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Sample records for femoral fixation device

  1. Evaluation and comparison of clinical results of femoral fixation devices in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Deniz; Ozcan, Mert

    2016-03-01

    Several femoral fixation devices are available for hamstring tendon autograft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, but the best technique is debatable. We hypothesised that different suspensory femoral fixation techniques have no superiority over each other. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical results of different suspensory femoral fixation devices in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. This was a Level III, retrospective, comparative study. A total of 100 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in a single institution with a mean follow-up time of 40 months (12-67 months) were divided into three groups according to femoral fixation devices as 'Endobutton' (n=34), 'Transfix' (n=35) and 'Aperfix' (n=31). The length of painful period after surgery, time to return to work and sporting activities, final range of motion, anterior drawer and Lachman tests, knee instability symptoms, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation score, Short Form 36 (SF-36) score, Lysholm knee score and Tegner point of the patients were evaluated and compared between groups. There were no significant differences between the groups. All techniques led to significant recovery in knee instability tests and symptoms. In this study, the clinical results of different suspensory femoral fixation techniques were found to be similar. We believe that different femoral fixation techniques have no effect on clinical results provided that the technique is correctly applied. The surgeon must choose a technique appropriate to his or her experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. COMPARISON OF VOLUMES OCCUPIED BY DIFFERENT INTERNAL FIXATION DEVICES FOR FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lauxen, Daniel; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto; Souza, Ralf Wellis de; Zimmer, Cinthia Gabriely; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. Methods: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dynamic hip screws (DHS) available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displacement. Results: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively), fixation with three screws did not show any statistically significant difference (p= 0.123, 0.08 and 0.381, respectively) and fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes than shown by DHS (p=0.072, 0.161 and 0.033). Conclusions: Fixation of the femoral neck with two cannulated screws occupied less volume than DHS, with a statistically significant difference. The majority of screw combinations did not reach statistical significance, although fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes on average than those occupied by DHS. PMID:27047886

  3. Fixation of displaced femoral neck fractures in young adults: Fixed-angle devices or Pauwel screws?

    PubMed

    Hoshino, C M; Christian, M W; O'Toole, R V; Manson, T T

    2016-08-01

    We sought to compare the incidence of complications after fixation of displaced femoral neck fractures in young adults treated with fixed-angle devices versus multiple cancellous screws and a trochanteric lag screw (Pauwel screw). We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a level I trauma centre. Sixty-two skeletally mature patients (age range, 16-60 years) with displaced femoral neck fractures were included in the study. Forty-seven were treated with a fixed-angle device (sliding hip plate with screw or helical blade) and 15 with multiple cancellous screws placed in a Pauwel configuration. The main outcome measure was postoperative complication of osteonecrosis or nonunion treated with a surgical procedure. Significantly fewer failures occurred in the fixed-angle group (21%) than in the screws group (60%) (p=0.008). Osteonecrosis was rare in the fixed-angle group, occurring in 2% of cases versus 33% of cases in the screws group (p=0.002). Consistent with previous studies, good to excellent reductions were associated with a failure rate of 25% and fair to poor reductions were associated with a failure rate of 55% (p=0.07). The best-case scenario of a good to excellent reduction stabilised with a fixed-angle device yielded a success rate of 85%. In young patients with displaced high-energy femoral neck fractures, fixed-angle devices resulted in fewer treatment failures than did Pauwel screws. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Comparison of Outcomes of Two Femoral Fixation Devices in Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Carrasco, Miguel Angel; Abellán, Juan Francisco; Qudsi-Sinclair, Salima; Ruiz-Merino, Guadalupe; Carrillo-Juliá, Francisco Javier; Bo-Rueda, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common ligamentous injury of the knee. Reconstruction of this ligament is often required to restore functional stability of the knee. Outcome of ACL reconstruction is significantly affected by how the graft is fixed to the bone. This study is to determine if there is a different clinical outcome after cortical versus cortical-cancellous suspension femoral fixation in hamstring based anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective comparative study conducted between 2006 and 2010. We enrolled patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Sixty two patients met inclusion criteria and 41 agreed to come for followup assessment. Median age was of 28 years (range 18–39 years). Demographic baseline profile of both groups was similar. The femoral fixation devices were cortical (n = 16) and cortical-cancellous suspension techniques (n = 25). The average period of evolution at the time of assessment was 40 months (range 12-72 months). The patients were examined according to Lachman test (using Rolimeter knee tester), anterior drawer test, pivot shift test, International Knee Documentation Committee questionnaire, and Tegner-Lysholm knee scoring scale. Results: The objective evaluation of the patients (Lachman test) showed better results in terms of stability in the group of patients who underwent the cortical-cancellous suspension method. These differences were not reflected in the assessment of activity level (Tegner-Lysholm), where both groups showed the same results. Conclusions: ACL reconstruction with both cortical and cortical-cancellous suspension femoral fixation techniques show the same clinical results at medium long followup. However, cortical-cancellous fixations seem to provide greater stability to the reconstruction. PMID:28966371

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the Bio-TransFix femoral fixation device and anteromedial portal technique.

    PubMed

    Hantes, Michael E; Dailiana, Zoe; Zachos, Vasilios C; Varitimidis, Sokratis E

    2006-05-01

    The cross-pin femoral fixation technique for soft tissue grafts is a popular option in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. One of these devices is the Bio-TransFix (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL, USA) which provides high fixation strength. According to the manufacturer, the femoral tunnel is created by placing the femoral aiming device through the tibial tunnel (transtibial technique). However, using this technique it is very difficult or even impossible to place the graft at the anatomical ACL attachment site at the "10 o'clock" position. In this report, we describe the use of the Bio-TransFix device with an anteromedial portal technique. Using this technique, the surgeon has more freedom to place the graft in an anatomical position, while combining the advantages of the excellent biomechanical properties of this device.

  6. Development of a fixation device for robot assisted fracture reduction of femoral shaft fractures: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Weber-Spickschen, T S; Oszwald, M; Westphal, R; Krettek, C; Wahl, F; Gosling, T

    2010-01-01

    Robot assisted fracture reduction of femoral shaft fractures provides precise alignment while reducing the amount of intraoperative imaging. The connection between the robot and the fracture fragment should allow conventional intramedullary nailing, be minimally invasive and provide interim fracture stability. In our study we tested three different reduction tools: a conventional External Fixator, a Reposition-Plate and a Three-Point-Device with two variations (a 40 degrees and a 90 degrees version). We measured relative movements between the tools and the bone fragments in all translation and rotation planes. The Three-Point-Device 90 degrees showed the smallest average relative displacement and was the only device able to withstand the maximum applied load of 70 Nm without failure of any bone fragment. The Three-Point-Device 90 degrees complies with all the stipulated requirements and is a suitable interface for robot assisted fracture reduction of femoral shaft fractures.

  7. When femoral fracture fixation fails: salvage options.

    PubMed

    Petrie, J; Sassoon, A; Haidukewych, G J

    2013-11-01

    Most hip fractures treated with modern internal fixation techniques will heal. However, failures occasionally occur and require revision procedures. Salvage strategies employed during revision are based on whether the fixation failure occurs in the femoral neck, or in the intertrochanteric region. Patient age and remaining bone stock also influence decision making. For fractures in young patients, efforts are generally focused on preserving the native femoral head via osteotomies and repeat internal fixation. For failures in older patients, some kind of hip replacement is usually selected. Disuse osteopenia, deformity, bone loss, and stress-risers from previous internal fixation devices all pose technical challenges to successful reconstruction. Attention to detail is important in order to minimise complications. In the majority of cases, good outcomes have been reported for the various salvage strategies.

  8. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. Material/Methods A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Results There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  10. Failed internal fixation of femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik; Opsahl, Jan-Henrik; Stiris, Morten; Paulsrud, Øyvind; Strømsøe, Knut

    2012-06-12

    There are two types of surgical treatment for fractures of the femoral neck; internal fixation and arthroplasty. Internal fixation is associated with a higher risk of complications such as secondary displacement, non-union and avascular necrosis. To improve treatment results of internal fixation, we have tried to identify procedure related risk-factors associated with fixation failure. A retrospective study was conducted based on the medical records and X-ray images of 337 patients sustaining intracapsular fractures of the hip during the period 1999-2000. The patients were treated with closed reduction and internal fixation at Oslo University Hospital, Aker. The reduction of the fracture and the placement of the fixation implants were evaluated and scored (six points representing best achievable result). Fixation failed in 23 (18,3 %) out of 126 patients with displaced fractures awarded six points for the reduction. In contrast, fixation failed in five (50 %) out of ten patients given a score of three points or less (p = 0.017). The risk of non-union increased when patients were treated more than 48 hours after the initial injury. In this group, 5 (25 %) out of 20 patients developed non-union compared to 16 (8 %) out of 200 patients treated within 48 hours (p = 0.014). Our findings emphasize the importance of achieving anatomical reduction of displaced femoral neck fractures, and to perform surgery within 48 hours unless an acute medical condition needs to be stabilized.

  11. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joon Soon; Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-06-01

    Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures.

  12. A biomechanical comparison of proximal femoral nails and locking proximal anatomic femoral plates in femoral fracture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Korhan; Türkmen, İsmail; Sahin, Adem; Yildiz, Yavuz; Erturk, Selim; Soylemez, Mehmet Salih

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of fractures in the trochanteric area has risen with the increasing numbers of elderly people with osteoporosis. Although dynamic hip screw fixation is the gold standard for the treatment of stable intertrochanteric femur fractures, treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fractures still remains controversial. Intramedullary devices such as Gamma nail or proximal femoral nail and proximal anatomic femur plates are in use for the treatment of intertrochanteric femur fractures. There are still many investigations to find the optimal implant to treat these fractures with minimum complications. For this reason, we aimed to perform a biomechanical comparison of the proximal femoral nail and the locking proximal anatomic femoral plate in the treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty synthetic, third generation human femur models, obtained for this purpose, were divided into two groups of 10 bones each. Femurs were provided as a standard representation of AO/Orthopedic Trauma Associationtype 31-A2 unstable fractures. Two types of implantations were inserted: the proximal femoral intramedullary nail in the first group and the locking anatomic femoral plate in the second group. Axial load was applied to the fracture models through the femoral head using a material testing machine, and the biomechanical properties of the implant types were compared. Result: Nail and plate models were locked distally at the same level. Axial steady load with a 5 mm/m velocity was applied through the mechanical axis of femur bone models. Axial loading in the proximal femoral intramedullary nail group was 1.78-fold greater compared to the plate group. All bones that had the plate applied were fractured in the portion containing the distal locking screw. Conclusion: The proximal femoral intramedullary nail provides more stability and allows for earlier weight bearing than the locking plate when used for the treatment of

  13. [Distal femoral fixation of the iliotibial tract].

    PubMed

    Lobenhoffer, P; Gerich, T; Lattermann, C

    1994-03-01

    Two femoral fixation areas were defined in the distal iliotibial tract (ITT) system. They were named supracondylar insertion and insertion near the septum. Biomechanical studies on these insertions revealed tension peaks in the insertion near the septum with anterior translation of the knee, with varus stress and rotational movements. We conclude that the fibers inserting here are secondary restraints against anterior and lateral knee instability. 5 lateral extraarticular procedures were investigated to evaluate their biomechanical effect on knee instability. A standardized cadaver knee model was used with two basic experiments: an excentric quadriceps contraction from 0 to 90 degrees of flexion and an anterior translation with 100 N in 30 degrees of flexion. 5 knees were investigated for each procedure. Results from the excentric quadriceps contraction study imply reduced ACL strain with all extraarticular procedures except the Andrews tenodesis. The quantitative effect was related to the mechanical strength of the fixation of the ITT. All lateral procedures reduced ACL strain with anterior translation of the knee. The last part of the study included simultaneous registration of rotation and translation of the knee. We demonstrated a close relation of decreased ACL strain due to a lateral procedure and pathological external rotation of the knee. The knee no longer reached the physiological neutral rotation angle after an effective lateral tenodesis procedure. The significance of this effect is not clear at the present time.

  14. Fixation of displaced subcapital femoral fractures. Compression screw fixation versus double divergent pins.

    PubMed

    Christie, J; Howie, C R; Armour, P C

    1988-03-01

    One hundred and twenty-seven consecutive patients with displaced subcapital fractures of the femoral neck (Garden Grade III or IV) all under 80 years of age and independently mobile, were randomly allocated to fixation with either double divergent pins or a single sliding screw-plate device. The incidence of non-union and infection in the sliding screw-plate group was significantly higher, and we believe that when internal fixation is considered appropriate multiple pinning should be used. Mobility after treatment was disappointing in about half of the patients, and we feel that internal fixation can only be justified in patients who are physiologically well preserved and who maintain a high level of activity.

  15. The role of AO external fixation in proximal femoral osteotomies in the pediatric neuromuscular population.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, John E; Weinberg, Jacob; Razi, Afshin; Mulley, Debra A

    2004-09-01

    Internal fixation in proximal femoral osteotomies using traditional devices may be sub-optimal in children with neuromuscular disorders who have small or osteopenic bone. In this population, between 1988 and 2000, we performed 36 proximal femoral varus osteotomies in 28 patients. These were controlled by the AO external fixator. The average age at surgery was 7 years (range, 2-13 years). A mean varus correction of 34 degrees (range, 15-90 degrees) was obtained. Complications consisted of one superficial pin tract infection, one skin breakdown, and one non-union. Other than the non-union, all osteotomies were stable at the time of the fixator removal. The AO external fixator is an effective alternative in maintaining corrective proximal femoral osteotomies in children with fragile bones.

  16. Distal femoral osteotomy using a novel deformity reduction device.

    PubMed

    Panichi, Enrico; Cappellari, Fulvio; Olimpo, Matteo; Piras, Lisa A; Radasch, Robert; Ferretti, Antonio; Peirone, Bruno

    2016-09-20

    Distal femoral osteotomy is a surgical procedure used to correct patellar luxation, secondary to a femoral deformity. A distal femoral osteotomy using the tibial plateau levelling osteotomy-jig to temporarily provide stability of the distal femoral osteotomy, maintaining limb alignment in the frontal and axial planes prior to internal plate fixation of the osteotomy, has been described. This report describes a novel jig named Deformity Reduction Device (DRD). This device was developed with the specific aim of increasing precision and predictability during corrective osteotomy execution in order to be consistent with the preoperative planning. The distal femoral osteotomy DRD-assisted procedure is described in detail, discussing the theoretical and practical principles of the application.

  17. Fixation of supracondylar femoral fractures following total knee arthroplasty: is there any difference comparing angular stable plate fixation versus rigid interlocking nail fixation?

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Silke; Schuster, Rupert; Haas, Nicole; Erhart, Jochen; Strickner, Markus; Blutsch, Beate; Wernhart, Simon; Leitgeb, Johannes; Platzer, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Literature does not provide any reliable comparison between angular stable plate fixation and rigid nail fixation for stabilization of supracondylar periprosthetic femoral fractures. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare these two implants in clinical practice relating to fracture healing, functional results and treatment-related complications. In this retrospective study (level IV), clinical and radiographic records of 86 patients (62 female and 24 male, average age: 75.6) with supracondylar periprosthetic femoral fractures between 1996 and 2010 were analyzed. 48 patients underwent lateral plate fixation by an angular stable plate system (LISS), whereas 38 patients were stabilized by a rigid interlocking nail device. Sixty-four (76 %) patients returned to their pre-injury activity level and were satisfied with their clinical outcome. We had an overall Oxford outcome score of 2.21, with patients following angular stable plate fixation of 2.22, and patients after rigid nail fixation of 2.20. Successful fracture healing within 6 months was achieved in 74 (88 %) patients. Comparing between plate fixation and nail fixation, statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences. Overall, we had a relatively high rate of fracture healing and a satisfactory functional outcome with both implants. Both methods of fixation showed similar results relating to the functional outcome and individual satisfaction of the patients. However, with regards to fracture healing and treatment-related complications, intramedullary nail fixation showed slight advantages.

  18. Analysis of risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jun-Ying; Zha, Guo-Chun; Jiang, Tao; You, Zhen-Jun; Yuan, De-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Femoral head necrosis is a rare but devastating complication following femoral neck fracture. The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fracture. This retrospective study included 166 patients with femoral neck fractures treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation at the authors' institution from January 2004 to December 2008. Eight patients died for reasons unrelated to the surgery, and 12 patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 fractures) were followed until union or until conversion to total hip arthroplasty. The patients included 61 males and 85 females with an average age of 47.5 years (range, 18-68 years). The authors analyzed the following factors: age, sex, Garden classification, reduction quality, surgical methods, injury-to-surgery interval, preoperative traction, weight-bearing time, and implant removal. All patients were followed for a mean of 52 months (range, 6-90 months). The incidence of femoral head necrosis was 14.4% (21/146). Garden classification (P=.012), reduction quality (P=.008), implant removal (P=.020), and preoperative traction (P=.003) were significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. Patient age (P=.990), sex (P=.287), injury-to-surgery interval (P=.360), weight-bearing time (P=.868), and surgical methods (P=.987) were not significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, implant removal was not a significant risk factor for femoral head necrosis development (P=.498). Garden classification, reduction quality, and preoperative traction had a significant effect on femoral head necrosis development. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  20. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  1. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  2. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  3. 21 CFR 886.1290 - Fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1290 Fixation device. (a) Identification. A fixation device is an AC-powered device intended for use as a fixation target for the patient during ophthalmological examination. The patient directs his or her gaze so that the visual image of the object falls...

  4. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Principles of internal fixation and selection of implants for periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Giannoudis, Peter V; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2007-06-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) are increasing as a result of changes in population demographics and the increase in the number of total hip replacements performed. The overall incidence has been reported to range from 0.1% to 6% of all total hip arthroplasties. Management of these fractures is often particularly demanding, complex and expensive. In many cases, the surgeon has to solve the simultaneous problems of implant loosening, bone loss and fracture. A thorough understanding of the unique characteristics of the different fracture types, the principles of PFF treatment and a familiarity with the various fixation devices, grafts and prosthetic implants are all of paramount importance. Internal fixation is used either alone or as an adjunct to stem revision. The stability of the original implant and the configuration of the fracture itself are the basic factors that influence the decision-making process. The current study reviews the existing literature on internal fixation of femoral periprosthetic fractures.

  6. Experimental fixation of femoral osteotomies by cerclage with nylon straps.

    PubMed

    Rhinelander, F W; Stewart, C L

    1983-10-01

    Following the successful experience of Partridge in the fixation of human femoral fractures by nylon-strap cerclage, this research in 23 mature dogs was performed to compare nylon-strap with wire-loop cerclage for healing periods of up to 12 weeks. Supplemented by intramedullary fixation with Steinmann pins, long oblique femoral osteotomies were fixed in one femur of each dog by nylon straps and in the other femur by wire loops, at separate operations. The nylon straps were all secured at the same tension by a special "gun." The wire loops were all secured at the same tension by the Rhinelander tightener-twister. Half of the nylon straps had "bumps" along the inner surface, which were added by Partridge in an effort to circumvent the microvascular disturbance reported with Parham bands. On examination by microangiography and correlated histology, all of the osteotomies, regardless of the type of fixation, showed good progress toward osseous union. After fixation by wire cerclage no loss of position or disturbance of blood supply was noted. After fixation by nylon straps slight (clinically insignificant) longitudinal displacement, attributed to slight lengthening of the straps, with consequent loosening was noted in all cases. This loosening was considered advantageous because it appeared to be responsible for the unexpected lack of impairment of the vascularization of the underlying cortical bone by any of the straps. The bumps on the undersurface of some of the straps were, thus, of no vascular advantage, and their presence made accurate fixation of the ostectomy fragments more difficult on the small bones. These studies support the value of fixation by plain nylon straps and show their advantage over straps with bumps for fixation of long oblique single osteotomies of bones the size of the canine femur.

  7. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  8. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  9. Biomechanical rationale for implant choices in femoral neck fracture fixation in the non-elderly.

    PubMed

    Panteli, Michalis; Rodham, Paul; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2015-03-01

    Femoral neck fractures represent a relatively uncommon injury in the non-elderly population often resulting from high-energy trauma. The cornerstone of their management is anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation of the femoral neck in an attempt to salvage the femoral head. Complications including avascular necrosis of the femoral head, non-union and post-traumatic osteoarthritis are not uncommon. The clinical outcomes of these patients can be improved with good pre-operative planning, optimization of surgical procedures and introduction of new improved implants and techniques. In the herein study, we attempt to describe the biomechanical properties of the hip and compare the performance of the most commonly used devices. Experimental evidence suggests that in Pauwels type III fracture patterns a cephalomedullary nail was significantly stronger in axial loading. Moreover, in unstable basicervical patterns cannulated screws (triangular configuration) demonstrated a lower ultimate load to failure, whereas in subcapital or transervical patterns both the cannulated screws (triangular configuration) and the sliding hip screw demonstrated no compromise in fixation strength. The fracture pattern appears to be the major determinant of the ideal type of implant to be selected. For a successful outcome each patient needs to be considered on an individual basis taking into account all patient and implant related factors.

  10. Arthroscopic Control for Safe and Secure Seating of Suspensory Devices for Femoral Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Three Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seo Goo; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of our technique that allows direct visualization of seating of suspensory devices in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods Three different suspensory devices (TightRope RT, RetroButton, and EndoButton) were used in ACL reconstruction using 3 different techniques (outside-in, anteromedial [AM] portal, and transtibial techniques). Positioning of a guiding material and seating pattern of the suspensory devices were evaluated according to the surgical technique and suspensory device used. Results On the transtibial technique, 21 of total 26 cases (81%) of single bundle reconstructions and 22 of total 22 cases (100%) of double bundle reconstructions required superolateral capsulotomy where buttons were found in 21 of total 21 cases (100%) and 17 of 22 cases (77%), respectively. On the AM portal technique, all patients required capsulotomy and the button was found in only 18 of total 32 cases (56%) even after capsulotomy. On the outside-in technique, all patients required capsulotomy and the button was found in 86 of total 86 cases (100%). Conclusions Our technique for direct visualization of seating of the suspensory devices was more effective in outside-in and single bundle transtibial ACL reconstruction. However, it was less effective in double bundle transtibial and AM portal ACL reconstructions. PMID:28231646

  11. A new femoral fixation device for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the outside-in technique and hamstring tendon graft: A comparison between two devices in cadaveric human knee models.

    PubMed

    Chong, Suri; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Balasubramanian, Dhanasekaraprabu; Song, Young Dong; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2017-10-01

    A new device (T-anchor) was developed for ACL reconstruction and is implanted via the outside-in technique using hamstring grafts. The purpose of this study was to compare the T-anchor with the EndoButton Direct. This study was conducted on 30 cadaveric knees (15 matched pairs). There were two groups of 15 each in the T-anchor and EndoButton Direct groups. After the harvest of grafts, fixation site profile and graft length were measured by loading the grafts onto both devices. They were then tested on a universal testing machine to assess elongation after cyclic loading, load to failure, ultimate load, and mode of failure. The fixation site profile was lower in the T-anchor group than in the EndoButton Direct group (2.3±0.4mm vs. 4.7±1.0mm, P<0.001). The length of the graft-device complex of the T-anchor specimens was longer than that of the EndoButton Direct specimens (125.0±8.9mm vs. 115.0±8.7mm, P<0.001). The mean cyclic elongation was lower for the T-anchor group when compared with the EndoButton Direct group (2.4±0.6mm vs. 3.9±2.6mm, P=0.015). There was no statistically significant difference in ultimate load and load to failure between the T-anchor and EndoButton Direct groups. For mode of failure, the T-anchor fared better (P=0.013) with all failures attributed to specimens. In this cadaveric study, the new device, T-anchor, performed better than the EndoButton Direct with respect to the above-mentioned study parameters except for ultimate load and load to failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Locking plate fixation of distal femoral fractures is a challenging technique: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Giampiero; Toro, Antonio; de Sire, Alessandro; Iolascon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Distal femoral fractures have typically a bimodal occurrence: in young people due to a high-energy trauma and in older people related to a low-energy trauma. These fractures are associated to a very high morbidity and mortality in elderly. Distal femoral fractures might be treated with plates, intramedullary nails, external fixations, and prosthesis. However, difficulties in fracture healing and the rate of complications are important clinical issues. The purpose of this retrospective review was to present our experience in treatment of distal femoral fracture in a sample of older people in order to evaluate the technical pitfalls and strategies used to face up the fractures unsuccessfully treated with locking plates. We included people aged more than 65 years, with a diagnosis of distal femoral fracture, treated with locking plates. We considered ‘unsuccessfully treated’ the cases with healing problems or hardware failures. Of the 12 patients (9 females and 3 males; mean aged 68.75 ± 3.31 years) included, we observed 3 ‘unsuccessfully cases’, 2 due to nonunions and 1 due to an early hardware failure, all treated using a condylar blade plate with a bone graft. One patient obtained a complete fracture healing after 1 year and in the other cases there was a nonunion. We observed as most common technical pitfalls: inadequate plate lengthening, fracture bridging, and number of locking screws. The use of locking plates is an emerging technique to treat these fractures but it seems more challenging than expected. In literature there is a lack of evidences about the surgical management of distal femoral fractures that is still an important challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon that has to be able to use all the fixation devices available. PMID:27134634

  13. Correlation Between Residual Displacement and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Following Cannulated Screw Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Xu, Gui-Jun; Han, Zhe; Jiang, Xuan; Zhang, Cheng-Bao; Dong, Qiang; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a new method for measuring the residual displacement of the femoral head after internal fixation and explore the relationship between residual displacement and osteonecrosis with femoral head, and to evaluate the risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with femoral neck fractures treated by closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation.One hundred and fifty patients who sustained intracapsular femoral neck fractures between January 2011 and April 2013 were enrolled in the study. All were treated with closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw internal fixation. The residual displacement of the femoral head after surgery was measured by 3-dimensional reconstruction that evaluated the quality of the reduction. Other data that might affect prognosis were also obtained from outpatient follow-up, telephone calls, or case reviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess the intrinsic relationship between the risk factors and the osteonecrosis of the femoral head.Osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 27 patients (18%). Significant differences were observed regarding the residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification. Moreover, we found more or less residual displacement of femoral head in all patients with high quality of reduction based on x-ray by the new technique. There was a close relationship between residual displacement and ONFH.There exists limitation to evaluate the quality of reduction by x-ray. Three-dimensional reconstruction and digital measurement, as a new method, is a more accurate method to assess the quality of reduction. Residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification were risk factors for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. High-quality reduction was necessary to avoid complications.

  14. Screw-blade fixation systems in Pauwels three femoral neck fractures: a biomechanical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Knobe, Matthias; Altgassen, Simon; Maier, Klaus-Jürgen; Gradl-Dietsch, Gertraud; Kaczmarek, Chris; Nebelung, Sven; Klos, Kajetan; Kim, Bong-Sung; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Horst, Klemens; Buecking, Benjamin

    2017-08-06

    To reduce mechanical complications after osteosynthesis of femoral neck fractures, improved fixation techniques have been developed including blade or screw-anchor devices. This biomechanical study compares different fixation systems used for treatment of unstable femoral neck fractures with evaluation of failure mode, load to failure, stiffness, femoral head rotation, femoral neck shortening and femoral head migration. Standardized Pauwels type 3 fractures (AO/OTA 31-B2) with comminution were created in 18 biomechanical sawbones using a custom-made sawguide. Fractures were stabilized using either SHS-Screw, SHS-Blade or Rotationally Stable Screw-Anchor (RoSA). Femurs were positioned in 25 degrees adduction and ten degrees posterior flexion and were cyclically loaded with an axial sinusoidal loading pattern of 0.5 Hz, starting with 300 N, with an increase by 300 N every 2000 cycles until bone-implant failure occurred. Mean failure load for the Screw-Anchor fixation (RoSA) was 5100 N (IQR 750 N), 3900 N (IQR 75 N) for SHS-Blade and 3000 N (IQR 675 N; p = 0.002) for SHS-Screw. For SHS-Screw and SHS-Blade we observed fracture displacement with consecutive fracture collapse as the main reason for failure, whereas RoSA mainly showed a cut-out under high loadings. Mean stiffness at 1800 N was 826 (IQR 431) N/mm for SHS-Screw, 1328 (IQR 441) N/mm for SHS-Blade and 1953 (IQR 617) N/mm for RoSA (p = 0.003). With a load of 1800 N (SHS-Screw 12° vs. SHS-Blade 7° vs. RoSA 2°; p = 0.003) and with 2700 N (24° vs. 15° vs. 3°; p = 0.002) the RoSA implants demonstrated a higher rotational stability and had the lowest femoral neck shortening (p = 0.002), compared with the SHS groups. At the 2700 N load point, RoSA systems showed a lower axial (p = 0.019) and cranial (p = 0.031) femoral head migration compared to the SHS-Screw. In our study, the new Screw-Anchor fixation (RoSA) was superior to the comparable SHS implants regarding rotational

  15. Femoral locking plate failure salvaged with hexapod circular external fixation: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N; Marais, L C

    2016-08-01

    Femoral non-unions are difficult to treat even for the experienced orthopaedic trauma surgeon. If the non-union follows failure of modern stable internal fixation, the complexity of the management is further increased. We report two cases of stiff hypertrophic femoral non-unions after failed locking plate fixation that were successfully treated with a new hexapod circular external fixator. In addition to providing the necessary stability for functional rehabilitation and union, the hexapod circular fixator software allows gradual correction of deformities in order to restore the normal mechanical alignment of the limb.

  16. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube...

  1. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure.

  2. Early rehabilitation following less invasive surgical stabilisation plate fixation for distal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Smith, T O; Hedges, C; MacNair, R; Schankat, K

    2009-06-01

    The less invasive surgical stabilisation (LISS) plate fixation method is an orthopaedic procedure for the fixation of distal femoral fractures. Early physiotherapy treatments of motion and mobilisation have been advocated following this procedure. This article critically appraises the evidence base assessing the early rehabilitation of patients following LISS fixation for distal femoral fractures. A review of EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and AMED, and a hand search were undertaken. Two independent reviewers identified all eligible articles. Two reviewers extracted the data, which were verified by a third reviewer. All included articles were critically appraised by two independent reviewers using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. Seventeen case series assessing 508 patients with 535 fractures were reviewed. No clinical trials comparing physiotherapy programmes were identified. The review identified that following LISS fixation for distal femoral fractures, patients begin range-of-motion exercises immediately and are initially required to restrict weight-bearing following surgery. It remains unclear whether casts, braces or immobilisation aids are applied during the initial postoperative period. The efficacy of different physiotherapy protocols following LISS fixation for distal femoral fractures remains unclear. Further well-designed randomised controlled trials are required to compare different postoperative physiotherapy rehabilitation programmes for patients following LISS fixation of distal femoral fractures in order to determine the optimal postoperative management for this complex patient group.

  3. Stiffness characteristics of hamstring tendon graft fixation methods at the femoral site.

    PubMed

    Benfield, D; Otto, D D; Bagnall, K M; Raso, V J; Moussa, W; Amirfazli, A

    2005-02-01

    In ACL reconstruction, stiffness and strength of a tendon graft complex are important features for knee stability and rehabilitation. The fixation between tendon and bone is known to be one of the weakest components of the graft complex. We examined the tensile load-displacement characteristics of looped semitendinosus tendons in a porcine femoral tunnel. Two groups of six cadaveric semitendinosus tendons and porcine femurs were tested, secured with either an aperture or non-aperture fixation method. Constructs were tested at 1 mm/s until failure in a materials testing machine, which allowed force and displacement data to be recorded. The non-aperture fixation group was significantly less stiff for the first 4 mm of displacement and had significantly higher ultimate failure loads. Provided that adequate ultimate strength can be achieved, stiffness properties of a tendon graft will be improved by using aperture fixation in femoral-site ACL reconstruction.

  4. [Growth and deformity after in situ fixation of slipped capital femoral epiphysis].

    PubMed

    Druschel, C; Placzek, R; Funk, J F

    2013-08-01

    For mild to moderate slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in situ fixation is the current treatment standard. However, concerning the implant selection (screw versus k-wires) as well as the prophylactic stabilisation of the non-affected hip, controversies still exist. The aim of this study was to analyse femoral residual growth and femoral deformities after in situ fixation of SCFE either with k-wires or screws. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the radiographs of adolescents treated for SCFE in our department between 01/2003 and 02/2011. To evaluate femoral growth the articulo-trochanteric distance, centro-trochanteric distance, caput-collum-diaphyseal angle, pin-joint ratio and pin-physis ratio were determined. The femoral deformity was assessed by measuring the sphericity of the femoral head. Degenerative changes were evaluated in the final radiographs. Statistical analysis was performed concerning differences between therapeutically and prophylactically treated hips as well as stabilisations with k-wires and screws. A total of 22 patients (female : male = 14 : 8, mean age girls: 11 ± 1 years, boys: 13 ± 2 years) with 26 slipped capital femoral epiphyses was analysed. K-wires were used for fixation in 4 hips each therapeutically and prophylactically, 22 hips with SCFE and 14 non-affected hips were stabilised with screws. Treatment with screws did not lead to significantly earlier physeal closure than k-wire pinning. Regarding the femoral growth parameters a significant decrease in the articulo-trochanteric distance and CCD angle was detectable in all groups. The pin-joint ratio revealed an adequate residual growth in 58 % of the therapeutically and in 72 % of the prophylactically treated hips without significant difference between k-wires and screws. The pin-physis ratio demonstrated similar values. Regarding the femoral deformity the SCFE hips resulted in a significantly reduced sphericity, which remained unchanged during follow-up. The

  5. Outcomes after fixation for undisplaced femoral neck fracture compared to hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fracture among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeff Chien-Fu; Liang, Wen-Miin

    2015-08-19

    This study compared the rates of mortality, medical complication, and reoperation after fixation surgery for displaced femoral neck fracture with those after hemiarthroplasty surgery for undisplaced femoral neck fracture using competing risk analysis in inpatients aged 60 years and above from a population database in Taiwan. We identified 13,772 subjects who underwent fixation for undisplaced cervical fracture and 13,772 matched controls who underwent hemiarthroplasty for displaced cervical fracture from 1998 to 2007, and followed them up until the end of 2009. The outcomes of patients who received internal fixation for undisplaced fracture and those of patients who received hemiarthroplasty for displaced fracture were compared. The 3-month, 2-year, and 10-year mortality rates were 4.9%, 22.1%, and 67.1% for fixation, and 5.6%, 23.8%, and 71.0% for hemiarthroplasty, respectively. The 3-month, 2-year, and 10-year cumulative incidence rates of the first reoperation were 7.4%, 18.1%, and 27.7% for fixation and 6.3%, 12.0%, and 22.3% for hemiarthroplasty, respectively. The 3-month cumulative incidence rates of the first medical complication were 14.4% for fixation and 15.4% for hemiarthroplasty, respectively. Hemiarthroplasty had a 1.09 times (95% CI: 1.05-1.12) higher hazard ratio for overall death than fixation. However, fixation had a 1.36 times (95% CI: 1.29-1.43) higher subdistribution hazard ratio for first reoperation than hemiarthroplasty after adjusting for gender, age, and comorbidities. The short-term overall mortality and medical complication rate of fixation for undisplaced fracture were slightly lower than those of hemiarthroplasty for displaced fracture. However, the short-term cumulative incidence of first reoperation after fixation was significantly higher than that for hemiarthroplasty. Further prospective studies or clinical trials based on the competing risk model, and which include important risk factors, are necessary to quantify the adjusted

  6. Femoral tunnel enlargement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using RigidFix compared with extracortical fixation.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Osmar Valadao; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro; Leite, Luiz Henrique Cunha; Buzzeto, Bruce Quatrin; Saggin, Paulo Renato Fernades; Kuhn, André

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare femoral tunnel enlargement after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery using hamstring autograft tendons fixed by bioabsorbable femoral trans-tunnel pins with that in patients in which the graft was fixed with extracortical fixation. Forty-three patients were randomly selected from our database and included in the study. Femoral tunnel diameter was measured by computed tomography in 20 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction via anteromedial portal technique using autologous quadruple hamstrings, fixed with two bioabsorbable trans-tunnel pins, RigidFix, on the femoral side and compared with 23 patients in whom extracortical fixation, EndoButton CL, was used. The diameter of the femoral tunnel was measured at a distance of 5 mm from the tunnel entrance and at the largest diameter along the tunnel axis. Data were compared with the diameter of the drill used during surgery. Clinical evaluation was performed using the Lysholm score, IKDC subjective score and anterior knee laxity measurements. Femoral tunnel enlargement 5 mm from the entrance and at the largest diameter was greater in the RigidFix group than the EndoButton group. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding age, gender, post-operative Lysholm score, IKDC subjective score or knee laxity measurements. The present study showed greater enlargement of the femoral bone tunnel when a bioabsorbable trans-tunnel pin system was used with the medial portal technique when compared to extracortical fixation. These findings confirm that femoral tunnel widening should be considered when RigidFix was used in ACL reconstruction by anteromedial portal technique. III.

  7. Biomechanical analyses of static and dynamic fixation techniques of retrograde interlocking femoral nailing using nonlinear finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hsu, Tzu-Pin; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2014-02-01

    Femoral shaft fractures can be treated using retrograde interlocking nailing systems; however, fracture nonunion still occurs. Dynamic fixation techniques, which remove either the proximal or distal locking screws, have been used to solve the problem of nonunion. In addition, a surgical rule for dynamic fixation techniques has been defined based on past clinical reports. However, the biomechanical performance of the retrograde interlocking nailing systems with either the traditional static fixation technique or the dynamic fixation techniques has not been investigated by using nonlinear numerical modeling. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models were developed, and the implant strength, fixation stability, and contact area of the fracture surfaces were evaluated. Three types of femoral shaft fractures (a proximal femoral shaft fracture, a middle femoral shaft fracture, and a distal femoral shaft fracture) fixed by three fixation techniques (insertion of all the locking screws, removal of the proximal locking screws, or removal of the distal locking screws) were analyzed. The results showed that the static fixation technique resulted in sufficient fixation stability and that the dynamic fixation techniques decreased the failure risk of the implant and produced a larger contact area of the fracture surfaces. The outcomes of the current study could assist orthopedic surgeons in comprehending the biomechanical performances of both static and dynamic fixation techniques. In addition, the surgeons could also select a fixation technique based on the specific patient situation using the numerical outcomes of this study.

  8. Long-Term Follow-Up Results of Delayed Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Elmi, Asghar; Tabrizi, Ali; Rouhani, Alireza; Mirzatolouei, Fardin

    2013-01-01

    Background Femoral neck fractures are urgent injuries that require precise reduction and stable fixation. In some cases, however, early treatment is not possible. Objectives The present study aimed to evaluate long-term results of delayed fixation of femoral neck fractures using cannulated screws. Patients and Methods This retrospective descriptive-analytical study was conducted on 26 patients with femoral neck fractures. The patients were treated through a closed reduction and fixation method using cannulated screws. Patients were followed up for at least five years and the rate of complications was determined. Results In this study, 26 patients with mean age of 34.3 years were assessed. Average time interval from injury to surgery was 46.4 ± 12.2 hours; 18 patients (69%) were operated on with more than 36 hours of delay. Incidence of AVN and nonunion was reported in 10 (38.4%) and 3 (11.5%) patients, respectively. Conclusions Time plays an important role in treatment results of femoral neck fractures. To treat the fractures, closed reduction and fixation using cannulated screws may still be the best option. PMID:24350142

  9. Autologous Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Failure Using the Anteromedial Portal Technique With Suspensory Femoral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Galdi, Balazs; Reyes, Allan; Brabston, Eugene W.; Levine, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anteromedial portal technique for drilling of the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been advocated by many surgeons as allowing improved access to the anatomical footprint. Furthermore, suspensory fixation of soft tissue grafts has become popularized because of complications associated with cross-pin fixation. Concerns regarding the use of both have recently arisen. Purpose: To raise awareness of the increased risk of graft failure when using the anteromedial portal technique with suspensory femoral fixation during ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From November 1998 to August 2012, a total of 465 primary ACL reconstructions were performed using quadrupled hamstring autograft tendons, with drilling of the femoral tunnel performed via the transtibial portal. Graft fixation on the femur was achieved with cross-pin fixation, while interference screw fixation was used on the tibia. From September 2012 to October 2013, there were 69 reconstructions performed through an anteromedial portal. While there was no change in graft choice, a change was made to using suspensory femoral fixation. No other surgical or postoperative rehabilitation changes were made. Results: During the 14-year period in which ACL reconstructions were performed via the transtibial portal and with cross-pin fixation, 2 graft failures (0.4% failure rate) were reported. After switching to the anteromedial portal with suspensory fixation, 7 graft failures (10.1% failure rate) were reported over a 13-month period. These were 5 male and 2 female patients, with a mean age of 18.8 years—all elite athletes. The same surgical technique was used in all patients, and all patients had at least an 8 mm–diameter graft. Patients were cleared to return to sport at an average of 8.4 months postoperatively, after completing functional performance tests. Of the 7 patients, 6 sustained a rerupture of the graft within

  10. Delayed fixation of displaced bilateral, atraumatic, femoral neck fractures in a patient with pregnancy related osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Docker, Charles; Starks, Ian; Wade, Roger; Wynn-Jones, Charles

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a woman diagnosed with simultaneous displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures following the birth of her second child. No traumatic event was identified. Diagnosis was delayed as the cause of her pain was thought to be non-skeletal in origin. Radiological and serological investigations were diagnostic of osteomalacia. Surgical fixation of her fractures was further delayed due to profound hypocalcaemia. Despite the delays, fixation with bilateral dynamic hip screws resulted in union with no evidence of avascular necrosis at 2 years follow-up. We believe this to be the first report of atraumatic bilateral femoral neck fractures and it shows that a good result can be achieved even in the presence of delayed fixation.

  11. Biomechanical comparison of 3 possible fixation strategies to resist femoral neck shortening after fracture.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tim; Neal, John W; Weinhold, Paul S; Dahners, Laurence E

    2010-04-01

    In light of recent reports that patients with femoral neck shortening following fracture fixation are dissatisfied with their outcomes, the objective of this study was to compare the compressive strength, or resistance to shortening, of 3 possible strategies for stabilization of the femoral neck that should resist shortening. The proximal portion of 21 synthetic composite femurs were prepared to isolate the femoral neck for study. A 4-mm segment of the femoral neck was removed to simulate a transcervical comminuted fracture that would be expected to shorten under standard treatment conditions. These simulated fractures were fixed by 1 of 3 methods: a 3-screw configuration using parallel partially threaded screws augmented with an injectable hydroxyapatite bone substitute in the fracture site; a 3-screw configuration using parallel fully threaded screws; or a nonparallel 3-screw configuration using partially threaded screws. The specimens were tested in compression along the axis of the femoral neck, and the mean stiffness and load to failure values were calculated.The hydroxyapatite bone substitute-augmented partially threaded screw fixation construct resulted in the highest stiffness (1928+/-135 N/mm) and load to failure (6529+/-674 N), followed by the fully threaded screw construct (1210+/-166 N/mm and 3987+/-419 N, respectively), and finally the nonparallel construct (518+/-176 N/mm and 592+/-295 N, respectively) (P<.001 for all groups). This study supports further evaluation of hydroxyapatite bone substitute augmentation at the fracture site to prevent femoral neck shortening in femoral neck fractures receiving internal fixation. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. A murine femoral segmental defect model for bone tissue engineering using a novel rigid internal fixation system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Li, Dianqi; Huang, Xiangyu; Lv, Kun; Ongodia, David; Zhu, Lingling; Zhou, Langming; Li, Zubing

    2013-08-01

    As a model animal, the mouse has already been widely used in bone-related research. However, there is a lack of ideal long bone segmental defect mouse model. Since external fixation has disadvantages of heavy weight, penetrating the skin, and hampering mobility, an internal fixation device is probably more preferable to maintain the segmental bone defect. The aim of this study was to establish a simple, reproducible, and standardized murine critical-size defect model through designing an internal fixation system, verifying its adaptability, and investigating the critical size of femoral segmental defect. By utilizing computer-aided measuring and processing system, anatomical data of adult C57BL/6 mouse femur was obtained, and a plate-bolts system was designed for rigid fixation. The plate and screws were fixed in 67 mice and 1.5 or 2.0 mm defect gaps were created in the femoral midshaft. Compression and three-point bending of bone-implant construct were tested in mice at 0, 2, 5, and 12 wk postoperative to test the biomechanical stability. X-ray, micro-computed tomography, and histology were used to investigate the defect healing process. The plate- and screws-fitted mouse femur and unilateral or bilateral operation had seemingly no adverse impact on the mouse in general. Mechanical tests indicated that there were no significant differences between the bone-implant construct and intact femur in compression and three-point bending loading. Micro-computed tomography scanning showed the bone mineral density had not been affected by the implantation of fixation device. There was no union of the 2.0 mm segmental defect in 12-wk period. Using the specifically designed rigid internal fixation device, a segmental defect size of 2.0 mm in C57BL/6 mouse femur will show nonunion and can serve as a critical defect size for bone tissue engineering and bone regeneration research. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional outcome after successful internal fixation versus salvage arthroplasty of patients with a femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Keijsers, Noël L.; Praet, Stephan F.E.; Heetveld, Martin J.; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine patient independency, health-related and disease-specific quality of life (QOL), gait pattern, and muscle strength in patients after salvage arthroplasty for failed internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture. Design Secondary cohort study to a randomized controlled trial. Setting Multicenter trial in the Netherlands, including 14 academic and non-academic hospitals Patients Patients after salvage arthroplasty for failed internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture were studied. A comparison was made with patients who healed uneventfully after internal fixation. Intervention None (observatory study) Main outcome measurements Patient characteristics, SF-12, and WOMAC scores were collected. Gait parameters were measured using plantar pressure measurement. Maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Groups were compared using univariate analysis. Results Of 248 internal fixation patients (median age 72 years), salvage arthroplasty was performed in 68 patients (27%). Salvage arthroplasty patients had a significantly lower WOMAC score (median 73 versus 90, P=0.016) than patients who healed uneventfully after internal fixation. Health-related QOL (SF-12) and patient independency did not differ significantly between the groups. Gait analysis showed a significantly impaired progression of the center of pressure in the salvage surgery patients (median ratio −8.9 versus 0.4, P=0.013) and a significant greater loss of abduction strength (median −25.4 versus −20.4 N, P=0.025). Conclusion Despite a similar level of dependency and QOL, salvage arthroplasty patients have inferior functional outcome than patients who heal after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture. PMID:24835623

  14. Functional outcome after successful internal fixation versus salvage arthroplasty of patients with a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2014-12-01

    To determine patient independency, health-related and disease-specific quality of life (QOL), gait pattern, and muscle strength in patients after salvage arthroplasty for failed internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture. Secondary cohort study to a randomized controlled trial. Multicenter trial in the Netherlands, including 14 academic and nonacademic hospitals. Patients after salvage arthroplasty for failed internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture were studied. A comparison was made with patients who healed uneventfully after internal fixation. None (observatory study). Patient characteristics, SF-12, and Western Ontario McMaster osteoarthritis index scores were collected. Gait parameters were measured using plantar pressure measurement. Maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Groups were compared using univariate analysis. Of 248 internal fixation patients (median age, 72 years), salvage arthroplasty was performed in 68 patients (27%). Salvage arthroplasty patients had a significantly lower Western Ontario McMaster osteoarthritis index score (median, 73 vs. 90; P = 0.016) than patients who healed uneventfully after internal fixation. Health-related QOL (SF-12) and patient independency did not differ significantly between the groups. Gait analysis showed a significantly impaired progression of the center of pressure in the salvage surgery patients (median ratio, -8.9 vs. 0.4, P = 0.013) and a significant greater loss of abduction strength (median, -25.4 vs. -20.4 N, P = 0.025). Despite a similar level of dependency and QOL, salvage arthroplasty patients have inferior functional outcome than patients who heal after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture. Therapeutic level III.

  15. Conversion of failed proximal femoral internal fixation to total hip arthroplasty in osteopetrotic bone.

    PubMed

    Ramiah, Reagon D; Baker, Richard P; Bannister, Gordon C

    2006-12-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare disease. When fractures are encountered, fixation is extremely difficult. A 38-year-old man with osteopetrosis who sustained a displaced Pauwels type IV fracture with 3 failed internal fixations required total hip arthroplasty. Two main problems were perceived during preoperative planning: the removal of failed and broken metalwork and reaming of the tight intramedullary canal to allow seating of the femoral stem. We present technical solutions to aid the surgeon in the management of this difficult type of case using custom-made tungsten carbide instrumentation.

  16. Intrapelvic Protrusion of a Broken Guide Wire Fragment during Fixation of a Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Ahmadreza

    2017-01-01

    During fixation of a femoral neck fracture in a 23-year-old male patient with cannulated screws, a broken guide wire fragment inadvertently advanced through the hip joint and protruded into the pelvis. A second surgical approach was needed to remove the broken fragment from the pelvis. Awareness of such a potentially devastating complication will make surgeons more cautious during implementation of orthopedic instruments and increases patient’s safety during surgery.

  17. Biomechanical considerations in slipped capital femoral epiphysis and insights into prophylactic fixation.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, E; Bellemore, J M; Cheng, T; Little, D G; Birke, O

    2017-04-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a deformity of the proximal femur secondary to widened and unstable physis. In stabilising the slip, gold standard treatments stop growth and involve premature physeal closure, which prevents the remodelling of the acquired deformity and creates a leg length discrepancy that may be significant in younger patients. We measured the impact of placing threaded screws across the proximal femoral physis by measuring the centre-trochanteric distance (CTD) and articulo-trochanteric distance (ATD) in participants with or without prophylactic fixation. We then compared the mechanical performance of static (stainless and titanium cannulated Synthes screws) and potentially growing implants (Synthes SCFE screw and Pega Medical Free Gliding screw) in a validated synthetic bone model. In the review of 30 non-fixed and 60 fixated hips over a mean follow-up of 1.9 years, we have noted a significant difference in pre/post CTD and ATD, as well as the change in CTD and ATD over time. In the biomechanical study, the newer implants allowing growth (Synthes SCFE screw and Pega Medical Free Gliding screw) were both shown to be at least non-inferior. The primary deformity of a SCFE in itself alters hip mechanics. Also, as confirmed in this study, there is a secondary deformity that is created by static fixation and relative trochanteric overgrowth. To help remodel mild deformities and prevent secondary trochanteric overgrowth, growing implants seem to be non-inferior to the more standard means of fixation in static testing.

  18. Revision surgery occurs frequently after percutaneous fixation of stable femoral neck fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Kain, Michael S; Marcantonio, Andrew J; Iorio, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Femoral neck fractures are a major public health problem. Multiple-screw fixation is the most commonly used surgical technique for the treatment of stable femoral neck fractures. We determined (1) the proportion of hips that had conversion surgery to THA, and (2) the proportion of hips that underwent repeat fracture surgery after percutaneous screw fixation of stable (Garden Stages I and II) femoral neck fractures in patients older than 65 years and the causes of these reoperations. We performed a retrospective study of all patients older than 65 years with stable femoral neck fractures secondary to low-energy trauma treated surgically at our institution between 2005 and 2008. We identified 121 fractures in 120 patients older than 65 years as stable (Garden Stage I or II); all were treated with percutaneous, cannulated screw fixation in an inverted triangle without performing a capsulotomy or aspiration of the fracture hematoma at the time of surgery. The average age of the patients at the time of fracture was 80 years (range, 65-100 years). Radiographs, operative reports, and medical records were reviewed. Fracture union, nonunion, osteonecrosis, intraarticular hardware, loss of fixation, and conversion to arthroplasty were noted. Followup averaged 11 months (range, 0-5 years) because all patients were included, including those who died. The mortality rate was 40% for all patients at the time of review. Twelve patients (10%) underwent conversion surgery to THA at a mean of 9 months after the index fracture repair (range, 2-24 months); the indications for conversion to THA included osteonecrosis, nonunion, and loss of fixation. Two others had periimplant subtrochanteric femur fractures treated by surgical repair with cephalomedullary nails and two patients had removal of hardware. Revision surgery after osteosynthesis for stable femoral neck fractures was more frequent in this series than previously has been reported. The reasons for this higher frequency

  19. Locking attachment plate fixation around a well-fixed stem in periprosthetic femoral shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Bom; Cho, Jae-Woo; Lee, Young Ho; Shon, Won-Yong; Park, Jung Wee; Kim, Jinil; Oh, Jong-Keon

    2017-07-08

    Periprosthetic fractures are difficult to manage. Plating technique has been considered a reliable form of management of periprosthetic fractures with a well-fixed stem, but a dependable and stable method of plate fixation to the bone is lacking. This study reports the clinical results using a locking attachment plate (LAP) instead of cable fixation to fix locking plates to a periprosthetic femoral shaft fracture. Nineteen patients with periprosthetic femoral shaft fractures around well-fixed stemmed implants were studied between August 2012 and December 2014. Patients were followed up for at least 1 year postoperatively. Median age was 74 years (range 56-96 years). Fractures were classified according to the Unified Classification System, Vancouver classification, and Su classification. Open reduction was performed under minimal incision and the locking plate was fixed to the lateral cortex of the femoral shaft. The part of the shaft without a stem was fixed to the plate using 5.0-mm locking screws, and the part with an underlying stem was fixed using 3.5-mm locking screws through the LAP instead of cables. Postoperatively, patients were managed using general principles for femoral shaft fractures. Average follow-up was 16 months (range 12-36 months). All cases achieved fracture healing without loss of reduction. There were no cases of implant breakage or stem loosening at final follow-up. The average number of LAPs per fixation construct was 2.1 (range 1-4), and the average number of 3.5-mm locking screws through each LAP was 3.3 (range 2-4). The average value of plate screw density was 0.55 (range 0.37-0.8), and the average working length was four holes (range 2-8). Using the LAP to manage periprosthetic fractures with a well-fixed stem could obviate the need for cable around the stem area and yield acceptable outcomes.

  20. Successful open reduction and internal fixation for displaced femoral fracture in a patient with osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiangfa; Pan, Jianke; Xu, Mingtao; Xu, Shuchai

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Osteopetrosis is a rare disease that predominantly occurs in descendants of inbreeding families. In the case of fractures happen in patients with osteopetrosis, the choice between operative or conservative treatment is still controversial. Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is a conventional treatment for fractures, and it possesses more applicability than conservative treatment. During this surgical treatment, ensure that bone union in the right way is pivotal to success and simultaneously prevents refracture and displacement after the operation. Herein, we present a case of femoral fracture of a patient with osteopetrosis via open reduction and internal fixation. To illustrate successful factors during the treatment process, we discuss experience combined with literature review following case report. Patient concerns: A 67-year-old man who has diagnosed with osteopetrosis over 20 years ago suffered from pain in the left hip last for more than 1 month and he was incapable of walking recently. Before this incident, he had sustained 4 femoral fractures that treated insufficiently by open reduction surgery. Diagnosis: Physical, radiological, and biological examinations indicated a femoral subtrochanteric fracture that was overlapping displacement between fracture ends. Interventions and outcomes: Treated with surgery by open reduction with internal fixation and osteotomy, the fracture united in 12 months, and he returned to walk with full weight bearing, during which no complication occurred. Lessons: Open reduction and internal fixation is also suitable for the patient with osteopetrosis, and they have similar union ability to the normal. To guarantee successful treatment, specific strategies of operation and rehabilitation program are necessary. PMID:28816960

  1. [Treatment of type C3 distal femoral fractures with double-plating fixation via anteriormiddle approach].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liu, Jian; Huang, Chun-Xia; Zhao, Zhan-Fu; Wang, Gang; Qin, Cong-Cong

    2012-12-01

    To investigate clinical efficacy and feasibility of double-plating fixation via anteriormiddle approach in treating type C3 distal femoral fractures. From August 2008 to August 2011, 12 cases with type C3 distal femoral fractures were treated, including 5 open fractures and 7 closed fractures. Among them, there were 8 males, 4 females with an average of 40 years (ranged, 25 to 55 years). There were 7 in left side, 5 in right side. Nine cases were caused by car accident, 3 cases by falling down. The duration from injury to hospital was form 20 minutes to 5 days (mean 135 min). After tibia bone traction for 5 to 8 days, the operation were performed by double-plating fixation via anteriormiddle approach, and autograft of iliac bone or allograft bone grafting were given to bone defect. Knee joint function was evaluated according to Merchanetal criteria. The operation time was from 110 to 160 min, with an average of 135 min, the blood loss was from 300 ml to 500 ml,with an average of 400 ml. Post-operative wound were stage I healing. All patients were followed up from 16 to 36 months (mean 24 months). No infection, reduction loss, nonunion, deep vein thrombosis occurred. Bone healing time was for 18 to 24 weeks with an average of 21 weeks. According to the Merchanetal criteria, 4 cases got excellent results, 6 good, 1 fair and 1 poor. Double-plating fixation via anteriormiddle approach for type C3 distal femoral fractures is an effective way, which has advantages of obvious exposure, simple manipulation, anatomical reduction, stable fixation. However,operation indications and operating instructions should be strictly followed.

  2. Treatment of the femoral shaft nonunion with double plate fixation and bone grafting: A case series of 14 patients.

    PubMed

    Maimaitiyiming, Asihaerjiang; Amat, Abdusami; Rehei, Aili; Tusongjiang, Mamatkeremula; Li, Cao

    2015-01-01

    The management of femoral shaft nonunion still remains a challenge in orthopaedic surgery. It represents a serious postoperative problem for the patient, associated with plate breakage and loosening, bone defect, shortening deformity and infection. A double plate fixation combined with bone grafting may become a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with femoral shaft nonunion. In this study, our goal was to evaluate the clinical outcome of a novel approach for 14 consecutive patients with femoral shaft nonunion using double plate fixation with bone grafting. Retrospective data from June 2010 to August 2012 were obtained from records for 14 consecutive femoral shaft aseptic nonunion patients treated with double plate fixation combined with bone grafting. Nine patients were men and five patients were woman and average age of the patients was 26 years (range from 22 to 32 years). The mean time since injury was 26.2 months. The nonunion had resulted from repeated internal fixation failure (including plate or intramedullary nail fixation) in nine cases and primary internal fixation in five cases. All the 14 patients were followed up for an average of 14.8 (10-25) months. All cases achieved bony union without wound infection or fixation failure and the mean time to union was 5.2 months (range 4-7 months). Double plate fixation and bone grafting are a promising method for femoral shaft nonunion. In addition, this strategy is useful for such a nonunion caused by a repeated plate or intramedullary nail fixation failure with bone defect due to its strong stability with three-dimensional fixation and fully bone graft availability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of effects of different screw materials in the triangle fixation of femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Gok, Kadir; Inal, Sermet; Gok, Arif; Gulbandilar, Eyyup

    2017-05-01

    In this study, biomechanical behaviors of three different screw materials (stainless steel, titanium and cobalt-chromium) have analyzed to fix with triangle fixation under axial loading in femoral neck fracture and which material is best has been investigated. Point cloud obtained after scanning the human femoral model with the three dimensional (3D) scanner and this point cloud has been converted to 3D femoral model by Geomagic Studio software. Femoral neck fracture was modeled by SolidWorks software for only triangle configuration and computer-aided numerical analyses of three different materials have been carried out by AnsysWorkbench finite element analysis (FEA) software. The loading, boundary conditions and material properties have prepared for FEA and Von-Misses stress values on upper and lower proximity of the femur and screws have been calculated. At the end of numerical analyses, the best advantageous screw material has calculated as titanium because it creates minimum stress at the upper and lower proximity of the fracture line.

  4. Using biomechanics to improve the surgical technique for internal fixation of intracapsular femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in science and technology, the success rate for the treatment of displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures in high-energy injuries remains disappointing. The blood supply system in the femoral head of humans does not favor recovery from these fractures. Once these fractures occur, osteonecrosis and nonunion rates may be as high as 30%, even if the newest technique is used. There are some surgical techniques used to supplement internal fixation to reestablish the blood supply in the femoral head, but none have been evidently successful. After analysis of related studies, the author concludes that immediate surgical treatment using improved techniques incorporating the principles of biomechanics can improve the success rate of treatment of these fractures. Using these principles, the fracture site can achieve sufficient stability. Consequently, the blood supply in the femoral head and neck can be reestablished earlier and loss of reduction of fragments during treatment can be minimized. Thus, the chance of full recovery from these complicated fractures can be maximized. In this study, the biomechanical characteristics of these fractures and the principles associated with the surgical techniques used for treating them are reviewed and clarified. Finally, a surgical technique which is ideal from the author's viewpoint is presented. The author believes that the recommended surgical technique may become the best method for treating these complicated fractures.

  5. Fixation of the fully hydroxyapatite-coated Corail stem implanted due to femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Today, dislocated femoral neck fractures are commonly treated with a cemented hip arthroplasty. However, cementing of the femoral component may lead to adverse effects and even death. Uncemented stems may lower these risks and hydroxyapatite (HA) coating may enhance integration, but prosthetic stability and clinical outcome in patients with osteoporotic bone have not been fully explored. We therefore studied fixation and clinical outcome in patients who had had a femoral neck fracture and who had received a fully HA-coated stem prosthesis. Patients and methods 50 patients with a dislocated femoral neck fracture were operated with the fully HA-coated Corail total or hemiarthroplasty. 38 patients, mean age 81 (70–96) years, were followed for 24 months with conventional radiographs, RSA, DEXA, and for clinical outcome. Results 31 of the 38 implants moved statistically significantly up to 3 months, mainly distally, mean 2.7 mm (max. 20 mm (SD 4.3)), and rotated into retroversion mean 3.3º (–1.8 to 17) (SD 4.3) and then appeared to stabilize. Distal stem migration was more pronounced if the stem was deemed to be too small. There was no correlation between BMD and stem migration. The migration did not result in any clinically adverse effects. Interpretation The fully hydroxyapatite-coated Corail stem migrates during the first 3 months, but clinical outcome appears to be good, without any adverse events. PMID:22112154

  6. Biomechanical testing of bioabsorbable cannulated screws for slipped capital femoral epiphysis fixation.

    PubMed

    Kroeber, Markus W; Rovinsky, David; Haskell, Andrew; Heilmann, Moira; Llotz, Jeff; Otsuka, Norman

    2002-06-01

    This study compared cannulated 4.5-mm bioabsorbable screws made of self-reinforced poly-levolactic acid to cannulated 4.5-mm steel and titanium screws for resistance to shear stress and ability to generate compression in a polyurethane foam model of slipped capital femoral epiphysis fixation. The maximum shear stress resisted by the three screw types was similar (self-reinforced poly-levolactic acid 371 +/- 146 MPa, steel 442 +/- 43 MPa, and titanium 470 +/- 91 MPa). The maximum compression generated by both the self-reinforced poly-levolactic acid screw (68.5 +/- 3.3 N) and the steel screw (63.3 +/- 5.9 N) was greater than that for the titanium screw (3 +/- 1.4 N, P <.05). These data suggest cannulated self-reinforced poly-levolactic acid screws can be used in the treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis because of their sufficient biomechanical strength.

