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Sample records for femoral trochlea arthroscopic

  1. Proximal Scaphoid Arthroplasty Using the Medial Femoral Trochlea Flap

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, James P.; Burger, Heinze K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The medial trochlea of the femur (medial femoral trochlea, MFT) provides a source of convex osteocartilaginous vascularized bone that has been demonstrated to have a similar contour to the proximal scaphoid. This provides a potential solution for difficult recalcitrant proximal pole scaphoid nonunions. Materials and Methods Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent MFT proximal scaphoid arthroplasty were reviewed. Follow-up data were recorded at a minimum of 6 months, with an average of 14 months. The results of this cohort were previously reported in detail but are summarized herein. Description of Technique The ability to reconstruct both bone and cartilage of the nonunion enables the surgeon to resect the nonunited proximal pole to prepare for scaphoid reconstruction. A segment of osteocartilaginous MFT is harvested in dimensions required by the scaphoid defect. The MFT segment is harvested on the transverse branch of the descending geniculate vessels. Fixation may be achieved with ease due to the size of the reconstructed segment. Results Computed tomography imaging demonstrated 15 of 16 reconstructed scaphoids achieving osseous union. Follow-up range of motion (ROM) of the wrist averaged 46.0° extension (range 28-80°) and 43.8° flexion (range 10-80°), which was similar to preoperative (average 45.7° extension and 43.0° flexion). Scapholunate angles remained unaffected (51.6° preoperatively and 48.6° postoperatively), indicating preservation of carpal relationships. Conclusions Vascularized MFT flaps provide a useful tool in the treatment of difficult proximal pole scaphoid nonunions. Early follow-up demonstrates high rate of achieving union with acceptable ROM and good pain relief. PMID:24436821

  2. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O’Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion’s proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided. PMID:27761182

  3. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O'Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion's proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided.

  4. Arthroscopic Treatment of Medial Femoral Condylar Coronal Fractures and Nonunions

    PubMed Central

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, M. Gokhan; Basaran, S. Hakan; Baca, Emre; Kural, Cemal; Avkan, M. Cevdet

    2013-01-01

    Nonunion of medial femoral condylar coronal fractures are uncommon. In neglected Hoffa fractures despite nonunion, there is a risk of missing accompanying ligamentous and intra-articular injuries. Neither preoperative clinical examination nor magnetic resonance imaging showed these injuries before arthroscopy. Arthroscopy before internal fixation gives additional information and changes the surgical protocol for these fractures and nonunions. PMID:24400191

  5. Pseudoaneurysm of a branch of the femoral circumflex artery as a complication of revision arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Naoki; Lisenda, Laughter; Khanduja, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of painful internal snapping hip via arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon is becoming the preferred option over open techniques because of the benefits of minimal dissection and fewer complications. However, complications do occur with arthroscopic techniques as well. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with painful internal snapping of her right hip and underwent arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon. Following the procedure she continued to complain of pain in her groin and was therefore investigated further with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which revealed a swelling near the femoral circumflex vessels. A computed tomography (CT) angiogram revealed a 15 mm pseudoaneurysm of the femoral circumflex artery, which was successfully treated by selective catheterisation and embolisation. Hip arthroscopists should be sufficiently familiar with the vascular anatomy around the hip and keep this complication in mind when releasing the iliopsoas tendon arthroscopically especially in revision cases with adhesions. PMID:28322718

  6. Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation to chondral lesion in femoral head.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Sarper; Toker, Berkin; Taser, Omer

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the treatment of 2 cases of full-thickness cartilage defect of the femoral head. The authors performed osteochondral autologous transplantation with a different technique that has not been reported to date. One patient was 37 years old, and the other was 42 years old. Both presented with hip pain. In both patients, radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a focal chondral defect on the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabular impingement. A retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation technique combined with hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic impingement treatment was performed. After a 2-month recovery period, the symptoms were resolved. In the first year of follow-up, Harris Hip scores improved significantly (case 1, 56.6 to 87.6; case 2, 58.6 to 90). The technique described yielded good short- and midterm clinical and radiologic outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe a retrograde osteochondral transplantation technique performed with hip arthroscopy in the femoral head.

  7. Treatment of the Bullet, Traversing Femoral Neck, Lodged in Hip Joint: Initial Arthroscopic Removal and Subsequent Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Çatma, Mehmet Faruk; Ünlü, Serhan; Ersan, Önder; Öztürk, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There have been several reports on arthroscopically assisted removal of the bullet imbedded in hip joint in the literature. Similarly, in this case, a bullet lodged in acetabulum was extracted with arthroscopic technique. What makes this case unique in the literature is that the bullet removed from the acetabulum traversed the femoral neck. Case Report: Male patient aged 32 years with a low-velocity gunshot wound was referred to the emergency room on August 28, 2012. The projectile was lodged in acetabular side of the hip joint transversing through the femoral neck. A hip arthroscopy was performed for bullet removal. Two years after surgery, the patient had groin pain and underwent a safe dislocation for femoral chondral injury. In the last follow-up in the second post-operative year, the patient had no clinical complaint. Conclusion: Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive and proper procedure for removal of foreign materials such as a bullet in the hip joint. Arthrotomy can be reserved for further complications such as chondral injury as in this case. PMID:28164046

  8. Cold bupivacaine versus magnesium sulfate added to room temperature bupivacaine in sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve block in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alzeftawy, Ashraf Elsayed; El-Daba, Ahmad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cooling of local anesthetic potentiates its action and increases its duration. Magnesium sulfate (MgSo4) added to local anesthetic prolongs the duration of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. Aim: The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the effect of cold to 4°C bupivacaine 0.5% and Mg added to normal temperature (20–25°C) bupivacaine 0.5% during sonar-guided combined femoral and sciatic nerve blocks on the onset of sensory and motor block, intraoperative anesthesia, duration of sensory and motor block, and postoperative analgesia in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Patients and Methods: A total of 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I and II patients who were scheduled to undergo elective ACL reconstruction were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly allocated to 3 equal groups to receive sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. In Group I, 17 ml of room temperature (20–25°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of room temperature saline were injected for each nerve block whereas in Group II, 17 ml of cold (4°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of cold saline were injected for each nerve block. In Group III, 17 ml of room temperature 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of MgSo4 5% were injected for each nerve block. The onset of sensory and motor block was evaluated every 3 min for 30 min. Surgery was started after complete sensory and motor block were achieved. Intraoperatively, the patients were evaluated for heart rate and mean arterial pressure, rescue analgesic and sedative requirements plus patient and surgeon satisfaction. Postoperatively, hemodynamics, duration of analgesia, resolution of motor block, time to first analgesic, total analgesic consumption, and the incidence of side effects were recorded. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in demographic data, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and duration of

  9. Incipient malunion of an isolated humeral trochlea fracture treated with an elbow hemiarthroplasty: case report.

    PubMed

    Lechasseur, Benoit; Laflamme, Mélissa; Leclerc, Alexandre; Bédard, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old woman with severe elbow ankylosis 10 weeks after a trochlea fracture treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Imaging confirmed failure of open reduction and internal fixation with a displaced and severely damaged trochlea. We treated the nascent malunited trochlea and associated elbow ankylosis with a distal humeral hemiarthroplasty and circumferential elbow arthrolysis. The patient regained functional range of motion of the elbow and had minimal pain. Distal humeral hemiarthroplasty, which has been indicated for acute fractures involving the capitellum or the entire distal humerus, may also be indicated for certain isolated complex fractures of the trochlea.

  10. Arthroscopic psoas tenotomy.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Michael; Jung, Jochen; Dienst, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Tenotomy may be indicated for psoas tendinitis or painful snapping if conservative treatment remains unsuccessful. Because of significant complications with open techniques, endoscopic operations have been developed. We present a new arthroscopic technique to access and release the psoas tendon from the hip joint. This procedure can be performed in addition to other arthroscopic procedures of the hip joint or alone. To exclude additional hip disease, a diagnostic round of the joint should be completed. After hip arthroscopy of the central compartment has been performed, traction is released and the 30 degrees arthroscope is placed via the proximal anterolateral portal lying on the anterior femoral neck. The medial synovial fold can be identified. This fold lies slightly medially underneath the anteromedial capsule at the level of the psoas tendon. The arthroscope is turned toward the anterior capsule. Sometimes, the tendon shines through a thin articular capsule, or it may even be accessed directly via a hole connecting the hip joint and the iliopectineal bursa at the level of the anterior head-neck junction. If this cannot be done, an electrothermic probe is introduced via the anterior portal to make a 2-cm transverse capsular incision. The tendon is released with the back side of the electrothermic device turned to the iliacus muscle that lies anterior to the psoas tendon. A complete release is achieved when the tendon stumps can be seen gapping at a distance and the fibers of the iliacus muscle are visible. The first 9 patients who underwent surgery performed according to this technique developed no complications, and their hip flexion strength was restored to normal within 3 months.

  11. An arthroscopic hip documentation form.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Satesh; Khan, Munir; Kuiper, Jan-Herman; Richardson, James B; Davies, Jonathan P

    2008-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is becoming increasingly popular. A simple, precise, and practical means of recording arthroscopic findings will be useful for diagnostic, research, and audit purposes. Basic principles of cartography exist to produce two-dimensional paper representations of our spherical planet. We used the same principles to produce a two-dimensional map of the acetabulum and femoral head. The resulting hip diagram shows the acetabulum as viewed from the side and the femoral head as viewed from above. The ligamentum teres is attached to the medial margin of the head. The head-neck junction and part of the femoral neck is shown at the opposite margin of the ligamentum teres. The hip documentation form is simple, precise, and accurate. We use it to record our findings at hip arthroscopy, which we have used to assist us in our practice.

  12. Arthroscopic Management of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pitta, Michael; Davis, William; Argintar, Evan H

    2016-02-01

    Arthroscopic surgery is commonly performed in the knee, shoulder, elbow, and hip. However, the role it plays in the management of osteoarthritis is controversial. Routine arthroscopic management of osteoarthritis was once common, but this practice has been recently scrutinized. Although some believe that there is no role for arthroscopic treatment in the management of osteoarthritis, it may be appropriate and beneficial in certain situations. The clinical success of such treatment may be rooted in appropriate patient selection and adherence to a specific surgical technique. Arthroscopy may serve as an effective and less invasive option than traditional methods of managing osteoarthritis.

  13. Modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-09-01

    The open modified Brostrom anatomic repair technique is widely accepted as the reference standard for lateral ankle stabilization. However, there is high incidence of intra-articular pathologies associated with chronic lateral ankle instability which may not be addressed by an isolated open Brostrom procedure. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with suture anchor has been described for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates seemed to be higher than open Brostrom procedure. Modification of the arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with the use of bone tunnel may reduce the risk of certain complications.

  14. Intraoperative measurements of femoral anterior tangent (FAT) line for determining the rotational alignment of femoral component of total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroki; Gejo, Ryuichi; Tokunaga, Ayano; Hirano, Norikazu; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we reported using CT images that the anterior surface of the femur immediately proximal to the trochlea and its tangent line (femoral anterior tangent line; FAT line) could be used as a good index of the femoral rotation. In this study, we developed a jig that allowed us to measure the FAT line during surgery, and we examine the relation between preoperative and intraoperative measurement values. The results indicated that the average intraoperative measurement value of the 'surgical' FAT line was 9.8° ± 3.2° internally rotated using surgical transepicondylar axis reference. This value significantly correlated to preoperative FAT line/clinical transepicondylar axis angle. These findings demonstrated that FAT line is a useful index for appropriate rotational alignment of femoral component, both before and during TKA.

  15. Arthroscopic core decompression of the lunate in early stage Kienbock disease of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Smith, Michael L; Watts, Adam C

    2011-03-01

    Since the first description of Kienbock disease in 1910, the etiology and treatment have remained controversial topics. Core decompression is an accepted treatment option in early-stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and more recently the humeral head. This paper reports the technique of arthroscopic fluoroscopically guided core decompression of the lunate with 6-year results.

  16. Creating and Closing the T-Capsulotomy for Improved Visualization During Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Reardon, Patrick J.; Levy, Bruce A.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of femoroacetabular impingement through an arthroscopic approach has gained widespread popularity in recent years. Although outcomes are generally favorable, one of the most common reasons for failure is incomplete resection of cam lesions of the femoral neck. As a result, the T-capsulotomy has been introduced as a method for improving access to the femoral head-neck junction, which is not always visible through a standard interportal capsulotomy. The T-capsulotomy has the benefits of improving arthroscopic visualization of the femoral neck, reducing overall fluoroscopy exposure for the patient and surgeon, and facilitating capsular plication. We present a reliable and efficient method for creating and repairing the T-capsulotomy. We routinely perform this technique in patients with cam lesions that are too large or too distal to safely visualize and decompress through an interportal capsulotomy. PMID:26870654

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication. PMID:27027027

  18. [Arthroscopic treatment for osteoarthritic knee].

    PubMed

    Bloom, Shlomo; Lebel, David; Cohen, Eugen; Atar, Dan; Rath, Ehud

    2008-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of knee morbidity. Age and overweight are the main risk factors for development of knee OA. The majority of patients respond to conservative treatment. For those who don't, surgical treatment is the only alternative. Arthroscopic surgery for the osteoarthritic knee is a well known procedure. Recently, numerous publications addressed the advantages of arthroscopic treatment for this indication. Some of the publications concluded that arthroscopic treatment for knee OA equals placebo. Others found temporary relief of symptoms. Among special subgroup of patients, in which acute pain exacerbation, mechanical block or early OA, utilizing arthroscopic techniques revealed satisfactory results. In this review, we discuss the indications and contraindications for arthroscopic treatment of the osteoarthritic knee according to the latest literature.

  19. Tibial tubercle osteotomy for patello-femoral joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew J; Mandalia, Vipul I

    2016-03-01

    Tibial tubercle osteotomy has a long history in the management of patella instability and patello-femoral arthritis. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the literature describing the biomechanics of the patello-femoral joint and the rationale behind the use of the tibial tubercle osteotomy in modern day practice. Several different tibial tubercle osteotomies are available and we aim to detail the concepts behind their use and the subsequent clinical results. With continued developments of chondrocyte implantation techniques, the potential to fill defects on the chondral surface of either the patella or trochlea in conjunction with a tibial tubercle osteotomy may well become more commonplace in a group that is commonly young and difficult to manage. Level of evidence III.

  20. Arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Bontempo, Nicholas A; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopy is an advancing field in orthopedics, the applications of which have been expanding over time. Traditionally, excision of ganglion cysts has been done in an open fashion. However, more recently, studies show outcomes following arthroscopic excision to be as good as open excision. Cosmetically, the incisions are smaller and heal faster following arthroscopy. In addition, there is the suggested benefit that patients will regain function and return to work faster following arthroscopic excision. More prospective studies comparing open and arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts need to be done in order to delineate if there is a true functional benefit.

  1. Arthroscopic Resection of Osteochondroma of Hip Joint Associated with Internal Snapping: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Heung-Tae; Hwang, Deuk-Soo; Jeon, Yoo-Sun

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year old male patient visited the hospital complaining of inguinal pain and internal snapping of right hip joint. In physical examination, the patient was presumed to be diagnosed femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tear. In radiologic evaluation, FAI and acetabular labral tear were identified and bony tumor associated with internal snapping was found on the posteromedial portion of the femoral neck. Despite of conservative treatment, there was no symptomatic improvement. So arthroscopic labral repair, osteoplasty and resection of bony tumor were performed. The tumor was pathologically diagnosed as osteochondroma through biopsy and all symptoms improved after surgery. There was no recurrence, complication or abnormal finding during 1 year follow up. Osteochondroma located at posteromedial portion of femoral neck can be a cause of internal snapping hip and although technical demands are challenging, arthroscopic resection can be a good treatment option. PMID:27536601

  2. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  3. Arthroscopic revision of Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Neri, Brian R; Tuckman, David V; Bravman, Jonathan T; Yim, Duke; Sahajpal, Deenesh T; Rokito, Andrew S

    2007-01-01

    The success of revision surgery for failed Bankart repair is not well known. This purpose of this study was to report the success rates achieved using arthroscopic techniques to revise failed Bankart repairs. Twelve arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs were performed on patients with recurrent unidirectional shoulder instability after open or arthroscopic Bankart repair. Follow-up was available on 11 of the 12 patients at a mean of 34.4 months (range, 25-56 months). The surgical findings, possible modes of failure, shoulder scores (Rowe score, University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Simple Shoulder Test), and clinical outcome were evaluated. Various modes of failure were recognized during revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Good-to-excellent results were obtained in 8 patients (73%) undergoing revision stabilization according to Rowe and UCLA scoring. A subluxation or dislocation event occurred in 3 (27%) of the 11 patients at a mean of 8.7 months (range, 6-12 months) postoperatively. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs are technically challenging procedures but can be used to achieve stable, pain-free, functional shoulders with return to prior sport. Owing to limited follow-up and the small number of patients in this study, we were unable to conclude any pattern of failure or selection criteria for this procedure.

  4. Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis: a new arthroscopic procedure.

    PubMed

    Arriaza, R; Leyes, M

    2011-01-01

    Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is considered an aggressive and technically demanding procedure that can be used to treat severe deformities of the hindfoot, and it is rarely performed. The indications for ankle arthroscopy are increasing, and arthroscopic tibiotalar arthrodesis is a common and successful procedure, but arthroscopic tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis has not been previously reported in the literature. A case of extensive talus necrosis with severe hindfoot deformity treated by means of an arthroscopic tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is presented.

  5. The pathoanatomy and arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, L. M.; Leunig, M.

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes pain and chondrolabral damage via mechanical overload during movement of the hip. It is caused by many different types of pathoanatomy, including the cam ‘bump’, decreased head–neck offset, acetabular retroversion, global acetabular overcoverage, prominent anterior–inferior iliac spine, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and the sequelae of childhood Perthes’ disease. Both evolutionary and developmental factors may cause FAI. Prevalence studies show that anatomic variations that cause FAI are common in the asymptomatic population. Young athletes may be predisposed to FAI because of the stress on the physis during development. Other factors, including the soft tissues, may also influence symptoms and chondrolabral damage. FAI and the resultant chondrolabral pathology are often treated arthroscopically. Although the results are favourable, morphologies can be complex, patient expectations are high and the surgery is challenging. The long-term outcomes of hip arthroscopy are still forthcoming and it is unknown if treatment of FAI will prevent arthrosis. PMID:23610655

  6. Groove model of tibia-femoral osteoarthritis in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Huub M; Weinans, Harrie; Coeleveld, Katja; van Rijen, Mattie H P; Lafeber, Floris P J G; Mastbergen, Simon C

    2017-03-01

    Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will counteract the potential beneficial effects of therapy. The groove model of osteoarthritis uses a one-time trigger, surgically induced cartilage damage on the femoral condyles, and has been validated for the canine tibia-femoral compartment. The present study evaluates this model for the rat knee joint. The articular cartilage of the weight bearing surface of both femoral condyles and trochlea were damaged (grooved) without damaging the underlying subchondral bone. Severity of joint degeneration was histologically assessed, in addition to patella cartilage damage, and subchondral bone characteristics by means of (contrast-enhanced) micro-CT. Mild histological degeneration of the surgically untouched tibial plateau cartilage was observed in addition to damage of the femoral condyles, without clear synovial tissue inflammation. Contrast enhanced micro-CT demonstrated proteoglycan loss of the surgically untouched patella cartilage. Besides, a more sclerotic structure of the subchondral bone was observed. The tibia-femoral groove model in a rat results in mild knee joint degeneration, without permanent joint instability and joint inflammation. This makes the rat groove model a useful model to study the onset and progression of post-traumatic non-inflammatory osteoarthritis, creating a relatively sensitive model to study disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:496-505, 2017.

  7. Groove model of tibia‐femoral osteoarthritis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    de Visser, Huub M.; Weinans, Harrie; Coeleveld, Katja; van Rijen, Mattie H. P.; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will counteract the potential beneficial effects of therapy. The groove model of osteoarthritis uses a one‐time trigger, surgically induced cartilage damage on the femoral condyles, and has been validated for the canine tibia‐femoral compartment. The present study evaluates this model for the rat knee joint. The articular cartilage of the weight bearing surface of both femoral condyles and trochlea were damaged (grooved) without damaging the underlying subchondral bone. Severity of joint degeneration was histologically assessed, in addition to patella cartilage damage, and subchondral bone characteristics by means of (contrast‐enhanced) micro‐CT. Mild histological degeneration of the surgically untouched tibial plateau cartilage was observed in addition to damage of the femoral condyles, without clear synovial tissue inflammation. Contrast enhanced micro‐CT demonstrated proteoglycan loss of the surgically untouched patella cartilage. Besides, a more sclerotic structure of the subchondral bone was observed. The tibia‐femoral groove model in a rat results in mild knee joint degeneration, without permanent joint instability and joint inflammation. This makes the rat groove model a useful model to study the onset and progression of post‐traumatic non‐inflammatory osteoarthritis, creating a relatively sensitive model to study disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:496–505, 2017. PMID:27183198

  8. Our Experience with Patello femoral joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Pablo; Arteaga, Gonzalo; Vargas, Medardo; Naranjo, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ten to fifteen percent of knee arthritis is reported to be isolated patellofemoral arthritis. Total knee arthroplasty is not recommended for isolated patella femoral arthritis particularly in young patients. We present the retrospective review our series in 7 years. Objectives: The aim of this presentation is to describe our experience in the management of patellofemoral osteoarthritis with the use of the partial patellofemoral arthroplasty, as well as to delineate the pitfalls and causes of revision in our initial series of 153 cases. Methods: between 2009 and 2016, our group performed 157 patellofemoral arthroplasties (PFA) 74% being in women, and 26% in men, the mean age for women was 58 yrs. And 38 yrs. for men, our initial 13 cases were managed with the Avon prosthesis (Stryker Corporation Kalamazoo, Michigan), and then we switched to the Vanguard PF (Zimmer-Biomet Warsaw In), both systems are an On-Lay design that is more flexible for addressing dysplastic trochleas that are more common in our population. Results: We performed a Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) for the assessment of the success of the procedure and obtained 87% of patients with excellent results (95 to 100), 10% with fair results (70 to 90) and 3% with poor outcomes (50), we performed a total of 3 revisions due to pain or progress to global arthritis. Conclusion: The PFA is a successful, safe and reproducible surgery that can be used in the group of patients that have isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. It requires a thorough knowledge of the patello femoral joint biomechanics, and physiopathology.

  9. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo C.; Queiroz, Marcelo C.; Ono, Nelson K.; Honda, Emerson K.; Guimarāes, Rodrigo P; Junior, Walter Ricioli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the short-term follow-up results of arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Our hypothesis is that arthroscopic treatment results are favorable. Methods: Between August 2003 and August 2007, 28 hips had femoroacetabular impingement treated by hip arthroscopy. The mean age was 34 years, with mean follow-up period of 27 months. Clinical results were graded with the modified Harris hip score, which was measured pre- and postoperatively. Patients had also their internal rotation analyzed. These parameters were calculated by using Wilcoxon's t test for analysis of nonparametric paired samples performed. Results: The mean preoperative Harris Hip Score was 54.2, improving to 94.8 postoperatively (p<0,001). The mean increase was 37.5 points. We had 4 good results (15%) and 24 excellent results (85%). Preoperatively, the patients had a mean internal rotation of 17°, and, postoperatively, 36°. The average internal rotation increase was 19° (p<0,001). Conclusions: The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement presents satisfactory results. PMID:27004177

  10. Closed Intramedullary Derotational Osteotomy and Hip Arthroscopy for Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement From Femoral Retroversion

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Martin, Hal D.

    2014-01-01

    Femoral retroversion is an uncommon cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may require surgical treatment beyond arthroscopic or open femoroplasty. We present the case of a young adult with bilateral severe femoral retroversion in whom such treatment failed. We discuss the rationale, surgical technique, and outcome of this patient, who underwent bilateral closed intramedullary derotational proximal femoral osteotomies and interlocked nailing with adjunctive pre- and post-osteotomy hip arthroscopies. Clinical improvement with normal foot progression angles, radiographic union, and resolution of bilateral cam femoroacetabular impingement from femoral retroversion was achieved. This surgery permits rapid institution of weight-bearing ambulation and an early rehabilitative program. Femoral retroversion may be an underappreciated and insufficiently treated cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may be readily detected and successfully remedied with this less invasive procedure. PMID:24749047

  11. Results of arthroscopic meniscal repair

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, María Belén; Arroquy, Damián; Chahla, Jorge; Guiñazú, Jorge; Bisso, Martín Carboni; Vilaseca, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Currently the arthroscopic treatment of meniscal pathology has become one of the most common procedures in orthopedic practice and although in most cases meniscectomy is done, meniscal sutures are the treatment of choice when a reparable lesion is diagnosed, especially in young patients. It has been reported that the meniscal repair leads to a lower incidence of developing degenerative changes in the long-term when compared with meniscectomy and nonsurgical treatment of meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of meniscal repair achieved in our sports medicine practice. Methods: Between 2006 and 2015, 62 meniscal tears in 58 patients with a mean age of 31 years (range 15-58) were repaired. Mean follow-up was 52 months (range 6-120 months). In 16 patients (28%) was associated with arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. The repair techniques used included outside-in sutures, inside-out sutures, all-inside sutures and a combination of techniques. Failure of the repair was defined by the requirement for repeat knee arthroscopy and partial or subtotal meniscectomy. The indication of arthroscopic revision was based on the presence of mechanical symptoms, after the suture. Results: Failure of meniscus repair occurred in four patients (failure rate: 6.45%), one case was associated with ACL reconstruction (failure rate: 6.25%) and 3 had undergone isolated meniscal suture (failure rate: 8%). The average time for the reoperation was 15 months (4-24). We had no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: The reported failure rate of meniscal repair in stable knees varies between 12% and 43%, with reports that demonstrate a clinical success rate of 100%. In this study, we obtained a success rate of 93.5%. These results are slightly higher than those in the literature, which can be attributed to careful selection of patients and the fact that clinical success tends to be better than the assessed arthroscopically. In summary, we consider the

  12. Arthroscopic extraction of a stainless steel foreign body imbedded in the tibial plateau.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Lee, Y T; Kim, H J

    1998-01-01

    We present a case of foreign body synovitis in the knee joint caused by a fragment of stainless steel imbedded in the tibial plateau for 10 years, which was extracted successfully using an arthroscope. The cause of synovitis was the long-standing release of small stainless steel particles resulting from the abrasion of the steel against the opposing lateral femoral condyle. For an articular foreign body, arthroscopy is by far the best treatment. Arthroscopy allows the surgeon to localize as well as to extract even the smallest foreign body fragment, and also provides for washing out of the joint cavity.

  13. Ankle instability and arthroscopic lateral ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle ligament insufficiency has focused on 2 main categories: local soft-tissue reconstruction and tendon grafts/transfer procedures. There is an increasing interest in the arthroscopic solutions for chronic instability of the ankle. Recent biomechanical studies suggest the at least one of the arthroscopic techniques can provide equivalent results to current open local soft-tissue reconstruction (such as the modified Brostrom technique). Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction is becoming an increasingly acceptable method for the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability.

  14. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  15. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room.

  16. Does patellofemoral congruence following total knee arthroplasty correlate with pain or function? Intraoperative arthroscopic assessment of 30 cases

    PubMed Central

    Senioris, Antoine; Rahali, Said; Malekpour, Louis; Dujardin, Franck; Courage, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior knee pain (AKP) is observed in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) both with and without patellar resurfacing, and neither patellar denervation nor secondary resurfacing are effective for treating the symptoms. The exact causes for pain remain unclear, though abnormal patellofemoral forces due to patellar malalignment or inadequate implant design can play an important role. The purpose of this study was to arthroscopically evaluate patellofemoral congruence after wound closure following TKA without patellar resurfacing and correlate it to patellar morphology and postoperative pain and function. Methods The authors prospectively studied 30 patients that received uncemented mobile-bearing TKA. Patellofemoral congruence was assessed arthroscopically after wound closure by estimating the contact area between the native patella and the prosthetic trochlea (> two-thirds, > one-third, < one-third). The findings were correlated to preoperative assessments of patellar geometry (Wiberg classification using X-rays) and clinical outcomes [Knee Society Score (KSS), AKP on Visual Analogic Scale (VAS), and patient satisfaction]. Results Knees of 22 women and 8 men aged 69.8 years (range, 61–84 years) were analyzed at 16 months (range, 12–23 months). Preoperative patellar geometry was Wiberg type A in 11, type B in 12 and type C in 7 knees. Postoperative KSS was 79.1 (range, 50.0–94) and the VAS for AKP was 1.6±1.3 (median, 1; range, 0–5). Patellar congruence was correlated with patellar morphology (P<0.001) but not correlated with any clinical outcomes (KSS, VAS or satisfaction). There were also no statistical correlations between patellar morphology or patellofemoral congruence and patient characteristics. Conclusions While patellar morphology and patellofemoral congruence are strongly related, they are not associated with clinical outcomes or patient demographics. Considering that numerous incongruent patellofemoral joints were pain-free, and conversely

  17. Arthroscopic lysis in knee arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Vidal, C; Medina, E; Baena, J

    1993-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis continues to be a difficult complication in articular surgery on the knee. We present our experience in 21 cases of arthroscopic lysis as an alternative to mobilization under anesthesia. The technique begins with the liberation of the adhesions of the suprapatellar pouch, continues down both gutters, and ends with a cleaning of the notch where necessary. When a restriction of patellar mobility persists, we make a retinacular release. The results obtained are very satisfactory, with an average increase in the arc of mobility of 68 degrees. The average gain in mobility at 6 months is significantly greater than that achieved in the immediate postoperative period. Longer follow-up showed no improvement in range of motion after 6 months.

  18. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  19. Arthroscopic landmarks of the equine carpus.

    PubMed

    Hurtig, M B; Fretz, P B

    1986-11-15

    The radiocarpal and middle carpal joints of 4 clinically normal horses and 24 necropsy specimens were examined with an arthroscope to describe the topographic anatomy of these joints. The carpal bones of the radiocarpal joint had congruent articular surfaces in extension, but carpal flexion resulted in a stairstep between the radial and intermediate carpal bones. The variable surface anatomy, as well as the restricted synovial space and the technical limitations of the arthroscope, contributed to the need for more than one arthroscopic approach to the radiocarpal joint to ensure a thorough examination. The middle carpal joint's hinge-like biomechanics resulted in a spacious synovial cavity that was more amenable to arthroscopic examination. Careful planning was necessary to ensure that areas of interest were distant from the arthroscope-insertion site to allow the best perspective possible. The lateral approach to the middle carpal joint provided the best viewing of both facets of the intermediate and third carpal bones as well as the dorsal rim of the radial carpal bone. The medial approach did not allow complete inspection of these areas.

  20. Femoral impaction grafting

    PubMed Central

    Scanelli, John A; Brown, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Femoral impaction grafting is a reconstruction option applicable to both simple and complex femoral component revisions. It is one of the preferred techniques for reconstructing large femoral defects when the isthmus is non-supportive. The available level of evidence is primarily derived from case series, which shows a mean survivorship of 90.5%, with revision or re-operation as the end-point, with an average follow-up of 11 years. The rate of femoral fracture requiring re-operation or revision of the component varies between several large case series, ranging from 2.5% to 9%, with an average of 5.4%. PMID:23362469

  1. Excimer laser in arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.

    1991-05-01

    The development of efficient high-power lasersystems for use in surgery, especially in arthroscopic fields, leads to a new push for all endoscopic techniques. Both techniques, laser and endoscope, complete each other in an ideal way and allow applications which could not be reached with conventional techniques. One of the newer laser types is the excimer laser, which will be a good choice for surface treatment because of its very considerate interaction with tissue. One example is the ablation or smoothing of articular cartilage and meniscal shaving in orthopaedics. On the other hand, the power of this laser system is high enough to cut tissue, for instance in the lateral release, and offers therefore an alternative to the mechanical and electrical instruments. All lasers can only work fine with effective delivery systems. Sometimes there is only a single fiber, which becomes very stiff at diameters of more than 800 micrometers . This fiber often allows only the tangential treatment of tissue, most of the laser power is lost in the background. New fiber systems with many, sometimes hundreds of very thin single fibers, could offer a solution. Special handpieces and fibersystems offer distinct advantages in small joint arthroscopy, especially those for use with excimer lasers will be discussed.

  2. Femoral head-neck junction reconstruction, after iatrogenic bone resection.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Alvarez, Alberto; Lash, Nicholas; Beck, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic over-resection of the head-neck junction during the treatment of a cam deformity can be a devastating complication and is difficult to treat. Large defects of the femoral head-neck junction (FHNJ) increase the risk of femoral neck fracture and can also affect hip biomechanics. We describe a case of an iatrogenic defect of the FHNJ due to excessive bone resection, and a previously non-described treatment using iliac crest autograft to restore femoral head-neck sphericity and hip joint stability. After protecting the femoral neck with an angled blade plate, the large anterior FHNJ defect was reconstructed using autogenous iliac crest bone graft; sphericity was restored by contouring the graft using spherical templates. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed up to 2 years. Results at 2 years showed no residual groin pain and normal range of motion. The Oxford Hip Score was 46/48, rated as excellent. Computed tomography (CT) scanning showed union of bone graft without resorption, and CT arthrogram indicating retained sphericity of the FHNJ without evidence of degenerative changes in the articular surface. This novel surgical technique can be used to restore the structural integrity and contour of the FHNJ that contains a significant anterior defect.

  3. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthroscopic shoulder anatomy, anatomic variants, and arthroscopic findings in anterior shoulder instability, is presented. In addition, correlation of arthroscopic findings with physical examination and advanced imaging (CT and MRI) in order to improve our understanding in anterior shoulder instability pathology is discussed. Results: Shoulder instability represents a broad spectrum of disease and a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy is the key for a successful treatment of the unstable shoulder. Patients can have a variety of pathologies concomitant with a traditional Bankart lesion, such as injuries of the glenoid (bony Bankart), injuries of the glenoid labrum, superiorly (SLAP) or anteroinferiorly (e.g. anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion, and Perthes), capsular lesions (humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament), and accompanying osseous-cartilage lesions (Hill-Sachs, glenolabral articular disruption). Shoulder arthroscopy allows for a detailed visualization and a dynamic examination of all anatomic structures, identification of pathologic findings, and treatment of all concomitant lesions. Conclusion: Surgeons must be well prepared and understanding the normal anatomy of the glenohumeral joint, including its anatomic variants to seek for the possible pathologic lesions in anterior shoulder instability during shoulder arthroscopy. Patient selection criteria, improved surgical techniques, and implants available have contributed to the enhancement of

  4. Arthroscopically assisted percutaneous fixation of Bennett fractures.

    PubMed

    Culp, Randall W; Johnson, Jeff W

    2010-01-01

    Arthroscopic-assisted reduction and fixation of Bennett-type fractures of the thumb metacarpal allow for the confirmation of reduction as well as the assessment of the degree of chondral damage. With use of a 1.9-mm arthroscope and a traction tower, direct visualization and reduction is possible. Traditional methods of fixation are used to secure the fracture fragment. Postoperative rehabilitation follows the usual protocol used in both open and percutaneous techniques. However, the potential to obtain and confirm a more accurate articular reduction may reduce the incidence of late arthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal articulation.

  5. [Comprehensive arthroscopic management of shoulder osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Ríos, D; Martetschlager, F; Millett, P J

    2012-01-01

    Shoulder osteoarthritis has been considered as a cause of severe pain and loss of shoulder function. Many patients with shoulder osteoarthritis are young and have demanding activities, which leads to questioning the choice of arthroplasty. This is why in this paper we describe the comprehensive arthroscopic management (CAM) that combines arthroscopic debridement, capsular release, osteoplasty of the lower humeral head, and auxiliary nerve decompression. In our experience this technique has shown short-term promising results as it decreases pain and allows patients to resume high performance demanding activities.

  6. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle is also known as frozen ankle and results in marked fibrosis and contracture of the ankle capsule. Arthroscopic capsular release is indicated for symptomatic frozen ankle that is resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated for ankle stiffness due to degenerative joint disease, intra-articular malunion, or adhesion of the extensors of the ankle. The procedure consists of endoscopic posterior ankle capsulectomy and arthroscopic anterior ankle capsulotomy. It has the advantages of being minimally invasive surgery and allowing early postoperative vigorous mobilization of the ankle joint.

  7. Modified Arthroscopic Brostrom Procedure With Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-08-01

    The open anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments (modified Brostrom procedure) is widely accepted as the standard surgical stabilization procedure for lateral ankle instability that does not respond to conservative measures. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedures with a suture anchor have been reported to achieve both anatomic repair of the lateral ankle ligaments and management of the associated intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates are higher than open Brostom procedures. Many of these complications are associated with the use of a suture anchor. We report a modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure in which the anterolateral ankle capsule is anchored to the lateral malleolus through small bone tunnels instead of suture anchors.

  8. Arthroscopic Arthrodesis of the Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic syndesmosis disruption can occur if an acute lesion is missed or inadequately managed. This can result in significant functional deficit and development of post-traumatic ankle arthritis. Anatomic reduction of the syndesmosis and maintenance of the reduction by syndesmotic screw fixation alone, ligamentous reconstruction, or fusion of the syndesmosis are recommended. A technique of arthroscopic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis arthrodesis is described.

  9. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  10. Arthroscopically Assisted Evacuation of Brodie’s Abscess of Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Manandhar, Rajeev R; Lakhey, Shisir; Rijal, Kiran P

    2017-01-01

    Brodie’s abscess is a type of subacute osteomyelitis. Opinions differ as to whether treatment should be surgical or medical for these classic lesions. Failure of symptoms to resolve after six weeks of antibiotics or worsening of the condition during treatment should be followed by surgical treatment. Clinical signs of subperiosteal pus or synovitis indicate that the subacute infection has transformed into an acute component, and it must be drained surgically. Surgical treatment is comprised of evacuation and curettage for small lesions and evacuation, packing with cancellous bone chips, for large cavities. When clinical signs of synovitis are present, with a possibility of pus within a joint, arthrotomy is performed. Arthroscopically assisted evacuation of Brodie’s abscess from the distal femur has never been reported in the literature. We report a case of a 23-year-old female who presented with pain and swelling over the left knee for four months. There was diffuse swelling in the knee; tenderness was present over medial femoral condyle and range of motion (ROM) of the knee was five to 45 degrees at the time of presentation. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed Brodie’s abscess on the lateral aspect of the medial femoral condyle. The patient was treated with the evacuation of pus and curettage of the cavity using an arthroscope. After two weeks, the patient had mild pain with knee ROM from zero to 45 degrees, and at the one-month follow-up, the knee ROM improved to zero to 90 degrees. At the two-year follow-up, the patient had no pain, with knee ROM from zero to 120 degrees. PMID:28168137

  11. Arthroscopic Keller technique for Freiberg disease.

    PubMed

    Carro, Luis Perez; Golano, Pau; Fariñas, Oscar; Cerezal, Luis; Abad, Jose

    2004-07-01

    Freiberg disease is a disorder that has a predilection for the second metatarsal head. Keller excision of the base of the proximal phalanx is a procedure described for the treatment of late-stage Freiberg disease. We describe a case of a 60-year-old man, with a stage IV lesion according to Smillie's classification, treated by debridement, removal of the free body, and arthroscopic Keller excision. Arthroscopic treatment allows the patient to begin and maintain an aggressive postoperative physical therapy program immediately after surgery, thus decreasing the risk of scarring and contracture. At last evaluation, 2 years postoperatively, he is symptom-free. A suggested pattern of minimally invasive surgery management of this disease is proposed.

  12. Arthroscopic Interphalangeal Arthrodesis of the Thumb.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrodesis of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb is an effective treatment for pain, deformity, or instability at the joint. Arthroscopic interphalangeal arthrodesis of the thumb is a minimally invasive surgery and has better cosmetic results and less surgical trauma as compared with the open approaches. The purpose of this technical note is to report the details of the arthroscopic interphalangeal arthrodesis with oblique placement of the headless screw. No traction device is used for this technique. It is indicated in recalcitrant painful arthritis of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb. It is contraindicated in case of significant deformity of the joint as a result of subchondral bone collapse. It is also contraindicated if there is impinging volar osteophyte, local infection, or lack of expertise.

  13. Arthroscopic Taloplasty for an Anterolateral Snapping Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Anterior ankle snapping syndrome is rare. Snapping of the extensor digitorum longus due to attenuated inferior extensor retinaculum and snapping due to hypertrophied or low-lying peroneal tertius muscle have been reported. We reported a new mechanism of anterolateral snapping due to a hypertrophied talar head. Anterolateral snapping ankle can be revealed by active dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the ankle with the foot inverted. Foot inversion will tension the inferior extensor retinaculum and uncover the dorsolateral prominence of the talar head. The dorsolateral prominence of the talar head will snap over the proximal edge of the inferior extensor retinaculum. This technical note reports the technique of arthroscopic contouring of the talar head via extra-articular ankle arthroscopy. We named this technique arthroscopic taloplasty.

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of unstable total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Ricardo; Aguinaga, Iñaki; Corcuera, Irene; Ponte, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime

    2010-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of apparently well-implanted but unstable total hip replacement prostheses. We present 2 cases of arthroscopically assisted capsular tightening in unstable total hip replacements. Both cases had significant capsular laxity. Case 2 had impingement of the lower part of the acetabulum with the lesser trochanter that caused hip dislocation. Early revision surgery can be avoided with the use of this technique in selected cases of unstable total hip replacements.

  15. Complications of arthroscopic surgery of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, A. V.; Bardakos, N. V.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent years hip arthroscopic surgery has evolved into one of the most rapidly expanding fields in orthopaedic surgery. Complications are largely transient and incidences between 0.5% and 6.4% have been reported. However, major complications can and do occur. This article analyses the reported complications and makes recommendations based on the literature review and personal experience on how to minimise them. PMID:23610683

  16. [Treatment of lateral ankle joint instability. Open or arthroscopic?].

    PubMed

    Galla, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle joint instability often necessitates operative treatment. Operative treatment methods are classified into non-anatomical tenodesis, anatomical reconstruction and direct repair. In addition to open approaches, arthroscopic techniques are increasingly becoming established. This article describes the various operative treatment procedures, their advantages and disadvantages and in particular the arthroscopic feasibility.

  17. Arthroscopic visualization during excision of a central physeal bar.

    PubMed

    Stricker, S

    1992-01-01

    A centrally located developmental physeal bar in the proximal tibia was removed via a metaphyseal window. The use of an arthroscope to assist in the complete removal of the bone bridge is described. The arthroscope improved visualization and allowed reduction in the size of the metaphyseal window. At 2-year follow-up, the growth plate showed no evidence of bar reformation.

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of patients with moderate arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg; Aldawoudy, Akram M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effect of arthroscopic management in patients with knee stiffness after total knee replacement. We present a case series study, in which 32 patients have been treated for moderate arthrofibrosis of the knee after total knee replacement, with the same regimen. We have excluded all cases of stiffness, because of infection, mechanical mal-alignment, loosening of the implants and other obvious reasons of stiffness of the knee, rather than pure arthrofibrosis. All patients first underwent a trial of conservative treatment before going for arthroscopic management. A pain catheter for femoral nerve block was inserted just before anesthesia for post-operative pain management. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the intra-articular pathology was performed in a standardized technique with release of all fibrous bands in the suprapatellar pouch, reestablishing the medial and lateral gutter, release of the patella, resection of the remaining meniscal tissue or an anterior cyclops, if needed. Intensive physiotherapy and continuous passive motion were to start immediately post-operatively. All the patients were available for the follow up and they were evaluated using the knee society rating system. A total of 25 of the 32 procedures resulted in an improvement of the patients knee score. All the knees operated upon had intra-articular fibrous bands, hypertrophic synovitis and peri-patellar adhesions. A total of eight patients suffered from an anterior cyclops lesion and six patients showed pseudomenicus. In 19 cases a medial and lateral relapse of the patella was performed; only 5 patients got an isolated lateral release. The mean knee flexion was 119 degrees (100-130) at the end of arthroscopy and was 97 degrees (75-115) at the last follow up. The eight patients with extension lags decreased from 27 degrees (10 degrees-35 degrees) pre-operatively to 4 degrees (0-10) at time of follow up. The average knee society ratings increased from 70

  19. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis].

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Haraux, E; Leroux, J; Gouron, R

    2017-03-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SFCE) is a disorder of the hip, characterized by a displacement of the capital femoral epiphysis from the metaphysic through the femoral growth plate. The epiphysis slips posteriorly and inferiorly. SCFE occurs during puberty and metabolic and epidemiologic risk factors, such as obesity are frequently found. Most chronic slips are diagnosed late. Sagittal hip X-rays show epiphysis slip. In case of untreated SCFE, a slip progression arises with an acute slip risk. Treatment is indicated to prevent slip worsening. The clinical and radiological classification is useful to guide treatment and it is predictive of the prognosis. In situ fixation of stable and moderately displaced SCFE with cannulated screws gives excellent results. Major complications are chondrolysis and osteonecrosis and the major sequelae are femoroacetabular impingement and early arthritis.

  20. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of "TMJ arthroscopic surgery", this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results.

  1. Arthroscopic ablation of osteoid osteoma in the wrist.

    PubMed

    Kamrani, Reza Shahryar; Farhadi, Leyla; Emamzadehfard, Sahra

    2013-09-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumor that rarely involves joints. Although there are several reports of arthroscopic osteoid osteoma excisions, to our knowledge, there are no reports of this type of treatment for osteoid osteoma in carpal bones. We report two cases of arthroscopic (a person who had a pain in the left wrist and the other one with carpal tunnel syndrome) with excision of osteoid osteoma in the carpal bones. We think arthroscopic excision is the best choice for treatment as long as the tumor is accessible for arthroscopic surgery, when osteoid osteoma has classic clinical and imaging findings and is near an articular surface. However, when the tumor is far from the joint surfaces, when we need pathologic confirmation or when the tumor is easily accessible using a non-articular approach, arthroscopic excision may not be the most appropriate technique.

  2. Arthroscopic microfracture may not be superior to arthroscopic debridement, but abrasion arthroplasty results are good, although not great.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-03-01

    Microfracture is nonanatomic because microfracture destroys the gross structure and the complex microscopic infrastructure of the subchondral plate, and may promote subchondral cyst formation. In consideration of the destruction of subchondral anatomy, it may be time to abandon the arthroscopic microfracture procedure. However, arthroscopic abrasion arthroplasty results in a positive outcome in 66% of patients, and may still merit consideration as a salvage procedure.

  3. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  4. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  5. [Arthroscopic treatment for calcaneal spur syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stropek, S; Dvorák, M

    2008-10-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Arthroscopic treatment of calcaneal spur syndrome is a tissue-sparing and effective approach when conservative therapy has failed. This method, its results and our experience with the treatment of this syndrome are presented here. MATERIAL Between January 2003 and November 2007, 26 patients underwent an arthroscopic procedure for calcaneal spur syndrome; of these, 20 were women with an average age of 49 years, and six were men with an average age of 45 years. Four, three women and one man, were lost to follow-up, therefore 22 patients with 24 heels were eventually evaluated. All had conservative therapy for 3 to 6 monts. METHODS The arthroscopic method used was developed by the arthroscopic group of the Orthopaedic Service of Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in Havana, Cuba. The surgical technique insolves treatment of the spur and plantar fasciitis commonly found in calcaneal spur syndrome, but it also addresses adjacent calcaneal periostitis. RESULTS The results were evaluated on the scale that is part of the foot function index developed by Budiman-Mak for measuring rheumatoid arthritis pain. The patients were asked mine questions on pain intensity during various activities before and after surgery. Pain was evaluated on a scale with grades from 0 to 9. The average value was 5.9 before surgery and 1.4 after surgery. A 0-1 pain range was reported by 25 %, 1-2 by 26 % and 2-4 by 22 % of the patients. All patients reported improvement. DISCUSSION The orthopaedic group in Havana led by Carlos achieved 85 % excellent outcomes (pain range, 0-2) at one-year followup; this was 79 % in our study, in which no problems with foot arches or wound infection were recorded. CONCLUSIONS The heel spur syndrome is a result of an inflamed ligament (plantar fascia) due to repeated microtrauma. It is not a traction osteophyte,but a reaction of the tissue where it attaches to the calcaneus. Adjacent calcaneal periostitis is usually present as well. Therefore, this

  6. Arthroscopically assisted central physeal bar resection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, James S; Polzhofer, Gert K

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-seven central physeal bars were removed with an arthroscopically assisted technique. Thirty children (32 cases) have been followed to maturity or physeal closure. There were 19 boys and 11 girls, aged 4-14 years (mean, 9.5 years). Site of arrest was distal femur (15), proximal tibia (9), distal tibia (6), and distal radius (2). Mean follow-up was 6.5 years (range, 2-12 years). Adequate longitudinal growth was realized in 21 patients (70%) just after bar resection. Five patients (17%) required osteotomy, lengthening, or epiphysiodesis in addition to bar resection. In 4 patients (13%), bar resection failed. Failures occurred in those patients whose source of growth arrest was infection (3) or degree of physeal trauma approached 50% (1 case). This is the first series that studies and documents the efficacy of the arthroscope in central physeal bar resection. It provides the best visualization with minimal morbidity. The technique is described, including a discussion of technical tips and pitfalls.

  7. Arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar joint arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Roussignol, X

    2016-02-01

    Arthroscopy has become indispensable for performing tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis. Now in 2015, it is the gold-standard surgical technique, and open surgery is reserved only for cases in which arthroscopy is contraindicated: material ablation after consolidation failure, osteophytes precluding a work chamber, excentric talus, severe malunion, bone defect requiring grafting, associated midfoot deformity, etc. The first reports of arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis date from the early 1990s. Consolidation rates were comparable to open surgery, but with significantly fewer postoperative complications: infection, skin necrosis, etc. Arthroscopy was for many years reserved to moderate deformity, with frontal or sagittal deviation less than 10°. The recent literature, however, seems to extend indications, the only restriction being the surgeon's experience. Tibiotalar arthrodesis on a posterior arthroscopic approach remains little used. And yet the posterior work chamber is much larger, and initial series showed consolidation rates similar to those of an anterior approach. The surgical technique for posterior tibiotalar arthrodesis was described by Van Dijk et al., initially using a posterior para-Achilles approach. This may be hampered by posterior osteophytes or ankylosis of the subtalar joint line (revision of non-consolidated arthrodesis, sequelae of calcaneal thalamus fracture) and is now used only by foot and ankle specialists. Posterior double tibiotalar-subtalar arthrodesis, described by Devos Bevernage et al., is facilitated by transplantar calcaneo-talo-tibial intramedullary nailing.

  8. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  9. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic procedure in the knee.

    PubMed

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Isolani, Guilherme Rufini; Baracho, Filipe Ribas; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Ridder Bauer, Luiz Antônio; Namba, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review all cases of pseudoaneurysm in the literature, in predominantly arthroscopic procedures on the knee, and to report on a case of pseudoaneurysm that we treated. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific articles published in Brazilian and foreign periodicals over the last 23 years. Forty-seven cases were found, in 40 articles. In addition to these 47 cases, there was the case that we treated, which was also included in the data. Among the operations that progressed with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, 60% were cases of meniscal injuries and 23%, anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In 46% of the cases, the artery affected with the popliteal, and in 21%, the inferomedial genicular artery. The commonest clinical symptom was pain (37%), followed by pulsating tumor (31%), edema of the calf (12%) and hemarthrosis (11%). The median time taken to make the diagnosis was 11 days, but it ranged from one day to 10 weeks after the procedure. Although rare, pseudoaneurysms are a risk that is inherent to arthroscopic surgery. All patients should be made aware of the vascular risks, even in small-scale procedures.

  10. Arthroscopic Anatomic Glenoid Reconstruction Without Subscapularis Split

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan H.; Urquhart, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone loss from the anterior glenoid in recurrent shoulder instability has been well established. We present a completely arthroscopic technique for reconstructing the anterior glenoid with distal tibial allograft and without a subscapularis split. We perform the arthroscopy in the lateral position. We measure and size an allograft distal tibial graft and place it arthroscopically. We use an inside-out medial portal to introduce the graft into the shoulder, passing it through the rotator interval and above the subscapularis. A double-cannula system is used to pass the graft, which is temporarily fixed with K-wires and held in place with cannulated screws. We then perform a Bankart-like repair of the soft tissues to balance the shoulder and augment our repair. Our technique is not only anatomic in the re-creation of the glenoid surface but also anatomic in the preservation of the coracoid and subscapularis tendon and repair of the capsulolabral complex. PMID:26697303

  11. Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Claudius D; Schmidt, Christopher C

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize the current concepts on rotator cuff disease with an emphasis on arthroscopic treatment. Most rotator cuff tears are the result of an ongoing attritional process. Once present, a tear is likely to gradually increase in size. Partial-thickness and subscapularis tears can both be successfully treated arthroscopically if conservative management fails. Partial tears involving greater than 50% of tendon thickness should be repaired. Articular-sided partial tears involving less than 50% of the rotator cuff can reliably be treated with debridement. A more aggressive approach should be considered for low-grade tears (<50%) if they occur on the bursal side. Biomechanical and anatomic studies have shown clear superiority with dual-row fixation compared with single-row techniques. However, current studies have yet to show clear clinical advantage with dual-row over single-row repairs. Biceps tenotomy or tenodesis can reliably provide symptomatic improvement in patients with irreparable massive tears. True pseudoparalysis of the shoulder is a contraindication to this procedure alone and other alternatives should be considered.

