic and morphometric analysis, while other half was subjected to skeletal examination. Results: A significant reduction in maternal weight, and food/water intake, was observed, however, no mortality and morbidity were observed. About 14 dead fetuses were found in Group-3 and -4 each, while 26 in Group 5. Morphological analysis revealed 21.2%, 45.4%, 67.2%, and 86.9% of total fetuses having hemorrhagic spots in Group-2, -3, -4, and -5, respectively. Dropping wrist/ankle and kinky tail were found in Group-4 and -5 only. Morphometric analysis showed a significant decline in fetal weight, full body length, skull length, forelimb length, hindlimb length, and tail length in all guaifenesin treated groups. Skeletal examination displayed that only Group 5 fetuses had increased intercostal space between 7th and 8th rib. We also observed improper development of carpals, metacarpals, tarsals, and metatarsals of the Group 5 fetuses. Conclusion: Guaifenesin showed a significant developmental toxicity at selected test doses; therefore, a careful use is suggested during pregnancy. PMID:27298495

  19. Determination of boron distribution in rat's brain, kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Behnam; Zargar, Maysam

    2009-07-01

    To determine relative boron distribution in rat's brain, liver and kidney, a mixture of boric acid and borax, was used. After transcardial injection of the solution, the animals were sacrificed and the brain, kidney and liver were removed. The coronal sections of certain areas of the brain were prepared by freezing microtome. The slices were sandwiched within two pieces of CR-39. The samples were bombarded in a thermal neutron field of the TRR pneumatic facility. The alpha tracks are registered on CR-39 after being etched in NaOH. The boron distribution was determined by counting these alpha tracks CR-39 plastics. The distribution showed non-uniformity in brain, liver and kidney. PMID:19375929

  20. Correlation Between Subacute Sensorimotor Deficits and Brain Edema in Rats after Surgical Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Adam, Loic; Oudin, Guillaume; Louis, Jean-Sébastien; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    No matter how carefully a neurosurgical procedure is performed, it is intrinsically linked to postoperative deficits resulting in delayed healing caused by direct trauma, hemorrhage, and brain edema, termed surgical brain injury (SBI). Cerebral edema occurs several hours after SBI and is a major contributor to patient morbidity, resulting in increased postoperative care. Currently, the correlation between functional recovery and brain edema after SBI remains unknown. Here we examine the correlation between neurological function and brain water content in rats 42 h after SBI. SBI was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats via frontal lobectomy. Twenty-four hours post-ictus animals were subjected to four neurobehavior tests: composite Garcia neuroscore, beam walking test, corner turn test, and beam balance test. Animals were then sacrificed for right-frontal brain water content measurement via the wet-dry method. Right-frontal lobe brain water content was found to significantly correlate with neurobehavioral deficits in the corner turn and beam balance tests: the number of left turns (percentage of total turns) for the corner turn test and distance traveled for the beam balance test were both inversely proportional with brain water content. No correlation was observed for the composite Garcia neuroscore or the beam walking test. PMID:26463968

  1. Differences in brain edema and intracranial pressure following traumatic brain injury across the estrous cycle: involvement of female sex steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Maghool, Fatemeh; Khaksari, Mohammad; Siahposht Khachki, Ali

    2013-02-25

    It has been shown that sex steroid hormones have profound neuroprotective effects in experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Because the endogenous hormone levels are proven to differ with estrous cycle stage, we evaluated whether estrous cycle stage affects various outcomes following diffuse TBI. TBI was induced by Marmarou's method in normal cycling and in ovariectomized rats with physiologically relevant restoration of hormonal levels by hormone capsule implantation. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were measured before and different times after TBI and brain edema was assessed at 24h after trauma. Results indicated that after TBI, water content (WC) in traumatic proestrous (TP) rats was less than the one in traumatic non-proestrous (TNP) and ovariectomized (TOVX) and also in high estradiol (HE) and progesterone (HP) was statistically less than in TBI untreated groups.There was no significant difference in WC between high doses hormone treated and TP and also between TNP, TOVX, low estradiol (LE) and progesterone (LP) groups. At 4h and 24h after trauma, there was a significant difference in ICP between TP, HE and HP compared to TNP and other TBI nontreated groups. Also in these times, the CPP increased in TP and hormone treated groups compared with TOVX, but the difference between TNP and TOVX was not significant. The results indicate that the estrous cycle has a prominent role in TBI outcome's and the difference in female sex steroid levels might be the reason of the different neuroprotective effects in proestrous and non-proestrous groups.

  2. [The effect of ethanol consumption by dams on the offspring locomotion in the open field test and carboxypeptidase activities in the rat brain and adrenal medulla].

    PubMed

    Mukhina, E S; Saldaev, D A; Vernigora, A N; Gengin, M T

    2005-03-01

    Consumption of dams ethanol increased the posterity locomotion activity in open field test. The increase in female rats was higher then in male ones. Differences in the carboxypeptidase H and PMSF-inhibited carboxypeptidase activities between the brain regions and adrenal medulla of prenatally exposed to ethanol and intact rats were found. The changing of enzyme activities in female rats was higher then in male ones. It is possible that dams ethanol consumption induced profound changes in locomotion mediated, at least partially, by changes in the rate of proteolytic processing of neuropeptide precursors.

  3. Changes in geometrical and biomechanical properties of immature male and female rat tibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernicke, Ronald F.; Hou, Jack C.-H.; Vailas, Arthur C.; Nishimoto, Mitchell; Patel, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    The differences in the geometry and mechanical properties of immature male and female rat tibiae were detailed in order to provide comparative data for spaceflight, exercise, or disease experiments that use immature rats as an animal model. The experiment focuses on the particularly rapid period of growth that occurs in the Sprague-Dawley rat between 40 and 60 d of age. Tibial length and middiaphysical cross-sectional data were analyzed for eight different groups of rats according to age and sex, and tibial mechanical properties were obtained via three-point bending tests to failure. Results indicate that, during the 15 d period of rapid growth, changes in rat tibial geometry are more important than changes in bone material properties for influencing the mechanical properties of the tibia. Male tibiae changed primarily in structural properties, while in the female rats major changes in mechanical properties of the tibia were only attributable to changes in the structural properties of the bone.

  4. Effects of central irisin administration on the uncoupling proteins in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Erden, Yavuz; Tekin, Suat; Sandal, Suleyman; Onalan, Ebru Etem; Tektemur, Ahmet; Kirbag, Sevda

    2016-04-01

    Irisin is a thermogenic peptide that enables the development of brown adipose tissue from white adipose tissue by activating the UCP1. This study has been designed to determine the effects of the irisin on UCPs. Sprague Dawley female rats were used in the study. 1, 3 and 10μM concentrations of irisin were injected intracerebroventricularly to the rats, and the control group was received only vehicle. The animals were killed at the 16, 24, and 48h time intervals and their brains were taken out. The hypothalamus, pituitary gland, hippocampus, cerebellum, striatum and cortex areas were separated and the UCP2, UCP3, UCP4 and UCP5 mRNA levels were determined. Just before the animals were killed, their body temperatures were recorded. It was observed that after application of the high dose irisin, UCP5 mRNA level in the all brain areas increased (p<0.05); it was also observed that the three doses decreased the UCP4 expression in all brain areas (except the pituitary gland; p<0.05). The UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expressions showed significantly increase in cerebellum and striatum (p<0.05). The UCP2 mRNA expression decreased in hypothalamus, pituitary gland, hippocampus and cortex areas (p<0.05). It was also observed that the body temperatures of the rats increased depending on the irisin injection and this increase was the most considerable at the 24h (p<0.05). The results of this study suggest that the UCP2-5 is expressed in different areas of the brain, and the irisin affects this expression, and may have effective roles in some brain functions.

  5. Green tea polyphenols attenuate deterioration of bone microarchitecture in female rats with systemic chronic inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Our previous study demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTP) benefit bone health in female rats with chronic inflammation, because of GTP’s antioxidant capacity. The current study further evaluates whether GTP can restore bone microstructure along with related mechanism in rats wit...

  6. GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO NONYLPHENOL CAUSES PRECOCIOUS MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN FEMALE RAT OFFSPRING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether or not exposure to 4-nonylphenol (NP) during late gestation affects reproductive and mammary development in the offspring of female rats. Time pregnant Long Evans rats were gavaged with NP (10 or 100 mg/kg), atrazine (ATR, 100 mg/kg), or corn oil on ge...

  7. Female spontaneously diabetic Torii fatty rats develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-like hepatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yukihito; Motohashi, Yu; Muramatsu, Makoto; Katsuda, Yoshiaki; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Sasase, Tomohiko; Yamada, Takahisa; Matsui, Tohru; Kume, Shinichi; Ohta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the histological features of the liver in spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rats compared with age-matched Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. METHODS: Female SDT Leprfa (SDT fatty) rats and age-matched SD rats were fed ad libitum. Body weight and biochemical parameters, such as serum glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels as well as fatty acid and TG accumulation in the liver were evaluated at 8 wk of age in the non-fasting state and at 8-wk intervals from 8 to 40 wk of age. Histopathological examinations of the liver were performed using hematoxylin and eosin and Sirius Red staining as well as double staining for ED-1 and toluidine blue. The expression of genes involved in TG synthesis, inflammation, and fibrosis was examined in the liver. RESULTS: SDT fatty rats showed significantly increased body weight compared with SD rats. Serum glucose, TG, and TC levels were significantly higher in SDT fatty rats compared with SD rats. The serum AST and ALT levels in SDT fatty rats were significantly elevated at 8 wk of age compared with the levels in SD rats. Hepatic TG content was marked in SDT fatty rats from 8 to 32 wk of age. Histopathologically, severe hepatosteatosis accompanied by inflammation was observed at 8 wk of age, and fibrosis started to occur at 32 wk of age. Furthermore, Sirius Red and ED-1 staining were increased in the liver at 32 wk of age. Hepatic gene expression related to TG synthesis, inflammation and fibrosis tended to increase in SDT fatty rats compared with SD rats, and the gene expression related to TG secretion was decreased in SDT fatty rats compared with SD rats. CONCLUSION: Female SDT fatty rats have the potential to become an important animal model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis with type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:26290633

  8. Differential expression of sirtuins in the aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braidy, Nady; Poljak, Anne; Grant, Ross; Jayasena, Tharusha; Mansour, Hussein; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; Smythe, George; Sachdev, Perminder; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    Although there are seven mammalian sirtuins (SIRT1-7), little is known about their expression in the aging brain. To characterize the change(s) in mRNA and protein expression of SIRT1-7 and their associated proteins in the brain of "physiologically" aged Wistar rats. We tested mRNA and protein expression levels of rat SIRT1-7, and the levels of associated proteins in the brain using RT-PCR and western blotting. Our data shows that SIRT1 expression increases with age, concurrently with increased acetylated p53 levels in all brain regions investigated. SIRT2 and FOXO3a protein levels increased only in the occipital lobe. SIRT3-5 expression declined significantly in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, associated with increases in superoxide and fatty acid oxidation levels, and acetylated CPS-1 protein expression, and a reduction in MnSOD level. While SIRT6 expression declines significantly with age acetylated H3K9 protein expression is increased throughout the brain. SIRT7 and Pol I protein expression increased in the frontal lobe. This study identifies previously unknown roles for sirtuins in regulating cellular homeostasis and healthy aging. PMID:26005404

  9. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  10. Low dose X-irradiation mitigates diazepam induced depression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amandeep; Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2016-10-01

    Depression is considered as one of the most prevalent health ailments. Various anti-depressant drugs have been used to provide succour to this ailment, but with little success and rather have resulted in many side effects. On the other hand, low dose of ionizing radiations are reported to exhibit many beneficial effects on human body by stimulating various biological processes. The present study was conducted to investigate the beneficial effects of low doses of X-rays, if any, during diazepam induced depression in rats. Female Sprague Dawley rats were segregated into four different groups viz: Normal control, Diazepam treated, X-irradiated and Diazepam + X-irradiated. Depression model was created in rats by subjecting them to diazepam treatment at a dosage of 2 mg/kg b.wt./day for 3 weeks. The skulls of animals belonging to X-irradiated and Diazepam + X-irradiated rats were X-irradiated with a single fraction of 0.5 Gy, given twice a day for 3 days, thereby delivered dose of 3 Gy. Diazepam treated animals showed significant alterations in the neurobehavior and neuro-histoarchitecture, which were improved after X-irradiation. Further, diazepam exposure significantly decreased the levels of neurotransmitters and acetylcholinesterase activity, but increased the monoamine oxidase activity in brain. Interestingly, X-rays exposure to diazepam treated rats increased the levels of neurotransmitters, acetylcholinesterase activity and decreased the monoamine oxidase activity. Further, depressed rats also showed increased oxidative stress with altered antioxidant parameters, which were normalized on X-rays exposure. The present study, suggests that low dose of ionizing radiations, shall prove to be an effective intervention and a novel therapy in controlling depression and possibly other brain related disorders.

  11. Low dose X-irradiation mitigates diazepam induced depression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amandeep; Singla, Neha; Dhawan, D K

    2016-10-01

    Depression is considered as one of the most prevalent health ailments. Various anti-depressant drugs have been used to provide succour to this ailment, but with little success and rather have resulted in many side effects. On the other hand, low dose of ionizing radiations are reported to exhibit many beneficial effects on human body by stimulating various biological processes. The present study was conducted to investigate the beneficial effects of low doses of X-rays, if any, during diazepam induced depression in rats. Female Sprague Dawley rats were segregated into four different groups viz: Normal control, Diazepam treated, X-irradiated and Diazepam + X-irradiated. Depression model was created in rats by subjecting them to diazepam treatment at a dosage of 2 mg/kg b.wt./day for 3 weeks. The skulls of animals belonging to X-irradiated and Diazepam + X-irradiated rats were X-irradiated with a single fraction of 0.5 Gy, given twice a day for 3 days, thereby delivered dose of 3 Gy. Diazepam treated animals showed significant alterations in the neurobehavior and neuro-histoarchitecture, which were improved after X-irradiation. Further, diazepam exposure significantly decreased the levels of neurotransmitters and acetylcholinesterase activity, but increased the monoamine oxidase activity in brain. Interestingly, X-rays exposure to diazepam treated rats increased the levels of neurotransmitters, acetylcholinesterase activity and decreased the monoamine oxidase activity. Further, depressed rats also showed increased oxidative stress with altered antioxidant parameters, which were normalized on X-rays exposure. The present study, suggests that low dose of ionizing radiations, shall prove to be an effective intervention and a novel therapy in controlling depression and possibly other brain related disorders. PMID:27316553

  12. The partner preference paradigm: a method to study sexual motivation and performance of female rats.

    PubMed

    Avitsur, R; Yirmiya, R

    1999-01-01

    Sexual behavior of the female rat consists of initiative, as well as receptive components. Previous studies on female sexual behavior have focused on the reflexive response to a male's mount, i.e., the lordosis reflex, whereas the initiative and soliciting gestures that are exhibited by the female during copulation were ignored by most researchers. This bias led to a misconception of the female's role in the sexual act, according to which the female is passive and submissive, whereas the male rat is sexually dominant or even aggressive. In this paper, we describe a procedure, the partner preference paradigm, designed to investigate and quantify sexual motivation, initiation and solicitation in female rats. In this paradigm, the female can control the sexual act because the mobility of her sexual partner is limited. This setting enables to measure a variety of soliciting behaviors that reflect the active seeking of sexual contact by an estrous female. In addition, this paradigm enables the evaluation of the females' motivation to engage in a sexual act, by measuring the preference for a sexually appropriate over an indifferent partner. Moreover, the partner preference paradigm may be easily adopted for studies in male subjects, allowing the comparison of males' and females' responses to various experimental conditions.

  13. Pair housing differentially affects motivation to self-administer cocaine in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Westenbroek, Christel; Perry, Adam N.; Becker, Jill B.

    2013-01-01

    Female rats exhibit greater intake and motivation to self-administer cocaine. In females but not males, isolation by itself is a stressor, which could lead to increased drug intake. Therefore, we hypothesized that social housing would buffer against stress and reduce the motivation to self-administer cocaine primarily in females. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually or in same-sex pairs. The individually housed rats and one of each pair were allowed to self-administer (SA) a low dose of cocaine (0.2 mg/kg/inf) on a fixed ratio (FR1) schedule for one week. Motivation for cocaine SA was measured for an additional 2 weeks on a progressive ratio schedule. Isolated females had greater cocaine-intake on the FR1 schedule and greater motivation to take cocaine than males. Pair-housing in females, but not males, attenuated the motivation to take cocaine. Isolated females, but not males, showed escalation of their motivation to take cocaine, which was attenuated by pair housing of females. Concluding, the motivation to take cocaine escalates in females but not males, and pair-housing of females attenuates this escalation. PMID:23727175

  14. The role of odors and ultrasonic vocalizations in female rat (Rattus norvegicus) partner choice.

    PubMed

    Snoeren, Eelke M S; Ågmo, Anders

    2014-11-01

    Intrasexual competition for access to a female mate is believed to be unusual in wild male rats, which suggests that female choosiness could be more important. It has been shown that females spend more time with one male than with others when tested in a multiple partner paradigm. The male of first entry is visited most. The role of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) and male odors in the female rat's initial choice to approach one male instead of another are studied in these experiments. In Experiment 1, female rats were allowed to choose between 3 different intact males, whereas in Experiment 2, females could choose between a devocalized male and 2 intact males. Both experiments started with a 15-min period with inaccessible males followed by a 15-min period with accessible males in which the female could copulate with the males of her choice. The results showed that female rats spent more time with the male of first entry over the males visited subsequently. No differences were found in USV subtype patterns emitted by the different males or the time spent sniffing the different males in the period preceding the choice. In addition, the results of Experiment 2 showed that females visited the silent males as much as the vocalizing males. Thus, the present experiments did not offer any evidence suggesting that USVs or individual differences in male odors play any role in female mate choice. Other factors that were not investigated in this study might be involved in female rat mate selection, but it should also be considered that mate selection could be random. PMID:25133463

  15. Sorbitol accumulation in male and female rats consuming starch or fructose diets with or without copper

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.G.; Fields, M.; Beal, T. )

    1989-02-09

    The present study was designed to examine the relationship between the sex of the rats, tissue sorbitol accumulation and copper deficiency in rats consuming dietary fructose. Rats were provided with a diet containing either 62.7% fructose or starch, and either 6.0 or 0.6 {mu}g copper/g for three weeks. Hepatic copper concentration of all rats consuming the copper-deficient diets was about 40% of copper sufficient rats. Hepatic, renal and thymic sorbitol concentrations were significantly elevated in males consuming the fructose, copper-deficient diet when compared to all other dietary groups regardless of the sex of the rat. Hepatic, renal the thymic fructose concentrations were significantly higher in rats eating fructose as compared to female rats. Hepatic glucose concentration was higher in males and females consuming the fructose, copper-deficient diet when compared to all other dietary groups. Renal glucose concentration was elevated in males as compared to females. These results demonstrate that the pathology and complications of copper deficiency in the male rat consuming fructose closely parallel aberration in tissue sorbitol accumulation.

  16. Brain activation-based sexual orientation in female-to-male transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Kim, T-H; Kim, G-W; Kim, S-K; Jeong, G-W

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to identify the sexual orientation in association with brain activation pattern in response to visual erotic stimuli in female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eleven FtM transsexuals who have had sex-reassignment surgery to alter their natal bodies with the gender-identity disorder were participated. Brain activation for sexual orientation was induced by visual stimuli with female and male erotic nude pictures compared with emotionally-neutral pictures. During viewing the erotic female pictures, the brain areas dominantly activated consist of the superior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, anterior/median cingulate gyri and hypothalamus, whereas during viewing male pictures, the brain areas with predominant activities were the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, angular gyrus, precuneus, superior/middle occipital gyri, cerebellar cortex and vermis. These findings demonstrate that the brain activation patterns induced by viewing male or female erotic pictures show some correlation to the sexual orientation opposite to the genetic sex in FtM transsexuals. This study would be helpful to understand the neural mechanism associated with visual sexual arousal in patients with gender disorder. PMID:26581912

  17. Acute stress differentially affects aromatase activity in specific brain nuclei of adult male and female quail.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Molly J; Cornil, Charlotte A; Balthazart, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    The rapid and temporary suppression of reproductive behavior is often assumed to be an important feature of the adaptive acute stress response. However, how this suppression operates at the mechanistic level is poorly understood. The enzyme aromatase converts testosterone to estradiol in the brain to activate reproductive behavior in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). The discovery of rapid and reversible modification of aromatase activity (AA) provides a potential mechanism for fast, stress-induced changes in behavior. We investigated the effects of acute stress on AA in both sexes by measuring enzyme activity in all aromatase-expressing brain nuclei before, during, and after 30 min of acute restraint stress. We show here that acute stress rapidly alters AA in the male and female brain and that these changes are specific to the brain nuclei and sex of the individual. Specifically, acute stress rapidly (5 min) increased AA in the male medial preoptic nucleus, a region controlling male reproductive behavior; in females, a similar increase was also observed, but it appeared delayed (15 min) and had smaller amplitude. In the ventromedial and tuberal hypothalamus, regions associated with female reproductive behavior, stress induced a quick and sustained decrease in AA in females, but in males, only a slight increase (ventromedial) or no change (tuberal) in AA was observed. Effects of acute stress on brain estrogen production, therefore, represent one potential way through which stress affects reproduction.

  18. Brain activation-based sexual orientation in female-to-male transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Kim, T-H; Kim, G-W; Kim, S-K; Jeong, G-W

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to identify the sexual orientation in association with brain activation pattern in response to visual erotic stimuli in female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eleven FtM transsexuals who have had sex-reassignment surgery to alter their natal bodies with the gender-identity disorder were participated. Brain activation for sexual orientation was induced by visual stimuli with female and male erotic nude pictures compared with emotionally-neutral pictures. During viewing the erotic female pictures, the brain areas dominantly activated consist of the superior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, anterior/median cingulate gyri and hypothalamus, whereas during viewing male pictures, the brain areas with predominant activities were the middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, angular gyrus, precuneus, superior/middle occipital gyri, cerebellar cortex and vermis. These findings demonstrate that the brain activation patterns induced by viewing male or female erotic pictures show some correlation to the sexual orientation opposite to the genetic sex in FtM transsexuals. This study would be helpful to understand the neural mechanism associated with visual sexual arousal in patients with gender disorder.

  19. Female cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) develop chronic anemia with renal inflammation and cystic changes.

    PubMed

    Ichii, Osamu; Nakamura, Teppei; Irie, Takao; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Daisuke; Nakamura, Saori; Sato, Shinobu; Yokoyama, Keisuke; Horino, Taro; Sunden, Yuji; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) is a laboratory rodent that has been used for studies on human infectious diseases. In the present study, we observed that female cotton rats, not the male cotton rats, developed chronic anemia characterized by reduced red blood cell, hemoglobin, and hematocrit levels from 5 to 9 months of age without any changes in the mean corpuscular hemoglobin and volume levels. In peripheral blood, the reticulocyte count did not increase in response to anemia in female cotton rats, and no extramedullary hematopoiesis was observed in the liver or spleen. Further, the serum levels of urea nitrogen and creatinine increased from 5 to 9 months of age in female cotton rats compared to male cotton rats, and these increases became more prominent from 10 months of age onward, indicating chronic kidney disease. Histopathologically, female cotton rats manifested tubulointerstitial lesions characterized by the infiltration of mononuclear cells, including plasma cells and CD3(+) T-cells, as well as the dilation of calbindin-D28k(+) distal tubules from 5 to 9 months of age. The severity of these lesions progressed from 10 months of age onward, and renal fibrotic features and numerous tubular cysts appeared without any obvious glomerular lesions. A significant decrease in the erythropoietin protein levels was observed in the kidney of aged female cotton rats, and significant correlations were detected between anemia and tubulointerstitial damage. These results suggest that aged female cotton rats chronically develop renal anemia, and this rodent may serve as a novel model to elucidate its pathogenesis. PMID:27099161

  20. Cloning and expression of a rat brain GABA transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.; Czyzyk, L.; Davidson, N.; Lester, H.A. ); Nelson, N.; Nelson, H.; Miedel, M.C. ); Keynan, S.; Kanner, B.I. )

    1990-09-14

    A complementary DNA clone (designated GAT-1) encoding a transporter for the neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been isolated from rat brain, and its functional properties have been examined in Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes injected with GAT-1 synthetic messenger RNA accumulated ({sup 3}H)GABA to levels above control values. The transporter encoded by GAT-1 has a high affinity for GABA, is sodium- and chloride-dependent, and is pharmacologically similar to neuronal GABA transporters. The GAT-1 protein shares antigenic determinants with a native rat brain GABA transporter. The nucleotide sequence of GAT-1 predicts a protein of 599 amino acids with a molecular weight of 67 kilodaltons. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced protein suggests multiple transmembrane regions, a feature shared by several cloned transporters; however, database searches indicate that GAT-1 is not homologous to any previously identified proteins. Therefore, GAT-1 appears to be a member of a previously uncharacterized family of transport molecules.

  1. Hormone-dependent aggression in female rats: testosterone implants attenuate the decline in aggression following ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1990-04-01

    Female rats were individually housed with a sterile male for a 4- to 5-week period. Each female was then tested for aggression toward an unfamiliar female intruder at weekly intervals. Those females that displayed a high level of aggression on each of three weekly tests were ovariectomized and given subcutaneous implants of testosterone-filled tubes, ovariectomized and given subcutaneous implants of empty tubes, or sham-ovariectomized and implanted with empty tubes. These implants should produce a serum testosterone concentration of about 0.6 ng/ml, compared to 0.17 ng/ml in intact females. Beginning 1 week postoperatively, the aggression of each female was tested weekly for 4 weeks. Ovariectomized females with testosterone implants displayed a level of aggression significantly higher than that of ovariectomized females with empty implants on 3 of 4 weekly tests. The level of aggression by females with testosterone implants was not significantly different from that of sham-ovariectomized females on the first postoperative test. Additional observations showed that testosterone implants did not produce an increase in aggression in females whose preoperative level of aggression was low. Further, Silastic implants containing estrogen (1 to 2 mm long) sufficient to maintain a serum estrogen level of 20 to 30 pg/ml also attenuated the decline of aggression following ovariectomy. These results suggest that testosterone and estrogen may both contribute to the biological substrate of hormone-dependent aggression in female rats.