  7. Implant Removal After Internal Fixation of a Femoral Neck Fracture: Effects on Physical Functioning.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2015-09-01

    The effect of implant removal after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture on physical functioning was analyzed. Characteristics of patients who had their implant removed were studied, as it is currently unknown from which type of patients implants are removed and what effect removal has on function. Secondary cohort study alongside a randomized controlled trial. Multicenter study in 14 hospitals. Patients who had their implant removed after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture are compared with patients who did not. Patient characteristics and quality of life (Short Form 12, Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index) were compared. Matched pairs were selected based on patient/fracture characteristics and prefracture physical functioning. Of 162 patients, 37 (23%) had their implant removed. These patients were younger (median age: 67 vs. 72 years, P = 0.024) and more often independently ambulatory prefracture (100% vs. 84%, P = 0.008) than patients who did not. They more often had evident implant back-out on x-rays (54% vs. 34%, P = 0.035), possibly related to a higher rate of Pauwels 3 fractures (41% vs. 22%, P = 0.032). In time, quality of life improved more in implant removal patients [+2 vs. -4 points, Short Form 12 (physical component), P = 0.024; +9 vs. 0 points, Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index, P = 0.019]. Implant removal after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture positively influenced quality of life. Implant removal patients were younger and more often independently ambulatory prefracture, more often had a Pauwels 3 fracture, and an evident implant back-out. Implant removal should be considered liberally for these patients if pain persists or functional recovery is unsatisfactory. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  8. Exchange nailing with enhanced distal fixation is effective for the treatment of infraisthmal femoral nonunions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Oh, Chang-Wug; Han, Seung-Beom; Sim, Jae-Ang; Oh, Jong-Keon

    2017-09-27

    The treatment options for nonunions of infraisthmal femoral shaft fractures after internal fixation are controversial. Methods such as exchanging an existing nail with a nail of a larger size, dynamization, removal of the nail followed by plating, and bone grafting have all been reported. Among those options, exchange nailing seems to be the most popular choice. In this study, a Poller screw, or an additional interlocking screw, was used in conjunction with exchange intramedullary nailing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of treating femoral shaft nonunions using insertion of a Poller screw or an additional interlocking screw in conjunction with intramedullary nail fixation. This study included 18 patients who presented with nonunion of femur shaft fractures after internal fixation at the infraisthmal level. These patients included 13 men and 5 women, with a mean age of 46.8 years (range 15-78 years). The mean postsurgical period of nonunion was 7.8 months (range 6-12 months). The patients were classified into two groups: the atrophic nonunion group and the hypertrophic nonunion group. In all patients, nailing was enhanced with a Poller screw or additional interlocking screws. All patients were followed up with plain film examinations and were assessed for their functional recovery status to determine the osseous union conditions. All 18 patients achieved postoperative bony union after a mean time of 7.5 months (range 3-12 months), and all patients were able to walk with full weight-bearing and without pain within 3 months. There were no significant complications, such as broken hardware, implant back-outs, axial or rotational malalignments, or deep infections. Poller screws and additional interlocking screws, along with intramedullary nailing exchange, may be an effective and reliable alternative for treating infraisthmal femoral shaft nonunions.

  9. Radiographic prevalence of CAM-type femoroacetabular impingement after open reduction and internal fixation of femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Mathew, G; Kowalczuk, M; Hetaimish, B; Bedi, A; Philippon, M J; Bhandari, M; Simunovic, N; Crouch, S; Ayeni, O R

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiographic prevalence of CAM-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in elderly patients (≥ 50 years) who have undergone internal fixation for femoral neck fracture. A total of 187 frog-leg lateral radiographs of elderly patients who underwent internal fixation for a femoral neck fracture were reviewed by two independent reviewers. The alpha angle, beta angle, and femoral head-neck offset ratio were calculated. The presence of two abnormal radiographic parameters was deemed to be diagnostic of radiographic CAM-type impingement. Radiographic CAM-type FAI was identified in 157 out of 187 (84 %) patients who underwent internal fixation for fractures of the femoral neck. Moderate-to-good inter-observer reliability was achieved in the measurement of radiographic parameters. With reference to fracture subtypes and prevalence of radiographic features of CAM-type morphology, 97 (72 %) out of 134 patients were positive for CAM in Garden subtypes I and II, whereas 49 (85.9 %) out of 57 patients had radiographic CAM in Garden III and IV subtypes. There was a high prevalence of CAM-type FAI in patients that underwent surgical fixation of femoral neck fractures. This is significantly higher than the reported prevalence in non-fracture patient populations. The high prevalence of CAM morphology could be related to several factors, including age, fracture morphology, quality of reduction, type of fixation, and fracture healing.

  10. Management of Femoral Shaft Fracture in Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome with External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yogendra; Jha, Ranjib Kumar; Karn, Navin Kumar; Sah, Sanjaya Kumar; Mishra, Bibhuti Nath; Bhattarai, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare complex malformation characterized by the clinical triad of capillary malformations, soft tissue and bone hypertrophy, and venous/lymphatic malformation. Fractures of long bones in such cases are challenging to treat. A 12-year-old female with this syndrome presented with femoral shaft fracture of right thigh. She was initially kept on skeletal traction for two weeks and then she underwent closed reduction and immobilization with external fixator with uneventful intraoperative and postoperative period. Fracture united at four and half months. PMID:26885423

  11. An Assessment of the Biological Fixation of a Retrieved Mayo Femoral Component

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, Russell D; Willie, Bettina M; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2003-01-01

    Implant analysis was conducted on a retrieved Mayo femoral prosthesis that has a non-anatomic design with two distinct surfaces intended for osseous fixation. The prosthesis itself has a circumferential grit-blasted region interposed with the porous surfaces and involving the entire proximal stem. In addition, there are pads of mesh porous coating on the anterior, posterior, and medial surfaces proximally. A single, radiographically stable stem retrieved after 18 months secondary to recurrent dislocations was examined for osseous fixation by measurement of trabecular bone into the porous-coated and onto the grit-blasted surfaces of the stem. Results showed 17% ± 7% bone ingrowth into the porous coated areas and 20% ± 16% osseointegration onto the grit-blasted surfaces. These results are similar to percentages of ingrowth seen with more conventional, anatomic design prostheses. PMID:14575260

  12. Pseudoaneurysm and intramuscular haematoma after dynamic hip screw fixation for intertrochanteric femoral fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie Sze-wun; Kong, Siu-wah; Sun, Kin-wai; Tsang, Pui-ki; Chow, Hung-lit

    2010-08-01

    We report the case of an 83-year-old woman who developed a pseudoaneurysm of the profunda femoris artery after dynamic hip screw fixation for an intertrochanteric femoral fracture. 23 days after the fixation, radiological investigations including colour Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography identified a pseudoaneurysm surrounded by a large intramuscular haematoma close to the profunda femoris. The patient underwent emergency evacuation and was under intensive care for 3 days and was discharged 6 weeks later, with no complications. At one-year follow-up, the wound and fracture had healed, but the patient was confined to a wheelchair. A high index of clinical suspicion and radiological imaging are necessary for making the diagnosis.

  13. Delayed fixation of displaced type II and III pediatric femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Md Quamar; Iraqi, AA; Sherwani, MKA; Abbas, M; Alam, Afzal; Sabir, Amir Bin; Asif, Naiyer

    2009-01-01

    Background: Time from injury to fixation of femoral neck fractures has been postulated as a vital determinant for rate of complications; however, no prospective study is available in the English literature. Delay, unfortunately, is inevitable in developing countries. The aim of the present study is to retrospectively review the outcome after delayed fixation of displaced type II and III femoral neck fractures in children. Materials and Methods: Using a standard assessment chart, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of all pediatric patients having femoral neck fractures presenting to our institution from June 1999 to May 2006. Inclusion criteria were children between 5 and 15 years of age sustaining displaced Delbet type II and III femoral neck fractures having a complete follow-up of at least 2 years. Patients with known metabolic disease, poliomyelitis or cerebral palsy, were excluded from the study. After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 22 patients having 22 fractures (13 type II and 9 type III) were studied. Surgery could be performed after a mean delay of 11.22 days (ranging from 2 to 21 days). Closed reduction was achieved in 14 cases and 8 cases required open reduction through anterolateral approach. Result: Osteonecrosis was noted in eight patients (36.37%) who included two of nine patients (22.22%) operated in the first week, three of eight patients (37.51%) operated in the second week, and three of five patients (60%) operated in the third week of injury. Nonunion was seen in four (18.18%) cases, and two of them were associated with failure of implants. One was treated by valgus osteotomy and the other by Meyer's procedure. Fractures united in both children but the latter developed avascular necrosis. Functional results, as assessed using Ratliff's criteria, were good in 14 (63.63%), fair in 2 (9%), and poor in 6 (27.27%) patients. Conclusion: Delay in fixation, type of fracture, and ability to achieve and maintain reduction are

  14. Pediatric anterior cruciate ligament femoral fixation: the trans-iliotibial band endoscopic portal for direct visualization of ideal button placement.

    PubMed

    Mistovich, R Justin; O'Toole, Patrick O J; Ganley, Theodore J

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric and adolescent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a commonly performed procedure that has been increasing in incidence. Multiple techniques for graft fixation have been described. Button-based femoral cortical suspension fixation of the anterior cruciate ligament graft allows for fast, secure fixation with strong load-to-failure biomechanical properties. The biomechanical properties of button-based femoral cortical suspension fixation are especially beneficial with soft-tissue grafts such as hamstring autografts. Confirmation of a successfully flipped button can be achieved with intraoperative fluoroscopy or indirect viewing; however, these techniques do not provide direct visualization of the flipped button. Our trans-iliotibial band endoscopic portal allows the surgeon to safely and directly visualize the flipped button on the lateral femoral cortex and ensure that there is no malpositioning in the form of an incompletely flipped button or from soft-tissue interposition between the button and the lateral femoral cortex. This portal therefore allows for direct visual confirmation that the button is fully flipped and resting flush against the femoral cortex, deep to the iliotibial band and vastus lateralis.

  15. Delayed internal fixation of femoral shaft fracture reduces mortality among patients with multisystem trauma.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Saam; Miclau, Theodore; Bembom, Oliver; Cohen, Mitchell; Knudson, M Margaret; Colford, John M

    2009-01-01

    Fractures of the femoral shaft are common and have potentially serious consequences in patients with multiple injuries. The appropriate timing of fracture repair is controversial. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of timing of internal fixation on mortality in patients with multisystem trauma. We performed a retrospective cohort study with use of data from public and private trauma centers throughout the United States that were reported to the National Trauma Data Bank (version 5.0 for 2000 through 2004). The study included 3069 patients with multisystem trauma (Injury Severity Score, > or =15) who underwent internal fixation of a femoral shaft fracture. The time to treatment was defined in categories as the time from admission to internal fixation: t(0) (twelve hours or less), t(1) (more than twelve hours to twenty-four hours), t(2) (more than twenty-four hours to forty-eight hours), t(3) (more than forty-eight hours to 120 hours), and t(4) (more than 120 hours). The relative risk of in-hospital mortality when the four later periods were compared with the earliest one was estimated with inverse probability of treatment-weighted analysis. Subgroups with serious head or neck, chest, abdominal, and additional extremity injury were investigated. When compared with that during the first twelve hours after admission, the estimated mortality risk was significantly lower in three time categories: t(1) (relative risk, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.15 to 0.98; p = 0.03), t(3) (relative risk, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.28 to 0.93; p = 0.03), and t(4) (relative risk, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.94; p = 0.03). Patients with serious abdominal trauma (Abbreviated Injury Score, > or =3) experienced the greatest benefit from a delay of internal fixation beyond twelve hours (relative risk, 0.82 [95% confidence interval, 0.54 to 1.35] for patients with an Abbreviated Injury Score of <3, compared with 0.36 [95% confidence interval, 0

  16. [Bone cement dry prosthetic with internal fixation treat senile osteoporotic femoral fractures].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Rong, X X; Chen, P; Xu, Y J; Zhu, G X

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To explore the treatment of senile osteoporotic femoral fractures after using internal fixation of bone cement dry prosthetic. Methods: Twelve patients aged from 74 to 94 years with mean age of (84.0±2.5) years with internal fixation of bone cement dry prosthetic surgery who were treated at Department of Orthopaedics in Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Wuxi Second Hospital between May 2013 and May 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 8 male and 4 female, 10 cases of tumble and 2 cases of traffic injury. The fracture types with AO type included 1 case of A1 type, 5 cases of A2 type, 3 cases of A3 type, 1 case of B1 type, 2 cases of B2 type. The steel plate internal fixation with bone cement dry prosthetic method was chosen to treat senile severe femoral fracture. Postoperative observation of postoperative pain assessment, hip joint activity and walking ability were evaluated. Paired simple t test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare the differences of pain score and the ability to walk. Results: Twelve cases received an average of (16.0±3.6) months follow-up. The average hospitalization days are (9.0±1.4) days and average of intraoperative time was (68.0±10.6) minutes. Intraoperative blood loss compared to normal was (106.0±24.2) ml. Patients began walking load and activities in two weeks. The gait and joint activities gradually restored and there were no obvious deformity and no loose internal fixation. All of the patients didn't have fracture shift with breaking plates or screws deformation and have no bone cement reaction. The walking ability was (4.1±0.9) points, the hip joint activities were 98.5°±7.7° and pain scores were 1.22±0.58 by Holden grading standards. The differences of walking ability (Z=-3.126, P<0.05) and pain scores (t=23.047, P<0.001) between pre- and post-operative were statistically significant. One patient had contralateral hip pain, 2 patients had lateral thigh pain, 10 patients returned to

  17. Primary total hip arthroplasty versus internal fixation in displaced fracture of femoral neck in sexa- and septuagenarians.

    PubMed

    Wani, Iftikhar H; Sharma, Sidhartha; Latoo, Irfan; Salaria, A Q; Farooq, Munir; Jan, Masrat

    2014-09-01

    The optimal treatment of femoral neck fracture in the elderly patient is still under debate. In patients aged 60-80 years, the decision between internal fixation and arthroplasty remains controversial. The primary aim of the present study is to evaluate the functional outcome of patients aged 60-80 years with femoral neck fracture treated with total hip arthroplasty or closed reduction and internal fixation. The secondary aim is to evaluate the incidence of nonunion and avascular necrosis in femoral neck fracture in different age groups. We studied 100 patients affected by displaced fracture of the femoral neck from May 2007 through June 2010. There were 60 men and 40 women with mean age of 66 years. Fifty patients were treated with closed reduction and internal fixation with cannulated screws (group A), and the other 50 patients with total hip arthroplasty (group B). Mean surgical time, blood loss, duration of hospital stay, Harris hip score, complications, and need for reoperation were recorded. Harris hip score was significantly higher in group B at 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-up evaluation. The overall complication rate was 28 % in group A and 32 % in group B, which was not statistically significant. A statistically significant difference was found regarding patients who required reoperation in group A (20 %) compared with group B (no one). The average Harris hip score in the internal fixation group was 90.6 and in the total hip arthroplasty group was 93.7, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Our study showed an increased risk for intracapsular hip fracture developing nonunion with older age. Primary total hip arthroplasty compared with internal fixation appears to be a reasonably safe method of treating displaced fracture of femoral neck in elderly patients. We also concluded that outcome regarding hip function is generally better after total hip arthroplasty compared with internal fixation. Level II-Prospective cohort study.

  18. Design and Optimization of Resorbable Silk Internal Fixation Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Dylan S.

    Limitations of current material options for internal fracture fixation devices have resulted in a large gap between user needs and hardware function. Metal systems offer robust mechanical strength and ease of implantation but require secondary surgery for removal and/or result in long-term complications (infection, palpability, sensitivity, etc.). Current resorbable devices eliminate the need for second surgery and long-term complications but are still associated with negative host response as well as limited functionality and more difficult implantation. There is a definitive need for orthopedic hardware that is mechanically capable of immediate fracture stabilization and fracture fixation during healing, can safely biodegrade while allowing complete bone remodeling, can be resterilized for reuse, and is easily implantable (self-tapping). Previous work investigated the use of silk protein to produce resorbable orthopedic hardware for non- load bearing fracture fixation. In this study, silk orthopedic hardware was further investigated and optimized in order to better understand the ability of silk as a fracture fixation system and more closely meet the unfulfilled market needs. Solvent-based and aqueous-based silk processing formulations were cross-linked with methanol to induce beta sheet structure, dried, autoclaved and then machined to the desired device/geometry. Silk hardware was evaluated for dry, hydrated and fatigued (cyclic) mechanical properties, in vitro degradation, resterilization, functionalization with osteoinductive molecules and implantation technique for fracture fixation. Mechanical strength showed minor improvements from previous results, but remains comparable to current resorbable fixation systems with the advantages of self-tapping ability for ease of implantation, full degradation in 10 months, ability to be resterilized and reused, and ability to release molecules for osteoinudction. In vivo assessment confirmed biocompatibility, showed

  19. Augmentation by cerclage wire improves fixation of vertical shear femoral neck fractures-A biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Fa-Chuan; Yeh, Ming-Long; Hong, Chih-Kai; Chiang, Florence L; Jou, I-Ming; Wang, Ping-Hui; Su, Wei-Ren

    2016-10-01

    Femoral neck fractures in young individuals are typically vertical shear fractures. These injuries are difficult to stabilize due to a significant varus displacement force across the hip with weight bearing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability offered by the addition of an augmented wire to conventional inverted triangle triple screw fixation for stabilizing vertical shear femoral neck fracture. Sixteen medium 4th-generation synthetic composite femurs (Sawbones Pacific Research Laboratories, Vashon, WA) were divided into two groups. Vertical osteotomy was performed to mimic Pauwels III femoral neck fracture. Group A (n=8) was fixed with three parallel 6.5-mm cannulated screws (Stryker) with washer in inverted triangle configuration. In group B (n=8), all the screws were set using methods identical to group A, with the addition of the cerclage wire. Both groups were tested with nondestructive axial compression test at 7 and 25° of valgus stress, respectively. Then axial cyclic loading test with 1000N was applied for 1000 cycles, and interfragmentary displacement was measured with Fastrak magnetic tracking system (Polhemus, Colchester, VT, USA). Finally, destructive axial compression test was conducted at 7°of valgus stress. Axial stiffness showed that group B had a 66% increase (879N/mm vs. 1461N/mm, P<0.01) at 7° valgus and a 46% increase (1611N/mm vs. 2349N/mm, P<0.01) at 25° valgus in comparison with group A. Interfragmentary fracture displacement after cyclic loading was significantly less for group B compared with group A (0.34 vs 0.13mm, P=0.0016). For axial failure load, there was 42% increase in group B compared with group A (2602N/mm vs. 3686N/mm, P=0.0023). Our study demonstrates that the addition of a cerclage wire to inverted triangle triple screws provides substantial improvement in mechanical performance regarding fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures when compared with the conventional construct

  20. Implantless Fixation of a Large Osteocartilaginous Fracture of the Lateral Femoral Condyle in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Jitendra; Mhaskar, Vikram; Mhaskar, Parul Maheshwari

    2017-01-01

    We describe for the first time a case of lateral femoral condyle fracture following a fall in a 13-year-old child that was reduced arthroscopically using a probe. It was definitively fixed with 0 vicryl sutures in a cruciate pattern after being initially stabilised with 1.5-mm Kirschner wires. Four beath pins carrying sutures were drilled at four opposing quadrants through the reduced fragment into the femur. The sutures were then tied on the lateral cortex of the femur. After fixation, the child was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks, partial weight bearing from 6 weeks to 12 weeks and then full weight bearing thereafter. Range of motion (ROM) exercises were commenced on the first postoperative day. At one-year follow-up, the ROM was from −5° to 130°, all symptoms disappeared, and complete resumption of all sports activities was allowed. PMID:28231653

  1. Implantless Fixation of a Large Osteocartilaginous Fracture of the Lateral Femoral Condyle in a Child.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Jitendra; Mhaskar, Vikram; Mhaskar, Parul Maheshwari

    2017-03-01

    We describe for the first time a case of lateral femoral condyle fracture following a fall in a 13-year-old child that was reduced arthroscopically using a probe. It was definitively fixed with 0 vicryl sutures in a cruciate pattern after being initially stabilised with 1.5-mm Kirschner wires. Four beath pins carrying sutures were drilled at four opposing quadrants through the reduced fragment into the femur. The sutures were then tied on the lateral cortex of the femur. After fixation, the child was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks, partial weight bearing from 6 weeks to 12 weeks and then full weight bearing thereafter. Range of motion (ROM) exercises were commenced on the first postoperative day. At one-year follow-up, the ROM was from -5° to 130°, all symptoms disappeared, and complete resumption of all sports activities was allowed.

  2. Cross Pins versus Endobutton Femoral Fixation in Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Minimum 4-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Kim, Geon-Hyeong; Ahn, Chi-Young

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to compare cross-pin fixation and Endobutton femoral fixation for hamstring anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with respect to clinical and radiographic results, including tunnel widening and the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Materials and Methods Between August 2002 and August 2005, 126 autogenous hamstring ACL reconstructions were performed using either cross pins or Endobutton for femoral fixation. Fifty-six of 75 patients in the cross-pin group and 35 of 51 patients in the Endobutton group were followed up for a minimum of 4 years. We compared the clinical and radiological results between the groups using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation form, the KT-2000 arthrometer side to side difference, the amount of tunnel widening and the advancement of OA on radiographs. Results There were no significant differences in the IKDC grades between the groups at the 4 year follow-up. There was no significant difference in the side to side difference according to KT-2000 arthrometer testing. Also, there were no significant differences in terms of tunnel widening or advancement of OA on radiographs. Conclusions Endobutton femoral fixation showed good results that were comparable to those of cross pins fixation in hamstring ACL reconstruction. PMID:22570850

  3. [Applied researches on polylactide internal fixation devices].

    PubMed

    Duan, H; Song, Y

    2001-03-01

    Nowadays, more and more basic and clinical researches on polylactide internal fixators were carried out in China. In this paper are reviewed the researches of polylactide acid(PLA), including its physical and chemical characters, biodegradation, absorption and mechanical properties, effects on fracture healing, and clinical application. Some problems that have not been solved are high-lighted and discussed. Also dealt with are some researches of PLA in future.

  4. Internal fixation versus arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Heetveld, Martin J; Rogmark, Cecilia; Frihagen, Frede; Keating, John

    2009-07-01

    A review of the current evidence for internal fixation versus hemiarthroplasty versus primary total hip arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures was undertaken. At the meta-analysis level no difference in postoperative pain, function, or quality of life can yet be demonstrated. A significant difference in mortality has also not been found, but a trend towards higher mortality after primary arthroplasty is possible. Internal fixation (IF) has less morbidity, but a higher risk of revision and less cost-effectiveness. Independent adjudication for IF technique is rare in studies and bias towards higher revision rates due to technical failure is an issue. Randomized trials comparing IF with arthroplasty remain underpowered in specific subgroups of patients, in which IF revision rates could be acceptable. In hemiarthroplasty the data suggest minimal differences in outcome between the prosthesis types. The cementless Austin-Moore prosthesis is out-dated. Currently a cemented unipolar or bipolar, depending on costs, hemi-arthroplasty is the treatment of choice for an elderly patient with functional limitations before the fracture. The role of modern, uncemented hemiarthroplasty designs are uncertain until more data are published. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) should be considered in any active older patient with a displaced femoral neck fracture. Patients with concomitant osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or renal failure do poorly with other treatment options and should be treated with THA. Randomized trials have shown THA to be a cost-effective treatment with lower revision rates than IF. THA may also appear to be superior to hemiarthroplasty in specific subgroups, but larger trials are needed to confirm this observation.

  5. The societal costs of femoral neck fracture patients treated with internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, S M; Bouwmans, C A M; Heetveld, M J; Bhandari, M; Patka, P; Van Lieshout, E M M

    2014-03-01

    The study rationale was to provide a detailed overview of the costs for femoral neck fracture treatment with internal fixation in the Netherlands. Mean total costs per patient at 2-years follow-up were 19,425. Costs were higher for older, less healthy patients. Results are comparable to internationally published costs. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed overview of the cost and healthcare consumption of patients treated for a hip fracture with internal fixation. A secondary aim was to compare costs of patients who underwent a revision surgery with patients who did not. The study was performed alongside the Dutch sample of an international randomized controlled trial, concerning femoral neck fracture patients treated with internal fixation. Patient characteristics and healthcare consumption were collected. Total follow-up was 2 years. A societal perspective was adopted. Costs included hospital costs during primary stay and follow-up, and costs related to rehabilitation and changes in living situation. Costs were compared between non-revision surgery patients, implant removal patients, and revision arthroplasty patients. A total of 248 patients were included (mean age 71 years). Mean total costs per patient at 2-years follow-up were 19,425. In the non-revision surgery patients total costs were 17,405 (N = 137), in the implant removal patients 10,066 (N = 38), and in the revision arthroplasty patients 26,733 (N = 67). The main contributing costs were related to the primary surgery, admission days, physical therapy, and revision surgeries. The main determinant was the costs of admission to a rehabilitation center/nursing home. Costs were specifically high in elderly with comorbidity, who were less independent pre-fracture, and have a longer admission to the hospital and/or a nursing home. Costs were also higher in revision surgery patients. The 2-years follow-up costs in our study were comparable to published costs

  6. Femoral fixation strength following soft-tissue posterolateral corner reconstruction using fibular-based technique: Biomechanical analysis of four techniques in normal and low-density synthetic bone.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Robert A; Sathyendra, Vikram; Sharkey, Neil A; Lewis, Gregory S

    2015-12-01

    Optimal femoral fixation of soft-tissue grafts has been described for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Posterolateral corner reconstruction differs from ACL reconstruction in two ways: (a) soft-tissue fixation into the femur requires two tails and (b) the line of force is different. Our purpose was to determine the optimal femoral fixation of soft-tissue grafts during posterolateral corner reconstructions. We hypothesized that interference screw fixation is the strongest technique in normal-density lateral femoral condyle, whereas, cortically-based fixation techniques are stronger methods in low-density lateral femoral condyle. We evaluated elongation during cyclic loading, yield load, peak load-to-failure, and stiffness of four soft-tissue graft femoral fixation methods during posterolateral corner reconstruction. Our model included bovine flexor tendons and contoured synthetic bones. Grafts were secured to the lateral epicondyle in normal- or low-density bone models using spiked washer, button, interference screw, or button and interference screw. Five specimens for each were tested in each bone density. Analysis of variance using Tukey-Kramer adjustment for multiple hypothesis testing was used. Six cadaver bones whose density was analyzed using computerized tomography scan quantitation were tested using interference screw fixation. No method produced significantly stronger yield load or peak load-to-failure in normal-density bone. In low-density bone, cortically-based methods produced significantly higher yield load or peak load-to-failure. Yield load or peak load-to-failure was significantly higher in normal-density bone when using spiked washer or interference screw fixation. No femoral fixation method tested produced superior yield load or peak load-to-failure. Spiked washer and interference screw fixation are inferior fixation methods in low-density bone. For fibular-based posterolateral corner reconstructions, all fixation methods tested are

  7. A biomechanical comparison of 2 femoral fixation techniques for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in skeletally immature patients: over-the-top fixation versus transphyseal technique.

    PubMed

    Lertwanich, Pisit; Kato, Yuki; Martins, Cesar A Q; Maeyama, Akira; Ingham, Sheila J M; Kramer, Scott; Linde-Rosen, Monica; Smolinski, Patrick; Fu, Freddie H

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare knee kinematics and in situ forces of the graft between 2 femoral fixation techniques of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction: the over-the-top (OTT) fixation and transphyseal (TP) techniques. ACL reconstruction in skeletally immature patients is a challenging procedure. Regarding the femoral fixation techniques, 2 methods are commonly used: the OTT fixation and TP techniques. Ten cadaveric knees (mean age, 57 years; range, 48 to 65 years) were tested with the robotic/universal force-moment sensor system by use of (1) an 89-N anterior tibial load at full extension and 15°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of knee flexion and (2) a combined 7-Nm valgus torque and 5-Nm internal tibial rotation torque at 15° and 30° of knee flexion. Both OTT and TP ACL reconstruction techniques closely restored the intact knee kinematics and had a significant reduction in anterior tibial translation under an anterior tibial load and in coupled anterior tibial translation under a combined rotatory load when compared with an ACL-deficient knee. When both ACL reconstruction techniques were compared, the only difference found was that the in situ force of the ACL graft reconstructed with the OTT technique in response to a combined rotatory load at 30° of flexion was significantly lower than the ACL graft reconstructed with the TP technique (5.3 ± 3.3 N and 10.7 ± 6.0 N, respectively; P = .013). This time 0 testing showed that both ACL reconstruction techniques, OTT and TP, can reproduce the kinematics of the intact knee in response to an anterior tibial load and a combined rotatory load. Both femoral fixation techniques exhibited comparable time 0 kinematics when subjected to simulated clinical examination loading conditions. Copyright © 2011 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: is it worth the risk and cost not to offer prophylactic fixation of the contralateral hip?

    PubMed

    Clement, N D; Vats, A; Duckworth, A D; Gaston, M S; Murray, A W

    2015-10-01

    Controversy remains whether the contralateral hip should be fixed in patients presenting with unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). This retrospective study compares the outcomes and cost of those patients who had prophylactic fixation with those who did not. Between January 2000 and December 2010 a total of 50 patients underwent unilateral fixation and 36 had prophylactic fixation of the contralateral hip. There were 54 males and 32 females with a mean age of 12.3 years (9 to 16). The rate of a subsequent slip without prophylactic fixation was 46%. The risk of complications was greater, the generic health measures (Short Form-12 physical (p < 0.001) and mental (p = 0.004) summary scores) were worse. Radiographic cam lesions in patients presenting with unilateral SCFE were only seen in patients who did not have prophylactic fixation. Furthermore, prophylactic fixation of the contralateral hip was found to be a cost-effective procedure, with a cost per quality adjusted life year gained of £1431 at the time of last follow-up. Prophylactic fixation of the contralateral hip is a cost-effective operation that limits the morbidity from the complications of a further slip, and the diminished functional outcome associated with unilateral fixation. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. The use of silk-based devices for fracture fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Gabriel S.; Leisk, Gary G.; Lo, Tim J.; Moreau, Jodie E.; Haas, Dylan S.; Papenburg, Bernke J.; Golden, Ethan B.; Partlow, Benjamin P.; Fox, Sharon E.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Lin, Samuel J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic fixation systems are currently the gold standard for fracture fixation but have problems including stress shielding, palpability and temperature sensitivity. Recently, resorbable systems have gained interest because they avoid removal and may improve bone remodelling due to the lack of stress shielding. However, their use is limited to paediatric craniofacial procedures mainly due to the laborious implantation requirements. Here we prepare and characterize a new family of resorbable screws prepared from silk fibroin for craniofacial fracture repair. In vivo assessment in rat femurs shows the screws to be self-tapping, remain fixed in the bone for 4 and 8 weeks, exhibit biocompatibility and promote bone remodelling. The silk-based devices compare favourably with current poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid fixation systems, however, silk-based devices offer numerous advantages including ease of implantation, conformal fit to the repair site, sterilization by autoclaving and minimal inflammatory response.

  10. Management of humeral and femoral fractures in dogs and cats with linear- circular hybrid external skeletal fixators.

    PubMed

    Kirkby, Kristin A; Lewis, Daniel D; Lafuente, M Pilar; Radasch, Robert M; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Farese, James P; Wheeler, Jason L; Hernandez, Jorge A

    2008-01-01

    Linear-circular hybrid fixators were used to stabilize humeral and femoral fractures in 21 dogs and five cats. Twenty-two of 24 fractures with sufficient follow-up radiographic evaluation obtained union. Time to radiographic union ranged from 25 to 280 days (mean +/- standard deviation [SD] 110+/-69 days; median 98 days). Eleven animals developed minor and two dogs developed major pin and/or wire tract inflammation. Functional outcome was rated as excellent (n=16), good (n=5), and fair (n=3) at the time of final long-term assessment (range 4.5 to 60.0 months; mean +/- SD 28.4+/-15.4 months; median 28.5 months). Follow-up information was unavailable for two animals. Hybrid fixators were useful constructs for stabilization of humeral and femoral fractures, particularly fractures with short, juxta-articular fracture segments.

  11. Femoral and Tibial Tunnel Widening following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Various Modalities of Fixation: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanthila, Mahesha; Saya, Rama Prakasha; Vidyasagar, JVS

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone tunnel enlargement after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACL-R) is a well-accepted phenomenon but there are very few published data comparing the extent of tunnel widening by various methods of fixation after ACL-R. Aim To compare the femoral and tibial tunnel widening following ACL-R with different methods of fixation using CT scan. Materials and Methods This one year prospective study included all patients with chronic Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL-R using tripled hamstring tendon autograft. The graft was fixed to the tibial tunnel by Interference Screw (IFS) or Suture Disc (SD) and to the femoral tunnel by IFS, SD, Cross-Pin (CP) or Endo-button CL (Smith & Nephew). The widening of the tibial and femoral tunnels in different methods of fixation was assessed by Computed Tomography (CT) at 12 months follow-up; and was compared using paired sample test. Results A total of 63 patients were included in the study of which 58 (92%) were males and 5 (8%) were females, with a mean age of 29.1 ± 5.9 years. The tibial tunnel widening at one year follow-up was 1.680 ± 1.08794 (19.37%) and 1.517 ± 0.94834 mm (17.39%) by IFS and SD methods respectively. Femoral tunnel widening at one year follow-up was 1.294 ± 0.231, 1.809 ± 0.912, 1.320 ± 0.238, 1.779 ± 0.889 mm by IFS, SD, EB, and CP methods respectively. Femoral tunnel widening following suture disc method of fixation was very highly significant (p<0.001) in comparison with other methods. Conclusion Femoral tunnel and tibial tunnel widening varies with different methods of fixation and was maximum with suture disc method compared to others at one year follow-up after ACL-R. PMID:28050456

  12. Biomechanical evaluation of a new augmentation method for enhanced screw fixation in osteoporotic proximal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    von der Linden, P; Gisep, A; Boner, V; Windolf, M; Appelt, A; Suhm, N

    2006-12-01

    A biomechanical investigation on eight pairs of human cadaver proximal femurs was performed to evaluate the impact of a new augmentation method on the internal fixation of osteoporotic proximal femur fractures. The study focused on enhancing implant purchase to reduce the incidence of implant cut-out in osteoporotic bone. In a left-right comparison, a conventional hip screw fixation (control) was compared to the new cement augmentation method. After bone bed preparation through high pressure irrigation to remove fat, blood, and bone debris, the bones were augmented with low viscosity polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. Step-wise fatigue testing was performed by cyclically loading the femoral heads in a physiological manner, beginning at 1,500 N and increasing 500 N every 5,000 cycles to 4,000 N, and continuously monitoring head displacement. Failure was defined as >5.0 mm head displacement. The head displacement at 2,000 N was significantly smaller (p=0.018) for the augmented group as compared to the conventionally treated bones (0.09+/-0.01 mm vs. 0.90+/-0.32 mm; mean+/-SEM). The displacement rate at the second load step was significantly higher (p=0.018) for the conventionally treated bones as compared to the augmented ones. All of the nonaugmented specimens failed during testing, where 50% of the augmented specimens did not fail. The promising results of these experiments suggest that this new standardized irrigation/augmentation method enhances the implant anchorage and offers a potential solution to the problem of implant cut-out in osteoporotic metaphyseal bone. Copyright (c) 2006 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  13. Comparison of CT imaging artifacts from craniomaxillofacial internal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Fiala, T G; Novelline, R A; Yaremchuk, M J

    1993-12-01

    This study compares the artifacts caused by craniomaxillofacial internal fixation devices in CT images. Mandibular reconstruction and "mini" titanium, Vitallium, and stainless steel systems, "micro" titanium and Vitallium systems, and stainless steel wires were evaluated. The hardware was placed on a nylon grid and submerged in water. CT images were obtained with both bone and soft-tissue window settings. All artifacts were compared and graded after a minimum of five observations each. The severity of "starburst" artifact was found to be related to the physical size of the fixation hardware and its composition. Titanium hardware caused the least amount of artifact. Vitallium and stainless steel fixation devices, with the exception of interfragmentary wiring, produced significantly more artifact. These results agree with theoretical predictions. The data indicate that when postoperative imaging is an important clinical consideration, (1) the least amount of implant material necessary to achieve stable fixation should be used, (2) the proximity of implant material to the area of interest should be considered, and (3) titanium implants produce less artifact than Vitallium or stainless steel implants.

  14. Olecranon osteotomy fixation using a novel device: the olecranon sled.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Timothy; Wong, Justin C; Patterson, John D; Rekant, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    A posterior approach to the elbow utilizing an olecranon osteotomy has been shown to provide excellent visualization of the distal humerus articular surface. However, many bony stabilization and fixation methods for the olecranon osteotomy are usually prominent, frequently symptomatic, and often require a second operation for removal. This paper evaluates the use of an innovative device, the olecranon sled, in fixation of olecranon osteotomies for exposure of intra-articular distal humerus fractures and provides follow-up results. A retrospective review of all patients with intra-articular distal humerus fracture treated through an olecranon osteotomy approach and fixed with an olecranon sled, between September 2008 and December 2011 was conducted. Charts and radiographs were reviewed to determine olecranon union or nonunion, presence of symptomatic hardware, and need for secondary surgery to remove symptomatic olecranon fixation. Fourteen patients were included in the study. Average clinical follow-up was 33.5 weeks (range, 6 to 118 wk). There were no olecranon nonunions. One patient underwent additional surgery for symptomatic hardware removal (7.1%). Two additional procedures were performed; 1 for revision open reduction and internal fixation of distal humerus fracture nonunion (7.1%) and 1 for release of elbow contracture (7.1%). Although follow-up is limited, the use of this device has been associated with excellent rates of olecranon union with a low rate of symptomatic hardware requiring removal.

  15. Deep Infections After Syndesmotic Fixation With a Suture Button Device.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda J; O'Donnell, Seth W; Born, Chris T; Hayda, Roman A

    2017-05-01

    Suture button devices such as the TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) have been increasingly used for syndesmotic fixation of ankle fractures. Despite proposed advantages, prior studies have shown equivalent outcomes, with a theoretical decreased need for removal of hardware. Complications of suture button fixation of syndesmotic instability may be underreported and include lateral suture knot inflammation with or without granuloma formation, infection, aseptic osteolysis with widening of the tibial drill tunnels, heterotopic ossification, and osteomyelitis. In this case series, the authors review the current literature and describe 3 patients with TightRope fixation for syndesmotic instability who developed deep infection. The authors believe that braided suture within suture button devices may provide an environment conducive to the propagation of infection across the syndesmotic fixation tract. Evidence of suture button migration or osteolysis of the TightRope tract should prompt an infectious workup and removal of hardware. If there is concern for infection associated with the TightRope, the authors recommend removing both metallic buttons and the entirety of the suture to prevent harboring a nidus for further infection. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e541-e545.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Internal screw fixation compared with bipolar hemiarthroplasty for treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Gjertsen, J-E; Vinje, T; Engesaeter, L B; Lie, S A; Havelin, L I; Furnes, O; Fevang, J M

    2010-03-01

    Internal fixation and arthroplasty are the two main options for the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly. The optimal treatment remains controversial. Using data from the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register, we compared the results of hemiarthroplasty and internal screw fixation in displaced femoral neck fractures. Data from 4335 patients over seventy years of age who had internal fixation (1823 patients) or hemiarthroplasty (2512 patients) to treat a displaced femoral neck fracture were compared at a minimum follow-up interval of twelve months. One-year mortality, the number of reoperations, and patient self-assessment of pain, satisfaction, and quality of life at four and twelve months were analyzed. Subanalyses of patients with cognitive impairment and reduced walking ability were done. In the arthroplasty group, only contemporary bipolar prostheses were used and uncemented prostheses with modern stems and hydroxyapatite coating accounted for 20.8% (522) of the implants. There were no differences in one-year mortality (27% in the osteosynthesis group and 25% in the arthroplasty group; p = 0.76). There were 412 reoperations (22.6%) performed in the osteosynthesis group and seventy-two (2.9%) in the hemiarthroplasty group during the follow-up period. After twelve months, the osteosynthesis group reported more pain (mean score, 29.9 compared with 19.2), higher dissatisfaction with the operation result (mean score, 38.9 compared with 25.7), and a lower quality of life (mean score, 0.51 compared with 0.60) than the arthroplasty group. All differences were significant (p < 0.001). For patients with cognitive impairment, hemiarthroplasty provided a better functional outcome (less pain, higher satisfaction with the result of the operation, and higher quality of life as measured on the EuroQol visual analog scale) at twelve months (p < 0.05). Displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly should be treated with hemiarthroplasty.

  17. Wintertime surgery increases the risk of conversion to hip arthroplasty after internal fixation of femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Sebestyén, A; Mester, S; Vokó, Z; Gajdácsi, J; Cserháti, P; Speer, G; Patczai, B; Warta, V; Bódis, J; Horváth, C; Boncz, I

    2015-03-01

    The study demonstrates that wintertime surgeries are associated with impaired fracture healing and increases the risk of conversion to hip arthroplasty after osteosynthesis of femoral neck fracture. Furthermore, the results raise the possibility of association between seasonal changes in vitamin D levels and impaired fracture healing of femoral neck fracture. Although the changes of vitamin D level and calcitropic hormones influencing bone metabolism are seasonal, the effect of seasons on hip fracture healing is unknown. We assessed the effects of seasonal periodicity on conversion to hip arthroplasty after primary osteosynthesis of femoral neck fracture. This nationwide retrospective observational cohort study involved 2779 patients aged ≥ 60 years who underwent internal screw fixation for primary femoral neck fracture and were discharged in 2000. Cases requiring conversion to arthroplasty during the 8-year follow-up derived from the Hungarian health insurance database were registered. Risk factors assessed included sex, age, fracture type, season of primary surgery and surgical delay. Competing-risks regression analysis was used for data analyses. During the observation period, 190 conversions to hip arthroplasty (6.8%) were identified, yielding an overall incidence of 19.5 per 1000 person-years. The crude incidence rates of conversions after osteosynthesis in winter, spring, summer and fall were 28.6, 17.8, 16.9 and 14.7 per 1000 person-years, respectively. Besides younger age, female sex and intracapsular fracture displacement, wintertime primary osteosynthesis significantly increased the risk of conversion (fall vs. winter, hazard ratio (HR): 0.50, 95% confidence interval [95% CI 0.33-0.76]; spring vs. winter, HR: 0.63, [95% CI 0.44-0.92]; summer vs. winter, HR: 0.62, [95% CI 0.42-0.91]). Our study demonstrate that wintertime primary osteosynthesis increases the risk of conversion surgeries. The results may help improving the outcome of primary fixation of

  18. Fixation Release and the Bone Bandaid: A New Bone Fixation Device Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Jahadakbar, Ahmadreza; Amerinatanzi, Amirhesam; Skoracki, Roman; Miller, Michael; Dean, David; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The current gold standard of care for mandibular segmental defeat reconstruction is the use of Ti-6Al-4V immobilization hardware and fibular double barrel graft. This method is often successful immediately at restoring mandible function, however the highly stiff fixation hardware causes stress shielding of the grafted bone and stress concentration in the fixation device over time which can lead to fixation device failure and revision surgery. The purpose of reconstructive surgery could be to create normal stress trajectories in the mandible following engraftment. We investigate the use of a two stage mechanism which separates the immobilization/healing and regenerative phases of mandibular segmental defect treatment. The device includes the use of a very stiff, Ti-6Al-4V, releasable mechanism which assures bone healing. Therefore it could be released once the reconstructed boney tissue and any of its ligamentous attachments have completely healed. Underneath the released Ti-6Al-4V plate would be a pre-loaded nitinol (NiTi) wire-frame apparatus that facilitates the normal stress-strain trajectory through the engrafted bone after the graft is healed in place and the Ti-6Al-4V fixation device has been released. Due to the use of NiTi wires forming a netting that connects vascularized bone and possibly bone chips, bone grafts are also more likely to be incorporate rather than to resorb. We first evaluated a healthy adult mandible during normal mastication to obtain the normal stress-strain distribution. Then, we developed the finite element (FE) model of the mandibular reconstruction (in the M1-3 region) with the proposed fixation device during the healing (locked state) and post-healing (released state) periods. To recreate normal stress trajectory in the reconstructed mandible, we applied the Response Surface Methodology (RMS) to optimize the Bone Bandaid geometry (i.e., wire diameters and location). The results demonstrate that the proposed mechanism immobilizes the

  19. Femoral Artery Stenosis Following Percutaneous Closure Using a Starclose Closure Device

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare Louise; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2008-07-15

    Starclose (Abbott Vascular Devices, Redwood City, CA) is a new arterial closure device that seals a femoral puncture site with an extravascular star-shaped nitinol clip. The clip projects small tines into the arterial wall which fold inward, causing the arterial wall to pucker, producing a purse-string-like seal closing the puncture site. The case history is that of a 76-year-old female patient who underwent day-case percutaneous diagnostic coronary angiography. A Starclose femoral artery closure device was used to achieve hemostasis with subsequent femoral artery stenosis.

  20. Fixation of intertrochanteric femur fractures using Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation (PFNA) in the lateral decubitus position without a traction table.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ali; Kalenderer, Önder; Günaydın, Burak; Önvural, Burak; Karapınar, Levent; Ağuş, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether intertrochanteric femur fractures can be reduced and nailed properly in the lateral decubitus position using Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation (PFNA) as a fixation device without the use of a traction table. The study included 207 patients (81 male and 126 female; mean age: 75 years, range: 22 to 95 years). According to the Evans classification, there were 7 Type 1, 40 Type 2, 33 Type 3, 38 Type 4, 61 Type 5 and 28 reverse oblique fractures. Radiographs were used to measure the tip-apex distance (TAD), the quadrant of the helical blade according to Cleveland and Bosworth, Ikuta's reduction subgroup, collodiaphyseal angle and reduction gaps postoperatively. Mean follow-up time was 20.4 (range: 6 to 38) months. According to Ikuta's classification, 176 (85%) reduced fractures were of subtype N, 15 (7.2%) subtype P and 16 (7.7%) subtype A. Good or acceptable reduction according to the Herman criteria was obtained in 99% of fractures. Mean TAD was 29.2 millimeters. Mean operation time was 57.2 minutes. Optimal blade position (center-center or inferior-center) was achieved in 53.5% of patients and was in the superior-posterior quadrants in only 2.4% of patients. Cut-out complication occurred in 9 patients (4.3%). While the nailing of intertrochanteric fractures in a lateral decubitus position does not provide ideal quadrant placement and TAD, results are encouraging probably due to the excellent stability that is provided by PFNA.

  1. Biomechanical Comparison of Fixation Devices for First Metatarsocuneiform Joint Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Ashleen R; Fleming, John F; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Ho, Nathan C; Warganich, Tibor; Harris, Thomas G; Sangiorgio, Sophia N

    2017-08-01

    Common surgical treatment of first tarsal-metatarsal arthritis is by first metatarsocuneiform joint arthrodesis. While crossed-screw and locking plate fixation are the most widely used methods, a novel construct was designed to alleviate soft tissue irritation while still providing stable fixation. Using anatomic first metatarsal and medial cuneiform composites, we compared 3 arthrodesis implants (crossed-screw, dorsal locking plate, and IO Fix) under 2 cyclic bending loading scenarios (cantilever and 4-point bending). Additionally, the optimal orientation (plantar-dorsal or dorsal-plantar) of the IO Fix construct was determined. Failure load, diastasis, joint space angle, and axial and angular stiffness were determined. Both crossed-screw fixation and the IO Fix constructs experienced significantly higher failure loads than the dorsal locking plate during both loading scenarios. Additionally, they had lower plantar diastasis and joint space angle at failure than the plate. Moreover, the plantar-dorsal IO Fix construct was significantly stiffer than the crossed-screw during cantilever bending. Finally, the plantar-dorsal orientation of the IO Fix device had higher failure load and lower diastasis and angle at failure than in the dorsal-plantar orientation. The results suggest that the IO Fix system can reduce motion at the interfragmentary site and ensure compression for healing comparable to that of the crossed-screw fixation. Level V: Bench testing.

  2. Costs of internal fixation and arthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures: a randomized study of 68 patients.

    PubMed

    Rogmark, Cecilia; Carlsson, Ake; Johnell, Olof; Sembo, Ingemar

    2003-06-01

    We included in a prospective, randomized study 68 patients aged 70 years or older, with displaced cervical hip fractures. The patients were randomized to internal fixation with hook-pins (36) or primary arthroplasty (32) (total or hemiarthroplasty due to their prefracture status) and followed for 2 years. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, mental confusion and/or residence in an institution were excluded. The postoperative stay in hospital, rehabilitation wards or nursing homes were recorded as well as complications and the costs of surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the accumulated costs of each method, during the first 2 years after the fracture. In the internal fixation group, 15/36 were considered failures, as compared to 1/32 in the arthroplasty group. As regards primary treatment of the fracture, the durations of surgery and hospital stay were shorter after internal fixation, but the total need for hospitalization/institutionalization was somewhat longer in these patients. The mean 2-year cost for a patient with internal fixation was USD 21,000 and of one with primary arthroplasty USD 15,000. We conclude that primary arthroplasty is a cost-efficient treatment. Considering the very much higher failure rate after internal fixation--leading to increased suffering for these patients--primary arthroplasty stands out as the best method for displaced fractures of the femoral neck.

  3. Wiring Techniques for the Fixation of Trochanteric Fragments during Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Intertrochanteric Fracture: Clinical Study and Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yongsuk; Kim, Junhyun; Kim, Dong-Won

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Femoral intertrochanteric fractures are common in the elderly. Appropriate surgical fixation of trochanteric fracture fragments can restore normal anatomical structure and ambulation, and can aid in the recovery of biomechanical function of the hip. We evaluated clinical outcomes of bipolar hemiarthroplasty using a wiring technique for trochanteric fracture fragment fixation. Materials and Methods From September 2006 to February 2015, a total of 260 cases underwent simultaneous bipolar hemiarthroplasty and wire fixation. A total of 65 patients (69 hips) with an average age of 78 years and more than one year of follow-up was included in the study. Using pre-, postoperative and follow-up radiograms, we evaluated wire fixation failure and also assessed changes in walking ability. Results Loosening or osteolysis around the stem was not observed; however, we did observe bone growth around the stem (54 cases), cortical hypertrophy (6 cases), a wide range of sclerotic lines but no stem subsidence (1 case), wire breakage (9 cases), and fracture fragment migration with no significant functional deficiency (2 cases). Conclusion Our study showed that additional wiring for trochanteric fracture fragment fixation following bipolar hemiarthroplasty can help restore normal anatomy. The added stability results in faster rehabilitation, and good clinical and radiographic outcomes. We recommend this procedure in this type of fracture. PMID:28316962

  4. A predictive method for subsequent avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) by observation of bleeding from the cannulated screw used for fixation of intracapsular femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myung-Rae; Lee, Sang-Wook; Shin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Kun; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Ko, Sang-Bong; Kwun, Koing-Woo

    2007-03-01

    To examine the validity of bleeding from the drill holes used for cannulated screw placement as a method for predicting any subsequent avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH) after the fixation of intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Retrospective study. University hospital. Forty-four patients (mean age, 51 years; range, 18-76 years) whose femoral neck fractures had been fixed with cannulated screws from March 1999 to January 2001 were enrolled in this study. The fractures were classified according to Garden and included 11 type I, 5 type II, 17 type III, and 11 type IV. The average delay between injury and surgery was 52 hours (< or =24 hours, 26; > or =24 hours, 18; range 7 to 504 hours). The follow-up period was more than 25 months (range, 25-57 months). 7.0 mm cannulated screws were used for fracture fixation. Three and 4 screws were used for fixation in 35 and 9 cases, respectively. The presence or absence of blood drainage from the holes of the proximal cannulated screws was determined by an independent observer and defined as bleeding or no bleeding throughout a 5 minute observation period. According to those findings, patients were classified into 2 groups: the bleeding group (38 cases), and the nonbleeding group (6 cases). The validity of the relationship between the 2 groups and the development of AVNFH was evaluated according to the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. A chi test was used for univariate analysis of the relationship between the related factors with the development of AVNFH. The mean follow-up was 39 months (range, 25-57 months). AVNFH developed in 7 cases (16%). One patient of 38 in the bleeding group (2.6%) and all 6 patients in the nonbleeding group (100%) developed AVNFH. The sensitivity was 86%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 97%. Age (P < 0.734), sex (P < 0.587), the type of the fracture (P < 0.356), procedure interval (P < 0

  5. Successful femoral reconstruction with a fluted and tapered modular distal fixation stem in revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Skyttä, E T; Eskelinen, A; Remes, V

    2012-01-01

    Early results of fluted and tapered distal fixation stems used in reconstruction of deficient femora in femoral revision arthroplasty have been successful in small series. We evaluated the survival of the LINK MP Reconstruction Hip Stem and factors associated with survival using data from a nation-wide arthroplasty register. 408 femoral revisions using LINK MP Reconstruction Hip Stem were performed during 1994 to 2007. The mean age of the patients was 72.5 (range: 36-93) years and 63% were performed in women. Kaplan-Meier analysis and the Cox regression model were used for the survival analysis. The effects of age, sex and diagnoses were also studied. The 9-year overall survivorship for the LINK MP Reconstruction Hip Stem was 75% (95% CI 70-80). Aseptic loosening was rare; the 9-year revision rate for aseptic loosening was only 3%, which coincides with earlier reports with shorter folllow-up. The most common reason for re-revision was dislocation of the prosthesis with or without malposition of the socket (67%). Indication for revision strongly affected the survival rate with revisions for dislocation having an over 3-fold and revisions for infection a 3-fold relative risk for re-revision compared to revisions for aseptic loosening. Increasing age slightly decreased the risk of re-revision but sex did not affect the survival. Based on our findings, we conclude LINK MP Reconstruction Hip Stem, as an example of a fluted and tapered distal fixation stem, appears to solve many problems with implant fixation in femoral revisions. High number of dislocations suggests that special attention should be paid to correct center of rotation, to correct implant positioning and to need of constrained implants in case of deficient abductor mechanism.

  6. Three-point fixation walking spica cast: an alternative to early or immediate casting of femoral shaft fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Guttmann, G G; Simon, R

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective review of 28 children treated for middle and proximal femoral shaft fractures was undertaken. Following preliminary traction, a modified pantaloon walking spica, utilizing the principle of total contact and three-point fixation molding, was applied, followed by immediate ambulation. The mean anterior bow was 5 degrees varus/valgus, 6.5 degrees angulation, and 1.2 cm shortening. There were no significant differences in the results when age groups or proximal to mid-shaft fractures were compared. No further shortening or angulation occurred with ambulation. The advantages of early ambulation and better control of proximal shaft fractures are discussed.

  7. Analysis of a Lane-plate internal fixation device after 64 years in vivo.

    PubMed

    McAuley, J P; Gow, K V; Covert, A; McDermott, A G; Yabsley, R H

    1987-11-01

    A patient presented for an above-knee amputation 64 years after successful internal fixation of a femoral fracture with a Lane plate. Chemical analyses of the plate and corrosion products were done using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, x-ray energy spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical properties of the fixation devices were measured using Rockwell-type instruments and metallographic analyses were also performed. In addition, pathologic and radiologic investigations of the underlying bone were carried out. Results disclosed that extensive corrosion had weakened the plate by 50%. The metallosis of the surrounding soft tissues and abnormal morphologic features of underlying bone were analysed. No appreciable cellular inflammatory or dysplastic reaction of adjacent tissues was identified. The underlying bone showed a persistent lack of mature compact bone and no evidence of remodelling. The products of corrosion were mainly ferrous carbonate and some ferrous chloride. The mechanism of the corrosion was the formation of a galvanic cell between the iron carbide and surrounding iron, with dissolution of the iron and formation of the corrosion products.

  8. The influence of proximal stem geometry and surface finish on the fixation of a double-tapered cemented femoral stem.

    PubMed

    Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Longjohn, Donald B; Dorr, Lawrence D; Ebramzadeh, Edward

    2011-01-04

    In this study, the in vitro fixation of four otherwise identical double-tapered stem-types, varying only in surface finish (polished or matte) and proximal stem geometry (with or without flanges) were compared under two conditions. First, four specimens of each stem type were tested with initially bonded stem-cement interfaces, representing early post-operative conditions. Then, simulating conditions a few weeks to months later, stems were implanted in unused synthetic femurs, with a thin layer coating the stem to prevent stem-cement adhesion. Per-cycle motions were measured at both cement interfaces throughout loading. Overall, surface finish had the smallest relative effect on fixation compared to flanges. Flanges increased axial fixation by 22 μm per-cycle, regardless of surface finish (P=0.01). Further, all stems moved under dynamic load at the stem-cement interface during the first few cycles of loading, even without a thin film. The results indicate that flanges have a greater effect on fixation than surface finish, and therefore adverse findings about matte surfaces should not necessarily apply to all double-tapered stems. Specifically, dorsal flanges enhance the stability of a tapered cemented femoral stem, regardless of surface finish.

  9. Risk factors of avascular necrosis of the femoral head and fixation failure in patients with valgus angulated femoral neck fractures over the age of 50 years.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyung Keun; Choi, Ho June; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-12-01

    The aim of our study was to identify the risk factors for avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN) and fixation failure (FF) after screw osteosynthesis in patients with valgus angulated femoral neck fractures. We conducted a retrospective study of 308 patients (mean age, 72.5 years, range, 50-97 years), with a mean follow-up of 21.4 months (range, 12-64 months). The risk for failure in treatment (FIT) associated with patient- and fracture-related factors was evaluated by logistic regression analyses. FIT was identified in 32 cases (10.3%): 22 cases (7.1%) of AVN and 10 cases (3.2%) of FF. Initial valgus tilt>15° (p=0.023), posterior tilt>15° (p=0.012), and screw sliding distance (p=0.037) were significantly associated with FIT. FIT occurred in 7 patients (5.2%) with B1.2.1 fractures and 17 patients (48.6%) with B1.1.2 fractures (p<0.001). The odds of FIT were 17-fold higher in patients with initial valgus and posterior tilts>15° (B1.1.2) compared to patients with <15° of tilt in both planes (B1.2.1). The severity of initial deformity predicts AVN and FF in patients with valgus angulated femoral neck fractures. Patients with an initial valgus and posterior tilt>15° are reasonable candidates for primary arthroplasty due to high risk of FIT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Low bone mineral density is not related to failure in femoral neck fracture patients treated with internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Viberg, Bjarke; Ryg, Jesper; Overgaard, Søren; Lauritsen, Jens; Ovesen, Ole

    2014-02-01

    Internal fixation (IF) in femoral neck fractures has high reoperation rates and some predictors of failure are known, such as age, quality of reduction, and implant positioning. Finding new predictors of failure is an ongoing process, and in this study we evaluated the importance of low bone mineral density (BMD). 140 consecutive patients (105 females, median age 80) treated with IF had a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan of the hip performed median 80 days after treatment. The patients' radiographs were evaluated for fracture displacement, implant positioning, and quality of reduction. From a questionnaire completed during admission, 2 variables for comorbidity and walking disability were chosen. Primary outcome was low hip BMD (amount of mineral matter per square centimeter of hip bone) compared to hip failure (resection, arthroplasty, or new hip fracture). A stratified Cox regression model on fracture displacement was applied and adjusted for age, sex, quality of reduction, implant positioning, comorbidity, and walking disability. 49 patients had a T-score below -2.5 (standard deviation from the young normal reference mean) and 70 patients had a failure. The failure rate after 2 years was 22% (95% CI: 12-39) for the undisplaced fractures and 66% (CI: 56-76) for the displaced fractures. Cox regression showed no association between low hip BMD and failure. For the covariates, only implant positioning showed an association with failure. We found no statistically significant association between low hip BMD and fixation failure in femoral neck fracture patients treated with IF.

  11. The influence of stem length and fixation on initial femoral component stability in revision total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Conlisk, N.; Gray, H.; Pankaj, P.; Howie, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Orthopaedic surgeons use stems in revision knee surgery to obtain stability when metaphyseal bone is missing. No consensus exists regarding stem size or method of fixation. This in vitro study investigated the influence of stem length and method of fixation on the pattern and level of relative motion at the bone–implant interface at a range of functional flexion angles. Methods A custom test rig using differential variable reluctance transducers (DVRTs) was developed to record all translational and rotational motions at the bone–implant interface. Composite femurs were used. These were secured to permit variation in flexion angle from 0° to 90°. Cyclic loads were applied through a tibial component based on three peaks corresponding to 0°, 10° and 20° flexion from a normal walking cycle. Three different femoral components were investigated in this study for cementless and cemented interface conditions. Results Relative motions were found to increase with flexion angle. Stemmed implants reduced relative motions in comparison to stemless implants for uncemented constructs. Relative motions for cemented implants were reduced to one-third of their equivalent uncemented constructs. Conclusions Stems are not necessary for cemented implants when the metaphyseal bone is intact. Short cemented femoral stems confer as much stability as long uncemented stems. PMID:23610659

  12. Internal Fixation Versus Hemiarthroplasty for Displaced Intra-Capsular Femoral Neck Fractures in ASA 3-5 Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie, W.; Wei, W.; Cleffken, B.I.; van der Vlies, C.H.; Cleffken, B.I.; Roukema, G.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The treatment of choice for elderly with a displaced intra-capsular femoral neck fractures is prosthetic replacement. This is however a major surgical procedure for geriatric patients with multiple co-morbidities which can threaten hemodynamic stability and lead to death. In this study we compared the outcome of internal fixation (IF) versus hemiarthroplasty (HA) for the management of intra-capsular femoral neck fractures in the elderly with severe co-morbidities. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all the patients who were admitted to our Level-II trauma centre with a femoral neck fracture between January 2009 and June 2011. Inclusion criteria were: 70 years or older, ASA 3 or higher, a displaced femoral neck fracture and treatment with either internal fixation or a cemented hemiprosthesis. The primary outcome was 6-month mortality rate. Secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality, post-operative complications, re-operation rate and length of hospital stay. Results: 80 patients met our inclusion criteria. The mean age of the IF group was 81.6 years and in the HA group it was 84.5 years (P=0.07). The medical records were retrieved 34-64 months after surgery. Two intra-operative deaths due to cement implantation syndrome were found in the HA group and none in the IF group. Twelve patients (21.8%) in the HA group died within 30 days after surgery and 2 (8.0%) in the IF group (P=0.21). The mean operating time was 83 min. for the HA group and 51 min. for the IF group (P=0.000). There were more implant-related complications in the IF than in the HA group (36% vs 9.1% respectively, P=0.008). The 6-month mortality rates didn’t differ between the IF and the HA groups (respectively 28.0% vs 34.5%, P=0.62). Conclusion: The post-operative mortality rates did not differ between the IF and the HA groups in elderly patients with a displaced femoral neck fracture and ASA 3 to 5. However, the HA associated with less implant-related complications than

  13. Successful Angioplasty of a Superficial Femoral Artery Stenosis Caused by a Suture-Mediated Closure Device

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmete, Joseph J. Dasika, Narasimham; Forauer, Andrew R.; Cho, Kyung; Williams, David M.

    2003-08-15

    We report the successful angioplasty of an acute arterial narrowing after suture-mediated closure (SMC) of a femoral arterial puncture. A 75-year-old woman underwent a cerebral arteriogramvia a right common femoral artery puncture. The arteriotomy site was closed with a SMC device. Four days after placement the patient complained of pain in her right calf after walking. An arteriogram 7 days after SMC showed a severe focal stenosis at the origin of the superficial femoral artery involving the presumed puncture site. The lesion was successfully treated with balloon angioplasty. The patient at 6 months was asymptomatic.