  12. Arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Aprato, Alessandro; Giachino, Matteo; Masse, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hip arthroscopy has gained popularity among the orthopedic community and a precise assessment of indications, techniques and results is constantly brought on. Methods In this chapter the principal standard entry portals for central and peripheral compartment are discussed. The description starts from the superficial landmarks for portals placement and continues with the deep layers. For each entry point an illustration of the main structures encountered is provided and the principal structures at risk for different portals are accurately examined. Articular anatomical description is carried out from the arthroscope point of view and sub-divided into central and peripheral compartment. The two compartments are systematically analyzed and the accessible articular areas for each portal explained. Moreover, some anatomical variations that can be found in the normal hip are reported. Conclusion The anatomical knowledge of the hip joint along with a precise notion of the structures encountered with the arthroscope is an essential requirement for a secure and successful surgery. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066735

  13. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  14. Prospective evaluation of femoral head viability following femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, B.; Kroop, S.A.; Nepola, I.V.; Grantham, A.S.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    The bone scans of 33 patients (pts) with recent subcapital fractures (fx) of the femur were evaluated prospectively to determine their value in predicting femoral head visability. Each of the 33 pts (ll men, 22 women, age range 30-92) had a pre-operative bone scan within 72 hrs of the fx (23 pts within 24 hrs). Anterior and posterior planar views of both hips and pinhole views (50% of pts) were obtained 2 hrs after administration of Tc-99m HDP. The femoral head was classified as perfused if it showed the same activity as the opposite normal side or if it showed only slightly decreased activity. Femoral heads showing absent activity were classified as nonperfused. Overall, 20 of the 33 pts showed a photopenic femoral head on the side of the fx. Only 2 pts showed increased activity at hte site of the fx. Internal fixation of the fx was performed in 23 pts, 12 of whom had one or more follow-up scans. Five of these 12 pts showed absent femoral head activity on their initial scan, but 2 showed later reperfusion. The other 7 pts showed good perfusion initially, with only 1 later showing decreased femoral head activity. The other 10 pts (7 of whom had absent femoral head activity) had immediate resection of the femoral head and insertion of a Cathcart prosthesis. The results suggest that femoral head activity seen on a bone scan in the immediate post-fx period is not always a reliable indicator of femoral head viability. Decreased femoral head activity may reflect, in part, compromised perfusion secondary to post-traumatic edema, with or without anatomic disruption of the blood supply.

  15. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, especially the differences to laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia are discussed in this article. PMID:27826574

  16. A new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel bone grafting using the OATS harvesters in revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Said, Hatem G; Baloch, Khalid; Green, Marcus

    2006-07-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is becoming more frequent, especially in specialized centers, because of the large numbers of primary ACL procedures performed. In 2-stage revisions, bone grafting of the tunnels may be undertaken if the primary position was inaccurate or if osteolysis has caused widening of the tunnels. This will allow the desired placement of the new tunnels without the risk of loss of structural integrity. It is technically difficult to deliver and impact bone graft into the femoral tunnel with the standard surgical and arthroscopic instruments. We describe a new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel impaction grafting in 2-stage ACL revisions, using the OATS grafting instruments (Osteochondral Autologous Transfer System; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The appropriately sized OATS harvester is chosen 1 mm larger than the tunnel size and is used to harvest bone graft from the iliac crest through a percutaneous approach. This provides a cylindrical graft, which is delivered to the femoral tunnel through the arthroscopic portal. The inside punch of the harvester is tapped and this allows delivery of the graft in a controlled manner and its impaction into the tunnel. The same is repeated for the tibial tunnel while providing support for the proximal end of the tunnel.

  17. Open and Arthroscopic with Mini-Open Surgical Hip Approaches for Treatment of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis and Concomitant Hip Pathology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare benign tumor affecting large joints and prompts excision to prevent local destruction of the joint. The purpose of this case report is to describe two differing surgical approaches for management of PVNS of the hip in patients requiring concomitant treatment for additional hip pathology. Methods. This report discusses the presentation, clinical and radiographic findings, and operative management of two contrasting cases of PVNS of the hip. Case 1 describes a 31-year-old female with localized PVNS in addition to a labral tear treated with arthroscopic labral repair followed by tumor excision via a mini-open incision. Case 2 describes a 29-year-old male with more diffuse PVNS in addition to a cam deformity managed with open surgical dislocation of the hip, tumor excision, and restoration of the femoral head/neck junction. Results. This report demonstrates two cases of successful excision of PVNS of the hip in addition to addressing concomitant hip pathology in both cases. Conclusions. Open surgical dislocation of the hip or arthroscopic surgery with a mini-open incision may be used in appropriately selected patients to successfully excise PVNS lesions in addition to addressing concomitant hip pathology. PMID:28326214

  18. [Arthroscopically assisted treatment of ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Braunstein, M; Baumbach, S F; Böcker, W; Mutschler, W; Polzer, H

    2016-02-01

    Acute ankle fractures are one of the most common fractures in adults with an incidence of 0.1-0.2 % per year. Operative treatment by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is the standard method of treatment for unstable or dislocated fractures. The main goal of the operation is the anatomical realignment of the joint and restoration of ankle stability; nevertheless, anatomical reduction does not automatically lead to favorable clinical results. According to several studies the mid-term and in particular the long-term outcome following operative treatment is often poor with residual symptoms including chronic pain, stiffness, recurrent swelling and ankle instability. There is growing evidence that this poor outcome might be related to occult intra-articular injuries involving cartilage and soft tissues. In recent studies the frequency of fracture-related osteochondral lesions was reported to be approximately 64 %. By physical examination, standard radiography or even computed tomography (CT), these intra-articular pathologies cannot be reliably diagnosed; therefore, many authors emphasize the value of ankle arthroscopy in acute fracture treatment as it has become a safe and effective diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Arthroscopically assisted open reduction and internal fixation (AORIF) allows control of the reduction as well examination of all intra-articular structures. If necessary, intra-articular pathologies can be addressed by removing ruptured ligaments and loose bodies, performing chondroplasty or microfracturing. So far there is no evidence that supplementary ankle arthroscopy increases the complication rate. On the other hand, the positive effect of AORIF has also not been clearly documented; nevertheless, there are clear indications that arthroscopically assisted fracture treatment is beneficial, especially in complex fractures.

  19. Arthroscopic Scar Resection for the Treatment of Anteromedial Knee Pain after Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Kohei; Michishita, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Takeshi; Akasaka, Yoshiyuki; Kaminaga, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It has been reported that the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty has good long-term outcomes for Western and Japanese patients. Alternatively, several reports have described reoperations after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty because of post-operative knee pain and sometimes it is difficult to diagnose the cause of pain. Case Report: We treated a patient with anteromedial knee pain caused by intra-articular scar tissue that contained residual cement fragments on the anterior surface of a femoral implant following Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. After arthroscopic resection of the scar tissue and removal of the 3 mm residual cement covered with the scar tissue, the patient’s post-operative symptoms were considerably alleviated. Conclusion: This is the first report describing a case of painful intra-articular scar tissue following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. PMID:28164064

  20. A new automatic landmark extraction framework on ultrasound images of femoral condyles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Sibut, Agnès; Nakib, Amir; Petit, Eric; Leitner, François

    2012-03-01

    In Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS), surgeons have to acquire some anatomical landmarks as inputs to the system. To do so, they use manual pointers that are localized in the Operating Room (OR) space using an infrared camera. When the needed landmark is not reachable through an opening, it is palpated directly on skin and there is a loss of precision that can vary from several millimeters to centimeters depending on the thickness of soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a new framework based on three main steps to register the bone surface and extract automatically anatomical landmarks with an ultrasound probe. This framework is based on an oriented gradient calculation, a simulated-compound and a contour closure using a graph representation. The oriented gradient allows extracting a set of pixels that probably belong to the bone surface. The simulatedcompound step allows using ultrasound images properties to define a set of small segments which may belong to the bone surface, and the graph representation allows eliminating false positive detection among remaining segments. The proposed method has been validated on a database of 230 ultrasound images of anterior femoral condyles (on the knee). The average computation time is 0.11 sec per image, and average errors are: 0.54 mm for the bone surface extraction, 0.31 mm for the condylar line, and 1.4 mm for the trochlea middle.

  1. Mycotic femoral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard Scott; Bennett, Kenneth R

    2007-05-01

    After several weeks of fever and chills, a 31-year-old logger developed pain in his right thigh. Upon examination a tender, pulsating upper thigh mass was found with a long loud bruit arising from it. Severe aortic insufficiency was present; however, blood cultures were negative. An angiogram, captured blood with contrast spewing from the profunda femoral artery to fill a 5 x 10 cm sac. A false aneurysm was diagnosed and resected; numerous gram positive cocci were present in cut sections, but cultures from the cavity grew the gram negative bacteria Salmonella and Alcaligenes. After one month of intravenous ampicillin the aortic valve was replaced after being destroyed by endocarditis. Ampicillin was continued and recovery was uneventful. Mycotic aneurysms are commonly caused by Salmonella (10%), which was second only to Staphylococcus (30%). The femoral artery accounts for 38% of all mycotic aneurysms. They typically present with a pulsatile mass (52%), bruit (50%), and fever (48%). This diagnosis can be supported by leukocytosis (64-71%), positive blood cultures (50-85%), and a history of arterial trauma (51%) (injection drug use, intravascular procedure, or trauma) or endocarditis (10%).

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability in soccer goalkeepers.

    PubMed

    Terra, B B; Ejnisman, B; Figueiredo, E A; Andreoli, C V; Pochini, A C; Cohen, C; Arliani, G G; Cohen, M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report epidemiologic data and results of arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability in soccer goalkeepers. We included 12 soccer goalkeepers with a mean age of 28.9 years (range 18-45 years) with acute or recurrent traumatic anterior instability who underwent an arthroscopic anatomic capsulolabral repair with bone anchors. Patients who underwent surgery within 4 weeks of the first episode of dislocation were classified as acute instability. The results were evaluated using the Rowe Scale and analyzed according to stability, range of motion and function. The mean follow-up was 3.8 years. The most common mechanism of injury (90% of the cases) was abduction, external rotation and extension. Associated injuries were present in 57.2% of recurrent cases and 20% of acute cases (p<0.293). Excellent or good results were observed in 80% of the cases of acute instability and in 57.2% of cases in the group with recurrent instability (p<0.586). From a total of 12 soccer goalkeepers who underwent the arthroscopic capsulolabral repair, good or excellent results were obtained in 66.6% of cases of glenohumeral instability. Surgical arthroscopic repair was possible in all cases of acute or recurrent instability based on well-established inclusion criteria, i. e., with well-defined exclusion criteria, such as HAGL lesion and significant glenohumeral bone loss, the arthroscopic capsulolabral repair can be carried out in soccer goalkeepers.

  3. Comparison of two arthroscopic pump systems based on image quality.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; van den Boomen, H; van Heerwaarden, R J; van Dijk, C N

    2008-06-01

    The effectiveness of arthroscopic pump systems has been investigated with either subjective measures or measures that were unrelated to the image quality. The goal of this study is to determine the performance of an automated pump in comparison to a gravity pump based on objective assessment of the quality of the arthroscopic view. Ten arthroscopic operations performed with a gravity pump and ten performed with an automated pump (FMS Duo system) were matched on duration of the surgery and shaver usage, type of operation, and surgical experience. Quality of the view was defined by means of the presence or absence of previously described definitions of disturbances (bleeding, turbidity, air bubbles, and loose fibrous tissue). The percentage of disturbances for all operations was assessed with a time-disturbance analysis of the recorded operations. The Mann-Whitney U test shows a significant difference in favor of the automated pump for the presence of turbidity only (Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] = 0.015). Otherwise, no differences were determined (Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] > 0.436). A new objective method is successfully applied to assess efficiency of pump systems based on the quality of the arthroscopic view. Important disturbances (bleeding, air bubbles, and loose fibrous tissue) are not reduced by an automated pump used in combination with a tourniquet. The most frequent disturbance turbidity is reduced by around 50%. It is questionable if this result justifies the use of an automated pump for straightforward arthroscopic knee surgeries using a tourniquet.

  4. Using the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool as a Pass-Fail Examination

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Ryan J.; Nicandri, Gregg T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Examination of arthroscopic skill requires evaluation tools that are valid and reliable with clear criteria for passing. The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool was developed as a video-based assessment of technical skill with criteria for passing established by a panel of experts. The purpose of this study was to test the validity and reliability of the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool as a pass-fail examination of arthroscopic skill. Methods: Twenty-eight residents and two sports medicine faculty members were recorded performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on a left and right cadaveric specimen in our arthroscopic skills laboratory. Procedure videos were evaluated with use of the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool by two raters blind to subject identity. Subjects were considered to pass the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool when they attained scores of ≥3 on all eight assessment domains. Results: The raters agreed on a pass-fail rating for fifty-five of sixty videos rated with an interclass correlation coefficient value of 0.83. Ten of thirty participants were assigned passing scores by both raters for both diagnostic arthroscopies performed in the laboratory. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that logging more than eighty arthroscopic cases or performing more than thirty-five arthroscopic knee cases was predictive of attaining a passing Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool score on both procedures performed in the laboratory. Conclusions: The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool is valid and reliable as a pass-fail examination of diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in the simulation laboratory. Clinical Relevance: This study demonstrates that the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool may be a useful tool for pass-fail examination of diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in the simulation laboratory. Further study is necessary to determine whether the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill

  5. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  6. Ganglion cyst in the supraspinous fossa: arthroscopically undetectable cases.

    PubMed

    Shimokobe, Hisao; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Eiichiro; Kume, Shinichiro; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Nagata, Kensei; Shiba, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes of arthroscopic decompression for ganglion cyst in the supraspinous fossa; however, little attention has been paid to the difficulty in detecting these cysts during arthroscopy. In this report, we present 2 cases in which ganglion cysts in the supraspinous fossa were undetectable during arthroscopy. The ganglion cysts were not identified in these cases during surgery despite arthroscopic decompression being performed through the area in which the cyst was expected until the suprascapular nerve was entirely exposed. After surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the disappearance of the ganglion cyst and external rotation strength was fully improved, without shoulder pain. We emphasize here that surgeons should be aware of this difficulty when performing arthroscopic decompression of ganglion cysts in the supraspinous fossa.

  7. Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

    1994-01-01

    With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of the septic knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J

    1986-01-01

    Pyarthrosis of the knee was treated in 30 patients by arthroscopic decompression and lavage, coupled with parenteral and oral antibiotics. There were 21 men and nine women patients whose ages ranged from 6 months to 65 years of age. Twenty-two patients were considered to have a hematogenous origin as a cause of their pyarthrosis, and eight were caused by penetrating trauma. Twenty-eight of these patients had the onset of symptoms within 72 h prior to arthroscopy. Two adults had the onset of their symptoms 1 week prior to treatment. Follow-up has ranged from 6 months to 5 years. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 20 knees, Streptococcus pneumonia in three knees, Haemophilus influenzae in four knees, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in one knee. The average hospital stay among 22 children aged 12 years or younger was 3.50 days. The other eight patients had an average hospital stay of 9.50 days. Three adults with diabetes and other medical problems, such as renal failure, had an average hospital stay of 17.33 days. Excellent results were obtained in 28 (93.3%) of 30 patients and good results were obtained in two (6.7%) of 30 patients. There were no poor results or recurrences, and no cases of osteomyelitis occurred. This method of treatment markedly reduces the morbidity and hospital stay of patients with a septic knee.

  9. Effect of Mirrored Views on Endoscopic and Arthroscopic Skill Performance

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Emanuel; Meier, Christoph; Wirth, Stefan; Koch, Peter Philipp; Meyer, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic procedures may be technically challenging because of impaired vision, limited space, and the 2-dimensional vision of a 3-dimensional structure. Spatial orientation may get more complicated when the camera is pointing toward the surgeon. Hypothesis: Spatial orientation and arthroscopic performance may be improved by simply mirroring the image on the monitor in different configurations regarding the position and orientation of camera and instrument. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirty volunteers from an orthopaedic department were divided into 3 equal groups according to their arthroscopic experience (beginners, intermediates, seniors). All subjects were asked to perform a standardized task in a closed box mimicking an endoscopic space. The same task had to be performed in 4 different configurations regarding camera and instrument position and orientation (pointing toward or away from the subject) with either the original or mirrored image on the monitor. Efficiency (time per stick; TPS), precision (successful completion of the task), and difficulty rating using a visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed. Results: Mirroring the image demonstrated no advantage over the original images in any configuration regarding TPS. Successful completion of the task was significantly better when the image was mirrored in the configuration with the camera pointing toward and the instrument away from the surgeon. There was a positive correlation between TPS and subjective VAS difficulty rating (r = 0.762, P = .000) and a negative correlation between the successful completion of the task and VAS (r = −0.515, P = .000). Conclusion: Mirroring the image may have a positive effect on arthroscopic performance of surgeons in certain configurations. A significantly improved performance was seen when the arthroscope was pointing toward and the grasping instrument pointing away from the subject. Mirroring the image may facilitate surgery in

  10. Complications Associated With Arthroscopic Labral Repair Implants: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Felder, Jerrod J; Elliott, Michael P; Mair, Scott D

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair in the shoulder has become commonplace in recent years. A variety of implants have evolved in parallel with arthroscopic techniques. Any orthopedic implant that is placed in close proximity to the joint has the potential to cause subsequent damage to the articular surface if it is left prominent or dislodges secondary to improper surgical technique. This article focuses on a series of implant-related complications of labral surgery and their subsequent management. Additionally, correct patient selection and surgical technique are discussed.

  11. Results of arthroscopic acromioplasty for chronic rotator cuff lesion.

    PubMed

    De Baere, Tom; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Joris, Daniel; Delloye, Christian

    2004-12-01

    The influence of acromioplasty in long standing rotator cuff deficiency with intractable pain was retrospectively evaluated in a consecutive series of 13 patients who were followed for a mean period of 19 months (range, 12 to 42 months) after arthroscopic acromioplasty. The Constant score improved from 59.3 (range, 39.9 to 90.3) preoperatively to 98.7 (69.1 to 122.7) postoperatively. Pain and motion improved significantly whereas strength did not improve. Arthroscopic acromioplasty in painful chronic rotator cuff avulsion was found to be an effective means to control pain and improve motion; it can be recommended when conservative treatment has failed.

  12. Arthroscopic Correction of a Supracondylar Malunion in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Steven M.; Sakamoto, Sara; Abernathie, Brenon L.; Hausman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Malunions are a well-recognized complication of pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures. Results of corrective osteotomies vary, and complication rates have been reported to be as high as 40%. Considering the high rate of complications for malunion correction, we investigated the feasibility of arthroscopy. We present a technique for arthroscopic supracondylar osteotomy and percutaneous pinning. There are many advantages of an arthroscopic approach to malunion correction, including extension-type deformity correction, safe access to the anterior humerus, and minimal dissection and scarring; any intracapsular contracture can be addressed as well. Elbow arthroscopy appears to be a viable option in the pediatric orthopaedic surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:26258033

  13. Arthroscopic Release of Lateral Half of the Talocalcaneonavicular Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the talocalcaneonavicular joint can follow trauma or surgery of the joint. Arthroscopic release of the lateral half of the talocalcaneonavicular joint is indicated if the painful restriction of hindfoot inversion together with tenderness of the lateral side of the joint that is not controlled with conservative treatment. This procedure is contraindicated in other causes of painful stiffness including post-traumatic arthritis, osteonecrosis, and malunion. This technique includes arthroscopic release of the lateral side of the anterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint. This is a technically demanding technique and should be reserved for the experienced foot and ankle arthroscopists.

  14. Arthroscopic skills assessment and use of box model for training in arthroscopic surgery using Sawbones – “FAST” workstation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Saumitra; Radi, Mohamed Abdel; Ramadan, Islam Karam-allah; Said, Hatem Galal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic skills training outside the operative room may decrease risks and errors by trainee surgeons. There is a need of simple objective method for evaluating proficiency and skill of arthroscopy trainees using simple bench model of arthroscopic simulator. The aim of this study is to correlate motor task performance to level of prior arthroscopic experience and establish benchmarks for training modules. Methods: Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed a set of tasks to assess a) arthroscopic triangulation, b) navigation, c) object handling and d) meniscus trimming using SAWBONES “FAST” arthroscopy skills workstation. Time to completion and the errors were computed. The subjects were divided into four levels; “Novice”, “Beginner”, “Intermediate” and “Advanced” based on previous arthroscopy experience, for analyses of performance. Results: The task performance under transparent dome was not related to experience of the surgeon unlike opaque dome, highlighting the importance of hand-eye co-ordination required in arthroscopy. Median time to completion for each task improved as the level of experience increased and this was found to be statistically significant (p < .05) e.g. time for maze navigation (Novice – 166 s, Beginner – 135.5 s, Intermediate – 100 s, Advance – 97.5 s) and the similar results for all tasks. Majority (>85%) of subjects across all the levels reported improvement in performance with sequential tasks. Conclusion: Use of the arthroscope requires visuo-spatial coordination which is a skill that develops with practice. This simple box model can reliably differentiate the arthroscopic skills based on experience and can be used to monitor progression of skills of trainees in institutions. PMID:27801643

  15. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF OSTEOCHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE TALUS

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Mariana Korbage; de Cillo, Mario Sergio Paulillo; Bittar, Cinthia Kelly; Zabeu, José Luis Amin; Cezar, Caroliny Nociti Moreira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess pain and function of the ankle in patients with injuries up to 1.5 cm diameter by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score after arthroscopic treatment. Methods: The AOFAS scale was applied before and after arthroscopy, as well as the degree of subjective satisfaction of ambulatory patients. Patients with type I osteochondral injuries, acute trauma, using plaster, presenting lesions in other joints of the lower limbs and cognitive impairment that would prevent the application of the satisfaction questionnaire were excluded from the study. Statistical analysis was performed using unpaired t test with Welch correction, Mann Whitney test, and ANOVA, with Kruskal Wallis test and Dun test, considering p value lower than 0.05. Results: There was an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment in 52 (94.5%) patients. The mean values of AOFAS score in 55 patients was 77.32 ± 6.67 points preoperative and 93.10± 8.24 points postoperative, with a mean variation of 15.8 points, p<0.001. Patients with stage II, III and IV injuries showed an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment, p<0.001. No difference was found between medial and lateral injuries, p >0.05. Conclusion: Patients with stage II, III or IV osteochondral injuries of the talus of up to 1.5 cm diameter, whether medial or lateral, showed a significant improvement after arthroscopic treatment. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Study. PMID:26997911

  16. Arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability in professional athletes

    PubMed Central

    Pantalone, Andrea; Vanni, Daniele; Guelfi, Matteo; Di Mauro, Michele; Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Post-traumatic shoulder instability is a common disease, especially in sportsmen. If inadequately or late treated, it may be responsible for an articular biomechanics alteration, with serious problems. This is much more obvious for professionals athletes, because corporate and market needs force them to a premature return to sport. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate if arthroscopic approach may be better than the open one and allowing a shoulder function rapid recovery, with fast return to sport. Materials and methods From January 2003 to January 2014, 46 professional athletes underwent surgical treatment for post traumatic shoulder instability. Two groups were made: 25 athletes treated arthroscopically and 21 treated with open approach. Patients were followed up from 36 to 92 months, according to Rowe Score for Instability and VAS scoring system. Results Patients in the open group returned later than the first one to sport. Moreover, pain in postoperative period and during rehabilitation, was lower in the arthroscopic group. There was only one recurrence in the open group. Conclusions Arthroscopic surgical approach appears to be excellent in shoulder instability management, reducing recovery time, allowing a faster return to sport, with less pain, if compared with open surgery. Level of Evidence III, a case control-study. PMID:28217564

  17. The Factors Affecting Pain Pattern after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Dong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the factors that affect pain pattern after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods From June 2009 to October 2010, 210 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operations. Of them, 84 patients were enrolled as subjects of the present study. The evaluation of postoperative pain was conducted by visual analog scale (VAS) scores during postoperative outpatient interviews at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The factors that were thought to affect postoperative pain were evaluated by dividing into three categories: preoperative, operative, and postoperative. Results Pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery showed a strictly decreasing pain pattern. In single analysis and multiple regression tests for factors influencing the strictly decreasing pain pattern, initial VAS and pain onset were shown to be statistically significant factors (p = 0.012, 0.012, 0.044 and 0.028, respectively). With regard to the factors influencing lower than average intensity pain pattern for each period, the stiffness of internal rotation at 3 months postoperatively was shown to be a statistically significant factor in single and multiple regression tests (p = 0.017 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions High initial VAS scores and the acute onset of pain affected the strictly decreasing postoperative pain pattern. Additionally, stiffness of internal rotation at postoperative 3 months affected the higher than average intensity pain pattern for each period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25436062

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, J E; Lau, A C; Hechtman, K S; Uribe, J W; Tjin-A-Tsoi, E W

    1999-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare disease, with multiple forms, anatomic sites, and treatment methods having been described. During a 10-year period, 14 patients, 7 male and 7 female, average age 35 years (range, 19 to 64 years) were treated for PVNS with arthroscopic partial or total synovectomy. Average follow-up was 42 months (range, 8 to 83 months). Twelve patients had diffuse and 2 had a localized form. Results were assessed subjectively, clinically, and radiographically, and were rated as excellent, good, fair, or poor. There were no complications and 10 patients (72%) were rated as excellent or good, 2 patients (14%) as fair, and 2 patients (14%) as poor. The recurrence rate was 14% and occurred in the group with diffuse PVNS. Radiographs did not show any bone erosion. The most widely accepted treatment for PVNS is synovectomy, and both open and arthroscopic synovectomy have been advocated as treatment. Advantages of arthroscopic treatment include accurate evaluation of the knee joint, treatment of other pathology, more rapid rehabilitation, decreased risk of joint stiffness, and less pain. In our experience, it appears that arthroscopic synovectomy is an effective method of treatment of this disorder.

  19. Long Term Outcomes of Arthroscopic Shoulder Instability Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karataglis, D.; Agathangelidis, F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder instability has been successfully managed arthroscopically over the past two decades with refined “anatomic” reconstruction procedures involving the use of anchors for the repositioning and re-tensioning of the antero-inferior capsuloligamentous complex, in an effort to recreate its “bumper effect”. Methods: Research and online content related to arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability was reviewed and their results compared. Results: The short- and mid-term results of this technique have been very satisfactory. The greatest number of recent reports suggests that long-term results (>5 years follow-up) remain rather satisfactory, especially in the absence of significant glenoid bone loss (>20-25%). In these studies recurrent instability, in the form of either dislocation or subluxation, ranges from 5.1 to over 20%, clinical scores, more than 5 years after the index procedure, remain good or excellent in >80% of patient population as do patient satisfaction and return to previous level of activities. As regards arthroscopic non-anatomic bony procedures (Latarjet or Bristow procedures) performed in revision cases or in the presence of >20-25% bone loss of the anteroinferior aspect of the glenoid, recent reports suggest that their long-term results are very satisfactory both in terms of re-dislocation rates and patient satisfaction. Conclusion: It appears that even “lege artis” performance of arthroscopic reconstruction decelerates but does not obliterate the degenerative procedure of dislocation arthropathy. The presence and grade of arthritic changes correlate with the number of dislocations sustained prior to the arthroscopic intervention, the number of anchors used and the age at initial dislocation and surgery. However, the clinical significance of radiologically evident dislocation arthropathy is debatable.

  20. Implantless Fixation of a Large Osteocartilaginous Fracture of the Lateral Femoral Condyle in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Jitendra; Mhaskar, Vikram; Mhaskar, Parul Maheshwari

    2017-01-01

    We describe for the first time a case of lateral femoral condyle fracture following a fall in a 13-year-old child that was reduced arthroscopically using a probe. It was definitively fixed with 0 vicryl sutures in a cruciate pattern after being initially stabilised with 1.5-mm Kirschner wires. Four beath pins carrying sutures were drilled at four opposing quadrants through the reduced fragment into the femur. The sutures were then tied on the lateral cortex of the femur. After fixation, the child was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks, partial weight bearing from 6 weeks to 12 weeks and then full weight bearing thereafter. Range of motion (ROM) exercises were commenced on the first postoperative day. At one-year follow-up, the ROM was from −5° to 130°, all symptoms disappeared, and complete resumption of all sports activities was allowed. PMID:28231653

  1. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of

  2. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  3. Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder and necrosis is a major skeletal problem in broiler breeders since they are maintained for a long time in the farm. The etiology of this disease is not well understood. A field study was conducted to understand the basis of this metabolic disease. Six ...

  4. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  5. Arthroscopy for shoulder instability and a technique for arthroscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Wiley, A M

    1988-01-01

    At this time the principal role of the arthroscope in the management of dislocating shoulder seems to be the identification of the intra-articular pathology. The findings should enable a surgeon to carry out an appropriate open repair, and the results of such surgery are excellent. Is there a place for arthroscopic repair? Some patients sometimes request it; others have had a failed open repair, or wish to avoid a scar. The author has devised a removable "Rivet," which fixes a loose labrum and the inferior glenohumeral ligament back on to a roughened glenoid margin. Use of this technique avoids some of the hazards that occur with implanting a staple or similar device in the joint. The "Rivet" is removed after 4-6 weeks. Ten patients have been so treated, with a follow-up of 6 months to 2 years. There was one failure, with a return of dislocation.

  6. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  7. Evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, José Carlos; Maia, Lucas Russo; Fonseca, Juliano Rocha; Zabeu, José Luís Amim; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide data for the analysis of arthroscopy as a method of surgical treatment for shoulder and discuss its actual indications and preliminary results. METHODS: We evaluated 15 patients submitted to reverse Bankart arthroscopic surgery. We used the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score to measure the results before surgery and 12 months thereafter. RESULTS: The average UCLA score changed from 26.67±0.25 (SD 0.97) before surgery to 34.20±0.53 (SD 2.04) after surgery. The effectiveness of surgery was 93%. In five cases loose bodies were found. A patient undergoing remplissage was evaluated separately. The data did not change after 24 months post-surgery. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability and posterior dislocation of the shoulder has been proved feasible and results in our series followed the same trends as in the literature. Level of Evidence III, Transversal Retrospective Study. PMID:26207089

  8. Three cases of septic arthritis following a recent arthroscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Rowton, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We report three cases of septic arthritis in patients who presented with a painful, swollen and supurative knee joint following a recent arthroscopic procedure, 8–15 days prior to attendance. In all three cases, patients presented with pain and swelling of the affected knee joint with discharge from the port sites. All were sent for washout of the affected joint and received intravenous antibiotic cover. Any patient presenting within 1 month of a recent arthroscopic procedure with pain and swelling of that joint should be presumed to have septic arthritis until proven otherwise. They must have urgent treatment in the form of joint washout and intravenous antibiotics, and receive 6 weeks oral antibiotics on discharge. PMID:23345477

  9. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Frank, Rachel M.; Pulido, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain, and when indicated, can be successfully managed through open surgery or hip arthroscopy. The goal of this review is to describe the different approaches to the surgical treatment of FAI. We present the indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and complications associated with (1) open hip dislocation, (2) reverse periacetabular osteotomy, (3) the direct anterior “mini-open” approach, and (4) arthroscopic surgery for FAI. PMID:26697431

  10. Arthroscopic foveal repair of the triangular fibrocartilage complex.

    PubMed

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-02-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei-European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications.

  11. Arthroscopic Foveal Repair of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications. PMID:25709875

  12. Arthroscopic stabilization procedures for recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Yahiro, M A; Matthews, L S

    1989-11-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is a common and functionally disabling problem in young athletes. The goal in treatment of this condition is a stable, yet mobile, joint. Current methods now being utilized in the arthroscopic stabilization of the anterior shoulder include staple capsulorrhaphy, removable rivet capsulorrhaphy, cannulated screw fixation, and the transglenoid suture technique. These techniques and the clinical experience with each are reviewed, with an emphasis on providing stability, improving function, and allowing earlier rehabilitation in the unstable shoulder of the athlete.

  13. Arthroscopic Lysis of Arthrofibrosis of the Fifth Tarsometatarsal Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Loss of motion of the fifth tarsometatarsal joint can be a cause of lateral foot pain after Lisfranc fracture-dislocation or fracture of the fifth metatarsal tubercle. Arthroscopic lysis of the joint can be an effective surgical treatment with the advantage of minimal soft-tissue trauma and early vigorous mobilization of the joint. The lysis can be extended to the fourth tarsometatarsal joint and the adjacent tendons if indicated.

  14. Arthroscopic Synovectomy for Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a condition typically found in ballet dancers and sometimes in soccer players and is related to chronic overuse. It mostly involves the portion of the tendon behind the ankle joint. However, the portion of the tendon under the sustentaculum tali can also be involved. Open synovectomy requires extensive dissection. We report the technique of arthroscopic synovectomy of the deep portion of the flexor hallucis longus.

  15. The Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management Procedure for Treatment of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mook, William R; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Younger, high-demand patients who are less suitable for joint replacement procedures are often affected by advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. There are several alternatives to total joint arthroplasty for the treatment of these patients. However, the outcomes of these procedures are less predictable and have limited durability. The comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure, which includes a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral debridement, chondroplasty, synovectomy, loose body removal, humeral osteoplasty with excision of the goat's beard osteophyte, capsular releases, subacromial and subcoracoid decompressions, axillary nerve decompression, and biceps tenodesis, has been shown to reduce pain, improve function, and provide a predictable short-term joint-preserving option for patients with advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. A unique feature of the comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure is the indirect and direct decompression of the axillary nerve, which may explain the difference in outcomes with this technique compared with other approaches. Furthermore, the technique is technically demanding and associated with several notable pitfalls that are preventable when using the meticulous surgical technique detailed in this article and accompanying video.

  16. Use of an Irrigation Pump System in Arthroscopic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Mark S; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Sieg, Ryan N; Owens, Brett D; Herzog, Joshua P

    2016-05-01

    Since its inception, arthroscopic surgery has become widely adopted among orthopedic surgeons. It is therefore important to have an understanding of the basic principles of arthroscopy. Compared with open techniques, arthroscopic procedures are associated with smaller incisions, less structural damage, improved intra-articular visualization, less pain in the immediate postoperative period, and faster recovery for patients. Pump systems used for arthroscopic surgery have evolved over the years to provide improved intraoperative visualization. Gravity flow systems were described first and are still commonly used today. More recently, automated pump systems with pressure or dual pressure and volume control have been developed. The advantages of automated irrigation systems over gravity irrigation include a more consistent flow, a greater degree of joint distention, improved visualization especially with motorized instrumentation, decreased need for tourniquet use, a tamponade effect on bleeding, and decreased operative time. Disadvantages include the need for additional equipment with increased cost and maintenance, the initial learning curve for the surgical team, and increased risk of extra-articular fluid dissection and associated complications such as compartment syndrome. As image quality and pump systems improve, so does the list of indications including diagnostic and treatment modalities to address intra-articular pathology of the knee, shoulder, hip, wrist, elbow, and ankle joints. This article reviews the current literature and presents the history of arthroscopy, basic science of pressure and flow, types of irrigation pumps and their functions, settings, applications, and complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e474-e478.].

  17. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone.

    PubMed

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications.

  18. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CALCIFYING TENDINITIS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Trevizani, Cassio Silva; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Neto, Francisco José dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of the rotator cuff in patients with calcifying tendinitis. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on twenty patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder between March 1999 and November 2005. Six patients were excluded due to loss of follow-up. The average follow-up period was 41.4 months. Eight patients (57%) were female and six (43%) were male. The right side was affected in 10 cases (71%) and the left in four cases (29%). Nine cases (64%) had calcification in the supraspinatus tendon, two (14%) in the infraspinatus tendon, and three (21%) in both tendons. Results: In all cases, resection of the calcium deposits was performed by means of a needle (Jelco® No. 14) in combination with curettage (mini-curette). Two shoulders (14%) underwent subacromial decompression, and one (7%) underwent excision of the distal clavicle. A tendon-tendon suture was performed in three shoulders (21%). None of the patients underwent tendon-bone reinsertion. The mean score obtained on the UCLA scale was 33 points (26-35), thus indicating that a majority of patients had good results. In the final radiographic evaluation, none of the patients showed signs of calcification. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder safely allows excision of the calcification, leading to good results in relation to shoulder pain and function. PMID:27022591

  19. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF POST-TRAUMATIC ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Jose Carlos Garcia; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim; Junior, Ivaldo Angelo Cintra; Mattos, Carlos Augusto; Myrrha, Jesely Pereira

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate patients undergoing arthroscopic release of a stiff elbow, with discussion of the technique, possible difficulties and risks. Methods: Twenty-four elbow arthroscopy procedures were performed. All the patients were evaluated using goniometry before the operation and six months afterwards and were rated using the Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS). Results: Fifteen men and nine women underwent surgery (14 right elbows and ten left elbows). Their mean age was 34.58 years and length of follow-up, 38.41 months. Their mean gain of range of motion was 43.3° and of MEPS, 85.4. Conclusion: Arthroscopic release might enable better intra-articular viewing and enhance the options for changing strategy during surgery, reducing surgical trauma and enabling early rehabilitation. This technique can reach similar or better results than open surgery. The disadvantages of arthroscopy are the long learning curve and higher cost of the procedure. Neurovascular complications are reported with both techniques. To avoid such problems, the protocol for portal construction must be rigorously followed. Arthroscopic release was shown to be a safe and effective option for achieving range-of-motion gains in cases of post-traumatic stiff elbow. PMID:27042641

  20. Arthroscopic Removal of Shotgun Pellet From Within the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Kyle; Cooke, Chris; Cooke, Pat; Tonnos, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic techniques are effective for the removal of intra-articular bullet and metal fragments after gunshot wounds to the shoulder, hip, knee, and sacroiliac joints. Surgical removal of bullets retained within the synovial joints is indicated; lead is dissolved by synovial fluid over time, leading to proliferative synovitis, lead arthropathy, elevated serum lead levels, and lead toxicity. We present an arthroscopic technique for removal of a shotgun pellet retained within the medial meniscus. In this technique, diagnostic knee arthroscopy is initially performed, which allows for localization of the pellet within the medial meniscus. An up-biter is used to resect the inner rim of meniscus surrounding the pellet, and the pellet is removed with a grasper. This arthroscopic approach is advantageous because it allows for efficient visualization of the pellet within the meniscus, thorough visualization of all compartments of the knee, a reduction in blood loss, and a decrease in surgical morbidity to the surrounding cartilaginous, neurovascular, and soft-tissue structures. This technique may therefore be one option to address bullet fragments or shotgun pellets that are retained within the medial meniscus. PMID:27073774

  1. Arthroscopic revision arthrodesis for non-union of the naviculocuneiform joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-08-01

    Naviculocuneiform arthrodesis is a viable treatment for symptomatic flatfoot with sag of the naviculocuneiform joint. Nonetheless, non-union is a common complication, and revision arthrodesis is indicated. This study reports arthroscopic revision arthrodesis for non-union of the naviculocuneiform. Accurate debridement and bone grafting of the nonunion site was performed arthroscopically.

  2. [Femoral shaft fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Dietz, H-G; Schlickewei, W

    2011-05-01

    Femoral shaft fractures in children represent 1.5% of all fractures in childhood. Up to the age of 4 years, conservative treatment in a hip spica or short-term overhead traction is the therapy of choice. Femoral shaft fractures between the age of 5 and 16 years should be treated surgically. In over 90% of these cases elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is the premier treatment option. Additional end caps can be used for unstable fractures and in length discrepancy. The external fixator and the locking plate are reserved for fractures with severe soft tissue injuries, vascular problems and some specific situations mentioned later on. By adhering to these standards good results can be achieved with a low complication rate.

  3. Metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty: revision surgery using a ceramic femoral component - a case report.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2012-03-01

    We present a case involving the revision of a total knee arthroplasty with a metal femoral component using a ceramic implant due to metal hypersensitivity. A 58-year-old female patient underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a standard metal bicondylar knee system. She suffered from persistent pain and strong limitations in her range of motion (ROM) associated with flexion during the early postoperative period. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the knee joint and intensive active and passive physical treatment, in combination with a cortisone regime, temporarily increased the ROM and reduced pain. No signs of low grade infection or other causes of implant failure were evident. Histology of synovial tissue revealed lymphoplasmacellular fibrinous tissue, consistent with a type IV allergic reaction. Allergometry (skin reaction) revealed type IV hypersensitivity against nickel-II-sulfate and palladium chloride. Revision surgery of the metal components was performed with a cemented ceramic femoral component (same bicondylar design) and a cemented titanium alloy tibial component. Postoperative evaluations were performed 10days, and 3 and 12months after the revision surgery. There was an increased ROM in flexion to 90° at the 12month follow-up. No swelling or effusion was observed at all clinical examinations after the revision surgery. No pain at rest and moderate walking pain were evident. The presented case demonstrates that ceramic implants are a promising solution for patients suffering from hypersensitivity to metal ions in total knee arthroplasty.

  4. Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions of the shoulder: Diagnosis and arthroscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Nuri; Sirin, Evrim; Arya, Alp

    2014-01-01

    After the improvement in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears are increasingly recognized and treated in persons with excessive overhead activities like throwers. Several potential mechanisms for the pathophysiology of superior labral tears have been proposed. The diagnosis of this condition can be possible by history, physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging combination. The treatment of type 1 SLAP tears in many cases especially in older patients is non-operative but some cases need arthroscopic intervention. The arthroscopic management of type 2 lesions in older patients can be biceps tenodesis, but young and active patients like throwers will need an arthroscopic repair. The results of arthroscopic repair in older patients are not encouraging. The purpose of this study is to perform an overview of the diagnosis of the SLAP tears and to help decision making for the surgical management. PMID:25035838

  5. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  6. Tissue sparing total femoral arthroplasty: technical note.

    PubMed

    Willimon, Samuel Clifton; Bolognesi, Michael P; Attarian, David E

    2011-01-01

    It is predicted that the number of revision hip and knee arthroplasties will double by the years 2026 and 2015, respectively. As the burden of end-stage prosthetic disease increases, there will be a greater potential need for total femoral arthroplasty. This report describes a patient with a femoral neck fracture nonunion with an ipsilateral multiply revised failed total knee arthroplasty treated by a tissue sparing total femoral arthroplasty. The technique is described, and potential benefits are reviewed.

  7. Femoral Nerve Palsy with Patella Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyoung; Lee, Tong Joo; Woo, Min Su

    2013-01-01

    Femoral neuropathy may be associated with various etiologies and can cause severe walking disability. We present the case of a 25-year-old woman who underwent surgical repair for a patella fracture and complained of lower extremity pain, paresthesia, and weakness postoperatively. Electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed partial peripheral neuropathy of the left femoral nerve associated with the patella fracture. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of femoral neuropathy associated with a patella fracture. PMID:24369003

  8. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  9. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Filho, Ildeu Afonso; de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Fim, Márcio; da Silva Corrêa, Lincoln Vargas; de Carvalho Junior, Antônio Enéas Rangel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clinically and radiologically evaluate patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment for anterior shoulder instability by means of the Bankart technique, using metal anchors. Methods: This was a retrospective study on 49 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability between 2002 and 2007. The patients were evaluated using the Carter-Rowe score and the Samilson and Prieto classification. The mean age at the time of surgery was 30 years. The mean length of follow-up was 42.7 months (ranging from 18 to 74). 85% of the patients were male. Results: The mean Carter-Rowe score was 83 points (ranging from 30 to 100) including 31 excellent results, 7 good, 3 fair and 8 poor. Recurrent dislocation was observed in 16% (8 patients), and 37.5% of them were of traumatic origin. Joint degeneration was present in 32.5% of the cases, including 5 cases of grade 1, 6 cases of grade 2 and 2 cases of grade 3. The average loss of external rotation was 12° and the loss of anterior elevation was 8°. There was a statistically significant relationship (p < 0.05) between arthritis and age at first dislocation, age at surgery and crackling. 92% of the patients reported high degrees of satisfaction after the procedure. Among the complications, there were two cases of stiff shoulder, one patient with prominence of the synthesis material and one case of anchor loosening. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability using metal anchors was shown to be effective, with a low complication rate. PMID:27042624

  10. Outcomes of arthroscopic Bankart repair in collision versus noncollision athletes.

    PubMed

    Petrera, Massimo; Dwyer, Tim; Tsuji, Matthew R S; Theodoropoulos, John S

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the recurrence rate of arthroscopic Bankart repair with suture anchors in collision vs noncollision athletes. Sixty-four patients who underwent arthroscopic shoulder stabilization using suture anchors for recurrent anterior dislocation were identified. Forty-three patients (22 collision and 21 noncollision) were evaluated at a minimum 24-month follow-up. The recurrence rate was reported, and functional outcomes (American Shoulder and Elbow Society, Western Ontario Shoulder Index, and Short Form 12) were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test and Student's t test with a 95% confidence interval and a significance level set at a P value less than .05. The overall dislocation recurrence rate was 4.6% (2 of 43 patients); the dislocation recurrence rate in collision athletes was 9% (2 of 22 patients), and no redislocations occurred in noncollision athletes. No statistical differences existed in Western Ontario Shoulder Index score (73.5% in collision and 73.4% in noncollision athletes; P=.831), American Shoulder and Elbow Society score (91.2 in collision and 80.7 in noncollision athletes; P=.228), and Short Form 12 score (108.5 in collision and 101.2 in noncollision athletes; P=.083). Average external rotation loss was 6.8° in collision and 5.5° in noncollision athletes (P=.864). Ninety percent of collision athletes vs 95% of noncollision athletes were satisfied. Seventy-three percent of collision and 81% of noncollision athletes were able to return to sport at their preinjury levels. Collision athletes had higher recurrence rates after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization compared with noncollision athletes, but no statistical difference was found. Functional outcomes according to American Shoulder and Elbow Society, Western Ontario Shoulder Index, and Short Form 12 were similar.

  11. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: Ulnar Shortening vs. Arthroscopic Wafer Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Luc De; Vandenberghe, Lore; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of ulnar shortenings was compared with that of arthroscopic wafer resections for ulnar impaction (or abutment) syndrome in patients with a positive ulnar variance. The outcome was measured by DASH score, visual analog scale for pain, and working incapacity. The mean DASH score in the ulnar shortening group was 26; in the wafer group it was 36. The VAS scores were respectively 4.4 and 4.6. The working incapacity was 7?months in the ulnar shortening group and 6.1 months in the wafer group. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. PMID:25032075

  12. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  13. Arthroscopic Management of Anterior, Posterior, and Multidirectional Shoulder Instabilities.

    PubMed

    Field, Larry D; Ryu, Richard K N; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Provencher, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization offers several potential advantages compared with open surgery, including the opportunity to more accurately evaluate the glenohumeral joint at the time of diagnostic assessment; comprehensively address multiple pathologic lesions that may be identified; and avoid potential complications unique to open stabilization, such as postoperative subscapularis failure. A thorough understanding of normal shoulder anatomy and biomechanics, along with the pathoanatomy responsible for anterior, posterior, and multidirectional shoulder instability patterns, is very important in the management of patients who have shoulder instability. The treating physician also must be familiar with diagnostic imaging and physical examination maneuvers that are required to accurately diagnose shoulder instability.

  14. Midterm clinical outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Garofalo, Raffaele; Lo, Eddie Y.; Feher, LeeAnne; Castagna, Alessandro; Qin, Huanying; Krishnan, Sumant G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic transosseous (TO) rotator cuff repair has recently emerged as a new option for surgical treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. Limited data is available regarding outcomes using this technique. This study evaluated midterm clinical outcomes following a novel arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 107 patients and 109 shoulders underwent arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair for a symptomatic full-thickness tear. Pre and postoperative range of motion (ROM) was compared at an average of 11.8 months. Postoperative outcome scores were obtained at an average of 38.0 months. Statistical analysis was performed to compare pre and postoperative ROM data. Univariate analysis was performed using Student's t-test to compare the effect of other clinical characteristics on final outcome. Results: Statistically significant improvements were noted in forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation (P < 0.0001). Average postoperative subjective shoulder value was 93.7, simple shoulder test 11.6, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score 94.6. According to ASES scores, results for the 109 shoulders available for final follow-up were excellent in 95 (87.1%), good in 8 (7.3%), fair in 3 (2.8%), and poor in 3 (2.8%). There was no difference in ROM or outcome scores in patients who underwent a concomitant biceps procedure (tenodesis or tenotomy) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients who underwent either biceps tenodesis or tenotomy. Age, history of injury preceding the onset of pain, tear size, number of TO tunnels required to perform the repair, and presence of fatty infiltration did not correlate with postoperative ROM or subjective outcome measures at final follow-up. Two complications and four failures were noted. Conclusions: Arthroscopic TO rotator cuff repair technique leads to

  15. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3(+) T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could

  16. Arthroscopic Excision of an Intraarticular Osteoid Osteoma in the Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk; Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Lee, Min Young

    2016-01-01

    An intraarticular osteoid osteoma of the knee is uncommon, and its treatment is challenging. The authors present a case of arthroscopic excision of an intraarticular osteoid osteoma in the distal femur, which was accessible through the knee joint. After confirming the nidus of the osteoid osteoma by computed tomography, the lesion was completely removed arthroscopically. The patient reported complete pain relief immediately after surgery. This case demonstrates that intraarticular osteoid osteomas in the knee joint can be treated by arthroscopic excision and that good results can be obtained. PMID:27904732

  17. Arthroscopic Excision of an Intraarticular Osteoid Osteoma in the Distal Femur.

    PubMed

    Kang, Suk; Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jong Pil

    2016-12-01

    An intraarticular osteoid osteoma of the knee is uncommon, and its treatment is challenging. The authors present a case of arthroscopic excision of an intraarticular osteoid osteoma in the distal femur, which was accessible through the knee joint. After confirming the nidus of the osteoid osteoma by computed tomography, the lesion was completely removed arthroscopically. The patient reported complete pain relief immediately after surgery. This case demonstrates that intraarticular osteoid osteomas in the knee joint can be treated by arthroscopic excision and that good results can be obtained.

  18. Arthroscopic excision of distal pole of patella for refractory patellar tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John D

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the results of arthroscopic tendon debridement with excision of the distal pole of the patella for refractory patellar tendinitis. Nine patients failed at least 3 months of conservative therapy and underwent arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with debridement of the deep proximal patella tendon. At least 3 months postoperatively (range, 3 months-5 years), 8 patients reported no distal patellar pole tenderness (Bassett sign), and 1 patient reported only mild tenderness. Arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with tendon debridement holds promise for the treatment of refractory patellar tendinitis.

  19. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  20. Ultrasound-guided arthroscopic management of hallux rigidus

    PubMed Central

    Kruczyński, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of metatarso-phalangeal joint arthroscopy in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans was first described in 1988. The technique produces good results. However, it can be difficult to enter a joint when it is deformed by degenerative disease. Sonography is a modern visualisation modality which can be used in orthopaedic surgery. Aim To describe a method of intraoperative sonographic navigation during first metatarso-phalangeal joint arthroscopy. Material and methods The modality was used in 3 patients. The joint was visualised in the ultrasound scanner. After confirming the intra-articular position of the guide needle, a medial portal was established. The procedure started with the removal and vaporisation of the hypertrophic synovium. Gradual resection of the osteophytes was then carried out. The procedure was terminated after the ultrasound image showed that a smooth upper surface of the metatarsal head had been achieved. Results All 3 patients were satisfied with the procedure and function of the treated feet. Average surgery time was 81 min. No complications were found. Conclusions Mini-invasive treatment of hallux rigidus with sonography-guided arthroscopic cheilectomy appears to be a reproducible procedure leading to good clinical results. We encourage surgeons familiar with ultrasound visualisation of the joints to use the technique described in this paper in the arthroscopic treatment of hallux rigidus. PMID:27829936

  1. The successful arthroscopic treatment of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Spinner, Robert J; Smith, Jay; Howe, Benjamin M; Amrami, Kimberly K; Iannotti, Joseph P; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can distinguish between intraneural ganglion cysts and paralabral (extraneural) cysts at the glenohumeral joint. Suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts share the same pathomechanism as their paralabral counterparts, emanating from a tear in the glenoid labrum. The authors present 2 cases to demonstrate that the identification and arthroscopic repair of labral tears form the cornerstone of treatment for intraneural ganglion cysts of the suprascapular nerve. METHODS Two patients with suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts were identified: 1 was recognized and treated prospectively, and the other, previously reported as a paralabral cyst, was identified retrospectively through the reinter-pretation of high-resolution MR images. RESULTS Both patients achieved full functional recovery and had complete radiological involution of the intraneural ganglion cysts at the 3-month and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Previous reports of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts described treatment by an open approach to decompress the cysts and resect the articular nerve branch to the glenohumeral joint. The 2 cases in this report demonstrate that intraneural ganglion cysts, similar to paralabral cysts, can be treated with arthroscopic repair of the glenoid labrum without resection of the articular branch. This approach minimizes surgical morbidity and directly addresses the primary etiology of intraneural and extraneural ganglion cysts.

  2. Arthroscopic gluteal muscle contracture release with radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Jie; Wang, Yan; Xue, Jing; Lui, Pauline Po-Yee; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture is common after repeated intramuscular injections and sometimes is sufficiently debilitating to require open surgery. We asked whether arthroscopic release of gluteal muscle contracture using radiofrequency energy would decrease complications with clinically acceptable results. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients with bilateral gluteal muscle contractures (57 males, 51 females; mean age, 23.7 years). We used inferior, anterosuperior, and posterosuperior portals. With the patient lying laterally, we developed and enlarged a potential space between the gluteal muscle group and the subcutaneous fat using blunt dissection. Under arthroscopic guidance through the inferior portal, we débrided and removed fatty tissue overlying the contractile band of the gluteal muscle group using a motorized shaver introduced through the superior portal. Radiofrequency then was introduced through the superior portal to gradually excise the contracted bands from superior to inferior. Finally, hemostasis was ensured using radiofrequency. Patients were followed a minimum of 7 months (mean, 17.4 months; range, 7-42 months). At last followup, the adduction and flexion ranges of the hip were 45.3 degrees +/- 8.7 degrees and 110.2 degrees +/- 11.9 degrees, compared with 10.4 degrees +/- 7.2 degrees and 44.8 degrees +/- 14.1 degrees before surgery. No hip abductor contracture recurred and no patient had residual hip pain or gluteal muscle wasting. We found gluteal muscle contracture could be released effectively with radiofrequency energy.