  2. Microwave effects on energy metabolism of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, A.P.; Schaefer, D.J.; Joines, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    Rat brain was exposed to 591-MHz, continuous-wave (CW) microwaves at 13.8 or 5.0 mW/cm2 to determine the effect on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced (NADH), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and creatine phosphate (CP) levels. On initiation of the in vivo microwave exposures, fluorimetrically determined NADH rapidly increased to a maximum of 4.0%-12.5% above pre-exposure control levels at one-half minute, than decreased slowly to 2% above control at three minutes, finally increasing slowly to 5% above control level at five minutes. ATP and CP assays were performed on sham- and microwave-exposed brain at each exposure time. At 13.8 mW/cm2, brain CP level was decreased an average of 39.4%, 41.1%, 18.2%, 13.1%, and 36.4% of control at exposure points one-half, one, two three, and five minutes, respectively, and brain ATP concentration was decreased an average of 25.2%, 15.2%, 17.8%, 7.4%, and 11.2% of control at the corresponding exposure periods. ATP and CP levels of rat brain exposed to 591-MHz cw microwaves at 5mW/cm2 for one-half and one minute were decreased significantly below control levels at these exposure times, but were not significantly different from the 13.8 mW/cm2 exposures. For all exposures, rectal temperature remained constant. Heat loss through the skull aperture caused brain temperature to decrease during the five-minute exposures. This decrease was the same in magnitude for experimental and control subjects. Changes in NADH, ATP, and CP levels during microwave exposure cannot be attributed to general tissue hyperthermia. The data support the hypothesis that microwave exposure inhibits mitochondrial electron transport chain function, which results in decreased ATP and CP levels in brain.

  3. Central Infusion of Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Agonist Compound 21 Attenuates DOCA/NaCl-Induced Hypertension in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Peng, Wei; Shen, Ying; He, Jing-Jing

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated whether central activation of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2-R) attenuates deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/NaCl-induced hypertension in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats and whether female sex hormone status has influence on the effects of AT2-R activation. DOCA/NaCl elicited a greater increase in blood pressure in OVX females than that in intact females. Central infusion of compound 21, a specific AT2-R agonist, abolished DOCA/NaCl pressor effect in intact females, whereas same treatment in OVX females produced an inhibitory effect. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that DOCA/NaCl enhanced the mRNA expression of hypertensive components including AT1-R, ACE-1, and TNF-α in the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus in both intact and OVX females. However, the mRNA expressions of antihypertensive components such as AT2-R, ACE-2, and IL-10 were increased only in intact females. Central AT2-R agonist reversed the changes in the hypertensive components in all females, while this agonist further upregulated the expression of ACE2 and IL-10 in intact females, but only IL-10 in OVX females. These results indicate that brain AT2-R activation plays an inhibitory role in the development of DOCA/NaCl-induced hypertension in females. This beneficial effect of AT2-R activation involves regulation of renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines.

  4. Central Infusion of Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Agonist Compound 21 Attenuates DOCA/NaCl-Induced Hypertension in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Peng, Wei; Shen, Ying; He, Jing-Jing

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated whether central activation of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2-R) attenuates deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/NaCl-induced hypertension in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats and whether female sex hormone status has influence on the effects of AT2-R activation. DOCA/NaCl elicited a greater increase in blood pressure in OVX females than that in intact females. Central infusion of compound 21, a specific AT2-R agonist, abolished DOCA/NaCl pressor effect in intact females, whereas same treatment in OVX females produced an inhibitory effect. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that DOCA/NaCl enhanced the mRNA expression of hypertensive components including AT1-R, ACE-1, and TNF-α in the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus in both intact and OVX females. However, the mRNA expressions of antihypertensive components such as AT2-R, ACE-2, and IL-10 were increased only in intact females. Central AT2-R agonist reversed the changes in the hypertensive components in all females, while this agonist further upregulated the expression of ACE2 and IL-10 in intact females, but only IL-10 in OVX females. These results indicate that brain AT2-R activation plays an inhibitory role in the development of DOCA/NaCl-induced hypertension in females. This beneficial effect of AT2-R activation involves regulation of renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26783414

  5. Comparison of male and female rats in avoidance of a moving object: more thigmotaxis, hypolocomotion and fear-like reactions in females.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, J; Telenský, P; Blahna, K; Bureš, J; Stuchlík, A

    2012-01-01

    Although male rats generally outperform females in many spatial tasks, sometimes gender differences are not present. This preliminary study examined gender effects in the Enemy avoidance task, in which a rat on a stable circular arena avoids approaching a small mobile robot while collecting randomly dispersed small pellets. Whenever distance between robot and the rat dropped below 25 cm, animal was punished by a mild footshock. Female rats showed thigmotaxis, hypolocomotion and avoidance of robot in the habituation phase, when approaches were not punished. No statistically significant differences in avoidance learning under reinforcement training sessions were observed; but females still spent significantly more time at periphery of the arena and foraged less than males. We conclude that females were able to perform at the same level as males under reinforcement despite different behavioral strategy. The thigmotaxic behavior appears to function as innate escape strategy in female rats triggered by the stressing effect of the moving robot rather then the presence of shocks.

  6. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor.

  7. Oxidative changes in brain of aniline-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kakkar, P.; Awasthi, S.; Viswanathan, P.N. )

    1992-10-01

    Oxidative stress in rat cerebellum, cortex and brain stem after a short-term high-dose exposure to aniline vapors under conditions akin to those after major chemical accidents, was studied. Significant increases in superoxide dismutase isozyme activities and formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive material along with depletion of ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl content suggest impairment of antioxidant defenses 24 h after single exposure to 15,302 ppm aniline vapors for 10 min.

  8. Behavioral effects of endogenous or exogenous estradiol and progesterone on cocaine sensitization in female rats.

    PubMed

    Souza, M F; Couto-Pereira, N S; Freese, L; Costa, P A; Caletti, G; Bisognin, K M; Nin, M S; Gomez, R; Barros, H M T

    2014-06-01

    Cocaine sensitization is a marker for some facets of addiction, is greater in female rats, and may be influenced by their sex hormones. We compared the modulatory effects of endogenous or exogenous estradiol and progesterone on cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in 106 female rats. Ovariectomized female rats received progesterone (0.5 mg/mL), estradiol (0.05 mg/mL), progesterone plus estradiol, or the oil vehicle. Sham-operated control females received oil. Control and acute subgroups received injections of saline, while the repeated group received cocaine (15 mg/kg, ip) for 8 days. After 10 days, the acute and repeated groups received a challenge dose of cocaine, after which locomotion and stereotypy were monitored. The estrous cycle phase was evaluated and blood was collected to verify hormone levels. Repeated cocaine treatment induced overall behavioral sensitization in female rats, with increased locomotion and stereotypies. In detailed analysis, ovariectomized rats showed no locomotor sensitization; however, the sensitization of stereotypies was maintained. Only females with endogenous estradiol and progesterone demonstrated increased locomotor activity after cocaine challenge. Estradiol replacement enhanced stereotyped behaviors after repeated cocaine administration. Cocaine sensitization of stereotyped behaviors in female rats was reduced after progesterone replacement, either alone or concomitant with estradiol. The behavioral responses (locomotion and stereotypy) to cocaine were affected differently, depending on whether the female hormones were of an endogenous or exogenous origin. Therefore, hormonal cycling appears to be an important factor in the sensitization of females. Although estradiol increases the risk of cocaine sensitization, progesterone warrants further study as a pharmacological treatment in the prevention of psychostimulant abuse.

  9. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus has similar effects on brain volumetrics and cognition in males and females.

    PubMed

    Behrman-Lay, Ashley M; Paul, Robert H; Heaps-Woodruff, Jodi; Baker, Laurie M; Usher, Christina; Ances, Beau M

    2016-02-01

    Most studies that have examined neuropsychological impairments associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have focused on males, yet females represent one of the largest groups of newly infected patients. Further, few studies have examined neuropsychological performance and neuroimaging outcomes among females compared to males in the modern era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). The present study investigated neuropsychological performance and brain volumetrics among HIV+ males (n = 93) and females (n = 44) on stable HAART compared to HIV seronegative (HIV-) males (n = 42) and females (n = 49). Results revealed a significant effect of HIV on neuropsychological performance and neuroimaging measures. An effect of gender, independent of HIV status, was also observed for neuroimaging measures but not neuropsychological performance. Additionally, no significant differences in neuropsychological performance or brain volumetrics were seen between HIV+ males and females. No significant interaction was observed between HIV and gender on either neuropsychological or neuroimaging indices. Our results suggest that both HIV+ males and females treated with HAART experience similar outcomes in terms of brain integrity.

  11. Bone turnover in passive smoking female rat: relationships to change in bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies have identified smoking as a risk factor for osteoporosis, but it is unclear whether passive smoking has an effect on bone mineral density and bone turnover and if such an effect could cause osteoporosis.The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of passive smoking on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover and the relationship between BMD and bone turnover in female rat. Methods Forty-eight female Wistar rats were randomized into six groups: 2-month, 3-month,4-month smoke-exposed rats and their controls. A rat model of passive cigarette smoking was prepared by breeding female rats in a cigarette-smoking box for 2, 3 or 4 months. Serums were analyzed for levels of osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP) and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP 5b). BMD was assessed at lumbar vertebrae and femur by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in passive smoking rats and in control rats. Results BMD of lumbar spine and femur was lower in 4-month smoke-exposed female rats than that in controls. However, there was no significant difference in serum osteocalcin levels between smoke-exposed rats and controls. Significantly lower b-ALP and higher TRACP 5b were found in the 3-month or 4-month smoke-exposed rats compared to controls. Subsequent analysis showed that b-ALP positively correlated with BMD of the lumbar vertebrae(r = 0.764, P = 0.027) and femur(r = 0.899, P = 0.002) in 4-month smoke-exposed female rats. Furthermore, TRACP 5b levels negatively correlated with BMD of lumbar vertebrae (r = -0.871, P = 0.005) and femur (r = -0.715, P = 0.046) in 4-month smoke-exposed female rats. Conclusion Our data suggest that smoke exposure can inhibit bone formation and increase bone resorption. The hazardous effects of passive smoking on bone status are associated with increased bone turnover in female rat. PMID:21663694

  12. Neuroprotection of Selective Brain Cooling After Penetrating Ballistic-like Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo; Lu, Xi-Chun M; Shear, Deborah A; Yang, Xiaofang; Tortella, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Induced hypothermia has been reported to provide neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury. We recently developed a novel method of selective brain cooling (SBC) and demonstrated its safety and neuroprotection efficacy in a rat model of ischemic brain injury. The primary focus of the current study was to evaluate the potential neuroprotective efficacy of SBC in a rat model of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) with a particular focus on the acute cerebral pathophysiology, neurofunction, and cognition. SBC (34°C) was induced immediately after PBBI, and maintained for 2 hours, followed by a spontaneous re-warming. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and regional cerebral blood flow were monitored continuously for 3 hours, and the ICP was measured again at 24 hours postinjury. Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier permeability, intracerebral hemorrhage, lesion size, and neurological status were assessed at 24 hours postinjury. Cognitive abilities were evaluated in a Morris water maze task at 12-16 days postinjury. Results showed that SBC significantly attenuated PBBI-induced elevation of ICP (PBBI = 33.2 ± 10.4; PBBI + SBC = 18.8 ± 6.7 mmHg) and reduced brain swelling, blood-brain barrier leakage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and lesion volume by 40%-45% for each matrix, and significantly improved neurologic function. However, these acute neuroprotective benefits of SBC did not translate into improved cognitive performance in the Morris water maze task. These results indicate that 34°C SBC is effective in protecting against acute brain damage and related neurological dysfunction. Further studies are required to establish the optimal treatment conditions (i.e., duration of cooling and/or combined therapeutic approaches) needed to achieve significant neurocognitive benefits.

  13. Cytosolic rat brain synapsin I is a diacylglycerol kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, D W; Besterman, J M

    1991-01-01

    The phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG), a reaction catalyzed by DG kinase, may be critical in the termination of effector-induced signals mediated by protein kinase C. Synapsin I is a principal target of intracellular protein kinases and is thought to be involved in the release of neurotransmitter from axon terminals. We present several lines of evidence which indicate that rat brain synapsin, in addition to this role, may function as a DG kinase. Purified rat brain DG kinase was digested with trypsin, which produced three major fragments whose sequence was identical to three regions in synapsin I. Using a rabbit anti-synapsin polyclonal antiserum, the elution profile of synapsin immunoreactivity coincided exactly with that of DG kinase activity in column fractions from the final step in the DG kinase purification procedure. As is the case with synapsin, the purified enzyme was a strongly basic protein with an isoelectric point greater than 10.0. Finally, incubating the DG kinase with highly purified bacterial collagenase, an enzyme that partially degrades the proline- and glycine-rich synapsin, resulted in the simultaneous loss of DG kinase activity and synapsin immunoreactivity. We conclude that cytosolic rat brain synapsin is capable of functioning as a DG kinase. Images PMID:1648730

  14. Methylphenidate alters NCS-1 expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Souza, Renan P; Soares, Eliane C; Rosa, Daniela V F; Souza, Bruno R; Réus, Gislaine Z; Barichello, Tatiana; Gomes, Karin M; Gomez, Marcus V; Quevedo, João; Romano-Silva, Marco A

    2008-07-01

    Methylphenidate has been used as an effective treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methylphenidate (MPH) blocks dopamine and norepinephrine transporters causing an increase in extracellular levels. The use of psychomotor stimulants continues to rise due to both the treatment of ADHD and illicit abuse. Methylphenidate sensitization mechanism has still poor knowledge. Neuronal calcium sensor 1 was identified as a dopaminergic receptor interacting protein. When expressed in mammalian cells, neuronal calcium sensor 1 attenuates dopamine-induced D2 receptor internalization by a mechanism that involves a reduction in D2 receptor phosphorylation. Neuronal calcium sensor 1 appears to play a pivotal role in regulating D2 receptor function, it will be important to determine if there are alterations in neuronal calcium sensor 1 in neuropathologies associated with deregulation in dopaminergic signaling. Then, we investigated if methylphenidate could alter neuronal calcium sensor 1 expression in five brain regions (striatum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, cortex and cerebellum) in young and adult rats. These regions were chosen because some are located in brain circuits related with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Our results showed changes in neuronal calcium sensor 1 expression in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and cerebellum mainly in adult rats. The demonstration that methylphenidate induces changes in neuronal calcium sensor 1 levels in rat brain may help to understand sensitization mechanisms as well as methylphenidate therapeutic effects to improve attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms.

  15. Gelation and fodrin purification from rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Péron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-06-01

    Extracts from rat brain tissue have been shown to give rise to a gel which exhibits the following features. It is mainly enriched in actin and in a high-molecular-weight protein with polypeptide chains of 235 and 240 kDa, which we identified as fodrin. Tubulin is also a major component of the gel but it appears to be trapped non-specifically during the gelation process. Gelation is pH-, ionic strength- and Ca2+-concentration-dependent, and is optimal under the conditions which promote the interaction between polymerized actin and fodrin. In a similar way to that described for the purification of rat brain actin (Levilliers, N., Péron-Renner, M., Coffe, G. and Pudles, J. (1984) Biochimie 66, 531-537), we used the gelation system as a selective means of recovering fodrin from the mixture of a low-ionic-strength extract from whole rat brain and a high-ionic-strength extract of the particulate fraction. From this gel, fodrin was purified with a good yield by a simple procedure involving gel dissociation in 0.5 M KCl and depolymerization in 0.7 M KI, Bio-Gel A-15m chromatography, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation. PMID:3707993

  16. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  17. The stressed female brain: neuronal activity in the prelimbic but not infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex suppresses learning after acute stress.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Lisa Y; Shors, Tracey J

    2013-01-01

    Women are nearly twice as likely as men to suffer from anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), indicating that many females are especially vulnerable to stressful life experience. A profound sex difference in the response to stress is also observed in laboratory animals. Acute exposure to an uncontrollable stressful event disrupts associative learning during classical eyeblink conditioning in female rats but enhances this same type of learning process in males. These sex differences in response to stress are dependent on neuronal activity in similar but also different brain regions. Neuronal activity in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is necessary in both males and females. However, neuronal activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during the stressor is necessary to modify learning in females but not in males. The mPFC is often divided into its prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) subregions, which differ both in structure and function. Through its connections to the BLA, we hypothesized that neuronal activity within the PL, but not IL, during the stressor is necessary to suppress learning in females. To test this hypothesis, either the PL or IL of adult female rats was bilaterally inactivated with GABAA agonist muscimol during acute inescapable swim stress. About 24 h later, all subjects were trained with classical eyeblink conditioning. Though stressed, females without neuronal activity in the PL learned well. In contrast, females with IL inactivation during the stressor did not learn well, behaving similarly to stressed vehicle-treated females. These data suggest that exposure to a stressful event critically engages the PL, but not IL, to disrupt associative learning in females. Together with previous studies, these data indicate that the PL communicates with the BLA to suppress learning after a stressful experience in females. This circuit may be similarly engaged in women who become cognitively impaired after stressful life

  18. Pathophysiological differences between paired and communal breeding of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Wexler, B C; Greenberg, B P

    1978-01-01

    Sexually mature, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were housed in large communal breeding cages or in smaller paired breeding cages. Virgin control rats of the same age were housed similarly but segregated by sex. Breeders became obese, developed a fatty liver, and showed elevated levels of triglycerides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. Breeders had high blood pressure, enlarged hearts, hyperglycemia, and islet beta cell degranulation. Serum enzymes, creatine phosphokinase, serum glutamic oxalo-pyruvic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, and blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated in breeder rats. The adrenal glands of male breeders appeared hyperactive; the adrenal glands of female breeders were thrombosed and appeared to be hypoactive. Male breeder rats developed microscopic aortic lesions only; female breeders developed advanced calcific aortic sclerosis. Male breeders kept in active stud service manifested the most abnormal metabolic and pathophysiological changes. Female breeders developed similar pathophysiological changes after four pregnancies, irrespective of their paired or communal breeding environment. Virgin rats were normal regardless of housing conditions. Our findings suggest that repeated breeding in male and female rats causes resetting of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-gonadal axis. This may lead to disturbed hormonal and metabolic changes which culminate with the development of accelerated cardiovascular degenerative changes.

  19. A Single Neonatal Injection of Ethinyl Estradiol Impairs Passive Avoidance Learning and Reduces Expression of Estrogen Receptor α in the Hippocampus and Cortex of Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Tatsuomi; Nakamura, Takahiro J.; Komine, Chiaki; Goto, Yoshikuni; Mizoguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Midori; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Kawaguchi, Maiko

    2016-01-01

    Although perinatal exposure of female rats to estrogenic compounds produces irreversible changes in brain function, it is still unclear how the amount and timing of exposure to those substances affect learning function, or if exposure alters estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression in the hippocampus and cortex. In adult female rats, we investigated the effects of neonatal exposure to a model estrogenic compound, ethinyl estradiol (EE), on passive avoidance learning and ERα expression. Female Wistar-Imamichi rats were subcutaneously injected with oil, 0.02 mg/kg EE, 2 mg/kg EE, or 20 mg/kg 17β-estradiol within 24 h after birth. All females were tested for passive avoidance learning at the age of 6 weeks. Neonatal 0.02 mg/kg EE administration significantly disrupted passive avoidance compared with oil treatment in gonadally intact females. In a second experiment, another set of experimental females, treated as described above, was ovariectomized under pentobarbital anesthesia at 10 weeks of age. At 15–17 weeks of age, half of each group received a subcutaneous injection of 5 μg estradiol benzoate a day before the passive avoidance learning test. Passive avoidance learning behavior was impaired by the 0.02 mg/kg EE dose, but notably only in the estradiol benzoate-injected group. At 17–19 weeks of age, hippocampal and cortical samples were collected from rats with or without the 5 μg estradiol benzoate injection, and western blots used to determine ERα expression. A significant decrease in ERα expression was observed in the hippocampus of the estradiol-injected, neonatal EE-treated females. The results demonstrated that exposure to EE immediately after birth decreased learning ability in adult female rats, and that this may be at least partly mediated by the decreased expression of ERα in the hippocampus. PMID:26741502

  20. A Single Neonatal Injection of Ethinyl Estradiol Impairs Passive Avoidance Learning and Reduces Expression of Estrogen Receptor α in the Hippocampus and Cortex of Adult Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Tatsuomi; Nakamura, Takahiro J; Komine, Chiaki; Goto, Yoshikuni; Mizoguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Midori; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Kawaguchi, Maiko

    2016-01-01

    Although perinatal exposure of female rats to estrogenic compounds produces irreversible changes in brain function, it is still unclear how the amount and timing of exposure to those substances affect learning function, or if exposure alters estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression in the hippocampus and cortex. In adult female rats, we investigated the effects of neonatal exposure to a model estrogenic compound, ethinyl estradiol (EE), on passive avoidance learning and ERα expression. Female Wistar-Imamichi rats were subcutaneously injected with oil, 0.02 mg/kg EE, 2 mg/kg EE, or 20 mg/kg 17β-estradiol within 24 h after birth. All females were tested for passive avoidance learning at the age of 6 weeks. Neonatal 0.02 mg/kg EE administration significantly disrupted passive avoidance compared with oil treatment in gonadally intact females. In a second experiment, another set of experimental females, treated as described above, was ovariectomized under pentobarbital anesthesia at 10 weeks of age. At 15-17 weeks of age, half of each group received a subcutaneous injection of 5 μg estradiol benzoate a day before the passive avoidance learning test. Passive avoidance learning behavior was impaired by the 0.02 mg/kg EE dose, but notably only in the estradiol benzoate-injected group. At 17-19 weeks of age, hippocampal and cortical samples were collected from rats with or without the 5 μg estradiol benzoate injection, and western blots used to determine ERα expression. A significant decrease in ERα expression was observed in the hippocampus of the estradiol-injected, neonatal EE-treated females. The results demonstrated that exposure to EE immediately after birth decreased learning ability in adult female rats, and that this may be at least partly mediated by the decreased expression of ERα in the hippocampus. PMID:26741502

  1. Female rats are more susceptible to the deleterious effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation on cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Hajali, Vahid; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Shabani, Mohammad

    2012-03-17

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) may alter subsequent learning and memory capacity. There are differences in both the intensity and direction of responses of the male and female species to the same environmental stimuli and experimental conditions. In the present study, we examined the extent of the effects of PSD for 72h on spatial learning and memory, anxiety-like behavior, corticosterone levels, and the body weight in male as well as in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats. Multiple platform method was used for PSD induction. Spatial learning and memory and anxiety-like behavior were determined using Morris water maze (MWM) task and open field test, respectively. The data showed that PSD could not significantly affect subsequent spatial learning and short-term memory in male rats, while it significantly impaired the performance of the intact and OVX female rats. The PSD-intact and -OVX female rats showed more memory impairment than the PSD-male animals. Those impairments do not appear to be due to elevated stress level, since the plasma corticosterone did not significantly change following PSD induction. The open field data showed that PSD significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior in all experimental groups. In addition, PSD had a reducing effect on the mean body weight of female groups. Such results suggest that the female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep loss on cognitive performance.

  2. Social stress increases the acquisition of cocaine self-administration in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Haney, M; Maccari, S; Le Moal, M; Simon, H; Piazza, P V

    1995-11-01

    The effect of social stress on the vulnerability to commence cocaine self-administration was examined in Sprague-Dawley rats repeatedly exposed to aggressive attack by a same-sex opponent. Both sexes were studied, since the factors influencing the acquisition of drug self-administration in females have not been defined. Male and female rats encountered an aggressive male or lactating female opponent on four separate occasions over the course of one week. Control male and female rats were not exposed to attack. All animals were implanted with jugular catheters, and six days later placed into the self-administration box, where a nose-poke in the designated 'active hole' resulted in a 20 microliters injection of cocaine (0.32 mg/kg). Nose-pokes in an 'inactive' hole had no effect. Male and female rats that had experienced social stress self-administered more cocaine than non-defeated controls. The difference between the stressed and non-stressed animals in the number of cocaine injections was not present during the first few days of exposure to cocaine, but became more pronounced over time. Social stress increased the number of responses for cocaine, but did not alter the number of non-specific responses. Sex differences in self-administration were not significant. Therefore, social status appears to be a potent influence in the onset of drug taking behavior in both male and female rats. PMID:8581502

  3. Intrinsic optical signals of brains in rats during loss of tissue viability: effect of brain temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2007-07-01

    Noninvasive, real-time monitoring of brain tissue viability is crucial for the patients with stroke, traumatic brain injury, etc. For this purpose, measurement of intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is attractive because it can provide direct information about the viability of brain tissue noninvasively. We performed simultaneous measurements of IOSs that are related to morphological characteristics, i.e., light scattering, and energy metabolism for rat brains during saline infusion as a model with temporal loss of brain tissue viability. The results showed that the scattering signal was steady in an initial phase but showed a drastic, triphasic change in a certain range of infusion time, during which the reduction of CuA in cytochrome c oxidase started and proceeded rapidly. The start time of triphasic scattering change was delayed for about 100 s by lowering brain temperature from 29°C to 24°C, demonstrating the optical detection of cerebroprotection effect by brain cooling. Electron microscopic observation showed morphological changes of dendrite and mitochondria in the cortical surface tissue after the triphasic scattering change, which was thought to be associated with the change in light scattering we observed. These findings suggest that the simultaneous measurement of the intrinsic optical signals related to morphological characteristics and energy metabolism is useful for monitoring tissue viability in brain.

  4. Magnetic micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CP-mag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM-tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 h after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. From the clinical editor: In this study, chitosan and PEI-coated magnetic micelles (CPMM) were demonstrated as potentially useful vehicles in traumatic brain injury in a rodent model. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain and, after intranasal delivery, CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response and were excreted from the body. PMID:24486465

  5. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development.

    PubMed

    Brøchner, Christian B; Holst, Camilla B; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6-21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer.