  14. Incidence of and Factors Influencing Femoral Neck Shortening in Elderly Patients After Fracture Fixation with Multiple Cancellous Screws

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobin; Zhang, Jianzheng; Wang, Xinling; Ren, Jixin; Liu, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Background To study the incidence of and factors influencing “neck shortening” in elderly patients treated for femoral neck fractures using multiple cancellous screws. Material/Methods Of the 197 femoral neck fracture cases treated via closed reduction and cancellous screws fixation from January 2006 to February 2010, 110 were followed up. Patient age, gender, operative time, implantation method, reduction quality, fracture type, bone mineral density, loading time, length of hospital stay, and Harris hip score 12 months after operation were recorded. The patients were divided into two groups (shortening and non-shortening) based on their X-ray performance during follow-up. The healing rates and Harris hip scores of the two groups were compared, and the influencing factors of femoral neck shortening were analyzed. Results Of the 110 cases followed up, 94.5% (104/110) were healed and neck shortening occurred in 41.8% (46/110) within 12.5 months (mean) after treatment. The Harris hip score of the shortening group was lower than that of the non-shortening group (78±17 vs. 86±23, p=0.048). The fracture healing rates of the two groups were not significantly different (p=0.068). The factors influencing neck shortening were significantly correlated with bone mineral density, patient age, gender, and type of fracture. Conclusions The incidence of neck shortening in elderly patients treated for femoral neck fracture using cancellous screws was high. Bone mineral density, patient age, gender, and type of fracture were the influencing factors of neck shortening. PMID:28343233

  15. Lower reoperation rate for cemented hemiarthroplasty than for uncemented hemiarthroplasty and internal fixation following femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Elderly patients with displaced femoral neck fractures are commonly treated with a hemiarthroplasty (HA), but little is known about the long-term failure of this treatment. We compared reoperation rates for patients aged at least 75 years with displaced femoral neck fractures treated with either internal fixation (IF), cemented HA, or uncemented HA (with or without hydroxyapatite coating), after 12–19 years of follow-up. Methods 4 hospitals with clearly defined guidelines for the treatment of 75+ year-old patients with a displaced femoral neck fracture were included. Cohort 1 (1991–1993) with 180 patients had undergone IF; cohort 2 (1991–1995) with 203 patients had received an uncemented bipolar Ultima HA stem (Austin-Moore); cohort 3 (1991–1995) with 209 patients had received a cemented Charnley-Hastings HA; and cohort 4 (1991–1998) with 158 patients had received an uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated Furlong HA. Data were retrieved from patient files, from the region-based patient administrative system, and from the National Registry of Patients at the end of 2010. We performed survival analysis with adjustment for comorbidity, age, and sex. Results Cemented HA had a reoperation rate (RR) of 5% and was used as reference in the Cox regression analysis, which showed significantly higher hazard ratios (HRs) for IF (HR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.9–7.5; RR = 18%), uncemented HA (HR = 2.2, CI: 1.1–4.5; RR = 11%) and uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated HA (HR = 3.6, CI: 1.8–7.4; RR = 16%). Interpretation Cemented HA has a superior long-term hip survival rate compared to IF and uncemented HA (with and without hydroxyapatite coating) in patients aged 75 years or more with displaced femoral neck fractures. PMID:23594248

  16. Clinical Results of Technique for Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hybrid Femoral Fixation and Retroscrew

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doo-Sup; Yi, Chang-Ho; Chung, Hoi-Jung

    2011-01-01

    Background Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been presented as a means to more accurately restore the native anatomy of this ligament. This article describes a new method that uses a double bundle to perform ACL reconstruction and to evaluate the clinical outcome. Methods Grafts are tibialis anterior tendon allograft for anteromedial bundle (AMB) and hamstring tendon autograft without detachment of the tibial insertion for posterolateral bundle (PLB). This technique creates 2 tunnels in both the femur and tibia. Femoral fixation was done by hybrid fixation using Endobutton and Rigidfix for AMB and by biointerference screw for PLB. Tibial fixations are done by Retroscrew for AMB and by native insertion of hamstring tendon for PLB. Both bundles are independently and differently tensioned. We performed ACL reconstruction in 63 patients using our new technique. Among them, 47 participated in this study. The patients were followed up with clinical examination, Lysholm scales and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system and radiological examination with a minimum 12 month follow-up duration. Results Significant improvement was seen on Lachman test and pivot-shift test between preoperative and last follow-up. Only one of participants had flexion contracture about 5 degrees at last follow-up. In anterior drawer test by KT-1000, authors found improvement from average 8.3 mm (range, 4 to 18 mm) preoperatively to average 1.4 mm (range, 0 to 6 mm) at last follow-up. Average Lysholm score of all patients was 72.7 ± 8.8 (range, 54 to 79) preoperatively and significant improvement was seen, score was 92.2 ± 5.3 (range, 74 to 97; p < 0.05) at last follow-up. Also IKDC score was normal in 35 cases, near normal in 11 cases, abnormal in 1 case at last follow-up. Conclusions Our new double bundle ACL reconstruction technique used hybrid fixation and Retroscrew had favorable outcomes. PMID:22162791

  17. Biomechanical characterization of double-bundle femoral press-fit fixation techniques.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, M; Haasper, C; Hankemeier, S; Hurschler, C; Breitmeier, D; Krettek, C; Jagodzinski, M

    2011-03-01

    Press-fit fixation of patellar tendon bone anterior cruciate ligament autografts is an interesting technique because no hardware is necessary. To date, no biomechanical data exist describing an implant-free double-bundle press-fit procedure. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biomechanical properties of three double-bundle press-fit fixations. In a controlled laboratory study, the patellar-, quadriceps- and hamstring tendons of 10 human cadavers (age: 49.2 ± 18.5 years) were used. An inside out press-fit fixation with a knot in the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons (SG) combined with an additional bone block, with two quadriceps tendon bone block grafts (QU) was compared with press-fit fixation of two bone patellar tendon bone block (PT) grafts in 30 porcine femora. Constructs were cyclically stretched and then loaded until failure. Maximum load to failure, stiffness and elongation during failure testing and cyclical loading were investigated. The maximum load to failure was 703 ± 136 N for SG fixation, 632 ± 130 N for QU and 656 ± 127 N for PT fixation. Stiffness of the constructs averaged 138 ± 26 N/mm for SG, 159 ± 74 N/mm for QU, and 154 ± 50 N/mm for PT fixation. Elongation during initial cyclical loading was 1.2 ± 1.4 mm for SG, 2.0 ± 1.4 mm for QU, and 1.0 ± 0.6 mm for PT (significantly larger for PT and QU between the first 5 cycles compared with cycles 15-20th, P < 0.01). All investigated double-bundle fixation techniques were equal in terms of maximum load to failure, stiffness, and elongation. Unlike with single-bundle press-fit fixation techniques that have been published, no difference was observed between pure tendon combined with an additional bone block and tendon bone grafts. All techniques exhibited larger elongation during initial cyclical loading. All three press-fit fixation techniques that were investigated exhibit comparable biomechanical properties. Preconditioning of the constructs

  18. Vascular closure devices for femoral arterial puncture site haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lindsay; Andras, Alina; Colgan, Frances; Jackson, Ralph

    2016-03-07

    Vascular closure devices (VCDs) are widely used to achieve haemostasis after procedures requiring percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture. There is no consensus regarding the benefits of VCDs, including potential reduction in procedure time, length of hospital stay or time to patient ambulation. No robust evidence exists that VCDs reduce the incidence of puncture site complications compared with haemostasis achieved through extrinsic (manual or mechanical) compression. To determine the efficacy and safety of VCDs versus traditional methods of extrinsic compression in achieving haemostasis after retrograde and antegrade percutaneous arterial puncture of the CFA. The Cochrane Vascular Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (April 2015) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 3). Clinical trials databases were searched for details of ongoing or unpublished studies. References of articles retrieved by electronic searches were searched for additional citations. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in which people undergoing a diagnostic or interventional procedure via percutaneous CFA puncture were randomised to one type of VCD versus extrinsic compression or another type of VCD. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of trials. We resolved disagreements by discussion with the third author. We performed meta-analyses when heterogeneity (I(2)) was < 90%. The primary efficacy outcomes were time to haemostasis and time to mobilisation (mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI)). The primary safety outcome was a major adverse event (mortality and vascular injury requiring repair) (odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI). Secondary outcomes included adverse events. We included 52 studies (19,192 participants) in the review. We found studies comparing VCDs with extrinsic compression (sheath size ≤ 9 Fr), different VCDs with each other

  19. A novel internal fixator device for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Wilson, Robin E; Love, James M; Fisher, John P; Shah, Sameer B

    2013-06-01

    Recovery from peripheral nerve damage, especially for a transected nerve, is rarely complete, resulting in impaired motor function, sensory loss, and chronic pain with inappropriate autonomic responses that seriously impair quality of life. In consequence, strategies for enhancing peripheral nerve repair are of high clinical importance. Tension is a key determinant of neuronal growth and function. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that moderate levels of imposed tension (strain) can encourage axonal outgrowth; however, few strategies of peripheral nerve repair emphasize the mechanical environment of the injured nerve. Toward the development of more effective nerve regeneration strategies, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and implementation of a novel, modular nerve-lengthening device, which allows the imposition of moderate tensile loads in parallel with existing scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies for nerve repair. This concept would enable nerve regeneration in two superposed regimes of nerve extension--traditional extension through axonal outgrowth into a scaffold and extension in intact regions of the proximal nerve, such as that occurring during growth or limb-lengthening. Self-sizing silicone nerve cuffs were fabricated to grip nerve stumps without slippage, and nerves were deformed by actuating a telescoping internal fixator. Poly(lactic co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) constructs mounted on the telescoping rods were apposed to the nerve stumps to guide axonal outgrowth. Neuronal cells were exposed to PLGA using direct contact and extract methods, and they exhibited no signs of cytotoxic effects in terms of cell morphology and viability. We confirmed the feasibility of implanting and actuating our device within a sciatic nerve gap and observed axonal outgrowth following device implantation. The successful fabrication and implementation of our device provides a novel method for examining mechanical influences on nerve regeneration.

  20. Mechanical testing of a device for subcutaneous internal anterior pelvic ring fixation versus external pelvic ring fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although useful in the emergency treatment of pelvic ring injuries, external fixation is associated with pin tract infections, the patient’s limited mobility and a restricted surgical accessibility to the lower abdomen. In this study, the mechanical stability of a subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) system is investigated. Methods A standard external fixation and a SIAF system were tested on pairs of Polyoxymethylene testing cylinders using a universal testing machine. Each specimen was subjected to a total of 2000 consecutive cyclic loadings at 1 Hz with sinusoidal lateral compression/distraction (+/−50 N) and torque (+/− 0.5 Nm) loading alternating every 200 cycles. Translational and rotational stiffness were determined at 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 cycles. Results There was no significant difference in translational stiffness between the SIAF and the standard external fixation when compared at 500 (p = .089), 700 (p = .081), and 900 (p = .266) cycles. Rotational stiffness observed for the SIAF was about 50 percent higher than the standard external fixation at 300 (p = .005), 500 (p = .020), and 900 (p = .005) cycles. No loosening or failure of the rod-pin/rod-screw interfaces was seen. Conclusions In comparison with the standard external fixation system, the tested device for subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) in vitro has similar translational and superior rotational stiffness. PMID:24684828

  1. Suitability of Exoseal Vascular Closure Device for Antegrade Femoral Artery Puncture Site Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelter, Christopher Liebl, Andrea; Poullos, Nektarios; Ruppert, Volker; Vorwerk, Dierk

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of the Exoseal vascular closure device for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. Methods. In a prospective study from February 2011 to January 2012, a total of 93 consecutive patients received a total of 100 interventional procedures via an antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. An Exoseal vascular closure device (6F) was used for closure in all cases. Puncture technique, duration of manual compression, and use of compression bandages were documented. All patients were monitored by vascular ultrasound and color-coded duplex sonography of their respective femoral artery puncture site within 12 to 36 h after angiography to check for vascular complications. Results. In 100 antegrade interventional procedures, the Exoseal vascular closure device was applied successfully for closure of the femoral artery puncture site in 96 cases (96 of 100, 96.0 %). The vascular closure device could not be deployed in one case as a result of kinking of the vascular sheath introducer and in three cases because the bioabsorbable plug was not properly delivered to the extravascular space adjacent to the arterial puncture site, but instead fully removed with the delivery system (4.0 %). Twelve to 36 h after the procedure, vascular ultrasound revealed no complications at the femoral artery puncture site in 93 cases (93.0 %). Minor vascular complications were found in seven cases (7.0 %), with four cases (4.0 %) of pseudoaneurysm and three cases (3.0 %) of significant late bleeding, none of which required surgery. Conclusion. The Exoseal vascular closure device was safely used for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery, with a high rate of procedural success (96.0 %), a low rate of minor vascular complications (7.0 %), and no major adverse events.

  2. The effects of femoral neck cut, cable tension, and muscles forces on the greater trochanter fixation.

    PubMed

    Petit, Yvan; Cloutier, Luc P; Duke, Kajsa; Laflamme, G Yves

    2012-04-01

    Greater trochanter (GT) stabilization techniques following a fracture or an osteotomy are still showing high levels of postoperative complications. Understanding the effect of femoral neck cut placement, cable tension and muscles forces on GT fragment displacements could help surgeons optimize their techniques. A 3D finite element model has been developed to evaluate, through a statistical experimental design, the impact of the above variables on the GT fragment gap and sliding displacements. Muscles forces were simulating typical daily activities. Stresses were also investigated. The femoral neck cut placement had the most significant effect on the fragment displacement. Lowering it by 5 mm increased the gap and sliding fragment displacements by 288 and 128 %, respectively. Excessive cable tightening provided no significant reduction in fragment displacement. Muscle activities increased the gap and the sliding displacements for all muscle configurations. The maximum total displacement of 0.41 mm was present with a 10 mm femoral neck cut, a cable tension of 178 N, and stair climbing. Caution must be used not to over tighten the cables as the potential damage caused by the increased stress is more significant than any reduction in fragment displacement. Furthermore, preservation of the contact area is important for GT stabilization.

  3. The effect of percutaneous pin fixation in the treatment of distal femoral physeal fractures.

    PubMed

    Garrett, B R; Hoffman, E B; Carrara, H

    2011-05-01

    Distal femoral physeal fractures in children have a high incidence of physeal arrest, occurring in a mean of 40% of cases. The underlying nature of the distal femoral physis may be the primary cause, but other factors have been postulated to contribute to the formation of a physeal bar. The purpose of this study was to assess the significance of contributing factors to physeal bar formation, in particular the use of percutaneous pins across the physis. We reviewed 55 patients with a median age of ten years (3 to 13), who had sustained displaced distal femoral physeal fractures. Most (40 of 55) were treated with percutaneous pinning after reduction, four were treated with screws and 11 with plaster. A total of 40 patients were assessed clinically and radiologically after skeletal maturity or at the time of formation of a bar. The remaining 15 were followed up for a minimum of two years. Formation of a physeal bar occurred in 12 (21.8%) patients, with the rate rising to 30.6% in patients with high-energy injuries compared with 5.3% in those with low-energy injuries. There was a significant trend for physeal arrest according to increasing severity using the Salter-Harris classification. Percutaneous smooth pins across the physis were not statistically associated with growth arrest.

  4. Are ligament-tensioning devices interchangeable? A study of femoral rotation.

    PubMed

    Basselot, F; Gicquel, T; Common, H; Hervé, A; Berton, E; Ropars, M; Huten, D

    2016-06-01

    During total knee arthroplasty (TKA), femoral rotation can be adjusted either in relation to bony landmarks or by tensioning the ligaments with the knee in 90° of flexion. The primary objective of this study was to compare femoral rotations achieved using various ligament-tensioning devices. The secondary objective was to compare these femoral rotations to that indicated by the transepicondylar axis (TEA). We performed 13 posterior-stabilised TKA procedures using HiFit (Ceraver(®)) on cadaver knees. Before performing the posterior condyle cut, we used an original method to measure the femoral rotation induced by five different ligament-tensioning devices (2 with a ratchet mechanism, 1 with screws, 1 force-sensing device, and 1 with spacer blocks) and the central tibio-femoral distance (CTFD). Both ratchet tensioners provided significantly greater mean external rotation values (P=0.002), of 4.94° and 4.46°, respectively, compared to the force-sensing and spacer tensioners. Significant differences were found across devices for CTFD, with a mean difference of about 2mm between the ratchet and screw tensioners versus the force-sensing and spacer tensioners. The mean differences in rotations obtained using the tensioners versus the TEA were close to 0° but with standard deviations greater than 4°. Femoral rotation was dependent on the distraction force applied to the joint. Tensioners that did not measure the distraction force were associated with greater distraction force and external rotation values. The TEA criterion did not reliably indicate good ligament balance. Experimental study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. A comparison of external fixation and locked intramedullary nailing in the treatment of femoral diaphysis fractures from gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Polat, G; Balci, H I; Ergin, O N; Asma, A; Şen, C; Kiliçoğlu, Ö

    2017-07-18

    We studied the safety and incidence of complications from the treatment of gunshot-induced femur diaphysis fractures with locked intramedullary nailing in comparison to external fixation. Patients who had femoral diaphysis fracture operations due to gunshot injuries (107 femurs of 99 patients) between 2003 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed, and 66 femurs of 60 patients were place into two groups (Group A: intramedullary nailing-38 femurs of the 36 patients; Group B: external fixator-28 femurs of 24 patients). The mean follow-up was 76.3 months (22-131). The study outcomes were patient complications, infection rate, union time, need for secondary surgery, functional assessment with lower extremity functional scale, and radiological evaluation with orthoroentgenograms. The mean age of the patients was 37.3 ± 7.4 years in Group A and 39 ± 6.1 years in Group B. There was no significant difference between the two groups in age, gender or follow-up. There were two deep infections (5.2%) in Group A and one deep infection (3.5%) in Group B. Delayed union was observed in four patients (10.5%) in Group A and in two patients (7.1%) in Group B. There was one non-union (2.6%) and one non-union (3.5%) in Group A and Group B, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups in incidence of union, delayed union or deep infection. The mean union time was 3.1 ± 2.5 months in Group A and 5.8 ± 1.4 months in Group B. The union time was significantly lower in the intramedullary nailing group (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences between the two groups in regards to radiological and functional evaluation. This study showed similar complication rates and functional results both for external fixator and intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral diaphysis fractures due to gunshot injuries. Level 3 retrospective comparative clinical study.

  6. Decreasing Complications of Quadricepsplasty for Knee Contracture after Femoral Fracture Treatment with an External Fixator: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Mitsuaki; Saegusa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Masayasu; Kashiwagi, Naoya; Seto, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In performing quadricepsplasty for contracture that develops after application of an external fixator for femoral fractures, surgeons must be aware of the potential risk for re-fracture and pin-related problems. The purpose of this report is to highlight these not well-detailed complications and to discuss specific findings and treatment suggestions. Case Series: 4 men (mean age, 40 years) presenting with secondary to contracture that developed after application of an external fixator for femoral fractures were included in this study. The radiographs showed union across the fracture site however two of these patients couldn’t stand on one leg raising suspicion about the union status. A computed tomographic image indeed demonstrated limited continuity of the cortex. Bone grafting was performed prior to quadricepsplasty. The mean extension and flexion before the quadricepsplasty were 0° and 57°, respectively. At the final follow-up examination, the mean active flexion of the knee had increased to 98°. Results: The incidence of re-fracture during and after quadricepsplasty has been reported to be between 10 and 25%. There are 2 preoperative features that may mislead surgeons into believing that complete union of the fractures has been attained: one is the patient's ability to stand on a single leg, and the other is the fact that plain radiographs may lend themselves to different interpretations. In such cases, computed tomography will provide evidence of the continuity of the cortical bone. Bone grafting in 2 of our patients is thought to have prevented the postoperative complications of re-fracture. Complications at pin sites induce contracture at surrounding structures. When extreme tightness of the skin is noted, a tension-releasing procedure such as a skin graft should be performed. Conclusion: In conclusion, re-fracture or pin-site contracture should be carefully managed before quadricepsplasty, because the patients who need a lengthy

  7. The biomechanical effect of bone quality and fracture topography on locking plate fixation in periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Leonidou, Andreas; Moazen, Mehran; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Graham, Simon M; Macheras, George A; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2015-02-01

    Optimal management of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) around a well fixed prosthesis (Vancouver B1) remains controversial as adequate fixation needs to be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to highlight the effect of bone quality i.e. canal thickness ratio (CTR), and fracture topography i.e. fracture angle and its position in relation to the stem, on the biomechanics of a locking plate for a Vancouver B1 fracture. A previously corroborated simplified finite element model of a femur with a cemented total hip replacement stem was used in this study. Canal thickness ratio (CTR) and fracture topography were altered in several models and the effect of these variations on the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture displacement was studied. Increasing the CTR led to reduction of the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture movement. In respect to the fracture angle with the medial cortex, it was shown that acute angles resulted in lower von Mises stress on the plate as opposed to obtuse angles. Furthermore, acute fracture angles resulted in lower fracture displacement compared to the other fractures considered here. Fractures around the tip of the stem had the same biomechanical effect on the locking plate. However, fractures more distal to the stem led to subsequent increase of stress, strain, and fracture displacement. Results highlight that in good bone quality and acute fracture angles, single locking plate fixation is perhaps an appropriate management method. On the contrary, for poor bone quality and obtuse fracture angles alternative management methods might be required as the fixation might be under higher risk of failure. Clinical studies for the management of PFF are required to further support our findings.

  8. Preoperative posterior tilt of at least 20° increased the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dolatowski, Filip C; Adampour, Mina; Frihagen, Frede; Stavem, Knut; Erik Utvåg, Stein; Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose It has been suggested that preoperative posterior tilt of the femoral head may increase the risk of fixation failure in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures. To investigate this association, we studied a cohort of 322 such patients. Patients and methods Patients treated with internal fixation between 2005 and 2012 were retrospectively identified using hospital records and the digital image bank. 2 raters measured the preoperative posterior tilt angle and categorized it into 3 groups: < 10°, 10–20°, and ≥ 20°. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) was determined. Patients were observed until September 2013 (with a minimum follow-up of 18 months) or until failure of fixation necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The risk of fixation failure was assessed using competing-risk regression analysis, adjusting for time to surgery. Results Patients with a posterior tilt of ≥ 20° had a higher risk of fixation failure: 19% (8/43) as compared to 11% (14/127) in the 10–20° category and 6% (9/152) in the < 10° category (p = 0.03). Posterior tilt of ≥ 20° increased the risk of fixation failure, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.4 (95% CI: 1.3–8.9; p = 0.01). The interclass correlation coefficient for angular measurements of posterior tilt was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.92), and the IRR for the categorization of posterior tilt into 3 groups was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69–0.81). Interpretation Preoperative posterior tilt of ≥ 20° in Garden-I and -II femoral neck fractures increased the risk of fixation failure necessitating salvage arthroplasty. The reliability of the methods that we used to measure posterior tilt ranged from good to excellent. PMID:26937557

  9. Femoral press-fit fixation in ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft: results at 15 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background If anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to be performed, decision regarding graft choice and its fixation remains one of the most controversial. Multiple techniques for ACL reconstruction are available. To avoid disadvantages related to fixation devices, a hardware-free, press-fit ACL reconstruction technique was developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcome and osteoarthritis progression in long term after ACL reconstruction with central third patellar-tendon autograft fixed to femur by press-fit technique. Methods Fifty two patients met inclusion/excusion criteria for this study. The patients were assessed preoperatively and at 15 years after surgery with International Knee Documentation Committee Knee Ligament Evaluation Form, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity scale and radiographs. Results Good overall clinical outcomes and self-reported assessments were documented, and remained good at 15 years. The mean Lysholm and Tegner scores improved from 59.7 ± 18.5 and 4.2 ± 1.0 preoperatively to 86.4 ± 5.6 (p = 0.004) and 6.9 ± 1.4 (p = 0.005) respectively at follow-up. The IKDC subjective score improved from 60.1 ± 9.2 to 80.2 ± 8.1 (p = 0.003). According to IKDC objective score, 75% of patients had normal or nearly normal knee joints at follow-up. Grade 0 or 1 results were seen in 85% of patients on laxity testing. Degenerative changes were found in 67% of patients. There was no correlation between arthritic changes and stability of knee and subjective evaluation (p > 0.05). Conclusions ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft fixed to femur with press-fit technique allows to achieve good self-reported assessments and clinical ligament evaluation up to 15 years. Advantages of the bone-patellar-tendon-bone (BPTB) press-fit fixation include unlimited bone-to-bone healing, cost effectiveness, avoidance of disadvantages associated with hardware, and ease for

  10. Femoral press-fit fixation in ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft: results at 15 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Widuchowski, Wojciech; Widuchowska, Malgorzata; Koczy, Bogdan; Dragan, Szymon; Czamara, Andrzej; Tomaszewski, Wieslaw; Widuchowski, Jerzy

    2012-06-27

    If anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to be performed, decision regarding graft choice and its fixation remains one of the most controversial. Multiple techniques for ACL reconstruction are available. To avoid disadvantages related to fixation devices, a hardware-free, press-fit ACL reconstruction technique was developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcome and osteoarthritis progression in long term after ACL reconstruction with central third patellar-tendon autograft fixed to femur by press-fit technique. Fifty two patients met inclusion/excusion criteria for this study. The patients were assessed preoperatively and at 15 years after surgery with International Knee Documentation Committee Knee Ligament Evaluation Form, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity scale and radiographs. Good overall clinical outcomes and self-reported assessments were documented, and remained good at 15 years. The mean Lysholm and Tegner scores improved from 59.7 ± 18.5 and 4.2 ± 1.0 preoperatively to 86.4 ± 5.6 (p = 0.004) and 6.9 ± 1.4 (p = 0.005) respectively at follow-up. The IKDC subjective score improved from 60.1 ± 9.2 to 80.2 ± 8.1 (p = 0.003). According to IKDC objective score, 75% of patients had normal or nearly normal knee joints at follow-up. Grade 0 or 1 results were seen in 85% of patients on laxity testing. Degenerative changes were found in 67% of patients. There was no correlation between arthritic changes and stability of knee and subjective evaluation (p > 0.05). ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autograft fixed to femur with press-fit technique allows to achieve good self-reported assessments and clinical ligament evaluation up to 15 years. Advantages of the bone-patellar-tendon-bone (BPTB) press-fit fixation include unlimited bone-to-bone healing, cost effectiveness, avoidance of disadvantages associated with hardware, and ease for revision surgery. BPTB femoral press-fit fixation technique can be safely applied in

  11. Comparison of radial, brachial, and femoral accesses using hemostatic devices for percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Masaya; Shiode, Nobuo; Nakao, Yasuhisa; Ikegami, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Arinori; Harima, Ayako; Higaki, Tadanao; Oi, Kuniomi; Dai, Kazuoki; Kawase, Tomoharu; Nakama, Yasuharu; Suenari, Kazuyoshi; Nishioka, Kenji; Sakai, Koyu; Shimatani, Yuji; Masaoka, Yoshiko; Inoue, Ichiro

    2016-11-09

    Some studies have suggested that radial access (RA) for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) reduces vascular complications and bleeding compared to femoral access (FA). The purpose of this study was to investigate the routine use of hemostatic devices and bleeding complications among RA, brachial access (BA), and FA. Between January 2015 and December 2015, 298 patients treated for PCI with RA were compared with 158 patients using BA and 206 patients using FA. The radial sheath was routinely removed with ADAPTY, the brachial sheath with BLEED SAFE, and the femoral sheath with Perclose ProGlide. In-hospital bleeding complications were investigated. Cardiogenic shock was most frequent in patients in the femoral group (RA 1.3%, BA 2.5%, FA 9.2%, p < 0.0001). The rate of major bleeding was highest in the femoral group (RA 1.0%, BA 2.5%, FA 5.3%, p = 0.01). Blood transfusion rates were highest in the femoral group (RA 0.7%, BA 1.3%, FA 4.4%, p = 0.01). Retroperitoneal bleeding was observed in 1.9% of patients in the femoral group. Patients in the brachial group had large hematomas (RA 0.7%, BA 4.4%, FA 1.5%, p = 0.01). Pseudoaneurysm formation needing intervention occurred most frequently in the brachial group (RA 0%, BA 1.3%, FA 0%, p = 0.04). In conclusion, compared to the brachial and femoral approaches, the radial approach appears to be the safest technique to avoid local vascular bleeding complications. The brachial approach has the highest risk of large hematoma and pseudoaneurysm formation among the three groups.

  12. Development of Femoral Head Interior Supporting Device and 3D Finite Element Analysis of its Application in the Treatment of Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongmin; Ye, Ming; Li, Xinfa; Yang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and perform the 3D finite element analysis of a femoral head interior supporting device (FHISD). Material/Methods The 3D finite element model was developed to analyze the surface load of femoral head and analyze the stress and strain of the femoral neck, using the normal femoral neck, decompressed bone graft, and FHISD-implanted bone graft models. Results The stress in the normal model concentrated around the femoral calcar, with displacement of 0.3556±0.1294 mm. In the decompressed bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the femur calcar and top and lateral sides of femoral head, with the displacement larger than the normal (0.4163±0.1310 mm). In the FHISD-implanted bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the segment below the lesser trochanter superior to the femur, with smaller displacement than the normal (0.1856±0.0118 mm). Conclusions FHISD could effectively maintain the biomechanical properties of the femoral neck. PMID:26010078

  13. Fixation versus primary replacement of displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moin; Aleem, Ilyas S; Poolman, Rudolf W

    2011-01-01

    Hip fractures are among the most common debilitating injuries in the elderly and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the ever-increasing literature on the topic of hip fractures, optimal treatment remains uncertain. Trials with small sizes, methodological limitations, strict inclusion criteria and wide confidence intervals leave the optimal approach to treating hip fractures unknown and controversial. In 2005, the International Hip Fracture Research Collaborative was officially established with the mandate of resolving controversies in hip fracture management. Presently, two multicenter randomized trials, FAITH and HEALTH, are underway. The FAITH trial (Fixation Using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip Fractures) will compare Sliding Hip Screws and Cancellous Screws; the HEALTH trial (Hip Fracture Evaluation with Alternatives of Total Hip Arthroplasty versus Hemi-Arthroplasty) will compare total hip arthroplasty and hemi-arthroplasty. The present paper reviews current controversies in hip fracture care. Ultimately, only large randomized trials, such as FAITH and HEALTH, will resolve the longstanding controversy of whether primary replacement or fixation is the preferred treatment modality in this common fracture. Subsequent trials need to focus on surgical strategies in the cognitively impaired patient.

  14. Long-term follow-up results of a second-generation cementless femoral prosthesis with a collar and straight distal fixation channels.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Wook; Yang, Ick Hwan; Lee, Hye Yeon; Han, Chang Dong

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the results of more than 10 years of follow-up of total hip arthroplasty using a second-generation cementless femoral prosthesis with a collar and straight distal fixation channels. One hundred five patients (129 hips) who underwent surgery between 1991 and 1996 for primary total hip arthroplasty using cementless straight distal fluted femoral stems were followed for more than 10 years. Ninety-four hips in 80 patients were available for clinical and radiologic analysis. The mean age at the time of surgery was 47 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 14.3 years. The mean Harris hip scores had improved from 58 points to 88 points at the time of the 10-year follow-up. Activity-related thigh pain was reported in nine hips (10%). At the last follow-up, 93 stems (99%) were biologically stable and one stem (1%) was revised because of loosening. No hip had distal diaphyseal osteolysis. Proximal femoral stress-shielding was reported in 86 hips (91%). We found no significant relationship between collar-calcar contact and thigh pain, stem fixation status, or stress-shielding. The cumulative survival of the femoral stem was 99% (95% confidence interval, 98-100%) after 10 years. The long-term results of total hip arthroplasty using a second-generation cementless femoral prosthesis with a collar and straight distal fixation channels were satisfactory; however, the high rate of proximal stress-shielding and the minimal effect of the collar indicate the need for some changes in the stem design.

  15. [Biomechanical performance of different wires and cable fixation devices in posterior instrumentation for atlantoaxial instability].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tie-long; Yan, Wang-jun; Han, Yu; Ye, Xiao-jian; Jia, Lian-shun; Li, Jia-shun; Yuan, Wen

    2010-05-01

    To compare the biomechanical performances of different wires and cable fixation devices in posterior instrumentation for atlantoaxial instability, and test the effect of different fixation strengths and fixation approaches on the surgical outcomes. Six specimens of the atlantoaxial complex (C0-C3) were used to establish models of the normal complex, unstable complex (type II odontoid fracture) and fixed complex. On the wd-5 mechanical testing machine, the parameters including the strength and rigidity of anti-rotation, change and strength of stress, and stability were measured for the normal complex, atlantoaxial instability complex, the new type titanium cable fixation system, Atlas titanium cable, Songer titanium cable, and stainless wire. The strength and rigidity of anti-rotation, change and strength of stress, stability of flexion, extension and lateral bending of the unstable atlantoaxial complex fixed by the new double locking titanium cable fixation system were superior to those of the Songer or Atlas titanium cable (P<0.05) and medical stainless wire (P<0.05). Simultaneous cable fastening on both sides resulted in better fixation effect than successive cable fastening (P<0.05). Better fixation effect was achieved by fastening the specimen following a rest (P<0.05). The fixation effects can be enhanced by increased fastening strengths. The new type double locking titanium cable fixation system has better biomechanical performance than the conventional Songer and Atlas titanium cables. Fastening the unstable specimens after a rest following simultaneous fastening of the specimen on both sides produces better fixation effect.

  16. A device for continuous monitoring of true central fixation based on foveal birefringence.

    PubMed

    Gramatikov, Boris; Irsch, Kristina; Müllenbroich, Marie; Frindt, Nicole; Qu, Yinhong; Gutmark, Ron; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David

    2013-09-01

    A device for continuous monitoring of central fixation utilizes birefringence, the property of the Henle fibers surrounding the human fovea, to change the polarization state of light. A circular scan of retinal birefringence, where the scanning circle encompasses the fovea, allows identification of true central fixation-an assessment much needed in various applications in ophthalmology, psychology, and psychiatry. The device allows continuous monitoring for central fixation over an extended period of time in the presence of fixation targets and distracting stimuli, which may be helpful in detecting attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and other disorders characterized by changes in the subject's ability to maintain fixation. A proof-of-concept has been obtained in a small study of ADHD patients and normal control subjects.

  17. Telemetry of forces from proximal femoral replacements and relevance to fixation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S J; Perry, J S; Meswania, J M; Donaldson, N; Walker, P S; Cannon, S R

    1997-03-01

    Two proximal femoral replacements were instrumented to enable axial forces to be determined at two sites within the prosthesis: in the main shaft and near the tip of the intramedullary stem. The goal was to measure the changes in force distribution over time, as indicated by the ratio of the two forces. Inductive coupling between a coil worn around the leg and a small implanted coil was used, both to supply power to electronic circuits sealed into a welded cavity in the prosthesis and to telemeter data from the prosthesis. Data from both subjects were recorded over the first two years following surgery. For the first subject, there was an increase in mean shaft force excursions (peak force minus resting force) during level walking from 0.53 x BW after 1 week 2.77 x BW after 23 months. The corresponding mean tip force excursions were 0.13 x BW and 1.74 x BW, respectively. The ratio of mean tip force excursions to shaft force excursions steadily increased over the same period from 25 to 63%. Similar increases over time in the tip/shaft ratio were found during treadmill walking, stair climbing and stair descending. Data from the second subject were obtained for the shaft forces only, and were consistent with those from the first subject. The progressive transfer of axial load from the proximal to the distal part of the IM stem recorded telemetrically, together with radiographic observations, suggested that bone remodelling had taken place together with a less stable interface around the proximal part of the stem. This process evidently began soon after implantation.

  18. Biomechanical testing of two devices for internal fixation of fractured ribs.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nicole; Richardson, Martin; Antippa, Phillip

    2010-05-01

    An intramedullary screw (Portland Orthopaedics, St. Clair, MI) and Inion (Tampere, Finland) Orthopaedic Trauma Plating System (OTPS) mesh for use for internal fixation of fractured ribs have not previously undergone biomechanical testing. The aim of this study is to compare the biomechanics of intact ribs undergoing four-point bending to the biomechanics of fractured ribs fixed with each of the two devices to determine which device provides superior fixation. Thirty fresh-frozen porcine ribs (ribs 6-8) were submitted to four-point bending to failure, at a rate of 2.5 mm/min, to determine stiffness and force at failure. The ribs were then randomized to receive fixation with either Inion OTPS mesh or an intramedullary screw. The fixated ribs were again submitted to four-point bending to failure. Ribs fixated with OTPS mesh were significantly stiffer and failed at a significantly higher load than ribs fixated with intramedullary screws (p = 0.0001). Ribs fixated with OTPS mesh were less stiff than intact ribs but failed at a similar force to intact ribs. The Inion OTPS mesh system provides superior fixation of fractured ribs compared with an intramedullary screw when tested with four-point bending. The OTPS mesh system also has the added advantage of being absorbable. The intramedullary screw needs to undergo modification and further testing before use in humans. Future studies should focus on more physiologic methods of loading.

  19. Cortical Button Versus Cross-pin Femoral Fixation for Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Ma, Guangzhi; Li, Qi; Hu, Yanqing; Li, Jian; Tang, Xin

    2017-07-01

    Incidences of graft rupture are associated with postoperative knee laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Reports of postoperative knee laxity after ACL reconstruction using different femoral fixation techniques in several studies are controversial. To compare, via meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), the clinical outcomes and postoperative knee laxity of autogenous hamstring ACL reconstruction using cortical button versus cross-pin femoral fixation. Meta-analysis. This study followed the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. The online PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched from inception to April 1, 2017. The study included only level 1 or 2 RCTs that compared cortical button and cross-pin femoral fixation for ACL reconstruction with hamstring autografts and that reported clinical outcomes or postoperative knee laxity. The Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool was used to assess the risk of bias for all included studies. For the meta-analysis, the investigators extracted data on clinical outcomes measured by postoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score or Lysholm score and postoperative knee laxity defined as >5 mm side-to-side difference by the arthrometric measurement, Lachman test ≥2+, and pivot-shift test ≥2+. The risk ratio (RR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were computed for dichotomous data. Heterogeneity was assessed by I(2) tests. A total of 6 RCTs with 445 patients were included. Statistical analysis of pooled data showed no significant difference between the cortical button and cross-pin groups on postoperative IKDC score (RR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-1.02; P = .13; I(2) = 4%) and Lysholm score (RR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.91-1.04; P = .45; I(2) = 0%). Postoperative knee laxity was reported in 5 studies, and no significant difference was found between the 2 groups (RR, 1

  20. Mechanical failures after fixation with proximal femoral nail and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Şemmi; Altay, Taşkın; Kayalı, Cemil; Ozan, Fırat; Yamak, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at assessing the clinical results, radiographic findings, and associated complications after osteosynthesis of trochanteric hip fractures with proximal femoral nail (PFN). A total of 152 patients with hip fractures who underwent osteosynthesis with PFN were included. The hip fracture types in the patients included in the study were classified according to the American Orthopedic/Orthopedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA). AO/OTA A1, A2, and A3 type fractures were found in 24 (15.8%), 107 (70.4%), and 21 (13.8%) patients, respectively. The Baumgaertner scale was used to assess the degree of postoperative reduction. The Salvati-Wilson hip function (SWS) scoring system was used to evaluate functional results. After a follow-up period, clinical and radiographic results were evaluated and complications were assessed. The relationship between the complications and SWS score, age, sex, fracture type, reduction quality, and time from the fracture to surgery was evaluated. Eighty-five (55.9%) female patients and 67 (44.1%) male patients were enrolled in the study. Seventy-nine (51.9%) patients had left hip fractures, and 73 (48.1%) had right hip fractures. The mean age was 76 (range 21-93) years, and the mean follow-up duration was 23.6 (range 7-49) months. Postoperatively, one patient (0.6%) had a poor reduction, 16 patients (10.5%) had an acceptable reduction, and 135 patients (88.9%) had a good reduction according to the above criteria. The SWS scores were excellent, good, moderate, and poor in 91 (59.8%), 45 (29.6%), 15 (9.8%), and one (0.6%) patients, respectively. Late postoperative complications were seen in 27 patients (17.7%). A total of 14 patients (9.2%) underwent a revision procedure for mechanical complications. The study results suggest that the quality of fracture reduction is an important factor that affects the revision rate and SWS score in patients with mechanical complications after osteosynthesis with PFN for trochanteric fractures.

  1. Application of intraoperative limb-length measurement by a new osteotomy device in hemiarthroplasty for treating femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhanle; Yang, Lei; Su, Yanling; Yu, Xian; Hou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yingze

    2017-05-15

    Limb length discrepancy is one of the most common complications after hip arthroplasty. We developed a device - intraoperative limb-length measurement and osteotomy device (ILMOD), and applied it to patients who were treated with hemiarthroplasty for femoral neck fracture to improve limb length discrepancy by providing an accurate osteotomy during hemi-arthroplasty. Between April 2012 and October 2013, 65 patients were treated with hip hemiarthroplasty for femoral neck fracture at our trauma center. 31 patients met the inclusion criteria and were randomly enrolled into two groups ILMOD group and control group. Hemiarthroplasty in this study was performed with cement fixation. Treatment-related measurements such as the operation time, attempts of osteotomy, and the volume of intra-operative blood loss were collected. In both groups, postoperative (1 month) radiologic analysis on anteroposterior weight-bearing pelvic view was performed to evaluate limb length discrepancy. The results showed significant improvement in limb length discrepancy in ILMOD group, and analysis of postoperative radiographs found the mean length difference is 2.1 ± 1.9 mm in ILMOD group compared to 8.8 ± 5.1 mm in control group (P < 0.0001). No complications associated with the use of the device were reported, and none of the patients complained of the discomfort related to limb-length discrepancy after surgery. The average intra-operative time was significantly longer in ILMOD group (84.9 ± 9.2 min) compared to that in control group (70.9 ± 10.2 min) (P = 0.0004). The ILMOD is an effective device that can be used easily for intraoperative limb length measurement and osteotomy during hemiarthroplasty. This method is applicable with Kocher-Langenbeck approach, and the technique could also be used in total hip arthroplasty. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-OOC-15005904 . Registered 30 Junuary 2015.

  2. Cemented versus uncemented fixation of the femoral component of the NexGen CR total knee replacement in patients younger than 60 years: a prospective randomised controlled RSA study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2009-06-01

    The optimal mode of femoral fixation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains controversial, especially for the young patient. In a prospective randomised study we compared the magnitude and pattern of the fixation of cemented versus uncemented femoral components during 2 years in patients younger than 60 years. Forty-one knees in 41 patients were randomised to receive a NexGen (Zimmer, Warsaw, USA) cruciate-retaining TKA with either a cemented or an uncemented non HA-coated femoral component. The patients were examined by radiostereometric analysis (RSA), as well as clinical and radiological evaluation. The magnitude and pattern of migration as measured by RSA did not differ significantly between the cemented and uncemented fixation during the 2-year follow-up, nor were there any differences between the groups in clinical parameters. These findings suggest that an uncemented and non HA-coated femoral component may behave equally as well as a cemented one in the long-term.

  3. Fixation of external drainage device with injectable shape-memory alloy clips.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jeffrey L; Erlanger, Michael

    2013-09-01

    To describe a novel surgical technique and novel surgical instrumentation for fixating an extraocular drainage device used for glaucoma-filtering surgery. The technique was performed in a laboratory setting using ex-vivo porcine eyes. We describe the surgical technique of using injectable, 25-gauge shape-memory clip system to fixate an Ahmed drainage device. The use of an injectable, shape-memory alloy clip provides the advantages of rapid, easy deployment and decreased risk of late suture failure. Importantly, the injectable, shape-memory clips can be used in surgical situations where suturing is difficult and time intensive, such as those encountered during glaucoma drainage device placement. The use of an injectable, shape-memory alloy clip is a promising new surgical tool and technique for fixating an extraocular drainage device used for glaucoma surgery.

  4. Factors associated with avascular necrosis of the femoral head and nonunion in patients younger than 65 years with displaced femoral neck fractures treated with reduction and internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Daniel; Melero, Patricio; Zylberberg, Alejandro; Salabarrieta, Julian; Urrutia, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in patients younger than 65 years, and risk factors for AVN or nonunion have not been clearly delineated within this age range. To determine factors associated with avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN) and nonunion in patients younger than 65 years with displaced femoral neck fractures treated with reduction and internal fixation, we conducted a retrospective study of 29 displaced femoral neck fractures in 29 consecutive patients treated at a single institution. The influence of age, trauma energy, open reduction, and time from fracture to treatment on development of AVN and nonunion was evaluated. Patients who developed AVN were significantly older and suffered lower energy trauma than cases without AVN. No recorded variables were associated with nonunion. Logistic regression determined that only age was independently associated with AVN. Age was a good predictor for developing AVN, with a C statistics of 0.861, and a best cutoff determined at 53.5 years. Patients between 53.5 and 65 years presented a higher risk of AVN. A primary arthroplasty should be considered in this subgroup.

  5. Pretensioning of quadruple flexor tendon grafts in two types of femoral fixation: quasi-randomised controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Cezar Teruyuki; de Moraes Barros Fucs, Patrícia Maria; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2011-04-01

    Pretensioning of the flexor tendon graft of the knee is used to improve the stability of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions. The objective was to demonstrate the pretensioning of grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis in situ with range of flexion and extension of 0-110°, and determine the appropriate number of cycles in two types of femoral fixation. ACL reconstruction was performed in 60 patients, aged 16-48 years, 90% male, with 50% right knees and 50% left knees, divided into two groups of 30 patients: One with the femur fixed using interference screws (direct form) and the other with the transcondylar cross-pin screw (from a distance). Total length of the grafts, their circumference and the measurements on the radiographs of length of the grafts submitted to pretensioning and the measurements with ten, 25 and 50 cycles of flexion and extension were determined. There was no significant difference in relation to the total tendon lengths and their circumferences. The lengths of the portions submitted to pretensioning were significantly different: 7.90 cm for the interference and 10.92 cm for the transcondylar (mean). After tensioning, in the interference and transcondylar groups, respectively, lengthening was 3.57 mm/3.97 mm with ten, 6.30 mm/7.03 mm with 25, and 6.83 mm/7.7 mm with 50 cycles. The greater the length of the graft, the greater the lengthening on pretensioning throughout the substance; the shorter the length, the earlier the end of the lengthening was achieved, close to 25 cycles; more than ten cycles were necessary, 25 being sufficient.

  6. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament by means of an anteromedial portal and femoral fixation using Rigidfix☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, André Manoel; Lopes Júnior, Osmar Valadão; Kuhn, André; Saggin, José Idílio; Fernandes Saggin, Paulo Renato; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro; de Castro, Daniela Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a series of patients who underwent surgery for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with flexor tendons, by means of the anteromedial transportal technique using Rigidfix for femoral fixation, and to analyze the positioning of the pins by means of tomography. Methods Thirty-two patients were included in the study. The clinical evaluation was done using the Lysholm, subjective IKDC and Rolimeter. All of them underwent computed tomography with 3D reconstruction in order to evaluate the entry point and positioning of the Rigidfix pins in relation to the joint cartilage of the lateral condyle of the femur. Results The mean Lysholm score obtained was 87.81 and the subjective IKDC was 83.72. Among the 32 patients evaluated, 43% returned to activities that were considered to be very vigorous, 9% vigorous, 37.5% moderate and 12.5% light. In 16 patients (50%), the distal entry point of the Rigidfix pin was located outside of the cartilage (extracartilage); in seven (21.87%), the distal pin injured the joint cartilage (intracartilage); and in nine (28.12%), it was at the border of the lateral condyle of the femur. Conclusion The patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by means of the anteromedial transportal using the Rigidfix system presented satisfactory clinical results over the length of follow-up evaluated. However, the risk of lesions of the joint cartilage from the distal Rigidfix pin needs to be taken into consideration when the technique via an anteromedial portal is used. Further studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow-up times should be conducted for better evaluation. PMID:26229871

  7. Clamping stiffness and its influence on load distribution between paired internal spinal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Rohlmann, A; Calisse, J; Bergmann, G; Radvan, J; Mayer, H M

    1996-06-01

    The load distribution between two internal spinal fixation devices depends, besides other factors, on their stiffness. The stiffness ranges were determined experimentally for the clamps of the AO internal fixator with lateral nut and with posterior nut as well as for the clamps of the SOCON fixator. The stiffness of eight devices each differed by a factor of 3.1 for the clamp with lateral nut, by a factor of 1.5 for the clamp with posterior nut, and by a factor of 1.4 for the clamp of the SOCON fixator. For the AO clamp with lateral nut, the influence of the nut-tightening torque on the stiffness was determined. Using instrumented internal spinal fixation devices mounted to plastic vertebrae and simulating a corpectomy, the load distribution between the implants was measured for different tightening torques. It could be shown that, for the AO internal fixator whose clamps have a lateral nut, a nut-tightening torque > 5 Nm has only a negligible influence on load-sharing between the implants. Tooth damage occurs when the teeth of the clamp body and clamping jaw of the clamp with lateral nut do not gear together exactly, which leads to changes in the clamping stiffness and load-sharing between the two implants.

  8. Attention attraction in an ophthalmic diagnostic device using sound-modulated fixation targets.

    PubMed

    Gramatikov, Boris I; Rangarajan, Shreya; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L

    2016-08-01

    This study relates to eye fixation systems with combined optical and audio systems. Many devices for eye diagnostics and some devices for eye therapeutics require the patient to fixate on a small target for a certain period of time, during which the eyes do not move and data from substructures of one or both eyes are acquired and analyzed. With young pediatric patients, a monotonously blinking target is not sufficient to retain attention steadily. We developed a method for modulating the intensity of a point fixation target using sounds appropriate to the child's age and preference. The method was realized as a subsystem of a Pediatric Vision Screener which employs retinal birefringence scanning for detection of central fixation. Twenty-one children, age 2-18, were studied. Modulation of the fixation target using sounds ensured the eye fixated on the target, and with appropriate choice of sounds, performed significantly better than a monotonously blinking target accompanied by a plain beep. The method was particularly effective with children of ages up to 10, after which its benefit disappeared. Typical applications of target modulation would be as supplemental subsystems in pediatric ophthalmic diagnostic devices, such as scanning laser ophthalmoscopes, optical coherence tomography units, retinal birefringence scanners, fundus cameras, and perimeters.

  9. The Application of Closed Reduction Internal Fixation and Iliac Bone Block Grafting in the Treatment of Acute Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yanling; Zhang, Qi; Hou, Zhiyong; Pan, Jinshe; Zhang, Yingze

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary clinical and radiographic outcomes of acute displaced femoral neck fracture treated by closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) with free iliac bone block grafting with comparison to a routine protocol of CRIF without bone grafting. Methods From December 2008 to February 2010, 220 adult patients with acute displaced femoral neck fractures were enrolled in this study. In study group, there were 124 patients (57 males, 67 females) with a mean age of 44.8 years (range, 20-64 years). There were 70 transcervical fractures and 54 subcapital fractures. The patients were treated by CRIF and free iliac bone block grafting. The control group consisted of 96 adult patients (46 males, 50 females) with a mean age of 46.3 years (range, 23-64 years). There were 61 transcervical fractures and 35 subcapital fractures. The patients in control group were treated by CRIF without bone grafting. Results In study group, 112 patients were followed up for an average of 27.4 months (range, 24-34 months). All fractures healed within 5 months. However, 10 patients presented AVN of the femoral heads. The mean Harris score was 88.6 (range, 41-100). In control group, 68 patients were followed up for an average of 31.2 months (range, 24-42 months). The rates of AVN of the femoral head and fracture nonunion in control group were 26.5% (18/68) and 16.2% (11/68), respectively, significantly higher than those in study group (both P<0.05). The mean Harris score in control group was 83.8 (41–100), significantly lower than that in study group (P<0.05). Conclusion Acute displaced femoral neck fractures can be treated by CRIF and free iliac bone block grafting in a minimally invasive manner. This technique can guarantee uneventful fracture healing and significantly reduce the rate of femoral head osteonecrosis. PMID:24040414

  10. The potential application of functionally graded material for proximal femoral nail antirotation device.

    PubMed

    Gong, He; Wang, Lizhen; Zheng, Dong; Fan, Yubo

    2012-09-01

    Proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) device is an intramedullary nail system designing for the treatment of trochanteric fractures. It is composed of a helical neck blade, a nail and a distal locking bolt. There were some reports of femoral shaft fractures even after the fractures were healed. The stress shielding effects of the PFNA device made of stiff titanium alloy on the bone-remodeling behavior of the host femur and the uneven distribution of interface shear stress may contribute to this complication. Recently, a new class of composite called functionally graded material (FGM) was developed, that consisted a gradual pattern of material composition and/or microstructures, and was introduced in dental implant and cementless hip stem. Accordingly, in this paper, we hypothesized that FGM might be used as the material of the nail in PFNA device with the material composition of the nail gradually shifting from more stiff at the proximal side of the femur to more flexible 'iso-elastic' towards the distal side. This hypothesis can be evaluated from the long-term remodeling behavior of host femur and the stress distributions in the PFNA device and bone.

  11. Design and Rationale of the Femoral Closure versus Radial Compression Devices Related to Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (FERARI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Behnes, Michael; Ünsal, Melike; Hoffmann, Ursula; Fastner, Christian; El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Lang, Siegfried; Mashayekhi, Kambis; Lehmann, Ralf; Borggrefe, Martin; Akin, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bleeding events after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) are associated with patients’ age, gender, and the presence of chronic kidney disease, antithrombotic treatment, as well as arterial access site. Patients being treated by PCI using radial access site are associated with an improved prognosis. However, the safety of femoral closure devices has never been compared to radial compression devices following PCI. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the safety of femoral closure compared to radial compression devices in patients treated by PCI envisaging access site bleedings as well as short- and long-term prognostic outcomes. METHODS The Femoral Closure versus Radial Compression Devices Related to Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (FERARI) study is a single-center observational study comparing 400 consecutive patients undergoing PCI either using radial compression devices (TR Band™) or femoral closure devices (Angio-Seal™) at the corresponding access site. The primary outcome consists of the occurrence of vascular complications at the arterial access site, including major bleedings as defined by common classification systems. Secondary outcomes consist of the occurrence of adverse cardiac events, including all-cause mortality, target lesion revascularization, and target vessel revascularization during 30 days and 12 months of follow-up. RESULTS Study enrollment was initiated in February 2014. The enrollment phase is expected to last until May 2015. CONCLUSIONS The FERARI study intends to comparatively evaluate the safety and prognostic outcome of patients being treated by radial or femoral arterial closure devices following PCI during daily clinical practice. PMID:26568686

  12. Fixation of the fully hydroxyapatite-coated Corail stem implanted due to femoral neck fracture: 38 patients followed for 2 years with RSA and DEXA.

    PubMed

    Schewelov, Thord von; Ahlborg, Henrik; Sanzén, Lennart; Besjakov, Jack; Carlsson, Ake

    2012-04-01

    Today, dislocated femoral neck fractures are commonly treated with a cemented hip arthroplasty. However, cementing of the femoral component may lead to adverse effects and even death. Uncemented stems may lower these risks and hydroxyapatite (HA) coating may enhance integration, but prosthetic stability and clinical outcome in patients with osteoporotic bone have not been fully explored. We therefore studied fixation and clinical outcome in patients who had had a femoral neck fracture and who had received a fully HA-coated stem prosthesis. 50 patients with a dislocated femoral neck fracture were operated with the fully HA-coated Corail total or hemiarthroplasty. 38 patients, mean age 81 (70-96) years, were followed for 24 months with conventional radiographs, RSA, DEXA, and for clinical outcome. 31 of the 38 implants moved statistically significantly up to 3 months, mainly distally, mean 2.7 mm (max. 20 mm (SD 4.3)), and rotated into retroversion mean 3.3º (-1.8 to 17) (SD 4.3) and then appeared to stabilize. Distal stem migration was more pronounced if the stem was deemed to be too small. There was no correlation between BMD and stem migration. The migration did not result in any clinically adverse effects. The fully hydroxyapatite-coated Corail stem migrates during the first 3 months, but clinical outcome appears to be good, without any adverse events.

  13. Iliopsoas bursitis-associated femoral neuropathy exacerbated after internal fixation of an intertrochanteric hip fracture in rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Asami; Ikari, Katsunori; Tsukahara, So; Toki, Hiroe; Miyawaki, Motoko; Mochizuki, Takeshi; Kawamura, Koichiro; Tomatsu, Taisuke; Momohara, Shigeki

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a six-year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a left iliopsoas bursitis. Radiography had detected destructive changes in her hip joint associated with her bursitis, and she had reported some paresthesia along the left anterior distal thigh. Her pain and numbness remained tolerable, and her disease activity was well controlled until she accidentally fell on the floor, which resulted in an unstable intertrochanteric fracture of left femur with displacement of the proximal portion. The fracture was successfully treated with open reduction and internal fixation, but after the surgery, her femoral nerve palsy worsened. She subsequently underwent bursa excision after the failure of conservative treatment. Accordingly, after bursa excision, the postoperative course was uneventful, and her neurological symptoms gradually disappeared. We would recommend that bursa excision be considered even in cases of iliopsoas bursitis associated with mild femoral neuropathy when destructive changes in the hip joint are also present.

  14. Mechanical design optimization of bioabsorbable fixation devices for bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Lovald, Scott T; Khraishi, Tariq; Wagner, Jon; Baack, Bret

    2009-03-01

    Bioabsorbable bone plates can eliminate the necessity for a permanent implant when used to fixate fractures of the human mandible. They are currently not in widespread use because of the low strength of the materials and the requisite large volume of the resulting bone plate. The aim of the current study was to discover a minimally invasive bioabsorbable bone plate design that can provide the same mechanical stability as a standard titanium bone plate. A finite element model of a mandible with a fracture in the body region is subjected to bite loads that are common to patients postsurgery. The model is used first to determine benchmark stress and strain values for a titanium plate. These values are then set as the limits within which the bioabsorbable bone plate must comply. The model is then modified to consider a bone plate made of the polymer poly-L/DL-lactide 70/30. An optimization routine is run to determine the smallest volume of bioabsorbable bone plate that can perform and a titanium bone plate when fixating fractures of this considered type. Two design parameters are varied for the bone plate design during the optimization analysis. The analysis determined that a strut style poly-L-lactide-co-DL-lactide plate of 690 mm2 can provide as much mechanical stability as a similar titanium design structure of 172 mm2. The model has determined a bioabsorbable bone plate design that is as strong as a titanium plate when fixating fractures of the load-bearing mandible. This is an intriguing outcome, considering that the polymer material has only 6% of the stiffness of titanium.

  15. Pin site infection in orthopaedic external fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    External fixation is a well-established mode of treatment within orthopaedics; however, despite continued research, pin site infection is still a problem. Pin site infection may cause pain and discomfort to the patient, and result in osteomyelitis or sepsis if minor infection is not managed in a timely and appropriate manner. Fundamental issues such as the assessment and reporting of infection are important in dealing with pin site infection, as is the ongoing management of the pin site itself. Many types of care are evident, with varying evidence to support their use in clinical practice. This article will discuss the identification and classification of pin site infection and the methods of care.

  16. A case series review of spinal cord stimulation migration rates with a novel fixation device.

    PubMed

    Justiz, Rafael; Bentley, Ishmael

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective review of a consecutive case series of 66 permanent spinal cord stimulation implants utilizing a novel tissue fixation device was performed. The purpose of this case series review is to examine the impact of a novel lead anchor to tissue fixation system and determine if it is a viable alternative to standard tissue fixation methods. Sixty-six cases were performed utilizing a novel method of lead anchor tissue fixation. Cases performed included cervical and thoracolumbar. For the majority of the 66 cases, two spinal cord stimulator leads and two SwiftLock lead anchors in conjunction with the novel method of tissue fixation were utilized. A retrospective review indicated no reports of lead migration during this case series, the mean follow-up time being 38 weeks (range 10-68 weeks). In addition, there were zero reported complications or untoward effects due to use of the novel device and technique. Overall complication rates for SCS have been reported in the range of 30-40%, with hardware-related complications contributing a significant percentage to the overall complication rate. Lead anchoring techniques still rely heavily on the experience and skill of the implanting physician. The novel device and method utilized in this case series to aid in anchoring leads demonstrated good results with no observed postoperative complications. These data suggest this novel method of tissue fixation may be a viable alternative for fixation of spinal cord stimulator leads to soft tissue. In this case series there were no reported incidents of migration or complications related to the novel device. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  17. Pocket-size imaging devices allow for reliable bedside screening for femoral artery access site complications.

    PubMed

    Filipiak-Strzecka, Dominika; Michalski, Błażej; Kasprzak, Jarosław D; Lipiec, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to validate pocket-size imaging devices (PSIDs) as a fast screening tool for detecting complications after femoral artery puncture. Forty patients undergoing femoral artery puncture for arterial access related to percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled. Twenty-four hours after percutaneous coronary intervention, the involved inguinal region was assessed with PSIDs enabling 2-D gray-scale and color Doppler imaging. Subsequently, examination with a stationary high-end ultrasound system was performed to verify the findings of bedside examination in all patients. In 37 patients, PSID imaging had good diagnostic quality. False aneurysms (one asymptomatic) occurred in four patients, and all were recognized during bedside screening with PSID. One case of femoral artery thrombosis was confirmed with PSID and during standard ultrasonographic examination. Physical examination augmented with the quick bedside PSID examination had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 91%. PSID facilitated rapid bedside detection of serious access site complications in the vast majority of patients, including asymptomatic cases.

  18. Maintenance of reduction with suture button fixation devices for ankle syndesmosis repair.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kyle S; Chapman, W Drew; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2015-06-01

    Malreduction of the syndesmosis can lead to increased peak pressures and subsequent arthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the initial syndesmotic reduction and radiographic maintenance when using a knotless suture button fixation device for treatment of syndesmotic injury. A retrospective chart and radiographic review was performed to identify patients who underwent open reduction internal fixation of ankle syndesmosis ruptures treated with a knotless, suture button fixation system. Radiographic measurements included medial clear space, tibiofibular overlap, tibiofibular clear space, and the distance between buttons. Fifty-six patients underwent repair of an ankle fracture with syndesmotic rupture over a 3-year period, with a mean follow-up of 160.9 days. The tibiofibular clear space and tibiofibular overlap significantly improved from pre- to first postoperative, but also demonstrated some loss of fixation at final follow-up (P < .001). The distance between the buttons increased on average 1.1 mm from immediate postoperative to final follow-up, demonstrating some postoperative creep and loss of fixation in the system. A low complication rate and need for a revision operation was found in our patient cohort. Some loss of reduction did occur postoperatively, although this did not correlate to adverse patient outcomes. Syndesmotic stabilization, using a knotless suture button fixation device demonstrated adequate initial syndesmotic reduction, but also exhibited an increase in the tibiofibular clear space and tibiofibular overlap, relative to initial postfixation position, at short-term follow-up. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Management of femoral fracture in a patient with essential thrombocythemia treated with plateletpheresis and intramedullary rod fixation, followed by hydroxyurea: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Long, William B; Cochran, Amy A; Kelley, Angela R; Woode, Dayna R; Greene, Jill Amanda; Takahashi, Gary W

    2008-06-01

    We describe the management of a patient with a femoral fracture who had asymptomatic essential thrombocythemia. When the diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia was made, the patient was treated with plateletpheresis to reduce the platelet count before intramedullary rod fixation of his fracture. His postoperative management included the examination of his peripheral blood as well as bone marrow, which confirmed that the cause of his elevated platelet count was due to JAK2 V617F mutation that is treated by hydroxyurea and aspirin after being discharged from the hospital.