  3. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    PubMed Central

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique. PMID:26998453

  4. Arthroscopic and open management of posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H

    2014-09-01

    Posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI) is the most common cause of residual instability following a simple elbow dislocation. PLRI may result from trauma or iatrogenic injury to the radial ulnohumeral ligament during treatment for other conditions, such as lateral epicondylitis. PLRI can be identified through a combination of history and physical examination, and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging arthrography. Once diagnosed, surgery is necessary to correct persistent instability. Instability can be confirmed arthroscopically through several findings, including subluxation of the radial head on the capitellum and the arthroscopic "drive through sign of the elbow." Acute repairs, both open and arthroscopic, heal with excellent patient outcomes. In the chronic setting, graft reconstruction may be required. This report describes arthroscopic repair of the radial ulnohumeral ligament and open reconstruction with associated outcomes. A high index of suspicion is necessary to correctly diagnosis this condition in patients with lateral elbow pain and feelings of instability.

  5. McMurray Test: A Prediction of Arthroscopic Meniscectomy Outcomes in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng; Lin, Xiangjin; Zhu, Liulong; Li, Min

    2015-05-01

    The McMurray test is used to evaluate patients with meniscal tears of the knee. Analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of McMurray test and the correlation between McMurray sign and postoperative outcomes are helpful to screen the candidates for arthroscopic meniscectomy. The present study compares the results of McMurray test with arthroscopic examination in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We studied 149 patients diagnosed as meniscal lesion with osteoarthritis by radiology and had arthroscopic surgery. Our data show that positive McMurray sign implies good postoperative outcomes for the patients with meniscal tear associated with osteoarthritis. For patients with osteoarthritis, those whose positive McMurray signs are in line with their radiological findings indicate they are eligible candidates for arthroscopic meniscectomy. Our study suggests that McMurray sign can be used as an indication for both symptomatic meniscal tear and postoperative outcomes.

  6. Result from arthroscopic surgical treatment of renewed tearing of the rotator cuff of the shoulder☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flávio de Oliveira; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; Prandini, Alexandre; Godinho, André Couto; Costa, Rafael Patrocínio de Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate function among patients with postoperative recurrence of rotator cuff injuries that was treated arthroscopically (case series) and compare this with function in patients without recurrence (control group); and to compare function among patients with recurrence of rotator cuff injuries that were greater than and smaller than 3 cm. Methods This was a retrospective evaluation of patients who underwent arthroscopic revision of rotator cuff injuries using the ASES, Constant & Murley and UCLA scores and a visual analog pain scale, in comparison with patients in a control group who underwent primary rotator cuff repair. Results The size of the rotator cuff injury recurrence had a statistically significant influence on the result from the arthroscopic surgical treatment. The functional scores showed worse results than those from the first procedure. Conclusion Arthroscopic surgical treatment of renewed tearing of rotator cuff injuries showed worse functional scores than those from primary repair of the injury. PMID:26229900

  7. Compression of the suprascapular nerve by a ganglion cyst of the spinoglenoid notch: the arthroscopic solution.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Sven; Magosch, Petra; Habermeyer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated an all arthroscopic technique for treating suprascapular nerve entrapment by cyst formation in the spinoglenoid notch. Eight patients showed positive MRI and EMG findings with clinical sign of weakness and pain and with atrophy of the muscle. All patients underwent an all-arthroscopic procedure. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively and for the latest follow-up by clinical examination, MRI, and EMG. All patients improved in terms of pain, strength, and function. We found six superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions. In these patients the cyst was drained, and the SLAP lesion was repaired. In two patients there was no communication between the joint and the cyst, and therefore capsulotomy was performed and left open. The results of our study show that arthroscopic decompression of the suprascapular nerve can be achieved by an all arthroscopic technique if the cyst formation is located at the spinoglenoid notch.

  8. All-Arthroscopic Technique for Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Cutbush, Kenneth; Hirpara, Kieran M.

    2015-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are a common injury particularly among contact sports players. There has been an increasing trend toward arthroscopic management of these injuries. To date, these reconstructions have primarily addressed superoinferior instability by reconstructing the coracoclavicular ligaments. We describe an all-arthroscopic technique for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments using Arthrex ABS TightRopes (Arthrex, Naples, FL), with additional stabilization of the superior acromioclavicular joint capsule using an anchor-based suture bridge to address anteroposterior instability. PMID:26697307

  9. An unusual complication of femoral vein catheterisation: pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Yildizdas, D; Tepe, T; Parlak, M; Akcali, M

    2007-12-01

    A 2-month-old girl with severe pneumonia required a central venous line. Femoral vein catheterisation was attempted but insertion was difficult. Pneumoperitoneum developed, which is a rare complication of femoral vein catheterisation. It is important when undertaking femoral vein catheterisation to use the correct landmarks in the femoral triangle below the inguinal ligament and an appropriate size of catheter.

  10. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  11. A biomechanical comparison of proximal femoral nails and locking proximal anatomic femoral plates in femoral fracture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Korhan; Türkmen, İsmail; Sahin, Adem; Yildiz, Yavuz; Erturk, Selim; Soylemez, Mehmet Salih

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of fractures in the trochanteric area has risen with the increasing numbers of elderly people with osteoporosis. Although dynamic hip screw fixation is the gold standard for the treatment of stable intertrochanteric femur fractures, treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fractures still remains controversial. Intramedullary devices such as Gamma nail or proximal femoral nail and proximal anatomic femur plates are in use for the treatment of intertrochanteric femur fractures. There are still many investigations to find the optimal implant to treat these fractures with minimum complications. For this reason, we aimed to perform a biomechanical comparison of the proximal femoral nail and the locking proximal anatomic femoral plate in the treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty synthetic, third generation human femur models, obtained for this purpose, were divided into two groups of 10 bones each. Femurs were provided as a standard representation of AO/Orthopedic Trauma Associationtype 31-A2 unstable fractures. Two types of implantations were inserted: the proximal femoral intramedullary nail in the first group and the locking anatomic femoral plate in the second group. Axial load was applied to the fracture models through the femoral head using a material testing machine, and the biomechanical properties of the implant types were compared. Result: Nail and plate models were locked distally at the same level. Axial steady load with a 5 mm/m velocity was applied through the mechanical axis of femur bone models. Axial loading in the proximal femoral intramedullary nail group was 1.78-fold greater compared to the plate group. All bones that had the plate applied were fractured in the portion containing the distal locking screw. Conclusion: The proximal femoral intramedullary nail provides more stability and allows for earlier weight bearing than the locking plate when used for the treatment of

  12. Arthroscopic assessment of Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Nakamura, R; Imaeda, T

    1995-06-01

    Arthroscopic examination was performed on 32 wrists of 32 patients with Kienböck's disease to relate the appearance of the intraarticular structures, particularly the articular cartilage, to the radiographic stage. The articular cartilage showed osteoarthritic changes in stage III, although this was not evident on plain radiographs. Cracking in the distal facet and flapping at the proximal facet of the lunate were identified as features of Kienböck's disease. The incidence of interosseous ligament tears was correlated with radiographically determined stage, whereas changes in triangular fibrocartilage were correlated with age and ulnar variance. Wrist arthroscopy is a useful staging tool for Kienböck's disease, supplying helpful information about the intraarticular pathoanatomy which can be used to guide patient management.

  13. Arthroscopic Interpositional Arthroplasty of the Second Metatarsophalangeal Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Painful degenerative diseases of the second metatarsophalangeal joint are frequently progressive and difficult to treat. Surgical options for the degenerated second metatarsophalangeal joint include joint debridement and synovectomy, drilling and microfracture, core decompression, dorsal closing-wedge metatarsal osteotomies, joint arthroplasty (implant or interpositional), elevation of the depressed articular fragment and bone graft, distraction arthroplasty, osteochondral plug transplantation, osteochondral distal metatarsal allograft reconstruction, and resection arthroplasty (phalangeal base or metatarsal head). This technical note describes the arthroscopic approach of interpositional arthroplasty of the second metatarsophalangeal joint using the extensor digitorum brevis tendon. It is indicated in adult patients with extensive involvement of the metatarsal head cartilage, especially when cartilage degeneration of the proximal phalanx is also present. It is contraindicated if there is significant bone loss of the metatarsal head or the extensor digitorum brevis tendon is flimsy.

  14. Femoral and Tibial Tunnel Widening following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Various Modalities of Fixation: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanthila, Mahesha; Saya, Rama Prakasha; Vidyasagar, JVS

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone tunnel enlargement after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACL-R) is a well-accepted phenomenon but there are very few published data comparing the extent of tunnel widening by various methods of fixation after ACL-R. Aim To compare the femoral and tibial tunnel widening following ACL-R with different methods of fixation using CT scan. Materials and Methods This one year prospective study included all patients with chronic Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL-R using tripled hamstring tendon autograft. The graft was fixed to the tibial tunnel by Interference Screw (IFS) or Suture Disc (SD) and to the femoral tunnel by IFS, SD, Cross-Pin (CP) or Endo-button CL (Smith & Nephew). The widening of the tibial and femoral tunnels in different methods of fixation was assessed by Computed Tomography (CT) at 12 months follow-up; and was compared using paired sample test. Results A total of 63 patients were included in the study of which 58 (92%) were males and 5 (8%) were females, with a mean age of 29.1 ± 5.9 years. The tibial tunnel widening at one year follow-up was 1.680 ± 1.08794 (19.37%) and 1.517 ± 0.94834 mm (17.39%) by IFS and SD methods respectively. Femoral tunnel widening at one year follow-up was 1.294 ± 0.231, 1.809 ± 0.912, 1.320 ± 0.238, 1.779 ± 0.889 mm by IFS, SD, EB, and CP methods respectively. Femoral tunnel widening following suture disc method of fixation was very highly significant (p<0.001) in comparison with other methods. Conclusion Femoral tunnel and tibial tunnel widening varies with different methods of fixation and was maximum with suture disc method compared to others at one year follow-up after ACL-R. PMID:28050456

  15. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  16. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  17. Femoral nerve entrapment: a new insight.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M T; Murillo, J; Maranillo, E; Parkin, I G; Sanudo, J

    2007-03-01

    Compression of the femoral nerve in the iliac fossa has been reported as a consequence of several pathologies, but never as a result of muscular compression. Aberrant slips of iliacus, however, have occasionally been reported to cover or split the femoral nerve. This study aimed to assess such variations as potential factors in femoral nerve compression. A large and homogeneous sample of 121 embalmed cadavers (242 specimens) was studied. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi-squared test. Muscular slips from iliacus and psoas, piercing or covering the femoral nerve, were found in 19 specimens (7.9%). No significant differences by sex or side were found. The more frequent variation was piercing of the femoral nerve by a muscular slip (17 specimens, 7.0%). The nerve then entered the thigh as one or more branches. The less frequent variation found was a muscular slip or sheet covering the femoral nerve as it lay on iliacus (2 specimens, 0.8%). Each disposition may be a potential risk for nerve entrapment.

  18. Efficacy of magnesium as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 nerve block for arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament repair

    PubMed Central

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Arora, Mahesh K; Trikha, Anjan; Sunder, Rani A; Prasad, Ganga; Singh, Preet M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Three-in-one and femoral nerve blocks are proven modalities for postoperative analgesia following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of magnesium (Mg) as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 block for ACL reconstruction. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were randomly allocated to Group I (3-in-1 block with 30 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine preceded by 1.5 ml of intravenous [IV] saline), Group II (3-in-1 block with 30 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine preceded by 1.5 ml of solution containing 150 mg Mg IV) or Group III (3-in-1 block with 30 ml containing 0.25% bupivacaine and 150 mg of Mg as adjuvant preceded by 1.5 ml of IV saline). Post-operatively, patients received morphine when visual analogue scale (VAS) score was ≥4. Quantitative parameters were compared using one-way ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis test and qualitative data were analysed using Chi-square test. Results: Demographics, haemodynamic parameters, intra-operative fentanyl requirement, post-operative VAS scores and total morphine requirement were comparable between groups. Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged in Group III (789 ± 436) min compared to Group I (466 ± 290 min) and Group II (519 ± 274 min), (P = 0.02 and 0.05). Significantly less number of patients in Group III (1/20) received morphine in the first 6 h post-operatively, compared to Group I (8/20) and Group II (6/20) (P = 0.008 and 0.03). No side effects were observed. Conclusion: Mg as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 block for ACL reconstruction significantly prolongs the time to first analgesic requirement and reduces the number of patients requiring morphine in the immediate post-operative period. PMID:27512165

  19. Vascular Complications in Arthroscopic Repair Of Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana; Grignaffini, María Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament is the primary stabilizer of the knee. Among the potential complications in arthroscopic repair of this ligament, there are vascular lesions, due to laceration, thrombosis and injury of the intima of the popliteal artery. We used one case to show the vascular complications that may arise in arthroscopic repair of the posterior cruciate ligament, how to handle it and the results. Methods: One patient, 33 years old, with a history of traffic accident. In a physical exam the patient shows pain and swelling of the knee, positive posterior drawer test and positive Godfrey test. X-rays on the knee show posterior tibial translation and MRI a complete fibers rupture at the middle third of the posterior cruciate ligament. An arthroscopic repair surgery was scheduled three weeks after trauma, with PCL reconstruction using simple band technique.After surgical intervention, hemostatic cuff was released, no peripheral pulse, paleness and coldness of the member was confirmed. An arteriography was carried out, which confirmed absences of distal vascular filling in the popliteal artery. An urgent referral was carried out with Vascular Surgery Services, who had been informed of the surgery previously (a notification that is part of our routine for this kind of interventions). Arteriorrhaphy and venorrhaphy of the popliteal arteries was fulfilled 12 hours later, with a leg fasciotomy. Daily monitoring was performed, and after 72 hours, muscle necrosis is seen with wound drainage, analysis shows presence of gram-negative bacilli, Proteus Mirabilis-Pseudomonas spp and the lab results showed leukocytes: 8.700/ml, ESR: 58, CRP: 48. A new surgery is performed with complete resection of the anterior external compartment of the leg, and a system of continuous cleansing is applied with physiological saline solution and boric acid for 14 days until drainage is eliminated. Vancomycin and ceftazidime EV was indicated for 14 days and, after a good

  20. Lateral Decubitus All-Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure for Treatment of Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lewington, Matthew R.; Urquhart, Nathan; Wong, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder instability can be a challenging condition to treat when it becomes refractory to soft-tissue procedures or when bone loss exceeds 25% to 27% of the glenoid. The Bristow-Latarjet procedure has been developed and popularized to deal with these concerns. Traditionally, the procedure has been performed as an open approach; however, this has been recently supplanted by novel arthroscopic techniques. We present a technique for the procedure performed with the patient in a semi-lateral decubitus position that assists with optimal graft placement on the native glenoid. We use the cannulated Bristow-Latarjet Instability Shoulder System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA). After a diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation, we use multiple arthroscopic anterior portals to debride the rim of the glenoid. The coracoid is prepared and taken down arthroscopically, and the cannulated guide is attached and advanced through an arthroscopically created subscapularis split. With the shoulder held in a reduced position, we are then able to drill and anchor the graft to the native glenoid. The patient is able to begin gentle range-of-motion exercises immediately postoperatively. PMID:26258032

  1. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnel Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Laurie A.; Kerslake, Sarah; Lafave, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a procedure aimed to reestablish the checkrein to lateral patellar translation in patients with symptomatic patellofemoral instability. Correct femoral tunnel position is thought to be crucial to successful MPFL reconstruction, but the accuracy of this statement in terms of patient outcomes has not been tested. Purpose: To assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in an MPFL reconstruction cohort and to determine the correlation between tunnel accuracy and a validated disease-specific, patient-reported quality-of-life outcome measure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Between June 2008 and February 2014, a total of 206 subjects underwent an MPFL reconstruction. Lateral radiographs were measured to determine the accuracy of the femoral tunnel by measuring the distance from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point. Banff Patella Instability Instrument (BPII) scores were collected a mean 24 months postoperatively. Results: A total of 155 (79.5%) subjects had adequate postoperative lateral radiographs and complete BPII scores. The mean duration of follow-up (±SD) was 24.4 ± 8.2 months (range, 12-74 months). Measurement from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point resulted in 143 (92.3%) tunnels being categorized as “good” or “ideal.” There were 8 failures in the cohort, none of which occurred in malpositioned tunnels. The mean distance from the center of the MPFL tunnel to the center of the Schöttle point was 5.9 ± 4.2 mm (range, 0.5-25.9 mm). The mean postoperative BPII score was 65.2 ± 22.5 (range, 9.2-100). Pearson r correlation demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between accuracy of femoral tunnel position and BPII score (r = –0.08; 95% CI, –0.24 to 0.08). Conclusion: There was no evidence of a correlation between the accuracy of MPFL reconstruction femoral tunnel in relation to the Schöttle point and

  2. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  3. The terminal branches of the medial femoral circumflex artery: the arterial supply of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, L E; Klinger, C E; Sculco, P K; Helfet, D L; Lorich, D G

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates and defines the topographic anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery (MFCA) terminal branches supplying the femoral head (FH). Gross dissection of 14 fresh-frozen cadaveric hips was undertaken to determine the extra and intracapsular course of the MFCA's terminal branches. A constant branch arising from the transverse MFCA (inferior retinacular artery; IRA) penetrates the capsule at the level of the anteroinferior neck, then courses obliquely within the fibrous prolongation of the capsule wall (inferior retinacula of Weitbrecht), elevated from the neck, to the posteroinferior femoral head-neck junction. This vessel has a mean of five (three to nine) terminal branches, of which the majority penetrate posteriorly. Branches from the ascending MFCA entered the femoral capsular attachment posteriorly, running deep to the synovium, through the neck, and terminating in two branches. The deep MFCA penetrates the posterosuperior femoral capsular. Once intracapsular, it divides into a mean of six (four to nine) terminal branches running deep to the synovium, within the superior retinacula of Weitbrecht of which 80% are posterior. Our study defines the exact anatomical location of the vessels, arising from the MFCA and supplying the FH. The IRA is in an elevated position from the femoral neck and may be protected from injury during fracture of the femoral neck. We present vascular 'danger zones' that may help avoid iatrogenic vascular injury during surgical interventions about the hip.

  4. Arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1A ankle Fractures in Children: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The risk of growth arrest following paediatric ankle fractures type 1 A is very high. Therefore all attempts should be done to anatomically reduce this kind of fracture. The advances in ankle arthroscopy have brought the possibility to reduce these fractures under direct vision, without the need of capsulotomy. The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance of the use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures. Case Report: We describe two cases with SH type IV fractures of the distal medial tibia, one treated with open reduction and percutaneous screw fixation and the other treated with arthroscopically assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation. The first case ended with severe growth disturbance, while the second gave a very good result. Conclusion: The use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures should be considered to ensure anatomical reduction. PMID:27298899

  5. Arthroscopic decompression with indigo carmine for treating paralabral cysts in the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kabuto, Y; Morihara, T; Furukawa, R; Kida, Y; Sukenari, T; Onishi, O; Minami, M; Arai, Y; Fujiwara, H; Kubo, T

    2016-12-01

    Paralabral cysts in the shoulder are a relatively rare pathology. It is sometimes difficult to detect the location of a paralabral cyst in the shoulder using arthroscopy, and it can be difficult to confirm sufficient decompression by arthroscopy. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent arthroscopic decompression for a paralabral cyst in the shoulder. Indigo carmine was injected into the cyst under ultrasonography guidance just before the operation. The leakage point of indigo carmine was detected using arthroscopy. Arthroscopic decompression was performed until the indigo carmine was completely discharged. Her shoulder pain, limited range of motion, and muscle weakness during abduction and external rotation improved postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the disappearance of the cyst. Arthroscopic decompression using an ultrasonography-guided injection of indigo carmine is a useful treatment for a paralabral cyst in the shoulder.

  6. Traumatic arteriovenous fistula as consequence of TMJ arthroscopic surgery. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Fernandez, Ana-Belen; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-01-01

    The ocurrence of a traumatic arteriovenous fistula after arthroscopic surgery of TMJ represents an extremely rare event. Specifically, this uncommon complication has been described only in a few case reports. In this light, the most frequent symptoms showed by this disease are thrills, bruits, pulsatile tinnitus, and an expansible vascular mass. Importantly, the severity of these symptoms is also dependent on the vessels involved. With regard to the management, is important to note that the vessel ligation with surgery as well as vessel emolization with endovascular procedures have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these cases. In view of that, the present study describes a case of superficial temporal arteriovenous fistula that arose as a postoperative complication of a bilateral arthroscopic eminoplasty of TMJ. The aim of the present report is to characterize this rare syndrome with the goal of proposing suitable treatments. Key words:Arteriovenous fistula, arthroscopic surgery, eminoplasty of TMJ, temporal vessels. PMID:27398189

  7. [Fracture arthroplasty of femoral neck fractures].

    PubMed

    Braun, K F; Hanschen, M; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    A paradigm shift in the treatment of elderly patients has recently taken place leading to an increase in joint replacement surgery. The aim of this article is to highlight new developments and to present a treatment algorithm for femoral neck fractures. The age limit must be individually determined considering the comorbidities and perioperative risk profile. Pertrochanteric femoral fractures are nearly exclusively treated by osteosynthesis regardless of age. The situation for femoral neck fractures is more complex. Patients younger than 65 years should generally be treated by osteosynthesis but patients older than 65 years benefit from hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. In patients aged between 65 and 75 years with high functional demands and a justifiable perioperative risk, total joint replacement is the treatment of choice. In physically less active patients older than 75 years and poor general condition, preference should be given to hemiarthroplasty.

  8. Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis: the posterior approach in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Carro, Luis Perez; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2007-04-01

    Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, as reported by Tasto, is done in the lateral decubitus position, and the portal sites are lateral. This report describes a new alternative method in which the patient is in the prone position and a posterior 2-portal approach is used, as described by van Dijk et al. The initial debridement and synovectomy are performed with 4- and 5-mm resectors. Debridement and decortication are done posterior to the interosseous ligament because only the posterior facet is fused. Denudation of the articular surfaces is performed with curettes, as well as 4.5- and 5.5-mm burs, to remove 2 mm of subchondral bone. Stabilization in 5 degrees of hindfoot valgus is accomplished with 2 percutaneous cannulated headless screws from the non-weight-bearing portion of the calcaneal tuberosity directed to a point 5 to 10 mm posterior to the anterior margin of the posterior facet. The advantages of this alternative treatment are better intra-articular visualization, more thorough preparation of the fusion site, and minimal bone removal of the lateral side with better control of the arthrodesis position and with less chance of malunion, as well as the possibility to perform a concomitant surgical fusion or debridement of the ankle joint during the same operative procedure with no need for additional portals or orientation.

  9. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree. PMID:26998466

  10. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat S; Karkamkar, Sachin S; Patil, Vaishali S Dumbre; Patil, Shailesh S; Ranaware, Abhijeet S

    2016-01-01

    Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN) or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS) are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP) of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22–65 years) and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27–72 months). Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion. PMID:27512218

  11. Anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery with respect to the vascularity of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zlotorowicz, M; Szczodry, M; Czubak, J; Ciszek, B

    2011-11-01

    We performed a series of 16 anatomical dissections on Caucasian cadaver material to determine the surgical anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery (MFCA) and its anastomoses. These confirmed that the femoral head receives its blood supply primarily from the MFCA via a group of posterior superior nutrient arteries and the posterior inferior nutrient artery. In terms of anastomoses that may also contribute to the blood supply, the anastomosis with the inferior gluteal artery, via the piriformis branch, is the most important. These dissections provide a base of knowledge for further radiological studies on the vascularity of the normal femoral head and its vascularity after dislocation of the hip.

  12. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  13. Combined partial arthroscopic synovectomy and radiation therapy for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Blanco, C E; Leon, H O; Guthrie, T B

    2001-05-01

    We present the results of combined partial arthroscopic synovectomy and low-dose external-beam radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the knee. Mechanical synovectomy is an effective tool in treating PVNS of the knee, but when used alone it may be insufficient to eliminate all affected tissue. Intra-articular radiation or external-beam radiation may be added to mechanical synovectomy to treat recurrence but is not routinely done at the time of initial synovectomy. Combining intra-articular synovectomy with RT at the initial treatment for PVNS of the knee may reduce the recurrence rate. We present a prospective study of the treatment of 22 patients with clinical, ultrasonic, and histologically confirmed findings of diffuse PVNS of the knee. Characteristic clinical findings included pain, swelling, and erythema. These patients were treated by the Arthroscopic Surgery Group of the Orthopaedic Service at the Hospital "Hermanos Ameijeiras" in Havana, Cuba from 1990 to 1998. The protocol included anterior (patellofemoral, medial, and lateral) arthroscopic synovectomy and postoperative RT with a total dose of 2,600 cGy. This combination therapy was effective in reducing symptoms of pain and edema, and in improving overall function of patients. Nineteen patients (86%) had good or excellent results at an average follow-up of 33 months (range, 26 to 76 months). Three patients had residual stiffness and swelling, 2 of whom also had pain. Three had clinically and ultrasonically confirmed recurrence of disease and were treated with repeat arthroscopic synovectomy without harmful effects from RT. In all of the cases requiring repeat arthroscopic synovectomy, we observed fibrous bands secondary to reorganization of synovial inflamed tissue, meniscal retraction, and microscopic findings of fibrosis and cellular paucity. Partial arthroscopic synovectomy combined with low-dose RT in anti-inflammatory doses produced good results

  14. Arthroscopic Resection of Too-Long Anterior Process of the Calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    A too-long anterior process (TLAP) of the calcaneus is an elongated anteromedial process of the calcaneus impinging the navicular or the talar head. TLAP can cause recurrent ankle sprain, peroneal muscle spasm, or persistent tarsal pain in adolescents. Arthroscopic resection is indicated if the symptoms do not respond to conservative treatment. It has the advantage of assessment of completeness of bone resection and treatment of associated lesions of the adjacent joints. The purpose of this technical note is to report an arthroscopic approach of the resection of the TLAP with the lateral midtarsal portal as the viewing portal.

  15. Arthroscopic First Metatarsophalangeal Arthrodesis for Repair of Fixed Hallux Varus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis for fixed hallux varus deformity can be very difficult because narrowing of the medial joint space results in difficult access. The abductor hallucis tendon and the medial capsule can be released through a small proximal plantar medial incision. This will convert the deformity into a flexible one and open up the medial joint space. This allows arthroscopic arthrodesis using the standard dorsolateral and medial portals. The plantar medial incision can also be used for arthroscopy of the metatarsosesamoid compartment and insertion of a screw for first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis.

  16. The Role of Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy in the Management of Degenerative Meniscus Tears: A Review of the Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohsin; Shenoy, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for middle aged to older adults with knee pain is one of the most common surgical procedures with approximately 150,000 knee arthroscopies being carried out in the United Kingdom each year, and about five times that number in the United States. Despite this, the procedure remains controversial. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the role of arthroscopic meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears and suggest recommendations for clinical practice. Methods: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases, including Pubmed, Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library to cover important randomised control trials surrounding the use of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Results: The majority of randomised control trials suggest that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is not superior to conservative measures such as exercise programmes. Furthermore, one randomised control trial found that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was not even superior to sham surgery. Conclusion: There is significant overtreatment of knee pain with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy when alternative, less invasive and less expensive treatment options are equally effective. First-line treatment of degenerative meniscus tears should be non-operative therapy focused on analgesia and physical therapy to provide pain relief as well as improve mechanical function of the knee joint. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should be considered as a last resort when extensive exercise programmes and physiotherapy have been tried and failed. PMID:28217206

  17. Femoral development in chronically centrifuged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    Groups of 30-d-old male and female rats were centrifuged at 2.00 G (RE, Rotation Experimental), 1.05 G (RC, Rotation Control) or exposed to the noise and wind of the centrifuge at 1.00 G (EC, Earth Control) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements of their femurs indicated that exposure to centrifugation a) decreased femoral length in RE animals, b) increased femoral length in RC animals, c) reduced femoral diameter in RE and RC animals, d) increased L/D ratios in RC animals, e) decreased L/D ratios in RE animals, f) increased femur length/body weight in RE animals, g) decreased cortical thickness (CT) in RE animals, h) increased relative CT in RE animals, and decreased it in RC animals, i) accelerated ossification in RC femoral heads, j) thinned and distorted RE epiphyseal plates, and k) thickened condylar cartilage in RE females. The effects tended to be strongly sexually dimorphic, with females more severely affected by the stress than males.

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN DIAPHYSEAL FEMORAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Cassiano Ricardo; Traldi, Eduardo Franceschini; Posser, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the personal, fracture, treatment and complication characteristics among patients with pediatric femoral shaft fractures attended at the pediatric orthopedic service of the Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on a population consisting of patients with femoral shaft fractures, aged between birth and 14 years and 11 months, who were divided into four age groups. Information was obtained from medical records and was transferred to a survey questionnaire to present personal, fracture, treatment and complication variables. Results: The study population consisted of 96 patients. Their mean age was 6.8 years. The cases were predominantly among males, comprising closed fractures on the right side, in the middle third with a single line. Regarding fracture etiology, traffic accidents predominated overall in the sample. Most of the patients (74 to 77.1%) presented femoral fractures as their only injury. Conservative treatment predominated in the group younger than six years of age, and surgical treatment in the group aged 6 to 14 years and 11 months. The complications observed until bone union were: discrepancy, infection and movement limitation. The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.6 ± 2.4 weeks, varying with age. Conclusion: The features of these fractures were similar to those described in the literature and the treatment used showed good results. The Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital has used the treatment proposed in the literature for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27042619

  19. Pathologic femoral neck fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Shrader, M Wade; Schwab, Joseph H; Shaughnessy, William J; Jacofsky, David J

    2009-02-01

    Pathologic fractures in children occur in a variety of malignant and benign pathologic processes. Pediatric pathologic femoral neck fractures are particularly rare. Until now, all reported cases have been isolated cases, small series, or cases reported in series of adult pathologic hip fractures. The present article is the first report of a relatively large series of pathologic femoral neck fractures in a pediatric population. We identified pathologic femoral neck fractures, including 2 basicervical fractures, in 15 children (9 boys, 6 girls) ranging in age from 18 months to 15 years (mean age, 9 years) and treated between 1960 and 2000. The pathologic diagnoses were fibrous dysplasia (5 children), unicameral bone cyst (2), Ewing's sarcoma (2), osteomyelitis (2), leukemia (1), rhabdomyosarcoma (1), osteogenesis imperfecta (1), and osteopetrosis (1). Treatment methods, including time to reduction and fixation, were reviewed in detail. One patient was lost to follow-up. All others were followed until union; mean long-term follow-up was 7 years (range, 1-16 years). All patients ultimately went on to union. Mean time to union was 19 weeks (range, 5-46 weeks). However, 2 patients died before 2 years. There was a 40% complication rate, with limb-length discrepancy being the most common (4 children). No patient developed avascular necrosis. Pathologic femoral neck fractures are rare in children. Pediatric patients who present with a pathologic hip fracture are at significant risk for complications. Physicians and family should be alerted to the prolonged course involved in treating these fractures to union.

  20. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  1. Correlation Between Femoral Neck Shaft Angle and Surgical Management in Trainees With Femoral Neck Stress Fractures.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Rivera, Jessica C; Tennent, David J; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The most common overuse injury leading to medical discharge of military recruits is a stress fracture. One of the high-risk stress fractures is of the lateral femoral neck which risks osteonecrosis of the femoral head, the need for arthroplasty and permanent disability. To prevent fracture progression early surgical intervention is recommended. Surgical repairs are performed in about 25% of cases of femoral neck stress fractures at military treatment facilities. Hip geometry is an important intrinsic risk for stress fractures. Loads in the average loading direction will not cause a fracture, but loads of extreme magnitude or extreme orientation may. The purpose of this study was to determine if, in the presence of femoral neck stress fracture, there is a correlation between femoral neck shaft angle, surgical treatment and outcomes. The results of this study suggest there is no correlation between return to full military duty rates, treatment, femoral neck shaft angle or fracture grade on MRI. Patients who underwent surgical fixation had greater fracture grade and pain than those that did not have surgery. Individuals who did not return to duty tended to have higher pain scores at initial evaluation.

  2. An arthroscopic evaluation of the anatomical "critical zone".

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Nerissa; Lazarus, Lelika; Osman, Shameem Ahmed; Satyapal, Kapil Sewsaran

    2016-09-26

    The "critical zone", a region of speculated vascularity, is situated approximately 10mm proximal to the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon. Despite its obvious role as an anatomical landmark demarcator, its patho-anatomic nature has been identified as the source of rotator cuff pathology. Although many studies have attempted to evaluate the vascularity of this region, the architecture regarding the exact length, width and shape of the critical zone, remains unreported. This study aimed to determine the shape and morphometry of the "critical zone" arthroscopically. The sample series, which comprised of 38 cases (n = 38) specific to pathological types, employed an anatomical investigation of the critical zone during routine real-time arthroscopy. Demographic representation: i) Sex: 19 Males, 19 Females; ii) Age range: 18 - 76 years old; iii) Race: White (29), Indian (7) and Coloured (2). The incidence of shape and the mean lengths and widths of the critical zone were determined in accordance with the relevant demographic factors and patient history. Although the cresenteric shape was predominant, hemispheric and sail-shaped critical zones were also identified. The lengths and widths of the critical zone appeared markedly increased in male individuals. While the increase in age may account for the increased incidence of rotator cuff degeneration due to poor end vascular supply, the additional factors of height and weight presented as major determinants of the increase in size of the critical zone. In addition, the comparisons of length and width with each other and shape yielded levels of significant difference, therefore indicating a directly proportional relationship between the length and width of the critical zone. This detailed understanding of the critical zone may prove beneficial for the success of post-operative rotator cuff healing.

  3. BiPOD Arthroscopic Acromioclavicular Repair Restores Bidirectional Stability.

    PubMed

    De Beer, Joe; Schaer, Michael; Latendresse, Kim; Raniga, Sumit; Moor, Beat K; Zumstein, Matthias A

    2016-09-19

    Stabilizing the acromioclavicular joint in the vertical and horizontal planes is challenging, and most current techniques do not reliably achieve this goal. The BiPOD repair is an arthroscopically assisted procedure performed with image intensifier guidance that reconstructs the coracoclavicular ligaments as well as the acromioclavicular ligaments to achieve bidirectional stability. Repair is achieved with a combination of 2-mm FiberTape (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) and 20-mm Poly-Tape (Neoligaments, Leeds, England) to achieve rigid repair, prevent bone abrasion, and promote tissue ingrowth. This study is a prospective review of the first 6 patients treated for high-grade acute acromioclavicular injury with the BiPOD technique. The study included 6 men who were 21 to 36 years old (mean, 27 years). At 6-month follow-up, complications were recorded and radiographic analysis was used to determine the coracoclavicular distance for vertical reduction and the amount of acromioclavicular translation on the Alexander axillary view was used to determine horizontal reduction. One patient had a superficial infection over the tape knot. The difference in coracoclavicular distance between the operated side and the uninvolved side was 9±2 mm preoperatively and 0.3±2 mm at 6-month follow-up. On Alexander axillary view, all 6 patients showed stable reduction, which is defined as a clavicle that is in line with the acromion. The findings show that BiPOD acromioclavicular reconstruction restores bidirectional stability of the acromioclavicular joint at 6 months. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):exx-exx.].

  4. Effect of nabumetone on hemostasis during arthroscopic knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, T J; Donahue, J R; Toomey, E P; Holtby, R M; Scuderi, G R; Adams, P L; Poland, M P

    1998-01-01

    The known effects of commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on hemostatic parameters have led to concern over their use in the perioperative period. Nabumetone, unlike other NSAIDs, has little effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. To evaluate the effect of nabumetone 2000 mg daily on other hemostatic parameters (e.g., bleeding time, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time) in the clinical setting, this double-masked study was conducted in patients with osteoarthritis undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. After a 1-week placebo washout period, 58 patients were randomized to receive nabumetone and 53 were randomized to receive placebo. They were assessed before surgery (after 1 to 2 weeks of treatment) and again after surgery (after an additional 3 weeks of treatment). The study was designed to have 90% power to show equivalence in bleeding time to within 1.5 minutes, a difference assumed to be of no clinical importance. No meaningful differences were observed between the groups in any of the measured hemostatic parameters. Before surgery, the bleeding time increased by only 0.3 minutes with nabumetone and decreased by 0.2 minutes with placebo. The mean (+/- SD) difference between the groups in change from baseline was 0.5 +/- 0.3 minutes. After surgery, the changes were 0.1 minutes and 0.0 minutes, respectively, and the difference between groups was 0.2 +/- 0.3 minutes. These differences were neither statistically nor clinically significant, and maximum individual increases were similar in each group. Furthermore, there were no reports of abnormal bleeding in the operative knees. The results of this study show that nabumetone had little or no effect on hemostasis and suggest that this drug can be used safely in the perioperative period.

  5. Editorial Commentary: Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair--Infection Rate After Rotator Cuff Repair With Arthroscopic, Open, and Mini-open Techniques.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    In "Risk Factors for Infection After Rotator Cuff Repair," B. G. Vopat et al. report a lower rate of postoperative infection with an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair than with an open or mini-open approach. Although there were only 14 infections (infection rate of 0.77%), the reason for the preponderance of male patients, 13 of the 14 infections, needs further research to determine effective preventive strategies.

  6. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Manikandan; Indiran, Venkatraman; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a fracture through the physis with resultant slip of the epiphysis, is the most common hip abnormality in adolescents and is a major cause of early osteoarthritis. Plain radiograph is the initial modality used to evaluate patients with painful hip joints. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which do not involve radiation exposure, have also been used. This case report supports the view that ultrasound can be used as an initial, cost-effective and radiation-free modality for the evaluation of suspected SCFE. Case Report A 15-year-old male patient presented with pain in the right hip for 5 days, following a slip and fall accident while playing soccer. The patient was referred to the Department of Radio-diagnosis for ultrasound. A posterior displacement of the femoral head epiphysis with a physeal step was seen on the longitudinal section obtained over the right hip joint region. The anterior physeal step (APS) measured ~3.8 mm on the right side. The distance between the anterior rim of the acetabulum and the metaphysis measured ~20.4 mm on the affected right side and ~23.6 mm on the left side. A plain radiograph in frog leg position showed a widening of the right proximal physis below the right femoral head, with a medial and posterior slip of the right femoral head. A frontal radiograph of the pelvis taken six months before showed a widening of the proximal right femoral physis. Conclusions Although MRI appears to be the most sensitive modality for identifying slips early, ultrasound may be used as a cost-effective and radiation-free alternative before proceeding with further evaluation of suspected SCFE, especially considering the demographics of the affected population. PMID:28382187

  7. Same day discharge following inter-scalene block administration for arthroscopic shoulder surgery: implementing a change in practice.

    PubMed

    Lane, Suzanne; Blundell, Clare; Mills, Simon; Charalambous, C P

    2014-10-01

    Patients who had arthroscopic shoulder surgery with the provision of an inter-scalene nerve block (ISB) at Blackpool Teaching Hospitals, were previously required to remain in hospital overnight. We introduced a new protocol that allowed same day discharge following arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anaesthesia and ISB. The aim of this study was to review the outcome of this change in practice. Our results indicated that providing a discharge protocol for patients having arthroscopic shoulder surgery with the inclusion of ISB can avoid unnecessary overnight stay and enable significant cost savings, without detriment to patient safety or satisfaction.

  8. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin young; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  9. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: basic science, surgical technique, and clinical follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Miller, Drew V.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1990-06-01

    Recent basic science studies (5) have provided a scientific foundation for the use of the Contact Nd:YAG Laser as an arthroscopic tool for xneniscal resection and acroxnioplasty of the shoulder in a saline medium. This study prospectively evaluates the results of a three stage laboratory investigation as well as the clinical results of arthroscopic xneniscal resection. Fifteen patients with meniscal tears underwent subtotal meniscectomies utilizing a Contact Nd:YAG Laser (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malvern, Pennsylvania) . This was done in a saline medium with an average laser wattage of 25 W, (range 20 W to 30 W). Patients were evaluated postoperatively with reference to subjective and objective parameters at one week and four weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated with regard to wound healing, intraarticular swelling and pain. Assessment of technical parameters such as ease of resection, time of resection and instrument access were compared to conventional instruments. All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing and swelling. In addition, although there was increased time with setting up the laser and calibrating it, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. Little, or no, secondary "trimmuning" was necessary with the laser. Increased accessibility was noted due to the small size of the laser. Arthroscopic Contact Nd:YAG Laser surgery is a safe and effective tool for menisca]. resection and coagulation in arthroscopic acromioplasties. It provides significant advantages over conventional cutting instruments with regard to accessibility and reduced need for secondary instruments.

  10. Arthroscopically Assisted Acromioclavicular and Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction for Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Instability.

    PubMed

    Martetschläger, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Habermeyer, Peter; Hawi, Nael

    2016-12-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries are common injuries, especially in the young and active, male population. AC joint injuries account for 12% of all injuries of the shoulder girdle in the overall population. Although conservative treatment is recommended for Rockwood type I and type II injuries, there is controversial debate about optimal treatment for type III injuries. High-grade injuries are typically treated operatively to avoid painful sequelae. A vast number of different surgical methods have been described over the past few decades. Recent advances in arthroscopic surgery have enabled the shoulder surgeon to treat acute and chronic AC lesions arthroscopically assisted. Clinical studies have already shown good and reliable results. Although surgeons agree that a biological augmentation is required to minimize the risk of recurrent instability in chronic cases, a gold standard still needs to be defined. We present an arthroscopically assisted biological augmentation technique to reconstruct the AC and coracoclavicular ligaments, protected by a button-suture tape construct for chronic AC joint instability. The presented arthroscopic biological augmentation technique uses less and/or smaller drill holes in the clavicle and coracoid than previously described, thus reducing weakening of the bony structures. At the same time it enhances both horizontal and vertical stability.

  11. [Relation of ultrastructural changes of articular cartilage and the arthroscopic classification in osteoarthritic knee].

    PubMed

    Chai, B F

    1992-01-01

    This paper reported the ultrastructural changes found in the diseased articular cartilages of 43 osteoarthritic knee joints, which were assessed according to the "Arthroscopic classification of the articular cartilage". The electron microscopic findings and the arthroscopic classification of the articular lesions were correlated. The lesioned articular cartilage revealed two categories of pathological changes. 1. The changes on the part of the articular chondrocytes comprised (1) The nucleus showed pyknosis and karyorrhexis. (2) The cytoplasm exhibited fat droplets, glycogen granules, and/or microfilaments. Lysosomes also emerged frequently. The mitochondria swelled and the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum dilated and became vesiculated. At the same time there was detachment of cell processes or of the cytoplasmic membrane. The chondrocyte underwent necrosis, contracted and eventually disintegrated into lipid debris. These changes increased in extent and degree with the lesion and the severity went parallel with the sequence of the "Arthroscopic stage classification". 2. The changes on the part of the matrix included appearance of electron-dense lipid debris and numerous, coarse and banded collagen fibrils. They resided both in the pericellular matrix and in the general matrix. Sometimes fibroblast-like cells made their appearance in the matrix. These cells also revealed degenerative changes. All these changes went parallel with the sequence of the "Arthroscopic grade classification".

  12. The role of osteonecrosis in canine coronoid dysplasia: arthroscopic and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Mariee, I C; Gröne, A; Theyse, L F H

    2014-06-01

    Coronoid dysplasia (CD) or medial coronoid disease is part of canine elbow dysplasia and eventually results in osteoarthrosis. Although CD was originally attributed to disturbed endochondral ossification, more recent data point to the subchondral bone. The objective of this study was to assess dysplastic bone and cartilage of dogs that underwent unilateral or bilateral arthroscopic subtotal coronoidectomy for the treatment of CD. Arthroscopic findings and histopathology of bone and cartilage removed from elbow joints with CD were compared. The most common arthroscopic finding was fragmentation with softening of the subchondral bone of the central part of the medial coronoid process. In dogs without obvious fragmentation, CD was characterised by bone softening and chondromalacia. During arthroscopic intervention dysplastic bone and cartilage were collected for histopathological assessment. Forty-five slices of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded bone and cartilage samples were stained using haematoxylin and eosin and evaluated. Histopathological findings primarily consisted of osteonecrosis of subchondral bone with necrosis within the marrow spaces. Histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were characterised by fibrillation, chondrocyte clone formation, and focal cartilage necrosis. The pathology was found primarily in the subchondral bone and not in the articular cartilage. Vascular compromise may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis in CD.

  13. Arthroscopic bursectomy with concomitant iliotibial band release for the treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Farr, Derek; Selesnick, Harlan; Janecki, Chet; Cordas, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Trochanteric bursitis with lateral hip pain is a commonly encountered orthopaedic condition. Although most patients respond to corticosteroid injections, rest, physical therapy (PT), stretching, and anti-inflammatory medications, those with recalcitrant symptoms may require operative intervention. Studies have explored the use of the arthroscope in the treatment of these patients. However, these reports have not addressed the underlying pathology in this chronic condition. We believe that the iliotibial band must be addressed and is the main cause of pain, inflammation, and trochanteric impingement leading to the development of bursitis. We report a new technique for arthroscopic trochanteric bursectomy with iliotibial band release. Our technique involves 2 incisions--one 4 cm proximal to the greater trochanter along the anterior border of the iliotibial band, and the other 4 cm distal and along the posterior border. The 30 degrees arthroscope is introduced through the inferior portal, and a cannula is introduced through the superior portal. A 5.5-mm arthroscopic shaver is inserted through the superior cannula to clear off the surface of the iliotibial band, so that it may be adequately visualized. A hooked electrocautery probe is then used to longitudinally incise the iliotibial band until it no longer rubs, causing impingement over the greater trochanter.

  14. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-01-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  15. Morphological classification of acromial spur: correlation between Rockwood tilt view and arthroscopic finding

    PubMed Central

    Kongmalai, Pinkawas; Apivatgaroon, Adinun; Chernchujit, Bancha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and hypothesis: Acromion spur is the extrinsic factor for impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tear. The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate prominence of the anterior acromion, however no study has shown the correlation of findings between the Rockwood tilt view and the arthroscopic finding. Methods: We developed the arthroscopic classification of acromion spur as type 1 flat spur, type 2 bump spur, type 3 heel spur, type 4 keel spur, and type 5 irregular spur. Patients with rotator cuff syndrome who underwent arthroscopic surgery were recruited. Two observers were asked to classify the type of spur from arthroscopic findings and Rockwood tilt views separately in random pattern. The prevalence of supraspinatus tendon tear was also recorded as no tear, partial-thickness tear, and full-thickness tear. Results: The keel spur (33.9%) was the most common finding followed by the heel spur (27.8%). The correlation was high especially for the heel, the keel, and the irregular spur (75.47%, 74.03%, and 72.73%, respectively.) These three types of spurs have a high prevalence of full thickness of supraspinatus tendon tear. Conclusion: The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate the morphology of an acromion spur, especially the at-risk spur that correlates highly with the full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. The arthroscopic classification will also be a useful tool to improve communication between the surgeon and the guide for appropriate treatment in a rotator cuff tear patient when encountering the heel, keel, and irregular spur. PMID:28074776

  16. Femoral remodeling may influence patient outcomes in slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    DeLullo, James A; Thomas, Eric; Cooney, Timothy E; McConnell, Sharon J; Sanders, James O

    2007-04-01

    Clinical studies of patients treated for slipped capital femoral epiphysis have found limited functional impairment and femoral neck deformity causing eventual coxarthrosis. Since patient-focused assessments minimize bias and reflect health-related quality of life status, we coupled their use to a clinical examination to obtain a more patient-centered picture of slipped capital femoral epiphyseal outcomes. The impact of residual deformity on outcomes also was examined. Of 78 patients treated for slipped capital femoral epiphyses between 1972 and 1998, 29 (38 hips) were evaluated at a mean followup of 7.6 years (range, 1.4-26 years). The average patient age was 21.8 years (range, 14.6-39 years), 55% were female, and the average body mass index was 28.7 (range, 16.1-50.2). Most slips were stable (92%, 35 of 38) and mild or moderate in severity (98%, 36 of 37). Followup examinations revealed slight deficits in range of motion, strength, and limb length. Radiographs showed slight improvements in head-shaft angle and reduced but persistent femoral neck deformity. Osteoarthritic changes were absent or negligible in 84% (32 of 38) of the hips. The average Iowa hip score was 90.5 (range, 51-100). Patient outcome scores for the AAOS Hip/Knee Questionnaire fell slightly below 50th percentile norms. Neither slip stability, severity, nor body mass index impacted outcome. Femoral neck deformity correlated with function, pain, and Boyer grade. Overall, patients had minor functional deficits and pain that may have been related to femoral neck deformity, but longer followup is warranted.

  17. Postcatheterization Femoral Arteriovenous Fistulas: Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Baran Kosar, Sule; Gumus, Terman; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Akpek, Sergin

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To report our results of stent-graft implantation for the endovascular treatment of postcatheterization femoral arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) occurring between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein.Methods: Endovascular treatment of iatrogenic femoral AVFs as a result of arterial puncture for coronary angiography and/or angioplasty was attempted in 10 cases. Balloon-expandable stent-grafts, one for each lesion, were used to repair the fistulas, which were between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein in all cases. Stent-graft implantation to the deep femoral artery was performed by a contralateral retrograde approach.Results: All stent-grafts were deployed successfully. Complete closure of the fistulas was accomplished immediately in nine of 10 cases. In one case, complete closure could not be obtained but the fact that the complaint subsided was taken to indicate clinical success. In three cases, side branch occlusion of the deep femoral artery occurred. No complications were observed after implantation. Follow-up for 8-31 months (mean 18.5 months) with color Doppler ultrasonography revealed patency of the stented arterial segments without recurrent arteriovenous shunting in those nine patients who had successful immediate closure of their AVFs.Conclusion: Our results with a mean follow-up 18.5 months suggest that stent-graft implantation for the closure of postcatheterization femoral AVFs originating from the deep femoral artery is an effective, minimally invasive alternative procedure.

  18. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  19. Femoral bifurcation disease: balloon or knife.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, Marc; Deloose, Koen

    2009-10-01

    Arterial occlusive disease at the level of the femoral bifurcation mostly occurs in combination with inflow and/or outflow lesions. Surgical endarterectomy of the femoral bifurcation is a well-proven low-risk and easy surgical intervention with known durable success, while, although proven to be safe, evidence is lacking about the durability of the endovascular approach. Based on the evidence at hand, the surgical approach should be recommended for the vast majority of patients and the endovascular approach should only be indicated as the first strategy in selected cases presenting with factors that might compromise the outcome of surgery in the groin. If feasible, the hybrid approach with endarterectomy at the level of the bifurcation and endovascular repair of the inflow and outflow lesions is preferred in patients with multilevel disease.

  20. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  1. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention. PMID:26504733

  2. When femoral fracture fixation fails: salvage options.

    PubMed

    Petrie, J; Sassoon, A; Haidukewych, G J

    2013-11-01

    Most hip fractures treated with modern internal fixation techniques will heal. However, failures occasionally occur and require revision procedures. Salvage strategies employed during revision are based on whether the fixation failure occurs in the femoral neck, or in the intertrochanteric region. Patient age and remaining bone stock also influence decision making. For fractures in young patients, efforts are generally focused on preserving the native femoral head via osteotomies and repeat internal fixation. For failures in older patients, some kind of hip replacement is usually selected. Disuse osteopenia, deformity, bone loss, and stress-risers from previous internal fixation devices all pose technical challenges to successful reconstruction. Attention to detail is important in order to minimise complications. In the majority of cases, good outcomes have been reported for the various salvage strategies.

  3. Ear Acupuncture for Post-Operative Pain Associated with Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-14

    E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 14 Jan 2014 Final Report Ear acupuncture for post-operative pain associated with ambulatory arthroscopic...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. The purpose of this study is to compare ear acupuncture plus standard therapy versus...3298 Ear Acupuncture for Post-operative Pa111 Assoc1ated With Ambulatory Arthroscopic Knee Surgery A Randomized Controlled Trial ’• V ’’ ’-’ I

  4. Arthroscopic pubic symphysis debridement and adductor enthesis repair in athletes with athletic pubalgia: technical note and video illustration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Sascha; Tumin, Masjudin; Wilhelm, Peter; Pohlemann, Tim; Kelm, Jens

    2014-11-01

    We elaborately describe our novel arthroscopic technique of the symphysis pubis in athletes with osteitis pubis and concomitant adductor enthesopathy who fail to conservative treatment modalities. The symphysis pubis is debrided arthroscopically and the degenerated origin of adductor tendon (enthesis) is excised and reattached. With our surgical procedure the stability of the symphysis pubis is successfully preserved and the adductor longus enthesopathy simultaneously addressed in the same setting.

  5. Diagnosis failure led to the recurrence of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the talus neck after arthroscopic excision.

    PubMed

    Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Schubert, Thomas; Galant, Christine; Malghem, Jacques

    2014-09-01

    Juxta-articular localization is not exceptional for an osteoid osteoma of the ankle. Arthroscopic treatment has been recently proposed. A case of recurrence of an osteoid osteoma at the talar neck is reported after arthroscopic resection performed following a diagnosis failure. The need for accurate imaging technique to precisely define and localize the nidus and the requirement to include osteoid osteoma in the differential diagnosis of monoarticular pain are discussed.