  6. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    PubMed Central

    Brøchner, Christian B.; Holst, Camilla B.; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6–21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer. PMID:25852456

  7. Hormonal regulation of type II glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, A; Lapointe, B; Barden, N

    1991-10-01

    Differences in the regulation of type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels in female rat brain regions involved in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis were studied by Northern blot analysis after chronic administration of corticosterone or dexamethasone to adrenalectomized (ADX), ovariectomized (OVX), and ADX/OVX animals. The effect of chronic estradiol or progesterone treatment of intact animals was also studied. Our results show that type II GR mRNA levels of ADX animals were significantly increased above control values in amygdala (140%) and hippocampus (196%), but not in hypothalamus. These increased transcript levels were down-regulated by corticosterone or dexamethasone, with the exception of those in the amygdala, where corticosterone had no effect. Ovariectomy significantly increased hypothalamic GR mRNA content (174%) over control values, and this increase was sensitive to dexamethasone. The combined effect of adrenalectomy/ovariectomy on GR mRNA levels was greater than that of adrenalectomy only in amygdala. Corticosterone increased amygdala transcript levels in OVX and ADX/OVX animals. Estradiol administration to intact animals raised the GR mRNA content of amygdala, while progesterone treatment had no effect on any of the brain regions studied. We conclude that there exists heterogeneity with respect to type II GR mRNA regulation by corticosterone and dexamethasone in brain regions of ADX female rats, and that certain limbic structures show greater sensitivity to these hormonal manipulations, suggesting a more prominent role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Our results also suggest that circulating estrogens can influence the sensitivity of brain structures (i.e. hypothalamus and amygdala) to glucocorticoids by altering GR mRNA levels. These regions may represent integration sites at which gonadal steroids are able to alter stress hormone secretion.

  8. Relationship between Morphofunctional Changes in Open Traumatic Brain Injury and the Severity of Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shakova, F M; Barskov, I V; Gulyaev, M V; Prokhorenko, S V; Romanova, G A; Grechko, A V

    2016-07-01

    A correlation between the severity of morphofunctional disturbances and the volume of brain tissue injury determined by MRT was demonstrated on the model of open traumatic brain injury in rats. A relationship between the studied parameters (limb placing and beam walking tests and histological changes) and impact force (the height of load fell onto exposed brain surface) was revealed.

  9. Relationship between Morphofunctional Changes in Open Traumatic Brain Injury and the Severity of Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shakova, F M; Barskov, I V; Gulyaev, M V; Prokhorenko, S V; Romanova, G A; Grechko, A V

    2016-07-01

    A correlation between the severity of morphofunctional disturbances and the volume of brain tissue injury determined by MRT was demonstrated on the model of open traumatic brain injury in rats. A relationship between the studied parameters (limb placing and beam walking tests and histological changes) and impact force (the height of load fell onto exposed brain surface) was revealed. PMID:27496035

  10. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  11. Deferoxamine attenuates acute hydrocephalus after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Zhi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2014-10-01

    Acute post-traumatic ventricular dilation and hydrocephalus are relatively frequent consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several recent studies have indicated that high iron levels in brain may relate to hydrocephalus development after intracranial hemorrhage. However, the role of iron in the development of post-traumatic hydrocephalus is still unclear. This study was to determine whether or not iron has a role in hydrocephalus development after TBI. TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Some rats had intraventricular injection of iron. Acute hydrocephalus was measured by magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging and brain hemorrhage was determined by T2* gradient-echo sequence imaging and brain hemoglobin levels. The effect of deferoxamine on TBI-induced hydrocephalus was examined. TBI resulted in acute hydrocephalus at 24 h (lateral ventricle volume: 24.1 ± 3.0 vs. 9.9 ± 0.2 mm(3) in sham group). Intraventricular injection of iron also caused hydrocephalus (25.7 ± 3.4 vs. 9.0 ± 0.6 mm(3) in saline group). Deferoxamine treatment attenuated TBI-induced hydrocephalus and heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. In conclusion, iron may contribute to acute hydrocephalus after TBI.

  12. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.

  13. Characterization of biliary conjugates of 4,4'-methylenedianiline in male versus female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kan; Cole, Richard B.; Santa Cruz, Vicente; Blakeney, Ernest W.; Kanz, Mary F.; Dugas, Tammy R.

    2008-10-15

    4,4'-Methylenedianiline (4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane; DAPM) is an aromatic diamine used in the production of numerous polyurethane foams and epoxy resins. Previous studies in rats revealed that DAPM initially injures biliary epithelial cells of the liver, that the toxicity is greater in female than in male rats, and that the toxic metabolites of DAPM are excreted into bile. Since male and female rats exhibit differences in the expression of both phase I and phase II enzymes, our hypothesis was that female rats either metabolize DAPM to more toxic metabolites or have a decreased capacity to conjugate metabolites to less toxic intermediates. Our objective was thus to isolate, characterize, and quantify DAPM metabolites excreted into bile in both male and female bile duct-cannulated Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were gavaged with [{sup 14}C]-DAPM, and the collected bile was subjected to reversed-phase HPLC with radioisotope detection. Peaks eluting from HPLC were collected and analyzed using electrospray MS and NMR spectroscopy. HPLC analysis indicated numerous metabolites in both sexes, but male rats excreted greater amounts of glutathione and glucuronide conjugates than females. Electrospray MS and NMR spectra of HPLC fractions revealed that the most prominent metabolite found in bile of both sexes was a glutathione conjugate of an imine metabolite of a 4'-nitroso-DAPM. Seven other metabolites were identified, including acetylated, cysteinyl-glycine, glutamyl-cysteine, glycine, and glucuronide conjugates. While our prior studies demonstrated increased covalent binding of DAPM in the liver and bile of female compared to male rats, in these studies, SDS-PAGE with autoradiography revealed 4-5 radiolabeled protein bands in the bile of rats treated with [{sup 14}C]-DAPM. In addition, these bands were much more prominent in female than in male rats. These studies thus suggest that a plausible mechanism for the increased sensitivity of female rats to DAPM toxicity may be

  14. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  15. Diminished Resistance to Hyperoxia in Brains of Reproductively Senescent Female CBA/H Mice

    PubMed Central

    Šarić, Ana; Sobočanec, Sandra; Šafranko, Željka Mačak; Hadžija, Marijana Popović; Bagarić, Robert; Farkaš, Vladimir; Švarc, Alfred; Marotti, Tatjana; Balog, Tihomir

    2015-01-01

    Background We have explored sex differences in ability to maintain redox balance during acute oxidative stress in brains of mice. We aimed to determine if there were differences in oxidative/antioxidative status upon hyperoxia in brains of reproductively senescent CBA/H mice in order to elucidate some of the possible mechanisms of lifespan regulation. Material/Methods The brains of 12-month-old male and female CBA/H mice (n=9 per sex and treatment) subjected to 18-h hyperoxia were evaluated for lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidative enzyme expression and activity - superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 (Sod-1, Sod-2), catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx-1), heme-oxygenase 1 (Ho-1), nad NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and for 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG) uptake. Results No increase in LPO was observed after hyperoxia, regardless of sex. Expression of Nrf-2 showed significant downregulation in hyperoxia-treated males (p=0.001), and upregulation in hyperoxia-treated females (p=0.023). Also, in females hyperoxia upregulated Sod-1 (p=0.046), and Ho-1 (p=0.014) genes. SOD1 protein was upregulated in both sexes after hyperoxia (p=0.009 for males and p=0.011 for females). SOD2 protein was upregulated only in females (p=0.008) while CAT (p=0.026) and HO-1 (p=0.042) proteins were increased after hyperoxia only in males. Uptake of 18FDG was decreased after hyperoxia in the back brain of females. Conclusions We found that females at their reproductive senescence are more susceptible to hyperoxia, compared to males. We propose this model of hyperoxia as a useful tool to assess sex differences in adaptive response to acute stress conditions, which may be partially responsible for observed sex differences in longevity of CBA/H mice. PMID:26373431

  16. 17β-estradiol is necessary for extinction of cocaine seeking in female rats.

    PubMed

    Twining, Robert C; Tuscher, Jennifer J; Doncheck, Elizabeth M; Frick, Karyn M; Mueller, Devin

    2013-05-15

    Human and preclinical models of addiction demonstrate that gonadal hormones modulate acquisition of drug seeking. Little is known, however, about the effects of these hormones on extinction of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we investigated how 17β-estradiol (E₂) affects expression and extinction of cocaine seeking in female rats. Using a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm, ovariectomized rats were maintained throughout conditioning with 2 d of E₂ treatment followed by 2 d of vehicle treatment, or were injected with E₂ daily. Hormone injections were paired or explicitly unpaired with place conditioning sessions. Expression of a cocaine CPP was of equal magnitude regardless of conditioning protocol, suggesting that E₂ levels during conditioning did not affect subsequent CPP expression. During extinction, daily E₂ administration initially enhanced expression of the cocaine CPP, but resulted in significantly faster extinction compared to controls. Whereas E₂-treated rats were extinguished within 8 d, vehicle-treated rats maintained CPP expression for more than a month, indicative of perseveration. To determine whether E₂ could rescue extinction in these rats, half were given daily E₂ treatment and half were given vehicle. E₂-treated rats showed rapid extinction, whereas vehicle-treated rats continued to perseverate. These data demonstrate for the first time that E₂ is necessary for extinction of cocaine seeking in female rats, and that it promotes rapid extinction when administered daily. Clinically, these findings suggest that monitoring and maintaining optimal E₂ levels during exposure therapy would facilitate therapeutic interventions for female cocaine addicts.

  17. Body composition of physically inactive and active 25-month-old female rats.

    PubMed

    Slentz, C A; Holloszy, J O

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of physical activity on the body composition of ageing female rats. Female pathogen-free Long-Evans rats were housed either in individual 7 x 14 x 8 inch cages or in cages with attached running wheels to which they had free access. The runners ate significantly more than the sedentary rats. Food intake from month 10 through month 24 of age averaged 14.6 +/- 0.7 g for the sedentary group, and 18.3 +/- 2.2 g for the active group. The body fat content of the sedentary rats was approximately 50% higher, while their lean body mass and protein content were significantly lower than that of the runners at age 25 months. Total body weight was similar in the active and sedentary groups. Percent body fat and protein of the 25-month-old physically active rats were not significantly different from that of 9-month-old rats, while the sedentary 25-month-old rats had a significantly higher body fat content and a lower body protein content than the 9-month-old animals. These results suggest the possibility that the changes in body composition that occur during middle age in sedentary female rats are largely due to physical inactivity, and that the lean tissue wasting that occurs as the result of the aging process is a late event that occurs closer to the end of life.

  18. Dichlorvos and lindane induced oxidative stress in rat brain: Protective effects of ginger

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam; Singh, Rambir

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dichlorvos and lindane pesticide causes toxicity in animals including humans. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is widely used as a culinary medicine in the Ayurvedic system of medicine, possessing a number of pharmacological properties. Objective: This study was designed to assess ameliorating effects of ginger juice in dichlorvos and lindane induced neurotoxicity in wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Dichlorvos (8.8 mg/kg bw) and lindane (8.8 mg/kg bw) were orally administered alone as well as in combination to adult male and female wistar rats for 14 days followed by the post-treatment of ginger juice (100 mg/kg bw) for 14 days. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), and activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), quinine reductase (QR), and protein level were measured to evaluate the toxicity of these pesticides in brain. Results: Dichlorvos and lindane administration alone and in combination increased LPO and decreased the GSH level, SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, GR, QR activity, and protein. Oxidative stress due to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is believed to be involved in the toxicities induced by these pesticides. Post-treatment of ginger juice decreased LPO and increased the level of GSH, SOD, CAT, GPx, GST, GR, QR activity and protein in the brain of rats. Conclusions: The results indicated that dichlorovos and lindane induced tissue damage was ameliorated by ginger juice. PMID:22224058

  19. Effect of prenatal stress on density of NMDA receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Elham; Saboory, Ehsan; Teshfam, Masood; Rasmi, Yusef; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Ilkhanizadeh, Behrooz; Hesari, Ali Kalantari

    2013-12-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are important excitatory receptors which contribute to many brain functions. Altered NMDA receptor levels cause maldevelopment of corticostriatal and corticolimbic pathways, which is a neurobiological predisposing factor for development of epilepsy, schizophrenia and other idiopathic psychotic disorders. It was hypothesized that prenatal stress could play a role in pathophysiology of these disorders by affecting expression of the receptors through releasing corticosterone. Sixty-eight virgin female Wistar rats were selected and mated with male rats with the same genotype. Then, the pregnant rats were subjected to restraint or predator stress on 15th, 16th and 17th gestation days. Prenatal stress consisted of restraint or predator stresses of the dams under normal room conditions. After parturition, the pups were studied in terms of density of NMDA receptors in brain at different time points. Meanwhile, blood sample was obtained and corticosterone blood level (CBL) was measured. The pups were then compared with the pups born to unstressed dams. Stress induced significant rise in CBL and NMDA receptors in brain of the offspring. CBL was significantly higher among the stressed rats compared to the control ones; there was significant difference between the two stresses and between the two sexes. The male pups were affected more severely. Stressful events during gestation had important effects on NMDA receptors of the offspring. It can be concluded that stress-induced elevation of NMDA receptors and corticosterone might mediate altered susceptibility to epilepsy and decrease ability of learning and memory and other stress-induced neurologic disorders. PMID:24120877

  20. Orexin Decreases Aromatase Gene Expression in The Hypothalamus of Androgenized Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Maliheh; Alishah, Zahra; Khazali, Homayoun; Mahmoudi, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background Orexin is a hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide, which third cerebral injection of it mainly exerts inhibitory effects on reproductive functions. It increases significantly the Aromatase (Cyp19) gene expression in the hypothalamus of male rats. Aromatase is an enzyme which converts androgens to estradiol in the hypothalamus of rats. Prenatal or neonatal exposure of females to testosterone masculinizes the pattern of Cyp19 mRNA levels in adulthood. In the present study the effects of central injections of orexin-A on hypothalamic Cyp19 gene expression of adult female rats were investigated, while they had been androgenized on third day of postnatal life. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, twenty female Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate (50 µg/100 µl) on their third day of postnatal life. Adult androgenized rats weighing 180-220 g, received either 3 µl saline or one of 2, 4 or 8 µg/3 µl concentration of orexin via third cerebral ventricle. Five non-androgenized rats, as control group, received intra cerebral ventricle (ICV) injection of 3 µl saline. The hypothalamuses were dissected out and mean Cyp19 mRNA levels were determined by semi-quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Data were analyzed by unpaired t test and one-way ANOVA using SPSS software, version 16. Results Mean relative Cyp19 mRNA level was significantly increased in the hypothalamus of androgenized compared to non-androgenized female rats. Central injec- tions of 2, 4 or 8 µg/3 µl orexin decreased significantly the hypothalamic Cyp19 mRNA level of androgenized rats compared to androgenized-control groups. Conclusion The results suggested that the orexin may exert inhibitory effects on the gene expression of Cyp19 in the hypothalamus of neonatal androgenized female rats in adulthood. PMID:27441052

  1. Maturation of metabolic connectivity of the adolescent rat brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Choi, Yoori; Kim, Kyu Wan; Kang, Hyejin; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, E Edmund; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-11-27

    Neuroimaging has been used to examine developmental changes of the brain. While PET studies revealed maturation-related changes, maturation of metabolic connectivity of the brain is not yet understood. Here, we show that rat brain metabolism is reconfigured to achieve long-distance connections with higher energy efficiency during maturation. Metabolism increased in anterior cerebrum and decreased in thalamus and cerebellum during maturation. When functional covariance patterns of PET images were examined, metabolic networks including default mode network (DMN) were extracted. Connectivity increased between the anterior and posterior parts of DMN and sensory-motor cortices during maturation. Energy efficiency, a ratio of connectivity strength to metabolism of a region, increased in medial prefrontal and retrosplenial cortices. Our data revealed that metabolic networks mature to increase metabolic connections and establish its efficiency between large-scale spatial components from childhood to early adulthood. Neurodevelopmental diseases might be understood by abnormal reconfiguration of metabolic connectivity and efficiency.

  2. Detecting Behavioral Deficits Post Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), ranging from mild to severe, almost always elicits an array of behavioral deficits in injured subjects. Some of these TBI-induced behavioral deficits include cognitive and vestibulomotor deficits as well as anxiety and other consequences. Rodent models of TBI have been (and still are) fundamental in establishing many of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI. Animal models are also utilized in screening and testing pharmacological effects of potential therapeutic agents for brain injury treatment. This chapter details validated protocols for each of these behavioral deficits post traumatic brain injury in Sprague-Dawley male rats. The elevated plus maze (EPM) protocol is described for assessing anxiety-like behavior; the Morris water maze protocol for assessing cognitive deficits in learning memory and spatial working memory and the rotarod test for assessing vestibulomotor deficits. PMID:27604739

  3. Adult consequences of post-weaning high fat feeding on the limbic-HPA axis of female rats.

    PubMed

    Boukouvalas, George; Gerozissis, Kyriaki; Kitraki, Efthimia

    2010-05-01

    The peripubertal period is critical for the final maturation of circuits controlling energy homeostasis and stress response. However, the consequence of juvenile fat consumption on adult physiology is not clear. This study analyzed the adult consequences of post-weaning fat feeding on limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis components and on metabolic regulators of female rats. Wistar rats were fed either a high fat (HF) diet or the normal chow from weaning to puberty or to 3 months of age. Additional groups crossed their diets at puberty onset. Plasma leptin, insulin, and corticosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay and their brain receptors by western blot analysis. Adult HF-fed animals though not overweight, had higher corticosterone and reduced glucocorticoid receptor levels in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, compared to the controls. The alterations in HPA axis emerged already at puberty onset. Leptin receptor levels in the hypothalamus were reduced only by continuous fat feeding from weaning to adulthood. The pre-pubertal period appeared more vulnerable to diet-induced alterations in adulthood than the post-pubertal one. Switching from fat diet to normal chow at puberty onset restored most of the diet-induced alterations in the HPA axis. The corticosteroid circuit rather than the leptin or insulin system appears as the principal target for the peripubertal fat diet-induced effects in adult female rats.

  4. Chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats induces emotional and memory deficits associated with morphological and molecular alterations in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Ca; Pereira, Maria Cs; Santana, Luana N da Silva; Fernandes, Rafael M; Teixeira, Francisco B; Oliveira, Gedeão B; Fernandes, Luanna Mp; Fontes-Júnior, Enéas A; Prediger, Rui D; Crespo-López, Maria E; Gomes-Leal, Walace; Lima, Rafael R; Maia, Cristiane do Socorro Ferraz

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that heavy ethanol exposure in early life may produce long-lasting neurobehavioral consequences, since brain structural maturation continues until adolescence. It is well established that females are more susceptible to alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and that ethanol consumption is increasing among women, especially during adolescence. In the present study, we investigated whether chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats may induce hippocampal histological damage and neurobehavioral impairments. Female rats were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) by gavage from the 35(th)-90(th) day of life. Ethanol-exposed animals displayed reduced exploration of the central area and increased number of fecal boluses in the open field test indicative of anxiogenic responses. Moreover, chronic high ethanol exposure during adolescence induced marked impairments on short-term memory of female rats addressed on social recognition and step-down inhibitory avoidance tasks. These neurobehavioral deficits induced by ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood were accompanied by the reduction of hippocampal formation volume as well as the loss of neurons, astrocytes and microglia cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that chronic high ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats induces long-lasting emotional and memory deficits associated with morphological and molecular alterations in the hippocampus.

  5. Gender Differences in Rat Erythrocyte and Brain Docosahexaenoic Acid Composition: Role of Ovarian Hormones and Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K.; Able, Jessica; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The two-fold higher prevalence rate of major depression in females may involve vulnerability to omega-3 fatty acid deficiency secondary to a dysregulation in ovarian hormones. However, the role of ovarian hormones in the regulation of brain omega-3 fatty acid composition has not been directly evaluated. Here we determined erythrocyte and regional brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in intact male and female rats, and in chronically ovariectomized (OVX) rats with or without cyclic estradiol treatment (2 μg/4 d). All groups were maintained on diets with or without the DHA precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3). We report that both male (−21%) and OVX (−19%) rats on ALA+ diet exhibited significantly lower erythrocyte DHA composition relative to female controls. Females on ALA+ diet exhibited lower DHA composition in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) relative males (−5%). OVX rats on ALA+ diet exhibited significantly lower DHA composition in the hippocampus (−6%), but not in the PFC, hypothalamus, or midbrain. Lower erythrocyte and hippocampus DHA composition in OVX rats was not prevented by estrogen replacement. All groups maintained on ALA− diet exhibited significantly lower erythrocyte and regional brain DHA composition relative to groups on ALA+ diet, and these reductions were greater in males but not in OVX rats. These preclinical data corroborate clinical evidence for gender differences in peripheral DHA composition (female>male), demonstrate gender differences in PFC DHA composition (male>female), and support a link between ovarian hormones and erythrocyte and region-specific brain DHA composition. PMID:19046819

  6. Effect of Nanosilver Particles on Procaspase-3 Expression in Newborn Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ganjuri, Mostafa; Moshtaghian, Jamal; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nanotechnology focuses on materials having at least one dimension of less than 100 nanometers. Nanomaterials such as Nanosilver (NS) have unique physical and chemical properties such as size, shape, surface charge. NS particles are thought to in- duce neuronal degeneration and necrosis in the brain. It has been reported that NS parti- cles generate free radicals and oxidative stress which alters gene expression and induces apoptosis. This study was designed to evaluate whether the detrimental effect of NS parti- cles is through the activation of Procaspase-3 during fetal neural development. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, thirty Wistar female rats at day one of pregnancy were semi-randomly distributed into three groups of ten. Group 1, the control group, had no treatment. From day 1 to the end of pregnancy, groups 2 and 3 received 1 and 10 ppm NS respectively via drinking water. Newborn rats were sacrificed immediately after birth and their brains were dissected and kept frozen. Total RNA, extracted from brain homogenates, was reverse transcribed to cDNA. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was undertaken to estimate the expression level of Procaspase-3. Results Developmental exposure to NS induced neurotoxicity and apoptosis. This corre- lated with a significant increase in Procaspase-3 expression level especially at 10 ppm NS. Conclusion The pro-apoptotic activity of NS in cells is likely to due to the dysregula- tion of Procaspase-3. PMID:26464820

  7. Disposition of Phenolic and Sulfated Metabolites after Inhalation Exposure to 4-Chlorobiphenyl (PCB3) in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PCBs, such as PCB3, are air contaminants in buildings and outdoors. Metabolites of PCB3 are potential endocrine disrupting chemicals and genotoxic agents. We studied the disposition of phenolic and sulfated metabolites after acute nose-only inhalation exposure to airborne PCB3 for 2 h in female rats. Inhalation exposure was carried out in three groups. In the first group, rats exposed to an estimated dose of 26 μg/rat were euthanized at 0, 1, 2, and 4 h after exposure. Highest concentrations of phenols and sulfates were observed at 0 h, and the values were 7 ± 1 and 560 ± 60 ng/mL in serum, 213 ± 120 and 842 ± 80 ng/g in liver, 31 ± 27 and 22 ± 7 ng/g in lung, and 27 ± 6 and 3 ± 0 ng/g in brain, respectively. First-order serum clearance half-lives of 0.5 h for phenols and 1 h for sulfates were estimated. In the second group, rats exposed to an estimated dose of 35 μg/rat were transferred to metabolism cages immediately after exposure for the collection of urine and feces over 24 h. Approximately 45 ± 5% of the dose was recovered from urine and consisted mostly of sulfates; the 18 ± 5% of the dose recovered from feces was exclusively phenols. Unchanged PCB3 was detected in both urine and feces but accounted for only 5 ± 3% of the dose. Peak excretion of metabolites in both urine and feces occurred within 18 h postexposure. In the third group, three bile-cannulated rats exposed to an estimated dose of 277 μg/rat were used for bile collection. Bile was collected for 4 h immediately after 2 h exposure. Biliary metabolites consisted mostly of sulfates, some glucuronides, and lower amounts of the free phenols. Control rats in each group were exposed to clean air. Clinical serum chemistry values, serum T4 level, and urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine were similar in treated and control rats. These data show that PCB3 is rapidly metabolized to phenols and conjugated to sulfates after inhalation and that both of these metabolites are distributed to liver

  8. Learning Style, Brain Modality, and Teaching Preferences of Incarcerated Females at the Pocatello Women's Correctional Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croker, Robert E.; And Others

    A study identified the learning style preferences and brain hemisphericity of female inmates at the Pocatello Women's Correctional Center in Pocatello, Idaho. It also identified teaching methodologies to which inmates were exposed while in a learning environment as well as preferred teaching methods. Data were gathered by the Learning Type Measure…

  9. The effects of female sexual steroids on gastric function and barrier resistance of gastrointestinal tract following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Khaksari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess the alteration of gastric function and barrier function of gastrointestinal (GI) tract following diffuse brain injury in varying ovarian hormone status. Materials and Methods: Diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced by Marmarou method. Rats were randomly assigned into 10 groups: Intact, sham + ovariectomized female (OVX), TBI, TBI + OVX, vehicle, estradiol (E2), progesterone (P), E2 + P, estrogen receptor alpha agonist and estrogen receptor beta agonist (DPN). Endotoxin levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. All the parameters were measured 5 days after TBI. Results: Intragastric pressure was significantly decreased in TBI as compared to the intact group (P < 0.001) and this was lower in TBI group versus TBI + OVX group (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with steroid hormones and their agonists did not have any effect on the gastric pressure compared to TBI + OVX or vehicle groups. Inflammation, congestion, ulcer and erosion were seen in the TBI rats. All treatment groups worsen the tissue condition so that the presence of thrombosis also was seen. The trauma induction did not have any effect on the serum and intestinal endotoxin levels. DPN had caused a significant reduction in serum levels of endotoxin compared with OVX + TBI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Pretreatment with sexual steroids is not useful in the treatment of GI dysfunction induced by TBI. The treatment with all sexual female hormones worsens the gastric tissue condition. Furthermore, the applied weight was not enough for releasing of endotoxin. It seems that estrogen reduced the endotoxin levels by estrogen beta receptor. PMID:25709342

  10. The mate choice brain: comparing gene profiles between female choice and male coercive poeciliids.

    PubMed

    Lynch, K S; Ramsey, M E; Cummings, M E

    2012-03-01

    Genes that mediate mate preferences potentially play a key role in promoting and maintaining biological diversity. In this study, we compare mate preference behavior in two related poeciliid fishes with contrasting behavioral phenotypes and relate these behavioral differences to gene profiles in the brain. Results reveal that one poeciliid fish, the Northern swordtail, exhibits robust mate preference as compared to the Western mosquitofish, which utilizes a coercive mating system. Female swordtails display no significant difference in association time between male- and female-exposure trials, whereas female mosquitofish spend significantly less time associating with males relative to females. Furthermore, the preference strength for large males is significantly lower in female mosquitofish relative to swordtails. We then examine expression of three candidate genes previously shown to be associated with mate preference behavior in female swordtails and linked to neural plasticity in other vertebrates: neuroserpin (NS), neuroligin-3 (NLG-3) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R). Whole brain gene expression patterns reveal that two genes (NS and NLG-3) are positively associated with mate preference behavior in female swordtails, a pattern opposing that of the mosquitofish. In mosquitofish females, these genes are downregulated when females express biases toward males yet are elevated in association with total motor activity patterns under asocial conditions, suggesting that the presence of males in mosquitofish species may inhibit expression of these genes. Both gene expression and female behavioral responses to males exhibit opposing patterns between these species, suggesting that this genetic pathway may potentially act as a substrate for the evolution of mate preference behavior.