  20. NiTiNol Hernia Device Stability in Inguinal Hernioplasty Without Fixation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective: To determine whether the NiTiNol frame of a novel hernia repair device utilizing polypropylene mesh for inguinal hernioplasty remains stable and intransient without fixation after a minimum of 6 months. Methods: Twenty patients had 27 inguinal hernias repaired using a novel hernia repair device that has a NiTiNol frame without any fixation. Initial single-view, postoperative X-rays were compared with a second X-ray obtained at least 6 months later. The NiTiNol frame, which can be easily visualized on a plain X-ray, was measured in 2 dimensions, as were anatomic landmarks. The measurements obtained and the appearances of the 2 X-rays were compared to determine the percentage of change in device size and device stability with regard to device location and shape. Results: There were minimal changes noted between the 2 sets of measurements obtained with an overall trend towards a slight increase in the size of the hernia repair device. The devices demonstrated intransience of position and stability of shape. Conclusions: The NiTiNol frame of a novel hernia repair device utilizing polypropylene mesh exhibits radiographic evidence of size and shape stability and intransience of position without fixation when used in inguinal hernioplasty after a minimum follow-up of 6 months. PMID:21902967

  1. Numerical investigations of MRI RF field induced heating for external fixation devices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radio frequency (RF) field induced heating on external fixation devices can be very high in the vicinity of device screws. Such induced RF heating is related to device constructs, device placements, as well as the device insertion depth into human subjects. In this study, computational modeling is performed to determine factors associated with such induced heating. Methods Numerical modeling, based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, is used to evaluate the temperature rises near external device screw tips inside the ASTM phantom for both 1.5-T and 3-T MRI systems. The modeling approach consists of 1) the development of RF coils for 1.5-T and 3-T, 2) the electromagnetic simulations of energy deposition near the screw tips of external fixation devices, and 3) the thermal simulations of temperature rises near the tips of these devices. Results It is found that changing insertion depth and screw spacing could largely affect the heating of these devices. In 1.5-T MRI system, smaller insertion depth and larger pin spacing will lead to higher temperature rise. However, for 3-T MRI system, the relation is not very clear when insertion depth is larger than 5 cm or when pin spacing became larger than 20 cm. The effect of connection bar material on device heating is also studied and the heating mechanism of the device is analysed. Conclusions Numerical simulation is used to study RF heating for external fixation devices in both 1.5-T and 3-T MRI coils. Typically, shallower insertion depth and larger pin spacing with conductive bar lead to higher RF heating. The heating mechanism is explained using induced current along the device and power decay inside ASTM phantom. PMID:23394173

  2. Monitoring the use of halo fixation device through an assessment form.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin-Hung; Li, Ka-Kin; Chin, Raymond Ping-Hong; Lee, Helen Wai-Man; Kwong, William Yan-Yee; Kwan, Hung-Hei

    2011-12-01

    To compare the use of the halo fixation device in our hospital before and after implementation of a new compliance protocol. From 2003 to 2008, 17 (47%) of 36 patients had dislodgement of their halo fixation device. All rings and vests and some of the pins were reused. Documentation of poundage assessment and change of skull pins before dislodgement was lacking. There was no protocol for assessing superstructure throughout the course of the application. To improve the standard of care, knowledge about the application of the halo fixation device in orthopaedic and orthotic departments was reinforced and compliance documented. From September 2008 to April 2010, 15 patients used the halo fixation device for cervical immobilisation. Patients were reminded to minimise shoulder shrugging and report any discomfort. Poundage checking was strictly observed during and after application. The integrity of the device was regularly checked by orthotists. The conditions of the skull pins, halo ring, and vest were also documented after removal. Two (13%) of the 15 patients had ring dislodgement. One occurred a day after application owing to malposition of a posterior skull pin, and the other was related to a fall in a toilet at week 4. Both involved reused skull pins. 45% of the skull pins were new, whereas 44% were found defective after removal of rings. Compliance with the new assessment form was satisfactory. Clinical audit improved outcome achieved with the halo fixation device. Reuse of titanium skull pins should be avoided. Re-torquing of the pin should be avoided when the tip is blunted or hooked. The new assessment form enabled compliance with the principle of application by orthotists and patients.

  3. Are there any complications with bioabsorbable fixation devices? A 10 year review in orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Laine, P; Kontio, R; Lindqvist, C; Suuronen, R

    2004-04-01

    Bioabsorbable fixation devices have been used in our departments between November 1991 and November 2001 in orthognathic surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess all complications experienced during this time period, when we have operated 163 patients who have undergone 329 orthognathic osteotomies fixated with bioresorbable devices. No postoperative intermaxillary fixation was used. Light guiding elastics were used for 5 to 7 weeks. Patients' acceptance was generally excellent and very few complications occurred during this follow-up of 10 years. The complications were minor and did not affect the end results of the operations. Minor complications occurred in 14 patients (8.6%). Only one patient (0.6%) had a postoperative infection with elevated infection parameters. The other minor complications consisted mainly of dehiscence of the wound and plate exposure together with granulation tissue in the operation field. The rest of the complications occurred in the beginning of our study, when large screw heads on top of the bone irritated the patient and had to be removed. Insufficient fixation resulted in open bite in three patients (1.8%) in the beginning of the trial use of new devices, which no longer are used. Based on our experience, bioresorbable devices are safe to be used in orthognathic procedures. However, there is a learning curve, as there is with all new methods introduced.

  4. Arthroplasty versus Internal Fixation for Displaced Intracapsular Femoral Neck Fracture in the Elderly: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Short- and Long-term Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chen-Yi; Liu, An; Xu, Ming-Yuan; Nonso, Nwofor Samuel; He, Rong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is conflicting evidence as to whether the femoral head should be preserved or replaced in elderly patients with displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures. In this article, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the short- and long-term effectiveness of arthroplasty (AR) and internal fixation (IF). Methods: PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched systematically up to January 2016. All randomized controlled trials directly comparing the effectiveness of AR and IF for displaced intracapsular fracture were retrieved with no limitation on language or publication year. Results: In total, eight prospective randomized studies involving 2206 patients were included. The results of our study showed that patients in the AR group reported significantly lower complication (risk ratio: 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.38–0.80), re-operation (risk ratio: 0.17, 95% CI = 0.13–0.22), revision rates (risk ratio: 0.11, 95% CI: 0.08–0.16), and better function compared with their IF counterparts, and they were less likely to suffer postoperative pain. No statistically significant differences for the rates of mortality, infection, and/or deep vein thrombosis between AR and IF were found. Conclusions: Based on our analysis, we recommend that AR should be used as the primary treatment for displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures in the elderly. However, IF may be appropriate for those who are very frail. PMID:27779172

  5. Titanium alloys as fixation device material for cranioplasty and its safety in electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaido, Takanobu; Noda, Takamasa; Otsuki, Taisuke; Kaneko, Yuu; Takahashi, Akio; Nakai, Tetsuji; Nabatame, Maki; Tani, Mariko

    2011-03-01

    Here, we report the case of a patient successfully treated by a series of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) who had implanted skull fixation devices made of titanium alloy. The patient was a 57-year-old man with bipolar I disorder. He was hospitalized for the treatment of manic symptoms of bipolar I disorder with pharmacotherapy and ECT. He sustained a fall and hit his head hard on the ground. Acute subdural hematoma developed, and emergent surgery to remove the hematoma was carried out. Cranioplasty was performed using fixation devices made of titanium alloy (Ti 6Al-4V). In order to control his manic symptoms, a series of ECT was readministered from 1 week after surgery. No adverse effects occurred. Devices must be investigated and chosen very carefully for permanent implantation, especially in patients during a course of ECT.

  6. [Fracture Type and Injury-to-Surgery Interval as Risk Factors for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head after Internal Fixation of Intracapsular Femoral Neck Fracture].

    PubMed

    Popelka, O; Skála-Rosenbaum, J; Bartoška, R; Waldauf, P; Krbec, M; Džupa, V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head following the osteosynthesis of intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck in relation to the time interval between injury and surgery and the type of fracture. The data of patients with intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck surgically treated in the period from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed. Of 1555 patients treated for this fracture, 125 (7%) underwent osteosynthesis. The evaluated group included 115 patients who came for examination at one-year follow-up. There were 59 (52%) women and 56 (48%) men. Dynamic hip screw (DHS) osteosynthesis with an anti-rotation screw was performed in 103 patients and lag-screw osteosynthesis involving three parallel cannulated cancellous screws was employed in 12 patients. The patients were allocated to groups according to the injury-to-surgery interval and to sub-groups on the basis of the Garden classification of femoral fracture stage. In the group of 58 patients treated within 6 h of injury, AVN developed in 10 (17%). When the type of fracture was considered, 4% of the non-displaced fractures and 30% of the displaced fractures developed AVN. The patients with Garden stage I and II (non-displaced) fractures treated within 6 h of injury had a significantly lower risk of AVN development than those with Garden stage III or IV (displaced) fractures. The group treated between 6 and 24 post-injury hours comprised 21 patients, of whom four (19%) had AVN. In non-displaced and displaced fracture sub-groups, 25% of the patients in the former and 16% in the latter had AVN. The stage of displacement had no effect on AVN development. The two groups together (patients treated by 24 h) had a significantly lower AVN incidence than the patients treated after 24 h (p = 0.0025). In this group of 36 patients, 16 had AVN (44%) and the fracture stage made no significant difference (p = 0.6985; nondisplacement sub-group, 41%; displacement sub

  7. Simulation-based particle swarm optimization and mechanical validation of screw position and number for the fixation stability of a femoral locking compression plate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chian-Her; Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Cho, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Locking compression plates (LCPs) have been used to fix femoral shaft fractures. Previous studies have attempted to identify the best LCP screw positions and numbers to achieve the fixation stability. However, the determined screw positions and numbers were mainly based on the surgeons' experiences. The aim of this study was to discover the best number and positions of LCP screws to achieve acceptable fixation stability. Three-dimensional numerical models of a fractured femur with the LCP were first developed. Then, the best screw position and number of LCPs were determined by using a simulation-based particle swarm optimization algorithm. Finally, the results of the numerical study were validated by conducting biomechanical tests. The results showed that the LCP with six locking screws resulted in the necessary fixation stability, and the best combination of positions of locking screws inserted into the LCP was 1-5-6-7-8-12 (three locking screws on either side of the bone fragment with two locking screws as close as practicable to the fracture site). In addition, the numerical models and algorithms developed in this study were validated by the biomechanical tests. Both the numerical and experimental results can provide clinical suggestions to surgeons and help them to understand the biomechanics of LCP systems.

  8. Analysis on the mechanical resistance of fixation of femoral neck fractures in synthetic bone, using the dynamic hip system and an anti-rotation screw☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Anderson; Torres, Gustavo Melo; Souza, André Cezar de Andrade de Mello e; Maciel, Rafael Almeida; Souto, Diogo Ranier de Macedo; Ferreira, George Neri de Barros

    2014-01-01

    Objective To statistically analyze the results obtained from biomechanical tests on fixation of femoral neck fractures of Pauwels III type, in synthetic bone, using the dynamic hip system with an anti-rotation screw, versus a control group. Methods Ten synthetic bones from a Brazilian manufacturer (model C1010) were used and divided into two groups: test and control. In the test group, fixation of an osteotomy was performed with 70° of inclination at the level of the femoral neck, using DHS with an anti-rotation screw. The resistance of this fixation was evaluated, along with its rotational deviation at 5 mm of displacement (phase 1) and at 10 mm of displacement (phase 2), which was considered to be failure of synthesis. In the control group, the models were tested in their entirety until femoral neck fracturing occurred. Results The test values in the test group (samples 1–5) in phase 1 were: 1512 N, 1439 N, 1205 N, 1251 N and 1273 N, respectively (mean = 1336 N; standard deviation [SD] = 132 N). The rotational deviations were: 4.90°, 3.27°, 2.62°, 0.66° and 0.66°, respectively (mean = 2.42°; SD = 1.81°). In phase 2, we obtained: 2064 N, 1895 N, 1682 N, 1713 N and 1354 N, respectively (mean = 1742 N; SD = 265 N). The failure loading values in the control group were: 1544 N, 1110 N, 1359 N, 1194 N and 1437 N, respectively (mean = 1329 N; SD = 177 N). The statistical analysis using the Mann–Whitney test showed that the test group presented maximum loading at a displacement of 10 mm, i.e. significantly greater than the failure loading of the control group (p = 0.047). Conclusion The mechanical resistance of the test group was significantly greater than that of the control group. PMID:26229866

  9. The biomechanical strength of a hardware-free femoral press-fit method for ACL bone-tendon-bone graft fixation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, M P; Burger, L D; Wirz, D; Goepfert, B; Hirschmann, M T

    2017-04-01

    The purpose was to investigate graft slippage and ultimate load to failure of a femoral press-fit fixation technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Nine fresh-frozen knees were used. Standardized harvesting of the B-PT-B graft was performed. The femora were cemented into steel rods, and a tunnel was drilled outside-in into the native ACL footprint and expanded using a manual mill bit. The femoral bone block was fixed press-fit. To pull the free end of the graft, it was fixed to a mechanical testing machine using a deep-freezing technique. A motion capture system was used to assess three-dimensional micro-motion. After preconditioning of the graft, 1000 cycles of tensile loading were applied. Finally, an ultimate load to failure test was performed. Graft slippage in mm ultimate load to failure as well as type of failure was noted. In six of the nine measured specimens, a typical pattern of graft slippage was observed during cyclic loading. For technical reasons, the results of three knees had to be discarded. 78.6 % of total graft slippage occurred in the first 100 cycles. Once the block had settled, graft slippage converged to zero, highlighting the importance of initial preconditioning of the graft in the clinical setting. Graft slippage after 1000 cycles varied around 3.4 ± 3.2 mm (R = 1.3-9.8 mm) between the specimens. Ultimate loading (n = 9) revealed two characteristic patterns of failure. In four knees, the tendon ruptured, while in five knees the bone block was pulled out of the femoral tunnel. The median ultimate load to failure was 852 N (R = 448-1349 N). The implant-free femoral press-fit fixation provided adequate primary stability with ultimate load to failure pull forces at least equal to published results for interference screws; hence, its clinical application is shown to be safe.

  10. Intra-cesarean insertion and fixation of frameless intrauterine devices

    PubMed Central

    Karateke, Ateş; Turgut, Abdulkadir; Özdamar, Özkan; Wildemeersch, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Various contraceptive methods are available to postpartum women including hormonal and nonhormonal barriers, as well as injectable forms. Of all the available birth control methods, intrauterine devices (IUD) are felt by many to be the near-ideal form of contraception, and are recommended by advocacy groups, physicians, and gynecological organizations worldwide. Immediate postpartum IUD insertion deserves greater attention because it can provide immediate contraception, prevents repeat unintended pregnancies, and may serve to reduce the incidence or need for secondary cesarean delivery; however, insertion of conventional T-shape IUDs immediately post placenta delivery is limited by their high expulsion and displacement rates. Anchoring of frameless-design IUDs that lack conventional cross-arms to the uterine fundal surfaces has been medically and commercially available throughout Europe for many years. The placement technique is simple, has minimal patient discomfort, and high long-term patient acceptance due to its high degree of uterine compatibility as a consequence of its small size and segmented design. Frameless-design IUD implantation appears to represent a major advance, suitable for general use, due to its lack of timing restraints and its simplicity of attachment, which only requires limited training. PMID:28913137

  11. Intra-cesarean insertion and fixation of frameless intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Karateke, Ateş; Turgut, Abdulkadir; Özdamar, Özkan; Wildemeersch, Dirk

    2017-03-01

    Various contraceptive methods are available to postpartum women including hormonal and nonhormonal barriers, as well as injectable forms. Of all the available birth control methods, intrauterine devices (IUD) are felt by many to be the near-ideal form of contraception, and are recommended by advocacy groups, physicians, and gynecological organizations worldwide. Immediate postpartum IUD insertion deserves greater attention because it can provide immediate contraception, prevents repeat unintended pregnancies, and may serve to reduce the incidence or need for secondary cesarean delivery; however, insertion of conventional T-shape IUDs immediately post placenta delivery is limited by their high expulsion and displacement rates. Anchoring of frameless-design IUDs that lack conventional cross-arms to the uterine fundal surfaces has been medically and commercially available throughout Europe for many years. The placement technique is simple, has minimal patient discomfort, and high long-term patient acceptance due to its high degree of uterine compatibility as a consequence of its small size and segmented design. Frameless-design IUD implantation appears to represent a major advance, suitable for general use, due to its lack of timing restraints and its simplicity of attachment, which only requires limited training.

  12. Posterior Wall Capture and Femoral Artery Stenosis Following Use of StarClose Closing Device: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin T.; Szubert, Wojciech; Grzelak, Piotr; Szopinski, Piotr; Majos, Agata

    2013-10-15

    A case of femoral artery obstruction following application of a StarClose type arterial puncture closing device (APCD) is presented. Ultrasonographic and angiographic imaging of this complication was obtained. The posterior wall of the vessel was accidentally caught in the anchoring element of the nitinol clip. This complication was successfully resolved by endovascular treatment and the implantation of a stent.

  13. A pedicle screw bridging device for posterior segmental fixation of the spine: preliminary mechanical testing results.

    PubMed

    Rahmatalla, A T; Hastings, G W; Dove, J; Crawshaw, A H

    1991-03-01

    Mechanical assessment of a new pedicle screw bridge device for spinal surgery is reported. Results are given for a series of single tests to failure and a fatigue cyclical loading test. Comparative testing of torsional and lateral bending resistance on three surgical spinal fixation systems was carried out: Luque, wired Hartshill rectangle and pedicle screwed bridge with Hartshill rectangle and pedicle screwed bridge with Hartshill rectangle. The results show the superiority of the bridged Hartshill in both rotational and lateral bending resistance. The new bridge device could also improve the versatility of the Hartshill system to cover a wider spectrum of spinal fixations. A test to determine the axial pull-out strength of three screw designs was undertaken. The differences between the forces needed were insignificant. At failure a cylinder of bone tissues greater than the major diameter of the screw was pulled out without breaking the bone.

  14. Does a trochanteric lag screw improve fixation of vertically oriented femoral neck fractures? A biomechanical analysis in cadaveric bone.

    PubMed

    Hawks, Michael A; Kim, Hyunchul; Strauss, Joseph E; Oliphant, Bryant W; Golden, Robert D; Hsieh, Adam H; Nascone, Jason W; O'Toole, Robert V

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the biomechanical performances of a trochanteric lag screw construct and a traditional inverted triangle construct in the treatment of simulated Pauwels type 3 femoral neck fractures. An inverted triangle construct (three 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed in inverted triangle orientation) and a trochanteric lag screw construct (two 7.3-mm cannulated screws placed across the superior portion of the femoral neck and one 4.5-mm lag screw placed perpendicular to the fracture in superolateral to inferomedial orientation) were tested in nine matched pairs of non-osteoporotic human cadaveric femora. We used a previously described vertically oriented femoral neck fracture model and testing protocol that incrementally loaded the constructs along the mechanical axis of the femur to 1400 N. Specimens that survived incremental loading underwent cyclic loading. Apparent construct stiffness, force at 3mm of displacement, and survival of incremental loading were recorded. The trochanteric lag screw group had a 70% increase in stiffness (261 N/mm [29 standard deviation] versus 153 N/mm [16 standard deviation]; P=0.026) and a 43% increase in force required for displacement (620 N versus 435 N; P=0.018) compared with the inverted triangle group. One trochanteric lag screw and no inverted triangle specimen survived incremental loading. A trochanteric lag screw construct applied to vertically oriented femoral neck fractures provides marked improvement in mechanical performance compared with the inverted triangle construct. © 2013.

  15. Biomechanical properties of a structurally optimized carbon-fibre/epoxy intramedullary nail for femoral shaft fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Samiezadeh, Saeid; Fawaz, Zouheir; Bougherara, Habiba

    2016-03-01

    Intramedullary nails are the golden treatment option for diaphyseal fractures. However, their high stiffness can shield the surrounding bone from the natural physiologic load resulting in subsequent bone loss. Their stiff structure can also delay union by reducing compressive loads at the fracture site, thereby inhibiting secondary bone healing. Composite intramedullary nails have recently been introduced to address these drawbacks. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the mechanical properties of a previously developed composite IM nail made of carbon-fibre/epoxy whose structure was optimized based on fracture healing requirements using the selective stress shielding approach. Following manufacturing, the cross-section of the composite nail was examined under an optical microscope to find the porosity of the structure. Mechanical properties of the proposed composite intramedullary nail were determined using standard tension, compression, bending, and torsion tests. The failed specimens were then examined to obtain the modes of failure. The material showed high strength in tension (403.9±7.8MPa), compression (316.9±10.9MPa), bending (405.3±8.1MPa), and torsion (328.5±7.3MPa). Comparing the flexural modulus (41.1±0.9GPa) with the compressive modulus (10.0±0.2GPa) yielded that the material was significantly more flexible in compression than in bending. This customized flexibility along with the high torsional stiffness of the nail (70.7±2.0Nm(2)) has made it ideal as a fracture fixation device since this unique structure can stabilize the fracture while allowing for compression of fracture ends. Negligible moisture absorption (~0.5%) and low porosity of the laminate structure (< 3%) are other advantages of the proposed structure. The findings suggested that the carbon-fibre/epoxy intramedullary nail is flexible axially while being relatively rigid in bending and torsion and is strong enough in all types of physiologic loading, making it a potential

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of an aluminum alloy used in external fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Cartner, Jacob L; Haggard, Warren O; Ong, Joo L; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2008-08-01

    Treatment for compound and/or comminuted fractures is frequently accomplished via external fixation. To achieve stability, the compositions of external fixators generally include aluminum alloy components due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. These alloys are particularly susceptible to corrosion in chloride environments. There have been several clinical cases of fixator failure in which corrosion was cited as a potential mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of physiological environments on the corrosion susceptibility of aluminum 7075-T6, since it is used in orthopedic external fixation devices. Electrochemical corrosion curves and alternate immersion stress corrosion cracking tests indicated aluminum 7075-T6 is susceptible to corrosive attack when placed in physiological environments. Pit initiated stress corrosion cracking was the primary form of alloy corrosion, and subsequent fracture, in this study. Anodization of the alloy provided a protective layer, but also caused a decrease in passivity ranges. These data suggest that once the anodization layer is disrupted, accelerated corrosion processes occur.

  17. Posterior occipitocervical fixation under skull-femoral traction for the treatment of basilar impression in a child with Klippel-Feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dokai, T; Nagashima, H; Nanjo, Y; Tanida, A; Teshima, R

    2011-11-01

    We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with symptoms due to Klippel-Feil syndrome. Radiographs and CT scans demonstrated basilar impression, occipitalisation of C1 and fusion of C2/C3. MRI showed ventral compression of the medullocervical junction. Skull traction was undertaken pre-operatively to determine whether the basilar impression could be safely reduced. During traction, the C3/C4 junction migrated 12 mm caudally and spasticity resolved. Peri-operative skull-femoral traction enabled posterior occipitocervical fixation without decompression. Following surgery, cervical alignment was restored and spasticity remained absent. One year after surgery he was not limited in his activities. The surgical strategy for patients with basilar impression and congenital anomalies remains controversial. The anterior approach with decompression is often recommended for patients with ventral compression of the medullocervical region, but such procedures are technically demanding and carry a significant risk of complications. Our surgical strategy was an alternative solution. Prior to a posterior cervical fixation, without decompression, skull traction was used to confirm that the deformity was reducible and effective in resolving associated myelopathy.

  18. Biomechanical effect of different femoral neck blade position on the fixation of intertrochanteric fracture: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Yuan; Lin, Kun-Jhih; Wei, Hung-Wen; Hu, Jin-Jia; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Tsai, Cheng-Lun; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Medial migration or cutout of the neck helical blade has commonly occurred in the treatment of trochanteric fracture of the femur. The position of the helical blade within the femoral head is one of the influencing factors that cause the blade to perforate the intact joint surface; however, the ideal placement of the helical blade is not currently known. A finite element model of a femur/nail construct was utilized to analyze five possible blade positions in the femoral head. Normal strain at the fracture surface, the minimum principal strain in the cancellous bone, and the von Mises stress in the implant itself were calculated and compared between different blade positions. The results showed that a large area of normal compressive strain at the fracture surface was observed in the inferior and posterior blade positions. The volume of cancellous bone strained to yielding in the femoral head and neck was lower for the inferior and posterior positions, whereas it was the highest for the superior position. The inferior and posterior positions had lower von Mises stress in the implant itself. The inferior and posterior positions may be the ideal position for the intramedullary nail with a helical neck blade.

  19. Hip shape and long-term hip function: a study of patients with in-situ fixation for slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Wall, Peter D H; Brown, Jamie S; Freshney, Sara; Parsons, Helen; Griffin, Damian R

    2013-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a rare adolescent hip disease that leads to a hip shape abnormality. Typical treatment involves in-situ fixation. It is not known if the degree of initial hip shape abnormality associated with SCFE has a significant effect on long-term hip function. A cohort of patients aged 18-50 who had undergone in-situ fixation for SCFE from 1970 onwards in our institution provided IHOT-33 (hip function) outcome data. Frog lateral radiographs from the time of surgery were used to measure radiological hip shape using both Southwick angle and alpha angle. There were 38 patients (46 hips) SCFE patients who met the eligibility criteria. We obtained follow-up data for 32 patients (38 hips), 83% follow-up. Ten patients (20 hips) had bilateral SCFE. The mean follow-up was 12.7 years (95% CI 10.7-14.7). 32 patients matched for age and sex who had no history of SCFE provided control IHOT-33 outcome data. There was a significant difference (p<0.05) in long-term hip function between patients undergoing in-situ fixation for SCFE and the control population (mean IHOT-33 scores of 71.8 and 95.8 respectively). There was no significant (p>0.05) correlation between long-term hip function and Southwick angle or lateral alpha angle. The initial severity of hip shape abnormality due to SCFE was not a strong predictor of long-term hip function. Other extraneous factors not related to hip shape may have an equally if not more important role to play in the subsequent long-term outcome of SCFE.

  20. IMF Screw: An Ideal Intermaxillary Fixation Device During Open Reduction of Mandibular Fracture.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, N K; Mohan, Ritu

    2010-06-01

    Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) is conventionally used for treatment of fractures involving maxillomandibular complex both for closed reduction and as an adjuvant to open reduction. To overcome the cumbersome procedure of tooth borne appliances cortical bone screws were introduced in the year of 1989 to achieve IMF which is essentially a bone borne appliance. In our institution we treated 45 cases of mandibular fracture both single and multiple fractures by open reduction over a period of 24 months. IMF screws were used to achieve dental occlusion in all the cases. Various advantages, disadvantages and complications are discussed. In our institutional experience we found that the IMF screws are an ideal device for temporary intermaxillary fixation for the cases having only mandibular fracture.

  1. In vitro evaluation of free-form biodegradable bone plates for fixation of distal femoral physeal fractures in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Sutherland, Brian J; Harrysson, Ola L A; Lee, Erica S

    2010-12-01

    To design and manufacture free-form biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) bone plates and to compare mechanical properties of femoral constructs with a distal physeal fracture repaired by use of 5 stabilization methods. 40 canine femoral replicas created by use of additive manufacturing and rapid tooling. Surgery duration, mediolateral and craniocaudal bending stiffness, and torsional stiffness of femoral physeal fracture repair constructs made by use of 5 stabilization methods were assessed. The implants included 2 Kirschner wires inserted medially and 2 inserted laterally (4KW), a commercial stainless steel plate (CSP), a custom free-form titanium plate (CTP), thin (2-mm-thick) biodegradable PCL plates (TNP) placed medially and laterally, and thick (4-mm-thick) PCL plates (TKP) placed medially and laterally. Surgical placement of 4KW was more rapid than placement of other implants The mean caudal cantilever bending stiffness of CTP and CSP constructs was greater than that for TNP TKP and 4KW constructs, and the mean caudal cantilever bending stiffness of TNP and TKP constructs was greater than that for 4KW constructs. The mean lateral cantilever bending stiffness of TKP constructs was greater than that for 4KW constructs. Differences among construct types were not significant in yield strength, ultimate strength, yield torque, and ultimate torque. The mechanical properties of fracture repair constructs made from free-form PCL biodegradable plates compared favorably with those of constructs made from Kirschner wires. The impact of PCL plates on musculoskeletal soft tissues, bone healing, and bone growth should be evaluated before clinical use.

  2. Correction of Hammertoe Deformity With Novel Intramedullary PIP Fusion Device Versus K-Wire Fixation.

    PubMed

    Richman, Seth H; Siqueira, Marcelo Bogliolo Piancastelli; McCullough, Kirk A; Berkowitz, Mark J

    2017-02-01

    K-wire fixation has been the most common method of fixation for hammertoe deformity. However intramedullary devices are gaining ground in both number of available choices and in procedures performed. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of hammertoe correction performed with K-wire fixation versus a novel intramedullary fusion device (CannuLink). A retrospective review of hammertoe correction by a single surgeon was performed from June 2011 to December 2013. Sixty patients (95 toes) underwent K-wire fixation and 39 patients (54 toes) underwent fusion with the CannuLink implant. Average age was 61.7 years and 61.4 years, respectively. Average length of follow-up was 12.9 and 12.3 months, respectively. Patients were evaluated for medical comorbidities, smoking status, inflammatory arthritis, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, pre- and postoperative visual analog pain scale, bony union percentage, revision rate, complications (hardware and surgery-related), and persistent symptoms at last follow-up. There was no significant difference in demographics or comorbidities between the 2 groups ( P > .05). In the K-wire group, 16 patients (18 toes) remained symptomatic at last follow-up (27%). Nine toes (9.5%) had recurrent deformity, 3 toes (3%) developed a late infection because of the recurrent deformity, and 1 toe (1%) developed partial numbness. One patient suffered a calf deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and peroneal nerve neuritis, 1 patient developed foot drop, and 3 patients continued to complain of pain. Five toes required revision surgery (5.3%). In the intramedullary group, 3 (7.7%) patients remained symptomatic and all were associated with a complication. One patient developed chronic regional pain syndrome in the foot, a calf DVT, and a nonfatal pulmonary embolus. A second patient developed a painless recurrent deformity. A third patient had wound dehiscence. Nobody had hardware failure or required a second operation. The CannuLink intramedullary

  3. Analysis of using antirotational device on cephalomedullary nail for proximal femoral fractures☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Marcelo Itiro; de Moraes, Ramon Candeloro Pedroso; de Almeida, Luis Gustavo Morato Pinto; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the influence of femoral neck diameter in the positioning of the sliding screw in cefalomedulares nails for treatment of unstable transtrochanteric fractures. Methods Prospectively throughout 2011, patients with unstable fractures transtrochanteric undergoing osteosynthesis with cephalomedullary nail using antirotacional device. They were evaluated for sex, age and fracture classification according to Tronzo. Through digital radiographs angle reduction, tip apex distance (TAD), stem diameter and measures between the positioning of the screws and the limits of the cervix were measured. Results Of the 58 patients, 42 (72.4%) were female and 16 (27.6%) were male. 33 patients were classified as Tronzo III (56.9%), 6 patients as Tronzo IV (10.4%) and 19 as Tronzo V (19.8%). The majority were in between the eighth and ninth decade of life. The average reduction in the angle was 130.05° for females and 129.4° for males. The TAD average was 19.7 mm for females and 21.6 for males. The average diameter of the neck and head vary with statistical significance between men and women. In 19 patients the placement of the sliding bolt can be optimal. If the ideal positioning was not possible, the mean displacement for non‐infringement of higher cortical neck was 4.06 mm. Conclusion The optimal placement would not be possible for the majority of the population, for the average diameter of the neck of the sample. PMID:26229767

  4. Negative pressure wound therapy and external fixation device: a simple way to seal the dressing.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Antonio; Farace, Francesco; Uzel, André-Pierre; Casoli, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Negative pressure therapy is widely applied to treat lower limb trauma. However, sealing a negative pressure dressing in the presence of an external fixation device may be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, screws, pins, wires, etc, may preclude the vacuum, preventing the plastic drape to perfectly adhere to the foam. To maintain the vacuum, we tried to prevent air leaking around the screws putting bone wax at the junction between the pins and the plastic drape. This solution, in our hands, avoids air leakage and helps maintain vacuum in a fast and inexpensive way.

  5. Implantable Subcutaneous Venous Access Devices: Is Port Fixation Necessary? A Review of 534 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, Nancy J. Perrich, Kiley D.; Silas, Anne M.; Linville, Robert M.; Forauer, Andrew R.

    2010-08-15

    Conventional surgical technique of subcutaneous venous port placement describes dissection of the port pocket to the pectoralis fascia and suture fixation of the port to the fascia to prevent inversion of the device within the pocket. This investigation addresses the necessity of that step. Between October 8, 2004 and October 19, 2007, 558 subcutaneous chest ports were placed at our institution; 24 cases were excluded from this study. We performed a retrospective review of the remaining 534 ports, which were placed using standard surgical technique with the exception that none were sutured into the pocket. Mean duration of port use, total number of port days, indications for removal, and complications were recorded and compared with the literature. Mean duration of port use was 341 days (182,235 total port days, range 1-1279). One port inversion/flip occurred, which resulted in malfunction and necessitated port revision (0.2%). Other complications necessitating port removal included infection 26 (5%), thrombosis n = 2 (<1%), catheter fracture/pinch n = 1 (<1%), pain n = 2 (<1%), and skin erosion n = 3 (1%). There were two arrhythmias at the time of placement; neither required port removal. The overall complication rate was 7%. The 0.2% incidence of port inversion we report is concordant with that previously published, although many previous reports do not specify if suture fixation of the port was performed. Suture fixation of the port, in our experience, is not routinely necessary and may negatively impact port removal.

  6. Vacuum sealing drainage therapy in the presence of an external fixation device

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dahui; Ju, Weina; Wang, Tiejun; Yu, Tiecheng; Qi, Baochang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) is widely utilized for treating traumatic wounds. Patient concerns: It is particularly difficult and time consuming to use in combination with an external fixator. Diagnoses: This is because the hardware or pins used for fixation interfere with maintaining a seal, resulting in poor adhesion and subsequent air leakage. Interventions: To resolve this problem, we have devised a new method for sealing the wound dressing, while maintaining the required vacuum.When using this technique, a rubber strip is wrapped around each pin in 3 circles outside the plastic drape, and then tightly tied. Outcomes: After completing this procedure, a vacuum is obtained, and any air leakage stops. We employed this technique to treat a cohort of patients in our department over a period of two years, and obtained good healing of soft tissue without air leakage, as well as good clinical outcomes. Lessons: We have observed that patients treated with this method experienced good clinical outcomes without air leakage, and we recommend its use in treating cases where an external fixation device is present. PMID:27861393

  7. Effect of hydroxyapatite concentration on high-modulus composite for biodegradable bone-fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Bryant; Grassie, Kevin; Shaw, Montgomery T; Olson, James R; Wei, Mei

    2017-10-01

    There are over 3 million bone fractures in the United States annually; over 30% of which require internal mechanical fixation devices to aid in the healing process. The current standard material used is a metal plate that is implanted onto the bone. However, metal fixation devices have many disadvantages, namely stress shielding and metal ion leaching. This study aims to fix these problems of metal implants by making a completely biodegradable material that will have a high modulus and exhibit great toughness. To accomplish this, long-fiber poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) was utilized in combination with a matrix composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) nano-rods. Through single fibril tensile tests, it was found that the PLLA fibers have a Young's modulus of 8.09 GPa. Synthesized HA nanorods have dimensions in the nanometer range with an aspect ratio over 6. By dip coating PLLA fibers in a suspension of PCL and HA and hot pressing the resulting coated fibers, dense fiber-reinforced samples were made having a flexural modulus up to 9.2 GPa and a flexural strength up to 187 MPa. The flexural modulus of cortical bone ranges from 7 to 25 GPa, so the modulus of the composite material falls into the range of bone. The typical flextural strength of bone is 130 MPa, and the samples here greatly exceed that with a strength of 187 MPa. After mechanical testing to failure the samples retained their shape, showing toughness with no catastrophic failure, indicating the possibility for use as a fixation material. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1963-1971, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Factors influencing postoperative movement in displaced femoral neck fractures: evaluation by conventional radiography and stereoradiography.

    PubMed

    Ragnarsson, J I; Kärrholm, J

    1992-01-01

    Postoperative movement in 46 displaced femoral neck fractures was studied using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA). Thirty-four fractures became stable, all within 1 year. Measurements on pre- and postreduction radiographs and scintimetry were performed to evaluate factors of importance in healing, redisplacement, and nonunion. Thirty-three fractures were treated with two hook-pins with (7 cases) or without (26 cases) a plate, and 13 were treated with two cancellous screws. Presence of intermediate fracture fragments and fixation with two screws implied increased movement of the femoral head center during the postoperative period. Remaining ad latus displacement on the anteroposterior or lateral view after reduction of more than 1 mm and low scintimetric uptake implied increased risk of redisplacement or pseudarthrosis. Increased displacement of the femoral head center during the first postoperative month was recorded in fractures that did not heal. The magnitude of the femoral head rotations did not differ between the implants, but smaller screw axis rotations were noted in fractures that subsequently healed. In most hips fixated with screws, the instant center of femoral head rotation went through the femoral head or neck, whereas hook-pin fixation more commonly was associated with screw axis position within or close to the trochanteric region, suggesting a more durable fixation in the femoral head of this device.

  9. Evaluation of body image and self-esteem in patients with external fixation devices: a Turkish perspective.

    PubMed

    Büyükyilmaz, Funda; Sendir, Merdiye; Salmond, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive study aimed to describe the body image and self-esteem of patients with external fixation devices. Fifty patients with external fixation devices who came for follow-up to the Ilizarov Outpatient Clinic of a university hospital in Turkey were included in this study. Data were collected by using a Demographic Questionnaire Form, Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ), and Coppersmith Self-Esteem Inventory. The perceived body image (197.58 +/- 25.14) and self-esteem (65.28 +/- 17.97) of the patients with external fixation devices were in the moderate range. There was no significant correlation between body image and self-esteem. Self-esteem was correlated with one's perception of whether external fixation impacted one's appearance and whether one wanted to avoid being seen by certain individuals because of the appearance of the external fixator. The study highlighted that body image disturbance and threats to self-esteem are not universal with the use of external fixation and need to be assessed individually.

  10. The effect of femoral tunnel widening on one-year clinical outcome after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using ZipLoop® technology for fixation in the cortical bone of the femur.

    PubMed

    Basson, Benjamin; Philippot, Rémi; Neri, Thomas; Meucci, Jean François; Boyer, Bertrand; Farizon, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    The effect of femoral tunnel widening on clinical outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been rarely investigated. In this study, ACL reconstructions were performed using semitendinosus and gracilis (STG) tendon grafts and single cortical fixation on the femoral side. The aim was to analyze femoral tunnel widening at one year and to evaluate its effect on clinical and laximetric outcomes. A total of 46 patients were enrolled in this prospective continuous single-operator monocenter study. Clinical protocol included pre-operative and one-year evaluation with subjective and objective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) clinical scores. Computed tomography (CT) scan was used for radiographic examination during the follow-up period. The femoral tunnel widening was measured as a three-dimensional (3D) image using OsiriX software. The cross-sectional area of each tunnel was measured at four different locations. The subjective preoperative IKDC score was 50 and one-year postoperative score was 81.8. The side-to-side difference in knee laxity decreased from 2.94 to 0.74 mm. The objective IKDC score during the final follow-up was rated A in 27 patients and B in 17. CT scan data revealed an average of 49.32% cone-shaped widening of the femoral tunnel. Femoral tunnel widening at the level of the joint (F4) was negatively correlated with the IKDC subjective score at one year. This study revealed a significant widening of the femoral tunnel by demonstrating its conical shape at one year post-surgery. A significant correlation could be established between femoral tunnel widening close to the joint and IKDC scores. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. FIXATION OF SUPRACONDYLAR FEMORAL FRACTURES: A BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS COMPARING 95° BLADE PLATES AND DYNAMIC CONDYLAR SCREWS (DCS)

    PubMed Central

    Percope Andrade, Marco Antônio; Rodrigues, André Soares; Mendonça, Celso Junio; Santos Portela, Luiz Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine, by means of comparative biomechanical tests, whether greater compressive load resistance and flexion is presented by 95° angled blade plates or by dynamic condylar screws (DCS), and to correlate the failure type presented during the tests with each type of plate. Methods: Sixty-five porcine femurs were subjected to 1 cm medial wedge osteotomy, in the metaphysis, to simulate an unstable supracondylar femoral fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed on these pieces: 35 were fixed using 95° lateral blade plates and 30 with DCS plates. Another variable studied was the failure type presented in each group, in an attempt to correlate this with the type of plate. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in biomechanical resistance between the two types of plates, or between the failure type and the plate type used for the osteosynthesis. Conclusion: The two types of plate behaved in a similar fashion. However, the angled blade plate proved to be superior to the DCS in the flexion test. No statistical difference in failure type or type of plate used was observed. PMID:27022525

  12. An application of principal component analysis to the clavicle and clavicle fixation devices

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Principal component analysis (PCA) enables the building of statistical shape models of bones and joints. This has been used in conjunction with computer assisted surgery in the past. However, PCA of the clavicle has not been performed. Using PCA, we present a novel method that examines the major modes of size and three-dimensional shape variation in male and female clavicles and suggests a method of grouping the clavicle into size and shape categories. Materials and methods Twenty-one high-resolution computerized tomography scans of the clavicle were reconstructed and analyzed using a specifically developed statistical software package. After performing statistical shape analysis, PCA was applied to study the factors that account for anatomical variation. Results The first principal component representing size accounted for 70.5 percent of anatomical variation. The addition of a further three principal components accounted for almost 87 percent. Using statistical shape analysis, clavicles in males have a greater lateral depth and are longer, wider and thicker than in females. However, the sternal angle in females is larger than in males. PCA confirmed these differences between genders but also noted that men exhibit greater variance and classified clavicles into five morphological groups. Discussion And Conclusions This unique approach is the first that standardizes a clavicular orientation. It provides information that is useful to both, the biomedical engineer and clinician. Other applications include implant design with regard to modifying current or designing future clavicle fixation devices. Our findings support the need for further development of clavicle fixation devices and the questioning of whether gender-specific devices are necessary. PMID:20346123

  13. The Inflammatory Response to Femoral Arterial Closure Devices: A Randomized Comparison Among FemoStop, AngioSeal, and Perclose

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Jens Saleh, Nawzad; Jensen, Ulf; Svane, Bertil; Joensson, Anders; Tornvall, Per

    2008-07-15

    The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the systemic inflammatory response differs, in patients undergoing coronary angiography, among the arterial closure devices FemoStop, AngioSeal, and Perclose. The study is a prospective and randomized study. We measured pre- and postprocedural C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) plasma levels and collected clinical and procedural data on 77 patients who underwent coronary angiography because of stable angina pectoris. Patients were randomized to the following device: FemoStop (mechanical compression), AngioSeal (anchor and collagen sponge), or Perclose (nonabsorbable suture). No patient group experienced an increased incidence of vascular complications. There were no differences among the three groups regarding CRP, fibrinogen, or IL-6 values before or after coronary angiography. IL-6 levels increased 6 h after the procedure in all groups (p < 0.01), however, the increase did not differ among the groups. After 30 days there were no increased values of CRP or fibrinogen. We conclude that the femoral arterial closure devices AngioSeal and Perclose do not enhance an inflammatory response after a diagnostic coronary angiography, measured by CRP, fibrinogen, and IL-6, compared to femoral arterial closure using a mechanical compression device.

  14. The systemic inflammatory response following femoral canal reaming using the reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) device.

    PubMed

    Giannoudis, P V; Tan, H B; Perry, S; Tzioupis, C; Kanakaris, N K

    2010-11-01

    We evaluated the peripheral release of inflammatory mediators after femoral fracture and subsequent intramedullary reaming using the RIA reamers. IL-6 was elevated after trauma, and reaming with RIA induced a measurable second hit response. However, despite a higher ISS, the levels of IL-6 in the RIA group were similar to the levels measured in a group of patients where reaming of the femoral canal was performed using conventional reamers. There was one death related to fat embolism syndrome in the conventional reamers group. However, the overall incidence of complications was low and similar between the 2 groups of studied patients. In polytrauma patients, large scale studies are desirable to evaluate further the immuno-inflammatory response using the RIA reamers prior to the instrumentation of the femoral canal.

  15. Spontaneous locking of the knee after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as a result of a broken tibial fixation device.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Andrew J; James, Stuart H; Fairclough, John A

    2008-10-01

    The Intrafix device (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is one of a number of recently developed products whose aim is to improve fixation of quadrupled hamstring grafts when used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We present a case of failure and intra-articular migration of the sleeve of an Intrafix device causing locking of the knee 10 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. We were unable to identify the cause of the failure or migration of the device. Rehabilitation had been progressing normally and without incident. The broken fragments were removed arthroscopically, and the reconstruction was found to be intact and healing well. Presumably, the device retained enough mechanical function to allow healing to progress, despite failure of the sleeve. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of such an event occurring with the new generation of hamstring graft fixation devices.

  16. Treatment of Infected Pseudoaneurysm of Femoral Artery after Vascular Closure Device Deployment: A Practical Solution

    PubMed Central

    Matic, Predrag; Babic, Srdjan; Tanaskovic, Slobodan; Jocic, Dario; Radak, Djordje

    2012-01-01

    Like other invasive procedures, percutaneous coronary interventions are associated with complications. Most common access site for these procedures is common femoral artery. Complications such as groin and retroperitoneal hematoma can be encountered as well as pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous fistulas, acute arterial occlusion, and infection. When infected pseudoaneurysm occurs, surgical treatment can be extremely difficult. We present a case of the patient in whom infected pseudoaneurysm of common femoral artery developed after percutaneous coronary intervention and was successfully treated by surgical excision and autoarterial graft insertion. PMID:23119221

  17. Characterization of short-fibre reinforced thermoplastics for fracture fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Hastings, R S; Mason, J J; Moet, A

    1990-10-01

    This study focuses on determining the effects of clinically relevant procedures on the flexural and fracture toughness properties of three short-fibre thermoplastic composites for potential application as fracture fixation devices. The procedures included sterilization, heat contouring and saline soaking. The three materials tested were polysulphone, polybutylene terephthalate and polyetheretherketone, all reinforced with 30% short carbon fibres. The polysulphone composite showed significant degradation in mechanical properties due to saline soaking. The polybutylene terephthalate exhibited significant degradation of mechanical properties following both contouring and saline soaking. The polyetheretherketone composite, however, exhibited no degradation in mechanical properties. The results demonstrated that flexion and fracture toughness testing were effective for determining the response of the composites to different applied conditions and demonstrated the stability of polyetheretherketone subjected to these treatments. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the most effective fibre-matrix bonding to be in the polyetheretherketone.

  18. Digital arthrodesis with a one-piece memory nitinol intramedullary fixation device: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Jaytinder S; DeCarbo, William T; Hofbauer, Mark H

    2013-10-01

    A 1-piece memory Nitinol intramedullary fixation device (Smart Toe; Stryker Corporation, Kalamazoo, MI) was used for proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis for correction of painful hammertoes in digits 2, 3, and 4. Sixty-five implants were placed in 35 patients. The mean age of our patients was 62.2 years (range = 27-82; standard deviation = 12.5). Mean follow-up time was 27 months (range = 12-40 months; standard deviation = 7). Overall, a 93.8% fusion rate was noted. Complications were noted in 4 patients (6.1%): 1 asymptomatic nonunion (1.5%), 2 hardware failures (3%), and 1 implant displacement (1.5%). To date, no patients required revisional surgery or hardware removal. V.

  19. Treatment of malar and midfacial fractures with osteoconductive forged unsintered hydroxyapatite and poly-L-lactide composite internal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Landes, Constantin; Ballon, Alexander; Ghanaati, Sharam; Tran, Andreas; Sader, Robert

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the internal fixation of malar and midfacial fractures, long-term results, and biocompatibility of osteoconductive internal fixation devices composed of a forged composite of unsintered hydroxyapatite and poly-L-lactide (F-u-HA/PLLA). From January 2006 to June 2010, 29 patients (24 males and 5 females; age 33 ± 15 years) were included in the present prospective study. The fracture type was malar in 24 patients, midfacial in 5, isolated orbital floor blowout in 2, and frontal sinus, cranial base in 2 patients. The fractures were fixed with internal fixation devices; these were plates and screws composed of F-u-HA/PLLA. The 24 patients with malar fractures were treated with a single 4-hole L-plate or a straight plate at the infrazygomatic crest. All fractures with internal fixation using devices composed of F-u-HA/PLLA healed well. All malar and midfacial fractures had satisfactory long-term stability. The follow-up examinations at 12 to 67 months after surgery showed that most patients had no complaints, although 2 patients (15%) had a foreign body reaction that was treated by implant removal, with complete symptom resolution. At 5 years after fracture fixation, 2 patients had ultrasound and 2 had radiographic evidence of residual material. An exemplar biopsy showed direct bone growth into the material. In patients with malar and midfacial fractures, hardware composed of the F-u-HA/PLLA composite provided reliable and satisfactory internal fixation, intraoperative handling, long-term stability, and biocompatibility. Direct bone growth into the material could be histopathologically exemplified, in contrast to previous polymer fixations that were resorbed and surrounded by a connective tissue layer. This finding indicates that long-term F-u-HA/PLLA residual material will be included into the remodeled bone, which was confirmed on long-term follow-up radiographs. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Inflow Cannula Fixation Techniques in Left Ventricular Assist Device Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Jasmin S; Krabatsch, Thomas; Rojas, Sebastian V; Deniz, Ezin; Ismail, Issam; Martens, Andreas; Shrestha, Malakh; Haverich, Axel; Netuka, Ivan; Schmitto, Jan D

    2017-03-01

    The therapy of terminal heart failure with left ventricular assist devices has become a standard in cardiac surgery. Yet the surgical implantation technique is not standardized and differs from center to center. Complications associated with left ventricular assist device (LVAD) inflow cannula placement are thrombosis, suction events, and flow disturbances. Within this in vitro study we aimed to investigate if the fixation technique of the sewing ring has an impact on the position of the inflow cannula. For this in vitro study the HeartMate III LVAD (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) was used. In five sessions, two approaches were considered for coring of the ventricle for LVAD inflow cannula insertion: "sew-then-core" and "core-then-sew." In the "sew-then-core" technique, the sewing cuff is first affixed to the heart, usually with 8-16 interrupted pledgeted mattress sutures. Subsequently, a cylindrical knife is used to resect a cylindrical core of myocardium to permit cannula insertion. In the "core-then-sew" technique, the sequence is reversed such that the knife is used before the suture ring is affixed. When the "sew-then-core" technique is used, the mattress sutures may be placed with full-thickness bites that penetrate the endocardium (i.e., transmural stitching) or partial-thickness bites that do not penetrate the endocardium (i.e., epicardial stitching). When the "core-then-sew" technique is used, the suture is passed fully into the ventricular lumen and fed back through the cored hole, at which point the needle may be reinserted into the freshly cored myocardium such that it exits the epicardium (i.e., transmural stitching with back stitch) or not (i.e., transmural stitching without back stitch). These four different sewing ring fixation suturing techniques were tested by experienced surgeons to affix the sewing ring: transmural stitching, epicardial stitching, transmural stitching with back stitch, and transmural stitching without back stitch

  1. Comparison of theoretical fixation stability of three devices employed in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy: a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of unicompartmental osteoarthritis and symptomatic varus malalignment. We hypothesized that different fixation devices generate different fixation stability profiles for the various wedge sizes in a finite element (FE) analysis. Methods Four types of fixation were compared: 1) first and 2) second generation Puddu plates, and 3) TomoFix plate with and 4) without bone graft. Cortical and cancellous bone was modelled and five different opening wedge sizes were studied for each model. Outcome measures included: 1) stresses in bone, 2) relative displacement of the proximal and distal tibial fragments, 3) stresses in the plates, 4) stresses on the upper and lower screw surfaces in the screw channels. Results The highest load for all fixation types occurred in the plate axis. For the vast majority of the wedge sizes and fixation types the shear stress (von Mises stress) was dominating in the bone independent of fixation type. The relative displacements of the tibial fragments were low (in μm range). With an increasing wedge size this displacement tended to increase for both Puddu plates and the TomoFix plate with bone graft. For the TomoFix plate without bone graft a rather opposite trend was observed. For all fixation types the occurring stresses at the screw-bone contact areas pulled at the screws and exceeded the allowable threshold of 1.2 MPa for at least one screw surface. Of the six screw surfaces that were studied, the TomoFix plate with bone graft showed a stress excess of one out of twelve and without bone graft, five out of twelve. With the Puddu plates, an excess stress occurred in the majority of screw surfaces. Conclusions The different fixation devices generate different fixation stability profiles for different opening wedge sizes. Based on the computational simulations, none of the studied osteosynthesis fixation types warranted an intransigent full

  2. Fascia iliaca block associated only with deep sedation in high-risk patients, taking P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, for intramedullary femoral fixation in intertrochanteric hip fracture: a series of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Carlos Rodrigues; Francisco, Emília Milheiro; Pinho-Oliveira, Vítor; Assunção, José Pedro

    2016-12-01

    We present a series of 3 cases in which the impact in outcome was, first of all, related to the capacity to offer early and safer treatment to some hip fracture high-risk patients using a fascia iliaca block (FIB; ropivacaine 0,5% 20 cc and mepivacaine 1,3% 15 cc, given 30 minutes before incision) associated only with deep sedation, contributing to better practice and outcome. All elderly patients were American Society of Anesthesiologists IV patients, under P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, suffering from an intertrochanteric fracture, and purposed for intramedullary femoral fixation (IMF). All patients have been managed successfully through a deep sedation using a low-dose infusion of propofol and bolus of fentanyl without face mask ventilation, supraglottic device placement, or endotracheal intubation after an FIB. Bispectral index was always greater than 75, and no CO2 retention or respiratory depression was present. No signs of pain or hemodynamic instability were observed. In these cases, surgery would be postponed if the choice was neuroaxial anesthesia, particularly because of P2Y12 receptor inhibitors' effect. FIB puncture site is distal to the fracture and incision site, but proximal local anesthetic migration through the interfascial planes allows for constant block of femoral nerve and lateral cutaneous of femur nerve and, less constantly, block of obturator. FIB may reduce the risk of perineural hematoma associated with several injections in nerve vicinity of different lumbar plexus branches. Frequently, indications for extramedullary or IMF are overlapping, but IMF is associated with less blood loss and may be managed using a low anesthetic depth if an FIB is done, increasing safety. This way, these less invasive surgical techniques combined with an adjusted anesthetic technique may have a crucial role in high-risk patients, particularly if taking P2Y12 receptor inhibitors. In these cases of IMF, surgical manipulation of sciatic and/or inferior subcostal

  3. Diminished abductor muscular strength in patients with valgus-impacted femoral neck fractures treated by internal fixation: Clinical study and biomechanical considerations.

    PubMed

    Noda, Mitsuaki; Saegusa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Masayasu; Kuroda, Yuichi; Takada, Yuma; Yoshikawa, Chihiro; Wakabayashi, Mimami; Adachi, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Yukiko

    2017-01-01

    Valgus-impacted femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation occasionally result in unsatisfactory postoperative locomotive function, partially due to muscle shortening and a decrease in the moment arm. This study quantifies the degree of diminished abduction strength both clinically and biomechanically. Fifteen patients were enrolled in this study. Twelve patients with fracture healed in valgus-impacted position were further evaluated. Muscular strength around hip was examined, and values between the nonoperated and operated side were compared and analyzed. For the biomechanical study, two three-dimensional models were prepared: model I (control model without displacement) and model II (simulated malunion of a 15° valgus-impacted fracture). Two sets of hip flexion angles in each of the models were simulated with flexion angles of 0° and 23°. Mean and standard deviation values for muscle strength from the nonoperative/operative side among the valgus group are as follows: flexion strength was 9.2 ± 4.0/9.2 ± 3.2, extension strength was 5.8 ± 2.8/6.1 ± 3.2, abduction strength at 0° was 9.1 ± 3.7/7.4 ± 3.6, abduction strength at 10° was 6.7 ± 3.0/5.5 ± 2.2, and knee extension strength was 15.3 ± 6.2/15.1 ± 6.0 (kgf). When comparing values between the nonoperative and operative sides, statistical significance was only observed in abduction strength ( p < 0.01). The biomechanical models prove that valgus impaction decreases the moment arm by approximately 10% at both flexion angle. A significant decrease in abductor strength at 0° and 10° was observed in the valgus-healed group. This may be related to a decrease in the moment arm. Further research should be done to define the acceptable limit of deformity for the satisfactory postoperative functioning.

  4. Complications after arthroscopic coracoclavicular reconstruction using a single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device in acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Kim, Nam-Ki

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes after arthroscopically assisted coracoclavicular (CC) fixation using a single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to report intraoperative and postoperative complications. Eighteen consecutive patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation underwent arthroscopically assisted CC fixation using a single TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, FL). Using the Rockwood classification, 3 patients had grade III dislocations, one patient had a grade IV dislocation, and 14 patients had grade V dislocations. The preoperative CC distance of the injured shoulder was 16.1 ± 2.7 mm (range, 11.2 to 21.0 mm), and it increased by 99% ± 36% (range, 17% to 153%) on average compared with the contralateral shoulder. The average CC distance was 10.5 ± 2.5 mm (range, 7.7 to 15.5 mm), and it increased by 30% ± 30% (range, -9.4% to 90%) at the final follow-up. Compared with immediate postoperative radiographs, the CC distance was maintained in 12 patients, increased between 50% and 100% in 4 patients, and increased more than 100% in 2 patients at final follow-up. However, there was no statistical difference in Constant scores between 6 patients with reduction loss (95.6 ± 4.5) and 12 patients with reduction maintenance (98.4 ± 2.5; P = .17). Perioperative complications occurred in 8 patients, including one case of acromioclavicular arthritis, one case of delayed distal clavicular fracture at the clavicular hole of the device, 3 cases of clavicular or coracoid button failures, and 3 cases of clavicular bony erosion. Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained after CC fixation using the single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. However, CC fixation failure of greater than 50% of the unaffected side in radiological examinations occurred in 33% of the patients within 3 months after the operation

  5. Internal fixation of intra-capsular proximal femoral fractures in patients older than 80 years: Still relevant? Multivariate analysis of a prospective multicentre cohort.

    PubMed

    Reina, N; Bonnevialle, P; Rubens Duval, B; Adam, P; Loubignac, F; Favier, T; Massin, P

    2017-02-01

    Arthroplasty is now widely used to treat intra-capsular proximal femoral fractures (PFFs) in older patients, even when there is little or no displacement. However, whether arthroplasty is associated with lower mortality and complication rates in non-displaced or mildly displaced PFFs is unknown. The objectives of this prospective study were: (1) to evaluate early mortality rates with the two treatment methods, (2) to identify risk factors for complications, (3) and to identify predictors of functional decline. Arthroplasty and internal fixation produce similar outcomes in non-displaced fractures of patients older than 80 years with PFFs. This multicentre prospective study included consecutive patients older than 80 years who were managed for intra-capsular PFFs at eight centres in 2014. Biometric data and geriatric assessment scores (Parker Mobility Score, Katz Index of Independence, and Mini-Nutritional Assessment [MNA] score) were collected before and 6 months after surgery. Independent risk factors were sought by multivariate analysis. We included 418 females and 124 males with a mean age of 87±4years. The distribution of Garden stages was stage I, n=56; stage II, n=33; stage III, n=130; and stage IV, n=323. Arthroplasty was performed in 494 patients and internal fixation in 48 patients with non-displaced intra-capsular PFFs. Mortality after 6 months was 16.4% overall, with no significant difference between the two groups. By multivariate analysis, two factors were significantly associated with higher mortality, namely, male gender (odds ratio [OR], 3.24; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.0-5.84; P<0.0001) and high ASA score (OR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.07-2.26; P=0.019). Two factors were independently associated with lower mortality, with 75% predictive value, namely, high haematocrit (OR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7-0.9; P=0.001) and better Parker score (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.8; P=0.01). The cut-off values associated with a significant risk increase were 2 for the Parker

  6. Effects of rigidity of an internal fixation device. A comprehensive biomechanical investigation.

    PubMed

    Goel, V K; Lim, T H; Gwon, J; Chen, J Y; Winterbottom, J M; Park, J B; Weinstein, J N; Ahn, J Y

    1991-03-01

    Internal fixation with instrumentation often accompanies surgical fusion to augment spinal stability, provide temporary fixation while the surgical fusion mass unites, and enhance postoperative mobilization of a patient. Some surgeons, however, feel that the existing plate-screw designs are too rigid and are the primary cause of "iatrogenic" adverse effects clinically observed. A three-part study, involving in vitro experimental protocol, analytical finite-element-based models, and an in vivo canine investigation, was undertaken to study the role of decreasing rigidity of a device on the biomechanical response of the stabilized segments. Two alternatives--the use of one variable screw placement (Steffee plate [unilateral, 1VSP model]) as opposed to two VSP plates (bilateral, 2VSP model) and two VSP plates with polymer washers placed in between the integral nut and plate (2MVSP model)--were considered for achieving a reduction in the rigidity of the conventional VSP system. The load-displacement data obtained from the in vitro experiments and the stress distributions within the stabilized and intact models predicted by the finite-element models revealed that the unilateral VSP system is less rigid and is likely to reduce stress shielding of the vertebral bodies compared with the 2VSP model. The undesirable effects associated with the use of the 1VSP plate system are the presence of coupled motions due to the inherent asymmetry and the likely inability to provide enough rigidity for decompression procedures requiring a complete excision of the disc. The use of two MVSP plates overcomes these deficiencies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Femoral lengthening with a motorized intramedullary nail

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Joachim; Grimsrud, Øyvind; Dagsgard, Anita Hoddevik; Huhnstock, Stefan; Steen, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We assessed whether an intramedullary lengthening device would reduce the problems normally associated with the external fixation technique. We also wanted to determine whether it is a reliable construct for limb lengthening and deformity correction in the femur. Patients and methods We conducted a matched-pair comparison of 30 femoral lengthenings, 15 with a motorized intramedullary nail (the nail group) and 15 lengthenings with an external ring fixator (the fixator group). The patients were matched based on age, sex, amount of lengthening, and the etiology of leg length discrepancy. Mean lengthening was 35 (25–55) mm in the nail group and 38 (15–75) mm in the fixator group. Outcome measures were: lengthening and alignment achieved, consolidation index, knee range of motion (ROM), and complications. Results The pairs in this matched-pair study were similar in terms of age, sex, diagnosis, and amount of lengthening. The planned amount of lengthening was achieved in all patients in both groups and axis correction was considered sufficient. The mean radiographic consolidation index in the nail group, at 1.5 (0.9–3.0) months/cm, was better than the mean value for the fixator group (1.9 (0.9–3.4) months/cm) (p = 0.01). Knee ROM was better in the nail group during the lengthening, 6 weeks after lengthening was completed, and 6 months after lengthening was completed (p < 0.001). A larger number of complications were observed in the fixator group than in the nail group. Interpretation A lengthening nail may be superior to external fixation in femoral lengthening, when the anatomical conditions and the complexity of the deformity allow the use of an intramedullary nail. PMID:25191936

  8. An analysis of the biomechanics of interference screw fixation and sheathed devices for biceps tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Saithna, Adnan; Chizari, Mahmoud; Morris, Guy; Anley, Cameron; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the differences in biomechanical properties of biceps tenodesis when performed with sheathed versus unsheathed screws and also to investigate the effect of altering the pre-tension. Tenodesis was performed in an in vitro model using biomechanical test blocks and ovine tendons. Blocks were allocated to 1 of 5 groups which varied by method of tenodesis and cyclical loading protocol: Group A, Biosure PK screw (10-100 N), Group B: 7-8 mm Biosure Sync and Biosure PK screw (10-100 N), Group C: Biosure PK screw (10-70 N), Group D: Biosure PK (20-100 N), and Group E: custom sheath and Biosure PK screw (10-100 N). If tenodeses remained intact after 500 cycles maximum load to failure testing was performed. 30% of tenodeses in Group A failed prior to 500 cycles whereas none failed in the sheathed device groups (P=0.02). Using a sheathed device prevented mal-rotation. However, tenodeses in Group B were more likely to fail immediately distal to the tenodesis at a load below the anticipated maximum load to failure suggesting tendon damage during fixation. Using the custom sheath, which did not have sharp edges, resulted in a statistically significant increased maximum load to failure in Group E (348 N) when compared to Group A (228 N, mean difference 120 N, P=0.01) and Group B (253N, mean difference 95 N, P=0.0007). Sheathed devices prevent mal-rotation and increase stiffness and maximum load to failure. This is further improved by reducing tendon damage at the time of tenodesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Off-label use of the Angioseal vascular closure device for femoral arteriotomy: retrospective analysis of safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sumedh S; Perez, Giancarlo; Snelling, Brian M; Haussen, Diogo C; Sur, Samir; Sharma, Ishna; Yavagal, Dileep R; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Peterson, Eric C

    2017-10-01

    Angioseal, an arteriotomy closure device (ACD), functions as a collagen plug that physically closes arteriotomy sites and can simultaneously induce platelet activation and aggregation. When used 'on-label', the safety and efficacy profile of Angioseal is superior compared with those of other ACDs. However, Angioseal is sometimes deployed in less than ideal situations. Therefore, we sought to assess the safety and efficacy of 'off-label' Angioseal use in patients undergoing femoral arteriotomies. We performed a retrospective review of all femoral arterial angiograms executed at our institution between 2008 and 2014. Patients whose femoral punctures did not fit the criteria for on-label Angioseal use were included, and were dichotomized based on vascular closure (off-label Angioseal vs manual compression). Of the 521 patients (1023 angiograms) reviewed, 303 (58.2%) patients had off-label Angioseal groin punctures. Mean patient age was 46.2±14.0 years, and 113 were men. 234 patients (77%) had off-label Angioseal deployment while 69 (22%) individuals received manual pressure, serving as controls. Demographic and procedural variables were nearly identical between the two groups but the Angioseal group comprised mostly patients that underwent neurointerventional procedures and thus received intraprocedural heparinization (41%) more often than the manual compression group (19%). The overall rate of major complications associated with off-label Angioseal deployment was low (<0.85%), and clinical complications were not independently associated with Angioseal use (OR 0.76 (95% CI 0.06 to 8.86); p=0.69). Off-label use of Angioseal was found to be safe and was not associated with an increased complication rate in our cohort. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Quantitative Impact of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Vascular Closure Devices on the Femoral Artery after Repeat Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Tiroch, Klaus A.; Matheny, Michael E.; Resnic, Frederic S.