  6. Subtrochanteric fractures after retrograde femoral nailing

    PubMed Central

    Mounasamy, Varatharaj; Mallu, Sathya; Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Secondary fractures around femoral nails placed for the management of hip fractures are well known. We report, two cases of a fracture of the femur at the interlocking screw site in the subtrochanteric area after retrograde femoral nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. Only a few reports in the existing literature have described these fractures. Two young men after sustaining a fall presented to us with pain, swelling and deformity in the upper thigh region. On enquiring, examining and radiographing them, peri-implant fractures of subtrochanteric nature through the distal interlocking screws were revealed in both patients who also had histories of previous falls for which retrograde intramedullary nailing was performed for their respective femora. Both patients were managed with similar surgical routines including removal of the existing hardware, open reduction and ace cephallomedullary antegrade nailing. The second case did show evidence of delayed healing and was additionally stabilized with cerclage wires. Both patients had uneventful postoperative outcomes and union was evident at the end of 6 mo postoperatively with a good range of motion at the hip and knee. Our report suggests that though seldom reported, peri-implant fractures around the subtrochanteric region can occur and pose a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We suggest these be managed, after initial stabilization and resuscitation, by implant removal, open reduction and interlocking intramedullary antegrade nailing. Good results and progression to union can be expected in these patients by adhering to basic principles of osteosynthesis. PMID:26495251

  7. Monitoring femoral component installation using vibration testing.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Seana; Cornwell, Phillip; Meneghini, R Michael

    2005-01-01

    With emerging minimally invasive surgical techniques in total hip arthroplasty, there has been anecdotal evidence of an increase in fractures associated with the insertion of the prosthesis into the femur. The diminished visibility associated with minimally invasive surgical techniques necessitates a greater emphasis on the surgeon's tactile and auditory senses. These senses are used to ascertain the femoral component position of maximum stability and interference fit, as well as to prevent further component impaction and subsequent fracture of the femur. The work described herein attempts to identify a means to supplement the surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used in civil and mechanical structures to monitor the insertion process of the prosthesis. It is hypothesized that vibration characteristics of the impact process may be used intraoperatively to determine at what position the femoral component has reached appropriate interference fit and stability in the femur. Such information may be used to prevent further impaction of the femoral component past a threshold that could result in a periprosthetic fracture. A piezoelectric accelerometer and impact hammer will be used to monitor the impact process. The acceleration time history data were analyzed by using low and high pass filters to allow frequency analysis of the time history signals. This paper will summarize features derived from the measured data that will be used to develop an insertion process termination indicator.

  8. Hybrid approach to limb salvage in the setting of an infected femoral-femoral bypass graft.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas W; Meltzer, Andrew J; Schneider, Darren B

    2014-08-01

    Prosthetic vascular graft infection in patients with advanced peripheral arterial disease can lead to multiple additional procedures, including extra-anatomic bypass or even amputation. We report the case of an 88-year-old woman with critical limb ischemia and an infected prosthetic femoral-femoral bypass graft. Using a planned hybrid 2-stage approach, we performed endovascular recanalization of the native left iliac arterial system using remote access via the superficial femoral artery to avoid infected groin wounds. Recanalization of the patient's Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II D chronic iliac occlusion allowed for removal of the infected graft and placement of a profunda femoris artery to proximal posterior tibial artery bypass, thereby restoring inflow and avoiding the infected left groin. Newer endovascular techniques coupled with open surgical options may lead to limb salvage in patients with previously unreconstructable peripheral arterial disease.

  9. Femoral stem fracture and in vivo corrosion of retrieved modular femoral hips.

    PubMed

    Huot Carlson, J Caitlin; Van Citters, Douglas W; Currier, John H; Bryant, Amber M; Mayor, Michael B; Collier, John P

    2012-08-01

    A series of 78 retrieved modular hip devices were assessed for fretting and corrosion. Damage was common at both the head-neck junction (54% showing corrosion; 88% showing fretting) and at the stem-sleeve junction (88% corrosion; 65% fretting). Corrosion correlated to in vivo duration, patient activity, and metal (vs ceramic) femoral heads but did not correlate to head carbon content. Femoral stem fatigue fracture was observed in seven retrievals; all had severe corrosion, were under increased stress, and were in vivo longer than the non-fractured cohort. This study emphasizes the potential for stem fracture when small diameter femoral stems with large offsets are used in heavy and active patients. Designs which reduce fretting and corrosion in modular implants is warranted as patients demand longer lasting implants.

  10. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis associated with hyperparathyroidism. A case report].

    PubMed

    Khiari, Karima; Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Nejib; Maazoun, Imen; Hadj Ali, Insaf; Bentaarit, Chokri; Turki, Sami; Ben Maïz, Hedi

    2003-12-01

    Slippage of the upper femoral epiphysis can occur in association with multiple endocrine imbalances. A case of slipped femoral epiphysis with primary hyperparathyroidism is reported. The patient was an adolescent, 16 Years of age, who presented bilateral slipped epiphysis. Investigation showed that he had hypercalcemia (3.1 mmol/l) related to primary hyperparathyroidism. A parathyroid adenoma was removed. Outcome was favorable and the slipped femoral epiphyses did not require a specific treatment.

  11. Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Higgins, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    All early (Pliocene-Early Pleistocene) hominins exhibit some differences in proximal femoral morphology from modern humans, including a long femoral neck and a low neck-shaft angle. In addition, australopiths (Au. afarensis, Au. africanus, Au. boisei, Paranthropus boisei), but not early Homo, have an "anteroposteriorly compressed" femoral neck and a small femoral head relative to femoral shaft breadth. Superoinferior asymmetry of cortical bone in the femoral neck has been claimed to be human-like in australopiths. In this study, we measured superior and inferior cortical thicknesses at the middle and base of the femoral neck using computed tomography in six Au. africanus and two P. robustus specimens. Cortical asymmetry in the fossils is closer overall to that of modern humans than to apes, although many values are intermediate between humans and apes, or even more ape-like in the midneck. Comparisons of external femoral neck and head dimensions were carried out for a more comprehensive sample of South and East African australopiths (n = 17) and two early Homo specimens. These show that compared with modern humans, femoral neck superoinferior, but not anteroposterior breadth, is larger relative to femoral head breadth in australopiths, but not in early Homo. Both internal and external characteristics of the australopith femoral neck indicate adaptation to relatively increased superoinferior bending loads, compared with both modern humans and early Homo. These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb.

  12. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay.

  13. Correlation Between Residual Displacement and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Following Cannulated Screw Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Xu, Gui-Jun; Han, Zhe; Jiang, Xuan; Zhang, Cheng-Bao; Dong, Qiang; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a new method for measuring the residual displacement of the femoral head after internal fixation and explore the relationship between residual displacement and osteonecrosis with femoral head, and to evaluate the risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with femoral neck fractures treated by closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation.One hundred and fifty patients who sustained intracapsular femoral neck fractures between January 2011 and April 2013 were enrolled in the study. All were treated with closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw internal fixation. The residual displacement of the femoral head after surgery was measured by 3-dimensional reconstruction that evaluated the quality of the reduction. Other data that might affect prognosis were also obtained from outpatient follow-up, telephone calls, or case reviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess the intrinsic relationship between the risk factors and the osteonecrosis of the femoral head.Osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 27 patients (18%). Significant differences were observed regarding the residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification. Moreover, we found more or less residual displacement of femoral head in all patients with high quality of reduction based on x-ray by the new technique. There was a close relationship between residual displacement and ONFH.There exists limitation to evaluate the quality of reduction by x-ray. Three-dimensional reconstruction and digital measurement, as a new method, is a more accurate method to assess the quality of reduction. Residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification were risk factors for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. High-quality reduction was necessary to avoid complications.

  14. Arthroscopic Direct Repair for a Complete Radial Tear of the Posterior Root of the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kook Hyun; Hwang, Dae Hee; Cho, Jin Ho; Changale, Sachin D.; Woo, Sung Jong

    2011-01-01

    We report here on a new arthroscopic direct repair technique for a radial tear of the posterior root of the medial meniscus (PRMM) using a posterior trans-septal portal. Radial tears of the PRMM are commonly observed in the elderly population of Korea and Japan, and the life style of these people requires squatting and kneeling down in daily life. A radial tear of the PRMM results in the loss of hoop tension and this accelerates degenerative changes in the knee joint and causes early osteoarthritis. Several reports in the medical literature have focused on various repair techniques for these tears by using pull out sutures. These techniques result in nonanatomic fixation of the meniscus, which may lead to disturbed meniscal excursion and failure to restore hoop tension. Arthroscopic direct repair may contribute to restoring hoop tension and preventing accelerated degenerative changes in the knee joint of these patients. PMID:22162797

  15. Arthroscopic assisted bone grafting for early stages of Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Pegoli, L; Ghezzi, A; Cavalli, E; Luchetti, R; Pajardi, G

    2011-01-01

    Kienböck's disease is known for its difficulty in being diagnosed and treated at early stages; option treatments are few and most of them quite aggressive. The author describes his experience with arthroscopic assisted lunate bone grafting. Three patients with diagnosis of stage I avascular necrosis of the lunate (average age: 45 years), were treated. Before surgical procedure, the patients underwent to a conservative treatment. After harvesting the bone graft from the volar surface of the radius, arthroscopic bone grafting was performed. At an average follow-up of 13.5 months (9-15), all the patients show a normal density of the lunate and no arthritic changes in radiographs. The MRI confirmed the lunate vascularity. The number of patients is definitely small, due also to the rarity of the disease and the difficulty in diagnosis, but, despite the very high learning curve, could be the proper first choice of treatment.

  16. Arthroscopic trans-portal deep medial collateral ligament pie-crusting release.

    PubMed

    Atoun, Ehud; Debbi, Ronen; Lubovsky, Omri; Weiler, Andreas; Debbi, Eytan; Rath, Ehud

    2013-02-01

    Arthroscopic treatments of meniscal injuries of the knee are among the most common orthopaedic procedures performed. Adequate visualization of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus might be challenging, especially in patients with tight medial compartments. In these cases instrument manipulation in an attempt to reach the posterior horn of the meniscus can cause an iatrogenic chondral injury because of the narrow medial joint space. A transcutaneous medial collateral ligament (MCL) pie-crusting release facilitates expansion of the medial joint space in a case of a tight medial compartment. Nevertheless, it might cause injury to the superficial MCL, infection, and pain and injury to the saphenous nerve because of multiple needle punctures of the skin. We describe an inside-out, arthroscopic deep MCL pie-crusting release, which allows access to the medial meniscus through the anterior approach to provide good visualization of the footprint and sufficient working space.

  17. Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions in Patients With Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Dahm, Diane L.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is often accompanied by a Hill-Sachs defect on the humeral head that can contribute to recurrent instability if not addressed at the time of surgery. We describe a method of performing arthroscopic remplissage to treat engaging Hill-Sachs lesions in patients with glenohumeral instability. It has the benefits of being an efficient procedure that can be performed with minimal technical difficulty and can be used to augment other stabilization procedures such as labral repair. The indications for this technique include the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs defect in patients will little or no glenoid bone loss. In appropriately selected patients, arthroscopic remplissage has shown reduced rates of recurrent instability. PMID:26697311

  18. High recurrence of instability in adolescents playing contact sports after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Matthew F; Keenan, Oisin; Funk, Lennard

    2015-05-01

    Sixty-one shoulders in 57 adolescents underwent primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization for labral tears sustained during contact sports (all Stanmore type 1). Mean follow-up was 22 months, mean age 16.8 (13-18) years. Postoperatively, the median subjective improvement was 90%, median VAS pain was 0 and mean Oxford Instability Score was 26.8. Sixty-one per cent returned to preinjury sporting level. A higher than expected proportion reported recurrent dislocation, with 15% followed up for 1 year and 31% for 4 years. Of these 11 requiring further surgery, 90% of redislocations occurred while playing rugby. Sex, type of sport, hyperlaxity and tear morphology were not significantly related to recurrence. Adolescents are at high risk for recurrence following arthroscopic stabilization. Patients should be counselled for the higher recurrence rate and consideration should be made for other aetiological factors such as returning to contact sports and joint hyperlaxity.

  19. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: surgical technique and clinical follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Miller, Drew V.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1991-05-01

    Fifteen patients were studied prospectively as a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the contact Neodynium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser in performing arthroscopic meniscal resection in a saline medium, (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malverne, PA). All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing, and post-operative swelling. Although there was increased time involved with setting up and calibrating the laser, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. In addition, the decreased need for secondary trimming and increased accessibility to the posterior horns of the menisci represent advantages over conventional instruments. Based on the findings, arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser surgery is a safe and effective clinical tool for meniscal resection which may, with increased technological advancements and cost reduction, replace standard instrumentation.

  20. Interstitial Tear of the Subscapularis Tendon, Arthroscopic Findings and Technique of Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Tears of the subscapularis tendon have been significantly recognized as a source of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the past decade, thanks to arthroscopic evaluation of the shoulder and biomechanical and anatomical studies of the tendon. Current classification of subscapularis tendon tear is based on insertion site of the tendon. Recently, a classification for non-insertional types of subscapularis tendon tear has been published. Interstitial tear of subscapularis tendon has not been described in classifications available in the literature. This report describes significant interstitial tear of the subscapularis tendon. This tear looks normal in superior, bursal and articular sides. Then its specific arthroscopic findings as “Air bag sign” and repair technique of the pathology is explained. PMID:27200399

  1. "Wet diapers--dry patients": an effective dressing for patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Kapila, Atul; Bhargava, Amit; Funk, Len; Copeland, Stephen; Levy, Ofer

    2005-02-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy is very commonly associated with postoperative leakage of irrigation fluid. This causes apprehension to patients and their relatives and leads to frequent change of dressings. We describe a simple and effective diaper dressing for patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. It is highly absorbent, cost-effective, and easy to apply. We have used this dressing successfully in more than 1,500 shoulder arthroscopies over the last 3 years with no adverse reaction.

  2. Suprascapular nerve palsy after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Sergi; Peidro, Lluis; Méndez, Anna; Calvo, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    The Bristow and Latarjet procedures have become popular among orthopaedic surgeons thanks to the development of new instruments that allow the use of arthroscopic techniques to treat cases of glenohumeral instability with bone defects or capsular deficiency. Nonetheless, several complications have been reported after Latarjet procedures, including neurological injuries. This report describes surgical damage to the suprascapular nerve, an unusual complication. Level of evidence Expert opinion, Level V.

  3. Preoperative interscalene brachial plexus block aids in perioperative temperature management during arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Se Hun; Lee, Wonjin; Park, JaeGwan; Kim, Myoung-hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lee, Jeong Han; Cheong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothermia is common during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia, and anesthetic-impaired thermoregulation is thought to be the major cause of hypothermia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare perioperative temperature during arthroscopic shoulder surgery with interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) followed by general anesthesia vs. general anesthesia alone. Methods Patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were randomly allocated to receive IBPB followed by general anesthesia (group GB, n = 20) or general anesthesia alone (group GO, n = 20), and intraoperative and postoperative body temperatures were measured. Results The initial body temperatures were 36.5 ± 0.3℃ vs. 36.4 ± 0.4℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P = 0.215). The body temperature at 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia was significantly higher in group GB than in group GO (35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 34.9 ± 0.3℃; P < 0.001). The body temperatures at 60 minutes after admission to the post-anesthesia care unit were 35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 35.2 ± 0.2℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P < 0.001). The concentrations of desflurane at 0, 15, and 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia were 6.0 vs. 6.0% (P = 0.330), 5.0 ± 0.8% vs. 5.8 ± 0.4% (P = 0.001), and 3.4 ± 0.4% vs. 7.1 ± 0.9% (P < 0.001) in group GB vs. GO, respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that preoperative IBPB could reduce both the intraoperative concentration of desflurane and the reduction in body temperature during and after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. PMID:27482313

  4. Direct Cost Analysis of Outpatient Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Medicare and Non-Medicare Populations

    PubMed Central

    Narvy, Steven J.; Didinger, Tracey C.; Lehoang, David; Vangsness, C. Thomas; Tibone, James E.; Hatch, George F. Rick; Omid, Reza; Osorno, Felipe; Gamradt, Seth C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Providing high-quality care while also containing cost is a paramount goal in orthopaedic surgery. Increasingly, insurance providers in the United States, including government payers, are requiring financial and performance accountability for episodes of care, including a push toward bundled payments. Hypothesis: The direct cost of outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was assessed to determine whether, due to an older population, rotator cuff surgery was more costly in Medicare-insured patients than in patients covered by other insurers. We hypothesized that operative time, implant cost, and overall higher cost would be observed in Medicare patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Billing and operative reports from 184 outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed by 5 fellowship-trained arthroscopic surgeons were reviewed. Operative time, number and cost of implants, hospital reimbursement, surgeon reimbursement, and insurance type were determined from billing records and operative reports. Patients were stratified by payer (Medicare vs non-Medicare), and these variables were compared. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the number of suture anchors used, implant cost, surgical duration, or overall cost of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between Medicare and other insurers. Reimbursement was significantly higher for other payers when compared with Medicare, resulting in a mean per case deficit of $263.54 between billing and reimbursement for Medicare patients. Conclusion: Operating room time, implant cost, and total procedural cost was the same for Medicare patients as for patients with private payers. Further research needs to be conducted to understand the patient-specific factors that affect the cost of an episode of care for rotator cuff surgery. PMID:27826595

  5. Prevention of arthrofibrosis after arthroscopic screw fixation of tibial spine fracture in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Shital N; Myer, David; Eismann, Emily A

    2014-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a major complication of tibial spine fracture treatment in children, potentially resulting in knee pain, quadriceps weakness, altered gait, decreased function, inability to return to sports, and long-term osteoarthritis. Thus, prevention rather than treatment of arthrofibrosis is desirable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an aggressive postoperative rehabilitation and early intervention approach to prevent permanent arthrofibrosis after tibial spine fracture treatment and to compare epiphyseal and transphyseal screws for fixation. A consecutive series of 24 patients younger than age 18 with displaced type II and III tibial spine fractures who underwent arthroscopic reduction and screw fixation between 2006 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Final range of motion was compared between patients with epiphyseal (n=12) and transphyseal (n=9) screws. One-third (4 of 12) of patients with epiphyseal screws underwent arthroscopic debridement and screw removal approximately 3 months postoperatively; 3 patients lacked 5° to 15° of extension, 1 experienced pain with extension, and 1 had radiographic evidence of screw pullout, loss of reduction, and resultant malunion. In the transphyseal screw group, 3 patients had 10° loss of extension, and all corrected after arthroscopic debridement and screw removal. The two groups did not significantly differ in time to hardware removal or return to sports or final range of motion. No growth disturbances were identified in patients after transphyseal screw removal. An aggressive approach of postoperative rehabilitation and early intervention after arthroscopic reduction and screw fixation of tibial spine fractures in children was successful in preventing permanent arthrofibrosis.

  6. Femoral shaft medialisation and neck-shaft angle in unstable pertrochanteric femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Pajarinen, J; Lindahl, J; Savolainen, V; Michelsson, O; Hirvensalo, E

    2004-12-01

    We analysed the time-dependent mean changes in the femoral neck length, neck-shaft angle and hip offset in a randomised study comprising 48 patients who were treated with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) or the proximal femoral nail (PFN) for an unstable intertrochanteric femoral fracture. As a consequence of fracture compression, the mean post-operative neck length was significantly shorter in patients treated with the DHS. During the first 6 weeks after the operation, a mean decrease of 4.6 degrees was observed in the neck-shaft angle, but there was not a significant difference between the treatment groups. The radiographic measures remained virtually unaffected during the interval from 6 weeks to 4 months in both groups. When the operated hip was compared to the opposite hip, patients who had received the DHS showed significantly greater medialisation of the femoral shaft at 4 months than those treated with the PFN. We thus recommend that unstable intertrochanteric fractures should be initially reduced in a slight valgus position in order to achieve an outcome after healing that is as normal as possible. As a result of differences in operative technique and implant stability, the PFN may be superior to the DHS in retaining the anatomical relations in the hip region in unstable intertrochanteric fractures.

  7. Treatment of ischiofemoral impingement: results of diagnostic injections and arthroscopic resection of the lesser trochanter

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark D.; Keene, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) is an often unrecognized cause of hip pain caused by abnormal contact between the lesser trochanter and the ischium. To date, surgical treatment for those whose pain is not relieved by activity modification and steroid injections has not been defined. This study describes our imaging protocol and reports the results of arthroscopic, lesser trochanteric resections that were performed to treat this condition. Seven patients with symptomatic, MRI-documented IFI had ultrasound injections of ropivicaine and steroid into their ischiofemoral space. The injections provided complete but only transient relief of their groin and buttock pain and thus, all seven ultimately had an arthroscopic resection of their lesser trochanter. All hips were evaluated preoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively with Byrd’s modified Harris hip scoring system. Average age of the seven patients was 46 years and there were five females and one male. Preoperative scores averaged 43 points. After surgery, all patients used crutches for 4–6 weeks, and had 6-week scores that averaged 58 points. The patients and their scores continued to improve and at 6 and 12 months, their scores averaged 86 and 91 points, and none had chronic hip flexor weakness or recurrence of their hip pain or snapping. Arthroscopic iliopsoas tenotomies in combination with a resection of the lesser trochanter will provide complete relief of the painful snapping, groin and buttock pain caused by ischiofemoral impingement. PMID:27583151

  8. ARTHROSCOPIC RELEASE OF THE SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE: SURGICAL TECHNIQUE AND EVALUATION OF CLINICAL CASES

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Júnior, José Carlos; Paccola, Ana Maria Ferreira; Tonoli, Cristiane; Zabeu, José Luis Amin; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    To describe a specific surgical technique for arthroscopic decompression of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) and evaluate its preliminary results. Methods: Ten shoulders of nine patients were operated using a technique with portals differing from the already-known techniques, which did not use traction and made use of materials available within the public healthcare system. Results: Among the ten shoulders of nine patients, eight were right shoulders and two were left shoulders. The mean age was 69.5 years. The UCLA score increased from 11.7 to 26.1 points over the postoperative follow-up of 16.6 months. The SF-36 questionnaire score was 122.9 and the raw pain scale value was 88%. Conclusion: Arthroscopic decompression of the SSN in accordance with the described technique is reproducible and less traumatic than the open techniques. The patients achieved improvements in many of the parameters evaluated, particularly with regard to pain. Arthroscopic decompression of the SSN may be a therapeutic option for pathological compression of the SSN. PMID:27027028

  9. Over-optimistic patient expectations of recovery and leisure activities after arthroscopic meniscus surgery.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Kenneth; Roos, Ewa M; Nissen, Nis; JøRgensen, Uffe; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2016-12-01

    Background and purpose - Patients' expectations of outcomes following arthroscopic meniscus surgery are largely unknown. We investigated patients' expectations concerning recovery and participation in leisure-time activities after arthroscopic meniscus surgery and the postoperative fulfillment of these. Patients and methods - The study sample consisted of 491 consecutively recruited patients (mean age 50 (SD 13) years, 55% men) who were assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus injury and later verified by arthroscopy. Before surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding their expectations of recovery time and postoperative participation in leisure activities. 3 months after surgery, the patients completed questionnaires on their actual level of leisure activity and their degree of satisfaction with their current knee function. We analyzed differences between the expected outcome and the actual outcome, and between fulfilled/exceeded expectations and satisfaction with knee function. Results - 478 patients (97%) completed the follow-up. 91% had expected to be fully recovered within 3 months. We found differences between patients' preoperative expectations of participation in leisure activities postoperatively and their actual participation in these, with 59% having unfulfilled expectations (p < 0.001). Satisfaction with current knee function was associated with expectations of leisure activities being fulfilled/exceeded. Interpretation - In general, patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscus surgery were too optimistic regarding their recovery time and postoperative participation in leisure activities. This highlights the need for shared decision making which should include giving the patient information on realistic expectations of recovery time and regarding participation in leisure-time activities after meniscal surgery.

  10. The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Vopat, Bryan G; Murali, Jothi; Gowda, Ashok L; Kaback, Lee; Blaine, Theodore

    2014-04-22

    Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthroscopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author's practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS) technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001). This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique.

  11. Arthroscopic treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with minimum follow up of six years

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with six to nine years of follow up. METHODS: From August 2002 to December 2004, ten patients underwent arthroscopic capsular release for adhesive capsulitis refractory to conservative treatment. An interscalene catheter was used for postoperative analgesia, before the procedure. All were in stage II, with a minimum follow up of six years. The mean age was of 52.9 years old (range, 39 to 66), with female predominance (90%) and six left shoulders. The time between the onset of symptoms and surgery varied from six to 20 months. There were four patients in the primary form (40%) and six in the secondary (60%). RESULTS: In the preoperative evaluation, the mean active anterior elevation was 92°, 10.5° of external rotation, and internal rotation level L5. Postoperatively, the mean active elevation was 149°, 40° of external rotation and internal level T12, respectively. Thus, the average gains were 57° in forward active elevation, 29.5° in external rotation and six spinous processes, these values being statistically significant (p <0.001). According to the Constant functional score (arc of movements), the value increased from 13.8 (preoperative mean) to 32 points (postoperative mean). CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder refractory to conservative treatment allows effective gain of range of motion of this joint. Level of Evidence IV, Retrospective Study (Case Series). PMID:27069406

  12. Arthroscopic treatment of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum: Report of 5 female athletes.

    PubMed

    Krijnen, Matthijs R; Lim, Liesbeth; Willems, W Jaap

    2003-02-01

    The management of osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum of the adolescent elbow is still controversial. We report on 5 cases of female high-level athletes aged from 10 to 19 years (4 gymnasts, 1 waterpolo player). All these athletes had a symptomatic osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum, which was treated arthroscopically in all cases. Follow-up time averaged 5 months (1 to 6.5 months). During the arthroscopy, loose osteochondral fragments of the capitellum and radial head were removed, and the defect was debrided. Thorough evaluation of the anterior and posterior joint including the olecranon fossa was performed. One of the 5 patients had a loose body requiring arthroscopic removal. Within 6 months after surgery, all except 1 elbow, the elbow with a loose body, regained maximum range of motion. Two patients returned to a high level of gymnastics and 1 was considering return. The short-term results of this treatment suggest that arthroscopic debridement of the loose osteochondral fragments provides a good result.

  13. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of minimally displaced greater tuberosity fractures.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Ra, Ki-Hang

    2007-10-01

    In cases of displaced greater tuberosity fractures, treatments by arthroscopic-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation have been reported. However, in cases in which there is a comminuted fracture or a minimally displaced fracture combined with concomitant lesions such as rotator cuff tear or labral pathology, it is difficult to reduce the fracture and to treat other pathologies by use of a percutaneous screw. Recently, many surgeons have used the double-row repair method in rotator cuff repair, which provides a tendon-bone interface better suited for biologic healing and restoring normal anatomy. In accordance with this method, we used the arthroscopic technique of double-row suture anchor fixation for a minimally displaced greater tuberosity fracture without additional incision. Initially, debridement was performed on the fracture surface by use of a shaver, and the medial-row anchor was inserted through the anterior portal or the intact cuff. Two lateral-row anchors were inserted just anterior and posterior to the lower margin of the fractured fragment under C-arm guidance. The medial-row sutures and lateral-row sutures were then placed. Arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation of a displaced greater tuberosity fracture restores the original footprint of the rotator cuff and normal tendon-bone interface of the displaced greater tuberosity fracture.

  14. Intraligamentous ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate Ligament: MR findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Do-Dai, D.D.; Youngberg, R.A.; Lanchbury, F.D.; Pitcher, J.D. Jr.; Garver, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlation of intraligamentous cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are presented. Three cases of intraligamentous cysts of the ACL were identified out of 681 knee MRI examinations over a 2-year period. Arthroscopy and postoperative MRI were performed in all three patients, each of whom experienced knee pain with extreme flexion and extension. In all three cases the intraligamentous cyst was homogeneously hypointense on T1-weighted imaging and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging relative to the ACL. Two of the three ACL cysts required a 70{degrees} scope for adequate visualization and establishment of posteromedial and posterolateral portals for arthroscopic treatment. One cyst could not be visualized arthroscopically and probing of the ACL from the anterior portal resulted in drainage of the cyst. No patient had presence of ACL cyst on follow-up MRI or recurrence of symptoms at a mean of 24 months. Intraligamentous cyst of ACL is a rare cause of knee pain. It should be suspected in patients having chronic pain with extremes of motion. Magnetic resonance findings are diagnostic and help to guide arthroscopy. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  15. EVALUATION OF RESULTS AND COMPLICATIONS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC SUTURE OF SLAP LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Soares, André Lopes; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results and complications from arthroscopic suturing of SLAP lesions. Methods: Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of SLAP lesions between July 1995 and May 2008 were evaluated. The procedures were performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Fernandinho Simonsen Wing, Santa Casa de São Paulo, Brazil. Associated lesions were seen in 68 of the 71 patients evaluated (96%), and the other three (4%) had SLAP lesions alone. Results: The associated lesions most frequently found in the patients under 40 years of age were labral lesions (69%), while in patients aged 40 years or over, impact syndrome with or without rotator cuff injury was the most commonly associated condition (71.4%). According to the UCLA method, 79% of our results (56 cases) were good or excellent. Postoperative complications occurred in 15 cases (21%); among these, the most common was the presence of residual pain (46.6%), followed by adhesive capsulitis (33.3%). Conclusions: There was a great association between SLAP lesions and other shoulder lesions, which varied according to the patients' age groups. Arthroscopic suturing of the SLAP lesions provided excellent results in the majority of the cases, but complications occurred in 21%. PMID:27026986

  16. Arthroscopic Treatment for Primary Septic Arthritis of the Hip in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Primary septic arthritis is a rare differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in adults. Inspired by the success of all-arthroscopic treatment in pediatric patients, we developed a diagnostic and surgical pathway for our adult patients. Methods. Seven patients, average age 44 ± 13.7 years with acute hip pain since 4.4 ± 2.9 days in the average, were included. Septic arthritis was confirmed by joint aspiration and dissemination was excluded by MRI and standard radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of immediate arthroscopic lavage using 4 portals for debridement, high-volume irrigation, partial synovectomy, and drainage. Results. Patients were treated in hospital for 12.4 ± 3.1 days (range 7–16 days). WBC and CRP returned to physiological levels. During the mean follow-up of 26.4 ± 19.4 months (range 13–66 months) no patient showed recurrence of infection. The 5 patients with an unimpaired hip joint prior to the infection had a mean modified Harris Hip Score of 94 ± 5.6 points (range 91–100) at final follow-up. Conclusions. Arthroscopic therapy using a minimally invasive approach with low perioperative morbidity for the treatment of primary septic arthritis of the adult hip is able to restore normal hip function in acute cases without dissemination of the infection. Level of Evidence. IV. PMID:27800188

  17. Arthroscopic arthrodesis of the shoulder: Fourteen-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Martín, Antonio; Pérez-Hidalgo, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder arthrodesis is indicated in infections, brachial paralysis, irreparable rotator cuff tears, osteoarthritis without indication of prosthesis, rescue after arthroplasty, or after surgery for cancer. Arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional. Our aim is presenting our result after 14 years of follow-up of one patient. We present a case report of a 17-year-old male patient. He suffered fracture of left scapula (type V, Ideberg), fracture of left clavicle (type I, Craig), and fracture of left distal ulna. We realized osteosynthesis of clavicle (plate and screws) with the aim of treating this floating shoulder. Electromyography showed partial axonotmesis of axilar nerve. After 7 months of follow-up, axonotmesis was still present. We realized arthroscopic shoulder arthrodesis (three cannulated screws). Fourteen years later, shoulder movement was as follows: Flexion, 0-90°; maximum abduction, 40° with shoulder atrophy; Constant, 47 points; and UCLA, 17 points, without pain. Arthrodesis with screws reaches a subjective benefit in 82% of patients. Percentage of pseudarthrosis is less than in patients treated with plates, although the risks of infections, fractures, and material removal are greater than in patients treated with plates. Shoulder arthroscopic arthrodesis is exceptional, but it allows minimal surgical aggression. PMID:21897586

  18. Arthroscopic Technique for the Treatment of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Simon; Haro, Marc S.; Riff, Andrew; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    Open synovectomy remains the treatment of choice for pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the hip but has shown modest results compared with the treatment of other joints. Recent advances in hip arthroscopy permit a thorough evaluation of the joint surfaces, improved access, and decreased postoperative morbidity. We describe an arthroscopic synovectomy technique for PVNS of the hip. The use of additional arthroscopic portals and creation of a large capsulotomy enable successful visualization and extensive synovectomy of the entire synovial lining of the hip. The T-capsulotomy enables extensive soft-tissue retraction for complete exposure. The midanterior portal enables use of an arthroscopic grasper and shaver to directly access and excise the synovial lining of the peripheral compartment while avoiding damage to the medial and lateral retinacular vessels. Technical innovations in hip arthroscopy have enhanced visualization in the central and peripheral compartments, as well as instrument management and diagnostic evaluation of the capsule, therefore allowing enhanced management of PVNS of the hip. PMID:25973372

  19. Periarticular osteoid osteoma of the ankle: a report of nine arthroscopically treated patients.

    PubMed

    Dimnjaković, Damjan; Bojanić, Ivan; Smoljanović, Tomislav; Mahnik, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Periarticular osteoid osteoma often presents with unspecific clinical symptoms, mimicking other clinical conditions. This can lead a clinician to a ''diagnostic side path'' and a delayed or missed diagnosis compared with extra-articular osteoid osteoma. We report the cases of 9 patients with a mean age of 22 (range 14 to 32) years who were diagnosed with periarticular osteoid osteoma of the ankle and were surgically treated in our department during a 12-year period. The diagnostic difficulties associated with periarticular osteoid osteoma must be resolved by obtaining a detailed patient history and performing a thorough physical examination. Computed tomography is the ultimate imaging method to confirm the suspicion of osteoid osteoma. Arthroscopic removal of the osteoid osteoma was performed in all 9 patients in the present case series, with synovectomy performed when indicated. Under arthroscopic visualization, a specimen was obtained for histopathologic analysis to confirm the diagnosis, followed by tumor excision. All the patients were pain free at the final follow-up visit after a mean duration of 6 years (range 6 months to 12.7 years) postoperatively. We suggest arthroscopic removal of periarticular osteoid osteomas of the ankle as an effective treatment method, because it allows complete tumor excision, synovectomy when needed, a short postoperative rehabilitation period, and satisfactory functional results.

  20. Arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy in high-level athletes

    PubMed Central

    Alaseirlis, Dimosthenis Artemis; Konstantinidis, George Athanasios; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Nakou, Lamprini Stefanos; Korompilias, Anastasios; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Summary To present the results of arthroscopic treatment of patellar tendinopathy in high-level competition athletes. Eleven high-level athletes presented chronic patellar tendinopathy which did not respond to long term conservative treatment. Average age of the patients was 24.8 ±3.4 years old. All patients received an arthroscopic procedure with osteoplasty of the distal patellar pole, debridement of the underlying Hoffa fat pad and of the degenerated areas of the proximal posterior patella tendon and cauterization of the visible neo-vessels. Mean duration of follow-up was 17.4±4 months. Patients showed a major improvement in the Lysholm score from 49.9±5.2 to 92.5±7 and in the VISA P score from 41.2±5.2 to 86.8±14.9 on tenth post-operative week. All patients had returned to sports activities by the twelfth postoperative week. Arthroscopic treatment of chronic patellar tendinopathy found to be a minimal invasive and safe technique which produced satisfactory results. PMID:23738308

  1. Arthroscopic sternoclavicular joint resection arthroplasty: a technical note and illustrated case report.

    PubMed

    Warth, Ryan J; Lee, Jared T; Campbell, Kevin J; Millett, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    Open resection arthroplasty of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint has historically provided good long-term results in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the SC joint. However, the procedure is rarely performed because of the risk of injury to vital mediastinal structures and concern regarding postoperative joint instability. Arthroscopic decompression of the SC joint has therefore emerged as a potential treatment option because of many recognized advantages including minimal tissue dissection, maintenance of joint stability, avoidance of posterior SC joint dissection, expeditious recovery, and improved cosmesis. There are, however, safety concerns given the proximity of neurovascular structures. In this article we demonstrate a technique for arthroscopic SC joint resection arthroplasty in a 26-year-old active man with bilateral, painful, idiopathic degenerative SC joint osteoarthritis. This case also highlights the pearls and pitfalls of arthroscopic resection arthroplasty for the SC joint. There were no perioperative complications. Four months postoperatively, the patient had returned to full activities, including weightlifting, without pain or evidence of SC joint instability. One year postoperatively, the patient showed substantial improvements in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score; Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation score; Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score; and Short Form 12 Physical Component Summary score over preoperative baseline values.

  2. RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ISOLATED TEARS OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Freita, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; dos Santos, Ricardo Barreto Monteiro; Taglietti, Thiago Martins; Guevara, Carlos Leonidas Escobar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes and identify prognostic factors in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of isolated tears of the subscapularis tendon. Methods: Between January 2003 and May 2009, we identified 18 shoulders with isolated tears or deinsertions that were complete or affected at least one third of the subscapularis tendon and underwent arthroscopic repair. Results: Three shoulders (17%) showed lesions in the upper third of the subscapularis; nine shoulders (50%) showed lesions in the upper two thirds; and six shoulders (33%) presented complete tears. In comparing the range of lateral rotation of the injured shoulder between before surgery and the time of the reevaluation, there was no statistical difference (p = 0.091). The LHBT was damaged in 11 shoulders (61%). According to the Constant score validation, we had excellent and good results in 83% of the cases and 17% were reasonable. The reevaluations on three patients showed re-tearing on MRI. Acromioplasty was performed on ten patients and this procedure did not represent statistical differences in the final results (p = 0.57). Conclusions: There was no statistically significant difference in relation to preoperative lateral rotation between the injured shoulder and the contralateral side. There was no significant loss of lateral rotation after surgery. The LHBT may be normal in deinsertions of the subscapularis tendon. Acromioplasty did not influence the results. The re-tearing rate for arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon was 16.6%. PMID:27042642

  3. Arthroscopic release of iliopsoas tendon in patients with femoro-acetabular impingement: clinical results at mid-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Via, Alessio Giai; Tomic, Alexander; Rodriguez, Claudio; Salineros, Matias; Somarriva, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The iliopsoas tendon is a recognized cause of extra-articular hip pain, and tenotomy has been described as an effective treatment in patients who do not respond to conservative treatments. Endoscopic release showed higher success rate, lower recurrence, fewer complications compared to open surgery. The aim of the study is to report the results at a mean of 4 years follow-up of a series of patients affected by femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and an associated iliopsoas tendinopathy, treated with hip arthroscopy and transcapsular tendon release. Methods Fifteen patients were retrospectively reviewed. Assessment of radiographic signs of FAI was performed, the alpha angle, the femoral head-neck offset and the lateral center edge angle (LCEA) were collected. Osteoarthritis was assessed from the AP pelvic and graded according to the Tönnis classification. Modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), VAIL score and VAS score were administered to all patients before surgery, at follow-up at 1 year (T1) and final follow-up (T2). Results We found a statistical significant improvement in functional scores (mHHS and VAIL score) from the baseline to T2. According to VAS score, a statistical significant improvement was also found from T0 to T2, from a median of 5.5 (range 3–7) to 0 (range 0–5) (P<0.001). Two patients referred a recurrence of pain one year after surgery who were treated conservatively. No other complications have been reported. Conclusion Iliopsoas tendinopathy can be associated to FAI in some patients, and failure in diagnosing and treating may be the reason of poor results and a revision surgery. Arthroscopic iliopsoas tendon release seems to produce good clinical outcome, reducing pain and the rate of a revision surgeries. Level of evidence: IV case series. PMID:28066744

  4. Routine femoral head fluoroscopy to reduce complications in coronary catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Joshua A.; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether routine preprocedure fluoroscopy of the femoral head would improve sheath placement or reduce the incidence of groin complications. Patients were randomized to receive either fluoroscopy or “blind” sheath placement using palpation alone. The location of the femoral sheath was established by femoral artery angiography. Sheath placement in relation to the femoral head, arterial location, and complication rates were compared. Placement was considered “ideal” if the sheath was in the common femoral artery and in the top or middle third of the femoral head. A total of 256 patients were enrolled. There was no difference in average age, body mass index (BMI), or rate of anticoagulation between the groups. There was no major bleeding in either group. The overall risk of minor bleeding was not statistically different. The treatment group showed higher “ideal” placement relative to the femoral head. In patients who had a BMI ≥30 kg/m2, the difference between the groups was statistically significant (treatment 69% vs control 50%). In conclusion, routine femoral fluoroscopy prior to sheath placement in coronary angiography and angioplasty did not significantly alter bleeding or complication rates but did increase the likelihood of ideal placement, especially in obese patients. PMID:19169390

  5. Compressive femoral neuropathy: a rare complication of anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Ong, H S

    2007-03-01

    The most common coagulation disorder associated with warfarin use is bleeding, but compressive femoral neuropathy is an unusual presentation. A 63-year-old man with compressive femoral neuropathy from an iliacus haematoma is reported. The diagnosis was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging and treated conservatively with good clinical response and radiological evidence of resolution.

  6. Improved Squat and Gait Biomechanics 6-Months Post-Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Cvetanovich, Gregory; Farkas, Gary Jordan; Rajan, Kumar; Espinoza, Alejandro; Nho, Shane Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess gait and squat biomechanics 6-months following arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement. Methods: Symptomatic patients with clinical and radiographic diagnosis of FAI who had failed non-operative treatment underwent gait and squat analysis preoperatively and at 6-months postoperatively following arthroscopic surgery for FAI. Age- and BMI-matched controls without radiographic FAI or other lumbar or lower extremity pathology underwent a single analysis for comparison. Comparisons between preoperative and 6-month postoperative gait and squat parameters as well as comparison to the control group were performed using paired and independent sample t-tests. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Fifteen FAI patients and 9 controls were analyzed. Age for the patients vs. controls was 28.7±9.6 y vs. 27.8±6.5 y (p>0.05), respectively; while BMI was 23.5±5.1 kg/m2 vs. 22.8±3.5 kg/m2 (p>0.05). All gait parameters were unchanged between preoperative and 6-month postoperative testing (p>0.05), with a trend toward significance for hip external rotation moment (p=0.056) (Table 1). Squat testing revealed that FAI arthroscopic surgery increased maximum hip extension (p=0.011), with a trend toward significance for hip adduction moment (p=0.059). All other squat parameters did not differ from preoperative to 6-month follow-up (p>0.05). Compared to the control group, preoperative FAI patients had reduced hip external rotation moment during gait (p=0.024), with a trend toward significance for hip abduction moment (p=0.082). No other gait or squat differences were detected between FAI patients preoperatively or 6-months postoperatively compared to controls (p>0.05). Conclusion: Biomechanical gait and squat analysis at 6-month follow-up from arthroscopic FAI surgery revealed a tendency to improve external hip rotation during gait and maximum hip extension and hip adduction during squat. Arthroscopic surgery for FAI may

  7. Femoral head banking: NUH tissue bank experience.

    PubMed

    Nather, Aziz; David, Vikram

    2007-04-01

    National University Hospital Tissue Bank protocol follows guidelines recommended by the American Association of Tissue Banks and the European Association of Tissue Banks using donor selection criteria: medical history, clinical examination, chart review and laboratory tests for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), hepatitis B, hepatitis C, syphilis, and specimen for culture/sensitivity tests. For living donors, repeat testing is performed for AIDS and hepatitis C approximately 180 days after procurement. Femoral heads are procured using the "sterile double jar technique" and stored at -80 degrees C. Our first study of 273 consecutive potential donors undergoing hemiarthroplasty from 1989 to 1994 showed that a high percentage (42.5%) was unsuitable for use. A second study involving 175 potential donors was conducted from 1995 to 2003 after hepatitis C screening was introduced. The bacterial contamination rates in both studies (3.5% and 5.7%) are low. The incidence of other diseases also are low: hepatitis B, 2.3% and syphilis, 1.8% in the first study and hepatitis B, 5.7%; hepatitis C, 0.6%; and syphilis, 5.1% in the second cohort. No cases of AIDS were reported in either study. By 2003, femoral heads were transplanted in 205 patients with a low complication rate of 2.9%.

  8. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  9. Distal femoral osteotomy using a novel deformity reduction device.

    PubMed

    Panichi, Enrico; Cappellari, Fulvio; Olimpo, Matteo; Piras, Lisa A; Radasch, Robert; Ferretti, Antonio; Peirone, Bruno

    2016-09-20

    Distal femoral osteotomy is a surgical procedure used to correct patellar luxation, secondary to a femoral deformity. A distal femoral osteotomy using the tibial plateau levelling osteotomy-jig to temporarily provide stability of the distal femoral osteotomy, maintaining limb alignment in the frontal and axial planes prior to internal plate fixation of the osteotomy, has been described. This report describes a novel jig named Deformity Reduction Device (DRD). This device was developed with the specific aim of increasing precision and predictability during corrective osteotomy execution in order to be consistent with the preoperative planning. The distal femoral osteotomy DRD-assisted procedure is described in detail, discussing the theoretical and practical principles of the application.

  10. Distal femoral physeal growth arrest secondary to a cemented proximal femoral endoprosthetic replacement.

    PubMed

    Gaston, C L; Tillman, R M; Grimer, R J

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of spontaneous physeal growth arrest of the distal femur in a nine-year-old child with Ewing's sarcoma of the proximal femur treated with chemotherapy and endoprosthetic replacement. Owing to the extent of disuse osteoporosis at the time of surgery, the entire intramedullary canal up to the distal femoral physis was filled with cement. Three years later, the femur remained at its pre-operative length of 19 cm. Pre-operative calculations of further growth failed to account for the growth arrest, and the initial expandable growing prosthesis inserted has been revised to a longer one in order to address the leg-length discrepancy. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of distal femoral physeal growth arrest following cemented endoprosthetic replacement of the proximal femur.

  11. FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WHO HAVE UNDERGONE ARTHROSCOPIC DEBRIDEMENT TO TREAT MASSIVE AND IRREPARABLE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Veado, Marco Antônio de Castro; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results from patients who underwent arthroscopic debridement of extensive irreparable rotator cuff injuries. Methods: 27 patients were operated between 2003 and 2007, and 22 of them were evaluated. The surgical procedure consisted of arthroscopic debridement of the stumps of the tendons involved, bursectomy, removal of acromial osteophytes and, possibly, biceps tenotomy and tuberoplasty. Results: All the patients showed involvement of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons at the preoperative stage. In the postoperative evaluation, 14 patients had a complete teres minor muscle, and three had partial tears of the subscapularis tendon. There was an improvement in the UCLA criteria, from 15 preoperatively to 31 postoperatively. There was no improvement in muscle strength, but there was a reduction in the pain. Conclusion: Arthroscopic debridement is a recommended procedure for elderly patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, good range of motion and low functional demand, when the main objective is to diminish pain. PMID:27022590

  12. "Owl" Technique for All-Arthroscopic Augmentation of a Massive or Large Rotator Cuff Tear With Extracellular Matrix Graft.

    PubMed

    Narvani, A Ali; Consigliere, Paolo; Polyzois, Ioannis; Sarkhel, Tanaya; Gupta, Rohit; Levy, Ofer

    2016-08-01

    Despite the vast improvement in techniques and technology for arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery, repairs of massive and large tears remain challenging because they are associated with significantly high failure rates. In recent years, patch augmentation has gained popularity as a technique to decrease these high failure rates. Arthroscopic patch augmentation of rotator cuff repair, however, is technically difficult. The purpose of this report is to describe a simple and reproducible technique for all-arthroscopic extracellular matrix graft augmentation. With this technique, which we refer to as the "owl" technique because the prepared extracellular augment resembles an owl, there are relatively few suture ends involved; therefore, augment introduction is straightforward with a reduced risk of suture ends becoming tangled. In addition, the way in which our augmentation is prepared helps to prevent it from becoming bunched up when being secured.

  13. Intestinal Obstruction due to Bilateral Strangulated Femoral Hernias

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Oderuth, Eshan; Ntakomyti, Eleni; Kald, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Femoral hernias are at high risk of strangulation due to the narrow femoral canal and femoral ring. This can lead to symptoms of obstruction or strangulation requiring emergency surgery and possible bowel resection. To our knowledge, there is only one previous published report of bilateral strangulated femoral hernia. We present our case of this phenomenon. Case Report. An 86-year-old woman presented with symptoms of small bowel obstruction. Examination revealed two tender lumps in the area of the femoral triangle. CT scan revealed bilateral femoral hernias. Both hernias were repaired and a small bowel resection on the right side was performed with side to side anastomosis. She made an uneventful recovery. Conclusion. Bilateral femoral hernias are a rare occurrence with only one reported case of bilateral strangulation. Our case highlights the importance of meticulous history taking and clinical examination as any delay in diagnosis will increase the risk of mortality and morbidity for the patient. Hernias should always be considered as a cause if one presents with symptoms of abdominal pain or obstruction. PMID:25057426

  14. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  15. Cortical bone allografting in femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cornu, O

    1999-01-01

    Ten femoral heads (six patients) with avascular necrosis were operated on using a fibular allograft. The procedure included core decompression followed by insertion of a cortical bone graft in order to relieve mechanical stresses from the overlying subchondral bone. The presence of the supporting graft should avoid an expected collapse or prevent its worsening if already present. A freeze-dried and processed cortical bone allograft was preferred to an autograft. Weightbearing was normally and fully resumed at the second postoperative month. There were three failures within the first year, four satisfactory results, in which the hip was replaced after 4 years while there are still 3 hips that have been preserved from arthroplasty in young patients after 5 years. The technique is easy and able to substantially delay an arthroplasty in an active patient.

  16. Outcome of arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: Are the results improving with improved techniques and equipment?: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Arun, G R; Kumar, Pradeep; Patnaik, Sarthak; Selvaraj, Karthik; Rajan, David; Singh, Anant; Kumaraswamy, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in understanding the subscapularis tears. There are multiple articles in the literature showing the short term results of isolated subscapularis tendon repair. However, the midterm and long term outcome studies for arthroscopic subscapularis repair are few. This study evaluates the functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Materials and Methods: The records of 35 patients who underwent an arthroscopic subscapularis repair between May 2008 and June 2012 were included in this retrospective study. The records of all patients were reviewed. There were 22 males and 13 female patients with mean age of 58.2 years (range 41-72 years). All patients had a complete history, physical examination, and radiographs of their shoulders. Visual analogue scale (VAS), range of movements, power of cuff muscles, and modified University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score were assessed. Results: The mean followup was 2.8 years (range 2-4 year). Functional outcome after arthroscopic subscapularis repair has an excellent outcome as analysed by clinical outcome, VAS score and UCLA score. Results were analyzed and had statistically significant values. The VAS for pain improved significantly (P < 0.001), and the mean modified UCLA score improved significantly (P < 0.001) from 14.24 ± 4.72 preoperatively to 33.15 ± 2.29 at 2 years postoperative. According to the UCLA system, there were 22 excellent, 11 good, and 2 fair results. Around 95% of patients returned to their usual work after surgery. Conclusion: At a median followup of 2 years, 95% of patients had a good to excellent result after an arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair. We conclude that the midterm results show that arthroscopic subscapularis repair remains a good option for the treatment of patients with subscapularis tendon repair. PMID:27293291

  17. Femoral lengthening with a motorized intramedullary nail

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Joachim; Grimsrud, Øyvind; Dagsgard, Anita Hoddevik; Huhnstock, Stefan; Steen, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We assessed whether an intramedullary lengthening device would reduce the problems normally associated with the external fixation technique. We also wanted to determine whether it is a reliable construct for limb lengthening and deformity correction in the femur. Patients and methods We conducted a matched-pair comparison of 30 femoral lengthenings, 15 with a motorized intramedullary nail (the nail group) and 15 lengthenings with an external ring fixator (the fixator group). The patients were matched based on age, sex, amount of lengthening, and the etiology of leg length discrepancy. Mean lengthening was 35 (25–55) mm in the nail group and 38 (15–75) mm in the fixator group. Outcome measures were: lengthening and alignment achieved, consolidation index, knee range of motion (ROM), and complications. Results The pairs in this matched-pair study were similar in terms of age, sex, diagnosis, and amount of lengthening. The planned amount of lengthening was achieved in all patients in both groups and axis correction was considered sufficient. The mean radiographic consolidation index in the nail group, at 1.5 (0.9–3.0) months/cm, was better than the mean value for the fixator group (1.9 (0.9–3.4) months/cm) (p = 0.01). Knee ROM was better in the nail group during the lengthening, 6 weeks after lengthening was completed, and 6 months after lengthening was completed (p < 0.001). A larger number of complications were observed in the fixator group than in the nail group. Interpretation A lengthening nail may be superior to external fixation in femoral lengthening, when the anatomical conditions and the complexity of the deformity allow the use of an intramedullary nail. PMID:25191936

  18. Bilateral Femoral Neck Stress Fracture in Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Woo; Yoon, Taek-Rim; Eshnazarovich, Eshnazarov Kamolhuja

    2016-01-01

    A femoral neck stress fracture in child is rare, particularly in bilateral case. It is easy to miss initially or may be misdiagnosed. The authors experienced a case of bilateral femoral neck stress fracture in a 10-year-old boy with bilateral hip. The patient was successfully healed by conservative treatment. We report this rare case with a review of the literature. A femoral neck stress fracture should be included in the differential diagnosis in children who present with sustained hip or groin pain. PMID:27777920

  19. Iliopsoas tendonitis caused by overhang of a collared femoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Brew, Christopher J; Stockley, Ian; Grainger, Andrew J; Stone, Martin H

    2011-04-01

    Pain after total hip arthroplasty can be due to a variety of causes, one of the less common being iliopsoas tendonitis. We report an unusual case of iliopsoas tendonitis caused by overhang of the femoral calcar by a collared femoral prosthesis resulting in impingement on the iliopsoas tendon. An ultrasound-guided corticosteroid and local anesthetic diagnostic injection to the site of impingement confirmed the diagnosis with temporary symptom relief. Revision of the femoral stem to a collarless prosthesis resulted in immediate and complete resolution of symptoms.

  20. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  1. Neurapraxia of the femoral nerve in a modern dancer.