  11. Chronic high fat feeding increases anxiety-like behaviour and reduces transcript abundance of glucocorticoid signalling genes in the hippocampus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Sivanathan, Shathveekan; Thavartnam, Kabriya; Arif, Shahneen; Elegino, Trisha; McGowan, Patrick O

    2015-06-01

    The consumption of diets high in saturated fats and obesity have been associated with impaired physical and mental health. Previous studies indicate that chronic high fat diet consumption leads to systemic inflammation in humans and non-human animal models. Studies in non-human animals suggest that altered physiological responses to stress are also a consequence of high fat diet consumption. Glucocorticoid signalling mechanisms may link immune and stress-related pathways in the brain, and were shown to be significantly altered in the brains of female rat offspring of mothers exposed to chronic high fat diet during pregnancy and lactation. For adult females, the consequence of chronic high fat diet consumption on these signalling pathways and their relationship to stress-related behaviour is not known. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic consumption of a high fat diet compared to a low fat control diet among adult female Long Evans rats. We found significant differences in weight gain, caloric intake, anxiety-related behaviours, and glucocorticoid-related gene expression over a 10-week exposure period. As expected, rats in the high fat diet group gained the most weight and consumed the greatest number of calories. Rats in the high fat diet group showed significantly greater levels of anxiety-related behaviour in the Light Dark and Open Field tasks compared to rats in the low fat diet group. Rats consuming high fat diet also exhibited reduced transcript abundance in the hippocampus of stress-related mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor genes, as well as nuclear factor kappa beta gene expression, implicated in inflammatory processes. Together, these data indicate that chronic high fat diet consumption may increase anxiety-like behaviour at least in part via alterations in glucocorticoid signalling mechanisms in limbic brain regions.

  12. Nonpreventive Role of Aerobic Exercise Against Cisplatin-induced Nephrotoxicity in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Noroozi, Jalaledin; Zeynali, Farzaneh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Pezeshki, Zahra; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CP) is a chemotherapy drug and nephrotoxicity is a major concern for CP therapy. CP-induced nephrotoxicity is gender-dependent, and the effect of aerobic exercise in females has not been reported yet while it has a beneficial effect in males. Hence, this study was designed to determine the protective role of aerobic exercise against CP-induced nephrotoxicity in female rats. Methods: Twenty-eight adult female rats were divided into four groups. Groups I and II had aerobic exercise on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Then, the exercise protocol was continued for another week in group I and stopped in group II. All animals in these groups received CP (2.5 mg/kg/day; i.p.) for 1-week. Groups III and IV were treated with CP and vehicle, respectively, without exercise. Finally, the animals were sacrificed for biochemical measurements and tissue histopathology investigations. Results: CP alone without exercise increased serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr), kidney weight, and kidney tissue damage score (KTDS); while exercise could not attenuate these parameters in female rats. Exercise in females increased the serum levels of BUN and Cr and KTDS and weight loss (P < 0.05). Kidney nitrite levels reduce significantly in group I in compared to positive and negative control groups. Exercise also did not have beneficial effects on malondialdehyde levels in plasma and kidney. Conclusions: Aerobic exercise cannot reduce CP-induced nephrotoxicity in female rats. Increasing the damage in female rats may be related to female sex hormone estrogen or gender differences in renal hemodynamic and renin-angiotensin system activity in the presence of exercise. In general, it is recommended that the females under CP chemotherapy avoid exercising during treatment. PMID:26288702

  13. Dietary aspartame with protein on plasma and brain amino acids, brain monoamines and behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), was investigated for its ability to alter levels of the large neutral amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume meals with or without protein for two hours. Additionally, the possible long term behavioral consequences of APM in 25% casein diets with or without 10% sucrose were determined. Acute APM ingestion increased both plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine levels, but brain tryptophan levels were not altered regardless of dietary protein. Brain norepinephrine and dopamine levels were unaltered by any of the diet while serotonin levels were slightly increased when a protein-free diet was consumed. But APM and/or protein ingestion minimized this increase of brain serotonin levels as much as controls. Chronic APM ingestion failed to influence diurnal feeding patterns, meal size distributions, or diurnal patterns of spontaneous motor activity. The chronic ingestion of abuse doses of APM produced no significant chemical changes in brain capable of altering behavioral parameters believed to be controlled by monoamines in rats.

  14. n-3 PUFAs have beneficial effects on anxiety and cognition in female rats: Effects of early life stress.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Matteo M; Kelly, Philip; Ariffin, Nurbazilah; Cryan, John F; Clarke, Gerard; Dinan, Timothy G

    2015-08-01

    Stressful life events, especially those in early life, can exert long-lasting changes in the brain, increasing vulnerability to mental illness especially in females. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) play a critical role in the development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, we investigated the influence of an eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (80% EPA, 20% DHA) n-3 PUFAs mixture on stress-related behavioural and neurobiological responses. Sprague-Dawley female rats were subjected to an early-life stress, maternal separation (MS) procedure from postnatal days 2 to 12. Non-separated (NS) and MS rats were administered saline, EPA/DHA 0.4g/kg/day or EPA/DHA 1g/kg/day, respectively. In adulthood, EPA/DHA treated animals had a dose dependent reduction in anxiety in NS rats. Furthermore, cognitive performance in the novel object recognition task (NOR) was improved by EPA/DHA treatment in NS animals only. EPA/DHA 1g/kg/day decreased behavioural despair in the forced swim test. Notably, EPA/DHA high dose increased the translocation of GRs into the nucleus of NS rat hippocampus. However, the levels of mBDNF remained unchanged in all the experimental groups. The corticosterone response to an acute stress was blunted in MS rats and this was further attenuated by pre-treatment with EPA/DHA. Immune response and monoamine neurotransmission were significantly altered by early-life stress. In conclusion, our study supports the view that n-3 PUFAs are beneficial in neurodevelopmentally normal animals but have little positive benefit in animals exposed to early life stress.

  15. Dorsal root ganglia microenvironment of female BB Wistar diabetic rats with mild neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, D W; Ho, L T; Allison, J A

    1994-12-01

    Abnormalities in the microenvironment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) might play a role in the pathogenesis of sensory abnormalities in human diabetic neuropathy. We examined aspects of DRG microenvironment by measuring local blood flow and oxygen tension in the L4 dorsal root ganglia of female BB Wistar (BBW) diabetic rats with mild neuropathy. The findings were compared with concurrent measurements of local sciatic endoneurial blood flow and oxygen tension. Diabetic rats were treated with insulin and underwent electrophysiological, blood flow and oxygen tension measurements at either 7-11 or 17-23 weeks after the development of glycosuria. Nondiabetic female BB Wistar rats from the same colony served as controls. At both ages, BBW diabetic rats had significant abnormalities in sensory, but not motor conduction compared to nondiabetic controls. Sciatic endoneurial blood flow in the diabetic rats of both ages was similar to control values, but the older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW diabetic rats had a selective reduction in DRG blood flow. Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tensions were not significantly altered in the diabetic rats. DRG oxygen tension appeared lowered in younger (7-11 week diabetic) but not older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW rats. Our findings indicate that there are important changes in the DRG microenvironment of diabetic rats with selective sensory neuropathy. PMID:7699389

  16. Dorsal root ganglia microenvironment of female BB Wistar diabetic rats with mild neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, D W; Ho, L T; Allison, J A

    1994-12-01

    Abnormalities in the microenvironment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) might play a role in the pathogenesis of sensory abnormalities in human diabetic neuropathy. We examined aspects of DRG microenvironment by measuring local blood flow and oxygen tension in the L4 dorsal root ganglia of female BB Wistar (BBW) diabetic rats with mild neuropathy. The findings were compared with concurrent measurements of local sciatic endoneurial blood flow and oxygen tension. Diabetic rats were treated with insulin and underwent electrophysiological, blood flow and oxygen tension measurements at either 7-11 or 17-23 weeks after the development of glycosuria. Nondiabetic female BB Wistar rats from the same colony served as controls. At both ages, BBW diabetic rats had significant abnormalities in sensory, but not motor conduction compared to nondiabetic controls. Sciatic endoneurial blood flow in the diabetic rats of both ages was similar to control values, but the older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW diabetic rats had a selective reduction in DRG blood flow. Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tensions were not significantly altered in the diabetic rats. DRG oxygen tension appeared lowered in younger (7-11 week diabetic) but not older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW rats. Our findings indicate that there are important changes in the DRG microenvironment of diabetic rats with selective sensory neuropathy.

  17. Global profiling of influence of intra-ischemic brain temperature on gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Megumi Sugahara; Asai, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nishida, Yayoi; Nagata, Toshihito; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2008-06-01

    Mild to moderate differences in brain temperature are known to greatly affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. The impact of brain temperature on ischemic disorders has been mainly evaluated through pathological analysis. However, no comprehensive analyses have been conducted at the gene expression level. Using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray, we screened 24000 genes in the hippocampus under hypothermic (32 degrees C), normothermic (37 degrees C), and hyperthermic (39 degrees C) conditions in a rat ischemia-reperfusion model. When the ischemic group at each intra-ischemic brain temperature was compared to a sham-operated control group, genes whose expression levels changed more than three-fold with statistical significance could be detected. In our screening condition, thirty-three genes (some of them novel) were obtained after screening, and extensive functional surveys and literature reviews were subsequently performed. In the hypothermic condition, many neuroprotective factor genes were obtained, whereas cell death- and cell damage-associated genes were detected as the brain temperature increased. At all intra-ischemic brain temperatures, multiple molecular chaperone genes were obtained. The finding that intra-ischemic brain temperature affects the expression level of many genes related to neuroprotection or neurotoxicity coincides with the different pathological outcomes at different brain temperatures, demonstrating the utility of the genetic approach.

  18. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J.; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  19. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  20. GH binding to liver in young and old female rats: relation to somatomedin-C secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Meites, J.

    1987-11-01

    Age-related changes in binding of /sup 125/I-bovine GH to liver membrane fractions were measured in female Long-Evans rats 2, 6, 12, and 20 months of age. Specific GH binding did not change between 2 and 6 months of age but increased significantly at 12 and 20 months of age. Scatchard analyses showed that the plots were curvilinear and consisted of high- and low-affinity binding sites. The age-related increases in binding sites were mainly due to an increase in number of low-affinity binding sites. Serum somatomedim-C (SM-C) levels in 20-month-old rats were about half those in the 6-month-old rats. Twice daily injections of ovine GH (2 mg/kg body wt) for 7 days depressed liver GH binding and increased serum SM-C levels in 19-month-old female rats, but had no effect on GH binding in 2-month-old female rats. These results suggest that the increase in liver GH binding sites and the decrease in SM-C secretion are associated with our previously reported decrease in GH secretion in old female rats.

  1. Long-term moderate treadmill exercise promotes stress-coping strategies in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Lalanza, Jaume F.; Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Cigarroa, Igor; Gagliano, Humberto; Fuentes, Silvia; Armario, Antonio; Capdevila, Lluís; Escorihuela, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the impact of exercise in alleviating anxiety and mood disorders; however, the exercise protocol that exerts such benefit is far from known. The current study was aimed to assess the effects of long-term moderate exercise on behavioural coping strategies (active vs. passive) and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal response in rats. Sprague-Dawley male and female rats were exposed to 32-weeks of treadmill exercise and then tested for two-way active avoidance learning (shuttle-box). Two groups were used as controls: a non-handled sedentary group, receiving no manipulation, and a control group exposed to a stationary treadmill. Female rats displayed shorter escape responses and higher number of avoidance responses, reaching criterion for performance earlier than male rats. In both sexes, exercise shortened escape latencies, increased the total number of avoidances and diminished the number of trials needed to reach criterion for performance. Those effects were greater during acquisition in female rats, but remained over the shuttle-box sessions in treadmill trained male rats. In females, exercise did not change ACTH and corticosterone levels after shuttle-box acquisition. Collectively, treadmill exercise improved active coping strategies in a sex-dependent manner. In a broader context, moderate exercise could serve as a therapeutic intervention for anxiety and mood disorders. PMID:26538081

  2. Long-term moderate treadmill exercise promotes stress-coping strategies in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Lalanza, Jaume F; Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Cigarroa, Igor; Gagliano, Humberto; Fuentes, Silvia; Armario, Antonio; Capdevila, Lluís; Escorihuela, Rosa M

    2015-11-05

    Recent evidence has revealed the impact of exercise in alleviating anxiety and mood disorders; however, the exercise protocol that exerts such benefit is far from known. The current study was aimed to assess the effects of long-term moderate exercise on behavioural coping strategies (active vs. passive) and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal response in rats. Sprague-Dawley male and female rats were exposed to 32-weeks of treadmill exercise and then tested for two-way active avoidance learning (shuttle-box). Two groups were used as controls: a non-handled sedentary group, receiving no manipulation, and a control group exposed to a stationary treadmill. Female rats displayed shorter escape responses and higher number of avoidance responses, reaching criterion for performance earlier than male rats. In both sexes, exercise shortened escape latencies, increased the total number of avoidances and diminished the number of trials needed to reach criterion for performance. Those effects were greater during acquisition in female rats, but remained over the shuttle-box sessions in treadmill trained male rats. In females, exercise did not change ACTH and corticosterone levels after shuttle-box acquisition. Collectively, treadmill exercise improved active coping strategies in a sex-dependent manner. In a broader context, moderate exercise could serve as a therapeutic intervention for anxiety and mood disorders.

  3. Persistent behavioral impairments and alterations of brain dopamine system after early postnatal administration of thimerosal in rats.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Meyza, Ksenia; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2011-09-30

    The neurotoxic organomercurial thimerosal (THIM), used for decades as vaccine preservative, is a suspected factor in the pathogenesis of some neurodevelopmental disorders. Previously we showed that neonatal administration of THIM at doses equivalent to those used in infant vaccines or higher, causes lasting alterations in the brain opioid system in rats. Here we investigated neonatal treatment with THIM (at doses 12, 240, 1440 and 3000 μg Hg/kg) on behaviors, which are characteristically altered in autism, such as locomotor activity, anxiety, social interactions, spatial learning, and on the brain dopaminergic system in Wistar rats of both sexes. Adult male and female rats, which were exposed to the entire range of THIM doses during the early postnatal life, manifested impairments of locomotor activity and increased anxiety/neophobia in the open field test. In animals of both sexes treated with the highest THIM dose, the frequency of prosocial interactions was reduced, while the frequency of asocial/antisocial interactions was increased in males, but decreased in females. Neonatal THIM treatment did not significantly affect spatial learning and memory. THIM-exposed rats also manifested reduced haloperidol-induced catalepsy, accompanied by a marked decline in the density of striatal D₂ receptors, measured by immunohistochemical staining, suggesting alterations to the brain dopaminergic system. Males were more sensitive than females to some neurodisruptive/neurotoxic actions of THIM. These data document that early postnatal THIM administration causes lasting neurobehavioral impairments and neurochemical alterations in the brain, dependent on dose and sex. If similar changes occur in THIM/mercurial-exposed children, they could contribute do neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:21549155

  4. Reduced Metabolsim in Brain 'Control Networks' Following Cocaine-Cues Exposure in Female Cocaine Abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2011-03-01

    Gender differences in vulnerability for cocaine addiction have been reported. Though the mechanisms are not understood, here we hypothesize that gender differences in reactivity to conditioned-cues, which contributes to relapse, are involved. To test this we compared brain metabolism (using PET and {sup 18}FDG) between female (n = 10) and male (n = 16) active cocaine abusers when they watched a neutral video (nature scenes) versus a cocaine-cues video. Self-reports of craving increased with the cocaine-cue video but responses did not differ between genders. In contrast, changes in whole brain metabolism with cocaine-cues differed by gender (p<0.05); females significantly decreased metabolism (-8.6% {+-} 10) whereas males tended to increase it (+5.5% {+-} 18). SPM analysis (Cocaine-cues vs Neutral) in females revealed decreases in frontal, cingulate and parietal cortices, thalamus and midbrain (p<0.001) whereas males showed increases in right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45) (only at p<0.005). The gender-cue interaction showed greater decrements with Cocaine-cues in females than males (p<0.001) in frontal (BA 8, 9, 10), anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32), posterior cingulate (BA 23, 31), inferior parietal (BA 40) and thalamus (dorsomedial nucleus). Females showed greater brain reactivity to cocaine-cues than males but no differences in craving, suggesting that there may be gender differences in response to cues that are not linked with craving but could affect subsequent drug use. Specifically deactivation of brain regions from 'control networks' (prefrontal, cingulate, inferior parietal, thalamus) in females could increase their vulnerability to relapse since it would interfere with executive function (cognitive inhibition). This highlights the importance of gender tailored interventions for cocaine addiction.

  5. Female Adolescents with Severe Substance and Conduct Problems Have Substantially Less Brain Gray Matter Volume

    PubMed Central

    Dalwani, Manish S.; McMahon, Mary Agnes; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Young, Susan E.; Regner, Michael F.; Raymond, Kristen M.; McWilliams, Shannon K.; Banich, Marie T.; Tanabe, Jody L.; Crowley, Thomas J; Sakai, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Structural neuroimaging studies have demonstrated lower regional gray matter volume in adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems. These research studies, including ours, have generally focused on male-only or mixed-sex samples of adolescents with conduct and/or substance problems. Here we compare gray matter volume between female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems and female healthy controls of similar ages. Hypotheses: Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems will show significantly less gray matter volume in frontal regions critical to inhibition (i.e. dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex), conflict processing (i.e., anterior cingulate), valuation of expected outcomes (i.e., medial orbitofrontal cortex) and the dopamine reward system (i.e. striatum). Methods We conducted whole-brain voxel-based morphometric comparison of structural MR images of 22 patients (14-18 years) with severe substance and conduct problems and 21 controls of similar age using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and voxel-based morphometric (VBM8) toolbox. We tested group differences in regional gray matter volume with analyses of covariance, adjusting for age and IQ at p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons at whole-brain cluster-level threshold. Results Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems compared to controls showed significantly less gray matter volume in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, medial orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, bilateral somatosensory cortex, left supramarginal gyrus, and bilateral angular gyrus. Considering the entire brain, patients had 9.5% less overall gray matter volume compared to controls. Conclusions Female adolescents with severe substance and conduct problems in comparison to similarly aged female healthy controls showed substantially lower gray matter volume in brain regions involved in

  6. Caffeine exposure during rat brain development causes memory impairment in a sex selective manner that is offset by caffeine consumption throughout life.

    PubMed

    Ardais, Ana Paula; Rocha, Andréia S; Borges, Maurício Felisberto; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Sallaberry, Cássia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Nunes, Fernanda; Pagnussat, Natália; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane de Oliveira

    2016-04-15

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide. In moderate doses, it affords a beneficial effect in adults and upon aging, but has a deleterious effect during brain development. We now tested if caffeine consumption by rats (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 g/L in the drinking water, only during active cycle and weekdays) during adulthood could revert the potentially negative effects of caffeine during early life. Thus, we compared caffeine intake starting 15 days before mating and lasting either up to weaning (development) or up to adulthood, on behavior and synaptic proteins in male and female rats. Recognition memory was impaired only in female rats receiving caffeine (0.3 and 1.0 g/L) during development, coincident with increased proBDNF and unchanged BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Caffeine in both treatment regimens caused hyperlocomotion only in male rats, whereas anxiety-related behavior was attenuated in both sexes by caffeine (1.0 g/L) throughout life. Both caffeine treatment regimens decreased GFAP (as an astrocyte marker) and SNAP-25 (as a nerve terminals marker) in the hippocampus from male rats. TrkB receptor was decreased in the hippocampus from both sexes and treatment regimens. These findings revealed that caffeine intake during a specific time window of brain development promotes sex-dependent behavioral outcomes related to modification in BDNF signaling. Furthermore, caffeine throughout life can overcome the deleterious effects of caffeine on recognition memory during brain development in female rats.

  7. Caffeine exposure during rat brain development causes memory impairment in a sex selective manner that is offset by caffeine consumption throughout life.

    PubMed

    Ardais, Ana Paula; Rocha, Andréia S; Borges, Maurício Felisberto; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Sallaberry, Cássia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Nunes, Fernanda; Pagnussat, Natália; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane de Oliveira

    2016-04-15

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide. In moderate doses, it affords a beneficial effect in adults and upon aging, but has a deleterious effect during brain development. We now tested if caffeine consumption by rats (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 g/L in the drinking water, only during active cycle and weekdays) during adulthood could revert the potentially negative effects of caffeine during early life. Thus, we compared caffeine intake starting 15 days before mating and lasting either up to weaning (development) or up to adulthood, on behavior and synaptic proteins in male and female rats. Recognition memory was impaired only in female rats receiving caffeine (0.3 and 1.0 g/L) during development, coincident with increased proBDNF and unchanged BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Caffeine in both treatment regimens caused hyperlocomotion only in male rats, whereas anxiety-related behavior was attenuated in both sexes by caffeine (1.0 g/L) throughout life. Both caffeine treatment regimens decreased GFAP (as an astrocyte marker) and SNAP-25 (as a nerve terminals marker) in the hippocampus from male rats. TrkB receptor was decreased in the hippocampus from both sexes and treatment regimens. These findings revealed that caffeine intake during a specific time window of brain development promotes sex-dependent behavioral outcomes related to modification in BDNF signaling. Furthermore, caffeine throughout life can overcome the deleterious effects of caffeine on recognition memory during brain development in female rats. PMID:26774980

  8. Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Distribution in the Anterior Hypothalamus of the Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Agustín; González-Toledo, Juan M.; Castañeyra-Ruiz, María; de Paz-Carmona, Héctor; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Carmona-Calero, Emilia M.

    2013-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) neurons and fibers are located in the anteroventral hypothalamus, specifically in the preoptic medial area and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Most luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neurons project to the median eminence where they are secreted in the pituitary portal system in order to control the release of gonadotropin. The aim of this study is to provide, using immunohistochemistry and female brain rats, a new description of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone fibers and neuron localization in the anterior hypothalamus. The greatest amount of the LHRH immunoreactive material was found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis that is located around the anterior region of the third ventricle. The intensity of the reaction of LHRH immunoreactive material decreases from cephalic to caudal localization; therefore, the greatest immunoreaction is in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, followed by the dorsomedial preoptic area, the ventromedial preoptic area, and finally the ventrolateral medial preoptic area, and in fibers surrounding the suprachiasmatic nucleus and subependymal layer on the floor of the third ventricle where the least amount immunoreactive material is found. PMID:25938107

  9. Nociceptive sensitivity and opioid antinociception and antihyperalgesia in Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritic male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Cook, Charles D; Nickerson, Michael D

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to examine sex differences in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and sex differences in opioid antinociception and anti-hyperalgesia. Female rats developed inflammation and hyperalgesia faster and exhibited greater peak hyperalgesia than male rats. In arthritic (CFA-treated) rats, lower thresholds were observed during estrus and proestrus, and in nonarthritic (vehicle-treated) rats, lower thresholds were observed during proestrus. Morphine and oxycodone were more potent in male than female arthritic rats, and butorphanol was more potent and effective in male than female arthritic rats. The potency of morphine was increased in arthritic rats, although to a greater magnitude in males. The potency of oxycodone was increased in male but not female arthritic rats. The potency of butorphanol was increased in arthritic male rats and the maximal antinociceptive effect of butorphanol was increased in arthritic female rats, but it did not result in greater than 20% antinociception. Morphine, oxycodone, and butorphanol all produced antihyperalgesic effects (returning thresholds of arthritic rats to the thresholds of nonarthritic rats) with greater potency in males than females. The peripherally acting opioid agonist loperamide produced intermediate levels of antinociception in male and female arthritic rats and no antinociception in nonarthritic rats. Loperamide was more potent in male than female arthritic rats at producing antihyperalgesia. These data demonstrate sex differences in arthritis-induced hyperalgesia and responsiveness to opioid analgesics. In arthritic rats, the antinociceptive effects of opioid agonists are most probably mediated by both central and peripheral opioid receptors, whereas their antihyperalgesic effects are mediated primarily by actions at peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15608071

  10. Molecular cloning and expression of novel sulphotransferase-like cDNAs from human and rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Falany, C N; Xie, X; Wang, J; Ferrer, J; Falany, J L

    2000-01-01

    The sulphotransferase (SULT) gene family is involved with the conjugation of many small drugs, xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. In this report, we describe the cloning and expression of novel cDNAs from human and rat brain, which are structurally related to the SULTs. These cDNAs have been termed 'brain sulphotransferase-like' (BR-STL), because of their similarity to the SULTs and their selective expression in brain tissue. The proteins encoded by the human and rat BR-STL cDNAs (hBR-STL-1 and rBR-STL cDNA respectively), denoted as hBR-STL and rBR-STL, are 98% identical and 99% similar in sequence. The hBR-STL-1 cDNA contains an 852-nt open reading frame encoding a 284-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 33083 Da. Northern-blot analyses of RNA isolated from eight human tissues indicate that the hBR-STL message is selectively expressed in brain. Characterization of different brain regions showed that message levels were highest in cortical brain regions. rBR-STL message levels were relatively low in brains of 1-day-old male and female rats, but increased to adult levels in RNA from 7-day-old rats, and remained at that level in adult animals. The hBR-STL and rBR-STL cDNAs were expressed in both Escherichia coli and Sf9 insect cells in the presence or absence of an N-terminal histidine-affinity tag (His-tag). Polyclonal antibodies were raised in chickens against purified His-tagged hBR-STL, and were used to detect the presence of rBR-STL in adult male and female rat brain cytosol. The high degree of sequence conservation, and the selective localization of the BR-STL message in brain, suggest an important function in the central nervous system. PMID:10698717

  11. /sup 20/neon ion- and x-ray-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, C.J.; Baum, J.W.; Holtzman, S.; Stone, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    One of the proposed uses of heavy ion irradiation is to image lesions of the human female breast. The rat model system was chosen to assess the carcinogenic potential of heavy ion irradiation in the belief that data obtained from rat studies would have a qualitatively predictive value for the human female. Accordingly, female rats were exposed to /sup 20/Ne ions at the BEVALAC and studied for the development of mammary neoplasia for 312 +- 2 days at Brookhaven along with rats exposed concurrently to x-irradiation or to no irradiation. As the dose of either type of radiation was increased the percent of rats with mammary adenocarcinomas, and the percent of rats with mammary fibroadenomas, tended to increase. At a prevalence of 20%, the RBE for /sup 20/Neon ions for mammary adenocarcinomas was estimated to be larger than 5 and for mammary fibroadenomas the RBE was estimated to be less than 2. No conclusion was reached concerning whether or not the RBE might vary with dose. We suggest that /sup 20/Ne ions do have a carcinogenic potential for rat mammary tissue and that this carcinogenic potential is likely to be greater than for x-irradiation. (DT)

  12. Consequences of Ischemic Preconditioning of Kidney: Comparing between Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Seyyed Meisam; Aboutaleb, Nahid; Nobakht, Maliheh

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a leading cause of kidney transplantation failure, and ischemic-preconditioning (IPC) is a protective method against the IRI. In the present study, the defensive effect of IPC on rats’ kidney was investigated and more importantly the differences between two genders were appraised. Materials and Methods Thirty two Wistar rats were randomly allocated to four groups: group A (8 male IR), B (8 female IR), C (8 male IPC) and D (8 female IPC). Ischemia was induced by clamping of left renal arteries for 45 min in groups A and B. Rats in groups C and D experienced four cycles of 4 min arterial clamping followed by 11 min of de-clamping prior to the final 45 min of ischemia. 24 hr later, serum was provided to assess the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine values. Also, renal tissues were obtained for histological measurements. Results Induction of IPC in both male and female rats led to significant decrease in creatinine levels in comparison with sham groups (P<0.01). The same results were seen in BUN levels (P<0.01). However, there were no significant difference between two genders. Besides, histological protective effects of IPC was proved especially in female rats (P<0.01). Conclusion Findings of our study confirmed that renal IPC reduces the damages in both genders especially females. Thus, the IPC procedure seems to be a useful method mainly in females. PMID:23653843

  13. In utero exposure to microwave radiation and rat brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, J.H.; Hardy, K.A.; Chamness, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    Timed-pregnancy rats were exposed in a circular waveguide system starting on day 2 of gestation. The system operated at 2,450 MHz (pulsed waves; 8 microseconds PW; 830 pps). Specific absorption rate (SAR) was maintained at 0.4 W/kg by increasing the input power as the animals grew in size. On day 18 of gestation the dams were removed from the waveguide cages and euthanized; the fetuses were removed and weighed. Fetal brains were excised and weighed, and brain RNA, DNA and protein were determined. Values for measured parameters of the radiated fetuses did not differ significantly from those of sham-exposed fetuses. A regression of brain weight on body weight showed no micrencephalous fetuses in the radiation group when using as a criterion a regression line based on two standard errors of the estimate of the sham-exposed group. In addition, metrics derived from brain DNA (ie, cell number and cell size) showed no significant differences when radiation was compared to sham exposure. We conclude that 2,450-MHz microwave radiation, at an SAR of 0.4 W/kg, did not produce significant alterations in brain organogenesis.