    2010-01-01

    Background We evaluated the exact quantitative long-term impact of repeated catheterizations, vascular closure devices (VCDs) and cardiovascular risk factors on the femoral artery after cardiac catheterization. Methods A total of 2,102 available femoral angiograms from 827 consecutive patients were analyzed using caliper-based quantitative vascular analysis (QVA). These patients underwent coronary interventions between 01/2005-04/2007, and had at least one additional catheterization procedure through the ipsilateral femoral access site from 12/2001 until 01/2008. Multivariate analysis was performed to control for confounding variables. The primary outcome was change in artery size. Results The average punctured artery diameter was 6.5mm±2.1mm. The average time between first case and last follow-up was 349 days. There was no significant change of the punctured artery size over time after the index procedure (P=0.15) and no change associated with the use of VCDs (P=0.25) after multivariate analysis. Smaller arteries were associated with female gender (−1.22mm, P<0.0001), presence of angiographic peripheral vascular disease (PVD, −1.19mm, P<0.0001), and current (−0.48mm, P=0.001) or former (−0.23mm, P=0.01) smoking status, while previous statin therapy was associated with an increase in artery size (+0.47mm, P<0.0001). VCDs were used less often compared to manual compression in cases preceding the first detection of angiographic PVD (P<0.001). Conclusion VCDs are not associated with a change in the artery size or progression of PVD. Overall, there is no change in vessel size over time after repeat catheterizations, with a decrease in vessel size associated with current and former smoking, and an increase with previous statin therapy. PMID:20102878

  11. Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy: incidence of lateral cortex fractures and influence of fixation device on osteotomy healing.

    PubMed

    Dexel, Julian; Fritzsche, Hagen; Beyer, Franziska; Harman, Melinda K; Lützner, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is an established treatment for young and middle-aged patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment. Although not intended, a lateral cortex fracture might occur during this procedure. Different fixation devices are available to repair such fractures. This study was performed to evaluate osteotomy healing after fixation with two different locking plates. Sixty-nine medial open-wedge HTO without bone grafting were followed until osteotomy healing. In patients with an intact lateral hinge, no problems were noted with either locking plate. A fracture of the lateral cortex occurred in 21 patients (30.4 %). In ten patients, the fracture was not recognized during surgery but was visible on the radiographs at the 6-week follow-up. Lateral cortex fracture resulted in non-union with the need for surgical treatment in three out of eight (37.5 %) patients using the newly introduced locking plate (Position HTO Maxi Plate), while this did not occur with a well-established locking plate (TomoFix) (0 out of 13, p = 0.023). With regard to other adverse events, no differences between both implants were observed. In cases of lateral cortex fracture, fixation with a smaller locking plate resulted in a relevant number of non-unions. Therefore, it is recommended that bone grafting, another fixation system, or an additional lateral fixation should be used in cases with lateral cortex fracture. III.

  12. Mechanical testing of a flexible fixation device for the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Leahy, J C; Mathias, K J; Hukins, D W; Shepherd, D E; Deans, W F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test mechanically a new flexible fixation system for the lumbar spine. This device incorporates loops of polyester braid which are secured by a crimped titanium sleeve. In tensile tests, all loops failed, by slippage through the crimped sleeve, at 434 +/- 25 N (mean +/- standard deviation from five loops) for a single crimp and 415 +/- 15 N (from five loops) for two crimps. The intact system was then tested according to the ASTM standard. In a static test, all five specimens failed by slippage of the braid through the sleeve. Initial slippage occurred between 600 and 700 N, but the mean maximum load sustained was 1090 +/- 140 N. Dynamic tests were performed on ten constructs at a frequency of 5 Hz, under a range of loading conditions. The maximum load applied in any of the tests was 825 N. Two constructs did not complete the required 5 x 10(6) test cycles because of fracture of their spinous process hooks. However, other tests, under the same conditions, showed no signs of failure. Fracture occurred as a result of fretting damage from the recommended stainless steel roll pins.

  13. A new method for osteosynthesis using dielectric (non-conductive) fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Dobrev, R P; Vladimirov, B J

    1984-01-01

    Investigation in the field of electrophysiology shows that bioelectric phenomena of different origin are present in bone, the most important being the bioelectric potential connected with bone viability and metabolism. The negative biopotential is high at the fracture site where metabolism is also increased. During healing the negative values decrease and when it is complete the configuration of biopotentials along the length of the bone regains the pattern characteristic of intact bone. Negative biopotentials are needed to achieve callus formation and they disappear when healing has occurred. A metal device is used for osteosynthesis to obtain stable fixation of the fragments, but the electroconductive metal produces a 'short-circuit' of biopotentials along its length, so depriving the bone of necessary negative biopotential. Consequently the intensity of the metabolic processes is also reduced, leading to a relative delay in callus formation. Although a plaster cast may fail to provide adequate stability the natural electrophysiological conditions are preserved, and the period of callus formation is shortened. The negative biopotentials required for fracture union may be preserved by using non-conductive (dielectric) implants to achieve stable osteosynthesis.

  14. Fixation filter, device for the rapid in situ preservation of particulate samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. D.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Doherty, K. W.; Engstrom, I.; Shanahan, T.; Pachiadaki, M. G.; Molyneaux, S. J.; Honjo, S.

    2015-02-01

    Niskin bottle rosettes have for years been the workhorse technology for collection of water samples used in biological and chemical oceanography. Studies of marine microbiology and biogeochemical cycling that aim to analyze labile organic molecules including messenger RNA, must take into account factors associated with sampling methodology that obscure an accurate picture of in situ activities/processes. With Niskin sampling, the large and often variable times between sample collection and preservation on deck of a ship, and the sometimes significant physico-chemical changes (e.g., changes in pressure, light, temperature, redox state, etc.) that water samples and organisms are exposed to, are likely to introduce artifacts. These concerns are likely more significant when working with phototrophs, deep-sea microbes, and/or organisms inhabiting low-oxygen or anoxic environments. We report here the development of a new technology for the in situ collection and chemical preservation of particulate microbial samples for a variety of downstream analyses depending on preservative choice by the user. The Fixation Filter Unit, version 3 (FF3) permits filtration of water sample through 47 mm diameter filters of the user's choice and upon completion of filtration, chemically preserves the retained sample within 10's of seconds. The stand-alone devices can be adapted to hydrocasting or mooring-based platforms.

  15. Prospective Nonrandomized Trial of Manual Compression and Angio-Seal and Starclose Arterial Closure Devices in Common Femoral Punctures

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, Lakshmi A.; Raja, Jowad; Munneke, Graham J.; Morgan, Robert A.; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2007-04-15

    We compared the use of manual compression and Angio-Seal and Starclose arterial closure devices to achieve hemostasis following common femoral artery (CFA) punctures in order to evaluate safety and efficacy. A prospective nonrandomized, single-center study was carried out on all patients undergoing CFA punctures over 1 year. Hemostasis was achieved using manual compression in 108 cases, Angio-Seal in 167 cases, and Starclose in 151 cases. Device-failure rates were low and not significantly different in the two groups (manual compression and closure devices; p = 0.8). There were significantly more Starclose (11.9%) patients compared to Angio-Seal (2.4%), with successful initial deployment subsequently requiring additional manual compression to achieve hemostasis (p < 0.0001). A significant number of very thin patients failed to achieve hemostasis (p = 0.014). Major complications were seen in 2.9% of Angio-Seal, 1.9% of Starclose, and 3.7% of manual compression patients, with no significant difference demonstrated; 4.7% of the major complications were seen in female patients compared to 1.3% in males (p = 0.0415). All three methods showed comparable safety and efficacy. Very thin patients are more likely to have failed hemostasis with the Starclose device, although this did not translate into an increased complication rate. There is a significant increased risk of major puncture-site complications in women with peripheral vascular disease.

  16. Regional alterations in long bone /sup 85/Sr clearance produced by internal fixation devices. Part II. Histomorphometry

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, D.J.; Daum, W.J.; Calhoun, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of each of the surgical stages involved in compression plating on the development of cortical thinning and porosity were assessed in the intact midshaft, stress-shielded femoral segments of adult mongrel dogs 6 months postoperatively. The data were evaluated in terms of a postsurgical tetracycline-based measure of remodeling and terminal /sup 85/Sr clearance (SrC) values for the plated segments of bone. Drilling had no effect on any parameter. Screw application was associated with minimal cortical thinning (p less than 0.05), while plate fixation clearly promoted thinning (p less than 0.01) and porosity (p less than 0.05). The percentage of labeled osteons, a measure of remodeling activity, increased only after plate fixation (p less than 0.05), and the labeling patterns suggested that most osteons had formed during the first 4 postsurgical months. That none of these changes were correlated with the 6-month SrC values suggests that the development of plate-induced osteopenia involves disparate histomorphometric time constants, rather than lack of any association.

  17. A Novel Technique Using Customized Headgear for Fixation of Rigid External Distraction Device in an Infant With Crouzon Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Firdaus; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Mahdah, Saridah; Mathaneswaran, Vickneswaran; Ganesan, Dharmendra

    2015-11-01

    Rigid external distraction device is often indicated for superior midfacial advancement in pediatric syndromic craniosynostosis patients. Even though the technique is proven reliable to treat the functional issues related to the craniofacial deformity, major complications associated with its fixation, such as intracranial pin perforation and migration have been reported. We report a novel technique of using a customized headgear to prevent intracranial pin perforation over a very thin temporal bone region in an 8-month-old infant with Crouzon syndrome who underwent monobloc Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis using a combination of bilateral internal and a rigid external distraction device. The customized headgear provides a protective platform at the temporal region thus preventing intracranial pin perforation and allows stable fixation during the early phase of consolidation period to prevent central component relapse. The headgear can be used short term when rigid external distractor is indicated in infant patient but requires close monitoring because of risks of skin necrosis and temporal region indentation.

  18. [Digital panoramic radiography in patients with rigid internal fixations devices after maxillofacial surgery].

    PubMed

    Nessi, R; Ottolina, P; Lazzerini, F; Giannì, A B

    1998-01-01

    Digital techniques have found promising applications in dental radiology in the recent past, namely with radiovisiography and digital panoramic radiography. These images present some features making them particularly interesting for alveolar bone studies. Digital panoramic radiography with light-emitting phosphors was performed on 16 patients during postoperative follow-up. The patients were previously submitted to multiple maxillofacial osteosynthesis with rigid internal fixation devices (32 miniplates, 12 microplates, 14 screws). Digital images were always observed and printed with analogic-like and Xeroradiographic-like post-processing. Digital panoramic radiographs yielded clear and effective images of the maxillary and mandibular arches and of surgical osteosynthesis, as demonstrated by a retrospective evaluation performed by three independent observers on a blind basis (score 3: 60.42%), with no major interobserver differences (p = .7286). Xeroradiographic-like images were the most effective in depicting bone structures and osteosynthesis materials, thanks to their better detailing and typically lower overall contrast. Among the drawbacks of the digital technique, reduced cassette size may prevent the full view of the mandibular arch from the symphysis to both condylar regions. The edge effect, which is typical of Xeroradiographic images, may mask useful details within the trabecular bone close to metal implants. This effect was present in some of our cases, but it was seldom disturbing according to our retrospective evaluation (score 3: 53.40%), with good interobserver agreement (p = .1117). Digital panoramic radiography proves to be a useful tool to study metal implants after maxillofacial surgery as well as alveolar bone structure. The digital technique markedly reduces the radiation dose to the patient, which is very important for an X-ray examination that must be repeated several times, often in young subjects.

  19. MRI after implantation of a novel femoral closure device following intra-arterial catheterisation: implications for subsequent contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Mohrs, Oliver K; Petersen, Steffen E; Nowak, Bernd; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Voigtlaender, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    To assess MRI safety aspects and artefacts of a novel femoral artery closure device during contrast-enhanced MR angiography in patients following intra-arterial catheterisation. Ten consecutive patients underwent MRI within 24 h of coronary angiography and placement of a femoral artery closure device. We used a T2-weighted gradient-echo MRI sequence to measure the device-related artefact size in comparison with a phantom image, phase-contrast flow measurement proximal to, at the level of and distal to the device to quantify potential differences in flow velocity and contrast-enhanced 3D gradient-echo MR angiography to differentiate potential femoral artery stenosis from device-related artefacts. The mean size of the oval-shaped artefact was 8.4 x 6.6 mm (+/-1.0 x 0.8 mm) and was almost identical to the maximum artefact size of the phantom measurement (8.3 x 5.7 mm). Device placement did not result in an increased peak velocity (proximal 69 +/- 23 cm/s, at the level of 64 +/- 11 cm/s and distal to the device 63 +/- 12 cm/s, p = 0.67). The mean artefact penetration into the vessel lumen was 0.5 +/- 0.5 mm (percentage vessel narrowing 7.0 +/- 6%; range 0-16%). The MR conditional StarClose femoral artery closure device was used safely within 24 h of deployment at 1.5 T. Despite clip-related artefacts MR angiography will allow for easy differentiation of clip-related artefacts from high-grade atherosclerotic stenosis.

  20. Investigation of metallic and carbon fibre PEEK fracture fixation devices for three-part proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Feerick, Emer M; Kennedy, Jim; Mullett, Hannan; FitzPatrick, David; McGarry, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    A computational investigation of proximal humeral fracture fixation has been conducted. Four devices were selected for the study; a locking plate, intramedullary nail (IM Nail), K-wires and a Bilboquet device. A 3D model of a humerus was created using a process of thresholding based on the grayscale values of a CT scan of an intact humerus. An idealised three part fracture was created in addition to removing a standard volume from the humeral head as a representation of bone voids that occur as a result of the injury. All finite element simulations conducted represent 90° arm abduction. Simulations were conducted to investigate the effect of filling this bone void with calcium phosphate cement for each device. The effect of constructing devices from carbon fibre polyetheretherketone (CFPEEK) was investigated. Simulations of cement reinforced devices predict greater stability for each device. The average unreinforced fracture line opening (FLO) is reduced by 48.5% for metallic devices with a lesser effect on composite devices with FLO reduced by 23.6%. Relative sliding (shear displacement) is also reduced between fracture fragments by an average of 58.34%. CFPEEK device simulations predict reduced stresses at the device-bone interface. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Importance of additional temporary pin fixation combined coracoclavicular augmentation using a suture button device for acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Beom-Soo; Kwon, Doo-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the outcomes of coracoclavicular (CC) augmentation using a suture button device with additional temporary pin fixation for acute acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Thirty-six consecutive cases who underwent CC augmentation using TightRope™ (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) were included. We temporarily fixed trans-articular pins in the first 10 cases (TA group) and a trans-spine pin in the next 26 cases (TS group). The radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated at minimum 2 years postoperatively. The mean follow-up period was 56.7 months (range, 24-84 months). At the final follow-up evaluation, reduction status showed anatomical reduction in 25 cases (69.4 %), slight loss of reduction in seven cases (19.4 %), partial loss of reduction in two cases (5.6 %), and total loss of reduction in two cases (5.6 %). The mean ASES score, UCLA score, and subjective shoulder value were 92.3, 32.9, and 91.6 %, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the outcomes. Intraoperative complications occurred in three cases (8.3 %) including two cases of failed reduction and one case of technical failure of the implant. Postoperative complications occurred in three cases (8.3 %) including one case of pin tract infection and distal clavicle fracture at the clavicle-hole, one case of reduction loss by severe subsidence of the clavicular button, and one case of shoulder stiffness. CC augmentation using a suture button device with temporary pin fixation yielded satisfactory radiological and clinical outcomes. These results support that temporary pin fixation for the AC joint may help to protect the AC reduction in the early phase of healing and rigid scar formation when performing CC fixation using a suture button device. Level-IV, Retrospective Case Series, Treatment Study.

  2. Lower reoperation rate for cemented hemiarthroplasty than for uncemented hemiarthroplasty and internal fixation following femoral neck fracture: 12- to 19-year follow-up of patients aged 75 years or more.

    PubMed

    Viberg, Bjarke; Overgaard, Søren; Lauritsen, Jens; Ovesen, Ole

    2013-06-01

    Elderly patients with displaced femoral neck fractures are commonly treated with a hemiarthroplasty (HA), but little is known about the long-term failure of this treatment. We compared reoperation rates for patients aged at least 75 years with displaced femoral neck fractures treated with either internal fixation (IF), cemented HA, or uncemented HA (with or without hydroxyapatite coating), after 12-19 years of follow-up. 4 hospitals with clearly defined guidelines for the treatment of 75+ year-old patients with a displaced femoral neck fracture were included. Cohort 1 (1991-1993) with 180 patients had undergone IF; cohort 2 (1991-1995) with 203 patients had received an uncemented bipolar Ultima HA stem (Austin-Moore); cohort 3 (1991-1995) with 209 patients had received a cemented Charnley-Hastings HA; and cohort 4 (1991-1998) with 158 patients had received an uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated Furlong HA. Data were retrieved from patient files, from the region-based patient administrative system, and from the National Registry of Patients at the end of 2010. We performed survival analysis with adjustment for comorbidity, age, and sex. Cemented HA had a reoperation rate (RR) of 5% and was used as reference in the Cox regression analysis, which showed significantly higher hazard ratios (HRs) for IF (HR = 3.8, 95% CI: 1.9-7.5; RR = 18%), uncemented HA (HR = 2.2, CI: 1.1-4.5; RR = 11%) and uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated HA (HR = 3.6, CI: 1.8-7.4; RR = 16%). Cemented HA has a superior long-term hip survival rate compared to IF and uncemented HA (with and without hydroxyapatite coating) in patients aged 75 years or more with displaced femoral neck fractures.

  3. The Use of ExoSeal Vascular Closure Device for Direct Antegrade Superficial Femoral Artery Puncture Site Hemostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, Uri Khaitovich, Boris; Yakubovich, Dmitry; Bensaid, Paul Golan, Gil; Silverberg, Daniel

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of the ExoSeal vascular closure device (VCD) to achieve hemostasis in antegrade access of the superficial femoral artery (SFA).MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed the outcome of ExoSeal VCD used for hemostasis in 110 accesses to the SFA in 93 patients between July 2011 and July 2013. All patients had patent proximal SFA based on computer tomography angiography or ultrasound duplex. Arterial calcifications at puncture site were graded using fluoroscopy. The SFA was accessed in an antegrade fashion with ultrasound or fluoroscopic guidance. In all patients, 5–7F vascular sheaths were used. The ExoSeal VCD was applied to achieve hemostasis at the end of the procedure. All patients were clinically examined and had ultrasound duplex exam for any puncture site complications during the 24 h postprocedure.ResultsIn all procedures, the ExoSeal was applied successfully. We did not encounter any device-related technical failure. There were four major complications in four patients (3.6 %): three pseudoaneurysms, which were treated with direct thrombin injection, and one hematoma, which necessitated transfusion of two blood units. All patients with complications were treated with anticoagulation preprocedure or received thrombolytic therapy.ConclusionsThe ExoSeal VCD can be safely used for antegrade puncture of the SFA, with a high procedural success rate (100 %) and a low rate of access site complications (3.6 %)

  4. Finite element analysis of three commonly used external fixation devices for treating Type III pilon fractures.

    PubMed

    Ramlee, Muhammad Hanif; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul; Murali, Malliga Raman; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-10-01

    Pilon fractures are commonly caused by high energy trauma and can result in long-term immobilization of patients. The use of an external fixator i.e. the (1) Delta, (2) Mitkovic or (3) Unilateral frame for treating type III pilon fractures is generally recommended by many experts owing to the stability provided by these constructs. This allows this type of fracture to heal quickly whilst permitting early mobilization. However, the stability of one fixator over the other has not been previously demonstrated. This study was conducted to determine the biomechanical stability of these external fixators in type III pilon fractures using finite element modelling. Three-dimensional models of the tibia, fibula, talus, calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, three cuneiforms and five metatarsal bones were reconstructed from previously obtained CT datasets. Bones were assigned with isotropic material properties, while the cartilage was assigned as hyperelastic springs with Mooney-Rivlin properties. Axial loads of 350 N and 70 N were applied at the tibia to simulate the stance and the swing phase of a gait cycle. To prevent rigid body motion, the calcaneus and metatarsals were fixed distally in all degrees of freedom. The results indicate that the model with the Delta frame produced the lowest relative micromovement (0.03 mm) compared to the Mitkovic (0.05 mm) and Unilateral (0.42 mm) fixators during the stance phase. The highest stress concentrations were found at the pin of the Unilateral external fixator (509.2 MPa) compared to the Mitkovic (286.0 MPa) and the Delta (266.7 MPa) frames. In conclusion, the Delta external fixator was found to be the most stable external fixator for treating type III pilon fractures. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Versatility of Taylor Spatial Frame in Gustilo-Anderson III C femoral fractures: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Albisetti, Walter; Capitani, Dario

    2010-11-01

    Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) combines a multiplanar external fixator and software accuracy for reduction of acute long-bone fractures. The frame gives stability, soft-tissue preservation, adjustability and functionality allowing bone to realize its full osteogenic potential. Three patients with multiple injuries and femoral Gustilo-Anderson type III C have been treated in our center. Initial surgery was performed within 6 h of injury with help of vascular surgeon. We used TSF as definitive fixation method. The results were assessed using the functional and radiological scoring system described by Paley and Maar. Fracture union occurred in all limbs and average fixation time was 151.6 days. All three patients had excellent outcome in terms of bony and functional ASAMI criteria. The TSF is a valuable tool. It is a definitive method of femoral Gustilo-Anderson type III C fracture care using external fixation with several advantages over previously used devices.

  6. Safety and efficacy of femoral artery closure with the FemoSeal(R) device after coronary angiography using a 7 French sheath.

    PubMed

    Wanitschek, M M; Suessenbacher, A; Dörler, J; Pachinger, O; Moes, N; Alber, H F

    2011-09-01

    Post-cardiac catheterization femoral artery hemostasis can be accomplished with several mechanisms, including the FemoSeal® hemostasis device which has been designed and approved for closure of 6 French (F) arterial puncture sites. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the FemoSeal® vascular closure device can effectively and safely seal 7F arterial puncture sites after diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations. Femoral artery puncture sites of 50 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were closed with the FemoSeal® vascular closure device, according to the manufacturer's instructions. Efficacy endpoints were time to hemostasis and successful ambulation. Safety endpoints included bleeding complications, vessel occlusion and pseudoaneurysms. Mean time to hemostasis was 57.8±26.3 seconds (0-125 seconds). Hemostasis was achieved in 100 percent of the 50 patients. One patient suffered minor bleeding the next day, i.e. local hematoma. This clinical study demonstrates that the FemoSeal® vascular closure device, initially approved for closure of 6F arterial puncture sites, shows promising efficacy and safety to seal a larger (7F) femoral arterial puncture sites after diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations.

  7. The end stage of dialysis access: femoral graft or HeRO vascular access device.

    PubMed

    Kudlaty, Elizabeth A; Pan, Jeanne; Allemang, Matthew T; Kendrick, Daniel E; Kashyap, Vikram S; Wong, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining and establishing vascular access in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients is complicated when they are poor candidates for traditional upper extremity access. Our objective was to compare our experience with 2 alternative dialysis accesses, the femoral arteriovenous graft (fAVG) and the Hemodialysis Reliable Outflow (HeRO), in patients with limited remaining options. A single institution, retrospective review of ESRD patients with fAVG or HeRO placed between May 2009 and February 2013 was performed. Adult patients were selected by reviewing all arteriovenous grafts placed at a single institution. Patient demographics, medical history, access characteristics, and outcomes were recorded from both institutional and dialysis center databases. Data were evaluated using Fisher's exact test, unpaired t-test for continuous variables, log-rank test, and univariate analysis. A total of 56 accesses in 43 unique patients met these criteria: 35 fAVG and 21 HeRO; with 1 HeRO patient lost immediately to follow-up. Clinical variables were similar except the HeRO group had more diabetic patients (60% HeRO, 22.9% fAVG; P = 0.01). The average number of years on hemodialysis was 7.0 ± 1.0 for fAVG and 5.7 ± 0.9 for HeRO (P = 0.41). Primary patency was 40.5%, 18.7%, and 14.9% for fAVG and 29.0%, 29.0%, and 0% for HeRO at 6 months, 12 months, and 2 years (P = 0.67), respectively. Assisted primary patency was also similar, with 43.8%, 29.4%, and 13.8% for fAVG and 34.8%, 34.8%, and 17.4% for HeRO at 6 months, 12 months, and 2 years (P = 0.81), respectively. Secondary patency was 62.6%, 50.6%, 19.3% for fAVG and 68.0%, 53.5%, 38.3% for HeRO at 6 months, 12 months, and 2 years (P = 0.69), respectively. Average number of interventions to maintain patency for fAVG was 1.1 ± 1.47 and 1.65 ± 2.52 for HeRO (P = 0.35). Infectious complications occurred in 29% of fAVG and 15% of HeRO (P = 0.33). Patients who received either fAVG or HeRO experience poor access patency. ESRD

  8. Prolene hernia system, ultrapro hernia system and 3D patch devices in the treatment of inguinal, femoral, umbilical and small incisional hernias in outpatient surgery.

    PubMed

    Dabić, D; Cerović, S; Azanjaç, B; Marić, B; Kostić, I

    2010-01-01

    The employment of a diversity of prosthetic materials and several types of mesh different in construction is opening a new chapter in hernia surgery and tension-free techniques are becoming a "golden standard" for repairing abdominal wall defects, whereas the conventional methods, i.e., the tension techniques are performed on young patients having small direct, indirect, or femoral hernias. The aim of this retrospective study is to present the results of using Prolene Hernia System (PHS), Ultrapro Hernia System (UHS) and 3D Patch (3DP) devices in the treatment of inguinal, femoral, umbilical and small incisional hernias in outpatient surgery. From January 2006 to January 2009, 70 patients were operated on for abdominal wall hernias (54 inguinal, 4 femoral, 8 umbilical and 4 small incisional hernias) using PHS, UHS and 3DP devices. All the patients underwent surgery under local infiltrative anaesthesia. All the surgical operations were performed by a single surgeon, 19 of them in the General Hospital and 51 in a private polyclinic. The mean size of the hernia defect in the inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernias was 2.5 cm (1-4 cm), while in the incisional hernias it was 4.5 cm (3-6 cm). The mean operating time was 2.4 hrs (2-6 hrs). There were no requirement for urinary drains. The mean follow-up was 18 months (0-36 months). The incidence of infection, chronic pain and recurrence was 0%. Three of the patients had complications: seroma in one patient with an incisional hernia and hematoma in two patients after inguinal hernia repair. The employment of PHS, UHS and 3DP devices, which have not yet been widely accepted in our hospitals, has had outstanding results in outpatient surgery. In addition, the type of anaesthesia and the 3D mesh construction prepare the way for a short hospital stay, smooth recovery and a swift return to normal activity.

  9. Novel Technique for Femoral Head Reconstruction using Allograft following Obturator Hip Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Church, Dane J; Merrill, Haley M; Kotwal, Suhel; Dubin, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Obturator hip dislocations with an associated osteochondral fracture of the femoral head are uncommon. The treatment of these injuries is challenging and the functional outcomes are poor. Though the injury pattern has been described previously in literature, there are few published reports regarding treatment options. This case report illustrates a novel technique for fixation and stabilization for an unusual injury involving an obturator hip dislocation and an osteochondral impaction fracture of the femoral head. A 30-years old African American male, involved in a motor vehicle collision, sustained an obturator dislocation of the left hip with a large posterior osteochondral fracture of the femoral head. An emergency closed reduction procedure was performed followed by a computed tomography (CT) scan of the hip joint which demonstrated a large osteochondral defect (25 x 10 mm, depth: 5 mm) of the femoral head, visualized within the weight-bearing area. Surgical intervention was planned as a fracture of the femoral head with a defect deeper than four millimeters has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of post-traumatic arthritis, often with onset of symptoms within 5 years of the date of injury. Following surgical hip dislocation, the defect of the femoral head was reconstructed with implantation of a femoral head allograft and internal fixation. At the six months follow-up, the patient could ambulate with minimal pain and without assistive devices. Radiographs demonstrated maintenance of articular congruity with no evidence of implant failure, post-traumatic arthritis or avascular necrosis. Surgical hip dislocation and reconstruction using femoral head allograft used to treat obturator hip dislocations with concomitant femoral head impaction fractures can lead to satisfactory short term functional outcomes.

  10. Novel Technique for Femoral Head Reconstruction using Allograft following Obturator Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Church, Dane J.; Merrill, Haley M.; Kotwal, Suhel; Dubin, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Obturator hip dislocations with an associated osteochondral fracture of the femoral head are uncommon. The treatment of these injuries is challenging and the functional outcomes are poor. Though the injury pattern has been described previously in literature, there are few published reports regarding treatment options. This case report illustrates a novel technique for fixation and stabilization for an unusual injury involving an obturator hip dislocation and an osteochondral impaction fracture of the femoral head. Case Presentation: A 30-years old African American male, involved in a motor vehicle collision, sustained an obturator dislocation of the left hip with a large posterior osteochondral fracture of the femoral head. An emergency closed reduction procedure was performed followed by a computed tomography (CT) scan of the hip joint which demonstrated a large osteochondral defect (25 x 10 mm, depth: 5 mm) of the femoral head, visualized within the weight-bearing area. Surgical intervention was planned as a fracture of the femoral head with a defect deeper than four millimeters has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of post-traumatic arthritis, often with onset of symptoms within 5 years of the date of injury. Following surgical hip dislocation, the defect of the femoral head was reconstructed with implantation of a femoral head allograft and internal fixation. At the six months follow-up, the patient could ambulate with minimal pain and without assistive devices. Radiographs demonstrated maintenance of articular congruity with no evidence of implant failure, post-traumatic arthritis or avascular necrosis. Conclusion: Surgical hip dislocation and reconstruction using femoral head allograft used to treat obturator hip dislocations with concomitant femoral head impaction fractures can lead to satisfactory short term functional outcomes. PMID:27299126

  11. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis].

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Haraux, E; Leroux, J; Gouron, R

    2017-03-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SFCE) is a disorder of the hip, characterized by a displacement of the capital femoral epiphysis from the metaphysic through the femoral growth plate. The epiphysis slips posteriorly and inferiorly. SCFE occurs during puberty and metabolic and epidemiologic risk factors, such as obesity are frequently found. Most chronic slips are diagnosed late. Sagittal hip X-rays show epiphysis slip. In case of untreated SCFE, a slip progression arises with an acute slip risk. Treatment is indicated to prevent slip worsening. The clinical and radiological classification is useful to guide treatment and it is predictive of the prognosis. In situ fixation of stable and moderately displaced SCFE with cannulated screws gives excellent results. Major complications are chondrolysis and osteonecrosis and the major sequelae are femoroacetabular impingement and early arthritis.

  12. Fluoroscopy vs. traditional guided femoral arterial access and the use of closure devices: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Abu-Fadel, Mazen S; Sparling, Jeffrey M; Zacharias, Soni J; Aston, Christopher E; Saucedo, Jorge F; Schechter, Eliot; Hennebry, Thomas A

    2009-10-01

    To compare the effectiveness of accessing the common femoral artery (CFA) using fluoroscopic guidance (FG) versus traditional anatomic landmark guidance (TALG) during cardiac catheterization and to determine the effect of the two modalities on the appropriateness for use of vascular closure devices (VCDs). Previous studies have shown a consistent relationship between the head of the femur and the CFA, yet there is no prospective data validating the superiority of fluoroscopy-assisted CFA access. A total of 972 patients were randomized to either FG or TALG access. The primary endpoint of the study was the angiographic suitability of the puncture site for VCD use. Secondary endpoints included arteriotomy location, time and number of attempts needed to obtain access, and the incidence of vascular complications. Of these, 474 patients were randomized into the FG arm and 498 patients into the TALG arm. A total of 79.5% of patients in the fluoroscopy arm and 80.7% in the traditional arm (P = 0.7) were deemed angiographically suitable for VCD based on the arteriotomy. The fluoroscopy group had significantly less arteriotomies below the inferior border of the head of the femur (P = 0.03). Total time for sheath insertion (105.7 +/- 130.7 vs. 106.5 +/- 152.6 sec) and number of arterial punctures (1.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.5) did not differ among the FG and TALG, respectively. The rates of vascular complications were not different. The angiographic suitability for VCD was not different between FG and TALG groups. Fluoroscopy decreased the number of low arteriotomies. The time to sheath insertion, number of arterial punctures needed to obtain access, and the incidence of complications were also similar.

  13. Use of Spider Filter Embolic Protection Device During Endovascular Revascularization of Acute Thromboembolic Occlusion of Superficial Femoral Artery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhongzhi; Zhao, Jinwei; Tian, Feng; Wang, Kai; Li, Shaoqin; Jiang, Guomin; Wang, Weiping

    2015-12-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Spider filter embolic protection device (EPD) in protecting patients from distal migration of thromboemboli during revascularization of acute superficial femoral artery (SFA) occlusion secondary to thromboemboli. Data from all patients at our institution who had EPD placement for embolic protection during endovascular revascularization for acute thromboembolic occlusion of the SFA were analyzed. From April 2007 to June 2014, a total of 14 patients had EPD placement during endovascular revascularization for acute SFA occlusion secondary to thromboemboli. All patients presented with acute onset of limb ischemia, and further work-up with imaging studies demonstrated thromboembolic occlusions. The duration from onset of symptoms to revascularization was 7.0 ± 2.7 h (range 2-14 h). An aspiration technique for thrombectomy was used in all 14 cases (aspiration alone, 6 cases; aspiration plus urokinase, 7 cases; additional angioplasty after urokinase, 1 case). Spider filter EPDs were successfully placed at the target in all 14 cases, and the thromboemboli were captured in 13/14 (92.9%) cases. Successful reestablishment of the SFA flow without distal branch embolism occurred in all 14 cases. There were no EPD-related complications. During a mean 32.2 ± 20.2 months of follow-up, 13 patients remained asymptomatic; one patient who underwent PTA during the procedure reported limb coolness and fatigue 6 months later because of recurrent atherosclerotic stenosis. The Spider filter EPD can be safe and effective in protecting patients from distal branch embolism when they undergo an endovascular thrombectomy procedure.

  14. Cost effectiveness of total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: comparison of devices with differing bearing surfaces and modes of fixation.

    PubMed

    Pulikottil-Jacob, R; Connock, M; Kandala, N-B; Mistry, H; Grove, A; Freeman, K; Costa, M; Sutcliffe, P; Clarke, A

    2015-04-01

    Many different designs of total hip arthroplasty (THA) with varying performance and cost are available. The identification of those which are the most cost-effective could allow significant cost-savings. We used an established Markov model to examine the cost effectiveness of five frequently used categories of THA which differed according to bearing surface and mode of fixation, using data from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales. Kaplan-Meier analyses of rates of revision for men and women were modelled with parametric distributions. Costs of devices were provided by the NHS Supply Chain and associated costs were taken from existing studies. Lifetime costs, lifetime quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) and the probability of a device being cost effective at a willingness to pay £20 000/QALY were included in the models. The differences in QALYs between different categories of implant were extremely small (< 0.0039 QALYs for men or women over the patient's lifetime) and differences in cost were also marginal (£2500 to £3000 in the same time period). As a result, the probability of any particular device being the most cost effective was very sensitive to small, plausible changes in quality of life estimates and cost. Our results suggest that available evidence does not support recommending a particular device on cost effectiveness grounds alone. We would recommend that the choice of prosthesis should be determined by the rate of revision, local costs and the preferences of the surgeon and patient.

  15. A new device for internal fixation of thoracolumbar and lumbar spine fractures: the 'fixateur interne'.

    PubMed

    Dick, W; Kluger, P; Magerl, F; Woersdörfer, O; Zäch, G

    1985-08-01

    A new system of operative fixation of thoracolumbar and lumbar spine fractures is presented: the 'fixateur interne' (F.I.). From a posterior approach long Schanz screws are inserted through the pedicles into the body of the two vertebrae just adjacent to the lesion and connected by th threaded F.I. rods. By tightening the nuts the Schanz screws are fixed in all directions. The advantages of the F.I. system are: excellent reposition by the long lever-arm of the Schanz screws, immobilization of only two segments and therefore good mobility of the residual spine, stability against flexion forces better than is obtained with Harrington distraction rods, additional rotational stability, and fixation in lordosis or kyphosis as is desired. The F.I. does not act as a four point bending system like all other dorsal spine instrumentation systems, but provides stability in flexion by itself. Therefore it can be Used independently of the condition of all ligaments (including the anterior longitudinal ligament) and of the posterior wall of the fractured vertebrae, and there is no need to fix more than the two immediately adjacent vertebrae, thus avoiding the often painful and cumbersome iatrogenic loss of lumbar lordosis and of mobility and permitting early mobilization of the patient. Experience with the first 45 patients is very promising.

  16. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  17. Cable plates and onlay allografts in periprosthetic femoral fractures after hip replacement: laboratory and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jonathan R; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Greidanus, Nelson V; Duncan, Clive P

    2004-01-01

    Fractures of the femur after total hip replacement are an increasingly common and technically challenging problem. The results of nonsurgical treatment are poor. When the general condition of the patient allows, these injuries should be treated surgically. Several surgical treatments can be used to treat these fractures, and classification of the fracture assists the surgeon in the choice of procedure. Over the past decade, cable plate fixation systems and onlay strut allografts have become two of the most commonly used methods of fixation for fractures associated with hip prostheses. The ideal method of fixation is yet to be determined. However, laboratory studies have shown that dual fixation using either a lateral plate and anterior strut graft or two strut grafts produces the strongest construct. Cables rather than smooth wires should be used for fixation, and fixation strength increases with the number of cables used. The use of screws proximally produces a strong fixation but there are theoretical disadvantages to using screws around a femoral implant. Clinical data show high rates of fracture union using cable plate fixation, cortical onlay allograft fixation, and combined fixation methods for fractures that occur around well-fixed implants. Results have been less encouraging when these techniques have been used to fix fractures around prostheses that are either loose or malaligned; such fractures are better managed by revision of the femoral component to a long-stemmed device. Care should also be taken when there has been previous periosteal stripping of the femur because this may predispose to fracture nonunion. Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are a complex surgical problem and require specialized training in a range of surgical techniques.

  18. Influence of stability and mechanical properties of a spinal fixation device on production of wear debris particles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Y; Bauer, T W; Nitto, H; Kambic, H E; Muschler, G F

    2000-01-01

    A prospective and quantitative animal study was performed to evaluate the production of wear particles from a spinal fixation device, and to test the hypothesis that the concentration of wear debris particles adjacent to spinal fixation hardware is correlated with the stiffness of the spinal fusion construct and local bone formation at the fusion site. An established canine segmental spinal fusion model with three interfacet fusions was used in this study. Several bone substitute materials were grafted to the area of the interfacet fusion. Internal fixation was performed on both sides of the spinous processes at each site using a stainless steel plate system in 19 dogs. After 12 weeks, spinal segments were excised, then 3-dimensional computerized tomography was used to measure bone volume and bone area of the individual fusion sites. The stiffness of each segment was tested using a servohydraulic materials testing machine. Biopsies were obtained from the soft tissues immediately around the plate system, and wear particles were collected and characterized using an electrical resistance particle analyzer, light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Biopsies from para-spinal tissue from adjacent, unoperated spinal levels served as negative controls. Histologically, 24 of 57 specimens (42.1%) showed only fibrous tissue with no recognizable macrophages, inflammation, or debris. Fourteen of 57 specimens (24.6%), however, contained many particles that were composed of Fe, Cr, and Ni, corresponding to elements found in the fixation hardware. Another 19 specimens showed only occasional particles. The mean concentration of particles from the tissue around the plate system was 2.8 x 10(9) per gram dry tissue weight, compared to 0.5 x 10(9) particles per gram for controls (p < 0.05). Statistical analyses showed significant inverse correlation between the log particle number and stiffness (r = -0.41, p < 0.01), bone volume (r

  19. Self-dissolution assisted coating on magnesium metal for biodegradable bone fixation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakbaz, Hadis; Walter, Rhys; Gordon, Timothy; Bobby Kannan, M.

    2014-12-01

    An attempt was made to develop a self-dissolution assisted coating on a pure magnesium metal for potential bone fixation implants. Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) was coated successfully on the magnesium metal in ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution. The in vitro degradation behaviour of the MPC coated metal was evaluated using electrochemical techniques. The MPC coating increased the polarisation resistance (RP) of the metal by ˜150% after 2 h immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and reduced the corrosion current density (icorr) by ˜80%. The RP of the MPC coated metal remained relatively high even after 8 h immersion period. However, post-degradation analysis of the MPC coated metal revealed localized attack. Hence, the study suggests that MPC coating alone may not be beneficial, but this novel coating could provide additional protection if used as a precursor for other potential coatings such as biodegradable polymers or calcium phosphates.

  20. Femoral Arterial Haemostasis Using an Anchored Collagen Plug after Percutaneous EVAR with an Ultra-Low Profile Device: Prospective Audit of an Evolving "Post-Close" Technique.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, A

    2017-08-01

    To present an audit of a successful "post-close" haemostatic technique using the Angio-Seal VIP vascular closure device (VCD) after percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair (p-EVAR) using an ultra-low profile (ULP) device. Thirty patients underwent EVAR using the Ovation device, of which 26 procedures were totally percutaneous. Data including patient habitus, procedural details, number of VCDs deployed including use of the double wire approach, and technical success/complications were prospectively recorded. Numerical/statistical analyses were undertaken using Microsoft Excel 2007 and Minitab for Windows. Thirty consecutive patients (27 male, 3 female; age range 70-85 years [mean 76.1, SD 6.5]) underwent EVAR for an infrarenal AAA (mean size 61 mm, SD 9.7) between March 2014 and August 2016 using the Ovation endograft system. In a few patients open ipsilateral femoral access was used (n=4); the remainder underwent p-EVAR (n=26), and these results are presented hereafter. Ipsilateral sheath sizes used varied between 14F (n=22), 15F (n=3), and 16F (n=1), and were closed using a single 8F Angio-Seal (n=7), a combination of 8F/6F Angio-Seal VCDs (n=18), or two 8F Angio-Seal VCDs (n=1) with prior double wire set up. Contralateral punctures were closed mostly with a single 8F Angio-Seal (n=24) or combination of 8F/6F Angio-Seal VCDs (n=2) to seal defects downsized to 12F. The overall immediate haemostasis success rate was 100%. Mean length of stay in the p-EVAR cohort was 2 days (SD 1.5). All patients had a post-EVAR computed tomography angiogram (n=24) or duplex ultrasound (n=2) which did not reveal any stenoses or seromas; two patients developed an ipsilateral femoral pseudoaneurysm successfully treated by thrombin injection. A "post-close" technique can be employed successfully for haemostasis after p-EVAR using an ULP device. An 8F Angio-Seal is usually effective in closing a 12F femoral arterial defect. This represents a viable option for femoral arterial closure

  1. Prospective evaluation of femoral head viability following femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, B.; Kroop, S.A.; Nepola, I.V.; Grantham, A.S.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    The bone scans of 33 patients (pts) with recent subcapital fractures (fx) of the femur were evaluated prospectively to determine their value in predicting femoral head visability. Each of the 33 pts (ll men, 22 women, age range 30-92) had a pre-operative bone scan within 72 hrs of the fx (23 pts within 24 hrs). Anterior and posterior planar views of both hips and pinhole views (50% of pts) were obtained 2 hrs after administration of Tc-99m HDP. The femoral head was classified as perfused if it showed the same activity as the opposite normal side or if it showed only slightly decreased activity. Femoral heads showing absent activity were classified as nonperfused. Overall, 20 of the 33 pts showed a photopenic femoral head on the side of the fx. Only 2 pts showed increased activity at hte site of the fx. Internal fixation of the fx was performed in 23 pts, 12 of whom had one or more follow-up scans. Five of these 12 pts showed absent femoral head activity on their initial scan, but 2 showed later reperfusion. The other 7 pts showed good perfusion initially, with only 1 later showing decreased femoral head activity. The other 10 pts (7 of whom had absent femoral head activity) had immediate resection of the femoral head and insertion of a Cathcart prosthesis. The results suggest that femoral head activity seen on a bone scan in the immediate post-fx period is not always a reliable indicator of femoral head viability. Decreased femoral head activity may reflect, in part, compromised perfusion secondary to post-traumatic edema, with or without anatomic disruption of the blood supply.

  2. Fixation using alternative implants for the treatment of hip fractures (FAITH): design and rationale for a multi-centre randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws and cancellous screws on revision surgery rates and quality of life in the treatment of femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are a common type of fragility fracture that afflict 293,000 Americans (over 5,000 per week) and 35,000 Canadians (over 670 per week) annually. Despite the large population impact the optimal fixation technique for low energy femoral neck fractures remains controversial. The primary objective of the FAITH study is to assess the impact of cancellous screw fixation versus sliding hip screws on rates of revision surgery at 24 months in individuals with femoral neck fractures. The secondary objective is to determine the impact on health-related quality of life, functional outcomes, health state utilities, fracture healing, mortality and fracture-related adverse events. Methods/Design FAITH is a multi-centre, multi-national randomized controlled trial utilizing minimization to determine patient allocation. Surgeons in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit a total of at least 1,000 patients with low-energy femoral neck fractures. Using central randomization, patients will be allocated to receive surgical treatment with cancellous screws or a sliding hip screw. Patient outcomes will be assessed at one week (baseline), 10 weeks, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post initial fixation. We will independently adjudicate revision surgery and complications within 24 months of the initial fixation. Outcome analysis will be performed using a Cox proportional hazards model and likelihood ratio test. Discussion This study represents major international efforts to definitively resolve the treatment of low-energy femoral neck fractures. This trial will not only change current Orthopaedic practice, but will also set a benchmark for the conduct of future Orthopaedic trials. Trial registration The FAITH trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT00761813). PMID:24965132

  3. Fixation using alternative implants for the treatment of hip fractures (FAITH): design and rationale for a multi-centre randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws and cancellous screws on revision surgery rates and quality of life in the treatment of femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    2014-06-26

    Hip fractures are a common type of fragility fracture that afflict 293,000 Americans (over 5,000 per week) and 35,000 Canadians (over 670 per week) annually. Despite the large population impact the optimal fixation technique for low energy femoral neck fractures remains controversial. The primary objective of the FAITH study is to assess the impact of cancellous screw fixation versus sliding hip screws on rates of revision surgery at 24 months in individuals with femoral neck fractures. The secondary objective is to determine the impact on health-related quality of life, functional outcomes, health state utilities, fracture healing, mortality and fracture-related adverse events. FAITH is a multi-centre, multi-national randomized controlled trial utilizing minimization to determine patient allocation. Surgeons in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit a total of at least 1,000 patients with low-energy femoral neck fractures. Using central randomization, patients will be allocated to receive surgical treatment with cancellous screws or a sliding hip screw. Patient outcomes will be assessed at one week (baseline), 10 weeks, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post initial fixation. We will independently adjudicate revision surgery and complications within 24 months of the initial fixation. Outcome analysis will be performed using a Cox proportional hazards model and likelihood ratio test. This study represents major international efforts to definitively resolve the treatment of low-energy femoral neck fractures. This trial will not only change current Orthopaedic practice, but will also set a benchmark for the conduct of future Orthopaedic trials. The FAITH trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT00761813).

  4. A biomechanical comparison of the antegrade inserted universal femoral nail with the retrograde inserted universal tibial nail for use in femoral shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Frankle, M; Cordey, J; Sanders, R W; Koval, K; Perren, S M

    1999-01-01

    Femoral shaft fractures with and without bony contact were simulated in cadaver specimens fixed with one of two different types of intramedullary locked nail systems; conventional antegrade nail fixation of the femur with the universal AO femoral nail or retrograde insertion in the femur with the universal tibial nail (a smaller diameter slotted nail) were utilized. Mechanical testing simulated one leg stance, and resultant deformation was measured in bending, torsion, and shortening. In stable fractures, fracture stability was similar to both devices, while in unstable fractures, the larger femoral nail was more stable. Furthermore, the simulation of single leg stance led to a coupled deformation of varus bending, axial shortening, and external rotation, which was dependent on bone geometry.

  5. Minimal fixation in the treatment of open hand and foot bone fractures caused by explosive devices: case series.

    PubMed

    Has, B; Jovanović, S; Wertheimer, B; Kondza, G; Grdić, P; Leko, K

    2001-12-01

    To evaluate minimal fixation method with Kirschner's wires in the treatment of open fractures of the hand and foot short bones, caused by explosive devices. There were 270 wounded persons with open fractures of hand and foot short bones, who were surgically treated at the Department of Surgery at the Osijek University Hospital. The stabilization of an unstable open fracture was performed with intramedullary positioned Kirschner's wires. In a few cases, satisfactory stabilization was achieved with Kirschner's wires positioned percutaneously alongside the wound and perpendicularly through the fracture. In the rest of the wounded, plaster immobilization was sufficient after surgical treatment and fracture reposition. Among 270 persons with 412 open hand and foot bone fractures, 49% had fracture only in the feet, 27% only in the hands, and 24% in both hands and feet. Unstable short bone fractures were found in 56 patients (21%). Such fractures were stabilized with Kirschner's wires (n=71). In 58 patients (21%) partial hand and foot amputations had to be performed. Reconstructive operations to improve pseudarthrosis after minimal osteosynthesis were performed on 5 short bones (7%). Osteitis was found on four short bones (6%) after minimal osteosynthesis. Minimal osteosynthesis with Kirschner's wires is a reliable and adequate method of the treatment of open unstable short bone fractures caused by explosive devices.

  6. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a polylactic acid-bioactive glass composite for bone fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Vergnol, Gwenaelle; Ginsac, Nathalie; Rivory, Pascaline; Meille, Sylvain; Chenal, Jean-Marc; Balvay, Sandra; Chevalier, Jérôme; Hartmann, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) is nowadays among the most used bioabsorbable materials for medical devices. To promote bone growth on the material surface and increase the degradation rate of the polymer, research is currently focused on organic-inorganic composites by adding a bioactive mineral to the polymer matrix. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of a poly(L,DL-lactide)-Bioglass® (P(L,DL)LA-Bioglass(®) 45S5) composite to be used as a bone fixation device. In vitro cell viability testing of P(l,dl)LA based composites containing different amounts of Bioglass(®) 45S5 particles was investigated. According to the degradation rate of the P(L,DL)LA matrix and the cytocompatibility experiments, the composite with 30 wt % of Bioglass® particles seemed to be the best candidate for further investigation. To study its behavior after immersion in simulated physiological conditions, the degradation of the composite was analyzed by measuring its weight loss and mechanical properties and by proceeding with X-ray tomography. We demonstrated that the presence of the bioactive glass significantly accelerated the in vitro degradation of the polymer. A preliminary in vivo investigation on rabbits shows that the addition of 30 wt % of Bioglass(®) in the P(L,DL)LA matrix seems to trigger bone osseointegration especially during the first month of implantation. This composite has thus strong potential interest for health applications.

  7. A double button adjustable loop device is biomechanically equivalent to tension band wire in the fixation of transverse patellar fractures-A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Han, Fucai; Pearce, Christopher Jon; Ng, David Q K; Ramruttun, Amit K; Chong, Desmond Y R; Murphy, Diarmuid; Lim, Chin Tat; Lee, Bernard C S

    2017-02-01

    Tension-band wire fixation of patellar fractures is associated with significant hardware-related complications and infection. Braided polyester suture fixation is an alternative option. However, these suture fixations have higher failure rates due to the difficulty in achieving rigid suture knot fixation. The Arthrex syndesmotic TightRope, which is a double-button adjustable loop fixation device utilizing a 4-point locking system using FibreWire, may not only offer stiff rigid fixation using a knotless system, but may also obviate the need for implant removal due to hardware related problems. The aim of our study is to compare the fixation rigidity of patella fractures using Tightrope versus conventional tension-band wiring (TBW) in a cadaveric model. TBW fixation was compared to TightRope fixation of transverse patella fractures in 5 matched pairs of cadaveric knees. The knees were cyclically brought through 0-90° of motion for a total of 500 cycles. Fracture gapping was measured before the start of the cycling, and at 50, 100, 200 and 500 cycles using an extensometer. The mean maximum fracture gapping was derived. Failure of the construct was defined as a displacement of more than 3mm, patella fracture or implant breakage. All but one knee from each group survived 500 cycles. The two failures were due to a fracture gap of more than 3mm during cycling. There was no significant difference in the mean number of cycles tolerated. There was no implant breakage. There was no statistical significant difference in mean maximum fracture gap between the TBW and TightRope group at all cyclical milestones after 500 cycles (0.3026±0.4091mm vs 0.3558±0.7173mm, p=0.388). We found no difference between the TBW and Tightrope fixation in terms of fracture gapping and failure. With possible lower risk of complications such as implant migration and soft tissue irritation, we believe tightrope fixation is a feasible alternative in fracture management of transverse patella

  8. Suitability of a 7-F ExoSeal Vascular Closure Device for Femoral Artery Punctures Made by 8-F or 9-F Introducer Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsaku; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Ishikawa, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Taiki; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2017-08-01

    To establish the safety and efficacy of the 7-F ExoSeal device for the closure of femoral puncture sites made by 8-F or 9-F introducer sheaths. Between January 2013 and December 2016, 332 patients (mean age 68.4±12.1 years; 195 men) underwent neurointerventional procedures via percutaneous puncture of the common femoral artery and an 8-F (n=272, 81.9%) or 9-F (n=60, 18.1%) introducer. The access sites were sealed with a 7-F ExoSeal in all cases. Procedure success and closure-related complication rates were evaluated, and risk factors for complications were analyzed by comparing patient characteristics between those who did and did not experience complications. Procedure success rates were 99.3% in the 8-F group and 100% in the 9-F group. The overall complication rate was 6.3% (n=17; all in the 8-F group), of which 13 (4.8%) were minor sequelae, including access-site hematoma (n=8), oozing (n=3), pseudoaneurysm (n=1), and retroperitoneal bleeding (n=1). Among the 4 (1.5%) major complications were 3 instances of bleeding requiring a blood transfusion and 1 surgical vascular repair. No complications were observed in the 9-F group. Patients who experienced complications had significantly longer activated clotting times (262±46 vs 218±55 seconds; p<0.001) compared with patients without complications. A 7-F ExoSeal vascular closure device is safe and effective for the closure of femoral puncture sites made by 8-F or 9-F introducer sheaths.

  9. Biomechanical comparison of 2 anterior cruciate ligament graft preparation techniques for tibial fixation: adjustable-length loop cortical button or interference screw.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Raul; Heinrichs, Christian Heinz; Eichinger, Martin; Coppola, Christian; Schmoelz, Werner; Attal, René

    2015-06-01

    Cortical button fixation at the femoral side and interference screws within the tibial bone tunnel are widely used for anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation. Using a bone socket instead of a full tunnel allows cortical button fixation on the tibial side as well. If adjustable-length loop cortical button devices are used for femoral and tibial fixation, the tendon graft has to be secured with sutures in a closed tendon loop. The increased distance of fixation points and potential slippage of the tendon strands at the securing sutures might lead to greater risk of postoperative graft elongation when compared with conventional graft preparation with tibial interference screw fixation. Compared with an anterior cruciate ligament graft with tibial adjustable-length loop cortical button fixation, a graft with tibial interference screw fixation will show less graft elongation during cyclic loading and lower ultimate failure loads. Controlled laboratory study. Grafts with tibial adjustable-length loop cortical button fixation and grafts with tibial interference screw fixation were biomechanically tested in calf tibiae (n = 10 per group). Femoral fixation was equivalent for both groups, using an adjustable-length loop cortical button. Specimens underwent cyclic loading followed by a load-to-failure test. Grafts with screw fixation showed significantly less initial elongation (cycles 1-5: 1.46 ± 0.26 mm), secondary elongation (cycles 6-1000: 1.87 ± 0.67 mm), and total elongation (cycles 1-1000: 3.33 ± 0.83 mm) in comparison with grafts with button fixation (2.47 ± 0.26, 3.56 ± 0.39, and 6.03 ± 0.61 mm, respectively) (P < .001). While pull-out stiffness was significantly higher for grafts with screw fixation (309.5 ± 33.2 vs 185.6 ± 16.4 N/mm) (P < .001), grafts with button fixation were able to withstand significantly higher ultimate failure loads (908 ± 74 vs 693 ± 119 N) (P < .001). Grafts with tibial adjustable-length loop cortical button fixation resulted

  10. Prompt and safe femoral hemostasis with a collagen device after intracoronary implantation of Palmaz-Schatz stents.

    PubMed

    Bartorelli, A L; Sganzerla, P; Fabbiocchi, F; Montorsi, P; De Cesare, N; Child, M; Tavasci, E; Passaretti, B; Loaldi, A

    1995-07-01

    We report the safety and efficacy of sealing the femoral puncture site with percutaneously applied collagen after Palmaz-Schatz stent implantation in 100 consecutive patients. Patients were anticoagulated with continuous heparin infusion, overlapping oral anticoagulants, and antiplatelet therapy by dextran, aspirin, and dipyridamole. At the time of sheath removal and collagen application, the mean activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time values expressed as international normalized ratio were 3.2 +/- 2.1 and 1.6 +/- 0.7, respectively. The hemostasis time ranged from 1 to 8 minutes (mean 2.18 +/- 2.08 minutes). Only two (2%) patients had major puncture-site bleeding (not seal related in one case) that required surgery and blood transfusions. Small (< 6 cm) and medium (6 to 10 cm) hematomas observed in 12 (12%) and 2 (2%) patients, respectively, resolved spontaneously without sequelae. Local infection developed in 2 (2%) patients, who were successfully treated with antibiotics without clinical consequences. Subacute stent thrombosis was observed in only 1 (1%) patient. Repeat catheterization through the same femoral artery was performed at 6-month follow-up in 55 patients without difficulty or vascular complications. These findings suggest that percutaneous collagen application after coronary stenting is a secure method of achieving prompt and effective femoral hemostasis with a low incidence of major vascular bleeding complications despite intense anticoagulation. Stable hemostasis may allow continued full-dose anticoagulation, reducing the risk of stent subacute thrombosis.

  11. Extensively coated cementless femoral components in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, N; Antoniou, J; Paprosky, W

    2000-01-01

    A septic loosening and osteolysis can compromise the available host bone in patients requiring revision hip arthroplasty. Secure fixation of revision femoral components may not be possible if reliant only on proximal femoral bone for biologic fixation or cement interdigitation. The challenge for the revision arthroplasty surgeon is to find the best method to secure the implant in a femur with deficient bone proximally that will provide stability for load bearing and motion. In addition to providing stability, the implant must be durable and maintain long-term fixation. With over 16 years of experience with fully porous coated femoral revision implants, we have found that maximizing prosthetic-bone fit in the proximal femoral diaphyseal bone provides reliable long-term fixation in the majority of femoral revision cases.

  12. Extensively Coated Cementless Femoral Components in Revision Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, Nelson; Antoniou, John; Paprosky, Wayne

    2000-10-01

    A septic loosening and osteolysis can compromise the available host bone in patients requiring revision hip arthroplasty. Secure fixation of revision femoral components may not be possible if reliant only on proximal femoral bone for biologic fixation or cement interdigitation. The challenge for the revision arthroplasty surgeon is to find the best method to secure the implant in a femur with deficient bone proximally that will provide stability for load bearing and motion. In addition to providing stability, the implant must be durable and maintain long-term fixation. With over 16 years of experience with fully porous coated femoral revision implants, we have found that maximizing prosthetic-bone fit in the proximal femoral diaphyseal bone provides reliable long-term fixation in the majority of femoral revision cases.