    PubMed

    Sammarco, G J; Stephens, M M

    1991-01-01

    We have presented a case of an acute onset femoral nerve neurapraxia in a pure modern dancer. Repeated mild stretching of the femoral nerve during an established dance routine over a period of several months is implicated as the etiology. The thigh muscles quickly weakened, but regained strength within 3 months. Electromyographic evidence of specific femoral nerve injury initially was negative, but was evident 6 weeks following injury. Overuse syndrome in dancers can cause rapid loss of strength. Other conditions such as herniated intervertebral disc, acute hemorrhage, trauma, iliopsoas rupture, and acute stretching must be ruled out. Complete recovery was the natural outcome.

  2. Arthroscopic Control for Safe and Secure Seating of Suspensory Devices for Femoral Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Three Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seo Goo; Lee, Yong Seuk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of our technique that allows direct visualization of seating of suspensory devices in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods Three different suspensory devices (TightRope RT, RetroButton, and EndoButton) were used in ACL reconstruction using 3 different techniques (outside-in, anteromedial [AM] portal, and transtibial techniques). Positioning of a guiding material and seating pattern of the suspensory devices were evaluated according to the surgical technique and suspensory device used. Results On the transtibial technique, 21 of total 26 cases (81%) of single bundle reconstructions and 22 of total 22 cases (100%) of double bundle reconstructions required superolateral capsulotomy where buttons were found in 21 of total 21 cases (100%) and 17 of 22 cases (77%), respectively. On the AM portal technique, all patients required capsulotomy and the button was found in only 18 of total 32 cases (56%) even after capsulotomy. On the outside-in technique, all patients required capsulotomy and the button was found in 86 of total 86 cases (100%). Conclusions Our technique for direct visualization of seating of the suspensory devices was more effective in outside-in and single bundle transtibial ACL reconstruction. However, it was less effective in double bundle transtibial and AM portal ACL reconstructions. PMID:28231646

  3. Needle Assisted Arthroscopic Clysis of the Medial Collateral Ligament of the Knee: a Simple Technique to Improve Exposure in Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinning; Selby, Ronald M.; Newman, Ashley; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    During knee arthroscopy, narrowness and tightness maybe encountered in the medial compartment that does not allow sufficient visualization or instrumentation. When this occurs, our team has found it helpful to perform a percutaneous clysis of the deep portion of the medial collateral ligament with a spinal needle. With the knee positioned in 10° to 20° of flexion and a valgus stress is applied. A spinal needle (18 Gauge) is passed percutaneously through the medial collateral ligament between the tibial plateau and undersurface of the medial meniscus. Several passes are made with the spinal needle with the bevel of the needle angled to selectively divide the fibers while keeping the medial collateral ligament under tension. Then with controlled valgus force, the medial compartment will progressively open allowing improved visualization to the posteromedial corner of the knee. This increase in space gives an enhanced visual field and further allows more room for arthroscopic instrumentation. PMID:24416482

  4. Arthroscopic treatment of displaced tibial eminence fractures using a suspensory fixation

    PubMed Central

    Loriaut, Philippe; Moreau, Pierre-Emmanuel; Loriaut, Patrick; Boyer, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Background: Avulsion fractures of the tibial intercondylar eminence are fairly common injuries requiring surgery for the optimal functional outcome. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and radiological outcomes of an arthroscopic treatment of displaced tibial intercondylar eminence fractures using a suspensory device. Material and Methods: Five patients with type 2 and 3 displaced tibial intercondylar eminence fractures who received an arthroscopically assisted fixation using a double button device were enrolled from 2011 to 2012. Clinical assessment included the patient demographics, cause of injury, the delay before surgery, time for surgery, time to return to work and sport, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm knee scores. Stability was measured with the KT-2000 arthrometer with a force of 134 N. A side to side difference on the KT-2000 examination superior to 3 mm was considered as a significant and abnormal increase in the anterior translation. Radiological examination consisted of anteroposterior and lateral radiographs, as well as computed tomography (CT) scan of the affected knee. Clinical and radiological followup was done at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively and at final followup. CT-scan was performed before surgery and at 3 months followup. Results: The median age of patients was 31 years. Mean followup was 27 ± 5.1 months. The average delay before surgery was 3 days. At final followup, the mean IKDC and Lysholm knee scores were, 93.9 and 94.5 respectively. All patients had a complete functional recovery and were able to return to work and to resume their sport activities. No secondary surgeries were required to remove hardware. No complication was noted. Bony union was achieved in all patients. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment of displaced tibial intercondylar eminence fractures using a suspensory system provided a satisfactory clinical and radiological outcome at a followup of 2 years.

  5. Arthroscopic optical coherence tomography provides detailed information on articular cartilage lesions in horses.

    PubMed

    te Moller, N C R; Brommer, H; Liukkonen, J; Virén, T; Timonen, M; Puhakka, P H; Jurvelin, J S; van Weeren, P R; Töyräs, J

    2013-09-01

    Arthroscopy enables direct inspection of the articular surface, but provides no information on deeper cartilage layers. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), based on measurement of reflection and backscattering of light, is a diagnostic technique used in cardiovascular surgery and ophthalmology. It provides cross-sectional images at resolutions comparable to that of low-power microscopy. The aim of this study was to determine if OCT is feasible for advanced clinical assessment of lesions in equine articular cartilage during diagnostic arthroscopy. Diagnostic arthroscopy of 36 metacarpophalangeal joints was carried out ex vivo. Of these, 18 joints with varying degrees of cartilage damage were selected, wherein OCT arthroscopy was conducted using an OCT catheter (diameter 0.9 mm) inserted through standard instrument portals. Five sites of interest, occasionally supplemented with other locations where defects were encountered, were arthroscopically graded according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification system. The same sites were evaluated qualitatively (ICRS classification and morphological description of the lesions) and quantitatively (measurement of cartilage thickness) on OCT images. OCT provided high resolution images of cartilage enabling determination of cartilage thickness. Comparing ICRS grades determined by both arthroscopy and OCT revealed poor agreement. Furthermore, OCT visualised a spectrum of lesions, including cavitation, fibrillation, superficial and deep clefts, erosion, ulceration and fragmentation. In addition, with OCT the arthroscopically inaccessible area between the dorsal MC3 and P1 was reachable in some cases. Arthroscopically-guided OCT provided more detailed and quantitative information on the morphology of articular cartilage lesions than conventional arthroscopy. OCT could therefore improve the diagnostic value of arthroscopy in equine orthopaedic surgery.

  6. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid following arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the knee.

    PubMed

    Thein, Rafael; Haviv, Barak; Kidron, Amos; Bronak, Shlomo

    2010-10-11

    The short-term recovery period post-arthroscopic meniscectomy is characterized by pain and impaired function most likely related to the irrigation of synovial fluid from the knee intraoperatively. Consequently, along with removal of harmful debris, the irrigation fluid dilutes the hyaluronic acid layer covering the joint tissues. Hyaluronic acid contributes to the homeostasis of the joint environment and is an important component of synovial fluid and cartilage matrix. Hence, the instillation of hyaluronic acid after the procedure may relieve symptoms. This prospective, single-blind, randomized, controlled study evaluated clinical outcome after hyaluronic acid injection to patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee. Patients with ligamentous injuries or severe chondral damage were excluded. Fifty-six patients with a mean age of 34 years (range, 17-44 years) were injected with Viscoseal (TRB Chemedica International S.A., Geneva, Switzerland) or normal saline immediately post-arthroscopy and divided into the Viscoseal group or control group, respectively. Patients were evaluated for pain, swelling, and function at 1, 4, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Patients in the control group reported more pain at week 1, with a mean visual analog score (VAS) of 43, than did patients in the Viscoseal group, with a mean VAS of 28 (P=.006). At 4 weeks postoperatively, none of the Viscoseal patients had consumed analgesics, where 9 (of 28) in the control group reported acetaminophen intake (P=.039). No significant difference in knee function was found between groups. Intra-articular injection of Viscoseal after arthroscopic meniscectomy reduced pain in the short-term recovery period.

  7. Neurovascular relationships of the approaches for arthroscopic total trapeziectomy with ligamentous stabilization.

    PubMed

    Durand, S; Gagey, O; Masquelet, A C; Thoreux, P

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to define the neurovascular relationships of the approaches used during arthroscopic total trapeziectomy with the Thompson "suspension-plasty." Fifteen fresh cadavers in which trapezio-metacarpal arthritis had been confirmed by preoperative radiographs were chosen. There were 12 women and 3 men (average age: 87 years), and small joint arthroscopy equipment was used. Two approaches for the trapezio-metacarpal joint were used: an ulnar approach situated at the ulnar border of the extensor pollicis brevis tendon and a radial approach placed at the middle of a line joining the tendons of the flexor carpi radialis and the abductor pollicis longus. A new transosseous approach at the base of the first metacarpal ("trans-M1" approach) is suggested and was used to do the ligamento-plasty. After the operation, a large skin flap was elevated in order to measure the distance between each surgical approach and the different neurovascular structures (radial artery, dividing branches of the superficial branch of the radial nerve and the end of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm) and to verify the absence of neurovascular lesions. The different neurovascular structures at risk during this arthroscopic maneuver were the radial artery for the ulnar approach, the branches of the superficial branch of the radial nerve for all of the approaches and the ending of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm for the radial and "trans-M1" approaches. The use of the approaches described allows arthroscopic trapeziectomy with the Thompson suspension-plasty without us having noted neurovascular lesion.

  8. Arthroscopic fixation of coronoid process fractures through coronoid tunnelling and capsular plication

    PubMed Central

    ARRIGONI, PAOLO; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; CUCCHI, DAVIDE; NICOLETTI, SIMONE; GUERRA, ENRICO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this study is to describe a new arthroscopic technique for reduction and fixation of coronoid process fractures (CPFs) and report clinical and functional results in 4 patients after a 24-month follow-up. Methods four patients underwent arthroscopic reduction and fixation of isolated CPFs (acute or non-unions, type I or type II according to the Regan-Morrey classification) performed using a new technique based on coronoid tunnelling and capsular plication. The patients were evaluated 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery, using the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scale (DASH), the Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI), and a visual analog scale (VAS); elbow range of motion (ROM) and joint stability were also evaluated and the rate of complications was reported. Results all 4 patients completed the follow-up. At 6, 12 and 24 months, respectively, they recorded mean DASH scores of 22, 14 and 7, mean MEPI scores of 74, 82 and 94, and mean VAS scores of 4, 2 and 1. The mean ROM increased in all directions (at 6, 12 and 24 months, respectively: flexion: 112°, 125°, 144°; extension: 3°, 5°, 6°; pronation: 76°, 84°, 91°; supination: 78°, 82°, 86°). No signs of instability were observed and no complications were reported. Conclusions the new all-arthroscopic coronoid tunnelling and capsular plication technique here proposed can restore elbow function, ROM and stability and allows anatomical reconstruction of the joint after type I or type II CPFs. If performed by an experienced arthroscopist, it is a valid alternative to open reduction and external fixation. Level of evidence Level IV, retrospective case series. PMID:27900307

  9. Reporting rotator cuff tears on magnetic resonance arthrography using the Snyder’s arthroscopic classification

    PubMed Central

    Aliprandi, Alberto; Messina, Carmelo; Arrigoni, Paolo; Bandirali, Michele; Di Leo, Giovanni; Longo, Stefano; Magnani, Sandro; Mattiuz, Chiara; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) in evaluating rotator cuff tears (RCTs) using Snyder’s classification for reporting. METHODS One hundred and twenty-six patients (64 males, 62 females; median age 55 years) underwent shoulder MRA and arthroscopy, which represented our reference standard. Surgical arthroscopic reports were reviewed and the reported Snyder’s classification was recorded. MRA examinations were evaluated by two independent radiologists (14 and 5 years’ experience) using Snyder’s classification system, blinded to arthroscopy. Agreement between arthroscopy and MRA on partial- and full-thickness tears was calculated, first regardless of their extent. Then, analysis took into account also the extent of the tear. Interobserver agreement was also calculated the quadratically-weighted Cohen kappa statistics. RESULTS On arthroscopy, 71/126 patients (56%) had a full-thickness RCT. The remaining 55/126 patients (44%) had a partial-thickness RCT. Regardless of tear extent, out of 71 patients with arthroscopically-confirmed full-thickness RCTs, 66 (93%) were correctly scored by both readers. All 55 patients with arthroscopic diagnosis of partial-thickness RCT were correctly assigned as having a partial-thickness RCT at MRA by both readers. Interobserver reproducibility analysis showed total agreement between the two readers in distinguishing partial-thickness from full-thickness RCTs, regardless of tear extent (k = 1.000). With regard to tear extent, in patients in whom a complete tear was correctly diagnosed, correct tear extent was detected in 61/66 cases (92%); in the remaining 5/66 cases (8%), tear extent was underestimated. Agreement was k = 0.955. Interobserver agreement was total (k = 1.000). CONCLUSION MRA shows high diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility in evaluating RCTs using the Snyder’s classification for reporting. Snyder’s classification may be adopted for routine reporting of MRA.

  10. Arthroscopic tenodesis through positioning portals to treat proximal lesions of the biceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ji; Gao, Qing-feng; Zhang, Yao; He, Yao-hua

    2014-12-01

    Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis is a good choice for treating proximal lesions of the biceps tendon. However, there are few descriptions of the surgical approach. We introduce a technique for proximal biceps tenodesis using positioning portals and placing suture anchors. Our patients had a minimum of 12 months of follow-up. Between January 2010 and June 2012, a total of 49 patients (21 men, 28 women) underwent arthroscopic biceps tenodesis. The pathology was mainly associated with proximal lesions of the biceps tendon, with the diagnosis confirmed in all patients. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and then up to and including the final follow-up. Their pain and conditions were assessed using the Constant, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) scores for pain; range of active forward flexion; and active range of motion. All data were analyzed statistically. All patients were operated on successfully. They achieved good healing during the follow-up (mean 14 months; range 12-34 months). Before surgery the ASES, Constant, and UCLA scores were 17.0, 39.4, and 15.4, respectively. After surgery they were 33.6, 89.1, and 31.2, respectively. The scores had significantly improved: ASES scores from 17.0 to 33.6 (P < 0.05); Constant scores from 39.4 to 89.1 (P < 0.05); UCLA scores from 15.4 to 31.2 (P < 0.05). Arthroscopic tenodesis through positioning portals to treat proximal lesions of the biceps tendon produces satisfactory clinical outcomes. This technique is convenient and safe.

  11. Arthroscopic grading of common wrist disorders and its role in management

    PubMed Central

    Bayoumy, Maysara Abdelhalim; Elkady, Hesham A.; Said, Hatem G.; El-Sayed, Amr; Saleh, Waleed Riad

    2015-01-01

    Palmer devised a classification system to guide treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex tears in 1989. The main division is between traumatic Type I and atraumatic Type II tears. The wrist arthroscopy makes diagnosis and treatment of ulnar impaction syndrome possible in a less invasive way. Arthroscopy is the most valuable tool for diagnosis and treatment of acute scapholunate and lunotriquetral dissociation. Arthroscopic grading of Kienböck's disease better describes articular damage compared with plain radiographs and can help surgical treatment. The wrist arthroscopy generally makes it possible to make the diagnosis of the chondral lesion before they are visible by the usual imaging. PMID:27047230

  12. Arthroscopically assisted percutaneous fixation for trans-scaphoid perilunate fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, I-H; Kim, H-J; Min, W-K; Cho, H-S; Kim, P-T

    2010-10-01

    Trans-scaphoid perilunate fracture dislocation is a complex carpal dislocation causing marked disruption of the carpal structures. Open treatment has been accepted as standard for this injury. We have used arthroscopically assisted percutaneous screw fixation and bone grafting to treat this injury in four patients. The functional outcome was good. All patients achieved solid union without nonunion or malunion. The complication and morbidity was relatively low; all patients had proper alignment and there was no evidence of instability or avascular necrosis or midcarpal arthritis.

  13. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  14. INDIRECT ARTHROSCOPIC DECOMPRESSION OF SPINOGLENOID CYST WITH SUPRASCAPULAR NEUROPATHY: REPORT OF TWO CASES AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Suprascapular nerve compression is rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with shoulder pain and external rotation deficit. Spinoglenoidal cysts may cause compression, and posterosuperior glenoid labrum lesions are the most likely hypothesis to explain their appearance. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography define the diagnosis. Indirect arthroscopic decompression of the cyst and repair of the glenoid labrum enable complete neurological recovery. The authors report two cases of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle caused by compression due to spinoglenoidal cysts that were treated by means of arthroscopy, and present the pre and postoperative assessments. PMID:27022558

  15. Return to Sports After Arthroscopic Treatment of Rotator Cuff Calcifications in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A.; Sirio, Adrian; Bruchmann, Guillermina; Maignon, Gastón D.; Bongiovanni, Santiago L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic treatment of calcific deposits of rotator cuff tears has been described with successful results in the general population. However, despite the high frequency of this condition, there is no information in the literature regarding arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff calcifications in athletes. Purpose: To analyze the time to return to sport, clinical outcomes, and complications of complete arthroscopic removal of intratendinous calcific deposits and repair of the tendon lesion without acromioplasty in athletes. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study retrospectively evaluated 24 consecutive patients with a mean age of 36.2 years. The mean follow-up was 59 months (range, 24-108 months). Patients completed a questionnaire focused on the time to return to sport and treatment course. Pre- and postoperative functional assessment was performed using the Constant score and University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS). Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed to evaluate the recurrence of calcifications and the indemnity of the supraspinatus tendon repair. Results: Of the 24 patients, 23 (95.8%) were able to return to sports; 91.3% returned to the same level. The mean time to return to play was 5.3 months (range, 3-9 months): 26% of patients (6/23) returned to sports in less than 4 months, 61% (14/24) returned between 4 and 6 months, and 13% (3/24) returned after the sixth month. The mean Constant score increased from 26.9 preoperatively to 89.7 postoperatively (P < .001), and the UCLA score increased from 17.3 preoperatively to 33.2 postoperatively (P < .001). Significant improvement was obtained for pain (mean VAS, 8.4 [before surgery] vs 0.6 [after]; P < .001). The overall majority (91.6%) of patients were satisfied with their result. MRI examination at last follow-up (79% of patients) showed no tendon tears. Conclusion: In athletes with

  16. Arthroscopic Excision of Juxta-articular Osteoid Osteoma of the Calcaneum

    PubMed Central

    Tauheed, Mohammed; Korula, Ravi Jacob; Shankarnarayanan, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma of the foot is a rare condition particularly of the calcaneum. This condition is difficult to diagnose and is more difficult to treat particularly if it involves deeper part of the joints. We present an arthroscopic technique to deal with a case of juxta-articular osteoid osteoma of the calcaneum using two portals: the anterolateral portal for instrumentation and the anterior anterolateral portal for visualization of the subtalar joint. Because this approach is minimally invasive, it offers early recovery and reduced morbidity compared with the conventional techniques. PMID:27073769

  17. Arthroscopic identification of iliopubic and ilioischial grooves in a single adult acetabulum

    PubMed Central

    Paliobeis, C P; Villar, R N

    2010-01-01

    We report the arthroscopic identification of combined morphological variants of the acetabulum in an adult. The combination of iliopubic and ilioischial grooves has not been reported before. Preoperative radiographic and MRI failed to detect the lesions. These grooves strongly suggest incomplete fusion between the three limbs of the triradiate cartilage. When identified, this condition should not be treated as pathological but as a rare anatomical variant. Hip arthroscopy is a competent tool in discovering such asymptomatic cartilage abnormalities and subtle anatomical variations even in the presence of normal preoperative imaging. PMID:22778204

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the proximal tibiofibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-08-01

    Disorders of the proximal tibiofibular joint should be kept in mind in the evaluation of lateral knee pain. They include osteoarthrosis, rheumatic disease, traumatic subluxation or dislocation, ganglion or synovial cysts, synostosis, synovial chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis and hypomobility of the joint. Peroneal nerve can be at risk with pathologies of the joint either by compressive effect or formation of intra-neural ganglion. A case of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the proximal tibiofibular joint was reported which presented with lateral knee pain. It was successfully treated by arthroscopic synovectomy. Level of evidence V.

  19. Giant cell tumor of the femoral neck: case report.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; Amaral, Rogério Andrade do; Oliveira, Leandro Alves de; Moraes, Frederico Barra de; Chaibe, Eduardo Damasceno

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with a giant cell tumor of the left femoral neck, with adjacent progressive invasion of bone tissue. Initial treatment was done with local curettage and autologous bone graft from fibula, electrocauterization and filling with methyl methacrylate. A local tumoral relapse was present after one year; therefore a new surgical procedure was necessary, with proximal femoral wide resection and unconventional endoprosthesis fixation. The article discusses the clinical aspects and surgical treatment. This report aimed to demonstrate the necessity to perform wide resection for giant cell tumor of the femoral neck, prioritizing total resection of the tumor and its local extension, preserving limb integrity and demonstrating the complete failure of preserving surgery in cases of femoral neck involvement.

  20. Acute femoral neuropathy secondary to an iliacus muscle hematoma.

    PubMed

    Seijo-Martínez, M; Castro del Río, M; Fontoira, E; Fontoira, M

    2003-05-15

    We present a patient with a spontaneous iliacus muscle hematoma, appearing immediately after a minor physical maneuver, presenting with pain and femoral neuropathy initially evidenced by massive quadriceps muscle fasciculations. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the pelvic area confirmed the diagnosis, showing a hematoma secondary to a partial muscle tear. The patient was managed conservatively, and the continuous muscle activity ceased in 3 days, with progressive improvement of the pain and weakness. The recovery was complete. Femoral neuropathy is uncommon and usually due to compression from psoas muscle mass lesions of diverse nature, including hematomas. Usually subacute, femoral neuropathy may present acutely in cases of large or strategically placed compressive femoral nerve lesions, and may require surgical evacuation. The case presented herein is remarkable since the muscle hematoma appeared after a nonviolent maneuver, fasciculations were present at onset, and conservative management was sufficient for a full recovery.

  1. Mechanisms of stem subsidence in femoral impaction allografting.

    PubMed

    Albert, Carolyne; Frei, Hanspeter; Duncan, Clive; Fernlund, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Failure of the femoral component of total hip arthroplasty is often accompanied by bone loss that can pose a significant challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. Femoral impaction allografting has attractive potential for restoring bone stock in deficient femurs. However, there have been reports of problematic postoperative stem subsidence with this procedure. Subsidence is highly variable among patients, and there is disagreement over the mechanisms that cause it. This article reviews the various mechanisms that can contribute to subsidence in femoral impaction allografting. Variables such as graft density, cement penetration profile, use of synthetic graft substitutes, or other graft additives are discussed, as well as their potential impact on subsidence. Finally, recommendations are made for future studies aiming to reduce the risk of excessive subsidence in femoral impaction allografting.

  2. Abnormalities of proximal femoral growth after severe Perthes' disease.

    PubMed

    Sponseller, P D; Desai, S S; Millis, M B

    1989-08-01

    We studied the pattern of proximal femoral growth after severe Perthes' disease (Catterall grade III or IV) by retrospective analysis of serial radiographs in 52 hips (46 patients). Our aim was to determine the relationship between proximal femoral growth abnormalities and metaphyseal cysts, epiphyseal extrusion, physeal narrowing, and extensive epiphyseal necrosis. The average follow-up after treatment was 9.8 years (range 4 to 16 years), and 37 of the hips were followed to skeletal maturity. Slowing of proximal femoral growth was common: symmetrical abnormality was seen in 26 hips and asymmetrical abnormality in nine. However, definite premature closure of the proximal femoral physis was seen in only three hips. Abnormality seemed to be due to altered growth velocity rather than to bar formation in most cases. Metaphyseal cysts, epiphyseal extrusion and physeal narrowing during the active stage of the disease, alone or in combination, were found to be neither sensitive nor specific predictors of the subsequent growth pattern.

  3. Sufficient penetration of peracetic acid into drilled human femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Brosig, H; Jacker, H-J; Borchert, H-H; Kalus, U; Dörner, T; von Versen, R; Pruss, A

    2005-01-01

    Chemical sterilisation methods for musculoskeletal transplants have the problem of penetration into all tissue strata. The present study examined if a peracetic acid/ethanol solution penetrated to a sufficient extent into specifically prepared femoral heads. To this effect, 10 femoral heads have been provided with drillings (diameter 2 mm, depth 10 mm) at a distance of 15 mm (series B) and placed in a diffusion chamber with sterilisation solution. From an additional central drilling at the femoral neck junction, the sample drawing was made after 30 min each over a period of 4 h for the iodometric determination of peracetic acid (PAA) concentration. Ten femoral heads, which did contain only the central drilling, served as controls (series A). In 9 of the examined femoral heads of series A the defined minimum concentration of PAA of 0.2% (inactivation of bacteria, spores, fungi) has been clearly exceeded over the complete period of measurement. About 0.8% PAA (inactivation of viruses) was achieved within 4 h only with six femoral heads. Nine out of the 10 examined femoral heads in series B show a clearly improved penetration behaviour which was expressed in smaller standard deviations, a faster increase in concentration, as well as in higher starting and final concentrations (approx. 0.9%) of PAA. Previous drying in air leads to a faster penetration into the centre of the bone. Standardised drilling of de-cartilaged femoral heads creates favourable conditions for the penetration of the PAA sterilisation solution into the whole tissue and guarantees a sufficient inactivation of microorganisms.

  4. The accuracy of femoral intramedullary guides in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Reed, S C; Gollish, J

    1997-09-01

    Of the technical factors important in achieving a successful total knee arthroplasty, limb alignment has been demonstrated to be most influential in determining implant survival. Intramedullary femoral guide systems rely on placement of the intramedullary rod along the anatomic axis of the femur. In this article, the accuracy of the femoral intramedullary guide is investigated using radiographs and a mathematical model. The femoral anatomic axis was drawn on 40 consecutive, preoperative, 3-ft standing radiographs. Using a mathematical model, the potential angular error in the distal femoral cut from aberrant placement of the intramedullary rod was estimated. Calculated values correlated with measured values from plain radiographs and an intramedullary guide template. The anatomic axis was found to exit the distal femur at an average of 6.6 mm medial to the center of the femoral notch. Substantial malalignment error resulted from minor malposition of the intramedullary rod. Most books and diagrams demonstrating the use of intramedullary guides indicate that the entry point is at the center of the femoral notch. These results show that the true entry point is medial to the center of the notch, and rod placement error results in excessive valgus alignment. Preoperative drawing of the anatomic axis on a 3-ft or 18-inch anteroposterior radiograph is recommended. The results both demonstrate the importance of correct use of the guide and heighten cognizance among surgeons performing total knee arthroplasty as to the limitations of the intramedullary guides.

  5. [Combination of modern physiotherapeutic methods in rehabilitation of patients with osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis after arthroscopic surgery on the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Men'shikova, I V

    2008-01-01

    Duration of the rehabilitation period after arthroscopic surgery on the knee joint was reduced by the use of a combination of two modern physiotherapeutic modalities, local cryo-aerotherapy and electrostimulation of smooth muscle components of vascular walls using a Lymphavision apparatus (5-7 sessions). This treatment was given to 55 patients with osteoarthrosis following arthroscopic meniscal resection and abrasive chondropasty and to 20 ones with rheumatoid arthritis after arthroscopic total synovectomy. All patients reported alleviation of pain and oedema in the affected joint. The rehabilitation period was 2-5 days shorter than after the traditional treatment.

  6. Nineteen year results of THA using modular 9 mm S-ROM femoral component in patients with small femoral canals.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Michael; Dwyer, Tim; Marmor, Meir; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Chakravertty, Rajesh; Chechik, Ofir; Cameron, Hugh U

    2013-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was undertaken of 30 consecutive THA performed in 25 patients with hypoplastic proximal femurs, who had received a 9-mm uncemented modular S-ROM stem. The mean patient age was 42 years (17-69 years), mean height was 152.5 cm (130-170.5 cm), mean weight was 63 kg (39-90 kg), and mean follow-up period was 19 years (range, 12-23 years). Subsidence was seen in 2 hips, with asymptomatic femoral osteolysis present in 11 hips; overall survival of the femoral stem was 93.3%, with two revisions of the femoral component required for aseptic loosening. After a mean follow-up of 19 years, the use of the S-ROM 9 mm femoral stem in the patient with the small femur was associated with a low revision rate due to aseptic loosening of the stem.

  7. [Treatment of beginning juvenile detachment of the femoral head, taking growth of the femoral neck into account (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, P

    1979-10-01

    Prevention of further detachment is the primary aim in the immediate treatment of beginning juvenile detachment of the femoral head. Screwing of the epiphysis of the head, first introduced by M. E. Mueller (1965), has proved successful. Besides providing immediate mechanical stability, this method, however, results in premature ossification of the joint of the femoral neck. Epiphysiodesis has a particularly unfavourable effect in early childhood, because it inhibits proper growth of the leg and development of the mechanism of the hip joint on account of the shortened femoral neck. Spiking of the epiphysis with Krischner screw wires guarantees safe fixation of the epiphyseal head on the one hand, and sufficient freedom of femoral neck growth on the other. Surgical treatment requires knowledge of the changed hip joint anatomy of the child. Preoperative planning via drawing to determine the length and position of the implantate on the basis of standardised x-ray films, will help to prevent operative failures.

  8. Osteoid Osteoma of the Femoral Neck in Athletes: Two Case Reports Differentiating From Femoral Neck Stress Injuries.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Christopher B; Dembowski, Scott C; Johnson, Michael R; Combs, John J; Svoboda, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma can be a challenging and lengthy process, with reports of delayed diagnosis of greater than 2 years. In the young, athletic patient with an atraumatic onset of groin pain, an overuse injury or muscle strain is the most likely etiology. However, an overuse injury of femoral neck stress fracture must be identified because of the potentially disastrous outcome of fracture completion. The similar clinical presentation of a femoral neck stress fracture and intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the femoral neck can further delay the diagnosis of the osteoid osteoma. In a patient with these differential diagnoses that do not improve with a period of nonweightbearing activity, a more intensive workup must ensue. The purpose of this case report is to describe the initial presentations, subsequent follow-up, and imaging findings leading to the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma as well as to differentiate an osteoid osteoma from femoral neck stress injuries.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Profunda Femoral Artery Branch After Fogarty Thrombectomy of a Femoro-Femoral Crossover Arterial Graft: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Manousaki, Eirini; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Kostas, Theodoros; Katsamouris, Asterios

    2010-02-15

    We present a very rare case of a life-threatening rupture of a profunda femoral artery distal branch after a Fogarty thrombectomy of a thrombosed crossover synthetic graft between the ipsilateral common femoral artery and a contralateral iliac-popliteal graft; the bleeding profunda femoral artery branch was successfully embolized with metallic coils through the axillary artery approach.

  10. Efficacy of arthroscopic surgery and midlaser treatments for chronic temporomandibular joint articular disc derangement following motor vehicle accident.

    PubMed

    McNamara, D C; Rosenberg, I; Jackson, P A; Hogben, J

    1996-12-01

    As a result of motor vehicle accident soft-tissue injury, temporomandibular joint articular disc derangement may develop and persist despite symptomatic treatment and medication. This study reports the effectiveness of management directed at controlling the TMJ and masticatory neuromuscular pain dysfunction with a TMJ/interocclusal stabilization appliance, specific biofeedback and ultrasound therapy. Following these conservative measures residual articular disc derangement was present in some subjects who were offered arthroscopic surgery and infrared midlaser with TMJ/occlusal stabilization. Twenty subjects with residual disc derangement were randomly selected into two groups with and without arthroscopic surgery, and analyses of variance made before treatment, 12 months after conservative procedures, 3 months following arthroscopic surgery and midlaser therapy and 3 years since commencement of management. Dependent variables compared were pain-discomfort, Clinical Dysfunction Index, articular disc derangement and maximal voluntary jaw opening. Conservative management alone provided significant reduction of pain-discomfort and clinical dysfunction, while arthroscopic surgery resulted in significant reduction in articular disc derangement. The midlaser with TMJ/occlusal stabilization maintained significant improvement in the variables (p < 0.01) for both groups. The common articular deviations in form found at arthroscopy were soft tissue alteration with hyperaemia, synovitis, synovial membrane and posterior attachment folding with connective tissue hyperplasia, and disc displacement with fibrous adhesions. The Global Status Score of pain behaviour compared with residual function, confirmed the presence of greater pain before treatment commenced.

  11. Arthroscopic Latarjet and Capsular Shift (ALCS) procedure: a new "freehand" technique for anterior shoulder instability associated with significant bone defects.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N

    2015-03-01

    Anterior shoulder instability associated with significant bone loss has been described as "bony-instability," and this condition is usually treated with an anterior glenoid bone grafting procedure (Latarjet procedure). The Latarjet procedure involves transfer of the horizontal limb of the coracoid process along with the conjoint tendon to the anterior glenoid rim, and is traditionally performed as an open surgical procedure. Recently, an arthroscopic technique for the Latarjet procedure has been described; the technique necessitates the use of specialized instrumentation and involves excision of the entire anterior capsule to facilitate coracoid fixation. We describe a new "freehand" arthroscopic technique for the Latarjet procedure, and, in addition, a simultaneous capsular shift to further optimize mid and end range stability. This technique eliminates the use of additional instrumentation and can be done using routine arthroscopic instruments. Preliminary experience with this technique suggests that the arthroscopic Latarjet and capsular shift is a technically demanding procedure. Glenohumeral capsule can be preserved, and this should be attempted wherever possible to optimize stability. Additional specialized instrumentation would probably reduce surgical time; however, the procedure can be performed with routine instruments.

  12. Are the good functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff injuries maintained over the long term?☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz; Yonamine, Alexandre Maris

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the good and excellent functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears are maintained over the long term. Methods From the sample of the study conducted by our group in 2006, in which we evaluated the functional results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears, 35 patients were reassessed, 8 years after the first evaluation. The inclusion criteria were that these patients with massive rotator cuff tears operated by means of an arthroscopic technique, who participated in the previous study and achieved good or excellent outcomes according to the UCLA criteria. Patients whose results were not good or excellent in the first evaluation according to the UCLA criteria were excluded. Results Among the 35 patients reassessed, 91% of them continued to present good and excellent results (40% excellent and 51% good), while 3% presented fair results and 6% poor results. The time interval between the first and second evaluations was 8 years and the minimum length of follow-up since the immediate postoperative period was 9 years (range: 9–17 years), with an average of 11.4 years. Conclusion The good and excellent results from arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears were mostly maintained (91%), with the same level of function and satisfaction, even though 8 years had passed since the first assessment, with a follow-up period averaging 11.4 years. PMID:26962491

  13. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression in the treatment of full thickness rotator cuff tears: a 3- to 6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, J E; Levy, H J; Lemak, L J

    1994-10-01

    Arthroscopic subacromial decompression has become an accepted treatment for patients with impingement syndrome; however, its use for full thickness rotator cuff tears continues to be controversial. The purpose of this study is to determine if the results of arthroscopic subacromial decompression alone for full thickness rotator cuff tears deteriorate at long-term follow-up. We reevaluated all 25 patients with full thickness rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression from our original study group. Based on the University of California at Los Angeles shoulder rating, 68% of patients were rated as excellent or good at the present mean follow-up of 45.8 months (range 36-72 months). This represents a significant decrease from our initial report of 84% satisfactory results at a mean follow-up of 24.6 months. There was a significant decrease in ratings with regard to pain and function; however, no significant deterioration was noted with regard to motion and strength. Two additional patients required open rotator cuff repair since the time of initial follow-up for a total of six. Large and massive rotator cuff tears fared worse over time as compared with small and moderate size tears. Although 1- to 3-year results of arthroscopic subacromial decompression and rotator cuff debridement were favorable, the long-term follow-up demonstrates deterioration of results. We therefore cannot support the use of decompression and debridement alone in the treatment of repairable full thickness rotator cuff tears.

  14. Arthroscopic Patelloplasty and Circumpatellar Denervation for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Yujie; Yuan, Bangtuo; Shen, Xuezhen; Qu, Feng; Wang, Jiangtao; Qi, Wei; Zhu, Juanli; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral osteoarthritis commonly occurs in older people, often resulting in anterior knee pain and severely reduced quality of life. The aim was to examine the effectiveness of arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA). Methods: A total of 156 PFOA patients (62 males, 94 females; ages 45-81 years, mean 66 years) treated in our department between September 2012 and March 2013 were involved in this study. Clinical manifestations included recurrent swelling and pain in the knee joint and aggravated pain upon ascending/descending stairs, squatting down, or standing up. PFOA was treated with arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation. The therapeutic effects before and after surgery were statistically evaluated using Lysholm and Kujala scores. The therapeutic effects were graded by classification of the degree of cartilage defect. Results: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average. The incisions healed well, and no complications occurred. After surgery, the average Lysholm score improved from 73.29 to 80.93, and the average Kujala score improved from 68.34 to 76.48. This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV. Conclusions: For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression. PMID:25563318

  15. Labrum repair combined with arthroscopic reduction of capsular volume in shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, William Dias

    2006-01-01

    We performed arthroscopic treatment of traumatic anterior and anteroinferior shoulder instability combining three procedures— labrum repair, reduction of capsular volume and suture of the rotator cuff interval—with the aim of analysing the results with regard to stability and function. Between January 1999 and December 2003, 27 patients underwent arthroscopic treatment for labrum repair with metal anchors, reduction of capsular volume through thermal capsulorrhaphy and suture of rotator cuff interval. These patients were evaluated in the pre- and postoperative period using the UCLA and Rowe scales and in the postoperative period using the ASES scale. During a mean follow-up period of 32.4 months (range 22–74 months) all shoulders remained stable. Using the UCLA scale, there was improvement from the preoperative period, with a mean score of 24.7, to the postoperative period, with a mean of 32.81. Improvement was also shown by the Rowe scale, with a mean score of 39.81 in the preoperative period and 90.74 in the postoperative period. On the ASES scale the mean score was 92.22. All shoulders remained stable and there was marked functional improvement in the patients who were treated. These results are comparable to those obtained with open surgery, observing similar patient selection criteria. PMID:16715457

  16. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    PubMed Central

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan; Jørgensen, Uffe; Nissen, Nis; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients’ characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods — 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18–77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about meniscal pathology and cartilage damage. Early or more established knee OA was defined as the combination of self-reported frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and the presence of degenerative meniscal tissue. Results — 43% of patients (269 of 620) had early or more established knee OA. Of these, a large proportion had severe cartilage lesions with almost half having a severe cartilage lesion in at least 1 knee compartment. Interpretation — Based on a definition including frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and degenerative meniscal tissue, early or more established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear. PMID:27798972

  17. Changes in temporomandibular joint spaces after arthroscopic disc repositioning: a self-control study

    PubMed Central

    Kai Hu, Ying; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie Yi; Xie, Qian Yang; Sah, Manoj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Disc repositioning is a common procedure for patients with anterior disc displacement (ADD). The purpose of this retrospective record-based study was to evaluate changes in the widths of joint spaces and condylar position changes in patients with unilateral ADD following arthroscopic disc repositioning, with the healthy sides as self-control, using magnetic resonance images (MRI).Widths of anterior, superior, and posterior joint spaces (AS, SS, and PS) were measured. The condylar position was described as anterior, centric or posterior, expressed as . Paired-t test and Chi-square test were used to analyze the data. Fifty-four records conformed to the inclusion criteria (mean age of 21.02 years). Widths of SS and PS increased significantly after surgery (P < 0.001) on the operative sides, while joint spaces of healthy sides and AS of operative sides had no significant changes. Dominant location of condyles of operative sides changed from a posterior position to an anterior position, while healthy sides were mostly centric condylar position no matter preoperatively or postoperatively. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that unilateral arthroscopic disc repositioning significantly increases the posterior and superior spaces of the affected joints, without affecting spaces of the healthy sides. PMID:28361905

  18. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan; Jørgensen, Uffe; Nissen, Nis; Schjerning, Jeppe; Thorlund, Jonas B

    2017-02-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18-77) years, 57% men) with full datasets available were included in the present study. Prior to surgery, patients completed questionnaires regarding onset of symptoms, duration of symptoms, and mechanical symptoms along with the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about meniscal pathology and cartilage damage. Early or more established knee OA was defined as the combination of self-reported frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and the presence of degenerative meniscal tissue. Results - 43% of patients (269 of 620) had early or more established knee OA. Of these, a large proportion had severe cartilage lesions with almost half having a severe cartilage lesion in at least 1 knee compartment. Interpretation - Based on a definition including frequent knee pain, cartilage damage, and degenerative meniscal tissue, early or more established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear.

  19. Fungal osteomyelitis after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Kai; Wang, Wei; Tian, Min

    2012-10-01

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a very rare complication after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction associated with catastrophic consequences. Herein, we present a case of such disastrous complication after ACL reconstruction. A 23-year-old man developed fever, swelling and pain of the affected knee from 18 days after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Therefore, he underwent arthroscopic debridement, removal of the graft and internal fixators, irrigation and suction drainage, successively. Negative results for serial bacterial cultures and smear examinations are obtained. However, computer tomography and X-ray examination showed massive bone destruction at 48 days after ACL reconstruction. As the first open debridement was performed at 50 days after ACL reconstruction, fungal infection was diagnosed based on finding Aspergillus hyphae in pathologic examination of the debrided bone sample. After the final debridement, a 12-cm bone loss in the distal femur was treated by Ilizarov's bone transport. The patient got solid arthrodesis of the affected knee without clinical infection at a year after the initial operation. In addition, a review of the literature regarding case reports of fungal osteomyelitis after ACL reconstruction is presented.

  20. Innovations in arthroscopic management of Basal joint arthritis of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Carro, Luis Perez; Golano, Pau; Vega, Jordi; Cabestany, Jose María

    2006-12-01

    Thumb arthroscopy and arthroscopically assisted treatment of the thumb are safe and effective techniques. This report describes technical innovations particularly useful in the surgical performance of arthroscopically assisted treatment of basal joint arthritis. (1) With adduction and hyperextension of the thumb, the bony landmarks are easier to palpate and a volar radial soft spot is clearly defined between the trapezium and metacarpal (i.e., the adduction-hyperextension maneuver). (2) After the distension of the joint with saline solution, the thumb automatically abducts and flexes if the capsule has been distended successfully (i.e., the flexion-abduction sign). (3) The radial and ulnar borders of the proximal phalanx and the local tendons can serve as external landmarks if fluid extravasation occurred. (4) Finally, the simultaneous use of the 3 portals described in the first carpometacarpal joint is very effective for better visualization and performance of the procedures in this joint (i.e., the 3-portal technique). We propose a new description of the portals for carpometacarpal arthroscopy as follows: (1) volar portal, which is just distal to the oblique ridge of the trapezium following a line referencing the radial edge of the flexor carpi radialis; (2) ulnar portal, which is just ulnar to the extensor pollicis brevis; and (3) radial portal, which is just radial to the abductor pollicis longus.

  1. Correlation Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Arthroscopic Findings in the Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hayat Ahmad; Ahad, Humayun; Sharma, Pradeep; Bajaj, Pankaj; Hassan, Nazia; Kamal, Younis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The knee joint is the largest and the most complex joint of the human body. It is not covered by any thick muscular covering anteriorly. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic capabilities of clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and arthroscopy in traumatic disorders of the knee joint, to seek correlation between clinical findings, MRI findings and arthroscopic. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 patients with a presentation suggestive of traumatic knee pathology were studied prospectively. A detailed history was taken and relevant clinical examination was done, which was followed by MRI of the knee. The patients were scheduled for arthroscopy under general/spinal anesthesia, whenever indicated. Results: Keeping arthroscopic examination as standard, the correlation between clinical and arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 86%, accuracy of 63.16%, negative predictive value of 93.48%; whereas MRI vs. arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 74.42%, specificity of 93.10%, accuracy of 84.21%, and negative predictive value of 88.04%. Conclusions: The clinical examination is an important and accurate diagnostic modality for evaluation of traumatic derangement of the knee joint. It is noninvasive, easy, available, and valuable diagnostic modality. The MRI is an accurate diagnostic modality. It can be used whenever there is an uncertain indication for arthroscopy. However, costs have to be kept in mind, especially in patients with low socio-economic status. PMID:25825695

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Moraes, Eduardo Wanzenboeck; de Souza, Alceuleir Cardoso; Cavatte, José Maria; Teixeira, João Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign proliferative disorder with metaplasia of the synovial membrane that affects the fibroblasts of the synovial joints, tendons and bursae. In literature, there are few descriptions of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. The objective of this article was to report a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow in a patient aged 32, basketball athlete, in which surgical treatment was chosen because of the pain and functional limitation and stage of disease with multiple loose bodies. Patient 32, male, presented with pain and limitation of motion of the elbow. The range of passive motion was 100° of flexion and 30° extension. The range of active motion was 40-90°. Magnetic resonance observed many loose bodies mainly in the posterior compartment in the olecranon fossa plus some chondral lesions in the capitellum. The arthroscopic treatment was chosen with two anteriors portals (medial and lateral) and two posterior portals (standard posterior and posterolateral) for easing loose bodies and osteoplasty of the olecranon fossa. The visual analog scale pain was 9-3 and its arc of active motion was 110° to -20° of flexion and extension. On a scale of performance from Mayo Clinic patients was 65 points preoperatively to 90 postoperatively with 9 months follow-up and the patient was satisfied with the treatment outcome. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow is an effective and safe therapeutic management with low morbidity and early return to activities.

  3. Arthroscopic treatment options for irreparable rotator cuff tears of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Anley, Cameron M; Chan, Samuel KL; Snow, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons with the final treatment option in many algorithms being either a reverse shoulder arthroplasty or a tendon transfer. The long term results of these procedures are however still widely debated, especially in younger patients. A variety of arthroscopic treatment options have been proposed for patients with an irreparable rotator cuff tear without the presence of arthritis of the glenohumeral joint. These include a simple debridement with or without a biceps tenotomy, partial rotator cuff repair with or without an interval slide, tuberplasty, graft interposition of the rotator cuff, suprascapular nerve ablation, superior capsule reconstruction and insertion of a biodegradable spacer (Inspace) to depress the humeral head. These options should be considered as part of the treatment algorithm in patients with an irreparable rotator cuff and could be used as either as an interim procedure, delaying the need for more invasive surgery in the physiologically young and active, or as potential definitive procedures in the medically unfit. The aim of this review is to highlight and summarise arthroscopic procedures and the results thereof currently utilised in the management of these challenging patients. PMID:25405083

  4. Technical guide and tips on the all-arthroscopic Latarjet procedure.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Claudio; Bongiorno, Vito; Samitier, Gonzalo; Dumont, Guillaume D; Szöllösy, Gregor; Lafosse, Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Shoulder dislocation and subsequent anterior instability is a common problem in young athletes. The arthroscopic Bankart repair was originally described by Morgan et al. in 1987. The procedure has benefited from many technical advancements over the past 25 years and currently remains the most commonly utilized procedure in the treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability without glenoid bone loss. Capsulolabral repair alone may not be sufficient for treatment of patients with poor capsular tissue quality and significant bony defects. In the presence of chronic anterior glenoid bony defects, a bony reconstruction should be considered. The treatment of anterior shoulder instability with transfer of the coracoid and attached conjoint tendon such as the Latarjet procedure has provided reliable results. The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure was described in 2007 by the senior author, who has now performed the procedure over 450 times. The initial surgical technique has evolved considerably since its introduction, and this article presents a comprehensive update on this demanding but well-defined procedure. This article reviews technical tips to help the surgeon perform the surgery more smoothly, navigate through challenging situations, and avoid potential complications. Level of evidence V.

  5. Rare coexistence of gouty and septic arthritis after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ichiseki, Toru; Ueda, Shusuke; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of septic arthritis and gouty arthritis is rare. In particular, no reports have described the development of both gouty and septic arthritis after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. He had a history of diabetes mellitus (HbA1c: 7.4%), but not of gout, and the GFR was decreased (GFR=46). During the postoperative course fever suddenly developed and joint fluid retention was found. Uric acid crystals were detected when the joint fluid was aspirated, after which when the culture results became available sepsis due to methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) was diagnosed. On the 2(nd) day after fever onset, lavage and debridement were performed under arthroscopy, with the subsequent course uneventful with no recurrence of the infection or gouty arthritis and no joint destruction. When uric acid crystals are found in aspirated joint fluid, gouty arthritis tends to be diagnosed, but like in the present case if infection also supervenes, joint destruction and a poor general state may result if appropriate intervention is not initiated swiftly. Accordingly, even if uric acid crystals are found, the possibility of coexistence of septic arthritis and gouty arthritis should be kept in mind.

  6. Isolated arthroscopic meniscal repair: a long-term outcome study (more than 10 years).

    PubMed

    Johnson, M J; Lucas, G L; Dusek, J K; Henning, C E

    1999-01-01

    A single surgeon's consecutive series of 50 arthroscopically repaired meniscal tears in 48 patients was retrospectively reviewed. None of these patients had concomitant ligament damage to the knee. The average follow-up period was 10 years, 9 months. Criteria for clinical success included 1) history of pain of grade 1 or less and absence of locking, catching, or giving way; 2) a physical examination demonstrating no significant effusion and a painless and negative jump sign; and 3) no subsequent surgical procedures on the repaired meniscus. Patient satisfaction was quite high, although clinical confirmation was possible in only 38 knees, indicating a clinical success rate of 76%. Bilateral standing radiographs were obtained on these 38 operated knees and were evaluated using Fairbank's classification. Evaluation of the radiographs revealed that 8% of the operated knees had minimal joint changes, as compared with 3% in the contralateral, nonoperated knee. This study demonstrates that arthroscopic meniscal repair in knees with isolated meniscal tears has the potential for a long-term successful clinical and radiographic outcome.

  7. Arthroscopic-assisted repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in distal radioulnar joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sung Jong; Jegal, Midum; Park, Min Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) foveal insertion can lead to distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability accompanied by ulnar-sided pain, weakness, snapping, and limited forearm rotation. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients with TFCC foveal tears treated with arthroscopic-assisted repair. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients underwent foveal repair of avulsed TFCC with the assistance of arthroscopy between 2011 and 2013. These patients were followed up for an average of 19 months (range 14–25 months). The avulsed TFCC were reattached to the fovea using a transosseous pull-out suture or a knotless suture anchor. At the final followup, the range of motion, grip strength and DRUJ stability were measured as objective outcomes. Subjective outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH score) and return to work. Results: Based on the DRUJ stress test, 5 patients had normal stability and 7 patients showed mild laxity as compared with the contralateral side. Postoperatively, the mean range of pronation supination increased from 141° to 166°, and the mean VAS score for pain decreased from 5.3 to 1.7 significantly. The PRWE and DASH questionnaires also showed significant functional improvement. All patients were able to return to their jobs. However, two patients complained of persistent pain. Conclusions: Arthroscopically assisted repair of TFCC foveal injury can provide significant pain relief, functional improvement and restoration of DRUJ stability. PMID:27293286

  8. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Neto, Douglas Lobato Lopes; Muchiuti Junior, Melvis; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the functional result from arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis, defined as incapacity to actively raise the arm above 90°, while complete passive elevation was possible. Methods we reevaluated 38 patients with a mean follow-up of 51 months (minimum of 24). We analyzed the pseudoparalysis reversion rate and the functional result obtained. Results according to the assessment criteria of the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA), 31 (82%) patients had good and excellent results, two (5%) had fair results and five (13%) had poor results. The mean active elevation went from 39° before the operation to 139° after the operation (p < 0.05); the mean active lateral rotation went from 30° to 48° (p < 0.05) and the mean active medial rotation went from level L3 to T12 (p < 0.05). Conclusion arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries produced good and excellent results in 82% of the cases and a statistically significant improvement of active range of motion, with reversion of the pseudoparalysis in 97.4% of the cases. It is therefore a good treatment option. PMID:26229796

  9. Femur-mounted navigation system for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. H.; Hwang, D. S.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement stems from an abnormal shape of the acetabulum and proximal femur. It is treated by resection of damaged soft tissue and by the shaping of bone to resemble normal features. The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement has many advantages, including minimal incisions, rapid recovery, and less pain. However, in some cases, revision is needed owing to the insufficient resection of damaged bone from a misreading of the surgical site. The limited view of arthroscopy is the major reason for the complications. In this research, a navigation method for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement is developed. The proposed navigation system consists of femur attachable measurement device and user interface. The bone mounted measurement devices measure points on head-neck junction for registration and position of surgical instrument. User interface shows the three-dimensional model of patient's femur and surgical instrument position that is tracked by measurement device. Surgeon can know the three-dimensional anatomical structure of hip joint and surgical instrument position on surgical site using navigation system. Surface registration was used to obtain relation between patient's coordinate at the surgical site and coordinate of three-dimensional model of femur. In this research, we evaluated the proposed navigation system using plastic model bone. It is expected that the surgical tool tracking position accuracy will be less than 1 mm.