  14. Brain Cortical Thickness Differences in Adolescent Females with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Peter K.; Dalwani, Manish S.; Tanabe, Jody; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Banich, Marie T.; Crowley, Thomas J.; Sakai, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Some youths develop multiple substance use disorders early in adolescence and have severe, persistent courses. Such youths often exhibit impulsivity, risk-taking, and problems of inhibition. However, relatively little is known about the possible brain bases of these behavioral traits, especially among females. Methods We recruited right-handed female patients, 14–19 years of age, from a university-based treatment program for youths with substance use disorders and community controls similar for age, race and zip code of residence. We obtained 43 T1-weighted structural brain images (22 patients and 21 controls) to examine group differences in cortical thickness across the entire brain as well as six a priori regions-of-interest: 1) medial orbitofrontal cortex; 2) rostral anterior cingulate cortex; and 3) middle frontal cortex, in each hemisphere. Age and IQ were entered as nuisance factors for all analyses. Results A priori region-of-interest analyses yielded no significant differences. However, whole-brain group comparisons revealed that the left pregenual rostral anterior cingulate cortex extending into the left medial orbitofrontal region (355.84 mm2 in size), a subset of two of our a priori regions-of-interest, was significantly thinner in patients compared to controls (vertex-level threshold p = 0.005 and cluster-level family wise error corrected threshold p = 0.05). The whole-brain group differences did not survive after adjusting for depression or externalizing scores. Whole-brain within-patient analyses demonstrated a positive association between cortical thickness in the left precuneus and behavioral disinhibition scores (458.23 mm2 in size). Conclusions Adolescent females with substance use disorders have significant differences in brain cortical thickness in regions engaged by the default mode network and that have been associated with problems of emotional dysregulation, inhibition, and behavioral control in past studies. PMID:27049765

  15. Increased vulnerability of the brain norepinephrine system of females to corticotropin-releasing factor overexpression.

    PubMed

    Bangasser, D A; Reyes, B A S; Piel, D; Garachh, V; Zhang, X-Y; Plona, Z M; Van Bockstaele, E J; Beck, S G; Valentino, R J

    2013-02-01

    Stress-related psychiatric disorders are more prevalent in women than men. As hypersecretion of the stress neuromediator, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) has been implicated in these disorders, sex differences in CRF sensitivity could underlie this disparity. Hyperarousal is a core symptom that is shared by stress-related disorders and this has been attributed to CRF regulation of the locus ceruleus (LC)-norepinephrine arousal system. We recently identified sex differences in CRF(1) receptor (CRF(1)) signaling and trafficking that render LC neurons of female rats more sensitive to CRF and potentially less able to adapt to excess CRF compared with male rats. The present study used a genetic model of CRF overexpression to test the hypothesis that females would be more vulnerable to LC dysregulation by conditions of excess CRF. In both male and female CRF overexpressing (CRF-OE) mice, the LC was more densely innervated by CRF compared with wild-type controls. Despite the equally dense CRF innervation of the LC in male and female CRF-OE mice, LC discharge rates recorded in slices in vitro were selectively elevated in female CRF-OE mice. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that this sex difference resulted from differential CRF(1) trafficking. In male CRF-OE mice, CRF(1) immunolabeling was prominent in the cytoplasm of LC neurons, indicative of internalization, a process that would protect cells from excessive CRF. However, in female CRF-OE mice, CRF(1) labeling was more prominent on the plasma membrane, suggesting that the compensatory response of internalization was compromised. Together, the findings suggest that the LC-norepinephrine system of females will be particularly affected by conditions resulting in elevated CRF because of differences in receptor trafficking. As excessive LC activation has been implicated in the arousal components of stress-related psychiatric disorders, this may be a cellular mechanism that contributes to the increased incidence of

  16. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  17. Pharmacologically Induced Hypothermia Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A.; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A six-hour hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15 min or 2 hr after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and Caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the

  18. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  19. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  20. Effects of perinatal methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on postweaning behaviors of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sherry A; Delbert Law, C; Sahin, Leyla; Montenegro, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is a common treatment for adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, little information exists regarding its safety during pregnancy and thus, women with ADHD face difficult decisions regarding continued use during pregnancy. Thus, Sprague-Dawley rats were orally treated 3×/day with 0 (control), 6 (low), 18 (mid), or 42 (high) mg MPH/kg/day (i.e., 0, 2, 6, or 14mg/kg at each treatment time) on gestational days 6-21. All offspring/litter were orally treated with the same dose their dam had received on postnatal days (PNDs) 1-21. After weaning, offspring were assessed for adolescent play behavior, locomotor activity, motor coordination, Barnes maze performance, acoustic startle response, novel object recognition, residential running wheel activity, flavored solution intake, home cage behavior, water maze performance, elevated plus maze behavior, locomotor response to an MPH challenge, and passive avoidance. At euthanasia, whole brain and striatal weights as well as serum hormone levels were measured. Body weights of the high MPH group were reduced in both sexes. Males of the high MPH group were less active than control males in open field assessments on PNDs 40-42. Latency to maximum acoustic startle was significantly altered in females of the medium and high MPH groups and residential running wheel activity of females of the low and medium MPH groups was lower than control females. Open arm entries in the elevated plus maze were increased in subjects of the medium MPH group. Females of the low MPH group were less sensitive to the locomotor-increasing effects of an acute 5mg/kg MPH challenge. Serum hormone levels and whole brain and striatal weights were not altered by prior MPH treatment. These results indicate that MPH treatment during development has sporadic effects on postweaning behaviors and those effects were generally exhibited by females. PMID:25514582

  1. Effects of ovarian hormones and environment on radial maze and water maze performance of female rats.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J M; Roberts, S L; Dohanich, G P

    1999-03-01

    The effects of gonadal hormones and environment on performance in an eight-arm radial maze and in the Morris water maze were determined in female rats. Long-Evans female rats were ovariectomized or sham ovariectomized at 35 days of age, and housed in complex environments or in isolation for the duration of the study. One month following surgeries, spatial working memory performance in the radial maze was assessed. Exposure to complex environmental conditions independently enhanced performance, as indicated by increased arm choice accuracy during 20 days of maze training. Additionally, gonadally intact females significantly outperformed ovariectomized females before cyclicity was disrupted by food deprivation. Following radial maze training, spatial reference memory performance was assessed in the same females utilizing the Morris water maze. Gonadally intact females housed in isolation performed significantly more poorly during 16 days of place training trials and displayed significantly shorter times in the platform quadrants and fewer target crossings during probe trials than gonadally intact and ovariectomized females housed in complex environments and ovariectomized rats housed in isolation. Consequently, acquisition and retention of the water maze was impaired by the presence of ovaries, and this impairment was counteracted by exposure to complex environments. Performance did not differ between groups on cued trials, indicating that sensorimotor and motivational functions did not differ between groups. Results of these experiments indicate that endogenous gonadal hormones can differentially affect performance on tasks of spatial working and spatial reference memory, and that environmental conditions can interact with gonadal hormones to affect behavior.

  2. Prenatal cocaine exposure alters progenitor cell markers in the subventricular zone of the adult rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhyanesh Arvind; Booze, Rosemarie M.; Mactutus, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term consequences of early developmental exposure to drugs of abuse may have deleterious effects on the proliferative plasticity of the brain. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to cocaine, using the IV route of administration and doses that mimic the peak arterial levels of cocaine use in humans, on the proliferative cell types of the subventricular zones (SVZ) in the adult (180 days-old) rat brain. Employing immunocytochemistry, the expression of GFAP+ (type B cells) and nestin+(GFAP−) (Type C and A cells) staining was quantified in the subcallosal area of the SVZ. GFAP+ expression was significantly different between the prenatal cocaine treated group and the vehicle (saline) control group. The prenatal cocaine treated group possessed significantly lower GFAP+ expression relative to the vehicle control group, suggesting that prenatal cocaine exposure significantly reduced the expression of type B neural stem cells of the SVZ. In addition, there was a significant sex difference in nestin+ expression with females showing approximately 8–13% higher nestin+ expression compared to the males. More importantly, a significant prenatal treatment condition (prenatal cocaine, control) by sex interaction in nestin+ expression was confirmed, indicating different effects of cocaine based on sex of the animal. Specifically, prenatal cocaine exposure eliminated the basal difference between the sexes. Collectively, the present findings suggest that prenatal exposure to cocaine, when delivered via a protocol designed to capture prominent features of recreational usage, can selectively alter the major proliferative cell types in the subcallosal area of the SVZ in an adult rat brain, and does so differently for males and females. PMID:22119286

  3. The blood-brain barrier penetration and distribution of PEGylated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Shuting; Yan, Feng; Wang, Ying; Sun, Yilin; Yang, Nan; Ye, Ling

    2010-04-16

    PEGylated PAMAM conjugated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles (PEGylated PFMSNs) have been synthesized for evaluating their ability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and distribution in rat brain. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA), zeta potential ({zeta}-potential) titration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The BBB penetration and distribution of PEGylated PFMSNs and FMSNs in rat brain were investigated not only at the cellular level with Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but also at the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results provide direct evidents that PEGylated PFMSNs could penetrate the BBB and spread into the brain parenchyma.

  4. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Klosinski, Lauren P; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N; Harrington, Michael G; Christensen, Trace A; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-12-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical. PMID:26844268

  5. Gene expression changes in female zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain in response to acute exposure to methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 h) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5(mu or u)g MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000-feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of pfemale brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and will investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure.

  6. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Klosinski, Lauren P; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N; Harrington, Michael G; Christensen, Trace A; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-12-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical.

  7. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klosinski, Lauren P.; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N.; Harrington, Michael G.; Christensen, Trace A.; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-01-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical. PMID:26844268

  8. Sub-Chronic Oral Exposure to Iridium (III) Chloride Hydrate in Female Wistar Rats: Distribution and Excretion of the Metal

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Pino, Anna; Mattei, Daniela; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Iridium tissue distribution and excretion in female Wistar rats following oral exposure to iridium (III) chloride hydrate in drinking water (from 1 to 1000 ng/ml) in a sub-chronic oral study were determined. Samples of urine, feces, blood and organs (kidneys, liver, lung, spleen and brain) were collected at the end of exposure. The most prominent fractions of iridium were retained in kidney and spleen; smaller amounts were found in lungs, liver and brain. Iridium brain levels were lower than those observed in other tissues but this finding can support the hypothesis of iridium capability to cross the blood brain barrier. The iridium kidney levels rose significantly with the administered dose. At the highest dose, important amounts of the metal were found in serum, urine and feces. Iridium was predominantly excreted via feces with a significant linear correlation with the ingested dose, which is likely due to low intestinal absorption of the metal. However, at the higher doses iridium was also eliminated through urine. These findings may be useful to help in the understanding of the adverse health effects, particularly on the immune system, of iridium dispersed in the environment as well as in identifying appropriate biological indices of iridium exposure. PMID:22942873

  9. [SUSTENTOCYTE NUMBERS IN THE NEONATAL PERIOD IN THE OFFSPRING OF FEMALE RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL LIVER DAMAGE].

    PubMed

    Briukhin, G V; Sizonenko, M L

    2016-01-01

    On serial histological sections of the testes, stained with hematoxylin-eosin, using a morphometric device, the total numbers of spermatogenic cells and sustentocytes (Sertoli cells) were measured in the convoluted seminiferous tubules of neonatal rat pups. Experimental groups consisted of rats born from females with experimental liver damage of various origins--autoimmune (n = 33), toxic (n = 32), alcoholic (n = 12), and medicinal (n = 27). The control group included pups born from normal female rats (n = 14). In experimental rats both increase and decrease of the total number of sustentocytes was detected. In the animals of most of the experimental groups, sustentocyte cell index reflecting the ratio of the number of spermatogenic cells and sustentocytes, was decreased. PMID:27487667

  10. Morphine Analgesia Modification in Normotensive and Hypertensive Female Rats after Repeated Fluoxetine Administration.

    PubMed

    Kosiorek-Witek, Anna; Makulska-Nowak, Helena Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine through the use of fluoxetine the effect of administering a serotonin reuptake inhibitor over several days on the antinociceptive action of μ-morphine type opioid receptor agonist. Investigations were performed on rats of both sexes, both the WKY normotensive strains as well as on the SHR genetically conditioned hypertensive strains. Results showed that the efficacy of morphine analgesia is higher in the SHR strain compared to normotensive rats (WKY). Surprisingly, repeated administration of fluoxetine reduced morphine analgesia, with the weakening of opioid antinociceptive action comparable to the duration of serotonin reuptake inhibitor administration. It was also concluded that the antinociceptive action of morphine in female rats and the alteration of its efficacy as a result of fluoxetine premedication for several days depend on oestrus cycle phase. The highest sensitivity of female rats to morphine was reported in the dioestrus and oestrus phases; much lower values were reported for the metoestrus phase.

  11. The weanling rat ventromedial syndrome: males get just as fat as females.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, L L; Bellinger, L L

    1976-12-01

    Weanling female and male Holtzman rats received bilateral electroytic lesions in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN) at the age of 27 and 26 days, respectively. Sham-operated rats served as controls. The animals were maintained on a synthetic diet (4.2 Cal/g) and tap water ad lib, and body weight, Lee (obesity) Index, tail length and food and water intake were recorded weekly for 6 weeks. The only parameters in which a significant sex difference could be demonstrated were body weight gains and water intake which were greater in the male VMN rats. Female and male VMN rats also utilized food energy for fat deposition, body weight and body length change to the same extent. The data also show that in growing animals, body weight is a poor criterion for the accurate assessment of obesity status and true growth.

  12. Cerebrolysin attenuates blood-brain barrier and brain pathology following whole body hyperthermia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Sharma, Aruna; Johanson, Conrad E

    2010-01-01

    The possibility that Cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors, has some neuroprotective effects on whole body hyperthermia (WBH) induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), brain edema formation and neuropathology were examined in a rat model. Rats subjected to a 4 h heat stress at 38 degrees C in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator exhibited profound increases in BBB and BCSFB permeability to Evans blue and radioiodine tracers compared to controls. Hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and hypothalamus exhibited pronounced increase in water content and brain pathology following 4 h heat stress. Pretreatment with Cerebrolysin (1, 2 or 5 mL/kg i.v.) 24 h before WBH significantly attenuated breakdown of the BBB or BCSFB and brain edema formation. This effect was dose dependent. Interestingly, the cell and tissue injury following WBH in cerebrolysin-treated groups were also considerably reduced. These novel observations suggest that cerebrolysin can attenuate WBH induced BBB and BCSFB damage resulting in neuroprotection.

  13. Magnetic Micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S.; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CPmag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM - tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 hours after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. PMID:24486465

  14. Diabetes-induced alterations of reproductive and adrenal function in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Valdes, C T; Elkind-Hirsch, K E; Rogers, D G

    1990-04-01

    Diabetes interferes with reproductive function in laboratory animals. Previous studies in female diabetic rats have not resolved if the reproductive abnormalities observed are at the hypothalamic, pituitary and/or ovarian level. The interaction of the gonadal and adrenal axes has not been studied in the diabetic female rat. The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to determine the level of dysfunction in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis caused by diabetes in the adult female rat controlling for stage of the estrous cycle, and, second, to evaluate basal corticosterone secretion in female diabetic rats. Sixty cycling 40-day-old female rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups; control (n = 32), diabetic (n = 14), and diabetic insulin-replaced animals (n = 14). The level of hyperglycemia in each group was documented by glycosylated hemoglobin levels and biweekly blood glucoses. Three weeks after induction of diabetes, pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) responsiveness following an i.v. injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was assessed in representative diestrous rats from each group. All animals were sacrificed in either diestrus or proestrus for determination of GnRH concentration in the hypothalamus, LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) content in pituitary and LH, FSH, estradiol and corticosterone in serum. Uterine weight to body weight ratios (a bioassay for estrogen) were also calculated. Hypothalamic GnRH concentration was significantly lower in diabetic versus control diestrous rats. Basal pituitary and serum gonadotropin levels were not different between any groups. GnRH-stimulated serum LH levels were higher in diabetic vs. control and diabetic insulin-treated animals. LH surges occurred in the control and diabetic insulin-replaced but not the diabetic group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR in ovariectomized rats, but its effects were normalized with 4 days of oestrogen treatment. Bilateral nanoinjection of SHU9119 into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), to block α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) type 3 and 4 receptors, decreased LSNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus but not dioestrus rats. Unlike leptin, i.c.v. insulin infusion increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA and HR similarly in pro-oestrus and dioestrus rats; these responses did not differ from those in male rats. We conclude that, in female rats, leptin's stimulatory effects on SNA are differentially enhanced by oestrogen, at least in part via an increase in α-MSH activity in the PVN. These data further suggest that the actions of leptin and insulin to increase the activity of various sympathetic nerves occur via different neuronal pathways or cellular mechanisms. These results may explain the poor correlation in females of SNA with adiposity, or of MAP with leptin. PMID:25398524

  16. Environmental enrichment attenuates nicotine behavioral sensitization in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Elliott, Brenda M; Berger, Sarah Shafer; Grunberg, Neil E

    2014-08-01

    Environmental enrichment decreases nicotine reactivity in male rats, but these effects have not been examined in females. This research was conducted to examine the effects of enrichment on nicotine behavioral sensitization (i.e., nicotine reactivity) in male and female rats. One hundred forty-four Sprague-Dawley rats (72 male, 72 female) were raised in isolation, social enrichment (groups of three rats [SE]), or combined physical enrichment and social enrichment (groups of three rats with novel toys [PESE]) housing conditions. As adults, they received daily subcutaneous injections of saline or nicotine (0.1, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg) for 12 days; locomotor activity was measured on drug days 1, 5, 9, and 12. Before drug administration, PESE and SE decreased activity in males; only PESE decreased activity in females, F(2, 120) = 6.51, p < .01. In the drug phase, nicotine behavioral sensitization occurred, F(8.46, 341.04) = 20.71, p < .001, and was greater in females than males, F(8.340, 319.715) = 2.072, p < .05. Enrichment decreased nicotine behavioral sensitization in both sexes, F(16.91, 341.04) = 2.48, p < .01. In conclusion, nicotine behavioral sensitization occurred in male and female rats and was attenuated by environmental enrichment. This research has implications for treatment and prevention strategies in humans. Programs that incorporate aspects of social and environmental stimulation may have enhanced effectiveness in preventing and reducing cigarette smoking and may have implications for relapse prevention. PMID:24956172

  17. Environmental enrichment attenuates nicotine behavioral sensitization in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Elliott, Brenda M; Berger, Sarah Shafer; Grunberg, Neil E

    2014-08-01

    Environmental enrichment decreases nicotine reactivity in male rats, but these effects have not been examined in females. This research was conducted to examine the effects of enrichment on nicotine behavioral sensitization (i.e., nicotine reactivity) in male and female rats. One hundred forty-four Sprague-Dawley rats (72 male, 72 female) were raised in isolation, social enrichment (groups of three rats [SE]), or combined physical enrichment and social enrichment (groups of three rats with novel toys [PESE]) housing conditions. As adults, they received daily subcutaneous injections of saline or nicotine (0.1, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg) for 12 days; locomotor activity was measured on drug days 1, 5, 9, and 12. Before drug administration, PESE and SE decreased activity in males; only PESE decreased activity in females, F(2, 120) = 6.51, p < .01. In the drug phase, nicotine behavioral sensitization occurred, F(8.46, 341.04) = 20.71, p < .001, and was greater in females than males, F(8.340, 319.715) = 2.072, p < .05. Enrichment decreased nicotine behavioral sensitization in both sexes, F(16.91, 341.04) = 2.48, p < .01. In conclusion, nicotine behavioral sensitization occurred in male and female rats and was attenuated by environmental enrichment. This research has implications for treatment and prevention strategies in humans. Programs that incorporate aspects of social and environmental stimulation may have enhanced effectiveness in preventing and reducing cigarette smoking and may have implications for relapse prevention.

  18. Cognitive differences between male and female rats following exposure to 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Bernard; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Luskin, Katharine; Long, Lauren; Joseph, James

    On exploratory class missions astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation (HZE particles) that are not experienced in low earth orbit. While it is likely that the crew will consist of both male and female astronauts, there has been little research on the effects of exposure to HZE particles on cognitive performance in female subjects. While previous research has shown that exposure to HZE particles disrupts cognitive performance in male rats it remains to be established whether or not similar effects will occur with female subjects because estrogen may act as a neuroprotectant. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were obtained from Taconic Farms. Thirty mm segments of silastic tubing containing either 180 pg l7-estradiol/mL in sesame oil or vehicle alone were implanted subcutaneously in the neck. Three days following surgery the rats were exposed to 56Fe particles (1000 MeV/n, 0-200 cGy) at the NSRL. Following irradiation the rats were shipped to UMBC for behavioral testing. The results indicated that the pattern of decrements in cognitive performance differed between male and female rats. In addition, for female rats, there were differences in performance as a function of the presence or absence of estradiol. In the vehicle implanted subjects exposure to 56Fe particles did not affect operant responding on an ascending fixed-ratio schedule; whereas irradiation did disrupt responding in OVX animals given estradiol. These results suggest that estrogen may not be protective following exposure to HZE particles. This research was supported by Grant NNX08AM66G from NASA.

  19. Detection of cocaine induced rat brain activation by photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) was used to detect the progressive changes on the cerebral cortex of Sprague Dawley rats after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Different concentrations (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution were injected into Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. Cerebral cortex images of the animals were continuously acquired by PAT. For continuous observation, PAT system used multi-transducers to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The obtained photoacoustic images were compared with each other and confirmed that changes in blood volume were induced by cocaine hydrochloride injection. The results demonstrate that PAT may be used to detect the effects of drug abuse-induced brain activation. PMID:21163301

  20. Prenatal alcohol exposure and adolescent stress increase sensitivity to stress and gonadal hormone influences on cognition in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Comeau, Wendy L; Lee, Kristen; Anderson, Katie; Weinberg, Joanne

    2015-09-01

    Abnormal activity of stress hormone (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA]), and gonadal hormone (hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal [HPG]) systems is reported following prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE). PAE increases vulnerability of brain regions involved in regulation of these systems to stressors or challenges during sensitive periods of development, such as adolescence. In addition, HPA and HPG functions are linked to higher order functions such as executive function (EF), with dysregulation of either system adversely affecting EF processes, including attention and response inhibition, that influence cognition. However, how HPA and HPG systems interact to influence cognitive performance in individuals with an FASD is not fully understood. To investigate, we used a rat model of moderate PAE. Adolescent female PAE and control offspring were exposed to 10days of chronic mild stress (CMS) and cognitive function was assessed on the radial arm maze (RAM) in adulthood. On the final test day, animals were sacrificed, with blood collected for hormone analyses, and vaginal smears taken to assess estrus stage at the time of termination. Analyses showed that adolescent CMS significantly increased levels of CORT and RAM errors during proestrus in adult PAE but not control females. Moreover, CORT levels were correlated with estradiol levels and with RAM errors, but only in PAE females, with outcome dependent on adolescent CMS condition. These results suggest that PAE increases sensitivity to the influences of stress and gonadal hormones on cognition, and thus, in turn, that HPA and HPG dysregulation may underlie some of the deficits in executive function described previously in PAE females.