  13. Clinical Evaluation of an Unsintered Hydroxyapatite/Poly-L-Lactide Osteoconductive Composite Device for the Internal Fixation of Maxillofacial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Sukegawa, Shintaro; Kanno, Takahiro; Katase, Naoki; Shibata, Akane; Takahashi, Yuka; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-09-01

    OSTEOTRANS MX (Takiron Co, Ltd, Osaka, Japan) is a resorbable osteosynthetic material composed of an unsintered hydroxyapatite/poly-L-lactide composite, and its osteoconductive capacity has been documented. The authors here report their clinical experience using OSTEOTRANS MX. The authors treated 35 patients (19 men, 16 women; age, 14-88 years; mean ± standard deviation, 38.4 ± 19.9 years) with maxillofacial fractures. The authors used standard surgery to stabilize fractures in all patients, fitting resorbable plates (thickness, 1.0 or 1.4 mm) and screws (diameter, 2 mm) according to Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Association (AO) for the Study of Internal Fixation guidelines. All patients eventually achieved satisfactory healing with favorable restoration of form and function without foreign body reaction. Complications occurred in 3 patients-plate exposure in 2 and discomfort in 1. However, fracture sites healed in all patients. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the devices bonded directly to the bone without interposition of nonmineralized tissue. OSTEOTRANS MX is a useful material with few complications. Its osteoconductive bioactivity is advantageous for the early functional improvement of maxillofacial fractures.

  14. Clinical Evaluation of an Unsintered Hydroxyapatite/Poly-L-Lactide Osteoconductive Composite Device for the Internal Fixation of Maxillofacial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, Shintaro; Kanno, Takahiro; Katase, Naoki; Shibata, Akane; Takahashi, Yuka; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: OSTEOTRANS MX (Takiron Co, Ltd, Osaka, Japan) is a resorbable osteosynthetic material composed of an unsintered hydroxyapatite/poly-l-lactide composite, and its osteoconductive capacity has been documented. The authors here report their clinical experience using OSTEOTRANS MX. Methods: The authors treated 35 patients (19 men, 16 women; age, 14–88 years; mean ± standard deviation, 38.4 ± 19.9 years) with maxillofacial fractures. The authors used standard surgery to stabilize fractures in all patients, fitting resorbable plates (thickness, 1.0 or 1.4 mm) and screws (diameter, 2 mm) according to Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Association (AO) for the Study of Internal Fixation guidelines. Results: All patients eventually achieved satisfactory healing with favorable restoration of form and function without foreign body reaction. Complications occurred in 3 patients—plate exposure in 2 and discomfort in 1. However, fracture sites healed in all patients. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the devices bonded directly to the bone without interposition of nonmineralized tissue. Conclusion: OSTEOTRANS MX is a useful material with few complications. Its osteoconductive bioactivity is advantageous for the early functional improvement of maxillofacial fractures. PMID:27428913

  15. Spring-action Apparatus for Fixation of Eyeball (SAFE): a novel, cost-effective yet simple device for ophthalmic wet-lab training.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Seema; Baskaran, Prabu; Fazal, Romana; Sulaiman, Syed Mohammad; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Venkatesh, Rengaraj

    2016-10-01

    Achieving a formed and firm eyeball which is stably fixed in a holding device is a major challenge of surgical wet-lab training. Our innovation, the 'Spring-action Apparatus for Fixation of Eyeball (SAFE)' is a robust, simple and economical device to solve this problem. It consists of a hollow iron cylinder to which a spring-action syringe is attached. The spring-action syringe generates vacuum and enables reliable fixation of a human or animal cadaveric eye on the iron cylinder. The rise in intraocular pressure due to vacuum fixation can be varied as per need or nature of surgery being practised. A mask-fixed version of this device is also designed to train surgeons for appropriate hand positioning. An experienced surgeon performed various surgeries including manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), phacoemulsification, laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), femtosecond LASIK docking, Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty, deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, penetrating keratoplasty and trabeculectomy on this device, while a trainee surgeon practised MSICS and wound suturing. Skill-appropriate comfort level was much higher with SAFE than with conventional globe holders for both surgeons. Due to its stability, pressure adjustability, portability, cost-efficiency and simplicity, we recommend SAFE as the basic equipment for every wet lab.

  16. Minimally invasive dynamic hip screw for fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Michael; Garau, Giorgio; Walley, Gayle; Oliva, Francesco; Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Longo, Umile Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compared a minimally invasive surgical technique to the conventional (open approach) surgical technique used in fixation of hip fractures with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) device. Using a case-control design (44 cases and 44 controls), we tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the two techniques in the following outcome measures: duration of surgery, time to mobilisation and weight bearing postoperatively, length of hospital stay, mean difference of pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels, position of the lag screw of the DHS device in the femoral head, and the tip–apex distance. The minimally invasive DHS technique had significantly shorter duration of surgery and length of hospital stay. There was also less blood loss in the minimally invasive DHS technique. The minimally invasive DHS technique produces better outcome measures in the operating time, length of hospital stay, and blood loss compared to the conventional approach while maintaining equal fixation stability. PMID:18478227

  17. An Uncemented Spreading Stem for the Fixation in the Metaphyseal Femur: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Daniel; Pumberger, Matthias; Fuchs, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment to restore full range of motion and full weight bearing after extensive femoral bone resection in patients with primary or metastatic femoral tumours is individually challenging. Especially when the remaining distal or proximal bone is very short, a rigid fixation of an implant is difficult to achieve due to the reverse funnel shape of the metaphysis. Herein, we present a novel implant design using a spreading mechanism in the distal part of the prosthesis for rigid, uncemented fixation in the remaining femoral bone after extensive tumour resection of the femur. We present the outcome of 5 female patients who underwent implantation of this spreading stem after extensive proximal or distal femoral bone resection. There was no radiological or clinical loosening or implant-related revision surgery in our follow-up (mean 21.46 months, range 3.5–46 months). This uncemented spreading stem may therefore represent an alternative option for fixation of a prosthetic device in the remaining metaphyseal femur. PMID:27293377

  18. Lack of stability at more than 12 months of follow-up after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using all-inside quadruple-stranded semitendinosus graft with adjustable cortical button fixation in both femoral and tibial sides.

    PubMed

    Bressy, G; Brun, V; Ferrier, A; Dujardin, D; Oubaya, N; Morel, N; Fontanin, N; Ohl, X

    2016-11-01

    The use of the semitendinosus tendon alone for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction keeps the gracilis muscle intact and decreases anterior pain in comparison with the use of the patellar tendon. Recently, Lubowitz described a new all-inside technique with an ST4 tendon fixed with a cortical button in both femoral and tibial sides. We hypothesized that this type of graft with cortical button fixation provides well-controlled residual anterior tibial translation (<3mm). The aim of this study was to assess the results obtained with this technique in terms of laxity and IKDC score at more than 1 year of follow-up. We performed a prospective single-center study to evaluate the results with this procedure with at least 1 year of follow-up. The primary endpoint was the objective IKDC score and side-to-side anterior tibial translation difference. The secondary endpoint was the subjective assessment using the subjective IKDC and Lysholm scores. Tunnel positioning was assessed using the Aglietti criteria. Thirty-five patients were included and reviewed with a mean follow-up of 19.7 months. Sixty-three percent of the patients were male and the mean age at the procedure was 28 years. The IKDC score was A or B in 43% of the patients and C or D in 57%; 54% of the patients had a residual side-to-side anterior tibial translation difference less than 3mm and 29% presented significant pivot shift (grade C or D). Five patients underwent revision surgery, including one for rupture of the ACL reconstruction. The meniscal status did not influence postoperative laxity and the IKDC grade. Our hypothesis was not verified and the postoperative stability of the knee was insufficient. Postoperative side-to-side anterior tibial translation difference remained greater than 3mm for 16 patients and the analysis seems to indicate that the distal cortical fixation of the graft with an adjusted loop is insufficient. Prospective study - Level IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  19. Comparison of operator radiation exposure with optimized radiation protection devices during coronary angiograms and ad hoc percutaneous coronary interventions by radial and femoral routes.

    PubMed

    Brasselet, Camille; Blanpain, Thierry; Tassan-Mangina, Sophie; Deschildre, Alain; Duval, Sébastien; Vitry, Fabien; Gaillot-Petit, Nathalie; Clément, Jean Paul; Metz, Damien

    2008-01-01

    Although underestimated by interventional cardiologists for a long time, radiation exposure of operators and patients is currently a major concern. The objective of the present operator-blinded registry was to compare related-peripheral arterial route radiation exposure of operators. During 420 consecutive coronary angiograms (CAs) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs), four interventional cardiologists were blindly screened. Radiation exposures were assessed using electronic personal dosimeters. Protection of operator was ensured using a lead apron, low leaded flaps, and leaded glass. Radiation exposure of operators was significantly higher using the radial route when compared with the femoral route for both CAs and CAs followed by ad hoc PCIs: 29.0 [1.0-195.0] microSv vs. 13.0 [1.0-164.0] microSv; P < 0.0001 and 69.5 [4.0-531.0] microSv vs. 41.0 [2.0-360.0] microSv; P = 0.018, respectively. Similarly, radiation exposure of patients was significantly higher using the radial route when compared with the femoral route for both CAs and CAs followed by ad hoc PCIs. Moreover, procedural durations and fluoroscopy times were significantly higher throughout the radial route. Although the radial route decreases peripheral arterial complication rates, increased radiation exposure of operators despite extensive use of specific protection devices is currently a growing problem for the interventional cardiologist health. Radial route indication should be promptly reconsidered in the light of the present findings.

  20. New bone formation in nongrafted sinus lifting with space-maintaining management: a novel technique using a titanium bone fixation device.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Takahiro; Masuda, Issei; Horie, Norio; Shimoyama, Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Sinus lifting without graft materials allows new bone formation in the sinus, but the amount of bone formation varies. This study aimed to investigate whether nongrafted sinus lifting using a titanium bone fixation device can promote bone formation in the sinus. Patients with atrophic posterior maxillae jeopardizing implant stability were included. After nongrafted sinus lifting in combination with implant placement, repositioning of the bone window and additional space-maintaining management were performed by use of the bone fixation device. The primary variables recorded retrospectively included implant survival and preoperative and postoperative alveolar crest height with and without Schneiderian membrane perforation. Independent variables included patient demographics, position and dimension of the implants, complications, and follow-up period. The t test was used for comparing differences in bone levels. The implant survival rate was estimated by uses of Kaplan-Meier statistics. The study included 11 patients (4 men and 7 women) and a total of 21 implants. Radiographically, new bone formation around the implant was generally observed in accordance with the implant apex. Postoperative alveolar crest height (mean, 10.9 ± 2.2 mm) was significantly higher compared with residual alveolar crest height (mean, 4.7 ± 1.4 mm), and no significant difference in bone formation was seen according to membrane perforation. The cumulative survival rate was 95.2%. This nongrafted sinus-lifting procedure using a bone fixation device could attain predictable bone formation. Additional space-maintaining management using a bone fixation device in a nongrafted sinus lift offers a useful technique for promoting bone formation in the sinus. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A novel 3D-printed device for localization and extraction of trabeculae from human femoral heads: a comparison with traditional visual extraction.

    PubMed

    Lv, H; Zhang, L; Yang, F; Li, M; Yin, P; Su, X; Yin, P; Zhang, L; Tang, P

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we propose a novel method for accurate trabeculae extraction from human femoral heads using 3D-printing techniques and compare spatial deviation errors between this novel method and the conventional method. We found that spatial deviation errors, which indicate inaccuracy and unreliability, were significantly higher with the conventional method. Assessment of structural and mechanical properties of local bone is important in the study of pathological changes associated with musculoskeletal degenerative diseases. However, the widely used visual extraction method (VIS) for trabecular columns showed large deviations from veridicality, referred to as spatial deviation errors (SDE). Here, we propose a novel method for accurately locating and trephining trabeculae using a 3D-printed (3DP) positioning device and also evaluate the SDE of the VIS. Twenty femoral heads were obtained from osteoporotic patients, and the trabecular columns were extracted from the principal compressive trabeculae by VIS (n = 10) or the 3DP (n = 10) method. Morphological, structural, and mechanical properties were compared between both groups along with the recorded errors in spatial deviation. Compared with the 3DP group, the average angle of central axis deflection in the VIS group was significantly greater; SDE in the VIS group was 26.1, 8.8, 4.1, 9.8, 7.2, 8.1, and 10.1 % greater for bone mineral density, bone volume/tissue volume ratio, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, Young's modulus, yield strength, and ultimate strength. In this study, a high degree of SDE was demonstrated in the VIS, which indicates that the conventional technique is unreliable. Additionally, accurate sample fabrication and credible quantitative analysis of local trabeculae among individuals can be achieved with the aid of computed tomography and the 3DP device, thus providing a more objective method for researching musculoskeletal degenerative diseases and possibly a better clinical

  2. A Novel Device for True Lumen Re-Entry After Subintimal Recanalization of Superficial Femoral Arteries: First-in-Man Experience and Technical Description

    SciTech Connect

    Airoldi, Flavio Faglia, Ezio Losa, Sergio Tavano, Davide; Latib, Azeem; Mantero, Manuela Lanza, Gaetano Clerici, Giacomo

    2011-02-15

    Subintimal angioplasty (SAP) is frequently performed for the treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI) and has been recognized as an effective technique for these patients. Nevertheless, this approach is limited by the lack of controlled re-entry into the true lumen of the target vessel. We describe a novel device for true lumen re-entry after subintimal recanalization of superficial femoral arteries (SFA). We report our experience with six patients treated between April 2009 and January 2010 with a novel system designed to facilitate true lumen re-entry. The device was advanced by ipsilateral antegrade approach through a 6-French sheath. Successful reaccess into the true lumen was obtained in five of six patients without complications. The patient in whom the reaccess to the true lumen was not possible underwent successful bypass surgery. At 30 days follow-up, the SFA was patent in all patients according to echo-Doppler examination. Our preliminary experience indicates that this novel re-entry device increases the success rate of percutaneous revascularization of chronically occluded SFA.

  3. The Sequoia circular fixator for limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J M; Tadlaoui, A; Wirotius, J M; Saleh, M

    1991-10-01

    With the Sequoia fixator, lengthenings can be achieved based on the clinical facts of the case. The device is a modular apparatus that can perform corrections in several planes, and, if necessary, in a septic environment. In our opinion, a "lengthener surgeon" is one who can foresee problems and take appropriate steps to prevent them. Likewise, the surgeon must act as the coordinator of an entire team. A successful lengthening is 5% surgery and 95% postoperative nursing and physiotherapy care. In the future, a number of changes will simplify postoperative management: 1. Composite carbon rings will make the frames radiolucent and one third lighter than those made of stainless steel. Automatic tensioners will help maintain steady tension on the wires. 2. Digital analysis of the callus will provide norms of consolidation, allowing faster fixator removal and conversion to an orthosis. 3. Incorporating the foot in the frame to overcome equinus will eliminate the need for tenotomy. We believe that monolateral and ring fixators can work together in certain locations. That is why we proposed, at the 18th Societé Internationale de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique meeting, a combined monolateral-ring construct that can be used for lengthening throughout the proximal femoral metaphysis.

  4. Does a tensioning device pinned to the tibia improve knee anterior-posterior load-displacement compared to manual tensioning of the graft following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A cadaveric study of two tibial fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Dustin M; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2006-09-01

    Devices that are pinned to the tibia to tension an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft produce joint reaction loads that in turn can affect the maintenance of graft initial tension after tibial fixation and hence knee anterior-posterior (AP) load-displacement. However, the effect of these devices on AP load-displacement is unknown. Our objectives were to determine whether tensioning by device versus tensioning by hand causes differences in AP load-displacement and intraarticular graft tension for two commonly used tibial fixation devices: a bioresorbable interference screw and a WasherLoc. AP load-displacement and intraarticular graft tension were measured in 20 cadaveric knees using a custom arthrometer. An initial tension of 110 N was applied to a double-looped tendon graft with the knee at extension using a tensioning device pinned to the tibia and a simulated method of tensioning by hand. After inserting the tibial fixation device, the 134 N anterior limit (i.e., anterior position of the tibia with respect to the femur with a 134 N anterior force applied to the tibia) and 0 N posterior limit (i.e., AP position of the tibia relative to the femur with a 0 N force applied to the tibia) were measured with the knee in 25 degrees flexion. Intraarticular graft tension was measured at extension. These limits and intraarticular graft tension were also measured after cyclically loading the knee 300 times. Compared to a simulated method of tensioning by hand, tensioning with a device pinned to the tibia did not decrease the 134 N anterior limit and did not cause posterior tibial translation. However, intraarticular graft tension was maintained better with a tensioning device pinned to the tibia for the Washerloc, but not the interference screw. For two commonly used tibial fixation devices, a tensioning device pinned to the tibia does not improve AP load-displacement at 25 degrees flexion over tensioning by hand when the graft is tensioned at full extension, but does

  5. Monitoring of Postoperative Bone Healing Using Smart Trauma-Fixation Device With Integrated Self-Powered Piezo-Floating-Gate Sensors.

    PubMed

    Borchani, Wassim; Aono, Kenji; Lajnef, Nizar; Chakrabartty, Shantanu

    2016-07-01

    Achieving better surgical outcomes in cases of traumatic bone fractures requires postoperative monitoring of changes in the growth and mechanical properties of the tissue and bones during the healing process. While current in-vivo imaging techniques can provide a snapshot of the extent of bone growth, it is unable to provide a history of the healing process, which is important if any corrective surgery is required. Monitoring the time evolution of in-vivo mechanical loads using existing technology is a challenge due to the need for continuous power while maintaining patient mobility and comfort. This paper investigates the feasibility of self-powered monitoring of the bone-healing process using our previously reported piezo-floating-gate (PFG) sensors. The sensors are directly integrated with a fixation device and operate by harvesting energy from microscale strain variations in the fixation structure. We show that the sensors can record and store the statistics of the strain evolution during the healing process for offline retrieval and analysis. Additionally, we present measurement results using a biomechanical phantom comprising of a femur fracture fixation plate; bone healing is emulated by inserting different materials, with gradually increasing elastic moduli, inside a fracture gap. The PFG sensor can effectively sense, compute, and record continuously evolving statistics of mechanical loading over a typical healing period of a bone, and the statistics could be used to differentiate between different bone-healing conditions. The proposed sensor presents a reliable objective technique to assess bone-healing progress and help decide on the removal time of the fixation device.

  6. The Meniscus Arrow® as a fixation device for the treatment of mallet fractures: results of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Fenne L M; Derks, Rosalie; Wouters, Diederick B

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of mallet fractures is a controversial and challenging problem. Generally, mallet fractures are treated conservatively except those involving more than one third of the base of the distal phalanx. Many different surgical fixation techniques have been published. This paper describes a new fixation procedure using ultimate bioresorbable meniscal fixation nails (Meniscus Arrows®). Mallet fractures in 50 digits of 49 patients were fixed with this nail in an outpatient surgical procedure, mostly under local (Oberst-block) anaesthesia. The average operation time was 21 min. According to the Crawford criteria, patient outcome was graded as excellent in 48 %, good in 22 %, and fair in 28 %. In one patient, the outcome was graded as poor, but the fracture was in a pre-existent arthritic joint. All fractures were consolidated without recurrent dislocation. Complications included one wound infection, which was successfully treated with antibiotics and without further consequences. No nail deformities occurred. Two times, the nail spontaneously and gradually dislocated during intensive use of the hand after, respectively, 3 and 6 months and could easily be removed under local anaesthesia without any functional sequelae. The bioresorbable meniscal nail fixation technique provides a fast and successful surgical treatment for mallet fractures with a minimum of adverse events.

  7. Use of the reamer-irrigator-aspirator may reduce tumor dissemination during intramedullary fixation of malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Cara A; Arvanitis, Leonidas D; Virkus, Walter W

    2012-01-16

    Intramedullary nail fixation is the treatment of choice for impending and pathologic fractures secondary to metastatic cancer; however, this procedure has been shown to cause systemic embolization of intramedullary contents. This article reports the use of the reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) (Synthes, Paoli, Pennsylvania) instead of a standard femoral reamer to decrease tumor intravasation during femoral intramedullary nail fixation for impending or pathologic fractures.Twenty-one consecutive patients indicated for fixation of malignant femoral lesions were treated with intramedullary nail placement. The RIA was used for canal preparation, and solid reamings were collected and submitted for analysis by a single pathologist. The volume of each specimen was recorded, and representative samples were examined histologically to determine their percent tumor content. These data were then used to estimate the volume of tumor retrieved by the RIA in each case. The mean volume of reamings collected by the RIA was 75.0 cc per case (range, 23.4-196.0 cc), and the mean tumor content was 24.8% (range, 1.0%-60.0%). The mean estimated volume of tumor retrieved in each case was 16.7 cc (range, 0.35-36.0 cc). In 2 cases, the tip of the RIA dissociated from the device intraoperatively but was retrieved without adverse consequence to the patient. Use of the RIA in cases of femoral intramedullary nail fixation for pathologic lesions or fractures effectively retrieves variable amounts of intramedullary contents, including tumor. By preventing the systemic dissemination of malignant cells, this technique may reduce the risk of distant metastases.

  8. Clinical and Subclinical Femoral Vascular Complications after Deployment of two Different Vascular Closure Devices or Manual Compression in the Setting of Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Yeni, Hakan; Axel, Meissner; Örnek, Ahmet; Butz, Thomas; Maagh, Petra; Plehn, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the past two decades vascular closure devices (VCD) have been increasingly utilized as an alternative to manual compression after percutaneous femoral artery access. However, there is a lack of data confirming a significant reduction of vascular complication in a routine interventional setting. Systematic assessment of puncture sites with ultrasound was hardly performed. Methods: 620 consecutive patients undergoing elective or urgent percutaneous coronary intervention were randomly allocated to either Angioseal (AS; n = 210), or Starclose (SC; n = 196) or manual compression (MC; n = 214). As an adjunct to clinical evaluation vascular ultrasonography was used to assess the safety of each hemostatic method in terms of major and minor vascular complications. The efficacy of VCDs was assessed by achievement of puncture site hemostasis. Results: No major complications needing transfusion or vascular surgery were observed. Furthermore, the overall incidence of clinical and subclinical minor complications was similar among the three groups. There was no differences in the occurrence of pseudoaneurysmata (AS = 10; SC = 6; MC = 10), arteriovenous fistula (AS = 1; SC = 4; MC = 2) and large hematoma (AS = 11; SC = 10; MC = 14). The choice of access site treatment had no impact in the duration of hospital stay (AS = 6.7; SC = 7.4; MS = 6.4 days). Conclusions: In the setting of routine coronary intervention AS and SC provide a similar efficacy and safety as manual compression. Subclinical vascular injuries are rare and not related to VCD use. PMID:27076781

  9. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat S; Karkamkar, Sachin S; Patil, Vaishali S Dumbre; Patil, Shailesh S; Ranaware, Abhijeet S

    2016-01-01

    Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN) or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS) are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP) of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22–65 years) and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27–72 months). Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion. PMID:27512218

  10. RAB-plate versus sliding hip screw for unstable trochanteric hip fractures: stability of the fixation and modes of failure--radiographic analysis of 218 fractures.

    PubMed

    Buciuto, R; Hammer, R

    2001-03-01

    The sliding hip screw has gained considerable acceptance in the treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures. However, the new type of 120 degrees fixed angle blade-plate with a buttress rod (RAB-plate) showed encouraging clinical results. The purpose of this study was to assess stability of fixation and analyze modes of failure in unstable trochanteric hip fractures treated with these devices. A retrospective radiographic review of 218 unstable fractures was performed. Linear and angular displacements of the major fragments and implant migration into the femoral head during healing were assessed. Additionally, adequacy of the reduction and the location of the implant within the femoral head as predictors of fixation failure were evaluated. The postreduction neck-shaft angle was maintained in the majority of the fractures in both groups. However, there was a significantly higher incidence of varus angulation by 10 degrees or more by the completion of healing among fractures treated with the sliding hip screw (p = 0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in vertical migration of the device into the femoral head between the implants used (p = 0.3). There was a significant relationship between failure of the fixation and varus reduction (p = 0.04) as well as screw/neck angle deviation more than 20 degrees in the lateral projection (p = 0.005) or if the implant was in a superior or posterior position (p = 0.02). The RAB-plate provided a more stable fixation, especially with regard to maintained postoperative alignment. However, positive predictors for fixation failure were identical for both devices. Here, the screw/neck angle deviation has had the strongest significance for prediction of fixation failure.

  11. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases

  12. Network Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials on the Safety of Vascular Closure Devices for Femoral Arterial Puncture Site Haemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Zou, Junjie; Ma, Hao; Jiao, Yuanyong; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiwei; Miao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The safety of vascular closure devices (VCDs) is still debated. The emergence of more related randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and newer VCDs makes it necessary to further evaluate the safety of VCDs. Relevant RCTs were identified by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials electronic databases updated in December 2014. Traditional and network meta-analyses were conducted to evaluate the rate of combined adverse vascular events (CAVEs) and haematomas by calculating the risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Forty RCTs including 16868 patients were included. Traditional meta-analysis demonstrated that there was no significant difference in the rate of CAVEs between all the VCDs and manual compression (MC). Subgroup analysis showed that FemoSeal and VCDs reported after the year 2005 reduced CAVEs. Moreover, the use of VCDs reduced the risk of haematomas compared with MC. Network meta-analysis showed that AngioSeal, which might be the best VCD among all the included VCDs, was associated with reduced rates of both CAVE and haematomas compared with MC. In conclusion, the use of VCDs is associated with a decreased risk of haematomas, and FemoSeal and AngioSeal appears to be better than MC for reducing the rate of CAVEs. PMID:26349075

  13. Network Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials on the Safety of Vascular Closure Devices for Femoral Arterial Puncture Site Haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Zou, Junjie; Ma, Hao; Jiao, Yuanyong; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiwei; Miao, Yi

    2015-09-08

    The safety of vascular closure devices (VCDs) is still debated. The emergence of more related randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and newer VCDs makes it necessary to further evaluate the safety of VCDs. Relevant RCTs were identified by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials electronic databases updated in December 2014. Traditional and network meta-analyses were conducted to evaluate the rate of combined adverse vascular events (CAVEs) and haematomas by calculating the risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Forty RCTs including 16868 patients were included. Traditional meta-analysis demonstrated that there was no significant difference in the rate of CAVEs between all the VCDs and manual compression (MC). Subgroup analysis showed that FemoSeal and VCDs reported after the year 2005 reduced CAVEs. Moreover, the use of VCDs reduced the risk of haematomas compared with MC. Network meta-analysis showed that AngioSeal, which might be the best VCD among all the included VCDs, was associated with reduced rates of both CAVE and haematomas compared with MC. In conclusion, the use of VCDs is associated with a decreased risk of haematomas, and FemoSeal and AngioSeal appears to be better than MC for reducing the rate of CAVEs.

  14. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  15. Additive manufactured push-fit implant fixation with screw-strength pull out.

    PubMed

    J van Arkel, Richard; Ghouse, Shaaz; E Milner, Piers; R T Jeffers, Jonathan

    2017-10-11

    Additive manufacturing offers exciting new possibilities for improving long-term metallic implant fixation in bone through enabling open porous structures for bony ingrowth. The aim of this research was to investigate how the technology could also improve initial fixation, a precursor to successful long-term fixation. A new barbed fixation mechanism, relying on flexible struts was proposed and manufactured as a push-fit peg. The technology was optimised using a synthetic bone model and compared with conventional press-fit peg controls tested over a range of interference fits. Optimum designs, achieving maximum pull-out force, were subsequently tested in a cadaveric femoral condyle model. The barbed fixation surface provided more than double the pull-out force for less than a third of the insertion force compared to the best performing conventional press-fit peg (p<0.001). Indeed, it provided screw-strength pull out from a push-fit device (1,124 ± 146 N). This step change in implant fixation potential offers new capabilities for low profile, minimally invasive implant design, whilst providing new options to simplify surgery, allowing for one-piece push-fit components with high levels of initial stability. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. [Femoral shaft fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Dietz, H-G; Schlickewei, W

    2011-05-01

    Femoral shaft fractures in children represent 1.5% of all fractures in childhood. Up to the age of 4 years, conservative treatment in a hip spica or short-term overhead traction is the therapy of choice. Femoral shaft fractures between the age of 5 and 16 years should be treated surgically. In over 90% of these cases elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is the premier treatment option. Additional end caps can be used for unstable fractures and in length discrepancy. The external fixator and the locking plate are reserved for fractures with severe soft tissue injuries, vascular problems and some specific situations mentioned later on. By adhering to these standards good results can be achieved with a low complication rate.

  17. Adjustable Stiffness, External Fixator for the Rat Femur Osteotomy and Segmental Bone Defect Models

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, Vaida; Matthys, Romano

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical environment around the healing of broken bone is very important as it determines the way the fracture will heal. Over the past decade there has been great clinical interest in improving bone healing by altering the mechanical environment through the fixation stability around the lesion. One constraint of preclinical animal research in this area is the lack of experimental control over the local mechanical environment within a large segmental defect as well as osteotomies as they heal. In this paper we report on the design and use of an external fixator to study the healing of large segmental bone defects or osteotomies. This device not only allows for controlled axial stiffness on the bone lesion as it heals, but it also enables the change of stiffness during the healing process in vivo. The conducted experiments have shown that the fixators were able to maintain a 5 mm femoral defect gap in rats in vivo during unrestricted cage activity for at least 8 weeks. Likewise, we observed no distortion or infections, including pin infections during the entire healing period. These results demonstrate that our newly developed external fixator was able to achieve reproducible and standardized stabilization, and the alteration of the mechanical environment of in vivo rat large bone defects and various size osteotomies. This confirms that the external fixation device is well suited for preclinical research investigations using a rat model in the field of bone regeneration and repair. PMID:25350129

  18. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such as...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such as...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such as...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such as...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3010 - Bone fixation cerclage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bone fixation cerclage. 888.3010 Section 888.3010...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3010 Bone fixation cerclage. (a) Identification. A bone fixation cerclage is a device intended to be implanted that is made of alloys, such as...

  3. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  4. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  10. Computed Tomography Analysis of Postsurgery Femoral Component Rotation Based on a Force Sensing Device Method versus Hypothetical Rotational Alignment Based on Anatomical Landmark Methods: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Stefan W; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Leffers, Kevin J; Johnson, Clint W; Dettmer, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Rotation of the femoral component is an important aspect of knee arthroplasty, due to its effects on postsurgery knee kinematics and associated functional outcomes. It is still debated which method for establishing rotational alignment is preferable in orthopedic surgery. We compared force sensing based femoral component rotation with traditional anatomic landmark methods to investigate which method is more accurate in terms of alignment to the true transepicondylar axis. Thirty-one patients underwent computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with femoral rotation established via a force sensor. During surgery, three alternative hypothetical femoral rotational alignments were assessed, based on transepicondylar axis, anterior-posterior axis, or the utilization of a posterior condyles referencing jig. Postoperative computed tomography scans were obtained to investigate rotation characteristics. Significant differences in rotation characteristics were found between rotation according to DKB and other methods (P < 0.05). Soft tissue balancing resulted in smaller deviation from anatomical epicondylar axis than any other method. 77% of operated knees were within a range of ±3° of rotation. Only between 48% and 52% of knees would have been rotated appropriately using the other methods. The current results indicate that force sensors may be valuable for establishing correct femoral rotation.

  11. Computed Tomography Analysis of Postsurgery Femoral Component Rotation Based on a Force Sensing Device Method versus Hypothetical Rotational Alignment Based on Anatomical Landmark Methods: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Stefan W.; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Leffers, Kevin J.; Johnson, Clint W.; Dettmer, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Rotation of the femoral component is an important aspect of knee arthroplasty, due to its effects on postsurgery knee kinematics and associated functional outcomes. It is still debated which method for establishing rotational alignment is preferable in orthopedic surgery. We compared force sensing based femoral component rotation with traditional anatomic landmark methods to investigate which method is more accurate in terms of alignment to the true transepicondylar axis. Thirty-one patients underwent computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with femoral rotation established via a force sensor. During surgery, three alternative hypothetical femoral rotational alignments were assessed, based on transepicondylar axis, anterior-posterior axis, or the utilization of a posterior condyles referencing jig. Postoperative computed tomography scans were obtained to investigate rotation characteristics. Significant differences in rotation characteristics were found between rotation according to DKB and other methods (P < 0.05). Soft tissue balancing resulted in smaller deviation from anatomical epicondylar axis than any other method. 77% of operated knees were within a range of ±3° of rotation. Only between 48% and 52% of knees would have been rotated appropriately using the other methods. The current results indicate that force sensors may be valuable for establishing correct femoral rotation. PMID:26881086

  12. Osteotomy does not improve early outcome after slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Diab, Mohammad; Daluvoy, Sanjay; Snyder, Brian D; Kasser, James R

    2006-03-01

    We performed a retrospective, nonrandomized cohort study of unilateral, chronic, severe, stable slipped capital femoral epiphysis comparing five girls and five boys who underwent in-situ screw fixation alone with five girls and five boys who underwent in-situ screw fixation combined with staged flexion intertrochanteric femoral osteotomy to restore proximal femoral alignment. Functional outcome was measured by the Harris hip score, with 20% selected as a goal for improvement in functional outcome after corrective osteotomy. While flexion intertrochanteric femoral osteotomy improved hip range of motion, we found no significant difference in functional outcome between the two groups at early follow-up. This is a level 3 evidence study.

  13. [Current trends and problems in the measurement of limb loading parameters during transosseous osteosynthesis using external fixation devices].

    PubMed

    Shuts, S A; Dzhafarova, O A; Shuts, B S

    1999-01-01

    The problem in question is whether it is reasonable to equip a conventional limb external fixation apparatus with means for the diagnosis of loading parameters: the forces and displacement of the opposite supporting elements of the apparatus. It is assumed that during distraction osteogenesis it is expedient to apply load to the limb by the load rate only at the initial stage of callus regeneration (the plastic or slightly elastic mechanical state) while the most effective way to do so is to act force at later stages. A number of functions derived from the modified parameters which might aid a physician to choose the optimum limb loading parameters at different stages of treatment were considered by using as example a hypothetical ring-type apparatus equipped with means for continuous measurement of current forces applied to the apparatus and current displacements of opposite ring blocks. Specifications for the measuring system of loading parameters were defined by using an Ilizarov apparatus as an example and why possible rough measurement errors may occur is revealed. The paper shows it necessary to develop methods for calculation of parasitic deformations, i.e. those of the loaded elements of the apparatus for the evaluation of the reciprocal displacement of bone fragments.

  14. Fractured neck of femur below long spinopelvic fixation for Charcot spine: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We present a case of a patient with a previously undescribed complication: intertrochanteric femoral neck insufficiency fracture after long-segment instrumented spinopelvic fusion to the ilium for Charcot spine. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian man with post-traumatic complete T6 paraplegia presented to our institution after developing Charcot spinal arthropathy at L3 and L4 and symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia 21 years after his original spinal cord injury. Multiple anterior and posterior surgeries were required to eventually achieve stabilization of his thoracolumbar spine to his pelvis and resolution of symptoms. The most distal fixation point was two iliac wing screws bilaterally. At 10 weeks after the final spinal surgery and after posterior spinal bony consolidation had occurred, he sustained an intertrochanteric femoral neck fracture, distal to the iliac fixation, whilst bending forward in his wheelchair. His proximal femoral fracture was internally fixed with an intramedullary device. Conclusions Spinal Charcot’s arthropathy is a rare condition that may occur in patients with post-traumatic spinal cord injury. Although associated with high risk of complications, circumferential instrumented fusion in Charcot spine can restore spinal stability. Insufficiency fractures of the proximal femur are possible complications of long spinopelvic fusions. PMID:24378187

  15. Residual position errors of lymph node surrogates in breast cancer adjuvant radiotherapy: Comparison of two arm fixation devices and the effect of arm position correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kapanen, Mika; Laaksomaa, Marko; Skyttä, Tanja; Haltamo, Mikko; Pehkonen, Jani; Lehtonen, Turkka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Hyödynmaa, Simo

    2016-04-01

    Residual position errors of the lymph node (LN) surrogates and humeral head (HH) were determined for 2 different arm fixation devices in radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer: a standard wrist-hold (WH) and a house-made rod-hold (RH). The effect of arm position correction (APC) based on setup images was also investigated. A total of 113 consecutive patients with early-stage breast cancer with LN irradiation were retrospectively analyzed (53 and 60 using the WH and RH, respectively). Residual position errors of the LN surrogates (Th1-2 and clavicle) and the HH were investigated to compare the 2 fixation devices. The position errors and setup margins were determined before and after the APC to investigate the efficacy of the APC in the treatment situation. A threshold of 5 mm was used for the residual errors of the clavicle and Th1-2 to perform the APC, and a threshold of 7 mm was used for the HH. The setup margins were calculated with the van Herk formula. Irradiated volumes of the HH were determined from RT treatment plans. With the WH and the RH, setup margins up to 8.1 and 6.7 mm should be used for the LN surrogates, and margins up to 4.6 and 3.6 mm should be used to spare the HH, respectively, without the APC. After the APC, the margins of the LN surrogates were equal to or less than 7.5/6.0 mm with the WH/RH, but margins up to 4.2/2.9 mm were required for the HH. The APC was needed at least once with both the devices for approximately 60% of the patients. With the RH, irradiated volume of the HH was approximately 2 times more than with the WH, without any dose constraints. Use of the RH together with the APC resulted in minimal residual position errors and setup margins for all the investigated bony landmarks. Based on the obtained results, we prefer the house-made RH. However, more attention should be given to minimize the irradiation of the HH with the RH than with the WH.

  16. Vertical shear fractures of the femoral neck. A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Baitner, A C; Maurer, S G; Hickey, D G; Jazrawi, L M; Kummer, F J; Jamal, J; Goldman, S; Koval, K J

    1999-10-01

    A biomechanical cadaver study was performed to compare the strength and stability of three cannulated cancellous lag screws with a sliding hip screw for fixation of a vertically oriented fracture of the femoral neck (Pauwels Type III). Using eight matched pairs of human cadaveric femurs, vertically oriented femoral neck osteotomies were created, reduced, and randomized to one of the two fixation methods. The constructs were tested with incremental axial loading from 100 N to 1200 N and cyclical loading at 1000 N for 10,000 cycles; fracture displacements and ultimate load to failure were determined. The specimens stabilized using a sliding hip screw showed less inferior femoral head displacement, less shearing displacement at the osteotomy site, and a much greater load to failure than did those stabilized with multiple cancellous lag screws. These results support the use of a sliding hip screw for treatment of vertically oriented fractures of the femoral neck.

  17. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  18. Feasibility study of a non-invasive eye fixation and monitoring device using a right-angle prism mirror for intensity-modulated radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Uemoto, Kenji; Hashida, Noriyasu

    2016-11-03

    We aimed to describe the feasibility and efficacy of a novel non-invasive fixation and monitoring (F-M) device for the eyeballs (which uses a right-angle prism mirror as the optic axis guide) in three consecutive patients with choroidal melanoma who were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The device consists of an immobilization shell, a right-angle prism mirror, a high magnification optical zoom video camera, a guide lamp, a digital voice recorder, a personal computer, and a National Television System Committee standard analog video cable. Using the right-angle prism mirror, the antero-posterior axis was determined coincident with the optic axis connecting the centers of the cornea and pupil. The axis was then connected to the guide light and video camera installed on the couch top on the distal side. Repositioning accuracy improved using this method. Furthermore, the positional error of the lens was markedly reduced from ±1.16, ±1.68 and ±1.11 mm to ±0.23, ±0.58 and ±0.26 mm in the horizontal direction, and from ±1.50, ±1.03 and ±0.48 mm to ±0.29, ±0.30 and ±0.24 mm in the vertical direction (Patient #1, #2 and #3, respectively). Accordingly, the F-M device method decreased the planning target volume size and improved the dose-volume histogram parameters of the organ-at-risk via IMRT inverse planning. Importantly, the treatment method was well tolerated.

  19. Coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest in patients who had neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    DiFazio, Rachel L; Kocher, Minider S; Berven, Sigurd; Kasser, James

    2003-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of four patients in whom a pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest and metaphyseal irregularities developed. These patients were all treated with neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and presented with a progressive gait disturbance and pain, leg-length discrepancy, and limited abduction. Imaging revealed coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest. Two patients (three hips) underwent proximal femoral valgus osteotomy, one patient underwent fixation of a femoral neck fracture with subsequent greater trochanter transfer, and one patient is being observed. This case series suggests an association between neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and this unusual pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest.

  20. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Mendes, Mariane Henseler Damaceno; Claudino, Stephanie; Baracho, Filipe; Borges, Paulo César; da Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1) standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2) inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3) control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength. Results There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05). Conclusion There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw. PMID:26229913

  1. Can markers injected into a single-loop anterior cruciate ligament graft define the axes of the tibial and femoral tunnels? A cadaveric study using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2008-08-01

    Lengthening of a soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft construct over time, which leads to an increase in anterior laxity following ACL reconstruction, can result from relative motions between the graft and fixation devices and between the fixation devices and bone. To determine these relative motions using Roentgen stereophotogrammetry (RSA), it is first necessary to identify the axes of the tibial and femoral tunnels. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the error in using markers injected into the portions of a soft-tissue tendon graft enclosed within the tibial and femoral tunnels to define the axes of these tunnels. Markers were injected into the tibia, femur, and graft in six cadaveric legs the knees of which were reconstructed with single-loop tibialis grafts. The axes of the tunnels were defined by marker pairs that were injected into the bones on lines parallel to the walls of the tibial and femoral tunnels (i.e., standard). By using marker pairs injected into the portions of the graft enclosed within the tibial and femoral tunnels and the marker pairs aligned with the tunnel axes, the directions of vectors were determined by using RSA, while a 150 N anterior force was transmitted at the knee. The average and standard deviations of the angle between the two vectors were 5.5+/-3.3 deg. This angle translates into an average error and standard deviation of the error in lengthening quantities (i.e., relative motions along the tunnel axes) at the sites of fixation of (0.6+/-0.8)%. Identifying the axes of the tunnels by using marker pairs in the graft rather than marker pairs in the walls of the tunnels will shorten the surgical procedure by eliminating the specialized tools and time required to insert marker pairs in the tunnel walls and will simplify the data analysis in in vivo studies.

  2. Five-Lumen Antibiotic-Impregnated Femoral Central Venous Catheters in Severely Burned Patients: An Investigation of Device Utility and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce C; Mian, Mohammad A H; Mullins, Robert F; Hassan, Zaheed; Shaver, Joseph R; Johnston, Krystal K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rate in a severely burned patient population, many of whom required prolonged use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Between January 2008 and June 2012, 151 patients underwent placement of 455 five-lumen minocycline/rifampin-impregnated CVCs. CRBSI was defined as at least one blood culture (>100,000 colonies) and one simultaneous roll-plate CVC tip culture (>15 colony forming units) positive for the same organism. Most patients had accidental burns (81.5%) with a mean TBSA of 50%. A mean of three catheters were inserted per patient (range, 1-25). CVCs were inserted in the femoral vein (91.2%), subclavian vein (5.3%), and internal jugular vein (3.3%). Mean overall catheter indwell time was 8 days (range, 0-39 days). The overall rate of CRBSI per 1000 catheter days was 11.2; patients with a TBSA >60% experienced significantly higher rates of CRBSI than patients with a TBSA ≤60% (16.2 vs 7.3, P = .01). CVCs placed through burned skin were four times more likely to be associated with CRBSI than CVCs placed through intact skin. The most common infectious organism was Acinetobacter baumannii. Deep venous thrombosis developed in eleven patients (7%). The overall rate of CRBSI was 11.2, consistent with published rates of CRBSI in burn patients. Thus, femoral placement of 5-lumen CVCs did not result in increased CRBSI rates. These data support the safety of femoral CVC placement in burn patients, contrary to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to avoid femoral CVC insertion.

  3. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  4. Clinical application of subdermal areolar tissue and superficial fascia graft as a new material for coverage of small exposure of bone cortex or orthopaedic fixation device.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Masahide; Matsumura, Hajime; Watanabe, Katsueki

    2017-08-01

    The presence of cortical bone, tendon that has been exposed by defects, may result in infection or osteomyelitis. In such cases, perifascial areolar tissue grafting (PATG) may be performed as a minimally invasive surgical procedure. However, perifascial areolar tissue (PAT) is located deep in the subcutaneous layer. It was considered that grafting of the superficial vascular network might enable less invasive surgery. This study reports use of subdermal areolar tissue (SAT) and superficial fascia (SF) to close avascular areas. This study treated eight areas of exposed bone, tendon, or orthopaedic fixation device in seven patients treated in the department between 2010-2013. The patients included five men and two women aged 15-80 years. Subdermal areolar tissue grafting (SATG) was performed on four areas, and superficial fascia grafting (SFG) on the remaining four areas. In all cases, split thickness skin graft (STSG) was used to cover the grafted tissue in a single procedure. The tissue grafted successfully in seven areas, and primary engraftment of the skin grafts was also achieved in three areas treated with SATG and one area treated with SFG. Additional skin grafting was performed to achieve closure in one site treated with SATG and two sites treated with SFG. The tissue graft became necrotic in one site treated with SFG. There were no problems at any donor sites and no graft site infections or other complications. SATG and SFG achieved good clinical results for the closure of exposed avascular tissue or artifacts.

  5. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Brianne A; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason; Couturier, Marc Roger

    2015-08-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  6. Clinical and Analytical Evaluation of a Single-Vial Stool Collection Device with Formalin-Free Fixative for Improved Processing and Comprehensive Detection of Gastrointestinal Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Brianne A.; Jensen, Ryan; Arias, Nora; Heffron, Michael; Gubler, Elyse; Case, Kristin; Gowans, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic examination of feces is a standard laboratory method for diagnosing gastrointestinal parasite infections. In North America, the ovum and parasite (O&P) examination is typically performed using stool that is chemically fixed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and formalin, after which the stool is concentrated by filtration to enhance sensitivity. Mini Parasep solvent-free (SF) tubes allow collection and concentration within a single collection vial. The goal of the study was to determine whether consolidated processing and concentration with the Parasep tubes using an alcohol-based fixative (Alcorfix) provide O&P examinations equivalent to or better than those done by processing of PVA-formalin-fixed stool using a SpinCon concentration device. Parasep tubes revealed filtration performance equivalent to that of the SpinCon concentration device using PVA-formalin-fixed stool containing protozoa. Specimens cocollected in Parasep tubes containing PVA-formalin and Alcorfix revealed comparable morphology and staining for various protozoa. Alcorfix effectively fixed live Cryptosporidium and microsporidia such that morphology and staining were conserved for modified acid-fast and modified trichrome stains. A work flow analysis revealed significant time savings for batches of 10 or 30 O&P specimens in tubes with Alcorfix compared to the amount of time that it took to analyze the same number of specimens in tubes with PVA-formalin. The direct hands-on time savings with Mini Parasep tubes were 17 min and 41 s and 32 min and 1 s for batches of 10 and 30 specimens, respectively. Parasep tubes containing Alcorfix provide significant work flow advantages to laboratories that process medium to high volumes of O&P specimens by streamlining processing and converting to a single tube. These improvements in work flow, reduction of the amount of formalin used in the laboratory, and equivalent microscopy results are attractive advancements in O&P testing for North American

  7. Effectiveness of operative interventions for hemi or total hip arthroplasty patients who sustain a Vancouver B2 peri-prosthetic femoral fracture: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Ianunzio, Jamie Raffaele; Munn, Zachary; Mandziak, Daniel; Stephenson, Matthew; Cain, Megan Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of operative interventions for individuals who have undergone a hemi or total hip arthroplasty who sustain a Vancouver type B2 peri-prosthetic femoral fracture or equivalent. Specifically, this review will investigate open reduction and internal fixation and femoral revision arthroplasty with or without internal fixation.

  8. Mechanical properties and cytocompatibility of oxygen-modified β-type Ti-Cr alloys for spinal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihong; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken; Narita, Kengo; Şen, Mustafa; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, various amounts of oxygen were added to Ti-10Cr (mass%) alloys. It is expected that a large changeable Young's modulus, caused by a deformation-induced ω-phase transformation, can be achieved in Ti-10Cr-O alloys by the appropriate oxygen addition. This "changeable Young's modulus" property can satisfy the otherwise conflicting requirements for use in spinal implant rods: high and low moduli are preferred by surgeons and patients, respectively. The influence of oxygen on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the alloys was examined, as well as the bending springback and cytocompatibility of the optimized alloy. Among the Ti-10Cr-O alloys, Ti-10Cr-0.2O (mass%) alloy shows the largest changeable Young's modulus following cold rolling for a constant reduction ratio. This is the result of two competing factors: increased apparent β-lattice stability and decreased amounts of athermal ω phase, both of which are caused by oxygen addition. The most favorable balance of these factors for the deformation-induced ω-phase transformation occurred at an oxygen concentration of 0.2mass%. Ti-10Cr-0.2O alloy not only exhibits high tensile strength and acceptable elongation, but also possesses a good combination of high bending strength, acceptable bending springback and great cytocompatibility. Therefore, Ti-10Cr-0.2O alloy is a potential material for use in spinal fixture devices.

  9. Conversion from temporary external fixation to definitive fixation: shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Paul J; Silverton, Craig; Yeni, Yener; Tashman, Scott; Weir, Robb

    2006-01-01

    Temporary external fixation is the most common method of initial stabilization of diaphyseal fractures in forward surgical hospitals. Once the patient arrives at a stable environment, usually the United States, the fracture is managed with intramedullary nailing, small-pin external fixation, or a modified external fixator. Future research should be directed toward improving methods of care. It is not precisely known when is the best time to convert to definitive fixation without increasing the risk of infection. The risk factors leading to infection and nonunion are not well-established, making that determination even more difficult. Clinical studies of a suitable size should provide insight into these problems. Although temporary external fixation is commonly used, an optimal construct has not been determined. Data from studies of in vivo fracture-site motion after application of the temporary external fixator should be compared with biomechanical testing of similar constructs. These data could be used to recommend optimal temporary external fixation constructs of tibia, femur, and humerus fractures using currently available devices as well as to provide groundwork for the next generation of fixators.

  10. Correlation Between Femoral Neck Shaft Angle and Surgical Management in Trainees With Femoral Neck Stress Fractures.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Rivera, Jessica C; Tennent, David J; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The most common overuse injury leading to medical discharge of military recruits is a stress fracture. One of the high-risk stress fractures is of the lateral femoral neck which risks osteonecrosis of the femoral head, the need for arthroplasty and permanent disability. To prevent fracture progression early surgical intervention is recommended. Surgical repairs are performed in about 25% of cases of femoral neck stress fractures at military treatment facilities. Hip geometry is an important intrinsic risk for stress fractures. Loads in the average loading direction will not cause a fracture, but loads of extreme magnitude or extreme orientation may. The purpose of this study was to determine if, in the presence of femoral neck stress fracture, there is a correlation between femoral neck shaft angle, surgical treatment and outcomes. The results of this study suggest there is no correlation between return to full military duty rates, treatment, femoral neck shaft angle or fracture grade on MRI. Patients who underwent surgical fixation had greater fracture grade and pain than those that did not have surgery. Individuals who did not return to duty tended to have higher pain scores at initial evaluation.

  11. Biomechanical comparison of odontoid plate fixation versus odontoid screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Eipeldauer, Stefan; Leitgeb, Johannes; Aldrian, Silke; Vécsei, Vilmos

    2011-05-01

    Randomized controlled trial with statistically significant difference or statistically no significant difference (Level I). The purpose of this study was to measure the mechanical stability of odontoid plate fixation, using a specially designed plate construct and to compare the results with those after odontoid single-screw and double-screw fixation. Plate fixation of the odontoid process without C1-C2 is a possible option for the management of odontoid fractures that are not suitable for conventional screw fixation. Although earlier biomechanical works have evaluated the effectiveness of different odontoid screw fixation techniques, no study has quantified the mechanical stability of odontoid fixation by a plate device. The second cervical vertebra was removed from 15 fresh human spinal columns. The specimens were fixed to the experimental apparatus with the load cell at the articular surface of the odontoid process. In the first test series, stiffness and failure load of the intact odontoid were measured. Type II odontoid fractures were created by a 45 degree oblique extension loading at the articular surface of the odontoid process. Afterward, the specimens were randomly assigned to 1 of the following 3 groups: in group I (n=5), the fractures were stabilized, using a specially designed plate construct, in group II, the fractures were fixed, using two 3.5 mm cortical screws, and in group III, we used 1 regular 4.5 mm cortical screw. In the second test series, stiffness and failure load of the stabilized odontoid fractures were assessed for comparison and statistical analysis. Group I (plate device) showed a significantly higher mean failure load than group II and group III. The mean failure load of group I, after fixation of the odontoid fracture, was 84% of the mean failure load that was necessary to create a type II odontoid fracture initially. Comparing group II (double screw technique) and group III (single screw technique), there was no significant

  12. Evaluation of long-term results and quality of life in patients who underwent rib fixation with titanium devices after trauma.

    PubMed

    Billè, Andrea; Okiror, Lawrence; Campbell, Aideen; Simons, Jason; Routledge, Tom

    2013-06-01

    To describe the long-term results, quality of life and chronic pain after chest wall fixation for traumatic rib fracture using a quality of life (QOL) score and a numeric pain score. Retrospective analysis of 10 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for rib fractures after trauma and reconstruction between October 2010 and March 2012. Chest rib fractures were fixed with titanium clips and bars or titanium plates and screws through a posterolateral thoracotomy. Pain was assessed with a numeric pain scale 0-10 and quality of life (QOL) with the EORTC questionnaire QLQ-C30. There were 5 males and 5 females. The median age was 58 years (range 21-80). There were no postoperative deaths. The only postoperative complication observed was a contralateral pleural effusion requiring drainage. Median length of stay of the drain and median length of hospital stay were 2 days (range 0-8) and 4 days (range 1-42 days), respectively. The average follow-up period of operatively managed patients was 14 months (range 8-23.5 months). Seven patients scored the pain as 0, one as 1 (mild), one as 4 (moderate) and one as 8 (severe). Only two patients are taking occasionally pain killers. Only one patient presents severe limitation in his life scoring his QOL as poor. Titanium devices (clips and bars; screws and plates) are effective and safe for repair of rib fractures and showed good long-term results in terms of pain and quality of life after the operation.

  13. Arthroscopic Treatment of Medial Femoral Condylar Coronal Fractures and Nonunions

    PubMed Central

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, M. Gokhan; Basaran, S. Hakan; Baca, Emre; Kural, Cemal; Avkan, M. Cevdet

    2013-01-01

    Nonunion of medial femoral condylar coronal fractures are uncommon. In neglected Hoffa fractures despite nonunion, there is a risk of missing accompanying ligamentous and intra-articular injuries. Neither preoperative clinical examination nor magnetic resonance imaging showed these injuries before arthroscopy. Arthroscopy before internal fixation gives additional information and changes the surgical protocol for these fractures and nonunions. PMID:24400191

  14. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head after osteosynthesis of femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2011-05-18

    The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. We evaluated the incidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral head with the use of contemporary techniques for femoral neck fracture fixation. We then sought to determine what potential risk factors influenced the development of avascular necrosis.Between 1990 and 2005, one hundred sixty-three intracapsular femoral neck fractures in 163 patients were treated with internal fixation at our level-I trauma center. All patients were monitored until conversion to total hip arthroplasty or for a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Ten patients (10 hips) died and 7 patients (7 hips) were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 hips) had a mean 5.2 years of follow-up (range, 3 months to 17 years). The incidence of avascular necrosis was 25.3% (37 hips). The average time to diagnosis of avascular necrosis was 18.8 months (range, 3-47 months). Patient sex, age, interval from injury to surgery, and mechanism of injury were statistically not associated with the development of avascular necrosis. The quality of fracture reduction, adequacy of fixation, degree of displacement, and comminution of the posterior cortex were significantly associated. After we controlled for patient and radiographic characteristics, multivariate analyses indicated that the important predictors for avascular necrosis are poor reduction (odds ratio=13.889) and initial displacement of the fracture (odds ratio=4.693). Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  16. Management of femoral neck fractures in the young patient: A critical analysis review

    PubMed Central

    Pauyo, Thierry; Drager, Justin; Albers, Anthony; Harvey, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    Femoral neck fractures account for nearly half of all hip fractures with the vast majority occurring in elderly patients after simple falls. Currently there may be sufficient evidence to support the routine use of hip replacement surgery for low demand elderly patients in all but non-displaced and valgus impacted femoral neck fractures. However, for the physiologically young patients, preservation of the natural hip anatomy and mechanics is a priority in management because of their high functional demands. The biomechanical challenges of femoral neck fixation and the vulnerability of the femoral head blood supply lead to a high incidence of non-union and osteonecrosis of the femoral head after internal fixation of displaced femoral neck fractures. Anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are essentials in achieving the goals of treatment in this young patient population. Furthermore, other management variables such as surgical timing, the role of capsulotomy and the choice of implant for fixation remain controversial. This review will focus both on the demographics and injury profile of young patients with femoral neck fractures and the current evidence behind the surgical management of these injuries as well as their major secondary complications. PMID:25035822

  17. Current trends in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Buckley, S L

    1997-05-01

    Healthcare cost containment and a desire for early discharge of the pediatric patient to the home environment have become important factors in the treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children. As a result, newer techniques of treatment have become popular. The immediate hip spica cast remains the primary method of treatment for most children 6 years of age and younger. The treatment for children between the ages of 6 and 10 years is the most controversial. Many such patients may be treated successfully with immediate hip spica casts. However, external fixation and flexible intramedullary rod fixation are being used more frequently, particularly in patients with multiple trauma. The initial enthusiasm for rigid intramedullary rod fixation of adolescent femoral fractures has been tempered by recent reports of femoral head avascular necrosis. Avoiding the piriformis fossa during rod insertion may prevent this complication. Most children and adolescents with femoral fractures can be treated successfully with a brief hospital course without compromising care or outcome.

  18. Femoral fracture repair and postoperative management in new zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Jon D; Ovadia, Shira; Howell, Paula; Jaskwich, David H

    2002-07-01

    Low bone density and large muscle mass predispose rabbits to femoral fractures. However, there are few reports describing treatment and prognosis. Two New Zealand White rabbits presented with unilateral left rear limb abduction and lateral rotation of the distal left rear limb 2 and 17 days after experimental surgery to create a "stair step" in the patellar groove of the left medial femoral chondyle. This procedure was performed after approval by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Radiography revealed a spiral oblique mid-shaft fracture of the left femur in both rabbits. Open fracture reduction was undertaken. Because of the presence of screws and Kirschner-wires in the medial femoral condyle, a lateral approach to surgical correction was chosen. Intramedullary fixation was used to reduce and stabilize the fractures. A 0.062" Kirschner wire was selected for the intramedullary device, because it was sufficiently flexible to allow easy passage into the femoral canal while being sufficiently stiff to promote reduction of the fracture. In addition, the ends of the fracture were secured with a 0.032" Kirschner cerclage wire to provide additional control of rotation and angulation. Then we assessed the range of motion of the knee joint to determine fracture stability and ensure that the hardware did not impinge on soft-tissue elements. After closure and application of sterile dressing, the hind legs were hobbled proximal to the hock by using elastic veterinary wrap in a figure-eight pattern to maintain limb alignment and prevent formation of pressure ulcers. Intraoperative fluoroscopic evaluation and postoperative radiographs confirmed fracture reduction. Bruising and seroma formation occurred at the surgical site, and transient anorexia developed. Rabbits were treated with fluids, analgesics, antibiotics, and fitted with Elizabethan collars. They were housed in isolation to limit excessive environmental stimulation, which could alarm them and provoke

  19. Femoral impaction grafting

    PubMed Central

    Scanelli, John A; Brown, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Femoral impaction grafting is a reconstruction option applicable to both simple and complex femoral component revisions. It is one of the preferred techniques for reconstructing large femoral defects when the isthmus is non-supportive. The available level of evidence is primarily derived from case series, which shows a mean survivorship of 90.5%, with revision or re-operation as the end-point, with an average follow-up of 11 years. The rate of femoral fracture requiring re-operation or revision of the component varies between several large case series, ranging from 2.5% to 9%, with an average of 5.4%. PMID:23362469

  20. Trochanteric osteotomy and fixation during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Archibeck, Michael J; Rosenberg, Aaron G; Berger, Richard A; Silverton, Craig D

    2003-01-01

    Once used routinely, trochanteric osteotomy in total hip arthroplasty now is usually limited to difficult primary and revision cases. There are three types: the standard trochanteric osteotomy and its variations, the trochanteric slide, and the extended trochanteric osteotomy. Each has unique indications, fixation techniques, and complications. Primary total hip arthroplasty procedures requiring the enhanced exposure provided by trochanteric osteotomy may be needed in patients with hip ankylosis or fusion, protrusio acetabuli, proximal femoral deformities, developmental dysplasia, or abductor muscle laxity. Trochanteric osteotomies in revision arthroplasties, primarily the extended trochanteric osteotomy, facilitate the removal of well-fixed femoral components, provide direct access to the diaphysis for distal fixation, and enhance acetabular exposure.

  1. Femoral neck fracture following intramedullary nailing with misplacement of an end cup: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Mańkowski, Bartosz; Kierzynka, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Femoral neck fracture is an unusual complication of intramedullary fixation of a broken femur. We report on two cases of femoral neck fractures attributed to misplacement of an end cup and subsequent invasive maneuvers in an effort to remove it. Iatrogenic fractures of the femoral neck during or after intramedullary nailing are reported in the medical literature. Authors associate it with many possible technical mistakes performed during the procedure, yet no complications after missed end cup placement were noted. We suggest that the fractures described below were a consequence of injury to the vascular supply and bone stock of the initially intact femoral neck. PMID:19384634

  2. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  3. The use of a circular external skeletal fixation device for the management of long bone osteotomies in large ruminants: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Aithal, H P; Singh, G R; Hoque, M; Maiti, S K; Kinjavdekar, P; Pawde, A M; Setia, H C

    2004-08-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of a simple, inexpensive model of circular external fixator (CEF) for use in large ruminants. A simple model of CEF frames consisting of four full rings (13-19 cm diameter, 4 cm wide and 4 mm thick with 18-24 holes) connected by threaded rods (8 mm diameter, 10-15 cm long) and nuts was developed using mild (low carbon) steel and were nickel-plated. In the first phase of the study, three male cow calves were utilized to study the feasibility of application of the fixators in the metatarsus, tibia and radius, in reference of adaptation and tolerance by animals. In the second phase, the fixators were tested in osteotomized bones. Six bull calves of 1.5-2 years of age weighing about 200-250 kg were utilized for this purpose. After preparing the area for aseptic surgery, under xylazine (at 0.1 mg/kg, i.m.)-ketamine (i.v. till effect) general anaesthesia, the test bone (metatarsus, radius and tibia in two animals each) was approached through the medial surface and an osteotomy was created with a saw and chisel at the mid-diaphysis. The pre-constructed 4-ring CEF was mounted on the limb around the test bone in such a way that it formed a cylinder with the axis of the limb at the centre. Each ring was then fixed to the bone with a pair of beaded wires (316 SS) of 3.5 mm diameter. During the post-operative period, the animals were observed for any change in behaviour, tolerance of the fixators, the weight bearing on the test limb, the status of the fixator, and the level of reduction of the osteotomy, alignment and healing at different intervals. The fixation of CEF was easier in the metatarsus and radius than in the tibia. The inner ring diameters found adequate for metatarsus, radius and tibia were 13-15 cm, 15-17 cm and 17-19 cm, respectively. The fixators applied to different bones were well-tolerated, and the animals could lay down, stand and walk freely with the fixator without any problems. All the animals showed

  4. Giant cell tumor of the femoral neck: case report.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; Amaral, Rogério Andrade do; Oliveira, Leandro Alves de; Moraes, Frederico Barra de; Chaibe, Eduardo Damasceno

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with a giant cell tumor of the left femoral neck, with adjacent progressive invasion of bone tissue. Initial treatment was done with local curettage and autologous bone graft from fibula, electrocauterization and filling with methyl methacrylate. A local tumoral relapse was present after one year; therefore a new surgical procedure was necessary, with proximal femoral wide resection and unconventional endoprosthesis fixation. The article discusses the clinical aspects and surgical treatment. This report aimed to demonstrate the necessity to perform wide resection for giant cell tumor of the femoral neck, prioritizing total resection of the tumor and its local extension, preserving limb integrity and demonstrating the complete failure of preserving surgery in cases of femoral neck involvement.