  10. Reconstruction of femoral length from fragmentary femora

    PubMed Central

    Offei, Eric Bekoe; Osabutey, Casmiel Kwabena

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of femoral length (FL) from fragmentary femora is an essential step in estimating stature from fragmentary skeletal remains in forensic investigations. While regression formulae for doing this have been suggested for several populations, such formulae have not been established for Ghanaian skeletal remains. This study, therefore, seeks to derive regression formulae for reconstruction of FL from fragmentary femora of skeletal samples obtained from Ghana. Six measurements (vertical head diameter, transverse head diameter, bicondylar breadth, epicondylar breadth, sub-trochanteric anterior-posterior diameter, and sub-trochanteric transverse diameter) were acquired from different anatomical portions of the femur and the relationship between each acquired measurement and FL was analyzed using linear regression. The results indicated significantly moderate-to-high correlations (r=0.580–0.818) between FL and each acquired measurement. The error estimates of the regression formulae were relatively low (i.e., standard error of estimate, 13.66–19.28 mm), suggesting that the discrepancies between actual and estimated stature were relatively low. Compared with other measurements, sub-trochanteric transverse diameter was the best estimate of FL. In the absence of a complete femur, the regression formulae based on the assessed measurements may be used to infer FL, from which stature can be estimated in forensic investigations. PMID:27722014

  11. Rupture of the Deep Femoral Artery during Proximal Femoral Nailing Following an Intertrochanteric Fracture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Han Kook; Park, Junyoung; Oyunbat, Choidog; Kim, Taehwan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we experienced a case where the diagnosis and management of a deep femoral artery rupture was delayed. This vascular complication occurred during the insertion of a distal interlocking screw of a proximal femoral nail for the fixation of an intertrochanteric femur fracture. A 79-year-old male patient was diagnosed with a right intertrochanteric fracture after a fall. We fixed the fracture with a proximal femoral nail (Zimmer® Natural Nail™ System). One day after the procedure, the patient complained of pain and swelling on the anteromedial side of his middle thigh followed by hypotension, anemia and prolonged thigh swelling. Computed tomography angiography was performed 7 days after the procedure. We found a pseudoaneurysm of the perforating artery caused by injury to the deep femoral artery and an intramuscular hematoma in the anterior thigh muscle. We successfully treated the pseudoaneurysm using coil embolization. Throughout the management of intertrochanteric femoral fractures, it is important to be aware and monitor signs and symptoms related to the possibility of blood vessel damage. When a patient presents with swelling and pain on the middle thigh and/or unexplained anemia postoperatively, the possibility that these symptoms are caused by an injury to the femoral artery must be considered. PMID:27536645

  12. Effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Ng, Choong; Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Hinman, Rana

    2007-06-01

    Background  Anterior instability is a frequent complication following a traumatic glenohumeral dislocation. Frequently the underlying pathology associated with recurrent instability is a Bankart lesion. Surgical correction of Bankart lesions and other associated pathology is the key to successful treatment. Open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation has been advocated as the gold standard because of consistently low postoperative recurrent instability rates. However, arthroscopic glenohumeral stabilisation could challenge open surgical repair as the gold standard treatment for traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Objectives  Primary evidence that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation was systematically collated regarding best-practice management for adults with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Search strategy  A systematic search was performed using 14 databases: MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), ISI Web of Science, Expanded Academic ASAP, Proquest Medical Library, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, TRIP Database, PubMed, ISI Current Contents Connect, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Studies published between January 1984 and December 2004 were included in this review. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria  Eligible studies were those that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability, which had more than 2 years of follow up and used recurrent instability and a functional shoulder questionnaire as primary outcomes. Studies that used non-anatomical open repair techniques, patient groups that were specifically 40 years or older, or had multidirectional instability or other concomitant

  13. Distal femoral cut in total knee arthroplasty in a Brazilian population☆

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcos Areias Vieira; Mozella, Alan de Paula; Cobra, Hugo Alexandre de Araujo Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the ideal angle for making the distal femoral cut in total knee arthroplasty in a Brazilian population. Methods Panoramic radiographs of the lower limbs bearing weight from 79 patients (57 women and 22 men) were studied, totaling 107 knees with an indication for total knee arthroplasty. The femoral anatomical axis, femoral mechanical axis and cervical-diaphyseal angle were traced out. The angle of the femoral cut was determined from the meeting point between the femoral anatomical and mechanical axes. The ideal degree of femoral valgus was compared between men and women and between knees presenting varus and valgus alignment of the lower limb. The ideal distal femoral cut was also correlated with the cervical-diaphyseal angle. Results The ideal femoral valgus angle ranged from 4.2 to 8.6 degrees, with a mean of 6.3 degrees. There was no statistically significant difference in the distal femoral cut between patients with coronal varus and valgus alignment (p = 0.180). Comparing men and women, there was no statistically significant difference regarding the ideal femoral valgus between the groups (p = 0.057). The cervical-diaphyseal angle presented an inverse relationship with the distal femoral cut. Conclusions The mean angle between the femoral mechanical and anatomical axes was 6.3 degree. Neither preoperative coronal alignment nor sex had any influence on the distal femoral cut. The cervical-diaphyseal angle presented an inverse relationship with the distal femoral cut. PMID:26229933

  14. In Vivo Evaluation of the Potential of High-Frequency Ultrasound for Arthroscopic Examination of the Shoulder Joint

    PubMed Central

    Puhakka, Jani; Afara, Isaac O.; Paatela, Teemu; Sormaala, Markus J.; Timonen, Matti A.; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    Objective Accurate arthroscopic evaluation of cartilage lesions could significantly improve the outcome of repair surgery. In this study, we investigated for the first time the potential of intra-articular ultrasound as an arthroscopic tool for grading cartilage defects in the human shoulder joint in vivo and compared the outcome to results from arthroscopic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Design A total of 26 sites from 9 patients undergoing routine shoulder arthroscopy were quantitatively evaluated with a clinical intravascular (40MHz) ultrasound imaging system, using the regular arthroscopy portals. Reflection coefficient (R), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), apparent integrated backscattering (AIB), and ultrasound roughness index (URI) were calculated, and high-resolution ultrasound images were obtained per site. Each site was visually graded according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) system. “Ultrasound scores” corresponding to the ICRS system were determined from the ultrasound images. Magnetic resonance imaging was conducted and cartilage integrity at each site was classified into 5 grades (0 = normal, 4 = severely abnormal) by a radiologist. Results R and IRC were lower at sites with damaged cartilage surface (P = 0.033 and P = 0.043, respectively) and correlated with arthroscopic ICRS grades (rs = −0.444, P = 0.023 and rs = −0.426, P = 0.03, respectively). Arthroscopic ICRS grades and ultrasound scores were significantly correlated (rs = 0.472, P = 0.015), but no significant correlation was found between magnetic resonance imaging data and other parameters. Conclusion The results suggest that ultrasound arthroscopy could facilitate quantitative clinical appraisal of articular cartilage integrity in the shoulder joint and provide information on cartilage lesion depth and severity for quantitative diagnostics in surgery. PMID:27375840

  15. Structural and functional studies of bioobjects prepared from femoral heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Popova, K. S.; Uvarkin, P. V.

    2015-11-01

    Results of examination of physicomechanical characteristics of samples of medial femoral head cuts are presented. The samples of medial femoral head cuts resected in 6 patients with coxarthrosis in primary endoprosthetic replacement of a coxofemoral joint have been tested for micro- and nanohardness. Young's modulus and elemental composition of bone tissue have been investigated. To estimate the architectonics of cancellous tissue of the femoral head, adjacent cuts of the same patient have been analyzed. The porosity of bone tissue was estimated from macroscopic images obtained using macrophotography. The total porosity is calculated as the ratio of the total length of straight line segments overlapping pores to the total length of secants. A three-point bending test of the samples has shown that their strength changed from 0.187 to 1.650 MPa and their elasticity modulus changes from 1.69 to 8.15 MPa. The microhardness of the samples changes in the range 220-265 MPa and the average microhardness of medial femoral head cuts is 240 MPa. The elemental composition of medial femoral head cuts is represented by basic Ca, P, O, Na and Mg elements as well as by Sn, S, Fe, Cr, and C in microamounts. The atomic Ca to P ratio for bone tissue is 1.55. It is revealed that pores of the upper part of the femoral head have a more regular shape and in the lower part they are more elongated along the cut and occupy a larger volume. The lower part of the femoral head has a higher porosity (39 and 33%) than the upper part (34 and 30%). The total porosity of all samples does not exceed 37%.

  16. Structural and functional studies of bioobjects prepared from femoral heads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, I. A. Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Popova, K. S. Uvarkin, P. V.

    2015-11-17

    Results of examination of physicomechanical characteristics of samples of medial femoral head cuts are presented. The samples of medial femoral head cuts resected in 6 patients with coxarthrosis in primary endoprosthetic replacement of a coxofemoral joint have been tested for micro- and nanohardness. Young’s modulus and elemental composition of bone tissue have been investigated. To estimate the architectonics of cancellous tissue of the femoral head, adjacent cuts of the same patient have been analyzed. The porosity of bone tissue was estimated from macroscopic images obtained using macrophotography. The total porosity is calculated as the ratio of the total length of straight line segments overlapping pores to the total length of secants. A three-point bending test of the samples has shown that their strength changed from 0.187 to 1.650 MPa and their elasticity modulus changes from 1.69 to 8.15 MPa. The microhardness of the samples changes in the range 220–265 MPa and the average microhardness of medial femoral head cuts is 240 MPa. The elemental composition of medial femoral head cuts is represented by basic Ca, P, O, Na and Mg elements as well as by Sn, S, Fe, Cr, and C in microamounts. The atomic Ca to P ratio for bone tissue is 1.55. It is revealed that pores of the upper part of the femoral head have a more regular shape and in the lower part they are more elongated along the cut and occupy a larger volume. The lower part of the femoral head has a higher porosity (39 and 33%) than the upper part (34 and 30%). The total porosity of all samples does not exceed 37%.

  17. Thumb carpometacarpal ligaments inside and out: a comparative study of arthroscopic and gross anatomy from the robert a. Chase hand and upper limb center at stanford university.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Andrew Y; Van Nortwick, Sarah; Hagert, Elisabet; Yao, Jeffrey; Ladd, Amy L

    2013-02-01

    Purpose We propose to identify and correlate arthroscopic internal ligaments with external ligaments, providing an accurate roadmap for arthroscopic ligament and joint anatomy. Ligamentous laxity is considered an important risk factor in developing the common basilar arthritis of the thumb. Controversy exists as to the precise ligamentous anatomy of the thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint (CMC-I); description of the internal arthroscopic anatomy is limited. Methods We performed CMC-I joint arthroscopy using the 1-Ulnar (1U) and thenar portals in five cadavers, seeking to identify the following seven ligaments arthroscopically: the superficial anterior oblique ligament (sAOL), deep anterior oblique ligament (dAOL), ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), dorsal trapeziometacarpal ligament (DTM-1), posterior oblique ligament (POL), dorsal central ligament (DCL), and dorsal radial ligament (DRL). After grading articular changes of the trapezium, we passed Kirschner wires (K-wires) (0.028) outside-in to mark the arthroscopic insertion of each ligament on the trapezium. Gross dissection was performed to confirm the wire placement; the anatomic identity and position of joint stabilizing ligaments, and the location of frequently used portals. Results The volar ligaments-the sAOL, dAOL, and UCL-were highly variable in their arthroscopic appearance and precise location. The sAOL is a thin veil of membranous tissue that variably drapes across the anterior joint capsule. The reported dAOL and UCL, in our study, correlated to a thickened portion of this veil around the volar beak and was not consistently identified with gross dissection. In contrast, the arthroscopic appearance and location of the dorsal ligaments-DTM-I, POL, DCL, and DRL-were consistent in all specimens. Conclusion Our study further defines and correlates the arthroscopic and external ligamentous anatomy of the CMC-I joint.

  18. Revision total hip arthroplasty: the femoral side using cemented implants.

    PubMed

    Holt, Graeme; Hook, Samantha; Hubble, Matthew

    2011-02-01

    Advances in surgical technique and implant technology have improved the ten-year survival after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Despite this, the number of revision procedures has been increasing in recent years, a trend which is predicted to continue into the future. Revision THA is a technically demanding procedure often complicated by a loss of host bone stock which may be compounded by the need to remove primary implants. Both cemented and uncemented implant designs are commonly used in the United Kingdom for primary and revision THA and much controversy still exists as to the ideal method of stem fixation. In this article we discuss revision of the femur using cemented components during revision THA. We focus on three clinical scenarios including femoral cement-in-cement revision where the primary femoral cement-bone interface remains well fixed, femoral cement-in-cement revision for peri-prosthetic femoral fractures, and femoral impaction grafting. We discuss the clinical indications, surgical techniques and clinical outcomes for each of these procedures.

  19. Valgus Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis in Patient with Hypopituitarism

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Hayashida, Tatsuro; Murakami, Koji; Makio, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuichi; Oka, Yoshinobu; Kim, Wook-Choel; Ogura, Taku; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common disease of adolescent and the epiphysis is positioned more posteromedially in relation to the femoral neck shaft with varus SCFE; however, posterolateral displacement of the capital epiphysis, valgus SCFE, occurs less frequently. We report a case of valgus SCFE in a 17-year-old boy with hypopituitarism. After falling down, he experienced difficulty in walking. The radiographs were inconclusive; however three-dimensional computed tomography images showed lateral displacement of the epiphysis on the right femoral head. Valgus SCFE was diagnosed. The patient underwent in situ pinning of both sides. In situ pinning on the left side was performed as a prophylactic pinning because of endocrine abnormalities. At the 1-year follow-up, he could walk without any difficulty and there were no signs of pain. The epiphysis is commonly positioned more posteromedially in relation to the femoral neck shaft with most SCFE, but, in this case, the epiphysis slipped laterally. Differential diagnosis included femoral neck fracture (Delbet-Colonna type 1); however, this was less likely due to the absence of other clinical signs. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient as SCFE. When children complain of leg pain and limp, valgus SCFE that may not be visualized on anteroposterior radiographs needs to be considered. PMID:28154765

  20. Numerical simulation of blood flow in femoral perfusion: comparison between side-armed femoral artery perfusion and direct femoral artery perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Shingo; Shirota, Minori; Fukuda, Wakako; Inamura, Takao; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2016-12-01

    Computational numerical analysis was performed to elucidate the flow dynamics of femoral artery perfusion. Numerical simulation of blood flow was performed from the right femoral artery in an aortic model. An incompressible Navier-Stokes equation and continuity equation were solved using computed flow dynamics software. Three different perfusion models were analyzed: a 4.0-mm cannula (outer diameter 15 French size), a 5.2-mm cannula (18 French size) and an 8-mm prosthetic graft. The cannula was inserted parallel to the femoral artery, while the graft was anastomosed perpendicular to the femoral artery. Shear stress was highest with the 4-mm cannula (172 Pa) followed by the graft (127 Pa) and the 5.2-mm cannula (99 Pa). The cannula exit velocity was high, even when the 5.2-mm cannula was used. Although side-armed perfusion with an 8-mm graft generated a high shear stress area near the point of anastomosis, flow velocity at the external iliac artery was decreased. The jet speed decreased due to the Coanda effect caused by the recirculation behind sudden expansion of diameter, and the flow velocity maintains a constant speed after the reattachment length of the flow. This study showed that iliac artery shear stress was lower with the 5.2-mm cannula than with the 4-mm cannula when used for femoral perfusion. Side-armed graft perfusion generates a high shear stress area around the anastomotic site, but flow velocity in the iliac artery is slower in the graft model than in the 5.2-mm cannula model.

  1. All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Gwinner, Clemens; Hoburg, Arnd; Wilde, Sophie; Schatka, Imke; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Jung, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsion fracture from its tibial insertion is a rare condition. Despite the further technical advent in refixation of avulsion fractures, the reported failure rate of current approaches remains high and the optimal surgical technique has not been elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study is to present an all-inside arthroscopic reconstruction technique for bony tibial avulsion fractures of the PCL and initial clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients underwent a thorough clinical and radiological examination of both knees at 3, 6, 12, 18, and if possible also at 24 months. Clinical evaluation included subjective and objective IKDC 2000, Lysholm score, and KOOS score. Radiographic imaging studies included CT scans for assessment of osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. In addition to that posterior stress radiographs of both knees using the Telos device (Arthrex, Naples, USA) were conducted to measure posterior tibial translation. Results: A total of four patients (1 female, 3 male; ø 38 (± 18) years), who underwent arthroscopic refixation of a PCL avulsion fracture using the Tight Rope device were enrolled in this study. Mean follow up was 22 [18–24] months. The mean subjective IKDC was 72.6% (± 9.9%). Regarding the objective IKDC three patients accounted for grade A, one patient for grade C. The Lysholm score yielded 82 (± 6.9) points. The KOOS score reached 75% (± 13%; symptoms 76%, pain 81%, function 76%, sports 66%, QoL 64%). All patients showed complete osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. The mean posterior tibial translation at final follow up was 2.8 [0–7] mm. Conclusions: All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament provides satisfactory clinical results in a preliminary patient cohort. It is a reproducible technique, which minimizes soft tissue damage and obviates a second surgery for hardware

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement performing acetabuloplasty without labral detachment

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Fernando; Slullitel, Pablo; Bronenberg, Pedro; Buttaro, Martin; Zanotti, Gerardo; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: In order to access and resect the acetabular rim, arthroscopic acetabuloplasty was described with labral detachment. However, when the chondrolabral junction remains intact, acetabuloplasty and labral refixation can be performed maintaining an unharmed labrum. We aimed to evaluate the outcome of a group of patients treated with arthroscopic acetabuloplasty without labral detachment. Methods: During the study period, we retrospectively analyzed 44 patients with pincer-type o combined impingement and an intact chondroblabral junction, with an average followup of 32 months (range: 27-38). We excluded patients with CAM-type impingement and previous hip pathology. Radiographs were analyzed to define impingement and classify grade of osteoarthritis. Clinical evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and WOMAC as well as postoperative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of pain and satisfaction. Reoperations were considered surgical failures for purposes of survival analysis.. Results: Mean preoperative anterior and lateral center-edge angles were 35º and 29º, respectively. Mean preoperative alfa angle was 52º. Crossover sign was found in 82% of cases. mHHS changed from 51.06 (SD 4.81) preoperatively to 84.97 (SD 12.79) postoperatively. Preoperative WOMAC was 29.18 (SD 8) and postoperative, 13.10 (SD 11). Postoperative VAS was 7.5 and 2.27 for satisfaction and pain, respectively. When comparing patients with Tönnis 0 to those with Tönnis 1, the former showed better results regarding postoperative mHHS (89.9s vs 77.85, p=0.03), pain VAS (1.5 vs 6.3, p=0.03) and satisfaction VAS (8.2 vs 6.3, p=0.01). Postoperative WOMAC was slightly better for Tönnis 0 patients (8.31 vs 19.3, p=0.05). No differences were found in preoperative WOMAC and mHHS. Three of 44 patients required a second surgical procedure and were considered failures. Survival was 100% at 24 months and 76% at 40 months (95%CI: 35%-98%). Conclusion

  3. Arthroscopic grafting of scaphoid nonunion - surgical technique and preliminary findings from 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Cognet, J-M; Louis, P; Martinache, X; Schernberg, F

    2017-02-01

    We report our experience with the arthroscopic treatment of 23 cases of scaphoid nonunion. We explain the surgical technique and describe the different steps needed to achieve bone union. We report our initial clinical and radiological results. This was a prospective non-randomized study. Inclusion criteria were a scaphoid nonunion without radiocarpal arthritis, without any time limit and without any selection as to nonunion location. Before the operation, patients underwent an X-Ray and CT scan or MRI. Schernberg's classification was used to evaluate the location of the nonunion. Internal fixation was performed with a screw or K-wires. Bone grafts were taken from the dorsal side of the distal radius using a T-Lok™ bone marrow biopsy needle (Argon Medical Devices, Plano, TX, USA). A CT scan was performed 3 months after the operation to determine whether union was achieved. Pain, strength and range of motion were evaluated before and after the operation. The patients' smoking habits were also documented. The average follow-up was 17.3 months (4-41). There were 20 men and 3 women with an average age of 26 years (17-63). The average duration of nonunion before the operation was 17 months (6-60). Based on Schernberg's classification, there was one type I, 12 type II and 10 type III nonunions. Wrist strength increased from 32 to 41kg. Union was obtained in all patients after an average of 4 months (3-12). Numerous treatments have been described for treating scaphoid nonunion: Matti-Russe, Fisk-Fernadez bone graft, vascularized bone graft, bone substitutes, etc. The success rate varies depending on the technique and study design. We have described an arthroscopic technique for treating scaphoid nonunion with very promising preliminary results. Arthroscopic debridement is needed to ensure good quality bone at the graft site, while preserving extrinsic vascularization. Traction is used during the operation to restore the scaphoid height, once debridement has been

  4. Transfer of arthroscopic skills from computer simulation training to the operating theatre: a review of evidence from two randomised controlled studies

    PubMed Central

    Boutefnouchet, Tarek; Laios, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is paucity in the research on transfer validity of arthroscopic simulator training. The aim of this article is to determine whether skills derived from arthroscopic simulation are transferrable to the operating theatre and retained over time. Methods: A systematic review with rigorous criteria to identify the highest level of evidence available was carried out. The studies were critically appraised with narrative data synthesis. Results: Twenty-one studies on arthroscopic simulation were identified. Only two studies were randomised controlled trials. The first article demonstrated improved performance of basic knee arthroscopic tasks following a fixed period of training. The second article showed improved performance of arthroscopic tasks and no deterioration in the levels of skills following a period of six months. In addition, the two studies succeeded in demonstrating the importance of 3D motion analysis using computer simulators in the assessment of technical skills. Components of evaluation such as time to task completion, distance travelled by instruments and incidence of instruments collisions were associated with the highest validity and reliability of assessment. This systematic review highlighted the limitations of these two randomised studies. Discussion: Evidence from the two trials suggests that knee arthroscopy simulator training can result in improved performance. This review helped highlight the contribution of the two studies in terms of internal validity and consistency of using arthroscopic skills training. Further level I studies are however required to demonstrate the evidence for transfer and predictive validity of computer simulation as a training instrument. PMID:27163093

  5. Pantaloon femoral vein graft as "neoaorta" in infected aortic disease.

    PubMed

    Verma, Himanshu; Mohan, Satish; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2015-10-01

    Infected abdominal aortic disease and graft infections pose a significant challenge for the vascular surgeon. Thorough radical débridement, either preceded by extra-anatomic bypass or followed by in situ aortic replacement, is the mainstay of treatment. The role of endovascular repair by stent grafts is being increasingly described but is limited to relatively less virulent mycotic aneurysms or as a "bridging" option in sick patients with florid sepsis that necessitates eventual delayed definitive surgical management. Autologous femoral vein has been an excellent conduit for aortic bifurcation reconstruction in this setting. Although various configurations of femoral vein conduit have been described for aortobi-iliac reconstruction, an in-depth knowledge of the venous anatomy, physiology, mechanisms of "profundization," and techniques of harvest and graft preparation is essential for efficient conduct of the operation and its optimal outcomes. We review in detail these aspects of "pantaloon" femoral vein graft creation as a "neoaorta".

  6. A Case of Late Femoral Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Stent Disconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele Tozzi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2010-10-15

    We present the case of a late superficial femoral artery stent disconnection causing an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm successfully treated with a stent-graft. A 67-year-old female was referred to our department for evaluation of claudication of the left lower limb and was diagnosed to have a total occlusion of the superficial femoral artery. Three nitinol stents were used to revascularize this artery. At 48 months, duplex-ultrasonography control revealed the presence of a 45-mm saccular femoral dilatation; X-rays and CT angiography showed fractures of the proximal stents and the presence of a pseudoaneurysm at the site of the distal stents disconnection. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded using two stent-grafts. We conclude that patients and surgeons should be aware of structural complications with all stents. Rigorous follow-up controls should be mandatory. Endovascular repair proved to be feasible and durable to manage a previous endovascular procedure.

  7. Intimal sarcoma of the superficial femoral artery with osteosarcomatous differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ebaugh, James L; Yuan, Minsheng; Hu, Jeffery; Chen, Ahchean; Raffetto, Joseph D

    2011-05-01

    Sarcomas of the large vessels usually present centrally in the aorta, pulmonary artery, and inferior vena cava. Peripheral arterial sarcomas are exceptionally rare. They have been reported in the iliac and common or profunda femoral arteries, and are frequently undifferentiated. In this study, we describe a differentiated intimal sarcoma of the superficial femoral artery with abundant osteosarcoma within the specimen. Before knowing the diagnosis, treatment was for a presumed pseudoaneurysm using excision and bypass. Postoperatively, the patient received palliative radiation therapy. The tumor's location and histopathology are unique. A differentiated intimal sarcoma has never been reported in the superficial femoral artery, and it represents the second peripheral arterial intimal sarcoma reported with osteosarcomatous differentiation.

  8. Emergency Stenting of a Ruptured Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina; Tsiodras, Sotiris; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-11-15

    A 74-year-old man presented with a ruptured infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free ruptured bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of ruptured infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated.

  9. Anatomical reference point for harvesting a flexor graft during arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    de Lima Lopes, Clécio; Arantes, Gabriel; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Victor Lapenda; Pinto, Dilamar Moreira; Gonçalves, Marcelo Carvalho Krause; Gonçalves, Romeu Carvalho Krause

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of a vascular network adjacent to the insertion of the pes anserinus, so that it could be used as an anatomical reference point to facilitate harvesting flexor grafts for arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty patients with ACL tears who were going to undergo ACL reconstruction using the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles as grafts were selected randomly. During the harvesting of these tendons, the presence or absence of this anatomical reference point was noted. Results All the patients presented a vascular network of greater or lesser diameter. Conclusion The vascular network seems to be a good reference point during harvesting of the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, for facilitating graft harvesting. PMID:26229911

  10. Arthroscopic Excision of Acetabular Osteoid Osteoma: Computer Tomography–Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tamam, Cüneyt; Howse, Elizabeth A.; Tamam, Muge; Barnes, Ryan H.; Kelsey, Thomas J.; Perry, Brad; Stubbs, Allston J.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign osteoblastic tumor that occurs in the subcortical shaft and metaphysis of the long bones of the lower extremities; however, intra-articular lesions are also possible. Intra-articular osteoid osteomas are rare, and clinical symptoms are often less specific and, thereby, may lead to misdiagnosis. The definitive treatment for osteoid osteoma is the excision of the nidus. We present the case of a 23-year-old man with a 4-year history of right anterior hip pain, subsequently diagnosed with a subarticular osteoid osteoma located in the right anterior acetabulum. Hip arthroscopic excision of the juxta-articular osteoid osteoma is presented as an effective treatment, with the advantage of less potential damage to normal bone and cartilage, as well as the additional benefits available with hip arthroscopy. PMID:26052484

  11. Arthroscopic Treatment of Hip Chondral Defects With Bone Marrow Stimulation and BST-CarGel

    PubMed Central

    Tey, Marc; Mas, Jesús; Pelfort, Xavier; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Microfracture, the current standard of care for the treatment of non-degenerative chondral lesions in the hip joint, is limited by the poor quality of the filling fibrocartilaginous tissue. BST-CarGel (Piramal Life Sciences, Laval, Quebec, Canada) is a chitosan-based biopolymer that, when mixed with fresh, autologous whole blood and placed over the previously microfractured area, stabilizes the blood clot and enhances marrow-triggered wound-healing repair processes. BST-CarGel has been previously applied in the knee, with statistically significant greater lesion filling and superior repair tissue quality compared with microfracture treatment alone. In this report we describe the application of BST-CarGel for the arthroscopic treatment of hip chondral lesions. Our preliminary data suggest that our BST-CarGel procedure provides high-quality repair tissue and therefore may be considered a safe, cost-efficient therapeutic choice for the treatment of hip chondral defects. PMID:25973370

  12. Arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments: A technical simplification.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R; Decante, C; Geffroy, L; Brulefert, K; Noailles, T

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments has become a pivotal component of the treatment strategy for chronic ankle instability. The recently described arthroscopic version of this procedure is indispensable to ensure that concomitant lesions are appropriately managed, yet remains technically demanding. Here, we describe a simplified variant involving percutaneous creation of the calcaneal tunnel for the distal attachment of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The rationale for this technical stratagem was provided by a preliminary cadaver study that demonstrated a correlation between the lateral malleolus and the distal footprint of the calcaneo-fibular ligament. The main objectives are simplification of the operative technique and decreased injury to tissues whose function is crucial to the recovery of proprioception.

  13. Hypotensive bradycardic events during shoulder arthroscopic surgery under interscalene brachial plexus blocks

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seok Young

    2012-01-01

    Sudden, profound hypotensive and bradycardic events (HBEs) have been reported in more than 20% of patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in the sitting position. Although HBEs may be associated with the adverse effects of interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in the sitting position, the underlying mechanisms responsible for HBEs during the course of shoulder surgery are not well understood. The basic mechanisms of HBEs may be associated with the underlying mechanisms responsible for vasovagal syncope, carotid sinus hypersensitivity or orthostatic syncope. In this review, we discussed the possible mechanisms of HBEs during shoulder arthroscopic surgery, in the sitting position, under ISBPB. In particular, we focused on the relationship between HBEs and various types of syncopal reactions, the relationship between HBEs and the Bezold-Jarisch reflex, and the new contributing factors for the occurrence of HBEs, such as stellate ganglion block or the intraoperative administration of intravenous fentanyl. PMID:22474545

  14. Arthroscopic excision of acetabular osteoid osteoma in a 7-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Aşık, Mehmet; Erşen, Ali; Polat, Gökhan; Bilgili, Fuat; Tunalı, Onur

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to present the case report of a 7-year-old patient who was treated with hip arthroscopy for an acetabular osteoid osteoma. A 7-year-old patient was referred to our clinic with hip pain. In the assessment of the patient, an acetabular osteoid osteoma was detected in his right hip; it was adjacent to his triradiate cartilage. An arthroscopic surgery was planned as an alternative to open safe hip dislocation. The osteoid osteoma was completely removed with hip arthroscopy. Postoperative CT scanning and histopathological analysis confirmed the diagnosis. Exposure of the acetabulum can be problematic in paediatric patients due to the potential risks of open safe dislocation. Hip arthroscopy can safely be used for benign hip lesions in paediatric patients. Level of evidence Case report, Level V.

  15. [Arthroscopically assisted osteosynthesis of dorsally tilted intraarticular distal radius fractures--technique and results].

    PubMed

    Lutz, M; Wieland, T; Deml, C; Erhart, S; Rudisch, A; Klestil, T

    2014-10-01

    The present paper describes the indication and application of an arthroscopically assisted osteosynthesis for distal radius fractures. Visualisation of articular incongruency is emphasised with special regard to articular fracture fragment reduction. In addition to that, classification of soft tissue injuries and treatment options are discussed. The final clinical and radiological results of 17 patients are presented: DASH and PRWE averaged 4.9 and 6.0 respectively. Active range of motion measured 123° for flexion/extension, 51° for radial and ulnar deviation and 163° for pronosupination, which is 87%, 98% and 97%, respectively, compared with the opposite wrist. Radial inclination at final follow-up was 23°, palmar tilt measured 6° and ulnar variance averaged -1.2 mm. The scapholunate gap at follow-up was 1.6 mm, and the scapholunate angle measured 57°.

  16. Simple arthroscopic partial meniscectomy associated with anterior cruciate-deficient knees.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S; Levas, M G; Harrah, A

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with combined tears of the meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament in the same knee were evaluated for the results of a simple arthroscopic meniscectomy that preserved the meniscal rim. These patients, classified as "recreational athletes," were analyzed to determine their postoperative functional capabilities. Using the presence or absence of the pivot shift sign as the most important indicator of functional capability, we found that partial meniscectomy was effective in allowing patients to regain a high degree of normal functional ability and in permitting forward motion activities. However, all patients were left with an anterior cruciate-deficient knee that caused laxity in the anterior plane and frequently in the rotatory plane. Rotatory laxity markedly limits activities, and those patients unable to adjust to their instability are considering further surgery.

  17. Loop biceps tenotomy: an arthroscopic technique for long head of biceps tenotomy.

    PubMed

    Goubier, Jean-Noel; Bihel, Thomas; Dubois, Elodie; Teboul, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon is frequently involved in shoulder pathologies, often in relation to inflammatory or degenerative damage to the rotator cuff. Biceps tenodesis in the bicipital groove and tenotomy are the main treatment options. Tenotomy of the long head of the biceps tendon is a simpler and quicker procedure than tenodesis, and it does not require the use of implants. However, retraction of the biceps tendon, leading to Popeye deformity, and biceps muscle cramps are common complications after tenotomy. Therefore we propose an arthroscopic technique for tenotomy that limits the risk of Popeye deformity. This procedure consists of creating a loop at the severed end of the biceps tendon, which prevents the tendon from retracting into the bicipital groove.

  18. Arthroscopically assisted Sauvé-Kapandji procedure: an advanced technique for distal radioulnar joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Riccardo; Khanchandani, Prakash; Da Rin, Ferdinando; Borelli, Pierpaolo P; Mathoulin, Christophe; Atzei, Andrea

    2008-12-01

    Osteoarthritis of distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) leads to chronic wrist pain, weakness of grip strength, and limitation of motion, all of which affect the quality of life of the patient. Over the years, several procedures have been used for the treatment of this condition; however, this condition still remains a therapeutic challenge for the hand surgeons. Many procedures such as Darrach procedure, Bower procedure, Sauvé-Kapandji procedure, and ulnar head replacement have been used. Despite many advances in wrist arthroscopy, arthroscopy has not been used for the treatment of arthritis of the DRUJ. We describe a novel technique of arthroscopically assisted Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for the arthritis of the DRUJ. The advantages of this technique are its less invasive nature, preservation of the extensor retinaculum, more anatomical position of the DRUJ, faster rehabilitation, and a better cosmesis.

  19. A case of unusual septic knee arthritis with Brucella abortus after arthroscopic meniscus surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Hwa; Kang, Hyunseong; Kim, Taejung; Choi, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    We present a 51-year-old male patient with Brucella abortus septic arthritis in the right knee following arthroscopic meniscus surgery. He had eaten a traditional dish of raw minced cattle conceptus (bovine fetus) that was prepared after the cow was slaughtered. Despite treatment with empirical antibiotics and debridement of the postoperative surgical wound, the infection persisted without improvement. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing identified Brucella abortus from tissue samples obtained from the patient. After confirmation of the diagnosis of brucellar infection, antibiotics were replaced with doxycycline and rifampin, which were used for 4 months. In patients with a non-specific arthralgia who eat raw meat or live close to animals, it is important to consider the possibility of septic arthritis due to infection with Brucella spp.

  20. The arthroscopic treatment of avascular necrosis of the proximal pole following scaphoid nonunion.

    PubMed

    Ruch, D S; Chang, D S; Poehling, G G

    1998-10-01

    The authors describe a technique of treating scaphoid nonunions with associated avascular necrosis consisting of arthroscopic resection of the distal pole of the scaphoid combined with radial styloidectomy. The results at 2-year follow-up showed all three patients to have complete relief of their mechanical pain and improvement in their range of motion as well as high satisfaction with the procedure. Modified Mayo Wrist Scores were a mean preoperatively of 60 and postoperatively of 88. Postoperative radiographs showed no increase in the scapholunate gap. However, the capitolunate angle increased from a mean of 3 degrees to 13 degrees . There was no progression of degenerative changes noted. The advantages of this technique include (1) minimal morbidity, (2) relief of mechanical pain, and (3) improved range of motion with no early degenerative changes. The rate and severity of degenerative change following this procedure remain unknown.

  1. Rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Lynch, Jamie; Norris, Sarah; Baker, Kevin; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has conventionally involved a 4- to 6-week period of immobilization; there are two schools of thought regarding activity level during this period. Some authors encourage early, more aggressive rehabilitation along with the use of a continuous passive motion device; others propose later, more conservative rehabilitation. Although some studies report trends in improved early range of motion, pain relief, and outcomes scores with aggressive rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair, no definitive consensus exists supporting a clinical difference resulting from rehabilitation timing in the early stages of healing. Rehabilitation timing does not affect outcomes after 6 to 12 months postoperatively. Given the lack of information regarding which patient groups benefit from aggressive rehabilitation, individualized patient care is warranted.

  2. Arthroscopic-assisted fibular synthesis and syndesmotic stabilization of a complex unstable ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio; Metelli, Giovanni Pietro; Bettinsoli, Rosita; Hacking, Steven Adam

    2009-03-01

    Traditional treatment of complex ankle fracture consists of open reduction and internal fixation. Nevertheless, this treatment can delay fracture healing and cause prolonged oedema. The surgeon should consider necessity of early recovery when treating athletes, especially football players. In this light, it was decided to perform an arthroscopy-assisted percutaneous minimal osteosynthesis of a fibular fracture together with a syndesmotic disruption in order to permit the patient, a 24-year-old male, to resume quicker and easier full sport activities. The outcome was good and allowed patient to play soccer since 6 months following surgery. The complete and detailed articular evaluation provided by the arthroscope permitted to manage carefully a complex articular traumatism, avoiding the necessity of plating the fracture and improving a rapid full recovery of the joint function.

  3. The use of radiofrequency energy for arthroscopic chondroplasty in the knee.

    PubMed

    Kosy, Jonathan D; Schranz, Peter J; Toms, Andrew D; Eyres, Keith S; Mandalia, Vipul I

    2011-05-01

    We present a review of the current literature surrounding the use of radiofrequency energy for arthroscopic chondroplasty in the knee. This review article summarizes basic science, clinical efficacy, and recent advances in the understanding of radiofrequency energy use for the treatment of chondral lesions. Laboratory evidence of increased mechanical stability and decreased release of inflammatory mediators associated with the use of radiofrequency energy chondroplasty is described with clinical evidence of decreased pain and increased functional scores when compared with mechanical chondroplasty. We re-examine concerns about the immediate side effects of radiofrequency energy use, including damage to local structures, in light of new potentially contradictory results, as well as the progression of techniques and probe design. However, although reported complications are few, because the quality of clinical evidence about safety and efficacy remains low, we suggest cautious and judicious use of this technology until future research has clearly defined the long-term clinical outcomes and risks.

  4. A rare case of femoral herniation of female internal genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Ambedkar, Vivek; Singh, Abhilash; Bain, Jayanta; Singh, Lal Mani

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case with herniation of the uterus, fallopian tube, and ovary in a femoral hernia. A female patient was admitted with complain of the painful lump in the left groin. Clinical examination indicated strangulated femoral hernia, which necessitated an emergency surgery. During surgical procedure, the uterine tube, left fallopian tube and left ovary, were observed as the contents of the hernia. The contents were reduced back into the pelvic cavity, and the hernia was repaired. The patient made good recovery postsurgery. PMID:26283851

  5. Nitinol Self-Expanding Stents for the Superficial Femoral Artery.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Ashwin; Kobayashi, Taisei; Giri, Jay

    2017-04-01

    The superficial femoral artery is a complex artery subject to a unique set of biomechanical loading conditions in its course through the leg. Plain balloon angioplasty and balloon-expandable stents had unacceptably high rates of restenosis, necessitating target vessel revascularization. Nitinol alloy is well suited to provide the strength and flexibility needed of stents to withstand the external forces posed by the environment of the superficial femoral artery. Advances in stent technology with the addition of a slow-releasing antiproliferative agent and changes in scaffold design have shown promise in reducing the rates of stent fracture and in-stent restenosis.

  6. Intramedullary locking femoral nails. Experience with the AO nail.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, A. B.; Yeates, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The AO interlocking nail was introduced to the Ulster Hospital, Dundonald in 1988 and since then has been used in over 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures. We have reviewed 45 patients with 46 femoral shaft fractures treated between June 1988 and April 1990. These included four compound fractures and 13 comminuted fractures. The results compare favourably with other series. The union rate was 98% and there were no instances of deep infection. The alternative treatment methods available are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. Images Fig 3 Fig 5 PMID:1785145

  7. Femoral torsion and neck-shaft angles in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Laplaza, F J; Root, L; Tassanawipas, A; Glasser, D B

    1993-01-01

    Excessive femoral and coxa valga have been reported to be major contributors leading to hip dislocation in patients with cerebral palsy (CP). Femoral torsion angle (FT) and neck-shaft angle (NSA) were measured by the radiographic technique described by Rippstein and Müller in 157 patients with CP (289 hips). Factors associated with the degree of FT and NSA were evaluated. The researchers explored the correlation between the two angles and hip pathology. A large database of measurements was constructed. Our findings suggest that age and ambulatory status are the main factors correlated with FT and NSA.

  8. Current concepts in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip condition that can be disabling. In this review, we provide an orientation on current trends in the clinical management of SCFE including conventional procedures and specialised surgical developments. Different methods of fixation of the epiphysis, risks of complications, and the rationale of addressing deformity, primarily or secondarily, are presented. Although improved understanding of the anatomy, vascularity and implications of residual deformity have changed management strategies, the best modality of treatment that would restore complete vascularity to the femoral head and prevent any residual deformity, impingement and early osteoarthritis remains elusive.

  9. Subsidiary lateral femoral condyle in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Schopler, S A; Menelaus, M B

    1987-01-01

    A previously undescribed anomaly of the distal femur occurred in a 3-month-old child with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. There was a large boss of bone superior and posterior to the true lateral femoral condyle with which the lateral tibial femoral condyle articulated. To obtain full extension of the knee, it was necessary to perform a full posterior release and to replace the tibial condyle distally onto the true lateral condyle. The etiology of the anomaly remains conjectural, but the lesion should be sought for in patients with resistant flexion contracture requiring surgical release.

  10. Femoral approach: an exceptional alternative for permanent pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Tereno Valente, Bruno; Conceição, José M; Nogueira da Silva, Manuel; M Oliveira, Mário; S Cunha, Pedro; Lousinha, Ana; Galrinho, Ana; C Ferreira, Rui

    2014-05-01

    The classic transvenous implantation of a permanent pacemaker in a pectoral location may be precluded by obstruction of venous access through the superior vena cava or recent infection at the implant site. When these barriers to the procedure are bilateral and there are also contraindications or technical difficulties to performing a thoracotomy for an epicardial approach, the femoral vein, although rarely used, can be a viable alternative. We describe the case of a patient with occlusion of both subclavian veins and a high risk for mini-thoracotomy or videothoracoscopy, who underwent implantation of a permanent single-chamber pacemaker via the right femoral vein.

  11. The Transseptal Arthroscopic Knee Portal Is in Close Proximity to the Popliteal Artery: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Werner, Brian C; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Kandil, Abdurrahman; Conte, Evan J; Gwathmey, Frank W; Miller, Mark D

    2017-03-10

    The purpose of this study was to use fluoroscopy to measure the distance between the transseptal portal and the popliteal artery under arthroscopic conditions with an intact posterior knee capsule, and to determine the difference between 90 degrees of knee flexion and full extension. The popliteal artery of eight fresh-frozen cadaveric knees was dissected and cannulated proximal to the knee joint. The posterolateral, posteromedial, and transseptal portals were then established at 90 degrees of flexion. A 4-mm switching stick was placed through the transseptal portal, and barium contrast was injected into the popliteal artery. A lateral fluoroscopic image was taken with the knee in 90 degrees of flexion and full extension, and the distance between the popliteal artery and the switching stick was measured and compared using a paired t-test. In knee flexion, the average distance between the transseptal portal and the anterior aspect of the popliteal artery for the eight cadaveric specimens was 12.0 mm ± 3.3 mm; in extension, this decreased to 9.0 mm ± 2.7 mm. The distance between the transseptal portal and popliteal artery was significantly higher at 90 degrees of knee flexion as compared with extension (p = 0.0005). The transseptal posterior knee arthroscopic portal must be carefully created due to the close proximity to the popliteal artery, and may be closer to the artery than previously reported in specimens with an intact posterior knee capsule. Creating the portal with the knee in flexion significantly displaces the popliteal artery away from the portal reducing the risk of arterial injury.

  12. RESULTS FROM FILLING “REMPLISSAGE” ARTHROSCOPIC TECHNIQUE FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Benegas, Eduardo; Prada, Flávia de Santis; de Sousa, Augusto Tadeu Barros; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Sunada, Edwin Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical result from the filling (“remplissage”) technique in association with Bankart lesion repair for treating recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Methods: Nine patients (10 shoulders), with a mean follow-up of 13.7 months, presented traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. All of them had a Bankart lesion, associated with a Hill-Sachs lesion showing the “engaging” sign. The Hill-Sachs lesion defect was measured and showed an average bone loss of 17.3% (7.7% to 26.7%) in relation to the diameter of the humeral head. All the cases underwent arthroscopic repair of the Bankart lesion, together with filling of the Hill-Sachs lesion by means of tenodesis of the infraspinatus. Results: The Rowe score ranged from 22.5 (10 to 45) before the operation to 80.5 (5 to 100) after the operation (p > 0.001). The UCLA score ranged from 18.0 (8 to 29) to 31.1 (21 to 31) (p > 0.001). The measurements of external and internal rotation at abduction of 90° after the operation were 63.5° (45° to 90°) and 73° (50° to 92°) respectively. Two patients presented recurrence (one with dislocation and the other with subluxation). None of the patients presented pain in the region of the infraspinatus tendon after the operation. Conclusion: Over the short term, the filling (“remplissage”) arthroscopic technique produced improvements in functional scores and a low complication rate when used for treating glenohumeral instability associated with Hill-Sachs lesions. PMID:27027073

  13. Experimental and numerical validation for the novel configuration of an arthroscopic indentation instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Rami K.; Saarakkala, Simo; Töyräs, Juha; Laasanen, Mikko S.; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2003-06-01

    Softening of articular cartilage, mainly attributable to deterioration of superficial collagen network and depletion of proteoglycans, is a sign of incipient osteoarthrosis. Early diagnosis of osteoarthrosis is essential to prevent the further destruction of the tissue. During the past decade, a few arthroscopic instruments have been introduced for the measurement of cartilage stiffness; these can be used to provide a sensitive measure of cartilage status. Ease of use, accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements as well as a low risk of damaging cartilage are the main qualities needed in any clinically applicable instrument. In this study, we have modified a commercially available arthroscopic indentation instrument to better fulfil these requirements when measuring cartilage stiffness in joints with thin cartilage. Our novel configuration was validated by experimental testing as well as by finite element (FE) modelling. Experimental and numerical tests indicated that it would be better to use a smaller reference plate and a lower pressing force (3 N) than those used in the original instrument (7-10 N). The reproducibility (CV = 5.0%) of the in situ indentation measurements was improved over that of the original instrument (CV = 7.6%), and the effect of material thickness on the indentation response was smaller than that obtained with the original instrument. The novel configuration showed a significant linear correlation between the indenter force and the reference dynamic modulus of cartilage in unconfined compression, especially in soft tissue (r = 0.893, p < 0.001, n = 16). FE analyses with a transversely isotropic poroelastic model indicated that the instrument was suitable for detecting the degeneration of superficial cartilage. In summary, the instrument presented in this study allows easy and reproducible measurement of cartilage stiffness, also in thin cartilage, and therefore represents a technical improvement for the early diagnosis of

  14. Comparison of Bristow procedure and Bankart arthroscopic method as the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Zarezade, Abolghasem; Dehghani, Mohammad; Rozati, Ali Reza; Banadaki, Hossein Saeid; Shekarchizade, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common major joint dislocation. In patients with recurrent shoulder dislocation, surgical intervention is necessary. In this study, two methods of treatment, Bankart arthroscopic method and open Bristow procedure, were compared. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial survey had been done in the orthopedic department of Alzahra and Kashani hospitals of Isfahan during 2008-2011. Patients with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation who were candidates for surgical treatment were randomly divided into two groups, one treated by Bankart arthroscopic technique and the other treated by Bristow method. All the patients were assessed after the surgery using the criteria of ROWE, CONSTANT, UCLA, and ASES. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Six patients (16.22%) had inappropriate condition with ROWE score (score less than 75); of them, one had been treated with Bristow and five with Bankart (5.26 vs. 27.78). Nine patients (24.32%) had appropriate condition, which included six from Bristow group and three treated by Bankart technique (31.58 vs. 16.67). Finally, 22 patients (59.46%) showed great improvement with this score, which included 12 from Bristow and 10 from Bankart groups (63.16 vs. 55.56). According to Fisher's exact test, there were no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion: The two mentioned techniques did not differ significantly, although some parameters such as level of performance, pain intensity, use of analgesics, and range of internal rotation showed more improvement in Bristow procedure. Therefore, if there is no contraindication for Bristow procedure, it is preferred to use this method. PMID:25590034

  15. Arthroscopic transtendinous repair of articular-sided pasta (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lu, Liangyu; Lu, Zhe; Xiao, Lei; Kang, Yifan; Wang, Zimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical efficacy of arthroscopic transtendinous repair of partial articular-sided PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury. Methods: From February 2011 to July 2014, 12 cases of PASTA, aged 29 to 72 years with an average of 52.9 ± 13.3 years, were treated arthoscopically. To repair PASTA, articular-sided rotator cuff tear was explored, injury site was punctured and labeled with PDS absorbable monofilament suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) suture, subacromial bursa was cleaned up with acromioplasty, and integrity of bursa-side rotator cuff was assessed. Then with arthroscope in glenohumeral joint, footprint of the bursa-side supraspinatus tendon was preserved, rivets were introduced into the joint through supraspinatus tendon, joint-side partial tear was sutured, and anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint was established. The patients were followed up post-operatively for 12-36 months, average 22 ± 7.3 months. The clinical outcomes were emulated with ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons) Shoulder Score system and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) Shoulder rating scale. Results: The post-operative ASES score was 89.7 ± 5.6, higher than the pre-operative one 49.8 ± 9.8 (t = 12.25, P <0.0001). While UCLA scale increased from the pre-operative 17.3, ± 3.3 to the post-operative 30.4 ± 3.2 points (t = 9.87, P <0.0001), with a satisfaction rate of 11/12 (91.7%). Conclusion: Trans-tendon repair is ideal for PASTA with advantage of maximal preservation of the normal rotator cuff tissue, anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint and stable fixation of tendon-bone interface. PMID:25784979

  16. Development of an Arthroscopic Joint Capsule Injury Model in the Canine Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David; Baker, Andrew R.; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Kim, Myung-Sun; Ricchetti, Eric T.; Derwin, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The natural history of rotator cuff tears can be unfavorable as patients develop fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy that is often associated with a loss of muscle strength and shoulder function. To facilitate study of possible biologic mechanisms involved in early degenerative changes to rotator cuff muscle and tendon tissues, the objective of this study was to develop a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder using arthroscopy. Methods Arthroscopic surgical methods for performing a posterior joint capsulectomy in the canine shoulder were first defined in cadavers. Subsequently, one canine subject underwent bilateral shoulder joint capsulectomy using arthroscopy, arthroscopic surveillance at 2, 4 and 8 weeks, and gross and histologic examination of the joint at 10 weeks. Results The canine subject was weight-bearing within eight hours after index and follow-up surgeries and had no significant soft tissue swelling of the shoulder girdle or gross lameness. Chronic synovitis and macroscopic and microscopic evidence of pathologic changes to the rotator cuff bony insertions, tendons, myotendinous junctions and muscles were observed. Conclusions This study demonstrates feasibility and proof-of-concept for a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder. Future work is needed to define the observed pathologic changes and their role in the progression of rotator cuff disease. Ultimately, better understanding of the biologic mechanisms of early progression of rotator cuff disease may lead to clinical interventions to halt or slow this process and avoid the more advanced and often irreversible conditions of large tendon tears with muscle fatty atrophy. PMID:26808837

  17. Perioperative Rehabilitation Using a Knee Extension Device and Arthroscopic Debridement in the Treatment of Arthrofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs-Kinzer, Angie; Murphy, Brian; Shelbourne, K. Donald; Urch, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background: Arthrofibrosis is a postoperative complication of intra-articular knee surgery that can be difficult to treat. Evidence suggests that maximizing knee range of motion may improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic debridement. Hypothesis: Patients who achieve greater knee range of motion will have better subjective scores. Study Design: Retrospective case series analysis. Methods: A review of records was performed for 33 patients with arthrofibrosis who underwent knee arthroscopy and scar resection coupled with perioperative rehabilitation to maximize knee range of motion. Patient demographics and preoperative and postoperative range of motion measurements were extracted from the records. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form was administered to assess pain, activity, and knee function. Patients performed a preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program utilizing a knee extension device to maximize knee extension. Results: According to the IKDC range of motion criteria, 27 of 33 patients achieved normal knee extension, and 14 of 33 achieved normal knee flexion at a mean of 8.6 months after surgery. Patients with normal knee motion had a mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form score of 72.6 ± 13.6, which was significantly higher than patients who did not achieve normal motion (P = .04). Overall, mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form scores improved from 45.3 ± 16.7 preoperatively to 67.1 ± 18.0 postoperatively (P < .01) at a mean of 14.7 months after surgery. Conclusions: Perioperative rehabilitation that emphasizes restoration of normal knee range of motion appears to improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic scar resection. In support of our hypothesis, patients who achieved greater knee range of motion had better subjective knee scores. PMID:23015970

  18. PROSPECTIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY ON FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER OPEN AND ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the surgical results from patients undergoing repairs to rotator cuff injuries via open and arthroscopic procedures, with regard to functional and clinical features, and by means of ultrasound examinations, and to compare occurrences of renewed tearing. Methods: Sixty patients underwent operations performed by the same surgeon (29 via open surgery and 31 via arthroscopy), to repair complete rotator cuff tears. The procedures were performed at Hospital Governor Israel Pinheiro (HGIP) and Mater Dei Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, between August 2007 and February 2009. The patients were assessed functionally by means of the UCLA score before and after the operation, and magnetic resonance imaging was done before the operation. All the patients were reassessed at least 12 months after the operation, and an ultrasound examination was also performed at this time. Results: Out of the 29 patients who underwent open surgery, 27 (93.1%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 32 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 14 months. Three patients presented renewed tearing on ultrasound, of whom one remained asymptomatic. Out of the 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic procedures, 29 (93.5%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 33 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 19 months. Two patients presented renewed tearing, of whom one remained asymptomatic and one evolved with loosening of an anchor, with an unsatisfactory result. Conclusion: The repairs on rotator cuff injuries presented good results by means of both open surgery and arthroscopy, with similar functional results in the two groups and similar rates of renewed tearing. PMID:27027052

  19. Postoperative outcomes of arthroscopic subacromial decompression for rotator cuff tear with shoulder stiffness.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Otoshi, Kenichi; Konno, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Some patients with rotator cuff tear have shoulder stiffness preoperatively. Concomitant preoperative shoulder stiffness may affect postoperative outcomes of arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) for rotator cuff tear. The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative outcomes for ASD between rotator cuff tear patients with and without preoperative shoulder stiffness and to analyze the serial change in functional scores, range of motion (ROM), and pain intensity of the 2 groups after operation. 60 shoulders of 58 patients who underwent ASD for rotator cuff tear were studied. Arthroscopic release was performed for the stiffness group. The results were assessed before surgery and 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery, and the results in the stiffness group and non-stiffness group were compared. No differences in serial changes for postoperative outcomes of ASD were seen in terms of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder scoring system (JOA scores) and the visual analog scale (VAS scores) for pain at night and pain during motion between the stiffness group and non-stiffness group. However, compared to the non-stiffness group, forward flexion and abduction angles were significantly smaller for the stiffness group at 1 and 3 months after surgery. External rotation and internal rotation angles were significantly smaller at 1 month after surgery for the stiffness group than for the non-stiffness group. Preoperative shoulder stiffness does not affect improvement of postoperative JOA scores and VAS scores of ASD. When measured 6 months after surgery, ROM in the stiffness group and the non-stiffness group was similar.