  1. Estrogenic Regulation of Histamine Receptor Subtype H1 Expression in the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiroko; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Yamawaki, Masanaga; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Female sexual behavior is controlled by central estrogenic action in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN). This region plays a pivotal role in facilitating sex-related behavior in response to estrogen stimulation via neural activation by several neurotransmitters, including histamine, which participates in this mechanism through its strong neural potentiating action. However, the mechanism through which estrogen signaling is linked to the histamine system in the VMN is unclear. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between estrogen and histamine receptor subtype H1 (H1R), which is a potent subtype among histamine receptors in the brain. We show localization of H1R exclusively in the ventrolateral subregion of the female VMN (vl VMN), and not in the dorsomedial subregion. In the vl VMN, abundantly expressed H1R were mostly colocalized with estrogen receptor α. Intriguingly, H1R mRNA levels in the vl VMN were significantly elevated in ovariectomized female rats treated with estrogen benzoate. These data suggest that estrogen can amplify histamine signaling by enhancing H1R expression in the vl VMN. This enhancement of histamine signaling might be functionally important for allowing neural excitation in response to estrogen stimulation of the neural circuit and may serve as an accelerator of female sexual arousal. PMID:24805361

  2. Hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is regulated by nicotine and stress in female but not in male rats.

    PubMed

    Keser, Aysegul; Balkan, Burcu; Gozen, Oguz; Kanit, Lutfiye; Pogun, Sakire

    2011-01-12

    NO (nitric oxide) produced in limbic brain regions has important roles in the regulation of autonomic nervous system and HPA axis activity, anxiety, fear learning, long-term memory formation, and depression. NO is synthesized from l-arginine in a reaction catalyzed by nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), one of the three isoforms of NOS, is synthesized constitutively in nerve cells. Increasing evidence indicates that nNOS expression in the nervous system may be regulated by stress and nicotinic receptors. Furthermore, data obtained from several studies suggest that signaling pathways induced by stress and nicotinic receptors may converge on various signal transduction molecules to regulate nNOS expression in brain. In the present study, we used Western Blot analysis to test the effect of forced swim stress, chronic nicotine administration, and the combined effect of both procedures on nNOS expression in the hippocampus, amygdala and frontal cortex of the male and female rat brain. Basal nNOS levels of the three brain regions examined did not show sex differences. However, forced swim stress and chronic nicotine administration increased nNOS expression in the hippocampus of female rats. When stress and nicotine were applied together, no additional increment was observed. Stress and nicotine did not regulate nNOS expression in the amygdala and the frontal cortex of either sex. Data obtained from the present study indicate that the regulation of stress and nicotine induced-nNOS expression in rat hippocampus shows sexual dimorphism and nNOS expression in the female rat hippocampus increases by nicotine and stress.

  3. Effects of cadium on growth, sexual development, and metabolism in female rats.

    PubMed

    Der, R; Fahim, Z; Yousef, M; Fahim, M

    1977-03-01

    Female rats were exposed to cadmium by multiple intramuscular injections of 250 mug CaCl2 for 54 days. Activity and haircoat were affected, sores on the sites of injection and persistent diestrus were observed in the treated rats. Morphological examination of organs revealed a smaller weight and size in reproductive organs and pituitary, but enlargement of liver, spleen, and kidney. The ratic enzymatic demethylation activity.

  4. The ameliorative effects of Eurycoma longifolia Jack on testosterone-induced reproductive disorders in female rats.

    PubMed

    Abdulghani, Mahfoudh; Hussin, Abas Hj; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Chan, Kit Lam

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this research was to study the ameliorative effects of a standardized quassinoid-rich extract (TAF 273) of Eurycoma longifolia root on some reproductive disorders in female rats. An irregular estrous cycle and ovarian cystic follicles were induced in 21-day-old females by the daily administration of testosterone (10 mg/kg, sc) for three weeks. The hormone-treated rats exhibited persistent diestrous as well as ovaries containing cystic follicles. Upon treatment with TAF 273, fewer animals showed irregular estrous cycles and there was less follicular morphological damage. The reversal effect may be derived from the anti-estrogenic properties of the plant quassinoids.

  5. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  6. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  7. 2-hydroxyestradiol modifies serotonergic processes in the male rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic (5 day) 2-hydroxyestradiol or estradiol on catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons in the male rat brain were studied. The results indicate estrogen to be specific is inducing changes in dopaminergic systems; whereas its hydroxymetabolite appears to have a preference for serotonergic processes. In particular, in vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol appears to be a potent inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in brain; this inhibition is especially potent in the cortex, where it is equal in potency to serotonin. However, unlike serotonin, which is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine, 2-hydroxyestradiol is an uncompetitive inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in cortex and hypothalamus and a noncompetitive inhibitor in the striatum; this suggests that the inhibition of binding takes place at a point other than the site of serotonin uptake. In vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol also appears to increase the uptake of serotonin into these tissues, a change which would be expected if the imipramine binding is blocked.

  8. Effect of cholecystokinin on food intake at different stages of the estrous cycle in female rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y S; Doi, R; Chowdhury, P; Pasley, J N; Nishikawa, M; Huang, T J; Rayford, P L

    1993-01-01

    Effects of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) on feeding behavior were examined in male and female rats. After an 18-hour fast, ad lib food intake for 30 minutes was measured for each rat. In male rats, food intake measured for 30 minutes was significantly decreased by intraperitoneal injection of 0.25 to 1 microgram/kg of CCK-8 in a dose-dependent manner. The satiety effect of CCK-8 was blocked by L-364,718 (20 nmol/kg), a specific cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. In female rats, food intake at proestrus and estrus was significantly less than that at diestrus. Food intake of female rats at diestrus and metestrus was significantly decreased by an intraperitoneal injection of CCK-8 prior to feeding, but it was not affected at proestrus and estrus. The effect of CCK-8 on food intake at diestrus and metestrus was dose dependent and was nearly abolished when 20 nmol/kg of L-364,718 was administered simultaneously. The results of this study suggest that stages of the estrous cycle affect feeding behavior of rats. Further, cholecystokinin's regulatory action on feeding behavior appears to be effective at diestrus and metestrus, but not at proestrus and estrus.

  9. Exercise reverses the effects of early life stress on orexin cell reactivity in male but not female rats

    PubMed Central

    James, Morgan H.; Campbell, Erin J.; Walker, Frederick R.; Smith, Doug W.; Richardson, Heather N.; Hodgson, Deborah M.; Dayas, Christopher V.

    2014-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a known antecedent for the development of mood disorders such as depression. Orexin neurons drive arousal and motivated behaviors in response to stress. We tested the hypothesis that ELS alters orexin system function and leads to an altered stress-induced behavioral phenotype in adulthood. We also investigated if voluntary exercise during adolescent development could reverse the ELS-induced changes. Male and female Wistar rats were subjected to maternal separation stress on postnatal days (PND) 2-14. A subset of animals was given access to running wheels in late adolescence (1hr/day, PND40-70). In adulthood, rats were exposed to restraint stress and then tested on the open field (OF) and elevated plus maze (EPM). Brains were processed for Fos-protein and orexin or tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. Restraint stress stimulated Fos-protein expression in perifornical area orexin cells, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and paraventricular thalamic nuclei, but this neuronal response was dampened in male and female rats exposed to ELS. ELS also reduced exploration in the OF, without affecting EPM behavior. These neural and behavioral changes are consistent with a depressive-like phenotype. Adolescent exercise reversed the orexin and behavioral deficits in ELS males. Exercise was not protective in females, although this may be due to sex differences in running behavior. Our findings highlight the inherent plasticity of the orexin system—a trait that may lead to a state of pathological rewiring but could also be treated using non-pharmacological approaches. We also highlight a need to better understand the sex-specific changes in orexin circuits and stress-related pathology. PMID:25100956

  10. Strain and sex differences in brain and behaviour of adult rats: Learning and memory, anxiety and volumetric estimates.

    PubMed

    Keeley, R J; Bye, C; Trow, J; McDonald, R J

    2015-07-15

    Alterations in behaviour can arise through a number of factors, including strain and sex. Here, we explored strain and sex differences between Long-Evans (LER) and Wistar (WR) male and female rats that had been trained in a myriad of behavioural tasks. Tests included those assessing motor learning (skilled reaching task), spatial learning and memory (Morris water task), contextual learning (discriminative fear-conditioning to context) and anxiety behaviour (elevated plus maze). Following behavioural assessment, associated brain areas were examined for volumetric differences, including the hippocampus and its subregions, prefrontal cortex areas and the amygdala. LER and WR differed in their rates of performance in the skilled reaching task throughout the training period. Overall, LER outperformed WR in tasks related to contextual and spatial learning, although this was not accompanied by larger volumes of associated brain areas. Males outperformed females in spatial learning, and females outperformed males in the contextual fear-conditioning task and had an associated larger amygdalar volume, although these sexual dimorphisms were only observed within the LER strain. Overall, this study highlights differences between these two rat strains as well as highlights that larger volumetric estimates of brain areas do not always confer improved function of associated behaviours.

  11. Stages of estrous mediate the stress-induced impairment of associative learning in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Shors, T J; Lewczyk, C; Pacynski, M; Mathew, P R; Pickett, J

    1998-02-16

    Exposure to a stressful event facilitates classical eyeblink conditioning in male rats and impairs conditioning in females. The contribution of stages of estrous to the stress-induced impairment of eyeblink conditioning was evaluated. Females in proestrus, estrus and diestrus were either exposed to an acute stressor of intermittent tailshocks or swim stress and compared to unstressed females in the three stages. Females in proestrus, when estrogen levels are high, acquired the conditioned response at a facilitated rate relative to females in other stages. However, exposure to a stressor of either intermittent tailshocks or inescapable swim stress severely impaired acquisition in females during proestrus. These results suggest that the enhancing effect of estrogen on procedural memory formation is disrupted by previous exposure to a stressful event.

  12. The impact of chronic stress on the rat brain lipidome.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Chan, R B; Bravo, F V; Miranda, A; Silva, R R; Zhou, B; Marques, F; Pinto, V; Cerqueira, J J; Di Paolo, G; Sousa, N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is a major risk factor for several human disorders that affect modern societies. The brain is a key target of chronic stress. In fact, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to stress affects learning and memory, decision making and emotional responses, and may even predispose for pathological processes, such as Alzheimer's disease and depression. Lipids are a major constituent of the brain and specifically signaling lipids have been shown to regulate brain function. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach to evaluate the impact of a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) paradigm on the rat brain in a region-specific manner. We found that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was the area with the highest degree of changes induced by chronic stress. Although the hippocampus presented relevant lipidomic changes, the amygdala and, to a greater extent, the cerebellum presented few lipid changes upon chronic stress exposure. The sphingolipid and phospholipid metabolism were profoundly affected, showing an increase in ceramide (Cer) and a decrease in sphingomyelin (SM) and dihydrosphingomyelin (dhSM) levels, and a decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and ether phosphatidylcholine (PCe) and increase in lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) levels, respectively. Furthermore, the fatty-acyl profile of phospholipids and diacylglycerol revealed that chronic stressed rats had higher 38 carbon(38C)-lipid levels in the hippocampus and reduced 36C-lipid levels in the PFC. Finally, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) levels in the PFC were found to be correlated with blood corticosterone (CORT) levels. In summary, lipidomic profiling of the effect of chronic stress allowed the identification of dysregulated lipid pathways, revealing putative targets for pharmacological intervention that may potentially be used to modulate stress-induced deficits.

  13. Data for mitochondrial proteomic alterations in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Lance M; Stauch, Kelly L; Fox, Howard S

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are a critical organelle involved in many cellular processes, and due to the nature of the brain, neuronal cells are almost completely reliant on these organelles for energy generation. Due to the fact that biomedical research tends to investigate disease state pathogenesis, one area of mitochondrial research commonly overlooked is homeostatic responses to energy demands. Therefore, to elucidate mitochondrial alterations occurring during the developmentally important phase of E18 to P7 in the brain, we quantified the proteins in the mitochondrial proteome as well as proteins interacting with the mitochondria. We identified a large number of significantly altered proteins involved in a variety of pathways including glycolysis, mitochondrial trafficking, mitophagy, and the unfolded protein response. These results are important because we identified alterations thought to be homeostatic in nature occurring within mitochondria, and these results may be used to identify any abnormal deviations in the mitochondrial proteome occurring during this period of brain development. A more comprehensive analysis of this data may be obtained from the article "Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands" in the Journal of Proteomics. PMID:26217684

  14. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  15. Somatostatin receptors: identification and characterization in rat brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1981-06-01

    We have identified and characterized specific receptors for tetradecapeptide somatostatin (SRIF; somatotropin release-inhibiting factor) in rat brain using [125I]Tyr11]SRIF as the radioligand. These receptors are present in membranes obtained from a subfraction of synaptosomes. Membranes derived from cerebral cortex bind SRIF with high affinity (Ka = 1.25 X 10(10) M-1) and have a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 0.155 X 10(-12) mol/mg. Neither opiates nor other neuropeptides appear to influence the binding of SRIF to brain membranes. Synthetic analogs with greater biological potency than SRIF--[D-Trp8]SRIF, [D-Cys14]SRIF, and [D-Trp8, D-Cys14]SRIF--bind to the receptors with greater avidity than SRIF, whereas inactive analogs [(2H)Ala3]SRIF and [Ala6]SRIF exhibit low binding. The ratio of receptor density to endogenous somatostatin is high in the cortex, thalamus, and striatum, low in the hypothalamus, and extremely low in the brain stem and cerebellum. Thus, SRIF receptors in the brain appear to be a distinct, new class of receptors with a regional distribution different from that of endogenous somatostatin.

  16. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  17. Influence of combined estradiol and testosterone implants on the aggressiveness of nonaggressive female rats.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1993-04-01

    Female rats that had been cohabiting with a sterile male or with another female for 6 weeks were tested for aggression toward an unfamiliar female once each week for 3 weeks. Females that were not aggressive as a result of cohabitation with a sterile male were ovariectomized. Half were implanted with a Silastic tube containing estradiol (1 mm long hormone-filled space) and a tube containing testosterone (5 mm long hormone-filled space). The other half were implanted with empty tubes. All females that had been cohabiting with another female were ovariectomized and implanted with an estradiol- and a testosterone-filled tube. Three additional weekly tests of aggression were given beginning 1 week postoperatively. Females given hormone replacement displayed only a slight increase in aggression postoperatively. Females not given hormone replacement declined in aggressiveness. These results indicate that hormone replacement levels sufficient to maintain aggression in highly aggressive females following ovariectomy are not sufficient to produce a high level of aggression in females that have not become aggressive following cohabitation with a sterile male or that have been cohabiting with another female.

  18. Hormone-dependent aggression in male and female rats: experiential, hormonal, and neural foundations.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Jonik, R H; Walsh, M L

    1992-01-01

    Hormone-dependent aggression in both male and female rats includes the distinctive behavioral characteristics of piloerection and lateral attack. In males the aggression is dependent on testicular testosterone and is commonly known as intermale aggression. In females, the aggression is most commonly observed as maternal aggression and is dependent on hormones whose identity is only beginning to emerge. The present review examines the experiential events which activate hormone-dependent aggression, the relation of the aggression to gonadal hormones, and the neural structures that participate in its modulation. In males and females, the aggression is activated by cohabitation with a conspecific of the opposite sex, by competitive experience, and by repeated exposure to unfamiliar conspecifics. In the female, the presence of pups also activates aggression. In both males and females, hormones are necessary for the full manifestation of the aggression. The essential hormone appears to be testosterone in males and a combination of testosterone and estradiol in females. The information available suggests the neural control systems for hormone-dependent aggression may be similar in males and females. It is argued that hormone-dependent aggression is behaviorally and biologically homologous in male and female rats.

  19. Memantine ameliorates autistic behavior, biochemistry & blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, commonly characterized by altered social behavior, communication, biochemistry and pathological conditions. One percent of the worldwide population suffers from autism and males suffer more than females. NMDA receptors have the important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. This study has been designed to investigate the role of memantine, a NMDA receptor modulator, in prenatal valproic acid-induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have shown the reduction in social interaction (three-chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alternation (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid-treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood-brain barrier permeability. Treatment with memantine has significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid-induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, memantine has also attenuated the prenatal valproic acid-induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood-brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behavior, biochemistry and blood-brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by memantine. NMDA receptor modulators like memantine should be explored further for the therapeutic

  20. Memantine ameliorates autistic behavior, biochemistry & blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, commonly characterized by altered social behavior, communication, biochemistry and pathological conditions. One percent of the worldwide population suffers from autism and males suffer more than females. NMDA receptors have the important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. This study has been designed to investigate the role of memantine, a NMDA receptor modulator, in prenatal valproic acid-induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have shown the reduction in social interaction (three-chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alternation (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid-treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood-brain barrier permeability. Treatment with memantine has significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid-induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, memantine has also attenuated the prenatal valproic acid-induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood-brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behavior, biochemistry and blood-brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by memantine. NMDA receptor modulators like memantine should be explored further for the therapeutic

  1. Enzyme Changes in the Offspring of Female Rats due to Long-Term Administration of Cyclic AMP and Insulin before Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Strumilo, S A; Czyzewska, U; Siemieniuk, M; Strumilo, J; Tylicki, A

    2016-07-01

    We studied the effects of insulin and cAMP on the offspring of female rats after daily treatment with these substances over 4 weeks. In adult offspring from cAMP-treated females, activities of pyruvate kinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase decreased in the liver and brain and activities of NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decreased in the liver. In the offspring of insulin-treated females, we observed only activation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase in the liver and only in females. Enzyme activity probably correlates with their content, as no changes in their kinetic properties were observed under these conditions. Long-term hormone treatment before pregnancy can affect the expression of genes for some enzymes in the offspring due to transmission of epigenetic signals by the ovum. However, further studies are required to confirm this mechanism. PMID:27502537

  2. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  3. Efficacy of Female Rat Models in Translational Cardiovascular Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K. M.; Fannin, J. C.; Gillette, C.; Blough, E. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States. Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease as well as cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Aging is a universal process that all humans undergo; however, research in aging is limited by cost and time constraints. Therefore, most research in aging has been done in primates and rodents; however it is unknown how well the effects of aging in rat models translate into humans. To compound the complication of aging gender has also been indicated as a risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system associated with aging and gender for aging research with regard to the applicability of rat derived data for translational application to human aging. PMID:25610649

  4. Accumulation of neurotoxic organochlorines and trace elements in brain of female European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, C; Scaion, D; Lemaire, B; Belpaire, C; Thomé, J-P; Thonon, M; Leermaker, M; Gao, Y; Debier, C; Silvestre, F; Kestemont, P; Rees, J-F

    2016-07-01

    Xenobiotics such as organochlorine compounds (OCs) and metals have been suggested to play a significant role in the collapse of European eel stocks in the last decades. Several of these pollutants could affect functioning of the nervous system. Still, no information is so far available on levels of potentially neurotoxic pollutants in eel brain. In present study, carried out on female eels caught in Belgian rivers and canals, we analyzed brain levels of potentially-neurotoxic trace elements (Ag, Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, MeHg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Sb, Zn) and OCs (Polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs; Hexachlorocyclohexanes, HCHs; Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites, DDTs). Data were compared to levels in liver and muscle tissues. Eel brain contained very high amounts of OCs, superior to those found in the two other tissues. Interestingly, the relative abundance of PCB congeners markedly differed between tissues. In brain, a predominance of low chlorinated PCBs was noted, whereas highly chlorinated congeners prevailed in muscle and liver. HCHs were particularly abundant in brain, which contains the highest amounts of β-HCH and ϒ-HCH. p,p'-DDTs concentration was similar between brain and muscle (i.e., about twice that of liver). A higher proportion of p,p'-DDT was noticed in brain. Except for Cr and inorganic Hg, all potentially neurotoxic metals accumulated in brain to levels equal to or lower than hepatic levels. Altogether, results indicate that eel brain is an important target for organic and, to a lesser extent, for inorganic neurotoxic pollutants.

  5. Accumulation of neurotoxic organochlorines and trace elements in brain of female European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, C; Scaion, D; Lemaire, B; Belpaire, C; Thomé, J-P; Thonon, M; Leermaker, M; Gao, Y; Debier, C; Silvestre, F; Kestemont, P; Rees, J-F

    2016-07-01

    Xenobiotics such as organochlorine compounds (OCs) and metals have been suggested to play a significant role in the collapse of European eel stocks in the last decades. Several of these pollutants could affect functioning of the nervous system. Still, no information is so far available on levels of potentially neurotoxic pollutants in eel brain. In present study, carried out on female eels caught in Belgian rivers and canals, we analyzed brain levels of potentially-neurotoxic trace elements (Ag, Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, MeHg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Sb, Zn) and OCs (Polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs; Hexachlorocyclohexanes, HCHs; Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites, DDTs). Data were compared to levels in liver and muscle tissues. Eel brain contained very high amounts of OCs, superior to those found in the two other tissues. Interestingly, the relative abundance of PCB congeners markedly differed between tissues. In brain, a predominance of low chlorinated PCBs was noted, whereas highly chlorinated congeners prevailed in muscle and liver. HCHs were particularly abundant in brain, which contains the highest amounts of β-HCH and ϒ-HCH. p,p'-DDTs concentration was similar between brain and muscle (i.e., about twice that of liver). A higher proportion of p,p'-DDT was noticed in brain. Except for Cr and inorganic Hg, all potentially neurotoxic metals accumulated in brain to levels equal to or lower than hepatic levels. Altogether, results indicate that eel brain is an important target for organic and, to a lesser extent, for inorganic neurotoxic pollutants. PMID:27376663

  6. Gender-dependent behavioural impairment and brain metabolites in young adult rats after short term exposure to lead acetate.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, M T; Naghizadeh, B; López-Larrubia, P; Cauli, O

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the behavioural effects of short-term lead (Pb) exposure in adult rats producing blood Pb concentration (<10 μg/dL) below those associated with neurological impairment in occupationally exposed individuals. In order to assess gender differences, we performed parallel behavioural experiments in male and female rats. Exposure to Pb acetate (50 mg/L in drinking water) for 30-45 days induced behavioural alterations consisting in hyperactivity in a novel environment and impairment of spatial memory. These effects were observed only in male rats. Object recognition, motor coordination were unaffected by Pb exposure. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows in vivo assessment of main brain metabolites (glutamate/glutamine, creatine, myoinositol, N-acetylaspartate and choline) whose changes have been demonstrated in several central nervous system pathologies. Exposure to Pb did not affect metabolite profile in the striatum and increase myoinositol signal in the hippocampus of male rats. The increase in myoinositol in hippocampus suggests early Pb-induced alteration in glial metabolism in this brain region and may represent a potential marker of early brain dysfunction during Pb exposure. PMID:22285975

  7. Exercise improves learning and memory impairments in sleep deprived female rats.

    PubMed

    Saadati, Hakimeh; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Nazeri, Masoud; Mazhari, Shahrzad; Sheibani, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate sleep is a common problem in modern societies. It has been previously shown that female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive functions. Physical exercise has been suggested to attenuate the cognitive impairments induced by sleep deprivation in male rats. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of physical exercise on cognitive functions of female rats following paradoxical sleep deprivation. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were used in the present study. The exercise protocol was 4 weeks of treadmill running. The multiple platform method was applied for the induction of 72h paradoxical sleep deprivation and the cognitive function was evaluated using Morris water maze (MWM). Plasma corticosterone level was evaluated in separate groups of study. ANOVA and repeated measures were used to analyze the data and P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Throughout the investigation, significant learning impairment was observed in sleep-deprived OVX rats compared to the intact and the other OVX groups. Short term memory impairment was observed in both sleep-deprived OVX and intact groups. Physical exercise alleviated the PSD-induced learning and memory impairments in both intact and OVX groups. Corticosterone levels were not statistically significant among the different groups. The results of our study confirmed the negative effects of PSD on cognitive functions in female rats and regular physical exercise seems to protect rats from these effects. Further studies are suggested to be carried out in order to evaluate the possible underlying mechanisms, and also to evaluate the possible interactions between sex hormones and PSD-induced cognitive impairments.

  8. Gallic acid improved behavior, brain electrophysiology, and inflammation in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sarkaki, Alireza; Farbood, Yaghoub; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Badavi, Mohammad; Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Haghparast, Abbas; Mirshekar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the main causes of intellectual and cognitive disabilities. In the clinic it is essential to limit the development of cognitive impairment after TBI. In this study, the effects of gallic acid (GA; 100 mg/kg, per oral, from 7 days before to 2 days after TBI induction) on neurological score, passive avoidance memory, long-term potentiation (LTP) deficits, and levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the brain have been evaluated. Brain injury was induced following Marmarou's method. Data were analyzed by one-way and repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc test. The results indicated that memory was significantly impaired (p < 0.001) in the group treated with TBI + vehicle, together with deterioration of the hippocampal LTP and increased brain tissue levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. GA treatment significantly improved memory and LTP in the TBI rats. The brain tissue levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were significantly reduced (p < 0.001) in the group treated with GA. The results suggest that GA has neuroprotective properties against TBI-induced behavioral, electrophysiological, and inflammatory disorders, probably via the decrease of cerebral proinflammatory cytokines.

  9. Female rats are resistant to developing the depressive phenotype induced by maternal separation stress.

    PubMed

    Dimatelis, J J; Vermeulen, I M; Bugarith, K; Stein, D J; Russell, V A

    2016-02-01

    Many stress-related psychiatric disorders are more common in women than in men. We aimed to determine how female rats respond to maternal separation (MS; removal of the dam from the litter for 3 h/day from postnatal day (P) 2-14)). A subset of MS females were also exposed to chronic constant light for 3 weeks during adolescence (P42-63) to investigate whether the antidepressant effect of light treatment, previously observed in male rats, could be seen in female rats. Ultrasonic vocalizations (22 kHz) were recorded and the forced swim test was conducted immediately after light exposure (P65-67) and 33 days later (P98-99) to determine depressive-like behaviour. Key proteins in the MAPK signal transduction pathway (MKP-1, phospho-ERK, total ERK) and a synaptosomal marker (synaptophysin) were measured in the ventral hippocampus. We found that MS decreased the duration of 22 kHz vocalizations at P65 which was reversed by subsequent light. Light exposure increased time spent in the inner zone of the open field and the number of 22 kHz calls in response to novelty at P98. MS decreased the time females spent immobile and increased time actively swimming in the forced swim test at P67 but not at P99. MKP-1 and synaptophysin levels remained unchanged while MS decreased phospho-ERK levels in the ventral hippocampus. In contrast to clinical findings, the results suggest that female rats may be resistant to MS-induced depression-like behaviour. The behavioural effects of MS and light treatment in female rats may involve the MAPK/ERK signal transduction pathway.