  5. Internal fixation: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Greenhagen, Robert M; Johnson, Adam R; Joseph, Alison

    2011-08-01

    Internal fixation has become a pillar of surgical specialties, yet the evolution of these devices has been relatively short. The first known description of medical management of a fracture was found in the Edwin Smith Papyrus of Ancient Egypt (circa 2600 bc). The first description of internal fixation in the medical literature was in the 18th century. The advancement of techniques and technology over the last 150 years has helped to preserve both life and function. The pace of advancement continues to accelerate as surgeons continue to seek new technology for osseous fixation. The authors present a thorough review of the history of internal fixation and the transformation into a multibillion dollar industry.

  6. Pathologic femoral neck fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Shrader, M Wade; Schwab, Joseph H; Shaughnessy, William J; Jacofsky, David J

    2009-02-01

    Pathologic fractures in children occur in a variety of malignant and benign pathologic processes. Pediatric pathologic femoral neck fractures are particularly rare. Until now, all reported cases have been isolated cases, small series, or cases reported in series of adult pathologic hip fractures. The present article is the first report of a relatively large series of pathologic femoral neck fractures in a pediatric population. We identified pathologic femoral neck fractures, including 2 basicervical fractures, in 15 children (9 boys, 6 girls) ranging in age from 18 months to 15 years (mean age, 9 years) and treated between 1960 and 2000. The pathologic diagnoses were fibrous dysplasia (5 children), unicameral bone cyst (2), Ewing's sarcoma (2), osteomyelitis (2), leukemia (1), rhabdomyosarcoma (1), osteogenesis imperfecta (1), and osteopetrosis (1). Treatment methods, including time to reduction and fixation, were reviewed in detail. One patient was lost to follow-up. All others were followed until union; mean long-term follow-up was 7 years (range, 1-16 years). All patients ultimately went on to union. Mean time to union was 19 weeks (range, 5-46 weeks). However, 2 patients died before 2 years. There was a 40% complication rate, with limb-length discrepancy being the most common (4 children). No patient developed avascular necrosis. Pathologic femoral neck fractures are rare in children. Pediatric patients who present with a pathologic hip fracture are at significant risk for complications. Physicians and family should be alerted to the prolonged course involved in treating these fractures to union.

  7. [Treatment of beginning juvenile detachment of the femoral head, taking growth of the femoral neck into account (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, P

    1979-10-01

    Prevention of further detachment is the primary aim in the immediate treatment of beginning juvenile detachment of the femoral head. Screwing of the epiphysis of the head, first introduced by M. E. Mueller (1965), has proved successful. Besides providing immediate mechanical stability, this method, however, results in premature ossification of the joint of the femoral neck. Epiphysiodesis has a particularly unfavourable effect in early childhood, because it inhibits proper growth of the leg and development of the mechanism of the hip joint on account of the shortened femoral neck. Spiking of the epiphysis with Krischner screw wires guarantees safe fixation of the epiphyseal head on the one hand, and sufficient freedom of femoral neck growth on the other. Surgical treatment requires knowledge of the changed hip joint anatomy of the child. Preoperative planning via drawing to determine the length and position of the implantate on the basis of standardised x-ray films, will help to prevent operative failures.

  8. Management and outcome of interprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Schuster, Rupert; Luxl, Monika; Widhalm, Harald Kurt; Eipeldauer, Stefan; Krusche-Mandl, Irena; Ostermann, Roman; Blutsch, Beate; Vécsei, Vilmos

    2011-11-01

    Interprosthetic femoral fractures following ipsilateral hip and knee arthroplasty are a rare but serious complication in clinical practice. In most cases, adequate management of these injuries might constitute a challenging problem. However, the literature provides only few data regarding the treatment and outcome of interprosthetic femoral fractures, and there are only few classifications available, which might assist in finding an appropriate treatment concept. The purpose of this study was to analyse our experience in the management of interprosthetic femoral fractures following ipsilateral hip and knee joint replacement. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of 23 patients (15 female and eight male, average age: 79.2 years) with an interprosthetic fracture after ipsilateral hip and knee joint replacement between 1992 and 2008. For the classification of interprosthetic femoral fractures, the fractures were divided into three types, depending on the fracture site and the adjacency to the prostheses. All patients underwent operative stabilisation, either by lateral plate fixation (n=19), by revision arthroplasty using a long stem (n=2) or by plate fixation and revision arthroplasty (n=2). Referring to the clinical outcome, 16 patients returned to their pre-injury activity level and were satisfied with their clinical outcome. In six patients, we saw a relevant decrease of hip or knee function and severe limitations in gait and activities of daily living. We had a mean Harris Hip Score (HHS) of 78.4 points, and a mean Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) of 71.8 points. Relating to the radiographic outcome, successful fracture healing was achieved in 19 of 22 patients (86%) within 6 months. Failures of reduction and fixation were noted in four (18%) of 22 patients. We had a satisfactory outcome following individualised treatment of interprosthetic femoral fractures following ipsilateral hip and knee joint replacement. Compared to the rare

  9. Percutaneous intraluminal recanalization of long, chronic superficial femoral and popliteal occlusions using the Frontrunner XP CTO device: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Nikolas; Schäfer, Philipp J; Trentmann, Jens; Hümme, Tim H; Stöhring, Christine; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of the Frontrunner XP CTO (chronic total occlusion) Catheter (Cordis) for recanalization of long femoropopliteal artery occlusions. A Frontrunner catheter was used to treat 26 CTOs in SFA after guidewire failure (68.3 +/- 8.8 years). Sixty-seven percent of patients had severe claudication. Critical lower limb ischemia with rest pain or minor tissue loss was present in three and eight patients, respectively. All the lesions were considered complex (TASC B, C, and D); 68% of the lesions were heavily calcified. The mean lesion length was 17.6 cm (range, 10-42 cm). The initial attempt to cross the occlusion with the CTO guidewire V18 was unsuccessful in 26 of 76 limbs (34.26%). A secondary attempt using the Frontrunner catheter (crossover approach, 27%; antegrade, 73%) performed in all 26 failed cases was successful in 17 limbs (65.38%), increasing the technical success rate to 88.12%. The main reasons for failure with the Frontrunner were inability to cross the lesion due to heavy calcification (six of nine) and inability to re-enter the true lumen after subintimal passage of the occluded segment (three of nine). The mean fluoroscopy time was 22.9 min. Minor complications included one distal extension of the dissection with involvement of the first popliteal segment and one perforation in the occluded segment. No major complications were seen. In conclusion, recanalization with the Frontrunner CTO catheter is a simple and safe method with a high technical success rate in the endovascular treatment of long superficial femoral artery occlusions and should be an alternative method after guidewire failure.

  10. Percutaneous Intraluminal Recanalization of Long, Chronic Superficial Femoral and Popliteal Occlusions Using the Frontrunner XP CTO Device: A Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Charalambous, Nikolas Schaefer, Philipp J.; Trentmann, Jens; Huemme, Tim. H.; Stoehring, Christine; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of the Frontrunner XP CTO (chronic total occlusion) Catheter (Cordis) for recanalization of long femoropopliteal artery occlusions. A Frontrunner catheter was used to treat 26 CTOs in SFA after guidewire failure (68.3 {+-} 8.8 years). Sixty-seven percent of patients had severe claudication. Critical lower limb ischemia with rest pain or minor tissue loss was present in three and eight patients, respectively. All the lesions were considered complex (TASC B, C, and D); 68% of the lesions were heavily calcified. The mean lesion length was 17.6 cm (range, 10-42 cm). The initial attempt to cross the occlusion with the CTO guidewire V18 was unsuccessful in 26 of 76 limbs (34.26%). A secondary attempt using the Frontrunner catheter (crossover approach, 27%; antegrade, 73%) performed in all 26 failed cases was successful in 17 limbs (65.38%), increasing the technical success rate to 88.12%. The main reasons for failure with the Frontrunner were inability to cross the lesion due to heavy calcification (six of nine) and inability to re-enter the true lumen after subintimal passage of the occluded segment (three of nine). The mean fluoroscopy time was 22.9 min. Minor complications included one distal extension of the dissection with involvement of the first popliteal segment and one perforation in the occluded segment. No major complications were seen. In conclusion, recanalization with the Frontrunner CTO catheter is a simple and safe method with a high technical success rate in the endovascular treatment of long superficial femoral artery occlusions and should be an alternative method after guidewire failure.

  11. Treatment of Angio-Seal® Vascular Closure Device-Induced Acute Femoral Artery Occlusion with SilverHawk® Directional Atherectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rishi; Vamanan, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Vascular closure devices provide a safe and cost-effective method to achieve rapid hemostasis and early ambulation after angiographic procedures. Rarely, they can result in arterial injury with resultant stenosis or acute arterial closure requiring open surgical intervention. We report an Angio-Seal® vascular closure device-induced acute arterial closure successfully treated percutaneously with the SilverHawk® plaque excision system. This report discusses the possible mechanisms of Angio-Seal® induced arterial occlusion and various percutaneous options for treatment. PMID:28083454

  12. Complex proximal femoral fractures in the elderly managed by reconstruction nailing – complications & outcomes: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rethnam, Ulfin; Cordell-Smith, James; Kumar, Thirumoolanathan M; Sinha, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Background Unstable proximal femoral fractures and pathological lesions involving the trochanteric region in the elderly comprise an increasing workload for the trauma surgeon as the ageing population increases. This study aims to evaluate use of the Russell-Taylor reconstruction nail (RTRN) in this group with regard to mortality risk, complication rates and final outcome. Methods Retrospective evaluation of 42 patients aged over 60 years who were treated by reconstruction nailing for proximal femoral fractures over a 4 year period. Results Over two-thirds of patients were high anaesthetic risk (ASA > 3) with ischemic heart disease the most common co-morbidity. 4 patients died within 30 days of surgery and 4 patients required further surgery for implant related failure. Majority of patients failed to regain their pre-injury mobility status and fewer than half the patients returned to their original domestic residence. Conclusion Favourable fixation of unstable complex femoral fractures in the elderly population can be achieved with the Russell-Taylor reconstruction nail. However, use of this device in this frail population was associated with a high implant complication and mortality rate that undoubtedly reflected the severity of the injury sustained, co-morbidity within the group and the stress of a major surgical procedure. PMID:18271998

  13. A micro-architectural evaluation of osteoporotic human femoral heads to guide implant placement in proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The micro-architecture of bone has been increasingly recognized as an important determinant of bone strength. Successful operative stabilization of fractures depends on bone strength. We evaluated the osseous micro-architecture and strength of the osteoporotic human femoral head. Material and methods 6 femoral heads, obtained during arthroplasty surgery for femoral neck fracture, underwent micro-computed tomography (microCT) scanning at 30 μm, and bone volume ratio (BV/TV), trabecular thickness, structural model index, connection density, and degree of anisotropy for volumes of interest throughout the head were derived. A further 15 femoral heads underwent mechanical testing of compressive failure stress of cubes of trabecular bone from different regions of the head. Results The greatest density and trabecular thickness was found in the central core that extended from the medial calcar to the physeal scar. This region also correlated with the greatest degree of anisotropy and proportion of plate-like trabeculae. In the epiphyseal region, the trabeculae were organized radially from the physeal scar. The weakest area was found at the apex and peripheral areas of the head. The strongest region was at the center of the head. Interpretation The center of the femoral head contained the strongest trabecular bone, with the thickest, most dense trabeculae. The apical region was weaker. From an anatomical and mechanical point of view, implants that achieve fixation in or below this central core may achieve the most stable fixation during fracture healing. PMID:24032522

  14. Current concepts in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip condition that can be disabling. In this review, we provide an orientation on current trends in the clinical management of SCFE including conventional procedures and specialised surgical developments. Different methods of fixation of the epiphysis, risks of complications, and the rationale of addressing deformity, primarily or secondarily, are presented. Although improved understanding of the anatomy, vascularity and implications of residual deformity have changed management strategies, the best modality of treatment that would restore complete vascularity to the femoral head and prevent any residual deformity, impingement and early osteoarthritis remains elusive.

  15. Comparison of double dynamic compression plating versus two configurations of an internal veterinary fixation device: Results of in vitro mechanical testing using a bone substitute.

    PubMed

    Haerdi-Landerer, Christina; Steiner, Adrian; Linke, Berend; Wahl, Dieter; Schneider, Erich; Hehli, Markus; Frei, Reto; Auer, Jörg A

    2002-01-01

    To compare the mechanical properties of 2 configurations of a veterinary fixation system (VFS) for large animal long bones with dynamic compression plating (DCP). Eighteen pairs of Canevasit tubes (Canevasit; Amsler und Frei, Schinznach Dorf, Switzerland) (length, 170 mm; diameter, 47.5 mm; cortex thickness, 10 mm), aligned with a 10-mm gap, and stabilized with 2 DCP or 2 VFS implants. Three groups (n = 6) were compared. Group 1 Canevasit tubes were stabilized with two 10-hole, broad 4.5-mm stainless steel DCP applied with both plates centered over the gap, in orthogonal planes parallel to the long axis of the tubes and staggered to allow bicortical fixation with ten 4.5-mm, 52-mm-long cortex screws each. Group 2 tubes were stabilized similarly with 2 VFS implants, each composed of a stainless steel rod (length, 167 mm; diameter, 8 mm), and 10 clamps were applied in alternating fashion left and right on the rod and fixed bicortically with ten 4.5-mm, 52-mm-long, cortex screws. Group 3 tubes were stabilized similarly, but using only 6 clamps/rod. All groups were tested initially in torsion within elastic limits and subsequently in 4-point bending, with 1 implant on the tension side, until gap closure occurred. None of the constructs failed, but all had plastic deformation after 4-point bending. No statistically significant differences were found among the 3 groups in torsional stiffness. Double DCP fixation was significantly stiffer and stronger in 4-point bending, compared with both configurations of double VFS fixation. The plate design was favored in this study. The VFS system may have to be adapted before further tests are conducted. Test modalities have to be chosen closer to clinical conditions (real bone, cyclic loading, closed gap). The veterinary fixation system has not yet proven its advantages for large animal long bone fracture repair. From the pure mechanical point of view, double DCP is the favored method for the treatment mentioned. Copyright 2002 by

  16. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Implant Rupture after Surgery for Atypical Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Yu; Ochi, Hironori; Watari, Taiji; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Treatment methods for delayed union and nonunion of atypical femoral fracture are still controversial. Moreover, no treatment method has been established for implant rupture caused by delayed union and nonunion. We encountered a 74-year-old female in whom nonunion-induced implant rupture occurred after treatment of atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture with internal fixation using a long femoral nail. It was unlikely that sufficient fixation could be obtained by repeating osteosynthesis alone. Moreover, the patient was elderly and early weight-bearing activity was essential for early recovery of ADL. Based on these reasons, we selected one-stage surgery with total hip arthroplasty and osteosynthesis with inverted condylar locking plate as salvage procedures. Bone union was achieved at 6 months after surgery. This case illustrated that osteosynthesis-combined one-staged total hip arthroplasty could be considered as one of the options for nonunion-induced implant rupture of atypical femoral subtrochanteric fracture. PMID:27818818

  17. Mortality and complications following stabilization of femoral metastatic lesions: a population-based study of regional variation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ristevski, Bill; Jenkinson, Richard J; Stephen, David J G; Finkelstein, Joel; Schemitsch, Emil H; McKee, Michael D; Kreder, Hans J

    2009-08-01

    BACKGROUND: It is considered that patients at risk for spontaneous fracture due to metastatic lesions should undergo surgical stabilization before fracture occurs; however, prophylactic stabilization is associated with surgical morbidity and mortality. We sought to compare pathological fracture fixation versus prophylactic stabilization of diaphyseal femoral lesions for patients with femoral metastases and assess the rate of prophylactic surgery completed in all regions of Ontario. METHODS: Using population data sets, we identified all patients who had undergone femoral stabilization, either for pathological femoral fractures or for prophylactic fixation of femoral metastases before pathological fractures, between 1992 and 1997 in Ontario. We compared the rates of survival, serious medical and surgical complications and length of stay in hospital between the 2 groups. RESULTS: A total of 624 patients underwent surgical stabilization for femoral metastases. The most common sites of primary metastases were the lungs (26%), breasts (16%), kidneys (6%) and prostate (6%); 46% of patients had other or multiple primary metastases. Overall, 37% of lesions were fixed prophylactically, with wide variation by region (17.6%-72.2%). Patients who underwent prophylactic stabilization had better overall survival at all postoperative time points. This held true after adjusting for age, sex, comorbidities and type of cancer (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate a survival advantage with prophylactic fixation of metastatic femoral lesions combined with a relatively low perioperative risk excluding concomitant bilateral procedures. Ontario regional rates of prophylactic fixation vary enormously, with most patients not receiving prophylactic treatment.

  18. Alendronate improves screw fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Antonio; Faldini, Cesare; Hoang-Kim, Amy; Pegreffi, Francesco; Giannini, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated the efficacy of the use of bisphosphonates to enhance screw fixation in bone. In this prospective, randomized study of pertrochanteric fractures treated with external fixation, we tested whether systemic administration of bisphosphonates would improve the fixation of hydroxyapatite-coated screws implanted in osteoporotic bone. Sixteen consecutive patients with a pertrochanteric fracture were selected. Inclusion criteria were female gender, an age of at least sixty-five years, and a bone mineral density T-score of less than -2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion criteria included bisphosphonate treatment during the two-year period prior to the fracture. Fractures were fixed with a pertrochanteric fixator and four hydroxyapatite-coated pins. Two pins were implanted in the femoral head (pin positions 1 and 2), and two were placed in the femoral diaphysis (pin positions 3 and 4). The patients were randomized either to therapy with alendronate for a three-month postoperative period (Group A) or to no therapy (Group B). The Group-A patients received an oral dose of 70 mg of alendronate per week. The fixators were removed after three months. All of the fractures healed, and no loss of reduction, nonunion, or delayed union was observed. The combined mean extraction torque (and standard deviation) of the pins implanted at positions 1 and 2 (cancellous bone) was 2558 +/- 1103 N/mm in Group A and 1171 +/- 480 N/mm in Group B (p < 0.0005). The combined mean extraction torque of the pins implanted at positions 3 and 4 (cortical bone) was 4327 +/- 1720 N/mm in Group A and 4075 +/- 1022 N/mm in Group B. These data show that weekly systemic administration of alendronate improves pin fixation in cancellous bone in elderly female patients with osteoporosis. We observed a twofold increase in extraction torque with the pins implanted in cancellous bone. These results support the use of alendronate in the treatment of osteoporotic pertrochanteric fractures

  19. Limits of internal fixation in long-bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Nieto, H; Baroan, C

    2017-02-01

    Alternatives to internal fixation of long-bone fracture comprise, depending on location, external fixation or joint replacement. Limitations comprise risk of infection and functional outcome quality, which vary according to technique. The present study examines these limitations, based on comparative or large-scale studies from which certain significant results emerge. Four main questions are dealt with: (1) the present role of locking plates; (2) conditions for intramedullary nailing in Gustilo grade IIIb open fracture; (3) the limitations of conversion from external fixation to intramedullary nailing in open lower leg fracture; (4) and the limitations of definitive anterograde femoral nailing in multiple trauma. Locking plate fixation has yet to prove clinical superiority in any of the anatomic sites for which good-quality comparative analyses are available. Infection risk in Gustilo grade IIIb open lower leg fracture is equivalent when treated by intramedullary nailing or external fixation, if wound care and debridement are effective, antibiotherapy is initiated rapidly and skin cover is restored within 7days. Conversion from primary external fixation to intramedullary nailing is possible if the external fixator was fitted less than 28days previously and skin cover was restored within 7days. The pulmonary and systemic impact of peripheral lesions or definitive anterograde intramedullary nailing of femoral fracture in multiple trauma calls for caution and what is known as "damage-control orthopedics" (DCO), a term covering the general consequences of both the initial trauma and its treatment. Femoral intramedullary nailing is thus contraindicated in case of hemorrhagic shock (blood pressure<90mmHg), hypothermia (<33°C), coagulation disorder (platelet count<90,000) or peripheral lesions such as multiple long-bone fractures, crushed limb or primary pulmonary contusion. In such cases, external fixation or retrograde nailing with a small-diameter nail and without

  20. Prognostic factors in the outcome of supracondylar femoral osteotomy for lateral compartment osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Hugh U.; Botsford, Deke J.; Park, Youn-Soo

    1997-01-01

    Objective To identify the demographic and operative factors that determine outcome in supracondylar femoral osteotomy for lateral compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Design Clinical and radiologic review of a nonrandomized, consecutive one-surgeon series. Setting A university-affiliated, elective surgical referral centre. Patients Forty-nine consecutive patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee, involving the lateral compartment, and of sufficient severity that the alternative surgical procedure would be total knee replacement. Intervention Supracondylar varus osteotomy stabilized with a blade plate. Main outcome measures Knee function measured by the Knee Society Score and time to conversion to total knee replacement. Results A Knee Society Score greater than 80 was obtained in 81% of patients, but in the function portion of the measurement only 30% had a similar score. After discarding the patients who died, life-table analysis demonstrated the predicted survival before conversion to total knee replacement to be 87% at 7 years. There was no correlation with patient age or sex, femorotibial angulation, amount of correction or time after the intervention. Removal of the fixation device improved the clinical result. Conclusion The role of supracondylar femoral osteotomy remains poorly defined, but the procedure can delay total knee replacement for considerable time in appropriate patients. PMID:9126124

  1. Rupture of the Deep Femoral Artery during Proximal Femoral Nailing Following an Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Han Kook; Park, Junyoung; Oyunbat, Choidog; Kim, Taehwan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we experienced a case where the diagnosis and management of a deep femoral artery rupture was delayed. This vascular complication occurred during the insertion of a distal interlocking screw of a proximal femoral nail for the fixation of an intertrochanteric femur fracture. A 79-year-old male patient was diagnosed with a right intertrochanteric fracture after a fall. We fixed the fracture with a proximal femoral nail (Zimmer® Natural Nail™ System). One day after the procedure, the patient complained of pain and swelling on the anteromedial side of his middle thigh followed by hypotension, anemia and prolonged thigh swelling. Computed tomography angiography was performed 7 days after the procedure. We found a pseudoaneurysm of the perforating artery caused by injury to the deep femoral artery and an intramuscular hematoma in the anterior thigh muscle. We successfully treated the pseudoaneurysm using coil embolization. Throughout the management of intertrochanteric femoral fractures, it is important to be aware and monitor signs and symptoms related to the possibility of blood vessel damage. When a patient presents with swelling and pain on the middle thigh and/or unexplained anemia postoperatively, the possibility that these symptoms are caused by an injury to the femoral artery must be considered. PMID:27536645

  2. A novel intramedullary callus distraction system for the treatment of femoral bone defects.

    PubMed

    Horas, Konstantin; Schnettler, Reinhard; Maier, Gerrit; Horas, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    An intramedullary device has some advantages over external fixation in callus distraction for bone defect reconstruction. There are difficulties controlling motorized intramedullary devices and monitoring the distraction rate which may lead to poor results. The aim of this study was to design a fully implantable and non-motorized simple distraction nail for the treatment of bone defects. The fully implantable device comprises a tube-in-tube system and a wire pulling mechanism for callus distraction. For the treatment of femoral bone defects, a traction wire, attached to the device at one end, is fixed to the tibial tubercle at its other end. Flexion of the knee joint over a predetermined angle generates a traction force on the wire triggering bone segment transport. This callus distraction system was implanted into the femur of four human cadavers (total 8 femora), and bone segment transport was conducted over 60-mm defects with radiographic monitoring. All bone segments were transported reliably to the docking site. From these preliminary results, we conclude that this callus distraction system offers an alternative to the current intramedullary systems for the treatment of bone defects.

  3. Acetabular perforation after medial migration of the helical blade through the femoral head after treatment of an unstable trochanteric fracture with proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA): a case report.

    PubMed

    Takigami, Iori; Ohnishi, Kazuichiro; Ito, Yoshiki; Nagano, Akihito; Sumida, Hisashi; Tanaka, Kaori; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2011-09-01

    The proximal femoral nail antirotation is a new generation of intramedullary device for the treatment of trochanteric femoral fractures, having a helical blade rather than a screw for suggested better purchase in osteoporotic bone. However, it is not free of complications. Few reports are available on postoperative perforation of the helical blade through the femoral head as a unique complication of proximal femoral nail antirotation. We report a 79-year-old woman with acetabular perforation after migration of the helical blade through the femoral head after an unstable trochanteric fracture, which was fixed with a proximal femoral nail antirotation.

  4. Regenerate bone fracture rate following femoral lengthening in paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Burke, N. G.; Cassar-Gheiti, A. J.; Tan, J.; McHugh, G.; O’Neil, B. J.; Noonan, M.; Moore, D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Femoral lengthening using a circular or mono-lateral frame is a commonly used technique. Fracture at the site of the regenerate bone is a major concern especially following removal of the external fixator. This aim of this study was to assess the rate of fracture of the regenerate bone in this single surgeon series of paediatric patients and determine potential risk factors. Methods Retrospective review of all the femoral lengthening performed by the senior author was performed. The medical and physiotherapy notes were reviewed. The gender, age at time of surgery, disease aetiology, total days in the external fixator and length of the new regenerate bone were recorded. Patients who sustained a regenerate fracture were identified. Results A total of 176 femoral lengthening procedures were performed on 108 patients. Eight regenerate fractures occurred in seven patients (4.5%). The mechanism of injury was a fall in five cases and during physiotherapy in three cases. The regenerate fracture occurred a median number of nine days following removal of frame. There was no significant difference between gender, age at time of surgery, total time in external fixator between those who sustained a regenerate fracture and those patients who did not. A significant difference was noted between the amount of lengthening between the ‘regenerate fracture group’ and the ‘no fracture group’ (50 mm vs 38 mm, respectively; p = 0.029). There was no association between disease aetiology and risk of regenerate fracture. Conclusions Femoral lengthening of more than 50 mm increases the risk of a fracture at the regenerate site regardless of the disease aetiology. We recommend avoidance of aggressive physiotherapy for the initial four weeks following external fixator removal. PMID:28828065

  5. Retrograde femoral interlocking nail in complex fractures.

    PubMed

    Anup, Khare; Mehra, M M

    2002-06-01

    Retrograde interlocking nail was used as the method of fixation in 35 different cases of combination of complex femoral fractures. We performed this procedure in fractures of femoral shaft associated with fracture neck femur, pathological fractures of proximal third of femur with trochanteric pathology, ipsilateral fracture of femur and tibia in polytrauma cases with multiple other injuries, in highly obese patients with fracture shaft femur. This technique was also used in cases of pregnancy with fracture shaft femur and in unstable pelvic fracture or dislocation hip associated with fracture shaft femur. Operative technique involved with retrograde insertion of un-reamed, non-cannulated custom made nail through entrance portal in intercondylar notch was applied for fixation of the shaft femur fracture. The other associated fracture around hip was stabilized separately using suitable implant according to type of fracture. In cases of ipsilateral fracture of femur and tibia, femur was stabilized by retrograde interlocking nail and tibia was stabilized by antigrade interlocking nail through same incision at the same sitting. The case was followed up for three years; the average union time was 12 to 18 weeks. Out of 35 cases, 31 cases regained full knee movement. Out of the remaining 4 cases, 2 cases could regain up to 90 degrees of movement, these were old fractures and non-cooperative patients. In one case, patellofemoral arthritis was developed because of an operative error where a nail was not put inside the articular surface. Mal-union was observed in an early case of the series and implant failure was nil. Retrograde interlocking nail was used as the method of fixation in complex fracture problems. Multiple fractures of long bones can be stabilized in one stage, preventing multiple operations at different stages in polytraumatized patients. This resulted in early recovery, lesser hospital stay, and early rehabilitation of patient with good results and is

  6. Latarjet Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Hasham M.; Monroe, Emily J.; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N.; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. Purpose: To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. Results: All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Clinical Relevance: Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option. PMID:27158630

  7. Electromagnetic bone segment tracking to control femoral derotation osteotomy-A saw bone study.

    PubMed

    Geisbüsch, Andreas; Auer, Christoph; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Niklasch, Mirjam; Dreher, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    Correction of rotational gait abnormalities is common practice in pediatric orthopaedics such as in children with cerebral palsy. Femoral derotation osteotomy is established as a standard treatment, however, different authors reported substantial variability in outcomes following surgery with patients showing over- or under-correction. Only 60% of the applied correction is observed postoperatively, which strongly suggests intraoperative measurement error or loss of correction during surgery. This study was conducted to verify the impact of error sources in the derotation procedure and assess the utility of a newly developed, instrumented measurement system based on electromagnetic tracking aiming to improve the accuracy of rotational correction. A supracondylar derotation osteotomy was performed in 21 artificial femur sawbones and the amount of derotation was quantified during the procedure by the tracking system and by nine raters using a conventional goniometer. Accuracy of both measurement devices was determined by repeated computer tomography scans. Average derotation measured by the tracking system differed by 0.1° ± 1.6° from the defined reference measurement . In contrast, a high inter-rater variability was found in goniometric measurements (range: 10.8° ± 6.9°, mean interquartile distance: 6.6°). During fixation of the osteosynthesis, the tracking system reliably detected unintentional manipulation of the correction angle with a mean absolute change of 4.0° ± 3.2°. Our findings show that conventional control of femoral derotation is subject to relevant observer bias whereas instrumental tracking yields accuracy better than ±2°. The tracking system is a step towards more reliable and safe implementation of femoral correction, promising substantial improvements of patient safety in the future. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a two...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a two...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  11. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest.

  12. Frequent complications and severe bone loss associated with the repiphysis expandable distal femoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Cara A; Gruzinova, Irina S; Frank, Rachel M; Gitelis, Steven; Virkus, Walter W

    2015-03-01

    future revision using standard stem fixation. The bone loss around the stem of this prosthesis limits subsequent revision options, often resulting in a total femoral prosthesis. Although the decision to use the Repiphysis device must be made on an individual basis, surgeons should recognize the potential for significant bone compromise limiting revision options and consider other options. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. Femoral stem fracture and in vivo corrosion of retrieved modular femoral hips.

    PubMed

    Huot Carlson, J Caitlin; Van Citters, Douglas W; Currier, John H; Bryant, Amber M; Mayor, Michael B; Collier, John P

    2012-08-01

    A series of 78 retrieved modular hip devices were assessed for fretting and corrosion. Damage was common at both the head-neck junction (54% showing corrosion; 88% showing fretting) and at the stem-sleeve junction (88% corrosion; 65% fretting). Corrosion correlated to in vivo duration, patient activity, and metal (vs ceramic) femoral heads but did not correlate to head carbon content. Femoral stem fatigue fracture was observed in seven retrievals; all had severe corrosion, were under increased stress, and were in vivo longer than the non-fractured cohort. This study emphasizes the potential for stem fracture when small diameter femoral stems with large offsets are used in heavy and active patients. Designs which reduce fretting and corrosion in modular implants is warranted as patients demand longer lasting implants.

  14. Special topic: Ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures--does evidence give us the answer?

    PubMed

    Boulton, Christina L; Pollak, Andrew N

    2015-03-01

    Ipsilateral fractures of the femoral neck and shaft are rare, high-energy injuries that typically occur in young polytrauma patients. The associated fracture of the neck is often vertical in nature and is more frequently non-displaced than in isolated femoral neck fractures. Historically the diagnosis of an associated femoral neck fracture was delayed or missed in approximately one third of cases. Studies have shown that detection can be significantly improved with the implementation of a protocolized approach to hip imaging in all patients with femoral shaft fractures. Prompt recognition of an associated femoral neck fracture allows for timely stabilization and may decrease the risks of non-union and avascular necrosis. In contrast, failure to recognize a non-displaced or minimally displaced associated neck fracture prior to fixation of the shaft can lead to displacement, a decrease in neck fixation options, a technically challenging secondary procedure and increased risk of long-term sequelae. A vast array of treatment strategies have been described for this combined injury. Published options range from spica casting to open reduction and internal fixation of both fractures and include almost all conceivable combinations in between. While timely surgical stabilization is now universally recommended for both shaft and neck, no consensus exists as to the most appropriate method of fixation for either fracture. Most authors recommend prompt, but not emergent, surgery with priority given to anatomic reduction and stabilization of the neck fracture by either closed or open methods. Fixation of the shaft fracture follows as patient condition allows. The rare nature of this injury makes it very challenging to study and most published series' are retrospective with very small sample sizes. In short, no scientificallycompelling study is available to definitively support any one implant choice or method of stabilzation over another for the treatment of associated fractures

  15. Femoral neck preservation in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Pipino, F; Molfetta, L

    1993-01-01

    Preservation of the femoral neck in hip arthroplasty creates a particular biomechanical situation which is clearly different from what is found even after partial neck removal. The femoral neck consists in fact of a "cylinder of cortical bone" that can be used as the "base" for anchoring the stem to the femur, in contrast to the press-fit procedure or other solutions. The mechanical and biological advantages are as follows: 1) Primary triplanar stem stability, in particular rotational stability. Rotational movements of the stem are blocked by the tough lateral cortical cylinder of the neck. Resistance to varus-valgus stress and collapse is also increased vertically and frontally. 2) Proximal cortical fixation. Primary fixation of the stem is provided by the neck cortex, whereas its mid-distal part is merely held by the metaphyseal cancellous bone and the tip is undersized with respect to the medullary canal. 3) Stress loads distributed along physiological lines of stress. Retention of the neck permits preservation of the trabecular systems, along which the stress is distributed towards the diaphysis and the greater trochanter. 4) Elasticity of the bone-prosthesis system. Most of the stem is contained within the metaphyseal cancellous bone that lies between the prosthesis and the cortical bone, creating a bone-prosthesis module with variable and integrated elasticity. 5) Preservation of the bone-stock. The amount of residual bone following implant of the prosthesis increases, not only because of the presence of the femoral neck, but also as a result of the preservation of most of the metaphyseal cancellous bone. There is therefore greater bone-ingrowth, which is also favoured by the fewer changes in the endosteal blood supply. 6) Prosthesis revision is simpler, since the stem can easily be removed and a second neck resection performed. Our clinical and experimental studies, together with those of Freeman et al., confirm that the femoral neck is present for a long

  16. An electronically instrumented internal fixator for the assessment of bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Kowald, B.; Seide, K.; Aljudaibi, M.; Faschingbauer, M.; Juergens, C.; Gille, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The monitoring of fracture healing is a complex process. Typically, successive radiographs are performed and an emerging calcification of the fracture area is evaluated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether different bone healing patterns can be distinguished using a telemetric instrumented femoral internal plate fixator. Materials and Methods An electronic telemetric system was developed to assess bone healing mechanically. The system consists of a telemetry module which is applied to an internal locking plate fixator, an external reader device, a sensor for measuring externally applied load and a laptop computer with processing software. By correlation between externally applied load and load measured in the implant, the elasticity of the osteosynthesis is calculated. The elasticity decreases with ongoing consolidation of a fracture or nonunion and is an appropriate parameter for the course of bone healing. At our centre, clinical application has been performed in 56 patients suffering nonunion or fracture of the femur. Results A total of 39 cases of clinical application were reviewed for this study. In total, four different types of healing curves were observed: fast healing; slow healing; plateau followed by healing; and non-healing. Conclusion The electronically instrumented internal fixator proved to be valuable for the assessment of bone healing in difficult healing situations. Cost-effective manufacturing is possible because the used electronic components are derived from large-scale production. The incorporation of microelectronics into orthopaedic implants will be an important innovation in future clinical care. Cite this article: B. Kienast, B. Kowald, K. Seide, M. Aljudaibi, M. Faschingbauer, C. Juergens, J. Gille. An electronically instrumented internal fixator for the assessment of bone healing. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:191–197. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.55.2000611. PMID:27226357

  17. Revision total hip arthroplasty: the femoral side using cemented implants.

    PubMed

    Holt, Graeme; Hook, Samantha; Hubble, Matthew

    2011-02-01

    Advances in surgical technique and implant technology have improved the ten-year survival after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Despite this, the number of revision procedures has been increasing in recent years, a trend which is predicted to continue into the future. Revision THA is a technically demanding procedure often complicated by a loss of host bone stock which may be compounded by the need to remove primary implants. Both cemented and uncemented implant designs are commonly used in the United Kingdom for primary and revision THA and much controversy still exists as to the ideal method of stem fixation. In this article we discuss revision of the femur using cemented components during revision THA. We focus on three clinical scenarios including femoral cement-in-cement revision where the primary femoral cement-bone interface remains well fixed, femoral cement-in-cement revision for peri-prosthetic femoral fractures, and femoral impaction grafting. We discuss the clinical indications, surgical techniques and clinical outcomes for each of these procedures.

  18. Revision total hip arthroplasty: the femoral side using cemented implants

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Samantha; Hubble, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Advances in surgical technique and implant technology have improved the ten-year survival after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Despite this, the number of revision procedures has been increasing in recent years, a trend which is predicted to continue into the future. Revision THA is a technically demanding procedure often complicated by a loss of host bone stock which may be compounded by the need to remove primary implants. Both cemented and uncemented implant designs are commonly used in the United Kingdom for primary and revision THA and much controversy still exists as to the ideal method of stem fixation. In this article we discuss revision of the femur using cemented components during revision THA. We focus on three clinical scenarios including femoral cement-in-cement revision where the primary femoral cement-bone interface remains well fixed, femoral cement-in-cement revision for peri-prosthetic femoral fractures, and femoral impaction grafting. We discuss the clinical indications, surgical techniques and clinical outcomes for each of these procedures. PMID:21165618

  19. Measuring femoral and rotational alignment: EOS system versus computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Folinais, D; Thelen, P; Delin, C; Radier, C; Catonne, Y; Lazennec, J Y

    2013-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the reference standard for measuring femoral and tibial rotational alignment. The EOS System is a new biplanar low-dose radiographic device that allows 3-dimensional lower-limb modelling with automated measurements of femoral and tibial rotational alignment (torsion). Femoral and tibial torsion measurements provided by the EOS System are equivalent to those obtained using CT. In a retrospective analysis of 43 lower limbs in 30 patients, three senior radiologists measured femoral and tibial torsion on both CT and EOS images. Agreement between CT and EOS values was assessed by computing Pearson's correlation coefficient and interobserver reproducibility by computing the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Femoral torsion was 13.4° by EOS vs. 13.7° by CT (P=0.5) and tibial torsion was 30.8° by EOS vs. 30.3° by CT (P=0.4). Strong associations were found between EOS and CT values for both femoral torsion (P=0.93) and tibial torsion (P=0.89). With EOS, the ICC was 0.93 for femoral torsion and 0.86 for tibial torsion; corresponding values with CT were 0.90 and 0.92. The EOS system is a valid alternative to CT for lower-limb torsion measurement. EOS imaging allows a comprehensive evaluation in all three planes while substantially decreasing patient radiation exposure. Level III, case-control. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Femoral neck fractures in osteogenesis imperfecta treated with bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Papanna, M. C.; Tafazal, S.; Bell, M. J.; Giles, S. N.; Fernandes, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a condition characterised by bone fragility and multiple fractures, which cause considerable morbidity in the affected patients. Most cases are associated with mutations in one of the type I collagen genes. Recently, bisphosponates have been used widely to reduce pain and the incidence of fragility fractures in OI in children, even though there have been concerns raised regarding the long-term complications of it due to their effect on the bone. The fragility fractures involving the neck of the femur in children with intramedullary rods in the femoral shaft are very difficult to treat. Although these fractures are frequently un-displaced, they require optimal internal fixation to achieve fracture union. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and radiological outcomes of OI patients with intracapsular femoral neck fracture treated with headless compression screws. Method and results At our institute, we identified seven patients (11 hips) with OI who underwent internal fixation with headless compression screws for a neck of femur fracture between June 2010 and Dec 2012. The time to fractures healing was on average 14 weeks (12 to 16). All patients gained their pre-injury ambulatory status. Conclusion It is very challenging and technically demanding for orthopaedic surgeons when treating the fragility fracture of the neck of femur in patients with intramedullary rod in the femoral shaft. The published data regarding the management of these complex conditions are very limited. We describe our experience with the technique of percutaneous headless compression screw fixation for treating the femoral neck fractures in OI patients. PMID:28828062

  1. Development of thermo-mechanical processing for fabricating highly durable β-type Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr rod for use in spinal fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kengo; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hieda, Junko; Oribe, Kazuya

    2012-05-01

    The mechanical strength of a beta titanium alloy such as Ti-Nb-Ta-Zr alloy (TNTZ) can be improved significantly by thermo-mechanical treatment. In this study, TNTZ was subjected to solution treatment, cold caliber rolling, and cold swaging before aging treatment to form a rod for spinal fixation. The {110}(β) are aligned parallel to the cross-section with two strong peaks approximately 180° apart, facing one another, in the TNTZ rods subjected to cold caliber rolling and six strong peaks at approximately 60° intervals, facing one another, in the TNTZ rods subjected to cold swaging. Therefore, the TNTZ rods subjected to cold swaging have a more uniform structure than those subjected to cold caliber rolling. The orientation relationship between the α and β phases is different. A [110](β)//[121](α), (112)(β)//(210)(α) orientation relationship is observed in the TNTZ rods subjected to aging treatment at 723 K after solution treatment and cold caliber rolling. On the other hand, a [110](β)//[001](α), (112)(β)//(200)(α) orientation relationship is observed in TNTZ rod subjected to aging treatment at 723 K after cold swaging. A high 0.2% proof stress of about 1200 MPa, high elongation of 18%, and high fatigue strength of 950 MPa indicate that aging treatment at 723 K after cold swaging is the optimal thermo-mechanical process for a TNTZ rod. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transpedicular vertebral body augmentation reinforced with pedicle screw fixation in fresh traumatic A2 and A3 lumbar fractures: comparison between two devices and two bone cements.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective study compares efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty (BK) with calcium phosphate (Group A) versus KIVA implant with PMMA (Group B) reinforced with three vertebrae pedicle screw constructs for A2 and A3 single fresh non-osteoporotic lumbar (L1-L4) fractures in 38 consecutive age- and diagnosis-matched patient populations. Extracanal leakage of both low-viscosity PMMA and calcium phosphate (CP) as well as the following roentgenographic parameters: segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior (PVBHr) vertebral body height ratio, spinal canal encroachment (SCE) clearance, and functional outcome measures: VAS and SF-36, were recorded and compared between the two groups. All patients in both groups were followed for a minimum 26 (Group A) and 25 (Group B) months. Extracanal CP and PMMA leakage was observed in four (18 %) and three (15 %) vertebrae/patients of group A and B, respectively. Hybrid fixation improved AVBHr, SKA, SCE, but PVBHr only in group B. VAS and SF-36 improved postoperatively in the patients of both groups. Short-segment construct with the novel KIVA implant restored better than BK-fractured lumbar vertebral body, but this had no impact in functional outcome. Since there was no leakage difference between PMMA and calcium phosphate and no short-term adverse related to PMMA use were observed, we advice the use of PMMA in fresh traumatic lumbar fractures.

  3. A biomechanical study on fixation stability with twin hook or lag screw in artificial cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Olsson, O; Tanner, K E; Ceder, L; Ryd, L

    2002-01-01

    The twin hook has been developed as an alternative to the conventional lag screw to be combined with a barrelled side-plate in the treatment of trochanteric hip fractures. With two oppositely directed apical hooks introduced into the subchondral bone of the femoral head, the twin hook provides different stabilising properties to the lag screw. The femoral head purchase of the twin hook and the lag screw were compared in a biomechanical study using artificial cancellous bone, and responses to axial and torsional loading was determined. A distinct yield point in load and torque was noted for the lag screw, representing failure of the laminas supporting the threads. For the twin hook, gradual increase of load and torque occurred during impaction of the bone supporting the hooks. The peak loads and torques were higher for the lag screw, but were similar for both devices after 8 mm deformation. The stiffness was higher for the lag screw, but in counter-clockwise rotation the stiffness for the lag screw was negligible. The twin hook appeared to provide fixation stability comparable to that offered by the lag screw, but with conceivable advantages in terms of a deformation response involving bone impaction and gradually increasing stability.

  4. Is reconstruction nailing of all femoral shaft fractures cost effective? A decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Faucett, Scott C; Collinge, Cory A; Koval, Kenneth J

    2012-11-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are usually treated with anterograde or retrograde nails that typically do not provide femoral neck fixation. Ipsilateral femoral neck fractures occur with 2.5%-10% of femoral shaft fractures; 19%-55% of associated femoral neck fractures are missed with plain films and 5%-22% with computed tomography (CT). This study was performed to determine if routine reconstruction nailing of all femoral shaft fractures with or without occult femoral neck fractures is cost effective. A decision tree model examined the cost effectiveness of reconstruction nailing over standard intramedullary nailing for all femoral shaft fractures in which an associated femoral neck fracture was not identified on plain radiographs. As a base model, we assumed that 5% of shaft fractures had an ipsilateral femoral neck fracture, and 37% were missed and required further surgery. We assigned a small morbidity and additional cost ($680) for the use of a reconstruction nail and 2 screws. Model inputs including costs, clinical outcome probabilities, and health utilities were derived from the literature, estimated from institutional data, or assumed by the authors. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of the rate of associated femoral neck fracture, the rate of missed femoral neck fracture, the complication rate of reconstruction screws, the cost of the extra reconstruction screws, and the utilities of each outcome on the incremental cost effectiveness (ICER) of both strategies. Current practice in cost-effectiveness analysis uses a threshold of $100,000 per quality-adjusted life year gained as cost effective. A secondary analysis of the use CT scans to reduce missed femoral neck fractures was also performed. The base model showed that the placement of reconstruction nails in all isolated femur fractures was not cost effective. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the ICER was most sensitive to the cost of the reconstruction nail, hemiarthroplasty, and a missed femoral

  5. Surgical treatment of femoral bending deformity in a patient with vitamin D-resistant rickets.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Thalhammer, Gerhild; Vecsei, Vilmos; Wozasek, Gerald E

    2005-10-01

    Surgical treatment of patients with vitamin D-resistant rickets is reserved for management of severe deformities or pathological fractures of the lower limbs. This case report describes the operative management of a child with vitamin D-resistant rickets suffering from a pathological fracture and a bending deformity of the right femoral bone. A modified technique of fragmentation and realignment by intramedullary fixation was performed using an unreamed humerus nail. We corrected the anatomical proximal femoral shaft angle (aMPFA) from 68 degrees to 84 degrees and achieved three more centimetres of femoral length. The same procedure was performed on the left femur and corrected the aMPFA from 108 degrees to 89 degrees and gained 2.5 more centimetres of femoral length. Thus the legs were almost equal in length. We preferred the modified technique of multiple osteotomies and intramedullary fixation by nailing (originally described by Sofield and Millar) because the correction of angulation and rotation of the femoral shaft in one step appeared to be much easier than with plate fixation. Moreover, this method seems to reduce the number of refractures and enables the patients to approach the normal activities of growing children.

  6. Hemi-arthroplasty of the hip followed by ipsilateral fracture of the femoral shaft.

    PubMed

    Barfod, G; Steen Jensen, J; Hansen, D; Larsen, E; Menck, H; Olsen, B; Rosenklint, A

    1986-03-01

    In a series of 74 ipsilateral fractures of the femoral shaft in relation to hemi-arthroplasties, treatment by a cemented long-stem total hip replacement was found to be superior to conservative treatment or internal fixation without removal of the prosthesis. Acceptable clinical results were obtained in 89 per cent of these cases.

  7. Simultaneous Bilateral Fracture of Femoral Neck in Korea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hwa-Jae; Shin, Hun-Kyu; Kim, Eugene; Ko, Taeg Su; Choi, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral femoral neck factures are common and their incidence is increasing. However, simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures are rare. Although cases of simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures have been reported, most were caused by strong muscle contractions during electroconvulsive therapy. Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures caused by a simple fall are an extremely rare injury; therefore, limited literature is available, and no case has been reported in Korea. We report herein a case of simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures caused by a simple fall. An 83-year-old woman visited the emergency department with bilateral hip joint pain and gait disturbance, which developed 1 day after a fall. Tenderness and severe limitation in left hip joint range of motion and mild limitation in right hip joint range of motion were observed on a physical examination. A Garden type IV femoral neck fracture in the left hip joint and a Garden type I femoral neck fracture in the right hip joint were observed on plain radiography. She underwent right screw fixation and left bipolar hemiarthroplasty 2 days after admission. The patient could walk using a walker 4 weeks postoperatively. Bone union in the right femoral neck was observed at the 3 month follow-up. No specific findings were observed at the left hip hemiarthroplasty site. PMID:27536603

  8. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  9. Tunnel widening after hamstring anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is influenced by the type of graft fixation used: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Fauno, Peter; Kaalund, Søren

    2005-11-01

    To compare the incidence of tunnel widening (TW) in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with hamstring graft using either (group A) transfemoral fixation implant (Transfix; Arthrex, Naples, FL) and an interference screw (Arthrex) in the tibial tunnel or (group B) extracortical fixation (EndoButton; Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) in the femur and bicortical screw and washer distal to the tibial tunnel. Prospective randomized study. One hundred patients were included and randomized and 87 patients were assessed at a 1-year follow-up. The evaluation included standardized radiographs, KT-1000 data, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) ratings, and Lysholm score. The diameter of the tunnel at the 1 year follow-up was, after correction for magnification, compared with the tunnel diameter of the radiograph from 2 weeks postoperatively. A more than 2-mm enlargement was considered TW. In group A in which transfixation in the femur and interference screw in the tibia was used, 7 of 41 patients had developed femoral TW and 5 of 41 tibial TW. In group B, 20 of 46 patients had TW in the femur and 16 of 46 in the tibia (P < .05, chi-square test). No significant difference was found with respect to Lysholm score, IKDC, or arthrometric evaluation. There was a significant reduction of TW in both the femur and the tibia using fixation points close to the joint, compared with the system where the distance between the fixation points is long. We conclude that the position of the fixation sites and type of fixation device are major factors in the development of TW after ACL surgery. Level I, therapeutic study in a prospective randomized clinical trial.

  10. Finite element analysis of posterior cervical fixation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y; Wang, H H; Jin, A M; Zhang, L; Min, S X; Liu, C L; Qiu, S J; Shu, X Q

    2015-02-01

    Despite largely, used in the past, biomechanical test, to investigate the fixation techniques of subaxial cervical spine, information is lacking about the internal structural response to external loading. It is not yet clear which technique represents the best choice and whether stabilization devices can be efficient and beneficial for three-column injuries (TCI). The different posterior cervical fixation techniques (pedicle screw PS, lateral mass screw LS, and transarticular screw TS) have respective indications. A detailed, geometrically accurate, nonlinear C3-C7 finite element model (FEM) had been successfully developed and validated. Then three FEMs were reconstructed from different fixation techniques after C4-C6 TCI. A compressive preload of 74N combined with a pure moment of 1.8 Nm in flexion, extension, left-right lateral bending, and left-right axial rotation was applied to the FEMs. The ROM results showed that there were obvious significant differences when comparing the different fixation techniques. PS and TS techniques can provide better immediate stabilization, compared to LS technique. The stress results showed that the variability of von Mises stress in the TS fixation device was minimum and LS fixation device was maximum. Furthermore, the screws inserted by TS technique had high stress concentration at the middle part of the screws. Screw inserted by PS and LS techniques had higher stress concentration at the actual cap-rod-screw interface. The research considers that spinal surgeon should first consider using the TS technique to treat cervical TCI. If PS technique is used, we should eventually prolong the need for external bracing in order to reduce the higher risk of fracture on fixation devices. If LS technique is used, we should add anterior cervical operation for acquire a better immediate stabilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. A systematic review on dynamic versus static distal tibiofibular fixation.

    PubMed

    Inge, S Y; Pull Ter Gunne, A F; Aarts, C A M; Bemelman, M

    2016-12-01

    In the last couple of years dynamic fixation for syndesmosis injuries, using a suture-button technique, raised more interest due to its advantages over the static fixation. In the current systematic review suture-button fixation is compared to the traditionally applied static fixation in unstable ankle fractures accompanied with distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury, including the functional outcome, post-operative complications, reoperation rate, recurrent diastasis and financial aspects. A computerized literature search using PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted in search of suitable articles between January 2006 and February 2016. A total of 4 suture-button studies, 5 suture-button vs. static fixation studies and 1 study discussing the financial aspects were identified. The AOFAS of 104 patients treated with the suture-button device was 91.08 points with an average study-follow up of 24.85 months. The AOFAS of 106 patients treated with a static fixation device was 87.95 with an average follow-up of 24.78 months. Removal of the suture-button device was reported in 10.5% of 229 patients and removal of the screws in 38.5%. Dynamic fixation demonstrated to be a viable alternative to the static fixation device, with lower reoperation rates and less complications. They can accurately stabilize the ruptured syndesmosis without device breakage or loss of reduction. 1A economic/decision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prosthesis. 888.3570 Section 888.3570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, intended to...

  17. Outcomes of Internal Fixation in a Combat Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    A variety of internal fixation procedures were performed to include 44 plate and/or screw (88%), four intramedullary nail (8%), and two tension band...that underwent intramedullary nailing at an Air Force Theater Hospital in Balad, Iraq. Two-thirds of the patients had high-energy ballistic injuries...JOURNAL OF SURGICAL ORTHOPAEDIC ADVANCES 5. Keeney, J. A., Ingari, J. V., Mentzer, K. D., et al. Closed intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures

  18. A new uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated femoral component for the treatment of femoral neck fractures: two-year radiostereometric and bone densitometric evaluation in 50 hips.

    PubMed

    Sköldenberg, O G; Salemyr, M O; Bodén, H S; Lundberg, A; Ahl, T E; Adolphson, P Y

    2011-05-01

    Our aim in this pilot study was to evaluate the fixation of, the bone remodelling around, and the clinical outcome after surgery of a new, uncemented, fully hydroxyapatite-coated, collared and tapered femoral component, designed specifically for elderly patients with a fracture of the femoral neck. We enrolled 50 patients, of at least 70 years of age, with an acute displaced fracture of the femoral neck in this prospective single-series study. They received a total hip replacement using the new component and were followed up regularly for two years. Fixation was evaluated by radiostereometric analysis and bone remodelling by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Hip function and the health-related quality of life were assessed using the Harris hip score and the EuroQol-5D. Up to six weeks post-operatively there was a mean subsidence of 0.2 mm (-2.1 to +0.5) and a retroversion of a mean of 1.2° (-8.2° to +1.5°). No component migrated after three months. The patients had a continuous loss of peri-prosthetic bone which amounted to a mean of 16% (-49% to +10%) at two years. The mean Harris hip score was 82 (51 to 100) after two years. The two-year results from this pilot study indicate that this new, uncemented femoral component can be used for elderly patients with osteoporotic fractures of the femoral neck.

  19. In vitro and in vivo studies on the degradation of high-purity Mg (99.99wt.%) screw with femoral intracondylar fractured rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Han, Pei; Cheng, Pengfei; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Changli; Ni, Jiahua; Zhang, Yuanzhuang; Zhong, Wanrun; Hou, Peng; Zhang, Xiaonong; Zheng, Yufeng; Chai, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    High-purity magnesium (HP Mg) takes advantage in no alloying toxic elements and slower degradation rate in lack of second phases and micro-galvanic corrosion. In this study, as rolled HP Mg was fabricated into screws and went through in vitro immersion tests, cytotoxicity test and bioactive analysis. The HP Mg screws performed uniform corrosion behavior in vitro, and its extraction promoted cell viability, bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation related gene, i.e. ALP, osteopontin (OPN) and RUNX2 of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Then HP Mg screws were implanted in vivo as load-bearing implant to fix bone fracture and subsequently gross observation, range of motion (ROM), X-ray scanning, qualitative micro-computed tomography (μCT) analysis, histological analysis, bending-force test and SEM morphology of retrieved screws were performed respectively at 4, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. As a result, the retrieved HP Mg screws in fixation of rabbit femoral intracondylar fracture showed uniform degradation morphology and enough bending force. However, part of PLLA screws was broken in bolt, although its screw thread was still intact. Good osseointegration was revealed surrounding HP Mg screws and increased bone volume and bone mineral density were detected at fracture gap, indicating the rigid fixation and enhanced fracture healing process provided by HP Mg screws. Consequently, the HP Mg showed great potential as internal fixation devices in intra-articular fracture operation.

  20. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, especially the differences to laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia are discussed in this article. PMID:27826574

  1. Mouse tissue fixation.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Miller, Claramae H; Munn, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    One of the primary goals of fixation is to stop postmortem changes that degrade the tissue and allow optimal preservation of morphologic and cytological detail as well as nucleic acid integrity. Following death, tissues soon undergo autolysis, and if organisms from the gastrointestinal, urinary, or respiratory tracts are present, their colonization can soon cause putrefaction. Time is of the essence because warmer temperatures accelerate both types of degradation. Placing the tissue into a fixative stops the postmortem changes. Fixatives have their effect on tissue by cross-linking, coagulation, or a combination of both. This article outlines the basic tissue fixation procedure and offers guidance on choosing an appropriate fixative, the timing and duration of fixation, sample storage, and quality issues.

  2. Investigation of a hybrid method of soft tissue graft fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony G; Otto, David D; Raso, V James; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2005-04-01

    To increase knee stability following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, development of increasingly stronger and stiffer fixation is required. This study assessed the initial pullout force, stiffness of fixation, and failure modes for a novel hybrid fixation method combining periosteal and direct fixation using porcine femoral bone. A soft tissue graft was secured by combining both an interference screw and an EndoButton (Smith and Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA). The results were compared with the traditional direct fixation method using a titanium interference screw. Twenty porcine hindlimbs were divided into two groups. Specimens were loaded in line with the bone tunnel on a materials testing machine. Maximum pullout force of the hybrid fixation (588+/-37 N) was significantly greater than with an interference screw alone (516+/-37 N). The stiffness of the hybrid fixation (52.1+/-12.8 N/mm) was similar to that of screw fixation (56.5+/-10.2 N/mm). Graft pullout was predominant for screw fixation, whereas a combination of graft pullout and graft failure was seen for hybrid fixation. These results indicate that initial pullout force of soft tissue grafts can be increased by using the suggested novel hybrid fixation method.

  3. Lateral Femoral Epicondylar Osteotomy: An Extensile Posterolateral Knee Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Open exposure of the posterolateral corner of the knee is challenged by limitations of posterolateral ligamentous tissues and posterior neurovascular structures. We have used a modification of a lateral femoral epicondyle osteotomy, described historically for surgical management of posterolateral rotatory instability, as an approach to the posterolateral intraarticular structures. The historic technique for ligamentous reconstruction has been abandoned because its nonanatomic fixation does not restore ligamentous isometry. In this report, osteotomy of a bone block from the lateral femoral epicondyle is used to access the joint space. The lateral collateral ligament is reflected distally and posteriorly through traction on the block. Once the intraarticular disorder has been addressed, the lateral femoral epicondyle is secured in its native, anatomic position, thereby restoring isometry and normal joint mechanics after surgery. This technique has been used successfully to address posterolateral articular disorders on femoral and tibial sides. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging verified restoration of lateral collateral ligament anatomy. Physical examination at 0° and 30° knee flexion showed clinical stability at all postoperative evaluations through 6 and 10 months followup. Using this technique, intraarticular disorders at the posterolateral corner may be addressed in an open manner with anatomic reduction and preserved postoperative function of the lateral collateral ligament. Level of Evidence: Level V, expert opinion. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18373126

  4. Distal Femoral Oblique Fracture in a Young Male Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David Naji; Al Khateeb, Hesham; Safwat, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Here, we report a case of a distal femoral fracture in a 23-year-old male army cadet who presented to the Accident and Emergency department following a twisting injury while participating in a routine military marching exercise. A pathological fracture was considered but this suspicion was put to rest following thorough investigations, leaving only a diagnosis of a nontraumatic spontaneous femoral fracture. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of distal femoral fractures associated with nontraumatic military exercises, with the majority of injuries instead related to stress fractures. A vigilant literature search yielded no cases of similar injury nature, which is the primary reason we believe that those interested in orthopaedics or military doctors would find themselves drawn to this case. The patient presented with severe pain in his left thigh and on examination there was a deformity of his left thigh. In terms of investigations, a bone profile, plain film radiographs, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and tumor markers were all preformed and proved unremarkable. The definitive treatment was by open reduction and internal fixation. Femoral fractures often require significant amounts of force, particularly in young, healthy individuals. Generally, these injuries in this demographic follow high-energy traumas, with the lion's share occurring following a road traffic accident or other high-speed impact. More often than not, the treatment is surgical. Given the extraordinary manner of this such, one must be attentive and exhaustive in their investigation of such presentations. PMID:27258509

  5. Algorithm for the management of femoral shaft fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Sanzarello, I; Calamoneri, E; D'Andrea, L; Rosa, M A

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric closed femoral shaft fractures are commonly related to a good prognosis. There is no consensus on treatment. We aimed to evaluate the treatment, features, radiological findings and management strategies, creating an algorithm of treatment. Fifty-two simple femoral shaft fractures in children were retrospectively evaluated for age and gender distribution, side of the fracture, etiology of injuries, limb length discrepancy, range of knee and hip motion and parents satisfaction with a mean clinical and radiographic follow-up of 3 years and 6 months. Twenty-eight patients were treated with reduction and early hip spica cast while 24 patients were treated with external fixation (EF). Nearly 58 % of the cases were caused by traffic accidents and were predominantly male (61.5 %). Most of the fractures were of the middle femoral shaft (57.6 %). Muscle strength was normal (MRC scale) in all patients with no pain (NIPS and PRS scale). Knee and Hip range of motion were similar in both types of treatment. Patients treated with EF had shorter limb length discrepancy compared with SC. There were no reports of re-fracture. We found a higher familiar satisfaction in patients treated with EF. An algorithm for the management of femoral shaft fractures in the pediatric population is proposed. Results on the study population gave raise to a satisfactory clinical and radiological results.