  20. Amputated limb by cerclage wire of femoral diaphyseal fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Yang, Kyu-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Kyoun; Weaver, M J; Allen, Elizabeth M

    2016-12-01

    An entrapment of the femoral artery by cerclage wiring is a rare complication after spiral diaphyseal femoral fractures. We report the case of an 82-year-old female treated by an antegrade intramedullary nailing and multiple cable augmentation, which was then complicated by injury to the femoral artery that resulted in ipsilateral leg necrosis and amputation. The entrapment was caused by direct belting by the cable and resulted in a total obstruction of the femoral artery.

  1. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  6. Effects of Multiple Drilling on the Ischemic Capital Femoral Epiphysis of Immature Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Sun Young; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Hui-Wan; Lee, Seung Yup

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the effects of multiple drilling on the immature capital femoral epiphysis following ischemic injury in a piglet model. Materials and Methods Ischemic necrosis of capital femoral epiphysis was induced bilaterally in 12 piglets using a cervical ligation method. Three weeks later, medial, central, and lateral 3 drill holes were made on the left femoral head using 0.062" K-wire. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks following the multiple drilling, femoral heads were harvested from each three piglets. On histologic examination, percent of revascularization, percent of osteoblast surface, capital femoral epiphyseal quotient and proximal femoral growth plate height were evaluated. Untreated right femoral heads served as control. Results While percent of revascularization of left capital femoral epiphysis with multiple drilling was significantly higher than untreated control side (p<0.001), percent of osteoblast surface, capital femoral epiphyseal quotient and proximal femoral growth plate height showed no significant difference. Conclusion This study indicates that multiple drilling could promote revascularization of ischemic capital femoral epiphysis, and multiple drilling does not appear to produce bony physeal bars at short-term, if using small diameter drill. However, multiple drilling alone does not seem to prevent femoral head deformity or to promote new bone formation. PMID:21786447

  7. Common femoral vein reconstruction using internal jugular vein after blast injury.

    PubMed

    Holt, Andrew M; West, Charles A; Davis, James A; Gilani, Ramyar; Askenasy, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Common femoral vein traumatic injuries are rare. Surgical management is controversial and by nature case specific. In this report, we present an unusual case of an isolated common femoral vein injury from a gunshot blast repaired with an interposition internal jugular vein bypass. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an isolated common femoral vein reconstructed in this manner.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  13. Arthroscopic-Assisted Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction Using the TightRope Device With Allograft Augmentation: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Trenhaile, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical management of acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations remains challenging, especially in the revision setting. Most commonly, Rockwood type I and II injuries are managed nonoperatively whereas type IV, V, and VI injuries are managed with surgery. Type III separations are more controversial, with evidence supporting both nonoperative and operative treatment options. Multiple different arthroscopic techniques have been described; however, there is no current gold standard. AC joint reconstruction with the TightRope device (Arthrex, Naples, FL) with the patient in the lateral decubitus position is a method of restoring joint stability that allows for a minimally invasive, low-profile fixation construct using a single drill hole through the clavicle. Allograft augmentation of this fixation construct helps to eliminate the stress risers potentially created by this device while increasing overall repair construct stability. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic AC joint reconstruction using a TightRope device with allograft augmentation. PMID:26759765

  14. Arthroscopic Repair of Inferior Labrum From Anterior to Posterior Lesions Associated With Multidirectional Instability of the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Burt, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder may arise spontaneously; however, recent evidence suggests that traumatic events may play a role in this syndrome. Variable degrees of injury around the circumference of the glenoid have been reported, ranging from Bankart and Kim lesions to 270° of injury and even 360° of injury. Hyperabduction injury may cause inferior subluxation of the shoulder and result in traumatic isolated injury to the inferior labrum from anterior to posterior. This particular lesion spans approximately 180° of the inferior hemisphere and may lead to symptomatic MDI. In contrast to open or arthroscopic plication procedures for atraumatic MDI without labral injury, the goal in these cases is anatomic arthroscopic repair of the inferior labrum tear without the need for capsular plication, volume reduction, or rotator interval closure. PMID:25685683

  15. Arthroscopic Transtendinous Double-Pulley Remplissage Technique in the Beach-Chair Position for Large Hill-Sachs Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Parnes, Nata; Carey, Paul A.; Schumacher, Christopher; Price, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Hill-Sachs lesions are a common finding in patients with glenohumeral instability. There have been numerous methods described for addressing Hill-Sachs deformity. One popular method includes transferring a portion of the infraspinatus muscle into the posterior-superior defect (remplissage) to prevent the lesion from engaging and the resultant instability. We present a method of arthroscopic remplissage whereby the lesion is addressed through transtendinous insertion of arthroscopic anchors. Once 2 anchors have been inserted, 1 limb of each suture is tied to the other anchor, the so-called pulley repair technique. This can be performed either under direct visualization in the subacromial space or blindly while the surgeon is viewing from the articular side. Once both limbs have been tied, the infraspinatus tendon nicely spans the defect, and there has been minimal morbidity to the tendon itself. We have found this method to be useful for addressing a large Hill-Sachs deformity. PMID:26759767

  16. One step arthroscopically assisted Latarjet and posterior bone-block, for recurrent posterior instability and anterior traumatic dislocation

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido; Taverna, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of the surgical management for a patient with a history of recurrent posterior shoulder instability and subsequently traumatic anterior dislocation. The patient was already on the waiting list for an arthroscopic posterior stabilization with anchors, when a car accident caused an additional anterior shoulder dislocation. This traumatic anterior dislocation created a bone loss with a glenoid fracture and aggravated the preexisting posterior instability. In order to address both problems, we decided to perform an arthroscopically assisted Latarjet procedure for anterior instability and to stabilize with a bone graft for posterior instability. To our best knowledge, this type of surgical procedure has so far never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this report is to present the surgical technique and to outline the decision making process. PMID:26288539

  17. Arthroscopic suture bridge technique for intratendinous tear of rotator cuff in chronically painful calcific tendinitis of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Moon, Chang-Yun; Park, Sang-Eun; Kim, Yeon-Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun

    2013-11-01

    Arthroscopic removal, now the main treatment option, has almost replaced open surgery for treatment of resistant calcific tendinitis. In some cases of chronic calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, the calcific materials are hard and adherent to the tendon. Removal of these materials can cause significant intratendinous tears between the superficial and deep layers of the degenerated rotator cuff. Thus far, there are no established surgical techniques for removing the calcific materials while ensuring cuff integrity. Good clinical results for rotator cuff repair were achieved by using an arthroscopic suture bridge technique in patients with long-standing calcific tendinitis. Intact rotator cuff integrity and recovery of signal change on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were confirmed. This is a technical note about a surgical technique and its clinical results with a review of relevant published reports.

  18. Arthroscopic Treatment for Shoulder Instability with Glenoid Bone Loss Using Distal Tibia Allograft Augmentation - Short Term Results

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan; Amar, Eyal; Coady, Catherine M.; Dilman, Daryl B.; Smith, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Background: The results of arthroscopic anterior labral (Bankart) repair have been shown to have high failure rate in patients with significant glenoid bone loss. Several reconstruction procedures using bone graft have been described to overcome the bone loss, including autogenous coracoid transfer to the anterior glenoid (Latarjet procedure) as well as iliac crest autograft and tibial allografts. In recent years, trends toward minimally invasive shoulder surgery along with improvements in technology and technique have led surgeons to expand the application of arthroscopic treatment. Purpose: This study aims to perform a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data to evaluate the clinical and radiological follow up of patient who underwent anatomic glenoid reconstruction using distal tibia allograft for the treatment of shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss at 1-year post operation time point. Methods: Between December 2011 and January 2015, 55 patients underwent arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder by means of capsule-labral reattachment to glenoid ream and bony augmentation of glenoid bone loss with distal tibial allograft for recurrent instability of the shoulder. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation included general assessment by the western Ontario shoulder instability index (WOSI) questionnaire, preoperative and postoperative radiographs and CT scans. Results: Fifty-five patients have been evaluated with mean age of 29.73 years at time of the index operation. There were 40 males (mean age of 29.66) and 15 female (mean age of 29.93). Minimum follow up time was 12 months. The following adverse effects were recorded: none suffered from recurrent dislocation, 2 patients suffered from bone resorption but without overt instability, 1 patient had malunion due to screw fracture, none of the patients had nonunion. The mean pre-operative WOSI score was 36.54 and the mean postoperative WOSI score was 61.0. Conclusion: Arthroscopic

  19. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the lateral tibial plateau treated with arthroscopically assisted removal and retrograde osteochondral grafting.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Nobuo; Shimose, Shoji; Nakamae, Atsuo; Okuhara, Atsushi; Kamei, Goki; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma is sometimes challenging, because of its location. We report a patient with an intra-articular osteoid osteoma of the lateral tibial plateau which was excised under an arthroscopically assisted procedure. After total resection of the intra-articular osteoid osteoma, the osteochondral defect of the lateral tibial plateau was reconstructed with a retrograde autogenous osteochondral graft which was harvested from the non-weightbearing area of the distal femur.

  20. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In the second paper of this series, the effect of transverse femoral stresses due to locomotion in theropod dinosaurs of different sizes was examined for the case of an unchanging leg geometry. Students are invariably thrilled to learn about theropod dinosaurs, and this activity applies the concepts of torque and stress to the issue of theropod…

  1. Quadratus lumborum block for femoral–femoral bypass graft placement

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Mitsuda, Shingo; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atherosclerosis has a complex etiology that leads to arterial obstruction and often results in inadequate perfusion of the distal limbs. Patients with atherosclerosis can have severe complications of this condition, with widespread systemic manifestations, and the operations undertaken are often challenging for anesthesiologists. Case report: A 79-year-old woman with chronic heart failure and respiratory dysfunction presented with bilateral gangrene of the distal lower extremities with obstruction of the left common iliac artery due to atherosclerosis. Femoral–femoral bypass graft and bilateral foot amputations were planned. Spinal anesthesia failed due to severe scoliosis and deformed vertebrae. General anesthesia was induced after performing multiple nerve blocks including quadratus lumborum, sciatic nerve, femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and obturator nerve blocks. However, general anesthesia was abandoned because of deterioration in systemic perfusion. The surgery was completed; the patient remained comfortable and awake without the need for further analgesics. Conclusion: Quadratus lumborum block may be a useful anesthetic technique to perform femoral–femoral bypass. PMID:27583851

  2. Simplified extraction of broken femoral stems. A brief technical note.

    PubMed

    Kozinn, S C

    1989-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive technique for extracting the retained distal portion of broken femoral stems is described. After removing the loose prosthetic head fragment and surrounding cement, needle-nosed pliers are used to grab the edges of the exposed distal stem. A vise-grip locking wrench is then applied tightly to the pliers to allow axial extraction with mallet blows.

  3. Distal Femoral Oblique Fracture in a Young Male Soldier

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David Naji; Al Khateeb, Hesham; Safwat, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Here, we report a case of a distal femoral fracture in a 23-year-old male army cadet who presented to the Accident and Emergency department following a twisting injury while participating in a routine military marching exercise. A pathological fracture was considered but this suspicion was put to rest following thorough investigations, leaving only a diagnosis of a nontraumatic spontaneous femoral fracture. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of distal femoral fractures associated with nontraumatic military exercises, with the majority of injuries instead related to stress fractures. A vigilant literature search yielded no cases of similar injury nature, which is the primary reason we believe that those interested in orthopaedics or military doctors would find themselves drawn to this case. The patient presented with severe pain in his left thigh and on examination there was a deformity of his left thigh. In terms of investigations, a bone profile, plain film radiographs, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and tumor markers were all preformed and proved unremarkable. The definitive treatment was by open reduction and internal fixation. Femoral fractures often require significant amounts of force, particularly in young, healthy individuals. Generally, these injuries in this demographic follow high-energy traumas, with the lion's share occurring following a road traffic accident or other high-speed impact. More often than not, the treatment is surgical. Given the extraordinary manner of this such, one must be attentive and exhaustive in their investigation of such presentations. PMID:27258509

  4. Unusual Foreign Bone Fragment in Femoral Open Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sadoni, Hanon; Arti, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Femoral shaft fracture is one of the typical bone fractures due to high energy trauma and may occur as an open fracture. Some foreign materials may enter the fracture site such as sand, cloth particles and so on. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old motorcycle riding military member and his collaborator were received in the hospital because of multiple traumas due to a fall in a hollow during a surveillance mission. His collaborator died because of head trauma and multiple severe open fractures. When fixing the patients femoral fracture, a large femoral butterfly fragment was removed from the patient’s thigh as a foreign segment. The patient’s femur was fixed with a plate and screws. No femoral defect was detected during surgery or post-operative X-rays and CT scan. The removed segment was not a part of the patient’s femur. Conclusions: Surgical and post-surgical findings showed that this segment was not related to the patient’s femur. The foreign segment may have belonged to the other victim of this trauma. PMID:27218050

  5. Poultry femoral head separation and necrosis: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head separation (FHS) is a degenerative skeletal problem in fast growing poultry where the growth plate of proximal femur separates from its articular cartilage. FHS can remain asymptomatic but under strenuous conditions the damage is pronounced leading to lameness. The etiology of FHS is po...

  6. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  7. Lateral Femoral Epicondylar Osteotomy: An Extensile Posterolateral Knee Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Open exposure of the posterolateral corner of the knee is challenged by limitations of posterolateral ligamentous tissues and posterior neurovascular structures. We have used a modification of a lateral femoral epicondyle osteotomy, described historically for surgical management of posterolateral rotatory instability, as an approach to the posterolateral intraarticular structures. The historic technique for ligamentous reconstruction has been abandoned because its nonanatomic fixation does not restore ligamentous isometry. In this report, osteotomy of a bone block from the lateral femoral epicondyle is used to access the joint space. The lateral collateral ligament is reflected distally and posteriorly through traction on the block. Once the intraarticular disorder has been addressed, the lateral femoral epicondyle is secured in its native, anatomic position, thereby restoring isometry and normal joint mechanics after surgery. This technique has been used successfully to address posterolateral articular disorders on femoral and tibial sides. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging verified restoration of lateral collateral ligament anatomy. Physical examination at 0° and 30° knee flexion showed clinical stability at all postoperative evaluations through 6 and 10 months followup. Using this technique, intraarticular disorders at the posterolateral corner may be addressed in an open manner with anatomic reduction and preserved postoperative function of the lateral collateral ligament. Level of Evidence: Level V, expert opinion. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18373126

  8. Interventional embolization therapy of puerile congenital deep femoral arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JING; TAN, XIAO-YUN; ZHOU, SHAO-YI; CHEN, KUN-SHAN; LI, HAI-BO; CHUANQIANG-NIU; JIANG, YI-ZHOU; LIN, QUE-QING

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the treatment efficiency of interventional embolization therapy in puerile congenital deep femoral arteriovenous fistula. A retrospective analysis was conducted for 9 cases of congenital deep femoral arteriovenous fistulae treated in our department in the past 5 years. B-ultrasound examination indicated that all puerile patients suffered from deep femoral arteriovenous fistulae, which was confirmed by angiography examination. For all patients, endovascular interventional embolization therapy was conducted and angiography re-examination was implemented after 4 weeks. If there were residual orificium fistulae, the interventional embolization therapy was conducted again. In the 6 month to 2 year follow-up period, improvement of clinical symptoms was observed. Following interventional embolization, 9 cases of deep femoral arteriovenous fistulae were completely occluded and the clinical symptoms were improved. No relapses occurred. In addition, after three embolization treatments, the disease condition of one case was controlled well and the disease condition did not progress. Interventional embolization therapy has a number of advantages, including simple surgery and reliable treatment efficacy. Therefore, it is worthy of promotion and application in the clinic. PMID:23407852

  9. Low-energy trauma-induced intercondylar femoral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Aeby, Mathias; Wyss, Tobias; Mentrup, Birgit; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Jakob, Franz; Aeberli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a 44-year-old female patient with recurrent fragility fractures including an intercondylar femoral fracture and with normal planar bone densitometry. Diagnosis of hypophosphatasia was suggested by low volumetric cortical bone mineral density and laboratory findings. DNA sequencing revealed heterozygous mutations in the exons 5, 6 and 9 of the ALPL gene, thus confirming the suspected diagnosis. PMID:27920814

  10. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients. PMID:27047819

  11. Comparative analysis on arthroscopic sutures of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries in relation to the degree of osteopenia☆

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Atti, Vinícius; Agostini, Daniel Cecconi; Valin, Márcio Rangel; de Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto; Agostini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries, according to the patient's degree of osteopenia. Method 138 patients who underwent arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries between 2003 and 2011 were analyzed. Those operated from October 2008 onwards formed a prospective cohort, while the remainder formed a retrospective cohort. Also from October 2008 onwards, bone densitometry evaluation was requested at the time of the surgical treatment. For the patients operated before this date, densitometry examinations performed up to two years before or after the surgical treatment were investigated. The patients were divided into three groups. Those with osteoporosis formed group 1 (n = 16); those with osteopenia, group 2 (n = 33); and normal individuals, group 3 (n = 55). Results In analyzing the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) scores of group 3 and comparing them with group 2, no statistically significant difference was seen (p = 0.070). Analysis on group 3 in comparison with group 1 showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.027). Conclusion The results from arthroscopic suturing of large and extensive rotator cuff injuries seem to be influenced by the patient's bone mineral density, as assessed using bone densitometry. PMID:26229899

  12. Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy and Combined Arthroscopic Surgery in Severe Medial Osteoarthritis and Varus Malalignment: Minimum 5-Year Results

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Shin, Yong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the radiologic and functional outcomes of medial open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) combined with arthroscopic procedure in patients with medial osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods From June 1996 to March 2010, 26 patients (32 knees) who underwent medial open wedge osteotomy and arthroscopic operation for medial osteoarthritis were retrospectively reviewed. Measurements included hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle, femorotibial angle, medial proximal tibial angle, posterior tibial slope angle, and Kellgren-Lawrence grade. Clinical evaluation was performed using Lysholm knee scoring scale and knee and function score of the American Knee Society. Results Differences between the mean preoperative and postoperative measurements were significant in all angles including the HKA angle (−5.7° and +5.5°), femorotibial angle (−1.9° and +9.8°), and medial proximal tibial angle (82.9° and 90.5°) (p<0.05). Mean Lysholm knee scoring scale was 63.6 preoperatively and 88.7 at the last follow-up, mean Knee Society knee score was 61.2 and 86.6, and mean function score was 59.3 and 87.2, respectively. All differences were significant (p<0.05). Conclusions Medial open wedge HTO in combination with arthroscopic procedure is an effective treatment method for medial osteoarthritis to treat varus deformity and an intra-articular lesion. PMID:27894173

  13. The effect of femoral component rotation and asymmetry in total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Worland, Richard L; Jessup, Douglas E; Vazquez-Vela Johnson, Gonzalo; Alemparte, Jose Antonio; Tanaka, Sakae; Rex, Francisco Soza; Keenan, Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    Between April 1999 and February 2000, femoral component rotation and asymmetry (universal versus anatomic) were studied in a prospective randomized control trial in 101 consecutive patients undergoing total knee replacement. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups. The same surgical technique was used in all patients except for femoral component symmetry and rotational alignment. Universal femoral components provide a cheaper and equally reliable solution compared to anatomic compo nents. External rotation of the femoral component or using an anatomic femoral component did not statistically reduce the need for lateral release or improve patellar tracking.

  14. Coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest in patients who had neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    DiFazio, Rachel L; Kocher, Minider S; Berven, Sigurd; Kasser, James

    2003-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of four patients in whom a pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest and metaphyseal irregularities developed. These patients were all treated with neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and presented with a progressive gait disturbance and pain, leg-length discrepancy, and limited abduction. Imaging revealed coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest. Two patients (three hips) underwent proximal femoral valgus osteotomy, one patient underwent fixation of a femoral neck fracture with subsequent greater trochanter transfer, and one patient is being observed. This case series suggests an association between neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and this unusual pattern of coxa vara with proximal femoral growth arrest.

  15. Analysis of Femoral Components of Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shantanu; Harsha, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    There have been continuous on-going revisions in design of prosthesis in Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) to improve the endurance of hip replacement. In the present work, Finite Element Analysis was performed on cemented THA with CoCrMo trapezoidal, CoCrMo circular, Ti6Al4V trapezoidal and Ti6Al4V circular stem. It was observed that cross section and material of femoral stem proved to be critical parameters for stress distribution in femoral components, distribution of interfacial stress and micro movements. In the first part of analysis, designs were investigated for micro movements and stress developed, for different stem materials. Later part of the analysis focused on investigations with respect to different stem cross sections. Femoral stem made of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) resulted in larger debonding of stem at cement-stem interface and increased stress within the cement mantle in contrast to chromium alloy (CoCrMo) stem. Thus, CoCrMo proved to be a better choice for cemented THA. Comparison between CoCrMo femoral stem of trapezium and circular cross section showed that trapezoidal stem experiences lesser sliding and debonding at interfaces than circular cross section stem. Also, trapezium cross section generated lower peak stress in femoral stem and cortical femur. In present study, femur head with diameter of 36 mm was considered for the analysis in order to avoid dislocation of the stem. Also, metallic femur head was coupled with cross linked polyethylene liner as it experiences negligible wear compared to conventional polyethylene liner and unlike metallic liner it is non carcinogenic.

  16. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  17. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-09-18

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated.

  18. A clinical study of the rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liangjia; Liu, Xiaomin; Liu, Changlu; Liu, Yingli

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The reasons for femorotibial rotational malalignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were analyzed to provide evidence for clinical knee joint surgery and to reduce complications. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety knees of 60 patients were selected and randomly divided into two groups (n=30). For one group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was determined by the transepicondylar axis and TKA was performed. For the other group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was conducted through 3° external rotation of the posterior femoral condyles. Knee joint specimens were operated with TKA and various biomechanical indices were measured. [Results] The femoral epicondylar axis was a constant, reliable reference for femoral component rotational alignment. When the femoral component was rotated by 0° versus the epicondylar axis, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint was optimal. When the femoral component was arranged in parallel with Whiteside’s line, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint varied largely. The patellofemoral contact areas of the two groups were similar. [Conclusion] Axial rotational alignment of the femoral component influenced the contact pressure of patellofemoral joints in TKA more significantly than external rotation of the femoral condyles. It is more reliable to use the femoral epicondylar axis as the reference for the rotational alignment of the femoral component. PMID:26311929

  19. Range of motion in a modular femoral stem system with a variety of neck options.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Sanaz; Chun, Sungwook; Cowan, James B; Bragdon, Charles; Malchau, Henrik; Rubash, Harry E

    2013-10-01

    Modular femoral stem systems decouple leg length, offset, and version. The hip ROM and type of impingement for 162 femoral head/neck combinations were measured at four extreme hip positions in a Sawbones pelvis and femur to identify constructs that lead to early impingement. Hip ROM increased in all positions with increasing head size and neck length. We identified a new type of impingement created by the build-up of the proximal femoral stem: femoral stem on acetabular liner impingement. Seventy percent of neutral neck options achieved our definition of acceptable ROM. In general, when utilizing a modular femoral stem, surgeons can minimize impingement by choosing the longest femoral neck that does not over-lengthen the limb, using the largest femoral head accommodated by the cup, and avoiding neck version unless the cup or stem is malaligned.

  20. The results of arthroscopic versus mini-open repair for rotator cuff tears at mid-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Pearsall, Albert W; Ibrahim, Khalid A; Madanagopal, Sudhakar G

    2007-01-01

    Background To prospectively evaluate patients who underwent a "mini-open" repair versus a completely arthroscopic technique for small to large size rotator cuff tears. Methods Fifty-two patients underwent "mini-open" or all arthroscopic repair of a full thickness tear of the rotator cuff. Patients who complained of shoulder pain and/or weakness and who had failed a minimum of 6 weeks of physical therapy and had at least one sub-acromial injection were surgical candidates. Pre and post-operative clinical evaluations included the following: 1) demographics; 2) Simple Shoulder Test (SST); 3) University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale; 4) visual analog pain assessment (VAS); and 5) pre-op SF12 assessment. Descriptive analysis was performed for patient demographics and for all variables. Pre and post outcome scores, range of motion and pain scale were compared using paired t-tests. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate any effect between dependent and independent variables. Significance was set at p is less than or equal to 0.05. Results There were 31 females and 21 males. The average follow-up was 50.6 months (27 – 84 months). The average age was similar between the two groups [arthroscopic x = 55 years/mini-open x = 58 years, p = 0.7]. Twenty-seven patients underwent arthroscopic repair and 25 underwent repair with a mini-open incision. The average rotator cuff tear size was 3.1 cm (range: 1–5 centimeters). There was no significant difference in tear size between the two groups (arthroscopic group = 2.9 cm/mini-open group = 3.2 cm, p = 0.3). Overall, there was a significant improvement from pre-operative status in shoulder pain, shoulder function as measured on the Simple Shoulder test and UCLA Shoulder Form. Visual analog pain improved, on average, 4.4 points and the most recent Short Shoulder Form and UCLA scores were 8 and 26 respectively. Both active and passive glenohumeral joint range of motion improved significantly from pre

  1. New Proximal Femoral Compaction Blade Provides Strong Antirotation Stability of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinya; Hirata, Yukiaki; Okamoto, Daiki; Kakunai, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Shingo; Takayama, Koji; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Niikura, Takahiro; Fujishiro, Takaaki; Hiranaka, Takafumi; Nishida, Kotaro; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2017-03-14

    This study investigated the mechanical properties of a new rectangular compaction blade and compared this blade with other types of nail. Three types of nail were tested: the Magnum lag screw (Robert Reid Inc, Tokyo, Japan), proximal femoral nail, and Magnum Fid blade (Robert Reid Inc). The nails were inserted into solid rigid polyurethane foam, and the torsional moments were loaded with an Instron testing machine (Instron, Kanagawa, Japan). The force curve was recorded, and the average maximum torque was calculated from this curve. A simulation study was performed with finite element models to determine the mechanism underlying differences in rotational stability. Mechanical testing showed that the new compaction blade had stronger resistance against rotational force than the helical blade and lag screw implants. Finite element analysis also showed that the new compaction blade had stronger resistance to migration of the polyurethane foam cylinder than the other implant types. In addition, the new compaction blade had strong rotational stability. This implant should be useful for the treatment of unstable trochanteric fracture in patients with osteoporosis. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  2. Geometry of proximal femur in the prediction of femoral neck fracture in the elderly female Thai population.

    PubMed

    Lektrakul, Nittaya; Ratarasarn, Onravee

    2009-09-01

    A retrospective study of two groups of 157 patients with one-sided hip fracture and 157 aged matched control group was performed in Siriraj hospital. Geometric measurement of femoral neck was performed as hip axis length (HAL), femoral neck length (FNL), femoral neck width (FNW), femoral head diameter (FHD), acetabular bone width (ABW), and femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA). All geographic parameters are higher in length/width or degree in the femoral neck fracture group than in the normal control group. Among these parameters, ABW has the strongest association with femoral neck fracture (p 0.000, odds ratio = 2.85), followed by FNW (p 0.001, odds ratio = 2.51). According to the low sensitivity and specificity, and ROC curve, using this parameter as a screening tool for femoral neck fracture is still questionable. Further prospective study with a standard position, interval changing of femoral geometry, or combined with bone density or femoral architecture is suggested.

  3. The Influence of Arthroscopic Remplissage for Engaging Hill-Sachs Lesions Combined with Bankart Repair on Redislocation and Shoulder Function Compared with Bankart Repair Alone

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Hun; Cha, Jae-Ryong; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Choe, Chang-Gyu; Kim, Min-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrence of glenohumeral dislocation after arthroscopic Bankart repair can be associated with a large osseous defect in the posterosuperior part of the humeral head. Our hypothesis is that remplissage is more effective to prevent recurrence of glenohumeral instability without a severe motion deficit. Methods Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions were observed in 48 of 737 patients (6.5%). Twenty-four patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage (group I) and the other 24 patients underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair alone (group II). Clinical outcomes were prospectively evaluated by assessing the range of motion. Complications, recurrence rates, and functional results were assessed utilizing the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Rowe score, and the Korean Shoulder Score for Instability (KSSI) score. Capsulotenodesis healing after remplissage was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. Results The average ASES, Rowe, and KSSI scores were statistically significantly higher in group I than group II. The frequency of recurrence was statistically significantly higher in group II. The average loss in external rotation measured with the arm positioned at the side of the trunk was greater in group II and that in abduction was also higher in group II. Conclusions Compared to single arthroscopic Bankart repair, the remplissage procedure combined with arthroscopic Bankart repair was more effective to prevent the recurrence of anterior shoulder instability without significant impact on shoulder mobility in patients who had huge Hill-Sachs lesions. PMID:27904726

  4. Differences in Femoral Geometry and Structure Due to Immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiratli, Beatrice Jenny; Yamada, M.; Smith, A.; Marcus, R. M.; Arnaud, S.; vanderMeulen, M. C. H.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Reduction in bone mass of the lower extremity is well documented in individuals with paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI). The consequent osteopenia leads to elevated fracture risk with fractures occurring more commonly in the femoral shaft and supracondylar regions than the hip. A model has recently been described to estimate geometry and structure of the femoral midshaft from whole body scans by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Increases in femoral geometric and structural properties during growth were primarily related to mechanical loading as reflected by body mass. In this study, we investigate the relationship between body mass and femoral geometry and structure in adults with normal habitual mechanical loading patterns and those with severely reduced loading. The subjects were 78 ambulatory men (aged 20-72 yrs) and 113 men with complete paralysis from SCI of more than 4 years duration (aged 21 73 yrs). Subregional analysis was performed on DXA whole body scans to obtain bone mineral content (BMC, g), cortical thickness (cm), crosssectional moment of inertia (CSMI, cm4), and section modulus (cm3) of the femoral midshaft. All measured bone variables were significantly lower in SCI compared with ambulatory subjects: -29% (BMC), -33% (cortical thickness), -23% (CSMI), and -22% (section modulus) while body mass was not significantly different. However, the associations between body mass and bone properties were notably different; r2 values were higher for ambulatory than SCI subjects in regressions of body mass on BMC (0.48 vs 0.20), CSMI (0.59 vs 0.32), and section modulus (0.59 vs 0.31). No association was seen between body mass and cortical thickness for either group. The greatest difference between groups is in the femoral cortex, consistent with reduced bone mass via endosteal expansion. The relatively lesser difference in geometric and structural properties implies that there is less effect on mechanical integrity than would be expected from

  5. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large

  6. Computer assisted measurement of femoral cortex thickening on radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Yixun; Chen, Foster; Summers, Ronald M.; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Radiographic features such as femoral cortex thickening have been frequently observed with atypical subtrochanteric fractures. These features may be a valuable finding to help prevent fractures before they happen. The current practice of manual measurement is often subjective and inconsistent. We developed a semi-automatic tool to consistently measure and monitor the progress of femoral cortex thickening on radiographs. By placing two seed points on each side of the femur, the program automatically extracts the periosteal and endosteal layers of the cortical shell by active contour models and B-spline fitting. Several measurements are taken along the femur shaft, including shaft diameter, cortical thickness, and integral area for medial and lateral cortex. The experiment was conducted on 52 patient datasets. The semi-automatic measurements were validated against manual measurements on 52 patients and demonstrated great improvement in consistency and accuracy (p<0.001).

  7. Femoral deformity planning: intentional placement of the apex of deformity.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Camara, James M; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, correction of femoral deformity has been performed with osteotomies through the center of rotation of angulation (CORA), but the CORA location is not always practical. If the osteotomy is created at a site adjacent to the CORA, an additional translation must be performed to accurately correct the deformity. However, at times, the ideal osteotomy site may require an unfeasible amount of translation. Multiple osteotomies may also be problematic, and when overcorrection of the mechanical axis is planned, the CORA method is not practical.This article describes a novel method by which the surgeon may choose the location of the osteotomy regardless of the location of the CORA and may consolidate a multiapical deformity into a single corrective osteotomy. Furthermore, intentional mechanical axis overcorrection may be performed to unload knee joint arthritis. Simple, complex, and multiapical deformities may now be corrected via a single familiar surgical procedure, such as a distal femoral osteotomy, and the need for translation is eliminated.

  8. Intraoperative Proximal Femoral Fracture in Primary Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Danielle Y; Shahi, Alisina; Park, Andrew G; Purtill, James J

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative proximal femoral fracture is a complication of primary cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) at rates of 2.95-27.8%. A retrospective review of 2423 consecutive primary cementless THA cases identified 102 hips (96 patients) with fracture. Multivariate analysis compared fracture incidences between implants, Accolade (Stryker Orthopaedics) and Tri-Lock (DePuy Orthopaedics, Inc.), and evaluated potential risk factors using a randomized control group of 1150 cases without fracture. The fracture incidence was 4.4% (102/2423), 3.7% (36/1019) using Accolade and 4.9% using Tri-Lock (66/1404) (P=0.18). Female gender (OR=1.96; 95% CI 1.19-3.23; P=0.008) and smaller stem size (OR=1.64; 95% CI 1.04-2.63; P=0.03) predicted increased odds of fracture. No revisions of the femoral component were required in the fracture cohort.

  9. Osteomyelitis of Bilateral Femoral Heads After Childbirth: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Kong, Sangwon; Kim, Junho; Kim, Taikon; Choi, Chan Beom; Kim, Yee-Suk; Lee, Kyu Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Hip and pelvic pain during pregnancy or after delivery is a common problem in young females, and in most cases this problem has a self-limiting course. The patient described in this case suffered from severe hip pain after childbirth. MR imaging study was performed and it showed arthritis of bilateral hip joints and osteomyelitis of femoral heads with an abscess in the surrounding muscle. Infection, such as septic arthritis or osteomyelitis, is an extremely rare cause of peripartum joint pain. The patient's clinical symptoms and laboratory findings improved with antibiotic therapy. However, limitation of motion of the bilateral hip joints persisted although the patient continued rehabilitative therapy for 15 months, and the patient had to undergo bilateral total hip replacement. Hereby, we present a case of severe osteomyelitis and pyogenic arthritis of bilateral femoral heads and hip joints after delivery, which eventually required bilateral total hip replacement.

  10. Osteomyelitis of Bilateral Femoral Heads After Childbirth: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Kong, Sangwon; Kim, Junho; Kim, Taikon; Choi, Chan Beom; Kim, Yee-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Hip and pelvic pain during pregnancy or after delivery is a common problem in young females, and in most cases this problem has a self-limiting course. The patient described in this case suffered from severe hip pain after childbirth. MR imaging study was performed and it showed arthritis of bilateral hip joints and osteomyelitis of femoral heads with an abscess in the surrounding muscle. Infection, such as septic arthritis or osteomyelitis, is an extremely rare cause of peripartum joint pain. The patient's clinical symptoms and laboratory findings improved with antibiotic therapy. However, limitation of motion of the bilateral hip joints persisted although the patient continued rehabilitative therapy for 15 months, and the patient had to undergo bilateral total hip replacement. Hereby, we present a case of severe osteomyelitis and pyogenic arthritis of bilateral femoral heads and hip joints after delivery, which eventually required bilateral total hip replacement. PMID:26161359

  11. The True Deep Femoral Artery Aneurysm: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Lee Chan; Park, Sung Su

    2017-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with a palpable pulsatile mass and pain in his left thigh was presented to us. He had no history of trauma in his left leg, interventions, operation, or medical diseases, including cardiac valve disease, endocarditis, and systemic infection. The size of the aneurysm was 10 cm×7 cm with a mural thrombus in ultrasonography and multidetector computer tomography. There was no evidence of other aneurysms or occlusive lesions in the other arteries. The aneurysm was resected without a vascular reconstruction of the deep femoral artery. The patient’s symptom improved rapidly. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery without complications. We report a case of true deep femoral artery aneurysm, which was successfully treated with resection of an aneurysm without a vascular reconstruction. PMID:28377912

  12. PROXIMAL FEMORAL EPIPHYSIOLYSIS AND SUBCLINICAL HYPOTHYROIDISM: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Grasiele Correa; Grossi, Gabriela; Coelho, Sílvio Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Proximal femoral epiphysiolysis is an orthopedic disease that is prevalent during adolescence, because this coincides with the time of greatest growth of osteomuscular structures. Curiously, some patients present this disease early, and this outcome converts to the possible etiological explanation that the slippage might occur through a growth spurt. For these patients, the genesis of the slippage has not yet been elucidated, but endocrine disorders have been noted as possible causes. In an attempt to strengthen the theory of endocrinological etiology and present the results from surgical treatment for this pathological condition, the case of a male patient aged 9 years and 3 months with proximal femoral epiphysiolysis and subclinical hypothyroidism who was diagnosed and treated at our university's teaching hospital is reported here. PMID:27047883

  13. Femoral anatomy of Aegyptopithecus zeuxis, an early oligocene anthropoid.

    PubMed

    Ankel-Simons, F; Fleagle, J G; Chatrath, P S

    1998-08-01

    Three partial femora from Quarries I and M of the early Oligocene Jebel Qatrani Formation in the Fayum of Egypt are attributed to Aegyptopithecus zeuxis on the basis of their appropriate size and anthropoid morphology. Compared with extant catarrhines, Aegyptopithecus is unusual in having a distinct gluteal tuberosity (third trochanter) and a relatively deep distal femoral articulation. In the estimated neck angle, Aegyptopithecus resembles arboreal quadrupeds rather than either leaping or suspensory primates. It seems likely that the femur of this species was relatively robust and short for its body mass. In aspects of its femoral anatomy, Aegyptopithecus is quite different from the parapithecid Apidium and more similar to Catopithecus from late Eocene deposits of the Fayum, and also to small hominoids from the Miocene of East Africa.

  14. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis and Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Anas A.; Ahmad, Maswood M.; Almalki, Mussa H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of reporting this case is to highlight the association of two disorders, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). They are usually seen in two different age groups and rarely together. PHPT is a rare cause of SCFE and only 10 cases have been reported in the literature worldwide. The patient in our report is a 13-year-old girl who presented to our clinic with bilateral knee pain and a waddling gait. Subsequent investigations showed that she had PHPT and SCFE with low bone mass. On admission, a parathyroidectomy was performed; then, the slipped femoral epiphyses were fixed with satisfactory results. A systematic algorithmic approach that was illustrated in a previously published case was used. Such cases should be managed with a systematic approach based on the patient’s clinical status to prevent future morbidity. A literature review was conducted by performing a Medline search of all reported cases of PHPT and SCFEs. PMID:27920593

  15. A Case of Femoral Fracture in Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Sam; Wong, Fabian; Back, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) who presented with severe bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Preoperative planning was commenced for a total knee replacement (TKR). Whilst on the waiting list the patient suffered a fall and sustained a complete femoral diaphysis fracture. Conservative management in the form of skin traction was initially chosen as significant extra- and intramedullary vascular malformations posed an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. This failed to progress to union, and so open reduction and internal fixation was performed. This subsequently resulted in on-going delayed union, which was subsequently managed with low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS, otherwise known as Exogen (Bioventus. exogen. Secondary exogen, 2012)). There are only two previous documented cases of femoral fracture in KTS. This is the first report of a patient with this rare syndrome receiving this treatment. We discuss the management of fracture in this challenging group of patients. PMID:25478269

  16. Arthroscopic Marginal Resection of a Lipoma of the Supraspinatus Muscle in the Subacromial Space

    PubMed Central

    Pagán Conesa, Alejandro; Aznar, Carlos Verdú; Herrera, Manuel Ruiz; Lopez-Prats, Fernando Anacleto

    2015-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain in young adults and seniors at present. The etiology of this syndrome is associated with several shoulder disorders, most related to aging, overhead activities, and overuse. The subacromial space is well circumscribed and limited in size, and soft-tissue growing lesions, such as tumors, can endanger the normal function of the shoulder girdle. We present a case of shoulder impingement syndrome caused by an intramuscular lipoma of the supraspinatus muscle in the subacromial space in a 50-year-old male bank manager. Radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and a computed tomography scan showed a well-circumscribed soft-tissue tumor at the supraspinatus-musculotendinous junction. It was arthroscopically inspected and dissected and complete marginal excision was performed through a conventional augmented anterolateral portal, avoiding the need to open the trapezius fascia or perform an acromial osteotomy. Microscopic study showed a benign lipoma, and the shoulder function of the patient was fully recovered after a rehabilitation period of 4 months. This less invasive technique shows similar results to conventional open surgery. PMID:26759779

  17. Arthroscopic decompressive medial release of the varus arthritic knee: Expanding the functional envelope.

    PubMed

    Leon, H O; Blanco, C E; Guthrie, T B

    2001-05-01

    We present the rationale and technique for treating medial knee osteoarthritis by dynamically unloading the medial compartment of the knee. Recent advances in kinematic studies indicate a dynamic linkage between differing degrees of freedom in the knee joint. Both the adduction moment and the foot progression angle are important determinants of medial compartment loading. The medially osteoarthritic knee has progressive compromise of free motion in more than 1 plane. Arthroscopic decompressive medial release unloads the medial compartment by release of the medial capsule and medial collateral ligament in the presence of intact cruciate ligaments, which may allow a decreased adduction moment and decrease of the external rotation restraint in extension found in more severely osteoarthritic knees. A case series of 38 patients with medial gonarthrosis was treated by this technique at the Hermanos Ameijeiras Hospital in Havana, Cuba. All patients had good results without postoperative valgus instability or significant complications. We feel that this technique warrants further clinical and biomechanical study for its use in isolation or in combination with high tibial osteotomy or minimally invasive selective osteotomy for the treatment of medial gonarthrosis of the knee. A minimally invasive, selective approach to biomechanical factors in osteoarthritis may be combined with other modulating techniques in efforts to forestall or prevent the need for total joint replacement.

  18. Treatment of Hemophilic Ankle Arthropathy with One-Step Arthroscopic Bone Marrow–Derived Cells Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Roberto; Cavallo, Marco; Cenacchi, Annarita; Natali, Simone; Vannini, Francesca; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ankle arthropathy is a frequent and invalidating manifestation of hemophilia. Arthrodesis is the gold standard surgical procedure in end-stage disease, with many drawbacks in young patients. Recent literature has shown increase interest in regenerative procedures in hemophilic arthropathy, which may be desirable to delay or even avoid arthrodesis. The aim of this article is to present five cases of osteochondral lesions in ankle hemophilic arthropathy treated with a regenerative procedure: bone marrow–derived cells transplantation (BMDCT). Design We report five hemophilic patients (four cases with hemophilia type A; one case with hemophilia type B) who have undergone BMDCT treatment, synovectomy, and arthroscopic debridement, with the use of autologous platelet-rich fibrin, to treat osteochondral lesions in hemophilic ankle arthropathy. The patients, included within this retrospective study, were clinically and radiologically evaluated with serial follow-ups, using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores, radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 35. After a mean follow-up of 2 years, the mean postoperative AOFAS score was 81, which included three patients returning back to sporting activities. The MRI Mocart score demonstrated signs of regeneration of chondral and bony tissue. No progression of joint degeneration was shown radiographically. Conclusion BMDCT is a promising regenerative treatment for osteochondral lesions in mild ankle hemophilic arthropathy, which may be useful to delay or even avoid ankle arthrodesis. Nevertheless, longer follow-ups and a larger case series are required. PMID:26175860

  19. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  20. Ketamine in outpatient arthroscopic shoulder surgery: Effects on postoperative pain, hemodynamic stability and process times

    PubMed Central

    Schotola, Hanna; Kirsch, Karl-Christian; Höcker, Jan; Egan, Michael; Büttner, Benedikt; Wiese, Christoph; Mansur, Ashham; Hinz, José Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery is often severe, and establishing a pain treatment regimen that does not delay discharge can be challenging. The reported ability of ketamine to prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia has not been investigated in this particular setting. Methods 300 adult patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy under general anesthesia were recruited for this observational clinical trial and were allotted to either receive 1mg/kg IV bolus of ketamine before surgery (ketamine group, KG) or to a control group (CG) without ketamine. NRS pain scores were obtained on the operative day and on postoperative days 1 and 2 and compared between groups. Secondary variables were blood pressure, heart rate, process times, satisfaction with the anesthetic and unwanted effects. Results Pain severity did not differ significantly between the groups at any time. Propofol injection rate and cumulative dose were higher in the KG. Heart rates and blood pressures were similar. Time to emergence and time in PACU were longer and vomiting was more frequent in patients given ketamine. Conclusion Preoperative low-dose ketamine added to a general anesthetic does not reduce perioperative pain after outpatient shoulder arthroscopy. It increases procedural times and the incidence of PONV.

  1. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  2. Arthroscopically Assisted Two-stage Cementation Technique for a Periarticular Knee Lesion.

    PubMed

    Christoforou, Dimitrios; Golant, Alexander; Ort, Paul J

    2010-03-01

    Managing skeletal metastatic disease can be a challenging task for the orthopedic surgeon. In patients who have poor survival prognoses or are poor candidates for extensive reconstructive procedures, management with intralesional curettage and stabilization with bone cement with or without internal fixation to prevent development or propagation of a pathologic fracture may be the best option. The use of bone cement is preferable over the use of bone graft, as it allows for immediate postoperative weight bearing on the affected extremity.This article describes a case where the combined use of arthroscopy and a 2-stage cementation technique may allow preservation of the articular surface and optimization of short-term functional outcome after curettage of a periarticular metastatic lesion in a patient with an end-stage malignancy. We used knee arthroscopy to identify any articular penetration or intra-articular loose bodies after curettage and initial cementation of the periarticular lesion of the distal femur. Arthroscopic evaluation was carried out again after the lesion was packed with cement to identify and remove any loose intra-articular debris. The applicability of this technique is broad, and it can be used in any procedure involving cement packing in a periarticular location. Performed with caution, this technique can be a useful adjunct to surgical management of both malignant and locally aggressive benign bone lesions in periarticular locations.

  3. [Controversies in the therapy of rotator cuff tears. Operative or nonoperative treatment, open or arthroscopic repair?].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain that may lead to severe impairment of shoulder function with significant limitation of the quality of life. Furthermore, they are associated with high direct and indirect costs.Conservative therapy and various surgical procedures for rotator cuff repair are all possible treatment options. Therefore, the correct treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear is important.The conservative therapy may be considered as an alternative treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in patients with small or incomplete tears with no fatty atrophy or tendon retraction, with only slight pain, and in older patients with few functional demands. Surgical treatment is recommended after failed conservative treatment lasting 3-6 months, with the corresponding psychological strain. Moreover, surgical treatment should be considered as a primary treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in young patients with high functional demands, patients with a high level of physical strain in their jobs, large tears, and tears where there is already significant muscle atrophy or tendon retraction.Arthroscopic treatment is considered to be the gold standard because of the better cosmetic results and treatment of concomitant pathological conditions, the lower levels of postoperative pain, the potentially lower risk of shoulder stiffness, and more focused adhesiolysis. However, arthroscopy does not improve clinical results. Because of the current financial situation, however, open rotator cuff repair is still a viable alternative.

  4. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  5. Augmentation of proximal femoral nail in unstable trochanteric fractures

    PubMed Central

    Gadegone, Wasudeo M.; Shivashankar, Bhaskaran; Lokhande, Vijayanad; Salphale, Yogesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Biomechanically proximal femoral nail (PFN) is a better choice of implant, still it is associated with screw breakage, cut out of screw through femoral head, Z effect, reverse Z effect, and lateral migration of screws. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of augmented PFN in terms of prevention of postoperative complications and failure rates in unstable trochanteric fractures. Material and methods: We carried out a prospective study of 82 cases with unstable trochanteric femoral fractures from April 2010 to December 2015. Forty-two females and 40 males in the age group between 58 and 81 years were included in this study. There were 45 cases of AO 31 A2 (2.2, 2.3) and 37 cases of AO 31 A3 (3.1, 3.2, 3.3). Fractures were fixed by PFN with augmentation by an additional screw from trochanter to inferior quadrant of femoral head or cerclage wire to strengthen the lateral trochanteric wall. Results: The bone healing is observed in all the cases in the mean period of 14.2 weeks. Nine patients developed complications, including lateral migration of neck screws (n = 5), Z effect (n = 1), infection (n = 2), and breakage of distal interlocking bolt in one case. Removal of screws was required in five cases. Patients were followed up for a mean of 8.4 months. At the end of follow-up the Salvati and Wilson hip function was 32 (out of 40) in 88% of patients. Conclusion: The stabilization of lateral trochanteric wall with additional screw or cerclage wire increases the stability of construct. PMID:28186871

  6. [Merle D'Aubigne's oblique proximal femoral osteotomy. Surgical technique].

    PubMed

    López Sosa, Francisco H; Valentín-Guerrero, Santiago; Miranda-López, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Proximal femoral osteotomy with the technique described by Merle D'AubignC and Valliant was used in the treatment of adult patients with osteoarthritis or idiopathic avascular necrosis. Dr. Antonio Flores applied this technique to children with subluxation and acetabular dysplasia, identified with exaggerated anteversion and valgus of the proximal femur. He reported correction of the deformity in 75% of patients. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technique, its indications and complications.

  7. Muscle strength and knee range of motion after femoral lengthening

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Woelber, Erik; Apelyan, Arman; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Femoral lengthening may result in decrease in knee range of motion (ROM) and quadriceps and hamstring muscle weakness. We evaluated preoperative and postoperative knee ROM, hamstring muscle strength, and quadriceps muscle strength in a diverse group of patients undergoing femoral lengthening. We hypothesized that lengthening would not result in a significant change in knee ROM or muscle strength. Patients and methods This prospective study of 48 patients (mean age 27 (9–60) years) compared ROM and muscle strength before and after femoral lengthening. Patient age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, level of osteotomy, fixation time, and method of lengthening were also evaluated regarding knee ROM and strength. The average length of follow-up was 2.9 (2.0–4.7) years. Results Mean amount of lengthening was 5.2 (2.4–11.0) cm. The difference between preoperative and final knee flexion ROM was 2° for the overall group. Congenital shortening cases lost an average of 5% or 6° of terminal knee flexion, developmental cases lost an average of 3% or 4°, and posttraumatic cases regained all motion. The difference in quadriceps strength at 45° preoperatively and after lengthening was not statistically or clinically significant (2.7 Nm; p = 0.06). Age, amount of lengthening, percent lengthening, osteotomy level, fixation time, and lengthening method had no statistically significant influence on knee ROM or quadriceps strength at final follow-up. Interpretation Most variables had no effect on ROM or strength, and higher age did not appear to be a limiting factor for femoral lengthening. Patients with congenital causes were most affected in terms of knee flexion. PMID:27892743

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  9. Femoral Nerve Palsy due to Anticoagulant Induced Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Orcun; Ercan, Abdulkadir; Kumtepe, Gencehan; Karal, İlker Hasan; Velioglu, Yusuf; Ener, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    A forty-one-year-old man who, sought evaluation for a sudden hip flexion contracture and groin pain with a history of mechanical mitral valve replacement, had been misdiagnosed and treated as having lumbar discopathy for two days. This patient finally was diagnosed with compressive femoral neuropathy due to warfarin-induced retroperitoneal hematoma and successfully managed nonoperatively. This case is reported in order to draw attention to this rare presentation. PMID:25386195

  10. Femoral neck non-union treatment by valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy in femoral neck non-union. METHODS : Forty-two patients with femoral neck fractures with non-union treated using Pauwels' intertrochanteric osteotomy were reviewed. Demographics, time elapsed between fracture and surgery, follow--up, osteosynthesis used, Garden's classification, limb shortening, and x-rays were evaluated. RESULTS : Twenty-two men and 20 women were reviewed. The youngest patient was 18 years old and the oldest 65 years old, with a mean age of 42.4 years (±11.2). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, with a mean of 10.2 years. The average time elapsed between initial fracture and osteotomy was 6.5 months. Twel-ve cases were neglected femoral neck fractures. Nineteen patients were classified as Garden III, and 23 patients as Garden IV. After valgus osteotomy, non-union healing was observed in 38 patients (38/42; 90.4%). Healing of thirty-seven cases of pseudoarthrosis were obtained after the first-attempt osteotomy, and one case required two operations for healing. The osteotomy failed in four cases. Conside-ring the healed osteotomies, good to excellent functional results were achieved in 80.9% (34/42) of the patients. Total hip replacement was subsequently performed in 14.2% (6/42) of the patients for unfavoura-ble outcomes (two for cutting out, two for osteonecrosis, and two for osteoarthritis). CONCLUSIONS : Valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy has a high success rate in archiving healing in femoral neck non-union with good functional results. It is a biological and effective method. Level of Evidence IV, Therapeutic Study. PMID:27057146

  11. Splitting of the Proximal Femur With a New Femoral Nail

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    offset from the top of this particular nail to its long axis. Key Words: lateral entry, trochanteric nail , intramedullary nailing , femur, complication...trochanteric intramedullary femoral nailing . J Orthop Trauma. 2005;19:681–686. 8. McConnell T, Tornetta P III, Benson E, et al. Gluteus medius tendon injury...Germany: Stryker Trauma; 2006: 191–199. 11. Gerhard Küntscher. Practice of Intramedullary Nailing . Translated by Herman Rinne. Springfield, IL: Thomas

  12. Slipped Distal Femoral Epiphysis in Congenital Insensitivity to Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, M Javed; Rex, C; Vignesh, R; Chavan, Madhav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare disorder, and often presents to an orthopaedic surgeon as recurrent fractures, dislocations, pseudoarthrosis, osteomyelitis etc. Here, we report a case of congenital insensitivity to pain presenting with distal femoral physeal separation in a child. Case Report: A 12-year-old girl child came with complaints of limp while walking and swelling in the left knee for past 5 weeks. Mother gave a history that the girl is a known case of congenital insensitivity to pain with clear history of no pain on intramuscular injection since birth. She was born of consanguineous marriage and had no significant trauma, fever, other joint involvement or any features of rheumatism. On local examination, she had no bony tenderness, mild warmth, and moderate knee effusion with restricted range of movement. Plain radiograph showed epiphysiolysis of distal femur with widening of physis. Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated gross movement indicating lower femoral physeal separation. This unstable distal femoral epiphysis was treated under general anaesthesia with closed reduction, percutaneous cross pinning and above knee plaster cast. Conclusion: Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare disorder to diagnose. Emphasis is given on early diagnosis of orthopaedic problems and prompt treatment, educating parents and prevention of accidents. Physeal separation without significant trauma must prompt an orthopaedic surgeon to think about congenital insensitivity to pain as a differential diagnosis. PMID:27703943

  13. Large diameter femoral heads: is bigger always better?

    PubMed

    Cooper, H J; Della Valle, C J

    2014-11-01

    Dislocation remains among the most common complications of, and reasons for, revision of both primary and revision total hip replacements (THR). Hence, there is great interest in maximising stability to prevent this complication. Head size has been recognised to have a strong influence on the risk of dislocation post-operatively. As femoral head size increases, stability is augmented, secondary to an increase in impingement-free range of movement. Larger head sizes also greatly increase the 'jump distance' required for the head to dislocate in an appropriately positioned cup. Level-one studies support the use of larger diameter heads as they decrease the risk of dislocation following primary and revision THR. Highly cross-linked polyethylene has allowed us to increase femoral head size, without a marked increase in wear. However, the thin polyethylene liners necessary to accommodate larger heads may increase the risk of liner fracture and larger heads have also been implicated in causing soft-tissue impingement resulting in groin pain. Larger diameter heads also impart larger forces on the femoral trunnion, which may contribute to corrosion, metal release, and adverse local tissue reactions. Alternative large bearings including large ceramic heads and dual mobility bearings may mitigate some of these risks, and several of these devices have been used with clinical success.