  10. Role of Oestrogen α Receptors in Sociosexual Behaviour in Female Rats Housed in a Seminatural Environment.

    PubMed

    Snoeren, E M S; Antonio-Cabrera, E; Spiteri, T; Musatov, S; Ogawa, S; Pfaff, D W; Ågmo, A

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the role of oestrogen receptor (ER)α in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN), the preoptic area (POA), the medial amygdala (MePD) and the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) in sociosexual behaviour in female rats. This was conducted in two sets of experiments, with the VMN and POA investigated in the first set, and the MePD and BNST in the second set. The VMN and POA received intense projections from the MePD and BNST. We used a short hairpin RNA encoded within an adeno-associated viral vector directed against the gene for ERα to reduce the number of ERα in the VMN or POA (first set of experiments) or in the BNST or MePD (second set of experiments) in female rats. The rats were housed in groups of four ovariectomised females and three males in a seminatural environment for 8 days. Compared with traditional test set-ups, the seminatural environment provides an arena in which the rats can express their full behavioural repertoire, which allowed us to investigate multiple aspects of social and sexual behaviour in groups of rats. Behavioural observation was performed after oestrogen and progesterone injections. A reduction of ERα expression in the VMN or POA diminished the display of paracopulatory behaviours and lordosis responses compared to controls, whereas the lordosis quotient remained unaffected. This suggests that ERα in the VMN and POA play an important role in intrinsic sexual motivation. The reduction in ERα did not affect the social behaviour of the females, although the males sniffed and pursued the females with reduced ERα less than the controls. This suggests that the ERα in the VMN and POA is involved in the regulation of sexual attractiveness of females. The ERα in the MePD and BNST, on the other hand, plays no role in sociosexual behaviour.

  11. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  12. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI.

  13. New evidence for distinct patterns of brain organization in rats differentiated on the basis of inherent laterality.

    PubMed

    LaHoste, G J; Mormède, P; Rivet, J M; Le Moal, M

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to search for possible relationships among diverse measures of behavioral laterality in a non-human species or to identify an index of laterality that was predictive of other non-lateralized functions. Several indices of behavioral laterality and open field activity were assessed in male and female rats before and after asymmetric neocortical ablations. Plasma adrenocorticotropin, corticosterone, and prolactin were measured following stress at sacrifice. Sex-dependent population-level lateral biases were observed preoperatively in the choice of arms in a T-maze and initial direction out of a corner of an open field. Unilateral left neocortical ablation induced a leftward bias in the T-maze in both male and female rats. The direction of rotation following the peripheral administration of amphetamine was correlated with: (a) the degree of sensitization to amphetamine; (b) preoperative open field activity in females; (c) the induction of hyperactivity following right neocortical ablation in males; (d) rotational responses to amphetamine in male rats sustaining bilateral ablations; and (e) the effect of left neocortical ablation on prolactin levels in males. We propose that these data provide new evidence for distinct patterns of brain organization in rats differentiated by a measure of inherent cerebral laterality. PMID:3208134

  14. Propagation and titration of Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus in the brains of newborn Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Madani, Tariq A; Kao, Moujahed; Abuelzein, El-Tayeb M E; Azhar, Esam I; Al-Bar, Hussein M S; Abu-Araki, Huda; Bokhary, Rana Y; Ksiazek, Thomas G

    2014-04-01

    Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) is a novel flavivirus identified first in Saudi Arabia. In this study, successful propagation of AHFV in the brains of newborn Wistar rats is described and the median rat lethal dose (RLD50) is determined. AHFV-RNA-positive human sera diluted 1:10 were injected intracerebrally into 16, ≤24h old rats. Post-inoculation, the rats were observed daily for 30 days. Brains of moribund rats were tested for AHFV-RNA using RT-PCR and cultured in LLC-MK2 cells. The titer of the isolated virus was determined and expressed in median tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50). To determine the RLD50, AHFV brain suspension was 10-fold diluted serially and each dilution was inoculated in the cerebral hemispheres of 10 rats for a total of 90 rats. Three days post-inoculation, the rats developed tremor, irritability, convulsion, opisthotonus, and spastic paresis starting in the hind limbs and ascending to involve the whole body. All infected rats died within 3-7 days with histopathologically confirmed meningoencephalitis. AHFV-RNA was detected in the brains of all infected rats and the virus titer was 10(9.4) RLD50/ml. The virus titer in LLC-MK2 was 10(8.2) TCID50/ml. In conclusion, AHFV was propagated successfully to high titers in the brains of newborn Wistar rats.

  15. Preventive Role of Estradiol on Kidney Injury Induced by Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion in Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iran-Nejad, Akram; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal ischemia-reperfusion (RIR) is the main cause of renal failure. The incidence of RIR injury seems to be gender-related due to female sex hormone; estrogen. This study was designed to investigate the protective role of estrogen against RIR injury in male and ovariectomized female rats. Methods: Thirty-nine Wistar rats were used in this study as male and ovariectomized female rats in the sham-operated, RIR, and estradiol-treated plus RIR groups. The RIR was induced by clamping the renal vessels for 45 min and then 24 h of reperfusion. All animals finally were sacrificed for the measurements. Results: The serum levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen and kidney tissue damage score significantly increased in both male and female RIR rats (P < 0.05). Estradiol however significantly attenuated theses parameters (P < 0.05) toward normal levels in female (P < 0.05), but not in male rats. Kidney weight increased in both genders and estradiol intensified it in the male rats (P < 0.05). Uterus weight was increased by estradiol in female rats (P < 0.05) and testis weight did not alter in male rats. Conclusions: Estradiol demonstrated a protective role against RIR injury in female rats; however, estradiol as an antioxidant could not protect the male kidney from RIR injury. PMID:25830011

  16. Regional distribution of neuropeptide processing endopeptidases in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Berman, Y L; Rattan, A K; Carr, K; Devi, L

    1994-01-01

    Many peptide hormone and neuropeptide precursors undergo post-translational processing at mono- and/or dibasic residues. An enzymatic activity capable of processing prodynorphin at a monobasic processing site designated 'dynorphin converting enzyme' has been previously reported in rat rain and bovine pituitary. In this study the distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity in ten regions of rat brain has been compared with the distribution of subtilisin-like processing enzymes and with the immuno-reactive dynorphin peptides. The distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity generally matches the distribution of immuno-reactive dynorphin B-13 in most but not all brain regions. The regions that are known to have a relatively large number of immuno-reactive dynorphin-neurons also contain high levels of dynorphin converting enzyme activity. The distribution of dynorphin converting enzyme activity does not match the distribution of subtilisin-like processing enzyme or carboxypeptidase E activities. Taken together the data support the possibility that the dynorphin converting enzyme is involved in the maturation of dynorphin, as well as other neuropeptides, and peptide hormones.

  17. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Pimpinella anisum in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Essential oil of Pimpinella anisum L. Apiaceae (anise oil) has been widely used in traditional Persian medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including some neurological disorders. This study was aimed to test the possible anti-seizure and anti-hypoxia effects of anise oil. Methods The effects of different concentrations of anise oil were tested on seizure attacks induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection and neuronal hypoxia induced by oxygen withdrawal as well as on production of dark neurons and induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in in vivo and in vitro experimental models of rat brain. Results Anise oil significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the amplitude and duration of epileptiform burst discharges induced by injection of intraperitoneal PTZ. In addition, anise oil significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the brain in epileptic rats. Anise oil also significantly enhanced the duration of the appearance of anoxic terminal negativity induced by oxygen withdrawal and inhibited induction of LTP in hippocampal slices. Conclusions Our data indicate the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of anise oil, likely via inhibition of synaptic plasticity. Further evaluation of anise oil to use in the treatment of neurological disorders is suggested. PMID:22709243

  18. Distribution of beacon immunoreactivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Tian, De-Run; Tian, Nan; Chen, Hui; Shi, Yu-Shun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Lan; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Beacon is a novel peptide isolated from the hypothalamus of Israeli sand rat. In the present study, we determined the distribution of beacon in the rat brain using immunohistochemical approach with a polyclonal antiserum directed against the synthetic C-terminal peptide fragment (47-73). The hypothalamus represented the major site of beacon-immunoreactive (IR) cell bodies that were concentrated in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Additional immunostained cells were found in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, subfornical organ and subcommissural organ. Beacon-IR fibers were seen with high density in the internal layer of the median eminence and low to moderate density in the external layer. Significant beacon-IR fibers were also seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and lateral reticular formation. The beacon neurons found in the PVN were further characterized by double label immunohistochemistry. Several beacon-IR neurons that resided in the medial PVN were shown to coexpress corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and most labeled beacon fibers in the external layer of median eminence coexist with CRH. The topographical distribution of beacon-IR in the brain suggests multiple biological activities for beacon in addition to its proposed roles in modulating feeding behaviors and pituitary hormone release.

  19. Wearable scanning photoacoustic brain imaging in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianbo; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-06-01

    A wearable scanning photoacoustic imaging (wPAI) system is presented for noninvasive brain study in behaving rats. This miniaturized wPAI system consists of four pico linear servos and a single transducer-based PAI probe. It has a dimension of 50 mm × 35 mm × 40 mm, and a weight of 26 g excluding cablings. Phantom evaluation shows that wPAI achieves a lateral resolution of ∼0.5 mm and an axial resolution of ∼0.1 mm at a depth of up to 11 mm. Its imaging ability is also tested in a behaving rat, and the results indicate that wPAI is able to image blood vessels at a depth of up to 5 mm with intact scalp and skull. With its noninvasive, deep penetration, and functional imaging ability in behaving animals, wPAI can be used for behavior, cognition, and preclinical brain disease studies. PMID:26777064

  20. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  1. NO-Tryptophan: A New Small Molecule Located in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mangas, A.; Yajeya, J.; González, N.; Duleu, S.; Geffard, M.; Coveñas, R.

    2016-01-01

    A highly specific monoclonal antibody directed against nitric oxide-tryptophan (NO-W) with good affinity (10-9 M) and specificity was developed. In the rat brain, using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, cell bodies containing NO-W were exclusively found in the intermediate and dorsal parts of the lateral septal nucleus. No immunoreactive fibres were found in the rat brain. This work reports the first visualization and the morphological characteristics of cell bodies containing NO-W in the mammalian brain. The restricted distribution of NO-W in the rat brain suggests that this molecule could be involved in specific physiological mechanisms. PMID:27734994

  2. COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE DORSAL HIPPOCAMPUS OF VERY OLD FEMALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Gustavo R.; Andersen, Tomás; Pardo, Joaquín; Zuccolilli, Gustavo O.; Cambiaggi, Vanina L.; Hereñú, Claudia B.; Goya, Rodolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus, a medial temporal lobe structure necessary for the formation of spatial memory, is particularly affected by both normal and pathologic aging. In previous studies, we observed a significant age-related increase in dopaminergic neuron loss in the hypothalamus and the substantia nigra of female rats, which becomes more conspicuous at extreme ages. Here, we extend our studies by assessing spatial memory 4–6 months old (young), 26 months old (old) and 29–32 months old (senile) Sprague–Dawley female rats as well as the age-related histopathological changes in their dorsal hippocampus. Age changes in spatial memory performance were assessed with a modified version of the Barnes maze test. We employed two probe trials (PT), one and five days after training, respectively, in order to evaluate learning ability as well as short-term and longer-term spatial memory retention. A set of relevant hippocampal cell markers was also quantitated in the animals by means of an unbiased stereological approach. The results revealed that old rats perform better than senile rats in acquisition trials and young rats perform better than both aging groups. However, during short-term PT both aging groups showed a preserved spatial memory while in longer-term PT, spatial memory showed deterioration in both aged groups. Morphological analysis showed a marked decrease (94–97%) in doublecortin neuron number in the dentate gyrus in both aged groups and a reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cell number in the stratum radiatum of aging rats. Astroglial process length and branching complexity decreased in the aged rats. We conclude that while target-seeking activity and learning ability decrease in aged females, spatial memory only declines in the longer-term tests. The reduction in neuroblast number and astroglial arborescence complexity in the dorsal hippocampus are likely to play a role in the cognitive deficits of aging rats. PMID:26141841

  3. Cognitive impairment and morphological changes in the dorsal hippocampus of very old female rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, G R; Andersen, T; Pardo, J; Zuccolilli, G O; Cambiaggi, V L; Hereñú, C B; Goya, R G

    2015-09-10

    The hippocampus, a medial temporal lobe structure necessary for the formation of spatial memory, is particularly affected by both normal and pathologic aging. In previous studies, we observed a significant age-related increase in dopaminergic neuron loss in the hypothalamus and the substantia nigra of female rats, which becomes more conspicuous at extreme ages. Here, we extend our studies by assessing spatial memory in 4-6 month-old (young), 26-month-old (old) and 29-32-month-old (senile) Sprague-Dawley female rats as well as the age-related histopathological changes in their dorsal hippocampus. Age changes in spatial memory performance were assessed with a modified version of the Barnes maze test. We employed two probe trials (PTs), one and five days after training, respectively, in order to evaluate learning ability as well as short-term and longer-term spatial memory retention. A set of relevant hippocampal cell markers was also quantitated in the animals by means of an unbiased stereological approach. The results revealed that old rats perform better than senile rats in acquisition trials and young rats perform better than both aging groups. However, during short-term PT both aging groups showed a preserved spatial memory while in longer-term PT, spatial memory showed deterioration in both aged groups. Morphological analysis showed a marked decrease (94-97%) in doublecortin neuron number in the dentate gyrus in both aged groups and a reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cell number in the stratum radiatum of aging rats. Astroglial process length and branching complexity decreased in aged rats. We conclude that while target-seeking activity and learning ability decrease in aged females, spatial memory only declines in the longer-term tests. The reduction in neuroblast number and astroglial arborescence complexity in the dorsal hippocampus are likely to play a role in the cognitive deficits of aging rats.

  4. [Effects of total saponins of semen ziziphi Spinosae on brain damages and brain biochemical parameters under cerebral ischemia of rats].

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Huang, Z; Mo, Z; Pan, H; Ding, H

    1996-02-01

    Total saponins of Semen Ziziphi Spinosae (ZS) can reduce the contents of water and MDA in ischemic rat's brain tissues, elevate the activity of SOD, CK and LDH, cut down the content of lactate and alleviate the damages of nerve cells in brain. The study shows that ZS possesses protective effects on cerebral ischemic injuries. PMID:8758767

  5. Neuroprotective effects of zinc on antioxidant defense system in lithium treated rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Punita; Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Dhar, Rakesh; Dhawan, D K

    2007-11-01

    With a view to find out whether zinc affords protection against lithium toxicity the activities of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation profile were determined in the cerebrum and cerebellum of lithium treated female Sprague Dawley rats. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased in both the cerebrum and the cerebellum of animals administered with lithium for a total duration of 4 months as compared to the normal control group. On the contrary, the activities of catalase and glutathione-s-transferase (GST) were significantly reduced after 4 months of lithium treatment. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly increased in the cerebrum after 4 months lithium administration, whereas in the cerebellum the enzyme activity was unaffected. No significant change in the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) was found in either cerebrum or cerebellum after 2 months of lithium treatment. However, 4 months lithium treatment did produce significant changes in GSH levels in the cerebrum and in the cerebellum. Zinc supplementation for 4 months in lithium-treated rats significantly increased the activities of catalase and GST in the cerebellum, showing that the treatment with zinc reversed the lithium induced depression in these enzyme activities. Though, zinc treatment tended to normalize the SOD activity in the cerebrum yet it was still significantly higher in comparison to normal levels. From the present study, it can be concluded that the antiperoxidative property of zinc is effective in reversing the oxidative stress induced by lithium toxicity in the rat brain.

  6. Early life inflammatory pain induces long-lasting deficits in hippocampal-dependent spatial memory in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Yoko O; Victoria, Nicole C; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Murphy, Anne Z; Parent, Marise B

    2015-02-01

    The present experiment tested the hypothesis that neonatal injury disrupts adult hippocampal functioning and that normal aging or chronic stress during adulthood, which are known to have a negative impact on hippocampal function, exacerbate these effects. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraplantar injection of the inflammatory agent carrageenan (1%) on the day of birth and their memory was tested in the hippocampal-dependent spatial water maze in adulthood and again in middle age. We found that neonatal injury impaired hippocampal-dependent memory in adulthood, that the effects of injury on memory were more pronounced in middle-aged male rats, and that chronic stress accelerated the onset of these memory deficits. Neonatal injury also decreased glucocorticoid receptor mRNA in the dorsal CA1 area of middle-aged rats, a brain region critical for spatial memory. Morphine administration at the time of injury completely reversed injury-induced memory deficits, but neonatal morphine treatments in the absence of injury produced significant memory impairments in adulthood. Collectively, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that neonatal injury produces long-lasting disruption in adult hippocampal functioning.

  7. Inhaled nitric oxide protects males but not females from neonatal mouse hypoxia-ischemia brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changlian; Sun, Yanyan; Gao, Jianfeng; Wang, Xiaoyang; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Blomgren, Klas

    2013-04-01

    It was recently discovered that while under normal conditions inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) does not affect cerebral blood flow, it selectively dilates arterioles in the ischemic penumbra during experimental cerebral ischemia, thereby increasing collateral blood flow and reducing ischemic brain damage. The mechanism was verified in multiple models, but only in male animals. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of iNO on brain injury in neonatal males and females. Nine-day-old mice were subjected to unilateral hypoxia-ischemia (HI), using 10% oxygen balanced with nitrogen, with or without 50 ppm NO. Brain injury 72 h after HI was reduced by iNO as judged by percentage of injury (-21.7%), atrophy (-23.7%), and total pathological score (-29%). The injury was significantly reduced in males (-32.4%, p<0.05) but not in females (-7.1%, n.s.). Neither the numbers nor the proliferation rates of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus were affected by iNO. In summary, intraischemic iNO reduced neonatal HI brain injury in a gender-related manner. PMID:24323275

  8. In utero phthalate effects in the female rat: a model for MRKH syndrome##

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is characterized by uterine and vaginal canal aplasia in normal karyotype human females and is a syndrome with poorly defined etiology. Reproductive toxicity of phthalate esters (PEs) occurs in rat offspring exposed in utero, a phen...

  9. DEVELOPMENTAL ATRAZINE EXPOSURE SUPPRESSES IMMUNE FUNCTION IN MALE, BUT NOT FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental Atrazine Exposure Suppresses Immune Function in Male, but not Female Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Andrew A. Rooney,*,1 Raymond A. Matulka,? and Robert Luebke?

    *College of Veterinary Medicine, Anatomy, Physiological Sciences and Radiology, NCSU, Raleigh, North...

  10. Skeletal muscle choristoma in the lung of a female Sprague-Dawley rat: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, Marcel; van Esch, Eric

    2012-03-01

    In this report we describe a choristoma in the lung of a female placebo rat. The lesion was observed microscopically in the central part of the left lung lobe and was characterized by a nodule consisting of well-differentiated skeletal muscle cells. The muscle fibers were haphazardly organized giving the nodule a poorly demarcated border. Choristoma is a very rare lesion.

  11. NONYLPHENOL AND ATRAZINE INDUCE INVERSE EFFECTS ON MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN FEMALE RATS EXPOSED IN UTERO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonylphenol and Atrazine Induce Inverse Effects on Mammary Gland Development in Female Rats Exposed In Utero.
    HJ Moon1, SY Han1, CC Davis2, and SE Fenton2
    1 Department of Toxicology, NITR, Korea FDA, 5Nokbun-Dong, Eunpyung-Gu, Seoul, Korea and 2 Reproductive Toxicology Divi...

  12. Effects of altered food intake during pubertal development in male and female Wistar rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S.EPA is currently validating assays that will be used in a Tier I Screening Battery to detect endocrine disrupting chemicals. A primary concern with the Protocols for the Assessment of Pubertal Development and Thyroid Function in Juvenile Male and Female Rats is that a non...

  13. THE ENDOCRINE PROFILE OF INTACT FEMALE RATS ON THE DAY OF PROESTRUS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Endocrine Profile of Intact Female Rats on the Day of Proestrus Following Exposure to Atrazine.
    RL Cooper, A Buckalew, SC Laws and TE Stoker
    Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, 27711.

    The chlorotriazine herbicide, atrazine, has been sho...

  14. 17ß-Estradiol Is Necessary for Extinction of Cocaine Seeking in Female Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twining, Robert C.; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Doncheck, Elizabeth M.; Frick, Karyn M.; Mueller, Devin

    2013-01-01

    Human and preclinical models of addiction demonstrate that gonadal hormones modulate acquisition of drug seeking. Little is known, however, about the effects of these hormones on extinction of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we investigated how 17ß-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) affects expression and extinction of cocaine seeking in female rats. Using a…

  15. In Utero Phthalate Effects in the Female Rat: A Model for MRKH Syndrome

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is characterized by uterine and vaginal canal aplasia in normal karyotype human females and is a syndrome with poorly define etiology. Reproductive toxicity of phthlate esters (PEs) occurs in rat offspring exposed in utero. a phenome...

  16. MASCULINIZATION OF FEMALE RATS BY PRENATAL TESTOSTERONE PROPIONATE IS PARTIALLY ATTENUATED BY VINCLOZOLIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    MASCULINIZATION OF FEMALE RATS BY PRENATAL TESTOSTERONE PROPIONATE IS PARTIALLY ATTENUATED BY VINCLOZOLIN
    Cynthia Wolf1,2, Gerald LeBlanc2, Andrew Hotchkiss3, Jonathan Furr1, L Earl Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC 27711, 2Dept. Molecular and En...

  17. Brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism during focal ischemia in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.N.; Liu, T.H.; Xu, J.; Hsu, C.Y.; Sun, G.Y. )

    1991-04-01

    Using a rat model of stroke, we examined the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the metabolism of polyphosphoinositides by injecting {sup 32}Pi into both the left and right cortices. After equilibration of the label for 2-3 hours, ischemia induced a significant decrease (p less than 0.001) in the concentrations of labeled phosphatidyl 4,5-bisphosphates (66-78%) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (64-67%) in the right middle cerebral artery cortex of four rats. The phospholipid labeling pattern in the left middle cerebral artery cortex, which sustained only mild ischemia and no permanent tissue damage, was not different from that of two sham-operated controls. However, when {sup 32}Pi was injected 1 hour after the ischemic insult, there was a significant decrease (p less than 0.01) in the incorporation of label into the phospholipids in both cortices of four ischemic rats compared with four sham-operated controls. Furthermore, differences in the phospholipid labeling pattern were observed in the left cortex compared with the sham-operated controls. The change in labeling pattern was attributed to the partial reduction in blood flow following ligation of the common carotid arteries. We provide a sensitive procedure for probing the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the polyphosphoinositide signaling pathway in the brain, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tissue injury.

  18. Effect of exposure to diazinon on adult rat's brain.

    PubMed

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Lari, Parisa; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-04-01

    Diazinon (DZN), a commonly used agricultural organophosphate insecticide, is one of the major concerns for human health. This study was planned to investigate neurotoxic effects of subacute exposure to DZN in adult male Wistar rats. Animals received corn oil as control and 15 and 30 mg/kg DZN orally by gastric gavage for 4 weeks. The cerebrum malondialdehyde and glutathione (GSH) contents were assessed as biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and nonenzyme antioxidants, respectively. Moreover, activated forms of caspase 3, -9, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios were evaluated as key apoptotic proteins. Results of this study suggested that chronic administration of DZN did not change lipid peroxidation and GSH levels significantly in comparison with control. Also, the active forms of caspase 3 and caspase 9 were not significantly altered in DZN-treated rat groups. Moreover, no significant changes were observed in Bax and Bcl-2 ratios. This study indicated that generation of reactive oxygen species was probably modulated by intracellular antioxidant system. In conclusion, subacute oral administration of DZN did not alter lipid peroxidation. Moreover, apoptosis induction was not observed in rat brain.

  19. Estradiol and Progesterone have Opposing Roles in the Regulation of Fear Extinction in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Graham, Bronwyn M; Daher, Melissa

    2016-02-01

    Fear extinction, the laboratory basis of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders, fluctuates across the female rat estrous cycle, where extinction is enhanced during proestrus (high estradiol and progesterone), and impaired during metestrus (low estradiol and progesterone). During the estrous cycle increasing levels of estradiol precede and then overlap with increased levels of progesterone. We sought to isolate the impact of these hormonal changes on fear extinction by systematically treating ovariectomized female rats with estradiol alone, or in combination with progesterone. We found that estradiol alone facilitated extinction recall, whereas the effects of progesterone on estradiol-treated rats were biphasic and dependent on the time interval between progesterone administration and extinction training. Progesterone potentiated estradiol's facilitation of extinction recall when extinction training occurred 6 h after progesterone administration. However, progesterone abolished estradiol's facilitation of extinction recall when extinction training occurred 24 h after progesterone administration. Furthermore, in naturally cycling rats, blocking progesterone receptor activation during proestrus (when progesterone levels peak) prevented the impairment in extinction recall in rats extinguished during metestrus. These results suggest that in naturally cycling females whereas cyclical increases in estradiol facilitate fear extinction, cyclical increases in progesterone may lead to fear extinction impairments. As extinction training took place after the hormonal treatments had been metabolized, we propose that genomic mechanisms may at least partly mediate the impact of cyclic fluctuations in sex hormones on fear extinction.