  6. A Case of Femoral Fracture in Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Sam; Wong, Fabian; Back, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) who presented with severe bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Preoperative planning was commenced for a total knee replacement (TKR). Whilst on the waiting list the patient suffered a fall and sustained a complete femoral diaphysis fracture. Conservative management in the form of skin traction was initially chosen as significant extra- and intramedullary vascular malformations posed an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. This failed to progress to union, and so open reduction and internal fixation was performed. This subsequently resulted in on-going delayed union, which was subsequently managed with low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS, otherwise known as Exogen (Bioventus. exogen. Secondary exogen, 2012)). There are only two previous documented cases of femoral fracture in KTS. This is the first report of a patient with this rare syndrome receiving this treatment. We discuss the management of fracture in this challenging group of patients. PMID:25478269

  7. Mycotic femoral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard Scott; Bennett, Kenneth R

    2007-05-01

    After several weeks of fever and chills, a 31-year-old logger developed pain in his right thigh. Upon examination a tender, pulsating upper thigh mass was found with a long loud bruit arising from it. Severe aortic insufficiency was present; however, blood cultures were negative. An angiogram, captured blood with contrast spewing from the profunda femoral artery to fill a 5 x 10 cm sac. A false aneurysm was diagnosed and resected; numerous gram positive cocci were present in cut sections, but cultures from the cavity grew the gram negative bacteria Salmonella and Alcaligenes. After one month of intravenous ampicillin the aortic valve was replaced after being destroyed by endocarditis. Ampicillin was continued and recovery was uneventful. Mycotic aneurysms are commonly caused by Salmonella (10%), which was second only to Staphylococcus (30%). The femoral artery accounts for 38% of all mycotic aneurysms. They typically present with a pulsatile mass (52%), bruit (50%), and fever (48%). This diagnosis can be supported by leukocytosis (64-71%), positive blood cultures (50-85%), and a history of arterial trauma (51%) (injection drug use, intravascular procedure, or trauma) or endocarditis (10%).

  8. Muscle strength and knee range of motion after femoral lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Woelber, Erik; Apelyan, Arman; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Femoral lengthening may result in decrease in knee range of motion (ROM) and quadriceps and hamstring muscle weakness. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative knee ROM, hamstring muscle strength, and quadriceps muscle strength in a diverse group of patients undergoing femoral lengthening. We hypothesized that lengthening would not result in a significant change in knee ROM or muscle strength. Patients and methods This prospective study of 48 patients (mean age 27 (9–60) years) compared ROM and muscle strength before and after femoral lengthening. Patient age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, level of osteotomy, fixation time, and method of lengthening were also evaluated regarding knee ROM and strength. The average length of follow-up was 2.9 (2.0–4.7) years. Results Mean amount of lengthening was 5.2 (2.4–11.0) cm. The difference between preoperative and final knee flexion ROM was 2° for the overall group. Congenital shortening cases lost an average of 5% or 6° of terminal knee flexion, developmental cases lost an average of 3% or 4°, and posttraumatic cases regained all motion. The difference in quadriceps strength at 45° preoperatively and after lengthening was not statistically or clinically significant (2.7 Nm; p = 0.06). Age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, osteotomy level, fixation time, and lengthening method had no statistically significant influence on knee ROM or quadriceps strength at final follow-up. Interpretation Most variables had no effect on ROM or strength, and higher age did not appear to be a limiting factor for femoral lengthening. Patients with congenital causes were most affected in terms of knee flexion. PMID:27892743

  9. External skeletal fixation of fractures in cattle.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Susan R; Anderson, David E

    2014-03-01

    External skeletal fixation (ESF) is a versatile method for rigid immobilization of long bone fractures in cattle. Traditional ESF devices may be used in young calves for clinical management of open fractures. Transfixation pinning and casting is an adaptation of ESF principles to improve versatility and clinical management of selected fractures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Femoral lengthening in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pejin, Z

    2017-02-01

    Current lengthening techniques are still based on the Ilizarov method and the concept of callotasis. Research and progress in medical devices have led to constant improvement in results. Hexapod fixators allow more precise correction of complex deformities, with shorter learning curve. Associating lengthening by external fixation (EF) to internal fixation (K-wire, intramedullary nail or locking plate) has reduced EF times and complications rates, while improving anatomic and functional results. Lengthening nails provides faster recovery of range of motion and return to activity during lengthening and consolidation, with better psychological tolerance. Lengthening with deformity correction by retrograde nailing has no impact on consolidation. Monolateral EF is a reliable and easy-to-implement technique that is well tolerated by patients. Association to internal fixation gives promising results. Bone healing solidity assessment on plain X-ray is highly subjective, with wide inter- and intra-observer variation; bone mineralization is better assessed in terms of pixel-value ratio (PVR: ratio of pixel value of regenerate to adjacent bone) on picture archiving and communication system (PACS) digitized radiographs, providing objective assessment of callus solidity.

  11. Percutaneous external fixator pins with bactericidal micron-thin sol-gel films for the prevention of pin tract infection.

    PubMed

    Qu, Haibo; Knabe, Christine; Radin, Shula; Garino, Jonathan; Ducheyne, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Risk of infection is considerable in open fractures, especially when fracture fixation devices are used to stabilize the fractured bones. Overall deep infection rates of 16.2% have been reported. The infection rate is even greater, up to 32.2%, with external fixation of femoral fractures. The use of percutaneous implants for certain clinical applications, such as percutaneous implants for external fracture fixation, still represents a challenge today. Currently, bone infections are very difficult to treat. Very potent antibiotics are needed, which creates the risk of irreversible damage to other organs, when the antibiotics are administered systemically. As such, controlled, local release is being pursued, but no such treatments are in clinical use. Herein, the use of bactericidal micron-thin sol-gel films on metallic fracture fixation pins is reported. The data demonstrates that triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenylether), an antimicrobial agent, can be successfully incorporated into micron-thin sol-gel films deposited on percutaneous pins. The sol-gel films continuously release triclosan in vitro for durations exceeding 8 weeks (longest measured time point). The bactericidal effect of the micron-thin sol-gel films follows from both in vitro and in vivo studies. Inserting percutaneous pins in distal rabbit tibiae, there were no signs of infection around implants coated with a micron-thin sol-gel/triclosan film. Healing had progressed normally, bone tissue growth was normal and there was no epithelial downgrowth. This result was in contrast with the results in rabbits that received control, uncoated percutaneous pins, in which abundant signs of infection and epithelial downgrowth were observed. Thus, well-adherent, micron-thin sol-gel films laden with a bactericidal molecule successfully prevented pin tract infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tunnel widening after ACL reconstruction with aperture screw fixation or all-inside reconstruction with suspensory cortical button fixation: Volumetric measurements on CT and MRI scans.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Raul; Smekal, Vinzenz; Koidl, Christian; Coppola, Christian; Fritz, Josef; Rudisch, Ansgar; Kranewitter, Christof; Attal, René

    2017-10-01

    Tunnel widening after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is influenced by the surgical and fixation techniques used. Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate image modality for assessing tunnel widening, but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might also be reliable for tunnel volume measurements. In the present study tunnel widening after ACLR using biodegradable interference screw fixation was compared with all-inside ACLR using button fixation, with tunnel volume changes being measured on CT and MRI scans. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Thirty-three patients were randomly assigned to hamstring ACLR using a biodegradable interference screw or all-inside cortical button fixation. CT and MRI scanning were done at the time of surgery and six months after. Tunnel volume changes were calculated and compared. On CT, femoral tunnel volumes changed from the postoperative state (100%) to 119.8% with screw fixation and 143.2% with button fixation (P=0.023). The changes in tibial tunnel volumes were not significant (113.9% vs. 117.7%). The changes in bone tunnel volume measured on MRI were comparable with those on CT only for tunnels with interference screws. Tibial tunnels with button fixation were significantly underestimated on MRI scanning (P=0.018). All-inside ACLR using cortical button fixation results in increased femoral tunnel widening in comparison with ACLR with biodegradable interference screw fixation. MRI represents a reliable imaging modality for future studies investigating tunnel widening with interference screw fixation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fixation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Fixation and regression were considered complementary by Freud. You tend to regress to a point of fixation. They are both opposed to progression. In the general area, Anna Freud has written (The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence. London: Hogarth and the Psycho-Analytic Institute, 1937), Sears has evaluated (Survey of Objective Studies of…

  14. Endovascular cerebral protection and revascularization of innominate artery stenosis through single-site access, with device entrapment and rescue: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Gordhan, Ajeet

    2013-07-01

    We describe a novel technique for cerebral embolic device placement with inadvertent entrapment and subsequent rescue in the endovascular treatment of innominate artery stenosis. A 62-year-old female presented with symptomatic right-sided subclavian steal syndrome. Single-site access for revascularization of critical innominate artery stenosis with simultaneous cerebral embolic protection performed for this diagnosis has not been previously reported. Initial nontarget self-expanding stent deployment within the right subclavian artery resulted in entrapment of the embolic protection device. The device was retrieved through snare fixation and resheathing within a 6-French guide catheter navigated through common femoral artery access. Innominate artery balloon-mounted stent angioplasty was performed preceded by the embolic device retrieval, with complete resolution of symptoms. Endovascular distal protection device placement for prevention of cerebral atherothromboembolism during innominate artery stent angioplasty is not without risk and utilization needs to be carefully considered. Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  15. Clinical and Radiological Outcomes After Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions: Comparison Between Fixed-Loop and Adjustable-Loop Cortical Suspension Devices.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nam-Hong; Yang, Bong-Seok; Victoroff, Brian N

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have compared clinical and radiological outcomes after hamstring anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with fixed-loop and adjustable-loop cortical suspension devices. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare clinical outcomes and tunnel widening after hamstring ACL reconstructions with fixed- and adjustable-loop cortical suspension devices. The hypothesis was that compared with femoral graft fixation with the fixed-loop device, fixation with the adjustable-loop device would show similar clinical outcomes and would result in less tunnel widening after hamstring ACL reconstruction. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 117 consecutive patients underwent hamstring ACL reconstruction at a single institution. The fixed-loop cortical suspension device was used in 67 patients, and the adjustable-loop cortical suspension device was used in 50 patients. All patients were observed for a minimum of 2 years. Postoperative knee laxity was evaluated with the Lachman test, pivot-shift test, and KT-1000 arthrometer. Functional evaluations were performed by use of the Lysholm score and the Tegner activity scale. On anteroposterior (AP) and lateral radiographs, the measured diameters of the femoral tunnel at 1 year after surgery were compared with the diameter of the reamer used at surgery. The measured diameters of the tibial tunnel at 1 year after surgery were compared with those taken immediately after surgery. The mean KT-1000 arthrometer laxity measurement was 1.5 ± 1.8 mm in the fixed-loop group and 1.2 ± 2.3 mm in the adjustable-loop group ( P = .530). Results of postoperative knee laxity evaluations and functional outcomes from both groups showed no statistically significant differences. However, the fixed-loop group showed significantly better stability in the pivot-shift test than did the adjustable-loop group ( P = .018). On AP radiographs, the mean diameter of the femoral and tibial tunnels increased by

  16. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation....3030 Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories. (a) Identification. Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories are devices intended to be...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation....3030 Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories. (a) Identification. Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories are devices intended to be...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation....3030 Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories. (a) Identification. Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories are devices intended to be...

  19. Coronal plane partial articular fractures of the distal femoral condyle: current concepts in management.

    PubMed

    Arastu, M H; Kokke, M C; Duffy, P J; Korley, R E C; Buckley, R E

    2013-09-01

    Coronal plane fractures of the posterior femoral condyle, also known as Hoffa fractures, are rare. Lateral fractures are three times more common than medial fractures, although the reason for this is not clear. The exact mechanism of injury is likely to be a vertical shear force on the posterior femoral condyle with varying degrees of knee flexion. These fractures are commonly associated with high-energy trauma and are a diagnostic and surgical challenge. Hoffa fractures are often associated with inter- or supracondylar distal femoral fractures and CT scans are useful in delineating the coronal shear component, which can easily be missed. There are few recommendations in the literature regarding the surgical approach and methods of fixation that may be used for this injury. Non-operative treatment has been associated with poor outcomes. The goals of treatment are anatomical reduction of the articular surface with rigid, stable fixation to allow early mobilisation in order to restore function. A surgical approach that allows access to the posterior aspect of the femoral condyle is described and the use of postero-anterior lag screws with or without an additional buttress plate for fixation of these difficult fractures.

  20. Backout of the helical blade of proximal femoral nail antirotation and accompanying fracture nonunion.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Takahiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Fukui, Tomoaki; Kawakami, Yohei; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2012-08-01

    This article describes a case of backout of the helical blade, a rare complication of proximal femoral nail antirotation. A 31-year-old man had sustained a trochanteric fracture of his right femur. Fracture fixation using proximal femoral nail antirotation and autologous bone grafting 7 months later were performed at another hospital. However, bony union was not obtained, and the patient's pain and limp persisted. Therefore, he presented to the current authors. A radiograph taken at presentation revealed backout of the helical blade and fracture nonunion. A radiograph taken 1 month later showed a more advanced backout of the helical blade. The authors performed exchange nailing supplemented with transplantation of peripheral blood CD34-positive cells and autologous bone grafting. The proximal femoral nail antirotation was revised to a long gamma 3 nail, and a U-lag screw was used to obtain better stability. The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient regained ambulation without pain or support at 12 weeks postoperatively. Radiographic bony union was completed 9 months postoperatively. At 1-year follow-up, he could run and stand on the previously injured leg and had returned to work. Backout of the helical blade should be considered as a possible complication of proximal femoral nail antirotation. Incomplete fixation of the helical blade is the possible reason for backout. The use of a helical blade in young patients may cause difficulty in insertion and result in incomplete fixation.

  1. Removal of a broken guide wire entrapped in a fractured femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-hua; Ye, Tian-wen; Guo, Yong-fei; Wang, Chong-li; Chen, Ai-min

    2013-01-01

    Guide wire plays an important role in the fixation of femoral neck fracture with dynamic hip screw (DHS). Breakage of a guide wire during operation is a very rare condition. We met such a dilemma in DHS fixation of a 54-year-old male patient who sustained Garden type IV fracture of the right femoral neck. The distal end of the guide wire broke and was entrapped in the fractured femoral neck. We tried to get the broken part out by a cannulated drill. Reaming was started with the cannulated drill slowly rotating around the guide K-wire until the reamer fully contained the target under fluoroscope. A bone curette was used to get the broken wire out but failed, so we had to use the cannuated drill to dredge this bone tunnel. Finally the broken wire end was taken out, mixed with blood and bone fragments. Through the existing drilling channel, DHS fixation was easily finished. The patient had an uneventful recovery without avascular necrosis of femoral head or non-union of the fracture at one year's follow-up. A few methods can be adopted to deal with the broken guide wire. The way used in our case is less invasive but technically challenging. When the guide wire is properly positioned, this method is very practical and useful.

  2. Biomechanical analysis of a novel femoral neck locking plate for treatment of vertical shear Pauwel's type C femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Nowotarski, Peter J; Ervin, Bain; Weatherby, Brian; Pettit, Jonathan; Goulet, Ron; Norris, Brent

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the biomechanical stability of a novel prototype femoral neck locking plate (FNLP) for treatment of Pauwels type C femoral neck fractures compared with other current fixation methods. Forty femur sawbones were divided into groups and a vertical femoral neck fracture was made. Each group was repaired with one of the following: (CS) three parallel cancellous screws; (XCS) two cancellous lag screws into the head and one transverse lag screw into the calcar; and (FNLP) a novel FNLP with two 5.7 mm locking, one lag screw into the calcar and two screws into the shaft; and (AMBI) a two-hole, 135° AMBI plate with a derotation screw. All groups were tested for change in axial stiffness over 20000 cycles, and rotational stiffness was measured before and after cyclic testing. A maximum load to failure test was also conducted. Results were compared with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher protected least significant difference (PLSD). Results for axial stiffness show that AMBI, CS, XCS and FNLP are 2779.0, 2207.2, 3029.9 and 3210.7 N-m mm(-1), respectively. Rotational rigidity results are 4.5, 4.1, 17.1 and 18.7 N-m mm(-1). The average cyclic displacements were 0.75, 0.88, 0.80 and 0.65 mm, respectively. Destructive failure loads for AMBI, CS, XCS and FNLP were 2.3, 1.7, 1.6 and 1.9 kN, respectively. The results of this experiment show statistically significant increases in axial stiffness for the FNLP compared with three traditional fixation methods. The FNLP demonstrates increased mechanical stiffness and combines the desirable features of current fixation methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Guide to radiation fixatives

    SciTech Connect

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.

    1983-11-01

    This report identifies and then characterizes a variety of substances available in the market place for potential effectiveness as a fixative on radiologically contaminated surfaces. The substances include both generic chemicals and proprietary products. In selecting a fixative for a particular application, several attributes of the fixative may be relevant to the choice. These attributes include: toxicity, durability, and cleanliness and removability. In addition to the attributes of the fixative, one should also take into account certain characteristics of the site to be treated. These characteristics relate to climate, nature of the surface, use to which the treated surface will be put, subsequent cleanup operations, and type of neighboring surfaces. Finally, costs and potential environmental effects may influence the decision. A variety of fixatives are evaluated with respect to these various attributes and summarized in a reference table.

  4. Cell fixatives for immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Fixation is one of the most critical steps in immunostaining. The object of fixation is to achieve good morphological preservation, while at the same time preserving antigenicity. Tissue blocks, sections, cell cultures or smears are usually immersed in a fixative solution, while in other situations, whole body perfusion of experimental animals is preferable. Fixation can be accomplished by either chemical or physical methods. The chemical methods include cross-linking agents such as formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and succinimide esters as well as solvents such as acetone and methanol, which precipitate proteins. Of the physical methods, freezing tissue and air drying are most widely used. This chapter deals with the chemical fixation methods most commonly used for light microscopy.

  5. Access and Hemostasis: Femoral and Popliteal Approaches and Closure Devices—Why, What, When, and How?

    PubMed Central

    Barbetta, Iacopo; van den Berg, Jos C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the arterial access sites used in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, including common femoral, superficial femoral, and popliteal arterial puncture. The optimal approach and techniques for arterial puncture will be described and technical tips and tricks will be discussed. An overview of the currently available vascular closure devices will also be presented. Indications, contraindications, and complications will be discussed. Results of the use of vascular closure devices compared with manual compression will be presented. PMID:25435661

  6. Clinical application of an external fixator in the repair of bone fractures in 28 birds.

    PubMed

    Hatt, J-M; Christen, C; Sandmeier, P

    2007-02-10

    The repair of seven tibiotarsal fractures, three humeral fractures, three tarsometatarsal fractures, two femoral fractures and 13 radial and ulnar fractures with a tubular external fixator system was evaluated prospectively in 10 common pigeons (Columba livia), 11 psittacine birds, six birds of prey and one Bali starling (Leucopsar rothschildii). The fixations included type 1, type 2 and intramedullary tie-in methods, and the fractures healed in all but three cases. A comparison of the weight of different connecting bars showed that the external fixation system and polymethylmethacrylate are the lightest available systems and that there was no clinically relevant difference between them.

  7. Ensuring precision in lower limb deformity correction through a combination of temporary external fixation followed by internal fixation: Results of a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ganjwala, Dhiren; Shah, Shrenik; Shah, Snehal

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is important to plan preoperatively when contemplating internal fixation following deformity correction. Surgeons often find it difficult to retain the achieved correction till the end of internal fixation. To maintain precise correction we used hybrid technique which uses both external and internal fixation. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this hybrid technique in achieving and retaining desired correction. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated the magnitude of deformity with radiological parameters. We compared correction which was planned and correction which was achieved. The technique was used during surgery for corrective osteotomies. Before carrying out the osteotomy, rail fixator with two swivel clamps was applied. After osteotomy swivel clamps were loosened. Desired correction was achieved. While fixator held the fragments in corrected position, definitive internal fixation was carried out. External fixator was removed after completion of internal fixation. Position of mechanical axis ratio, mechanical lateral distal femoral angle and mechanical medial proximal tibial angle were measured before and 12 weeks after surgery. Student t-test was used to analyze the difference between correction which was planned and correction which was achieved. Results: There was no statistical difference between the desired correction and the correction achieved. Conclusions: Temporary use of external fixator while correcting angular deformities of lower limb allows to achieve accurate correction. PMID:25298557

  8. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices §...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. 888.3050... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal...

  15. 21 CFR 878.3250 - External facial fracture fixation appliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External facial fracture fixation appliance. 878.3250 Section 878.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3250...

  16. Logistic regression analysis of risk factors for femoral head osteonecrosis after healed intertrochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Zhengliang; Sheng, Jiagen; Zhang, Changqing; Zhu, Zhenhong

    2016-05-16

    To evaluate the potential risk factors of the development of femoral head osteonecrosis after healed intertrochanteric fractures. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who were operated upon with closed reduction and internal fixation for intertrochanteric fractures by our medical group from December 1993 to December 2012. Patients with healed fractures were identified. Age, gender, comorbidities favouring osteonecrosis, causes of injuries, fracture patterns, the location of the primary fracture line, time from injury to surgery, fixation methods, and the development of femur head osteonecrosis of these patients were summarised. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the correlation between potential risk factors and the development of femoral head osteonecrosis. A total of 916 patients with healed intertrochanteric fractures were identified. Femoral head osteonecrosis was found in 8 cases (0.87%). According to the results of univariate logistic regression, a more proximal fracture line, fixation with dynamic hip screws and age were found to be statistically significant factors. The results of multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the statistically significant predictors of femoral head osteonecrosis were younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 17.103; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.988-147.111), a more proximal fracture line (OR = 31.439; 95% CI, 3.700-267.119) and applying dynamic hip screw as the internal fixation (OR = 11.114; 95% CI, 2.064-59.854). Regular follow-up is commended in young patients with a proximal fracture line who underwent closed reduction and internal fixation with dynamic hip screw, even though the bone had healed.

  17. Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons. Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...2009 The Author(s) Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs Daniel K. Park,* MD...4-stranded allografts are used for soft tissue anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; however, the fixation properties of fixation devices are

  18. Femoral offset following trochanteric femoral fractures: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Buecking, Benjamin; Boese, Christoph Kolja; Seifert, Vinzenz; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Frink, Michael; Lechler, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the femoral offset reportedly improves outcome following total hip arthroplasty, but little is known of its influence following hip fractures. We aimed to establish the effect of the femoral offset on the medium-term functional outcome in elderly patients who had sustained trochanteric fractures requiring proximal femoral nailing. We measured the rotation corrected femoral offset (FORC) and relative femoral offset (FORL) on plain anteroposterior radiographs of the hip in 188 patients (58 male, 130 female) with a trochanteric fracture who underwent proximal femoral nailing at our institution. The primary outcome measure was the Harris hip score (HSS) 6 and 12 months postoperatively; the Barthel index was assessed as a secondary outcome. The mean FORC after surgery was 58 mm (±11 mm), while the mean FORL was 1.21 (±0.22). At final follow up, we found significant inverse relationships (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, ρ) between FORC and FORL and the functional outcome assessed by the HSS (FORC: ρ = -0.207, p = 0.036; FORL: ρ = -0.247, p = 0.012), and FORL and the Barthel index (FORC: ρ = -147, p = 0.129; FORL: ρ = -0.192, p = 0.046). A consistent trend was observed after adjustment for confounding variables. Our results underline the biomechanical importance of the femoral offset for medium-term outcomes in elderly patients with trochanteric fractures. In contrast with the published findings on total hip arthroplasty, we found an inverse correlation between functional outcome and the extent of the reconstructed femoral offset. Level I - Prognostic study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High and pointed type of femoral localized reaction frequently extends to complete and incomplete atypical femoral fracture in patients with autoimmune diseases on long-term glucocorticoids and bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Sato, H; Kondo, N; Nakatsue, T; Wada, Y; Fujisawa, J; Kazama, J J; Kuroda, T; Suzuki, Y; Nakano, M; Endo, N; Narita, I

    2017-04-13

    Once a localized reaction (beaking) was detected, discontinuation of bisphosphonates (BPs) and switching to vitamin D supplementation or teriparatide therapy effectively improved its shape. When the localized reaction was high, of the pointed type, and/or accompanied by prodromal pain, the risks of complete and incomplete atypical femoral fracture increased and consideration of prophylactic fixation for such patients was required.

  20. Midterm Results of Porous Tantalum Femoral Cones in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Potter, G David; Abdel, Matthew P; Lewallen, David G; Hanssen, Arlen D

    2016-08-03

    Severe bone loss during a revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a challenging problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the midterm clinical outcomes, fixation as evaluated radiographically, and survivorship of tantalum femoral cones used during revision TKAs in patients with severe femoral bone loss. From 2003 to 2011, 159 tantalum metaphyseal femoral cones were implanted in 157 patients at a single institution. Knee Society scores, radiographic results, and implant survivorship were analyzed. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Nineteen died of causes unrelated to the surgery but had been followed for >2 years and thus were included in the study. The mean age at the time of the index surgery was 64 years, and 82 patients were male. The mean duration of follow-up was 5 years (range, 2 to 10 years). The mean Knee Society score increased from 47 preoperatively to 65 at the most recent follow-up evaluation (p = 0.1). Radiographically, all 134 unrevised femoral cones were seen to be well fixed without any evidence of loosening. At 5 years, 23 cones had been revised: 14 because of infection, 6 because of aseptic loosening of the cone (all in hinged TKAs in patients with a Type-3 defect), and 3 because of ligamentous instability. The 5-year survivorship was 96% when the end point was revision of the cone due to aseptic loosening, 84% when it was revision of the cone for any reason, and 70% when it was any reoperation. In what we believe to be the largest series of such implants, femoral cones provided a durable and reliable option for metaphyseal fixation during revision TKA with severe femoral bone loss. Aseptic failure of the femoral cone was associated with use of a hinged TKA in a patient with a Type-3 bone defect. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  1. The halo fixator.

    PubMed

    Bono, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    The halo fixator may be used for the definitive treatment of cervical spine trauma, preoperative reduction in the patient with spinal deformity, and adjunctive postoperative stabilization following cervical spine surgery. Halo fixation decreases cervical motion by 30% to 96%. Absolute contraindications include cranial fracture, infection, and severe soft-tissue injury at the proposed pin sites. Relative contraindications include severe chest trauma, obesity, advanced age, and a barrel-shaped chest. In children, a computed tomography scan of the head should be obtained before pin placement to determine cranial bone thickness. Complications of halo fixation include pin loosening, pin site infection, and skin breakdown. A concerning rate of life-threatening complications, such as respiratory distress, has been reported in elderly patients. Despite a paucity of contemporary data, recent retrospective studies have demonstrated acceptable results for halo fixation in managing some upper and lower cervical spine injuries.

  2. Photographic fixative poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Photographic fixatives are chemicals used to develop photographs. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing such chemicals. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an ...

  3. Fixation-based filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Thomas J.; Lockwood, Robert J.

    1992-11-01

    Fixation and visual attention are central themes in active vision research, and are closely related. In this paper we discuss one of several ways in which they interact. We describe filtering methods that allow an agent to selectively extract features of the object it is fixating and suppress features of foreground and background objects. The methods are essentially depth filters; they use disparity or motion information to suppress image features that are far from the fixation point in depth. They share a simple computational structure based on the Laplacian pyramid, and are readily amenable to hardware implementation. We present the filters and the properties of fixation geometry that allow them to work, and discuss their behavior. We present methods of implementing them in real time and describe ways of extending them to other features besides depth.

  4. [Distal femoral periprosthetic fractures: classification and therapy].

    PubMed

    Tomás, T; Nachtnebl, L; Otiepka, P

    2010-06-01

    IId group solved with revision TKA. Miniosteosynthesis in three cases, with failure in two.One failure in IIa group treated with condylar plate, one in IIb group treated with intramedullary nail and additional hydroxyapatite plombage. Revision total knee arthroplasty in five cases with no failure. Extraction of TKA, external fixation, and arthrodesis in 1 case with no failure. The rules for treatment of distal femoral periprosthetic fractures are not definite yet. For fractures above TKA is recommended nail osteosynthesis; for fractures at the level of femoral component is preferable to use osteosynthetic material, condylar plate or LCP. Bone grafts, bone cement, and artificial bone are used to augment osteosynthesis in comminuted fractures. Fractures at the site of loosening are indicated for revision TKA. According to our results: Type I: Conservative treatment possible. Osteosynthesis with condylar plate is recommended. Type IIa: Indication for condylar plate osteosynthesis. Type IIb: The most problematic group. Osteosynthesis with condylar plate with augmentation or condylar plate placed from medial side. Type IIc: Plate osteosynthesis possible, intramedullary nail is recommended. Type IId: Osteosynthesis with augmentation is possible in some cases; revision TKA is recommended. Type III: Indication for revision TKA.

  5. Extramedullary fixation implants and external fixators for extracapsular hip fractures in adults.

    PubMed

    Parker, Martyn J; Das, Avishek

    2013-02-28

    Extramedullary fixation of hip fractures involves the application of a plate and screws to the lateral side of the proximal femur. In external fixators, the stabilising component is held outside the thigh by pins or screws driven into the bone. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 1998, and last updated in 2005. To assess the relative effects of different types of extramedullary fixation implant, as well as external fixators, for treating extracapsular proximal femoral (hip) fractures in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (July 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to June Week 4 2011), EMBASE (1988 to 2011 Week 25), various other databases, conference proceedings and reference lists. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing extramedullary implants or external fixators for fixing extracapsular hip fracture in adults were included. Two review authors independently selected trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. Data were pooled where appropriate. The 18 included trials tested seven comparisons in a total of 2615 mainly female and older participants with a total of 2619 fractures. All trials had methodological flaws that may affect the validity of their results.Three trials of 355 participants comparing a fixed nail plate (Jewett or McLaughlin) with the sliding hip screw (SHS) found an increased risk of fixation failure for fixed nail plates.The two trials of 433 participants comparing the Resistance Augmented Bateaux (RAB) plate with the SHS had contrasting results, notably in terms of operative complications, fixation failure and anatomical restoration.One trial of 100 participants comparing the Pugh nail and the SHS found no significant difference between implants.Three trials of 458 participants compared the Medoff plate with the SHS. There was a trend to higher blood losses and

  6. Southwick Osteotomy Stabilised with External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Grubor, Predrag; Mitkovic, Milorad; Grubor, Milan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Epiphysiolysis of the femoral head is the most common accident occurring towards the end of pre-puberty and puberty growth. Case report: The author describes the experience in the treatment of chronic epiphysiolysis in two patients treated by Southwick osteotomy. The site is accessed by way of a 15-cm long lateral skin incision and the trochanteric region is reached through the layers. The osteotomy angles prepared beforehand on a thin aluminium model are used to mark the Southwick osteotomy site on the anterior and lateral sides at the level of the lesser trochanter. Before performing the trochanteric osteotomy, two Mitković convergent pins type M20 are applied distally and proximally, above the planned osteotomy site. A tenotomy of the iliopsas muscle is performed, and then the previously marked bone triangle is redissected up to three quarters of the width of the femur. The distal part of the femur is rotated inwards, so that the patella is turned towards the ceiling. The osteotomised fragments of the femur are adapted, repositioned and fixated by installing an external fixator on the previously placed pins. Two more pins are placed, one proximally and one distally, with a view to adequately stabilising the femur. The patient was mobile from day two after the surgery. If, after the surgery, the lead surgeon realises that there is a requirement to make a correction of 5, 10 and 15 degrees of the valgus, varus, anteversion or retroversion deformity, the correction shall be performed without surgically opening the patient, using the fixator pins. Conclusion: After performing a Southwick osteotomy it is easier to adapt, reposition and fixate the osteotomised fragments of the femur using a fixator type M20. Adequate stability allows regaining mobility quickly, which in turn is the best prevention of chondrolysis of the hip. It is possible to make post-operative valgus, varus, anteversion and retroversion corrections of 5, 10 and 15 degrees

  7. Femoral fractures in children, is early interventional treatment beneficial?

    PubMed

    Sturdee, S W; Templeton, P A; Dahabreh, Z; Cullen, E; Giannoudis, P V

    2007-08-01

    A protocol of early intervention (flexible intramedullary nails, early hip spica, and external fixation) was started in 1999 and during a 3-year period there were 25 children who sustained a femoral shaft fracture (early intervention group). These were prospectively reviewed with a minimum follow up of 24 months (Range 24-35 months). A historical control group of 41 children was used. These children were injured between February 1996 and February 1999 and were retrospectively reviewed. They had traditional in patient treatments with either Gallows or Thomas splint traction (traditional treatment group). Over the 6-year period from 1996 to 2002 there were a total of 66 femoral shaft fractures in the study that presented to our hospital. The mean length of hospital stay was 29 nights in the traditional group and 10 nights in the early intervention group. This difference is significant (p<0.001). The malunion rate was slightly higher in the early active group at radiological union but most of these remodelled over the 2 years of follow up. The protocol of early intervention used in our institution, of flexible nails, early hip spica or external fixation depended on the age of the child, and has resulted in a shorter hospital stay for the children. This has benefits for the child, the family and the hospital.

  8. Proximal femoral fracture surgery in a patient with osteopetrosis tarda: complications and treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Seyfettinoglu, Fırat; Tuhanioğlu, Ümit; Ogur, Hasan Ulas; Cicek, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare, inherited disease characterized by defects in osteoclastic function that results in defective bone resorption. When fractures are encountered, fixation is extremely difficult. Osteopetrosis patients have an increased predisposition to infection. If infection develops after a fracture, treatment is more difficult. In this paper, treatment is presented of a 49-year old female to whom proximal femoral nailing was applied for fixation of an osteopetrotic proximal femur fracture; and when it was unsuccessful, revision was made with a locked anatomic plate, which subsequently led to development of infection. PMID:27843357

  9. Misdiagnosis of pathological femoral fracture in a patient with intramuscular hemangioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YU, XIAOLONG; NIE, TAO; ZHANG, BIN; DAI, MIN; LIU, HUCHENG; ZOU, FAN

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is a common disease; however, intramuscular hemangioma (IH) presenting with a pathological fracture is extremely rare. The present study reports a case of a 46-year-old male patient that suffered from IH of the right thigh, presenting with a pathological femoral fracture. The patient was initially diagnosed with a traumatic femoral fracture, and routine open reduction and internal fixation were performed at a local hospital. However, 20 days subsequent to surgery, gradual swelling and soreness around the incision were observed. The incision eventually ruptured during squatting for bowel movement, which led to extensive blood loss. Based on computed tomography (CT) and deep femoral artery arteriography, IH presenting with a pathological femoral fracture was diagnosed. The patient underwent artery embolization, from which he recovered well. At the 6-month follow-up, the femoral fracture was revealed to have healed, and a CT scan demonstrated no evidence of recurrence; however, continuous observation using CT is required in order to determine the long-term outcome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a misdiagnosed pathological femoral fracture in a patient with IH reported in the English literature. PMID:27347124

  10. A Complication During Femoral Broaching in Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Waldstein, Wenzel; Boettner, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Press-fit component fixation is one of the primary goals in uncemented total hip arthroplasty. When aiming at proximal load transfer, the stem size has to be selected with regard to the shape of the proximal femoral canal. This can be challenging in patients with ‘champagne flute’ femurs with a relatively narrow diaphysis, especially when a long stem femoral component is used. The present case report describes a complication during femoral broaching for a primary uncemented femoral component. Because of the narrow diaphysis, the distal portion of the broach got caught in the narrow canal and it became impossible to remove the broach with conventional techniques. Via a second distal incision, the femur was split from the distal tip of the broach to approximately 5 cm distal of the femoral neck cut along the posterior aspects of the femur. This loosened the broach enough to allow for an uncomplicated removal. The longitudinal split was secured with cables before a similar size primary implant was press fitted into the femoral canal. PMID:23961301

  11. Mid-term outcome of a modular, cementless, proximally hydroxyapatite-coated, anatomic femoral stem.

    PubMed

    Cossetto, David J; Goudar, Anil

    2012-12-01

    To report the mid-term outcome of a modular, cementless, proximally hydroxyapatitecoated, anatomic femoral stem in total hip arthroplasty (THA). 160 consecutive patients aged 42 to 92 (mean, 70) years underwent 185 cementless THAs for primary osteoarthritis or femoral neck fractures. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon using the same modular, cementless, proximally hydroxyapatite-coated, anatomic femoral stem, regardless of age and bone quality. Clinical evaluation (pain, range of movement, and ability to walk) was based on the Merle d'Aubigne and Postel scores. Radiological assessment was based on criteria by Engh et al. in the 7 Gruen zones with regard to the presence of radiolucent lines, osteolysis, cancellous condensation, cortical hypertrophy or atrophy, reactive lines, and pedestal formation. Failure of the stem was defined as revision or impending revision because of aseptic loosening or pain. Of the 160 patients, 21 died and none were lost to follow-up. In 3 of the 21 patients, the femoral stems were revised for periprosthetic fractures after a fall at 6 weeks, 10 months, and 3.8 years. 138 patients (162 THAs) completed a mean follow-up of 7.8 (range, 5.5-10.4) years. Their overall mean Merle d'Aubigne and Postel scores increased from 7.09 preoperatively to 16.36 postoperatively. The mean Engh score was 24.9 out of 27, with the mean score for femoral stem fixation 10 out of 10 and 14.9 out of 17 for femoral stem stability. No reactive lines at the bone-stem interfaces and no subsidence or osteolysis were evident in any of the radiographs. There were 5 periprosthetic femoral fractures, 2 deep infections, 3 dislocations, and 2 aseptic loosening (one each for the femoral stem and acetabular socket). Survivorship of the femoral stem at 10 years was 99% when revision secondary to only aseptic loosening of the stem was the endpoint. It was 96% when failures due to all causes (infection, periprosthetic fracture, and aseptic loosening) were the

  12. Treatment of open proximal femoral fractures sustained in combat.

    PubMed

    Mack, Andrew W; Freedman, Brett A; Groth, Adam T; Kirk, Kevin L; Keeling, John J; Andersen, Romney C

    2013-02-06

    Open proximal femoral fractures are rare injuries that often result from wartime high-energy causes. Limited data exist regarding the treatment and complications of these injuries. We retrospectively reviewed the records of combat casualties treated at two institutions between March 2003 and March 2008. The casualty patient databases, medical records, radiographs, and laboratory data were reviewed to determine time to union, complication rates, and patient outcomes. Forty-one patients (thirty-nine men and two women) with a mean age of 25.7 years were identified as receiving treatment for open proximal femoral fractures. The mechanisms of injury for these forty-one patients were blast (twenty-nine patients [71%]), gunshot wound (eight patients [20%]), motor vehicle crash (three patients [7%]), and helicopter crash (one patient [2%]). There were thirty Type-IIIA, six Type-IIIB, and five Type-IIIC open fractures. The predominant method of definitive fixation was a cephalomedullary or reconstruction nail in thirty-four patients (83%). Thirty-nine patients had at least two years of follow-up data available for assessment of complications and radiographic union. The mean time to union was 5.1 months (range, 2.8 to 16.0 months). Complications requiring reoperation occurred in twenty-two (56%) of thirty-nine patients. Wound infection (twelve patients [31%]) and symptomatic heterotopic ossification (ten patients [26%]) were the most common complications. Cephalomedullary nail fixation of open Type-III wartime subtrochanteric and pertrochanteric femoral fractures can be reliably used to effect fracture union in a timely manner. The most frequent complications of treatment are wound infection and symptomatic heterotopic ossification.

  13. Intramedullary Tibial Nail Fixation of Simple Intraarticular Distal Tibia Fractures.

    PubMed

    Scolaro, John A; Broghammer, Francis H; Donegan, Derek J

    2016-11-01

    The optimal treatment strategy for distal tibia fractures, especially those with intraarticular extension, remains controversial. Although open reduction and internal fixation with a plate and screw device is commonly performed for these injuries, the risk of soft tissue complications using this approach is significant. Staged treatment protocols and alternative means of fixation have been proposed to address these undesired events. Although potentially more technically demanding than fixation of diaphyseal or extraarticular tibial fractures, intramedullary nail (IMN) fixation of simple intraarticular distal tibia fractures is a viable treatment alternative with unique advantages. This article presents a review of the literature and rationale for intramedullary tibial nail fixation of simple intraarticular distal tibia fractures and a surgical approach commonly utilized for successful implementation.

  14. Surgical Revision after Sacroiliac Joint Fixation or Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion has been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of SIJ dysfunction. Multiple devices are available to perform SIJ fixation or fusion. Surgical revision rates after these procedures have not been directly compared. Methods We retrospectively identified all patients in our practice who underwent SIJ fixation or fusion between 2003 and 2015. Using both chart review and focused contact with individual patients, we determined the likelihood of surgical revision. Revision rates were compared using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Thirty-eight patients underwent SIJ fixation with screws and 274 patients underwent SIJ fusion using triangular titanium implants. Four-year cumulative revision rates were 30.8% for fixation and 5.7% for fusion. Conclusions In our study, SIJ fixation with screws had a much higher revision rate compared to SIJ fusion with triangular titanium implants designed for bone adherence.

  15. Minimally invasive treatment of unstable pelvic ring injuries with modified pedicle screw-rod fixator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Tian; Liu, Zuo-Qing; Fu, Wen-Qin; Zhao, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical application of the minimally invasive modified pedicle screw-rod fixator for unstable pelvic ring injuries, including its feasibility, merits, and limitations. Methods Twenty-three patients (13 males, 10 females; average age, 36.3 years) with unstable pelvic ring injuries underwent anterior fixation using a modified pedicle screw-rod fixator with or without posterior fixation using a transiliac internal fixator. The clinical findings were assessed using Majeed scores. The quality of reduction was evaluated using the Matta criteria. Results Clinical results at 1 year postoperatively were excellent in 14 patients, good in 7, and fair in 2. The two patients with fair results had intermittent pain at the sacroiliac joint because of the posterior implant. One woman complained of persistent pain at the pubic tubercle during sexual intercourse. Iatrogenic neuropraxia of the unilateral lateral femoral cutaneous nerve occurred in three patients. Unilateral femoral nerve palsy occurred in one patient. The quality of fracture reduction was excellent in 12 patients, good in 8, and fair in 3. Heterotopic ossification occurred in eight patients; all were asymptomatic. Conclusions Minimally invasive modified pedicle screw-rod fixation is an effective alternative treatment for pelvic ring injuries.

  16. Midterm Results of Consecutive Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures Vancouver Type A and B

    PubMed Central

    Trieb, Klemens; Fiala, Rainer; Briglauer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures has a high complication and mortality rate of more than 10%. The aim of this study is to report the outcome of a consecutive single center patient group. Thirty-four consecutive patients (mean age 81.2+/-8.5 years, 14 male, 20 female) with a periprosthetic femoral fracture Vancouver type A (n=5) or type B (n=29) were followed-up after 43.2 months, none of the patients were lost to follow-up. Nineteen of the patients were treated through change of the stem and cerclage fixation, five by plates and ten by cerclage cables. One successfully treated infection was observed. No further complications have been reported peri- or postoperatively, therefore resulting in 2.9% overall complication rate. These results demonstrate that precisely selected revision surgery protocol following periprosthetic femoral fractures within elderly multimorbid patients may lead to beneficial outcomes at a low risk of complications. PMID:27777712

  17. FEMORAL SHAFT FRACTURES—A Study of Closed Reduction and Open Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ramey, Ernest Edgar

    1960-01-01

    A comparative study was made of 58 cases of closed femoral shaft fractures treated by skeletal traction, and 24 cases of closed femoral shaft fractures treated by open reduction with internal fixation. Although complications occurred in some cases, intramedullary nailing appeared to be the most satisfactory method, resulting in primary union, in decreased time of recumbency and time in hospital, in earlier ambulation and in less residual disability. Success of intramedullary nailing depends largely upon adequate training or experience of the surgeon in the technical operative aspects of the procedure and in postoperative management. Placing supplemental autogenous iliac bone chips at the fracture site in closed femoral fractures in which intramedullary nailing is performed appears to enhance callus formation and bony consolidation. Skeletal traction should be utilized on all patients whose general physical condition does not permit operative intervention. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:14436039

  18. Physeal-Sparing Technique for Femoral Tunnel Drilling in Pediatric Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Posteromedial Portal

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Stephen E.; Keating, Patrick M.; Scott, Timothy P.; Siwiec, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears present a technical dilemma for orthopaedic surgeons. Multiple surgical techniques have been described to protect the distal femoral and proximal tibial physes. We present an ACL reconstruction technique performed on a 12-year-old girl with open physes who sustained an ACL tear after a noncontact twisting injury while playing soccer. A hamstring autograft reconstruction was performed by use of a posteromedial portal to drill the femoral tunnel in an all-epiphyseal fashion at the anatomic footprint of the native ACL. This case provides a new surgical technique to achieve anatomic fixation for ACL reconstruction in a skeletally immature individual using a posteromedial portal to drill a physeal-sparing lateral femoral tunnel for anatomic ACL reconstruction. This advancement may make drilling the femoral tunnel less technically challenging compared with other proposed methods while maintaining the lateral wall of the distal femur. PMID:24892013

  19. Femoral and tibial graft tunnel parameters after transtibial, anteromedial portal, and outside-in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Krawinkel, Alessa; Ostermann, Michael; Hoffelner, Thomas; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2015-09-01

    Anatomic graft tunnel placement is recommended in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to restore knee joint stability and function. Transtibial (TT), anteromedial portal (AMP), and outside-in (OI) retrograde drilling surgical techniques have been described for tibial and femoral bone tunnel preparation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bone tunnel parameters and compare the ability of 3 different surgical techniques to achieve placement of the ACL femoral and tibial bone tunnels at the center of the native ACL femoral and tibial attachment sites. The hypothesis was that tunnel placement using an AMP or OI technique would result in optimized tunnel parameters and more closely reconstruct the center of the native ACL femoral attachment site. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The study population consisted of 100 patients undergoing anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction using multiple-stranded hamstring tendon grafts. In group 1 (n = 36), the femoral tunnel was drilled using a TT surgical technique; in group 2 (n = 32), the femoral tunnel was drilled through an AMP; and in group 3 (n = 32), the femoral tunnel was created by use of an OI technique with retrograde drilling. Computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained postoperatively, and characteristics of femoral and tibial tunnel apertures were correlated to femoral and tibial measurement grid systems. The position of the resulting tibial and femoral bone tunnels for each group was compared with the center of the native ACL attachment sites. There were statistically significant differences (P < .05) for the ACL femoral tunnel between the 3 groups with respect to intercondylar height, total tunnel length, graft fixation length, tunnel axis, and tunnel entry angle. Statistically significant differences (P < .05) were found for the ACL tibial tunnel with respect to anteroposterior tunnel position and sagittal tunnel axis between the TT and both the OI and AMP techniques. The OI surgical

  20. Exchange nailing for femoral diaphyseal fracture non-unions: Risk factors for failure.

    PubMed

    Tsang, S T J; Mills, L A; Baren, J; Frantzias, J; Keating, J F; Simpson, A H R W

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for failure of exchange nailing for femoral diaphyseal fracture non-unions. The study cohort comprised 40 patients with femoral diaphyseal non-unions treated by exchange nailing, of which six were open injuries. The median time to exchange nailing from primary fixation was 8.4 months. The main outcome measures were union, number of secondary fixation procedures required to achieve union and time to union. Multiple causes for non-union were found in 16 (40%) cases, with infection present in 12 (30.0%) patients. Further surgical procedures were required in nine (22.5%) cases, one of whom (2.5%) required the use of another fixation modality to achieve union. Union was ultimately achieved with exchange nailing in 34/37 (91.9%) patients. The median time to union after the exchange nailing was 9.4 months. Cigarette smoking and infection were risk factors for failure of exchange nailing. Multivariate analysis found infection to be the strongest predictor of exchange failure (p<0.05). Exchange nailing is an effective treatment for aseptic femoral diaphyseal fracture non-union. However, 50% of patients undergoing exchange nailing in the presence of infection required at least one further procedure. It is important to counsel patients of this so that they can plan for it and do not consider that the first exchange operation has failed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. KIRSCHNER WIRE VERSUS TITANIUM ELASTIC NAILS IN PEDIATRIC FEMORAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Isik, Cengiz; Kurtulmus, Tuhan; Saglam, Necdet; Saka, Gursel; Akpinar, Fuat; Sarman, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of intramedullary fixation using the Kirschner-wire (K-wire) compared to the titanium elastic nail (TEN) in pediatric femoral shaft fractures. Methods: A sample of 42 pediatric patients with a mean age of 6.55±2.42 years (range 4-11 years) presenting femoral shaft fractures underwent intramedullary fixation using the K-wire or TEN. Results: There was no significant difference found between groups, of which 16 (38.1%) patients were treated with K-wire and 26 (61.9%) patients were treated with TEN in terms of union duration. Moreover, none of the patients showed nonunion or a delayed union. Conclusions: The use of adjusted K-wire instead of TEN in the intramedullary fixation of femoral shaft fractures in selected children may be an advantageous surgical option due to the lower cost, easy accessibility and no need for a second surgery for implant removal. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Study. PMID:26981033

  2. Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty for Simple Distal Femoral Fractures in Elderly Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nam-Yong; Sohn, Jong-Min; Cho, Sung-Gil; Kim, Seung-Chan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be an alternative method for treating distal femoral fractures in elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results in patients with knee osteoarthritis who underwent TKA with the Medial Pivot prosthesis for distal femoral fractures. Materials and Methods Eight displaced distal femoral fractures in 8 patients were treated with TKA using the Medial Pivot prosthesis and internal fixation. The radiographic and clinical evaluations were performed using simple radiographs and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) knee scores during a mean follow-up period of 49 months. Results All fractures united and the mean time to radiographic union was 15 weeks. The mean range of motion of the knee joint was 114.3° and the mean HSS knee score was 85.1 at the final follow-up. Conclusions Based on the radiographic and clinical results, TKA with internal fixation can be considered as an option for the treatment of simple distal femoral fractures in elderly patients who have advanced osteoarthritis of the knee with appropriate bone stock. PMID:24032103

  3. Better Axial Stiffness of a Bicortical Screw Construct Compared to a Cable Construct for Comminuted Vancouver B1 Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jamie T; Taheri, Arash; Day, Robert E; Yates, Piers J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to biomechanically evaluate the Locking attachment plate (LAP) construct in comparison to a Cable plate construct, for the fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures after cemented total hip arthroplasty. Each construct incorporated a locking compression plate with bi-cortical locking screws for distal fixation. In the Cable construct, 2 cables and 2 uni-cortical locking screws were used for proximal fixation. In the LAP construct, the cables were replaced by a LAP with 4 bi-cortical locking screws. The LAP construct was significantly stiffer than the cable construct under axial load with a bone gap (P=0.01). The LAP construct offers better axial stiffness compared to the cable construct in the fixation of comminuted Vancouver B1 proximal femoral fractures. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing in a lateral position].

    PubMed

    Friederichs, J; von Rüden, C; Hierholzer, C; Bühren, V

    2015-04-01

    Intramedullary nailing is the gold standard for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures; however, rotational malalignment remains a common complication. The patient can be positioned on the fracture table in a supine position or alternatively in the lateral decubitus position without any traction. The aim of this article is to describe an effective method to control intraoperative torsion of the femur. The surgical technique described in this article is the standard procedure for femoral shaft fractures and subtrochanteric fractures in this level 1 trauma center. The patient is positioned in a lateral position on a radiolucent table with free draping of the injured leg. Using the C-arm, reduction can be performed with this technique with precise placing of the nails and torsion can be exactly adjusted and controlled with the aid of the femoral neck axis, the distal locking holes and both parallel femoral condyles. The described technique represents an effective method for the intraoperative control of femoral torsion. With an acceptable and most probably clinically irrelevant bias, this technique is able to avoid significant rotational malalignment. It does not prolong the operative procedure and does not require additional navigation settings. It has also been shown to be helpful in the treatment of subtrochanteric fractures. The surgical technique of anterograde intramedullary nailing using the lateral decubitus position without any traction device and free draping of the injured leg represents a safe and reliable treatment concept and offers logistical advantages compared to the supine position of the patient on a fracture table. Together with other described methods of intraoperative torsional control of femoral fractures, the radiological technique described in this study is an easily applicable and safe method, which needs to be confirmed in clinical studies.

  5. Fixation of a human rib by an intramedullary telescoping splint anchored by bone cement.

    PubMed

    Liovic, Petar; Šutalo, Ilija D; Marasco, Silvana F

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept for rib fixation is presented that involves the use of a bioresorbable polymer intramedullary telescoping splint. Bone cement is used to anchor each end of the splint inside the medullary canal on each side of the fracture site. In this manner, rib fixation is achieved without fixation device protrusion from the rib, making the splint completely intramedullary. Finite element analysis is used to demonstrate that such a splint/cement composite can preserve rib fixation subjected to cough-intensity force loadings. Computational fluid dynamics and porcine rib experiments were used to study the anchor formation process required to complete the fixation.

  6. Improving Carbon Fixation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that alternative pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials. PMID:22647231

  7. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  8. Femoral Head and Neck Excision.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tisha A M

    2017-07-01

    Femoral head and neck excision is a surgical procedure that is commonly performed in small animal patients. It is a salvage procedure that is done to relieve pain in the coxofemoral joint and restore acceptable function of the limb. Femoral head and neck excision is most commonly used to treat severe osteoarthritis in the coxofemoral joint and can be done in dogs and cats of any size or age. The procedure should not be overused and ideally should not be done when the integrity of the coxofemoral joint can be restored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcomes of ACL Reconstruction With Fixed Versus Variable Loop Button Fixation.

    PubMed

    Wise, Brent T; Patel, Nick N; Wier, Garrison; Labib, Sameh A

    2017-03-01

    Suspensory femoral fixation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts with fixed loop button and variable loop button devices has gained popularity for ACL reconstruction. This study examined these 2 methods of fixation to determine their effect on graft laxity and patient-reported outcome scores. A database search was performed to identify patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction with either a fixed loop or a variable loop button technique performed by the primary surgeon. Lysholm, Tegner, and 12-Item Short Form Health Survey scores were obtained, and KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometer (MEDmetric, San Diego, California) mechanical knee testing was performed. Results were compared with the uninjured knee. Of the 112 patients who were identified, 91 met the study criteria. Of these patients, 57 completed KT-1000 knee testing, 33 in the variable group and 24 in the fixed group. The average KT-1000 value for the variable group was 0.38 mm, and the average for the closed group was 0.92 mm (P=.19; 95% confidence interval, -0.28 to 1.35). Among the 19 patients in the variable group and the 13 in the closed group who completed the subjective outcomes questionnaires, no statistically significant difference was found. Clinically lax knees (KT-1000>3 mm) were found in 6.1% and 12.5% of patients in the variable group and the fixed group, respectively (P=.2). The variable group had a rerupture rate of 4.7%, whereas the fixed group had a rerupture rate of 8.7% (P=.21). The study found no statistical difference in ACL graft laxity or postoperative functional outcomes between grafts fixed with the variable loop or fixed loop button technique. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e275-e280.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Dynamic Simulation of the Effects of Graft Fixation Errors During Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elias, John J.; Kelly, Michael J.; Smith, Kathryn E.; Gall, Kenneth A.; Farr, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is performed to prevent recurrent instability, but errors in femoral fixation can elevate graft tension. Hypothesis: Errors related to femoral fixation will overconstrain the patella and increase medial patellofemoral pressures. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Five knees with patellar instability were represented with computational models. Kinematics during knee extension were characterized from computational reconstruction of motion performed within a dynamic computed tomography (CT) scanner. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee extension, with discrete element analysis used to quantify contact pressures, was performed for the preoperative condition and after MPFL reconstruction. A standard femoral attachment and graft resting length were set for each knee. The resting length was decreased by 2 mm, and the femoral attachment was shifted 5 mm posteriorly. The simulated errors were also combined. Root-mean-square errors were quantified for the comparison of preoperative patellar lateral shift and tilt between computationally reconstructed motion and dynamic simulation. Simulation output was compared between the preoperative and MPFL reconstruction conditions with repeated-measures Friedman tests and Dunnett comparisons against a control, which was the standard MPFL condition, with statistical significance set at P < .05. Results: Root-mean-square errors for simulated patellar tilt and shift were 5.8° and 3.3 mm, respectively. Patellar lateral tracking for the preoperative condition was significantly larger near full extension compared with the standard MPFL reconstruction (mean differences of 8 mm and 13° for shift and tilt, respectively, at 0°), and lateral tracking was significantly smaller for a posterior femoral attachment (mean differences of 3 mm and 4° for shift and tilt, respectively, at 0°). The maximum medial pressure was also larger for the short graft with a

  11. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  12. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  13. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  14. Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder and necrosis is a major skeletal problem in broiler breeders since they are maintained for a long time in the farm. The etiology of this disease is not well understood. A field study was conducted to understand the basis of this metabolic disease. Six ...

  15. Cardiac resynchronization therapy: Femoral approach.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Luís; Miranda, Rita; Almeida, Sofia; Ribeiro, Luciano; Alvarenga, Carlos; João, Isabel; Pereira, Hélder

    2017-04-01

    We describe the case of a 62-year-old female patient with bilateral subclavian vein occlusion, in whom a cardiac resynchronization system was implanted via a femoral vein. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Results of deformity correction in children with X-linked hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets by external fixation or combined technique.

    PubMed

    Popkov, Arnold; Aranovich, Anna; Popkov, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    The operative procedures to correct multiplanar bone deformities may be indicated for prevention of secondary orthopaedic complications in children with X-linked hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets (XHPR). Different problems related to surgical correction were reported: increased rate of non-union, delayed union, recurrent deformity, deep intramedullary infection, refracture, nerve palsy, and pin tract infection. The aim of this retrospective study was comparison of results of correction in children with XHPR who underwent the treatment with either the Ilizarov device alone or a combined technique: the Ilizarov fixator with flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) with hydroxyapatite bioactive coating and FIN. We retrospectively analysed 47 cases (children of age under 14 years) affected by XHPR. Simultaneous deformity correction in femur and tibia was performed with the Ilizarov device (group I) or the combined method (group II). This article is based on the results of a historical comparative retrospective study from the same institution. The duration of external fixation is noted to be shorter applying the combined technique: 124.7 days (group I) vs 87.4 days (group II). In both groups deformity correction was achieved with a proper alignment. Nevertheless, while a child continues to grow during long-term follow-up, deviations of the mechanic axis from the centre of the knee joint have been developing again and values of mLDFA, mMPTA have become pathologic in the most of the cases. In group I location of a newly developed deformity resembled a pre-operative one, whereby both diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts were deformed. In group II in all the cases an apex of deformity was located in distal metadiaphyseal zone of the femur and proximal metadiaphyseal zone of the tibia. It is important to note that all of those in group II were out of the zone of the intramedullary nail. Simultaneous correction of femoral and tibial deformities by means of circular external

  17. Effectiveness of exchange nailing and augmentation plating for femoral shaft nonunion after nailing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Liu, Chunfeng; Liu, Chaoqun; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Jinlian

    2014-11-01

    We assessed indications and outcomes of exchange nailing and augmentation plating for femoral shaft nonunion following femoral nail failure. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 21 consecutive patients with femoral shaft nonunion treated with femoral nailing from August 2008 to June 2013. Nonunion cases with infection were excluded from this study. The study population consisted of nine men and 12 women, with an average age of 40 (range 21-61) years. All patients received internal fixation using exchange nailing and an augment plate coupled with decortication and bone graft. All patients in our study obtained osseous union with a mean time of six (range four to12) months. Mean operation time was three hours (range two to five hours), and mean blood loss was 800 ml (range 500-950 ml). There were no postoperative complications. At the last follow-up, all patients could flex their knees > 110°. Exchange nailing and augment plating coupled with decortication and bone graft is an effective treatment option for femoral shaft nonunion and has more indications and higher union rate than the popular exchange nailing treatment.

  18. Influence of time to surgery on the incidence of complications in femoral neck fracture treated with cannulated screws.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Thiego Pedro Freitas; Guimaraes, Tales Mollica; Andrade-Silva, Fernando Brandao; Kojima, Kodi Edson; Silva, Jorge Dos Santos

    2014-11-01

    Osteosynthesis of femoral neck fractures is particularly indicated in patients aged under 60 years. A prolonged interval between the fracture and surgical fixation has been associated with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the association between the time to surgery and the development of complications in patients with femoral neck fractures. Patients with displaced fractures of the femoral neck (Garden III or IV) who underwent fixation with three cannulated screws in the inverted triangle configuration from January 2009 to December 2010 were evaluated retrospectively for the development of orthopaedic complications. Patients were divided into two groups according to the time to surgery (within 7 days or more than 7 days). Complication rates were compared between the two groups. Regression analyses were performed to assess the risk factors for complications. Thirty-one patients were included in the study; the duration of follow-up ranged from 24 to 50 months. The time from fracture to surgery ranged from 3 to 18 days. Fifteen patients underwent surgery within 7 days, and 16 patients underwent surgery after 7 days. There were four cases of femoral head necrosis. One patient had an associated infection; one patient experienced non-union, and another demonstrated osteosynthesis failure. There were no statistically significant differences in the overall rate of complications between the groups (p = 0.999). None of the preoperative parameters or fracture characteristics were predictive factors for complications. The only factor associated with the development of complications was inadequate fracture reduction in the anteroposterior (AP) view (odds ratio [OR] = 35.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.56 to 548.36, p = 0.008). The interval between the occurrence of the injury and surgical fixation is not associated with the development of complications in fractures of the femoral neck. Inadequate fracture

  19. [Epidemiological analysis of hospitalized patients with femoral neck fracture in a first-class hospital of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Li, N; Liu, H N; Gong, X F; Zhu, S W; Wu, X B; He, L

    2016-04-18

    To analyze the clinical parameters of the patients with femoral neck fracture such as general condition, therapy method, hospitalized expense so as to provide more effective management plan for the clinical work. The patients with femoral neck fracture above 50 years who received in-patient treatment from 2008 January to 2012 December were admitted into this study. We collected and analyzed the information, such as age, chronic medical disease, therapy method, hospitalized duration and expense and so on. There were 1 794 femoral neck fracture patients above 50 years (male/female=1/2.06) in our hospital in recent 5 years and the annual average rate of increase was 7.3%. The average age of the patients was (69.9±10.7) years and the annual average rate of increase was 0.6%. The chronic medical disease diagnosis ratio was 55.0%. The average waiting time for operation was (6.8±4.2) days and the average hospitalized duration was (12.9±4.9) days which showed downward trend in recent years. The most popular operations were cannulated screw internal fixation (41.8%) and artificial femoral head replacement (34.1%). In the study, 146 cases (7.9%) received nonsurgical treatment which showed downward trend. The average hospitalized expense was (35 075.7±11 343.2) yuan which showed no obvious change in recent years. The cost for the females was more than that for the males. The expense for hemiarthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty increased while that for cannulated screw internal fixation decreased gradually. The cannulated screw internal fixation and artificial femoral head replacement were the most important operations for the patients with femoral neck fracture. The number and the average age of the patients were on the rise while the expense showed no obvious change in recent years.

  20. Scaphoid Proximal Pole Fracture Following Headless Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Rancy, Schneider K.; Zelken, Jonathan A.; Lipman, Joseph D.; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Headless screw fixation of scaphoid fractures and nonunions yields predictably excellent outcomes with a relatively low complication profile. However, intramedullary implants affect the load to failure and stress distribution within bone and may be implicated in subsequent fracture. Case Description We describe a posttraumatic fracture pattern of the scaphoid proximal pole originating at the previous headless screw insertion site in three young male patients with healed scaphoid nonunions. Each fracture was remarkably similar in shape and size, comprised the volar proximal pole, and was contiguous with the screw entry point. Treatment was challenging but successful in all cases. Literature Review Previous reports have posited that stress-raisers secondary to screw orientation may be implicated in subsequent peri-implant fracture of the femoral neck. Repeat scaphoid fracture after screw fixation has also been reported. However, the shape and locality of secondary fracture have not been described, nor has the potential role of screw fixation in the production of distinct fracture patterns. Clinical Relevance Hand surgeons must be aware of this difficult complication that may follow antegrade headless screw fixation of scaphoid fracture nonunion, and of available treatment strategies. PMID:26855840