  20. Antifertility activity of aqueous ethanolic extract of Hymenocardia acida stem bark in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Hyacinth, Abu Adakole; Nwocha, Uchendu Chukwuka

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hymenocardia acida is traditionally used in African herbal medicine and has numerous therapeutic benefits. But little is known about its potentially negative effects on pregnant women. Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antifertility effect of aqueous ethanolic extract of Hymenocardia acida stem bark in female Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Four groups of rats were administered orally aqueous ethanolic extract of Hymenocardia acida at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight daily for 19 days. The control group received distilled water. On day 20 of gestation, each rat was laparatomised and number of corpora lutea of pregnancy, number of live fetuses as well as the postcoitum fertility index, weights of the foetuses and placentae were determined. Results: Oral administration of the extract from days 1 to 19 of gestation showed reduction (p<0.05) in the number of corpora lutea of pregnancy and number of live fetuses. Weights of fetuses of extract treated female rats were also smaller (p<0.05) compared with the control. Anti-implantation activity of the treatment groups were 41.4%, 48.3% and 51.7% for groups II to IV respectively, whereas antifertility activity of the groups was found to be 40%, 60% and 60% in the same order. Conclusion: The results suggest that aqueous ethanolic extract of Hymenocardia acida stem bark could induce negative effects on reproductive functions in female albino rats. PMID:26396567

  1. Sexual behavior of female rats in a multiple-partner preference test.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Nuño, A; Morales-Otal, A; Paredes, Raúl G; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J

    2005-03-01

    In this study, sexually experienced female rats were tested in a multiple-partner preference test (MPPT) in which they were allowed to pace their sexual contacts with four sexually active males. Four cylinders, with a small hole through which only the female could move freely from one cylinder to another, were assembled forming in the center an empty compartment. An intact female was placed in the central compartment and a sexually active male in each cylinder. Female sexual behavior was analyzed throughout the estrus cycle in four consecutive days. Each daily test lasted 15 min. The percentage of exits after intromission or ejaculation was significantly higher than the percentage of exits after each mount. The female spent significantly longer time with one of the males. We designated this male as the preferred male (PM). Although in each of the 4 days studied, females spent significantly longer time with the PM, however, the male selected was not the same throughout the estrus cycle. The number of entries into the compartment of the PM was significantly higher and increased around proestrus. Compared to previous studies, pacing behavior was notably lower in the conditions of the MPPT. No significant differences were observed during the estrous cycle concerning the other parameters recorded. The present results suggest that the MPPT could be a good model to study partner preference in the female rat. PMID:15708757

  2. Sexual behavior of female rats in a multiple-partner preference test.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Nuño, A; Morales-Otal, A; Paredes, Raúl G; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J

    2005-03-01

    In this study, sexually experienced female rats were tested in a multiple-partner preference test (MPPT) in which they were allowed to pace their sexual contacts with four sexually active males. Four cylinders, with a small hole through which only the female could move freely from one cylinder to another, were assembled forming in the center an empty compartment. An intact female was placed in the central compartment and a sexually active male in each cylinder. Female sexual behavior was analyzed throughout the estrus cycle in four consecutive days. Each daily test lasted 15 min. The percentage of exits after intromission or ejaculation was significantly higher than the percentage of exits after each mount. The female spent significantly longer time with one of the males. We designated this male as the preferred male (PM). Although in each of the 4 days studied, females spent significantly longer time with the PM, however, the male selected was not the same throughout the estrus cycle. The number of entries into the compartment of the PM was significantly higher and increased around proestrus. Compared to previous studies, pacing behavior was notably lower in the conditions of the MPPT. No significant differences were observed during the estrous cycle concerning the other parameters recorded. The present results suggest that the MPPT could be a good model to study partner preference in the female rat.

  3. Toxicokinetics of α-thujone following intravenous and gavage administration of α-thujone or α- and β-thujone mixture in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waidyanatha, Suramya; Johnson, Jerry D.; Hong, S. Peter; Robinson, Veronica Godfrey; Gibbs, Seth; Graves, Steven W.; Hooth, Michelle J.; Smith, Cynthia S.

    2013-09-01

    Plants containing thujone have widespread use and hence have significant human exposure. α-Thujone caused seizures in rodents following gavage administration. We investigated the toxicokinetics of α-thujone in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice following intravenous and gavage administration of α-thujone or a mixture of α- and β-thujone (which will be referred to as α,β-thujone). Absorption of α-thujone following gavage administration was rapid without any dose-, species-, sex- or test article-related effect. Absolute bioavailability of α-thujone following administration of α-thujone or α,β-thujone was generally higher in rats than in mice. In rats, females had higher bioavailability than males following administration of either test article although a sex difference was not observed in mice. C{sub max} and AUC{sub ∞} increased greater than proportional to the dose in female rats following administration of α-thujone and in male and female mice following administration of α,β-thujone suggesting possible saturation of elimination kinetics with increasing dose. Dose-adjusted AUC{sub ∞} for male and female rats was 5- to 15-fold and 3- to 24-fold higher than mice counterparts following administration of α-thujone and α,β-thujone, respectively (p-value < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Following both intravenous and gavage administration, α-thujone was distributed to the brains of rats and mice with females, in general, having higher brain:plasma ratios than males. These data are in support of the observed toxicity of α-thujone and α,β-thujone where females were more sensitive than males of both species to α-thujone-induced neurotoxicity. In general there was no difference in toxicokinetics between test articles when normalized to α-thujone concentration. - Highlights: • Absorption of α-thujone following gavage administration was rapid in rats and mice. • Rats undergo higher exposure to α-thujone than mice. • α-Thujone brain

  4. Influences of chemical sympathectomy and simulated weightlessness on male and female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, Christopher R.; Stump, Craig S.; Stump, Jane A.; Sebastian, Lisa A.; Rahman, Z.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to a study aimed at determining whether the sympathetic nervous system is associated with the changes in maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), run time, and mechanical efficiency observed during simulated weightlessness in male and female rats. Female and male rats were compared for food consumption, body mass, and body composition in conditions of simulated weightlessness to provide an insight into how these parameters may influence aerobic capacity and exercise performance. It is concluded that chemical sympathectomy and/or a weight-bearing stimulus will attenuate the loss in VO2max associated with simulated weightlessness in rats despite similar changes in body mass and composition. It is noted that the mechanisms remain unclear at this time.

  5. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    Key points Leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, which contributes to obesity-induced hypertension; however, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. We report that leptin does increase SNA and heart rate in female rats; however, for lumbar and renal SNA, this action is only evident in pro-oestrus and in oestrogen-treated ovariectomized rats, but not in ovariectomized or dioestrus rats. Leptin increases SNA and heart rate similarly in male and pro-oestrus female rats; however, leptin increases arterial pressure only in males. Blockade of MC3/4 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) with SHU9119 decreases SNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus rats, suggesting that leptin increases SNA in part by increasing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone drive of PVN presympathetic neurons. Our data establish sex differences in leptin's effects to increase SNA and arterial pressure, which emphasizes the need for enhanced recognition and investigation of sex differences in obesity-induced sympathoexcitation and hypertension. Abstract Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR

  6. [Ethanol pharmacokinetics in narcotic action and endogenous ethanol in female rats].

    PubMed

    Andronova, L M; Ushakova, M M; Kudriavtsev, R V; Barkov, N K

    1982-12-01

    Experiments were made on female rats to demonstrate a positive correlation between the time of ethanol anesthesia in estrus and diestrus and (1) subsequent preference of ethanol to water (r = 0.68) and (2) ethanol consumption dosage (r = 0.72). In the same rats (during estrus and diestrus), the endogenous level and blood concentrations of ethanol were measured 30 minutes after administering the anesthetic dose (4.5 g/kg) and during the animal's "egress" from anesthesia. The low level of endogenous ethanol and rapid decrease of the blood ethanol concentration upon administering the anesthetic dose during estrus were characteristic of those female rats which, under the conditions of free choice, preferred ethanol to water and consumed it in large doses.

  7. Resveratrol affects differently rat liver and brain mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress in vitro: investigation of the role of gender.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana C; Silva, Ana M; Santos, Maria S; Sardão, Vilma A

    2013-03-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans stilbene) is commonly recognized by its antioxidant properties. Despite its beneficial qualities, the toxic effects of this natural compound are still unknown. Since mitochondria are essential to support the energy-dependent regulation of several cell functions, the objective of this study was to evaluate resveratrol effects on rat brain and liver mitochondrial fractions from male and females regarding oxidative stress and bioenergetics. No basal differences were observed between mitochondrial fractions from males and females, except in liver mitochondria, the generation of H(2)O(2) by the respiratory chain is lower for female preparations. Resveratrol inhibited lipid peroxidation in preparations from both genders and organs. Furthermore, brain mitochondria in both gender groups appeared susceptible to resveratrol as seen by a decrease in state 3 respiration and alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential fluctuations during ADP phosphorylation. As opposed, liver mitochondria were less affected by resveratrol. Our data also demonstrates that resveratrol inhibits complex I activity in all mitochondrial preparations. The results suggest that brain mitochondria appear to be more susceptible to resveratrol effects, and gender appears to play a minor role. It remains to be determined if resveratrol effects on brain mitochondria contribute to deterioration of mitochondrial function or instead to mediate hormesis-mediated events.

  8. Effect of low doses of progesterone in the expression of the GABA(A) receptor α4 subunit and procaspase-3 in the hypothalamus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Arbo, Bruno D; Andrade, Susie; Osterkamp, Gabriela; Gomez, Rosane; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M

    2014-08-01

    Progesterone is a steroid which regulates neural function, thereby modulating neurotransmission, cell survival, and behavior. Previous studies by our group have shown that chronic administration of low doses of progesterone in diestrus II female rats has an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST). Depression is associated with the several neurotransmitters systems, including GABA and serotonin, and with neurodegeneration and cell death in some brain circuits. The aim of this study was to verify the effect of progesterone on the protein expression of the GABA(A) receptor α4 subunit, serotonin transporter (SERT), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), and caspase-3 in the hypothalamus of diestrus II female rats exposed to the FST. Female rats were treated with a daily injection of progesterone (0.4 mg/kg) or vehicle, during two complete oestrous cycles. On the day of the experiment, the animals were euthanized 30 min after the FST, the hypothalamus was dissected and protein expression of GABA(A) receptor α4 subunit, SERT, Akt, Erk, and caspase-3 was evaluated. Progesterone increased the expression of GABA(A) receptor α4 subunit but did not change the expression of SERT. Progesterone decreased the expression of procaspase-3 in the hypothalamus without changing the activation of Akt and Erk in this structure. In summary, our results suggest that progesterone acts to increase the expression of the GABA(A) receptor α4 subunit and decrease the expression of procaspase-3 in the hypothalamus of female rats. Such effects may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of progesterone in female rats exposed to the FST.

  9. Adolescent peer-rejection persistently alters pain perception and CB1 receptor expression in female rats.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Peggy; Hannusch, Christin; Schmahl, Christian; Bohus, Martin; Spanagel, Rainer; Schneider, Miriam

    2014-02-01

    Peer-interactions are particularly important during adolescence and teenagers display enhanced sensitivity toward rejection by peers. Social rejection has been shown to induce alterations in pain perception in humans. However, the neurobiological consequences of adolescent social rejection have yet to be extensively characterized, and no appropriate animal model is available. Here, we propose inadequate playful interactions in adolescent rats as a novel animal model for social peer-rejection and examine potential long-term consequences into adulthood. Acute social pairing of female adolescent Wistar rats with an age-matched rat from the less playful Fischer344 strain was found to alter social play and decrease pain reactivity, indicating Fischer rats as inadequate social partners for Wistar animals. Therefore, in a second experiment, adolescent female Wistar rats were either reared with another Wistar rat (adequate social rearing; control) or with a Fischer rat (inadequate social rearing; play-deprived). Beginning on day 50, all Wistar rats were group housed with same-strain partners and tested for behavioral, neurobiological and endocrine differences in adulthood. Playful peer-interactions were decreased during adolescence in play-deprived animals, without affecting social contact behavior. Consequently, adult play-deprived rats showed decreased pain sensitivity and increased startle reactivity compared to controls, but did not differ in activity, anxiety-related behavior or social interaction. Both groups also differed in their endocrine stress-response, and expression levels of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were increased in the thalamus, whereas FAAH levels were decreased in the amygdala. The present animal model therefore represents a novel approach to assess the long-term consequences of peer-rejection during adolescence. PMID:23669059

  10. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)—a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin—has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  11. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  12. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin-has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  13. Neurotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in Rat Brain After Intragastric Exposure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liming; Shao, Anliang; Zhao, Yanhong; Wang, Zhijie; Zhang, Cuiping; Sun, Yilin; Deng, Jie; Chou, Laisheng Lee

    2015-06-01

    It is known that the biological half-life of silver in the central nervous system is longer than in other organs. However, the potential toxicity of silver nanoparticles (NPs) on brain tissue and the underlying mechanism(s) of action are not well understood. In this study, neurotoxicity of silver NPs was examined in rat after intragastric administration. After a two-week exposure to low-dose (1 mg/kg, body weight) or high-dose (10 mg/kg) silver NPs, the pathological and ultrastructural changes in brain tissue were evaluated with H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy. The mRNA expression levels of key tight junction proteins of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, and several inflammatory factors were assessed in blood using ELISA assay. We observed neuron shrinkage, cytoplasmic or foot swelling of astrocytes, and extra-vascular lymphocytes in silver NP exposure groups. The cadherin 1 (2(-ΔΔCt): 1.45-fold/control) and Claudin-1 (2(-ΔΔCt): 2.77-fold/control) were slightly increase in mRNA expression levels, and IL-4 significantly increased after silver NP exposure. It was suggest that silver NP can induce neuronal degeneration and astrocyte swelling, even with a low-dose (1 mg/kg) oral exposure. One potential mechanism for the effects of silver NPs to the nervous cells is involved in inflammatory effects.

  14. Ovarian Toxicity in Female Rats after Oral Administration of Melamine or Melamine and Cyanuric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiarui; Zhang, Xinchen; Cao, Yinan; Zhao, Qiling; Bao, Endong; Lv, Yingjun

    2016-01-01

    Although the toxicity of melamine to the kidneys and testes is well known, few studies have investigated the effects of melamine on female reproductive organs. Therefore, this study explores the effects of oral administration melamine or melamine and cyanuric acid for 28 days on the ovaries of female rats. Rats that were exposed to the mixture exhibited reduced ovarian and uterine weights, a shorter estrous cycle, and reduced serum estrogen and progesterone levels compared to rats that were exposed to melamine and control rats. Furthermore, morphological analysis revealed pathological changes in the ovaries of rats exposed to melamine or the mixture, such as more atretic follicles and necrosis of oocytes and granulosa cells. TUNEL staining revealed that the exposed groups had a higher proportion of TUNEL-positive granulosa cells than the control group, and the mRNA expressions of SOD1, GPX1, GPX2, P450scc, 17β-HSD I, and 17β-HSD II were reduced in the exposure groups compared with the control group. These results indicated that exposure to melamine alone or to the melamine-cyanuric acid mixture could damage the ovaries in rats. PMID:26866683

  15. Estrogen promotes microvascular pathology in female stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Stier, Charles T; Chander, Praveen N; Rosenfeld, Louis; Powers, C Andrew

    2003-07-01

    Estrogen produces both beneficial and adverse effects on cardiovascular health via mechanisms that remain unclear. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) maintained on Stroke-Prone Rodent Diet and 1% NaCl drinking water (starting at 8 wk of age) rapidly develop stroke and malignant nephrosclerosis that can be prevented, despite continued hypertension, by drugs targeting angiotensin II and aldosterone actions. This study evaluated estrogen's effects in the SHRSP model. Female SHRSP that were sham operated (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX) at 4 wk of age, or OVX and treated with estradiol benzoate (E2,30 microg x kg-1 x wk-1) were studied. In a survival protocol, OVX rats lived significantly longer (15.1 +/- 0.3 wk) compared with SHAM (13.6 +/- 0.2 wk) or OVX+E2 rats (12.4 +/- 0.2 wk). In a protocol in which animals were matched for age, at 11.5 wk, terminal systolic blood pressure and urine protein excretion were elevated in SHAM and OVX+E2 rats compared with OVX rats; blood urea nitrogen, renal microvascular and glomerular lesions, and plasma renin concentration were elevated in OVX+E2 relative to SHAM or OVX rats. In a survival protocol using intact female SHRSP, treatment with an antiestrogen (tamoxifen, 7 mg.kg-1.wk-1) prolonged survival by >2 wk compared with controls (P < 0.01). The data indicate that estrogen promotes microangiopathy in the kidney and stroke in saline-drinking SHRSP.

  16. Oxidized LDL Is Strictly Limited to Hyperthyroidism Irrespective of Fat Feeding in Female Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Zelzer, Sieglinde; Mangge, Harald; Pailer, Sabine; Ainoedhofer, Herwig; Kieslinger, Petra; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Prüller, Florian; Weghuber, Daniel; Datz, Christian; Haybaeck, Johannes; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Trummer, Christian; Gostner, Johanna; Gruber, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunctions might play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of thyroid dysfunctions. This study aimed to investigate the impact of a controlled diet (normal versus high fat feeding) on hypothyroid and hyperthyroid Sprague Dawley rats. Female Sprague Dawley rats (n = 66) were grouped into normal diet (n = 30) and high-fat diet (n = 36) groups and subdivided into controls, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid groups, induced through propylthiouracil or triiodothyronine (T3) treatment, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment metabolic parameters, such as oxidized LDL (oxLDL), malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), the lipid profile, body weight and food intake parameters were analyzed. Successfully induced thyroid dysfunctions were shown by T3 levels, both under normal and high fat diet. Thyroid dysfunctions were accompanied by changes in calorie intake and body weight as well as in the lipid profile. In detail, hypothyroid rats showed significantly decreased oxLDL levels, whereas hyperthyroid rats showed significantly increased oxLDL levels. These effects were seen under high fat diet and were less pronounced with normal feeding. Taken together, we showed for the first time in female SD rats that only hyper-, but not hypothyroidism, is associated with high atherogenic oxidized LDL irrespective of normal or high-fat diet in Sprague Dawley rats. PMID:26006242

  17. Oxidized LDL Is Strictly Limited to Hyperthyroidism Irrespective of Fat Feeding in Female Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zelzer, Sieglinde; Mangge, Harald; Pailer, Sabine; Ainoedhofer, Herwig; Kieslinger, Petra; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Prüller, Florian; Weghuber, Daniel; Datz, Christian; Haybaeck, Johannes; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Trummer, Christian; Gostner, Johanna; Gruber, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunctions might play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of thyroid dysfunctions. This study aimed to investigate the impact of a controlled diet (normal versus high fat feeding) on hypothyroid and hyperthyroid Sprague Dawley rats. Female Sprague Dawley rats (n = 66) were grouped into normal diet (n = 30) and high-fat diet (n = 36) groups and subdivided into controls, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid groups, induced through propylthiouracil or triiodothyronine (T3) treatment, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment metabolic parameters, such as oxidized LDL (oxLDL), malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), the lipid profile, body weight and food intake parameters were analyzed. Successfully induced thyroid dysfunctions were shown by T3 levels, both under normal and high fat diet. Thyroid dysfunctions were accompanied by changes in calorie intake and body weight as well as in the lipid profile. In detail, hypothyroid rats showed significantly decreased oxLDL levels, whereas hyperthyroid rats showed significantly increased oxLDL levels. These effects were seen under high fat diet and were less pronounced with normal feeding. Taken together, we showed for the first time in female SD rats that only hyper-, but not hypothyroidism, is associated with high atherogenic oxidized LDL irrespective of normal or high-fat diet in Sprague Dawley rats. PMID:26006242

  18. HIV-1 Transgenic Female Rat: Synaptodendritic Alterations of Medium Spiny Neurons in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Roscoe, Robert F.; Mactutus, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 associated neurocognitive deficits are increasing in prevalence, although the neuronal basis for these deficits is unclear. HIV-1 Tg rats constitutively express 7 of 9 HIV-associated proteins, and may be useful for studying the neuropathological substrates of HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). In this study, adult female HIV-1 Tg rats and F344 control rats had similar growth rates, estrous cyclicity and startle reflex inhibition to a visual prepulse stimulus. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) were ballistically-labeled utilizing the indocarbocyanine dye DiI. The branching complexity of MSNs in the NAcc was significantly decreased in HIV-1 Tg rats, relative to controls; moreover, the shorter length and decreased volume of dendritic spines, but unchanged head diameter, in HIV-1 Tg rats suggested a reduction of longer spines and an increase in shorter, less projected spines, indicating a population shift to a more immature spine phenotype. Collectively, these results from HIV-1 Tg female rats indicated significant synaptodendritic alterations of MSNs in the NAcc occur as a consequence of chronic, low-level, exposure to HIV-1 associated proteins. PMID:25037595

  19. Protein Restriction during Pregnancy Induces Hypertension in Adult Female Rat Offspring—Influence of Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Sathishkumar, K; Elkins, Rebekah; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that gestational dietary protein restriction in rats causes gender-related differences in development of offspring's blood pressure (BP) that is more pronounced in the males than females. Since such effects may depend on sex hormones, we investigated the role of estradiol in the development of hypertension in female offspring of protein restricted dams. Female offspring of pregnant rats fed normal (20%) or protein restricted (6%) casein diets throughout pregnancy were kept either, intact, ovariectomized or ovariectomized with estradiol supplementation. BP, estradiol and testosterone levels and vascular estrogen receptor (ER) were examined. BP was significantly higher and plasma estradiol levels were significantly lower by 34% in intact protein restricted female offspring compared to corresponding controls. Further decrease in estradiol levels by ovariectomy exacerbated hypertension in the protein restricted females with an earlier onset and more prominent elevation in BP compared to controls. Estradiol supplementation in ovariectomized protein restricted females significantly reversed ovariectomy-induced hypertension but did not normalize BP to control levels. The hypertensive protein restricted females have reduced vascular ERα expression that was unaffected by ovariectomy or estradiol replacement. In addition, the testosterone levels were significantly higher by 2.4-, 3.4-, and 2.8-fold in intact, ovariectomized and estradiol replaced protein restricted females compared to corresponding controls. Our data show that: 1) hypertension in protein restricted adult female offspring is associated with reduced plasma estradiol levels, 2) estradiol protects and limits the severity of hypertension in protein restricted females and contribute for sexual dimorphism, and 3) Estradiol replacement fails to completely reverse hypertension, which may be related to limited availability of vascular ERα receptors and/or increased circulating testosterone

  20. Divergent effects of ERα and ERβ on fluid intake by female rats are not dependent on concomitant changes in AT1R expression or body weight.

    PubMed

    Santollo, Jessica; Marshall, Anikó; Curtis, Kathleen S; Speth, Robert C; Clark, Stewart D; Daniels, Derek

    2016-07-01

    Estradiol (E2) decreases both water and saline intakes by female rats. The ERα and ERβ subtypes are expressed in areas of the brain that control fluid intake; however, the role that these receptors play in E2's antidipsogenic and antinatriorexigenic effects have not been examined. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that activation of ERα and ERβ decreases water and saline intakes by female rats. We found a divergence in E2's inhibitory effect on intake: activation of ERα decreased water intake, whereas activation of ERβ decreased saline intake. E2 decreases expression of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), a receptor with known relevance to water and salt intakes, in multiple areas of the brain where ERα and ERβ are differentially expressed. Therefore, we tested for agonist-induced changes in AT1R mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by analyzing receptor binding to test the hypothesis that the divergent effects of these ER subtypes are mediated by region-specific changes in AT1R expression. Although we found no changes in AT1R mRNA or binding in areas of the brain known to control fluid intake associated with agonist treatment, the experimental results replicate and extend previous findings that body weight changes mediate alterations in AT1R expression in distinct brain regions. Together, the results reveal selective effects of ER subtypes on ingestive behaviors, advancing our understanding of E2's inhibitory role in the controls of fluid intake by female rats.

  1. Divergent effects of ERα and ERβ on fluid intake by female rats are not dependent on concomitant changes in AT1R expression or body weight.

    PubMed

    Santollo, Jessica; Marshall, Anikó; Curtis, Kathleen S; Speth, Robert C; Clark, Stewart D; Daniels, Derek

    2016-07-01

    Estradiol (E2) decreases both water and saline intakes by female rats. The ERα and ERβ subtypes are expressed in areas of the brain that control fluid intake; however, the role that these receptors play in E2's antidipsogenic and antinatriorexigenic effects have not been examined. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that activation of ERα and ERβ decreases water and saline intakes by female rats. We found a divergence in E2's inhibitory effect on intake: activation of ERα decreased water intake, whereas activation of ERβ decreased saline intake. E2 decreases expression of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), a receptor with known relevance to water and salt intakes, in multiple areas of the brain where ERα and ERβ are differentially expressed. Therefore, we tested for agonist-induced changes in AT1R mRNA expression by RT-PCR and protein expression by analyzing receptor binding to test the hypothesis that the divergent effects of these ER subtypes are mediated by region-specific changes in AT1R expression. Although we found no changes in AT1R mRNA or binding in areas of the brain known to control fluid intake associated with agonist treatment, the experimental results replicate and extend previous findings that body weight changes mediate alterations in AT1R expression in distinct brain regions. Together, the results reveal selective effects of ER subtypes on ingestive behaviors, advancing our understanding of E2's inhibitory role in the controls of fluid intake by female rats. PMID:27122368

  2. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  3. The Role of RFamide-Related Peptide-3 in Age-Related Reproductive Decline in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Anna C.; Muroy, Sandra E.; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.; Bentley, George E.; Kaufer, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive senescence, the point in time when females cease to show estrous cyclicity, is associated with endocrine changes in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonads. However, the mechanisms triggering this transition are not well understood. To gain a better understanding of the top-down control of the transition from reproductive competence to a state of reproductive senescence, we investigated middle-aged female rats exhibiting varying degrees of reproductive decline, including individuals with normal cycles, irregular cycles, and complete cessation of cycles. We identified hormonal changes in the brain that manifest before ovarian cycles exhibit any deterioration. We found that females exhibit an increase in RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus in middle age prior to changes in estrous cycle length. This increase is transient and followed by subsequent decreases in kisspeptin (KiSS1) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) mRNA expression. Expression of RFRP3 and its receptor also increased locally in the ovaries with advancing age. While it is well known that aging is associated with decreased GnRH release and downstream disruption of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis, herein, we provide evidence that reproductive senescence is likely triggered by alterations in a network of regulatory neuropeptides upstream of the GnRH system. PMID:27445974

  4. The Role of RFamide-Related Peptide-3 in Age-Related Reproductive Decline in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Anna C; Muroy, Sandra E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Bentley, George E; Kaufer, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive senescence, the point in time when females cease to show estrous cyclicity, is associated with endocrine changes in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonads. However, the mechanisms triggering this transition are not well understood. To gain a better understanding of the top-down control of the transition from re