  14. [Femoral venous catheterization. Does it really need to be avoided?].

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; León, C

    2009-12-01

    The guidelines to prevent central venous catheter related bloodstream infections (CVCBSI) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of 2002, Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias/ Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEMICYUC/SEIMC) of 2004, and the recently published guidelines of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America/Infectious Diseases Society of America (SHEA(IDSA) of 2008 have recommended using the subclavian vein and avoiding the use of the femoral vein. They also recommend considering the use of antiseptic- or antimicrobial-impregnated CVCs for hospital units or groups of patients with a high incidence of CVCBSI. When implementing these guidelines, two questions could be asked: 1) Could the abuse of the subclavian vein and avoiding the use of the femoral vein imply a decrease in the incidence of CVCBSI, but an increase in the rate of mechanical complications as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax? 2) Couldn't antimicrobial-impregnated CVCs be used to prevent CVCBSI when the femoral venous access is used?

  15. Implant Size Availability Affects Reproduction of Distal Femoral Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Morris, William Z; Gebhart, Jeremy J; Goldberg, Victor M; Wera, Glenn D

    2016-07-01

    A total knee arthroplasty system offers more distal femoral implant anterior-posterior (AP) sizes than its predecessor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of increased size availability on an implant system's ability to reproduce the AP dimension of the native distal femur. We measured 200 cadaveric femora with the AP-sizing guides of Zimmer (Warsaw, IN) NexGen (8 sizes) and Zimmer Persona (12 sizes) total knee arthroplasty systems. We defined "size deviation" as the difference in the AP dimension between the anatomic size of the native femur and the closest implant size. We defined satisfactory reproduction of distal femoral dimensions as < 1 mm difference between the implant and native femur size. The NexGen system was associated with a mean 0.46 mm greater implant size deviation than Persona (p < 0.001). When using a 1 mm size deviation as a cutoff for satisfactory replication of the native distal femoral anatomy, 85/200 specimens (42.5%) were a poor fit by NexGen, but a satisfactory fit by Persona. Only 1/200 specimens (0.5%) was a poor fit by Persona, but a satisfactory fit by NexGen (p < 0.001). The novel knee system with 12 versus 8 sizes reproduces the AP dimension of the native distal femur more closely than its predecessor. Further study is needed to determine the clinical impact of these differences.

  16. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  17. Subtrochanteric Femoral Insufficiency Fracture Following Bisphosphonate Therapy for Osseous Metastases.

    PubMed

    Bush, Lisabeth A; Chew, Felix S

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of an insufficiency fracture of the femoral shaft in a 61-year-old man who had received bisphosphonate therapy to reduce the fracture risk from lytic renal cell carcinoma metastases to the spine. Approximately 1.5 years after beginning monthly intravenous infusions of zoledronic acid (Zometa), the patient complained of persistent thigh pain. Radionuclide bone scan showed mildly increased activity in the lateral subtrochanteric cortex of the right femur, where there was focally increased T2 signal on MRI and a small, triangular ridge or cortical beak on radiographs. The lesion was initially thought to represent a metastasis, but after the patient returned with a transverse femoral shaft fracture through the ridge following minimal trauma, MRI and biopsy of the lesion failed to show any evidence of tumor. We suggest that this fracture is similar to the low-energy proximal femoral shaft fractures recently reported in postmenopausal women who have received oral bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. Suppression of bone turnover may play a role in the development of these fractures.

  18. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  19. A Technical Note for Extracting an Incarcerated Femoral Kuntscher Nail

    PubMed Central

    Marí, R; Vilamala, D Valverde; García, A León; Guirro, P; López, F Marqués

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The use of the Kuntscher nail has been the most important advancement in trauma surgery. One of the problems is the difficulty to remove it. A new extraction technique is described in the present case report. Case Report: A 46-year-old man was referred for hip osteoarthritis. He had an acetabulum fracture and a femoral shaft fracture treated 30 years ago with a reamed Kuntscher femoral nail. Lateral hip approach was performed and after attempting to remove the nail with the specific tools being unsuccessful we decided to be more aggressive. Firstly, we performed a simple unicortical osteotomy on the lateral side from the proximal part to below the callus in order to decompress the femoral canal without success. Secondly, a trench in the greater trochanter around the proximal hole was performed to hit the nail from below which was still insufficient and furthermore, the hole broke when hitting the nail so we needed to drill a new hole distally. Finally, the Kuntscher nail was removed. Several cerclages closed the osteotomy and a bone graft was used to close the trench. The patient had a good evolution at one year of follow-up. Conclusion: With this case report, we present a new salvage technique to remove an incarcerated Kuntscher nail when all the described methods have failed. PMID:28116256

  20. Multiple Small Diameter Drillings Increase Femoral Neck Stability Compared with Single Large Diameter Femoral Head Core Decompression Technique for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip J; Mannava, Sandeep; Seyler, Thorsten M; Plate, Johannes F; Van Sikes, Charles; Stitzel, Joel D; Lang, Jason E

    2016-10-26

    Femoral head core decompression is an efficacious joint-preserving procedure for treatment of early stage avascular necrosis. However, postoperative fractures have been described which may be related to the decompression technique used. Femoral head decompressions were performed on 12 matched human cadaveric femora comparing large 8mm single bore versus multiple 3mm small drilling techniques. Ultimate failure strength of the femora was tested using a servo-hydraulic material testing system. Ultimate load to failure was compared between the different decompression techniques using two paired ANCOVA linear regression models. Prior to biomechanical testing and after the intervention, volumetric bone mineral density was determined using quantitative computed tomography to account for variation between cadaveric samples and to assess the amount of bone disruption by the core decompression. Core decompression, using the small diameter bore and multiple drilling technique, withstood significantly greater load prior to failure compared with the single large bore technique after adjustment for bone mineral density (p< 0.05). The 8mm single bore technique removed a significantly larger volume of bone compared to the 3mm multiple drilling technique (p< 0.001). However, total fracture energy was similar between the two core decompression techniques. When considering core decompression for the treatment of early stage avascular necrosis, the multiple small bore technique removed less bone volume, thereby potentially leading to higher load to failure.

  1. [Femoral arteriovenous fistula: a late uncommon complication of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Conz, P A; Malagoli, A; Normanno, M; Munaro, D

    2007-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was admitted due to AV graft thrombosis; given the technical impossibility of performing other native AV fistulas, we chose to insert a tunnelled central venous catheter. Considering the vascular history of the patient, the central venous catheter could not be placed into the internal jugular vein; it was therefore put into the left femoral vein. Following a 3-month-period of the catheter working properly, the patient was hospitalized due to sudden acute pain in the left thigh. In a few days the patient developed an important haematoma with serious anemization in the left lower limb. Ultrasonography showed the presence of a fistula between the left common femoral artery and the femoral vein, leading to the subsequent successful positioning of a stent into the common femoral artery through right trans-femoral access. Angiography examination showed the femoral vein patency along the proximal stretch with respect to the function of the tunnelled venous catheter.

  2. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head, nonunion and potential risk factors in Pauwels grade-3 femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue-Lei; Chen, Song; Ai, Zi-Sheng; Gao, You-Shui; Mei, Jiong; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study was to analyze clinical outcome of Pauwels grade-3 femoral neck fractures treated by different surgical techniques. Potential risk factors associated with nonunion and osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) were investigated as well. The retrospective study comprised of 67 sequential patients treated between January 2008 and December 2011. Patients with Pauwels grade-3 femoral neck fractures were treated by operative reduction and internal fixation. Cannulated screws (CS) were used in 46 patients, dynamic hip screw plus CS (DHS+CS) in 14, and locking compression plate (LCP) for proximal femur in 7. Reduction quality was assessed according to Haidukewych criteria. Postoperative radiographic examinations were conducted to observe fracture healing. Fracture displacement, comminution, fashion of internal fixation, and the sliding effect were analyzed, regarding the incidence of nonunion and ONFH. All patients had a follow-up of 21.6 ± 6.0 months on average. The phenomenon of sliding effect was observed in 16 cases (23.9%). In terms of reduction quality, 64 cases were graded as excellent, 2 were good, and 1 was poor. ONFH was presented in 15 cases (22.4%) and nonunion was found in 8 (11.9%), with 1 patient had ONFH and nonunion concomitantly. Profound hip contour was preserved in 45 cases (67.2%). The fashion of internal fixation yielded different results regarding ONFH and nonunion, whereas the effects of fracture displacement, comminution, and the sliding effect were not significant. ONFH and nonunion were common complications following Pauwels grade-3 femoral neck fractures. Higher incidence of ONFH in DHS+CS and of nonunion in the LCP group should be noted. PMID:27310950

  3. Surgical hip dislocation in treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Elmarghany, Mohammed; Abd El-Ghaffar, Tarek M.; Seddik, Mahmoud; Akar, Ahmed; Gad, Yousef; Ragheb, Eissa; Aprato, Alessandro; Massè, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Background: Most surgeons advocate in situ fixation of the slipped epiphysis with acceptance of any persistent deformity in the proximal femur [Aronsson DD, Loder RT, Breur GJ, Weinstein SL (2006) Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: current concepts. J Am Acad Orthop Surg 14, 666–679]. This residual deformity can lead to osteoarthritis due to femoroacetabular cam impingement (FAI) [Leunig M, Slongo T, Ganz R (2008) Subcapital realignment in slipped capital femoral epiphysis: surgical hip dislocation and trimming of the stable trochanter to protect the perfusion of the epiphysis. Instr Course Lect 57, 499–507]. Objective: The primary aim of our study was to report the results of the technique of capital realignment with Ganz surgical hip dislocation and its reproducibility to restore hip anatomy and function. Patients and methods: This prospective case series study included 30 patients (32 hips, 13 left (Lt) hips, 19 right (Rt) hips) with stable chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) after surgical correction with a modified Dunn procedure. This study included 22 males and eight females. The mean age of our patients was 14 years (10–18 years). The mean follow-up period was 14.5 months (6–36 months). Results: Thirty hips had excellent and good clinical and radiographic outcomes with respect to hip function and radiographic parameters. Two patients had fair to poor clinical outcome including three patients who developed Avascular Necrosis (AVN). The difference between those who developed AVN and those who did not develop AVN was statistically significant in postoperative clinical scores (p = 0.0000). The mean slip angle of the femoral head was 52.5° ± 14.6 preoperatively and was corrected to a mean value of 5.6° ± 8.2° with mean correction of 46.85° ± 14.9° (p = 0.0000). The mean postoperative alpha angle was 51.15° ± 4.2° with mean correction of 46.70 ± 14.20 (p = 0.0000). In our series, the mean postoperative Harris hip

  4. Outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous equivalent suture bridge double row rotator cuff repair: a prospective study and short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohamed Abdelnabi; Abdelkafy, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: The transosseous-equivalent cross bridge double row (TESBDR) rotator cuff (RC) repair technique has been developed to optimize healing biology at a repaired RC tendon insertion. It has been shown in the laboratory to improve pressurized contact area and mean foot print pressure when compared with a double row anchor technique. Pressure has been shown to influence healing between tendon and bone, and the tendon compression vector provided by the transosseous-equivalent suture bridges may enhance healing. The purpose was to prospectively evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair. Methods: Single center prospective case series study. Sixty-nine patients were selected to undergo arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair and were included in the current study. Primary outcome measures included the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score, the Constant-Murley (CM) Score and Range of motion (ROM). Secondary outcome measures included a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, another VAS for patient satisfaction from the operative procedure, EuroQoL 5-Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D) for quality of life assessment. Results: At 24 months post-operative, average OSS score was 44, average UCLA score was 31, average CM score was 88, average forward flexion was 145°, average internal rotation was 35°, average external rotation was 79°, average abduction was 150°, average EQ-5D score was 0.73, average VAS for pain was 2.3, and average VAS for patient satisfaction was 9.2. Conclusion: Arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair is a procedure with good post-operative functional outcome and low re-tear rate based on a short term follow-up. PMID:27163096

  5. Can we improve the indication for Bankart arthroscopic repair? A preliminary clinical study using the ISIS score.

    PubMed

    Thomazeau, H; Courage, O; Barth, J; Pélégri, C; Charousset, C; Lespagnol, F; Nourissat, G; Audebert, S; Guillo, S; Toussaint, B; Lafosse, L; Bradel, J; Veillard, D; Boileau, P

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study on arthroscopic treatment of chronic anterior shoulder instability were the collection of the current practices for this indication, their development as reported in the literature, and the analysis of preliminary results on a multicenter prospective series of Bankart arthroscopic procedures undertaken using a common technique on patients selected based on the Instability Severity Index Score (ISIS). This procedure predominates in the English-speaking world, whereas the Latarjet protocol is preferred in France. The choice between the two seems to be cultural since neither technique could be demonstrated to be superior in an analysis of 171 responses to an Internet questionnaire in this study. The literature reports disappointing results in the Bankart arthroscopic procedure and recent articles have researched the predictive factors for its failure. Eleven centers prospectively included 125 patients from 1 December 2007 to 30 November 2008. The inclusion criteria were recurrence of anterior instability and an ISIS less than or equal to four points out of 10. All the selected patients underwent capsuloligamentous reinsertion with a common minimal technique of at least three anchors and four sutures with the same postoperative protocol. At a mean follow-up of 18 months, four patients (3.2%) had experienced recurrence. For the 84 patients reexamined at 1 year, the Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were, respectively, 88.4 and 87.8 points out of 100. Subjectively, 88.1% of the patients declared they were satisfied and would undergo the intervention again. This study confirmed the use of the ISIS as a consultation tool. Only continuation of the study with a minimum follow-up of 3 years will allow us to validate the lower limit of the ISIS below which this technique could be proposed provided that it respects the technical prerequisite of at least four capsuloligamentous sutures.

  6. Arthroscopic treatment of the atraumatic shoulder instability: a case series with two-year follow-up evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Gervasi, Enrico; Sebastiani, Enrico; Cautero, Enrico; Spicuzza, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The purpose of this work is to evaluate the results of arthroscopic capsulolabroplasty in patients affected by atraumatic shoulder instability (ASI). Methods A retrospective review was performed of 10 patients (7 women and 3 men) who underwent arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic ASI. Mean age at evaluation was 27.9 (19–35) years and the mean follow-up was 23.3 (12–37) months. We evaluated recurrence rate, range of movement, apprehension and relocation tests, hyperlaxity, and sport activity. The ASES score, the Rowe score, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were also used as outcomes measure. Results None of the patients experienced episodes of dislocation or subluxation after surgery. The apprehension and relocation tests produced positive results in 2 patients. Six out of 10 patients reported apprehension with the arm in specific positions. The ASES mean score was 93.4 (55–100); the Rowe mean score was 85.5 (70–100); the SST mean score was 9.1 (5.8–10). On average, external rotation is reduced by 10° in adduction, and by 8° in abduction in 6 out of 10 patients; internal rotation is reduced on average by 6.6° in abduction with the arm abducted, and was overall limited in 6 out of 10 patients. Conclusions Arthroscopic capsulolabroplasty ensures excellent results in patients showing atraumatic shoulder instability in terms of recurrence. Still, an underlying insecurity persists and the risk of residual stiffness is tangible. Level of evidence V. PMID:28217563

  7. Evaluation of functional results from shoulders after arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff tears associated with traumatic anterior dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; de Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Godinho, Pedro Couto

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff fixation and, when present, simultaneous repair of the Bankart lesion caused by traumatic dislocation; and to assess whether the size of the rotator cuff injury caused by traumatic dislocation has any influence on the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods Thirty-three patients with traumatic shoulder dislocation and complete rotator cuff injury, with at least two years of follow up, were retrospectively evaluated. For analysis purposes, the patients were divided into groups: presence of fixed Bankart lesion or absence of this lesion, and rotator cuff lesions smaller than 3.0 cm (group A) or greater than or equal to 3.0 cm (group B). All the patients underwent arthroscopic repair of the lesions and were evaluated postoperatively by means of the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score and strength measurements. Results The group with Bankart lesion repair had a postoperative UCLA score of 33.96, while the score of the group without Bankart lesion was 33.7, without statistical significance (p = 0.743). Group A had a postoperative UCLA score of 34.35 and group B, 33.15, without statistical significance (p = 0.416). Conclusion The functional outcomes of the patients who only presented complete rotator cuff tearing after traumatic shoulder dislocation, which underwent arthroscopic repair, were similar to the outcomes of those who presented an associated with a Bankart lesion that was corrected simultaneously with the rotator cuff injury. The extent of the original rotator cuff injury did not alter the functional results in the postoperative evaluation. PMID:27069884

  8. Report of experience in 190 patients with the use of closed suction drainage in arthroscopic knee procedures.

    PubMed

    Tatari, Hasan; Dervişbey, Mahmut; Muratli, Kivanç; Ergör, Alp

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study is to report our experience with the use of suction drainage for various arthroscopic knee procedures. One hundred and ninety patients who underwent arthroscopic knee procedures participated in the study, and were divided into two groups (Group 1: Suction drainage, Group 2: No suction drainage). For every patient, the following parameters were recorded: age, gender, operative time, tourniquet or pump use, the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain, presence of meniscal tear, type of the operative procedure, date of the operation, and presence of effusion at the follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed to detect any significant statistical difference between the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain and the other mentioned parameters in Group 1; and these patients were divided into four subgroups to facilitate the statistical evaluation between the procedures and the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain. The partial meniscectomy subgroup had significantly lower amounts of collected fluid when compared to the subtotal meniscectomy subgroup. Drilling of the osteochondral faces led to significantly higher amounts of fluid when compared to non-drilling cases. Use of an infusion pump during surgery and shorter operation time led to lower amounts of fluid to be collected. No case in either main group suffered from effusion at the follow-up. Our investigation demonstrated that in different arthroscopic interventions, variable amounts of fluid can be collected in the hemovac drains. Subtotal meniscal resection, drilling of the osteochondral faces and longer duration of the operation increase the amount of fluid. In cases of partial meniscal resection and/or chondral debridement, limited synovial and plica resection, suction drainage is unnecessary.

  9. Acetabular perforation after medial migration of the helical blade through the femoral head after treatment of an unstable trochanteric fracture with proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA): a case report.

    PubMed

    Takigami, Iori; Ohnishi, Kazuichiro; Ito, Yoshiki; Nagano, Akihito; Sumida, Hisashi; Tanaka, Kaori; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2011-09-01

    The proximal femoral nail antirotation is a new generation of intramedullary device for the treatment of trochanteric femoral fractures, having a helical blade rather than a screw for suggested better purchase in osteoporotic bone. However, it is not free of complications. Few reports are available on postoperative perforation of the helical blade through the femoral head as a unique complication of proximal femoral nail antirotation. We report a 79-year-old woman with acetabular perforation after migration of the helical blade through the femoral head after an unstable trochanteric fracture, which was fixed with a proximal femoral nail antirotation.

  10. Pelvic migration of the helical blade after treatment of transtrochanteric fracture using a proximal femoral nail.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Pedro Luciano Teixeira; Castelo, Luís Sá; Lopes, António Lemos; Maio, Marta; Miranda, Adélia; Dias, António Marques

    2016-01-01

    Proximal femoral nails with a helical blade are a new generation of implants used for treating transtrochanteric fractures. The blade design provides rotational and angular stability for the fracture. Despite greater biomechanical resistance, they sometimes present complications. In the literature, there are some reports of cases of perforation of the femoral head caused by helical blades. Here, a clinical case of medial migration of the helical blade through the femoral head and acetabulum into the pelvic cavity is presented.

  11. Effect of microgravity on renal and femoral flows during LBNP & intravenous saline load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Gaffney, F. A.; Beck, L.; Coulon, J.; Porcher, M.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    Renal and femoral hemodynamics were studied in crew members at rest and during lower body negative pressure before and after the D-2 Spacelab mission and with intravenous saline loading. Specific measurements included renal vascular resistance, femoral arterial flow, and vascular resistance, along with other cardiovascular parameters. Cardiovascular adaptation to microgravity is discussed with a focus on changes observed in femoral and renal vascular resistance.

  12. Bilateral Femoral Neck Stress Fracture Presented with Unilateral Symptoms in a Shipman Laborer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Santoso, Asep; Joo, Sang-Don; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Seol, Young-Jun; Yoon, Taek-Rim

    2017-01-01

    Femoral neck stress fracture occured commonly in athlete and military recruit populations, some of them are bilateral. Bilateral femoral neck stress fracture that associated with other occupation is very uncommon. We report a bilateral femoral neck stress fracture case that presented with unilateral symptoms in a male shipman laborer. The patient was successfully treated conservatively. Stress fracture sometimes occur associated with an unexpected specific occupation. Consideration of bilateral involvement is highly important in managing stress fracture. PMID:28316966

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative management for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Birmingham, Trevor B; Giffin, J Robert; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Feagan, Brian G; Litchfield, Robert; Willits, Kevin; Fowler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery in addition to non-operative treatments compared with non-operative treatments alone in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design, setting and participants We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a single-centre, randomised trial among patients with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (KL grade ≥2). Interventions Patients received arthroscopic debridement and partial resection of degenerative knee tissues in addition to optimised non-operative therapy, or optimised non-operative therapy only. Main outcome measures Direct and indirect costs were collected prospectively over the 2-year study period. The effectiveness outcomes were the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-effectiveness was estimated using the net benefit regression framework considering a range of willingness-to-pay values from the Canadian public payer and societal perspectives. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and conducted sensitivity analyses using the extremes of the 95% CIs surrounding mean differences in effect between groups. Results 168 patients were included. Patients allocated to arthroscopy received partial resection and debridement of degenerative meniscal tears (81%) and/or articular cartilage (97%). There were no significant differences between groups in use of non-operative treatments. The incremental net benefit was negative for all willingness-to-pay values. Uncertainty estimates suggest that even if willing to pay $400 000 to achieve a clinically important improvement in WOMAC score, or ≥$50 000 for an additional QALY, there is <20% probability that the addition of arthroscopy is cost-effective compared with non-operative therapies only. Our sensitivity analysis suggests that even when assuming the largest treatment effect, the addition of arthroscopic surgery is not economically attractive compared with non

  14. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC: Shetty-Kim technique) - A matrix based acellular single stage arthroscopic cartilage repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Kim, Seok Jung; Shetty, Vishvas; Jang, Jae Deog; Huh, Sung Woo; Lee, Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The defects of articular cartilage in the knee joint are a common degenerative disease and currently there are several established techniques to treat this problem, each with their own advantages and shortcomings. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard but the technique is expensive, time-consuming and most versions require two stage procedures and an arthrotomy. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) is a single-stage arthroscopic procedure and we developed. This method uses microfracture technique with atelocollagen mixed with fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We introduce this ACIC techniques and its scientific background.

  15. Comparison of efficacy of intraarticular application of tenoxicam, bupivacaine and tenoxicam: bupivacaine combination in arthroscopic knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Talu, Gül K; Ozyalçin, Süleyman; Koltka, Kemallettin; Ertürk, Engin; Akinci, Ozkan; Aşik, Mehmet; Pembeci, Kamil

    2002-11-01

    Arthroscopic knee surgery is one of the most common surgeries done in outpatient settings; however, postoperative pain is believed to be the major barrier for discharge and early rehabilitation. In this study we evaluated and compared the efficacy of intraarticular application of long-lasting non-steroidal analgesic drug tenoxicam, a long-lasting local anaesthetic bupivacaine and combination of the two on postoperative pain after arthroscopic knee surgery. With the approval of the local ethics committee and signed informed consent of the patients, 75 American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients aged between 18 and 65 years going under elective arthroscopic meniscectomy were included in this randomized, blind, prospective study. The patients were divided into three groups: group-T (GT) patients ( n=25) had intraarticular 20 mg of tenoxicam in 20 ml normal saline; group-B (GB) patients ( n=25) had 50 mg bupivacaine in 20 ml normal saline (0.25%); group-BT (GBT) patients ( n=25) had intraarticular 20 mg of tenoxicam and 50 mg bupivacaine (0.25%) in 20 ml normal saline after completion of the surgery and before deflation of the tourniquet. Postoperative analgesia was maintained by intravenous tramadol hydrochloride 50 mg/s at the first 4 h and paracetamol 500 mg and codeine 7.5 mg preparation (Pacofen) as needed (maximum six per day) during the study period. The numeric rating scale (NRS) values were at rest and at active-passive motion at 4, 12, 24 and 48 h, total analgesic consumption, at 4 h for tramadol and at the end of 48 h for oral medication; and patient satisfaction at the end of 48 h was evaluated and recorded. The demographic features of the patients, and tourniquet times, were found to be similar between the groups. Group BT had significantly lower NRS values than GB at 12 h at rest. Group BT was found to have significantly lower NRS values at 4 h compared with GT, and significantly lower NRS values at 12 h compared with GB. Group BT was found to

  16. Ossifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff after arthroscopic excision of calcium deposits: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Dave, Arpit C; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    Ossifying tendinitis (OT) is a type of heterotopic ossification, characterized by deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in a histologic pattern of mature lamellar bone. It is usually associated with surgical intervention or trauma and is more commonly seen in Achilles or distal biceps tendons, and also in the gluteus maximus tendon. To our knowledge, there is no description of OT as a complication of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff. In this report, we describe two cases in which the patients developed an OT of the supraspinatus after arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits. The related literature is reviewed.

  17. POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH AUTOGRAFT OF THE DOUBLE SEMITENDINOSUS MUSCLES AND MIDDLE THIRD OF THE QUADRICEPS TENDON WITH DOUBLE FEMORAL AND SINGLE TIBIAL TUNNELS: CLINICAL RESULTS IN TWO YEARS FOLLOW UP

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; Avakian, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surgical aspects that may offer good anatomic and functional results in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using an autologous graft of the quadriceps tendon and double semitendinosus through a double femoral tunnel. Methods: Fourteen patients with isolated PCL lesions, instability and pain were operated on by arthroscopy and evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scales. Posterior knee laxity was examined with a KT1000 arthrometer. Results: The mean postoperative posterior side-to-side difference was between 0-2 mm in 57.1% of patients and between 3 and 5 mm in 35.7% of cases. The average Lysholm score was 93 points in the final follow-up. In the IKDC evaluation, 3 patients were graded A, 10 were graded B, and 1 patient was graded C. Conclusions: Double bundle arthroscopic PCL reconstruction based on the anatomical positioning of the tunnels, with double semitendinosus tendon and single quadriceps, provides a clinically evident reduction in symptoms and restores satisfactory stability, although no statistically significant difference was found due to the small sample. PMID:27027083

  18. Posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement in the risk of knee flexion contracture.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Tomohiro; Majima, Tokifumi; Nishiike, Osamu; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the risk of knee flexion contracture associated with a posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement (TKR). Radiographs from 100 healthy Japanese volunteers were included in the study. We evaluated femoral component posterior offset in various implants and compared them with the normal Japanese knee. Posterior offset of the femoral condyle is up to a maximum of 4.7 times greater than that of the healthy Japanese knee in all knee implants. Excess posterior offset of the femoral condyle in TKR prostheses may cause knee joint flexion contracture due to the relative shortening of the posterior soft tissue.

  19. Fatal fat embolism following femoral head resection in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Walker, N M; Bateson, T; Reavley, P; Prakash, D

    2008-01-01

    We report a rare complication during primary total hip arthroplasty. A fatal fat pulmonary embolism immediately followed removal of the femoral head, prior to further preparation of the acetabulum or femoral shaft. Fat embolism syndrome is a well-known complication during total joint arthroplasty, usually attributed to preparation of the femoral shaft, particularly intramedullary reaming and insertion of the prosthesis. These risk factors have previously been identified in the literature. We believe that this case highlights the need for further research to establish the intramedullary pressures during the processes of dislocation and resection of the femoral neck and the attendant risk.

  20. Femoral head epiphysis growth and development among Chinese children aged 0-5 years.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiayou; Tang, Jin; Zhou, Libo; Zeng, Rong; Mou, Jinsong; Zhang, Lingli

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the pattern of femoral head epiphysis growth and development among Chinese children. Between January and December, 2007, we randomly sampled 1,450 healthy Chinese children (0-5 years old) from Hunan Provincial Children's Hospital in Changsha, Hunan, China. The diameter of femoral head epiphysis was measured by pelvic X-ray photography and processed by medical image processing software. The growth of femoral head epiphysis in girls was 2-3 months earlier than that in boys. The diameter of femoral head epiphysis increased with advancing age in both girls and boys, but the diameter of femoral head epiphysis in 2, 3, 4, 6, and 10-month-old girls was significantly larger than that in boys. Cubic regression equations between the diameter of femoral head epiphysis and age were created for boys and girls that could be used to predict the diameter of femoral head epiphysis. In conclusion, there was gender difference in femoral head epiphysis growth and development among Chinese children, and our prediction models will provide the guidance for early diagnosis of diseases related to the growth and development of the femoral head epiphysis.

  1. A histomorphometric study of necrotic femoral head in rabbits treated with extracorporeal shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan-Zhi; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Li, Dong; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Bing-Fang

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effectiveness and mechanisms of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis. [Subjects and Methods] Histomorphometric analysis of necrotic femoral head in rabbits treated with shock waves was performed. Bilateral osteonecrosis of femoral heads was induced with methylprednisolone and lipopolysaccharide in eight rabbits. The left limb (study side) received shock waves to the femoral head. The right limb (control side) received no shock waves. Biopsies of the femoral heads were performed at 12 weeks after shock wave therapy. [Results] Necrotic femoral heads treated with shock waves, compared with controls, had higher bone volume per tissue volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, osteoblast surface/bone surface, osteoid surface/bone surface, osteoid thickness, mineralizing surface/bone surface, mineralizing apposition rate, and bone formation rate. However, trabecular separation was lower in shock wave-treated femoral heads than in controls. Eroded surface/bone surface and osteoclast surface/bone surface did not differ significantly between groups. [Conclusion] The bone mass of necrotic femoral heads treated with shock waves increases. Extracorporeal shock wave may promote bone repair in necrotic femoral heads through the proliferation and activation of osteoblasts. PMID:28210032

  2. Acute thigh compartment syndrome post femoral vein catheterization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Mark W

    2008-08-01

    This case report presents a previously unreported etiology of acute thigh compartment syndrome following ipsilateral femoral vein catheterization, including clinical results and a brief review of the literature.

  3. Iatrogenic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm and Secondary Ipsilateral Deep Vein Thrombosis: An Indication for Early Surgical Exploration.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Marios; Zirngibl, Hubert; Floros, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation often complicates transfemoral interventional procedures. Nonsurgical treatment consists of femoral compression and thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance. We report a 74-year-old man who was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm, following coronary angiography. Duplex ultrasound revealed deep vein thrombosis of the ipsilateral common femoral vein. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was unsuccessfully performed, and the patient subsequently underwent surgical exploration for repair of the pseudoaneurysm and release of the venous compression. The increased local inflammation, because of the thrombosis, added in surgical difficulties. We conclude that early surgical intervention should be considered as a primary strategy in patients with femoral pseudoaneurysms and deep vein thrombosis secondary to femoral compression.

  4. Femoral neck fracture following intramedullary nailing with misplacement of an end cup: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Mańkowski, Bartosz; Kierzynka, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    Femoral neck fracture is an unusual complication of intramedullary fixation of a broken femur. We report on two cases of femoral neck fractures attributed to misplacement of an end cup and subsequent invasive maneuvers in an effort to remove it. Iatrogenic fractures of the femoral neck during or after intramedullary nailing are reported in the medical literature. Authors associate it with many possible technical mistakes performed during the procedure, yet no complications after missed end cup placement were noted. We suggest that the fractures described below were a consequence of injury to the vascular supply and bone stock of the initially intact femoral neck. PMID:19384634

  5. Osteotomy does not improve early outcome after slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Diab, Mohammad; Daluvoy, Sanjay; Snyder, Brian D; Kasser, James R

    2006-03-01

    We performed a retrospective, nonrandomized cohort study of unilateral, chronic, severe, stable slipped capital femoral epiphysis comparing five girls and five boys who underwent in-situ screw fixation alone with five girls and five boys who underwent in-situ screw fixation combined with staged flexion intertrochanteric femoral osteotomy to restore proximal femoral alignment. Functional outcome was measured by the Harris hip score, with 20% selected as a goal for improvement in functional outcome after corrective osteotomy. While flexion intertrochanteric femoral osteotomy improved hip range of motion, we found no significant difference in functional outcome between the two groups at early follow-up. This is a level 3 evidence study.

  6. Predictors of Outcomes after Arthroscopic Double-row Rotator Cuff Repair in 155 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Katthagen, Jan Christoph; Millett, Peter J.; Espinoza-Ervin, Christopher; Horan, Marilee P.; Ho, Charles P.; Warth, Ryan J.; Dornan, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze predictors of clinical outcomes of knotted versus knotless double-row self-reinforcing rotator cuff repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tears with propensity score matching. Methods: Patients with arthroscopic repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tears involving the supraspinatus tendon using either a knotted or knotless linked, self-reinforcing double-row technique were included in the study. Preoperative subjective evaluation was performed using the ASES and SF-12 PCS scores. After a minimum two-year follow-up period, ASES and SF-12 PCS scores were collected again along with the SANE score, the QuickDASH score, and patient satisfaction. All data were collected prospectively and retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative ASES and SF-12 PCS scores were then modeled using inverse propensity score weighting in a multiple linear regression model (MLR) with multiple imputations. Age, sex, baseline ASES score, length of follow-up, number of anchors, worker’s compensation, previous cuff repair, and double-row repair technique (knotted or knotless) were the covariates used in this model. Results: 155 shoulders in 151 patients (109 men, 42 women; mean age at time of surgery 59±10 years) were eligible for inclusion. Outcomes data were available for 130 of 148 shoulders (87.8%) after exclusion of seven shoulders (4.5%) that underwent revision rotator cuff repair before final follow up (n=33/39 in the knotted group [84.6%]; n=97/109 [88.9%] in the knotless group).The mean follow-up was 2.9 years (range, 2.0-5.4 years). Overall, postoperative outcomes scores were significantly improved when compared to preoperative baselines (p<0.05), with a median postoperative ASES score of 97 for the entire cohort. Our model showed that previous rotator cuff repair had a significant negative effect on postoperative ASES (β = -12.7, p<0.001) and SF-12 PCS scores (β = -5.0, p = 0.036). A workers’ compensation claim (β = -10.6, p

  7. Deep vein thrombosis in arthroscopic surgery and chemoprophylaxis recommendation in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Kuei Siong Andy; Lim, Wen Siang Kevin; Lee, Yee Han Dave

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There are currently no guidelines supporting the use of routine chemoprophylaxis to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in arthroscopic surgery. Studies and meta-analysis show opposing views on its routine use in arthroscopy. This study aimed to examine the incidence of DVT in a prospective cohort of knee arthroscopy and knee arthroplasty patients, and to analyse the risk factors contributing to DVT. METHODS All patients scheduled to undergo knee arthroscopy or arthroplasty over a two-year period were included. A standardised regimen of postoperative mechanical prophylaxis and rehabilitation was applied to all patients. Only patients who were postoperatively symptomatic were referred for ultrasonography. DVT incidence was calculated, and univariate and multivariate analyses of the risk factors were performed. RESULTS The overall incidence of DVT was 0.5% among the 1,410 arthroscopy patients and 3.1% among the 802 arthroplasty patients. The incidence of proximal DVT among the arthroscopy and arthroplasty patients was 0.4% and 1.1%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that age was the only significant predictor of DVT incidence. Using the receiver operating characteristic method, the cut-off age for the arthroscopy and arthroplasty patients was 52 years, while that for the arthroscopy patients only was 40 years (increased risk of DVT: 5.46 and 6.44 times, respectively; negative predictive value: 99.7% and 99.8%, respectively). CONCLUSION DVT incidence among Asian arthroplasty and arthroscopy patients remains low, even without chemoprophylaxis. Since age was found to be a significant risk factor for DVT, DVT prophylaxis can be considered for patients in high-risk age groups. PMID:27549352

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement in patients older than 60 years

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Via, Alessio Giai; Rivera, Alvaro; Tomic, Alexander; Somarriva, Marcelo; Wainer, Mauricio; Camacho, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The indications of hip arthroscopy increased over the past decade. Although mostly recommended for treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in young patients, well-selected older patients (> 60 years old) may benefit from this surgery. However, the role of hip arthroscopy for the management of older patients is controversial. The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of a series of patients aged 60 years and older who underwent hip arthroscopy for FAI at mid-term follow-up. Materials and methods Sixty-year-old patients and older, with a joint space greater than 2 mm, and a grade I and II hip osteoarthrosis (OA) according Tönnis scale were included into the study. Twenty-three patients (28 hips) met the inclusion criteria. The T-Student test was used to detect for differences between variables (p<0.05). Results The mean age of the patients was 63.4 years, and the mean follow-up was 4.4 years (2–9 years). We found an improvement in mHHS and VAS score from the baseline to the final follow-up in 87% of patients (p<0.05). Three patients (13%) were submitted to a THA at a mean of 12 months, while the survivorship rate at the final follow-up was 75%. No major complications have been reported. Conclusion Arthroscopic treatment of FAI in patients over 60 years old, with no signs of advanced osteoarthrosis, showed a significant improvement of functional score and pain in most of cases, and it can be consider a reasonable option in well selected patients. Level of evidence: IV case series. PMID:28066746

  9. Arthroscopic-Assisted Fixation of Tibial Plateau Fractures: Patient-Reported Postoperative Activity Levels.

    PubMed

    Kampa, John; Dunlay, Ryan; Sikka, Robby; Swiontkowski, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Tibial plateau fractures may result in significant limitations postoperatively. Studies have described outcomes of arthroscopic-assisted percutaneous fixation (AAPF) of these injuries but have rarely reported postoperative activity levels. Between 2009 and 2013, patients who sustained a lateral split, split depression, or pure depression type tibial plateau fracture (Schatzker types I-III fractures) and underwent outpatient AAPF were eligible for the study. Outcomes were assessed using Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, Lysholm score, and Marx activity score. Twenty-five consecutive patients were eligible for the study, and 22 (88%) were included in the final analysis, with average follow-up of 2.5 years (range, 1-5.2 years). Thirteen women and 9 men with an average age of 48.3 years (range, 23-65 years) comprised the study population. Average number of screws used for fixation was 2 (range, 1-4). The average depression was 8 mm preoperatively and 0.9 mm (range, 0-3 mm) postoperatively. Four patients (18%) had complications: 2 with hardware removal and 2 with postoperative deep venous thrombosis. Average postoperative Marx activity score was 5.7. Average postoperative KOOS Symptoms, Sports, and Quality of Life scores were 88 (range, 68-100), 85 (range, 45-100), and 77 (range, 50-100), respectively. Average IKDC and Lysholm scores were 81 (range, 55-97) and 87 (range, 54-100), respectively. The AAPF surgical technique, which was performed in an outpatient setting, facilitated excellent postoperative range of motion, outcomes, and activity scores with minimal complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e486-e491.].

  10. Optical design and evaluation of a 4 mm cost-effective ultra-high-definition arthroscope.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Yongtian; Yu, Lu; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-08-01

    High definition and magnification rigid endoscope plays an important role in modern minimally invasive medical surgery and diagnosis. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation methods of a high definition rigid endoscope, specifically an arthroscope, with a large depth of field (DOF). The incident heights and exit angles of the sampled rays on the relay lens are controlled during the optimization process to ensure an effective field view (70°) and a normal ray path within the limited lens diameter of 2.7 mm. The lens is set up as a multi-configuration system with two extreme and one middle object distances to cover a large DOF. As a result, an entrance pupil of 0.3 mm is achieved for the first time, to bring the theoretical resolution to 23.1 lps/mm in the object space at a working distance of 20 mm, with the wavelength of 0.532 um. The modulation transfer function (MTF) curves approach diffraction limit, and the values are all higher than 0.3 at 160 line pairs/mm (lps/mm) in the image space. Meanwhile, stray light caused by total internal reflection on the inner wall of the rod lenses and the objective lens is eliminated. The measured resolution in the object space at a 20 mm working distance is 22.3 lps/mm, and test results show that other performance characteristics also fulfill design requirements. The relay lenses are designed with only one type of the spacer and two types of lenses to greatly reduce the fabrication and assembly cost. The design method has important research and application values for lens systems used in modern minimally invasive medical surgery and industrial non-destructive testing area.

  11. Ruptured disc after arthroscopic repositioning in the temporomandibular joint: a retrospective magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cai, Xieyi; Yang, Chi; Wang, Shaoyi; Huang, Linjian

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to explore the incidence of rupture after arthroscopic repositioning of the disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by reviewing magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the TMJ taken before and after operation, and to investigate correlations retrospectively. We studied 247 patients with anterior disc displacement of the TMJ, and categorised them into 3 groups based on the postoperative MRI. The first group comprised those whose disc ruptured after repositioning, the second those who had a possible rupture of the disc after repositioning, and the third had no rupture of the disc after repositioning. Age, sex, duration of symptoms, maximum incisal mouth opening, whether the anterior disc displacement was unilateral or bilateral, and the Wilkes stage, were included in the analysis. The incidence of rupture (5/247) was 2%. Weak points at the intermediate zone of the disc were found in 4 of the 5 joints. The patients whose discs ruptured were significantly younger than the other 2 groups (p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in preoperative duration of symptoms and mouth opening among the groups. The proportions of unilateral and bilateral disc displacement (p=0.047) and Wilkes stage (p=0.027) differed among the 3 groups. The Wilkes stages was significantly more advanced in the ruptured group than in the other 2 groups (p=0.027) with 4/5 being bilateral. The weak point in the intermediate zone of the disc on MRI could be a sign of rupture. Teenagers and young adults with anterior disc displacement without reduction, particularly those in whom it is bilateral, are at a higher risk of a rupture after repositioning of the disc by arthroscopy.

  12. Optical design and evaluation of a 4 mm cost-effective ultra-high-definition arthroscope

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Yongtian; Yu, Lu; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    High definition and magnification rigid endoscope plays an important role in modern minimally invasive medical surgery and diagnosis. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation methods of a high definition rigid endoscope, specifically an arthroscope, with a large depth of field (DOF). The incident heights and exit angles of the sampled rays on the relay lens are controlled during the optimization process to ensure an effective field view (70°) and a normal ray path within the limited lens diameter of 2.7 mm. The lens is set up as a multi-configuration system with two extreme and one middle object distances to cover a large DOF. As a result, an entrance pupil of 0.3 mm is achieved for the first time, to bring the theoretical resolution to 23.1 lps/mm in the object space at a working distance of 20 mm, with the wavelength of 0.532 um. The modulation transfer function (MTF) curves approach diffraction limit, and the values are all higher than 0.3 at 160 line pairs/mm (lps/mm) in the image space. Meanwhile, stray light caused by total internal reflection on the inner wall of the rod lenses and the objective lens is eliminated. The measured resolution in the object space at a 20 mm working distance is 22.3 lps/mm, and test results show that other performance characteristics also fulfill design requirements. The relay lenses are designed with only one type of the spacer and two types of lenses to greatly reduce the fabrication and assembly cost. The design method has important research and application values for lens systems used in modern minimally invasive medical surgery and industrial non-destructive testing area. PMID:25136495

  13. Intraarticular analgesia after arthroscopic knee surgery: comparison of neostigmine, clonidine, tenoxicam, morphine and bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Alagol, A; Calpur, O U; Usar, P Saral; Turan, N; Pamukcu, Z

    2005-11-01

    We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blinded study to compare the analgesic effects of intraarticular neostigmine, morphine, tenoxicam, clonidine and bupivacaine in 150 patients undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. General anaesthesia protocol was same in all patients. At the end of the surgical procedure, patients were randomized into six intraarticular groups equally. Group N received 500 mug neostigmine, Group M received 2 mg morphine, Group T received 20 mg tenoxicam, Group C received 1 microg kg(-1) clonidine, Group B received 100 mg bupivacaine and Group S received saline 20 ml. Visual analog scale scores 0, 30 and 60 min and 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, time to first analgesic need, analgesic consumption at 48 h and 72 h and side effects were noted. Demographic and operational parameters were similar in six groups. All study groups provided analgesia when compared with saline group (P<0.05). Duration of analgesia in Group N and C was longer than other groups (P<0.001). Analgesic consumptions of Group N, C and T were lower than other groups (P<0.01). Pain scores during 2 h postoperatively were lower in all study groups than the control group (P<0.001). In Group B, median pain scores were higher than Groups N and C at 0 min and 30 min postoperatively (P<0.001). Side effects were not significantly different among the six groups. We conclude that the most effective drugs that are administered intraarticularly are neostigmine and clonidine among the five drugs we studied. Tenoxicam provided longer analgesia when compared with morphine and bupivacaine, postoperatively.

  14. Ankle fracture configuration following treatment with and without arthroscopic-assisted reduction and fixation

    PubMed Central

    Angthong, Chayanin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report ankle fracture configurations and bone quality following arthroscopic-assisted reduction and internal-fixation (ARIF) or open reduction and internal-fixation (ORIF). METHODS: The patients of ARIF (n = 16) or ORIF (n = 29) to treat unstable ankle fracture between 2006 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Baseline data, including age, sex, type of injury, immediate postoperative fracture configuration (assessed on X-rays and graded by widest gap and largest step-off of any intra-articular site), bone quality [assessed with bone mineral density (BMD) testing] and arthritic changes on X-rays following surgical treatments were recorded for each group. RESULTS: Immediate-postoperative fracture configurations did not differ significantly between the ARIF and ORIF groups. There were anatomic alignments as 8 (50%) and 8 (27.6%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.539) respectively. There were acceptable alignments as 12 (75%) and 17 (58.6%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.341) respectively. The arthritic changes in follow-up period as at least 16 wk following the surgeries were shown as 6 (75%) and 10 (83.3%) patients in ARIF and ORIF groups (P = 0.300) respectively. Significantly more BMD tests were performed in patients aged > 60 years (P < 0.001), ARIF patients (P = 0.021), and female patients (P = 0.029). There was no significant difference in BMD test t scores between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Ankle fracture configurations following surgeries are similar between ARIF and ORIF groups, suggesting that ARIF is not superior to ORIF in treatment of unstable ankle fractures. PMID:27114933

  15. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD. PMID:27622182

  16. Arthroscopic reconstruction of chronic AC joint dislocations by transposition of the coracoacromial ligament augmented by the Tight Rope device: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Hamid; Friedmann, Svenja; Tröger, Markus; Lobenhoffer, Philipp; Agneskirchner, Jens D

    2009-01-01

    We present a new arthroscopic technique for chronic AC joint dislocations with coracoacromial ligament transposition and augmentation by the Tight Rope device (Arthrex, Naples, USA). First the glenohumeral joint is visualised to repair concomitant lesions, such as SLAP lesions, if needed. Once the rotator interval is opened and the coracoid is identified, the arthroscope is moved to an additional anterolateral portal. A 1.5 cm incision is made 2 cm medial to the AC joint. After drilling a 4 mm hole with a cannulated drill through the clavicle and coracoid a Tight Rope is inserted, the clavicule is reduced and stabilized with the implant. The arthroscope is moved to the subacromial space and a partial bursectomy is performed to visualise the CA ligament and lateral clavicle. The CA ligament is armed with a strong braided suture using a Lasso stitch and dissected from the undersurface of the acromion. It is then reattached to the distal part of the clavicle by transosseous suture fixation after abrasion of its undersurface. Although this combined arthroscopic procedure of AC joint augmentation with a Tight Rope combined with a ligament transposition is technically demanding, it is a safe method to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligaments and achieve a sufficient reduction of the clavicle without the need of further implant removal or autologous tendon transplantation.

  17. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis in 17 Maine Coon cats.

    PubMed

    Borak, Danilo; Wunderlin, Nadja; Brückner, Michael; Schwarz, Günter; Klang, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Objectives From May 2009 to January 2015, 208 Maine Coon cats presented to the Tierklinik Hollabrunn - a small animal referral and first-opinion centre - and 17 (8.17%) cats were diagnosed with a slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Over the same time period, 29 (0.67%) of 4348 cats (all breeds) were diagnosed with SCFE. Methods Clinical and orthopaedic examinations and diagnostic imaging were performed on all affected Maine Coons. Age at first presentation, sex, body weight, body condition score (BCS), unilateral or bilateral manifestation of the disease, activity level and duration of lameness, age at neutering and known family history of disease were recorded. Sixteen of 17 Maine Coons were surgically treated. Surgically removed femoral tissue samples were histologically examined in 13 cases. Results The mean age at first presentation was 21.47 months; male to female ratio was 16:1; mean body weight was 7.5 kg (range 5.3-9.3 kg); and mean BCS was 5.06/9.0. Seven cats were bilaterally affected; the median duration of decreased activity level and lameness was 2 weeks; mean age at neutering was 7.7 months (range 3.0-12.0 months); and four cats were littermates. Fourteen femoral head and neck ostectomies, eight total hip replacements and one primary fixation were performed. All 13 histologically available samples confirmed the diagnosis of SCFE. Conclusions and relevance To date, SCFE has been reported only occasionally in Maine Coon cats. However, the results of this study showed that Maine Coons were approximately 12-fold more likely to develop SCFE than the overall population of cats presenting to the Tierklinik Hollabrunn over the same time period. Male sex, neutering, delayed physeal closure and breed-specific high body weight may play an important role in the pathogenesis of SCFE in Maine Coon cats.

  18. Heterologous mesenchymal stem cells successfully treat femoral pseudarthrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effectiveness of treating pseudarthrosis in rats by using bone marrow cell suspensions or cultures of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells Methods Thirty-eight specific pathogen-free (SPF) animals were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1, Control, without surgical intervention; Group 2 (Placebo), experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated only with saline solution; Group 3, experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated with heterologous bone marrow cells suspension; Group 4, experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated with cultures of heterologous mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow. When pseudarthrosis was confirmed by simple radiological studies, digital radiography and histopathology after a 120-day postoperative period, Groups 2, 3 and 4 were treated as above. At 30, 60 and 90 days after the treatment, all animals were evaluated by simple radiological studies, and at the end of the experiment, the animals were assessed by computed axial tomography and anatomopathological and histomorphometric examinations. Results Injected cells were detected in the areas affected by pseudarthrosis using scintigraphy within the first 24 hours after their administration. After 60 days, the animals of Group 3 showed callus formation while the animals of Group 4 presented periosteal reaction and had some consolidated areas. In contrast, Group 2 showed a predominance of fibro-osteoid tissue. After 90 days, bone consolidation and remodeling was observed in all animals from Group 3 whereas animals from Group 4 exhibited partial consolidation and those ones from Group 2 persisted with pseudarthrosis. Conclusion The treatment with heterologous bone marrow cells suspension proved to be effective in the treatment of pseudarthrosis whereas cultures of heterologous bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells did not show the same potential to aid bone healing. PMID:22429995

  19. Risk of atypical femoral fracture during and after bisphosphonate use

    PubMed Central

    Schilcher, Jörg; Koeppen, Veronika; Aspenberg, Per; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Use of bisphosphonates in women is associated with higher risk of atypical femoral fractures. The risk in terms of timing of use and type of bisphosphonate, and in men, remains unclear. Patients and methods We reviewed radiographs of 5,342 Swedish women and men aged 55 years or more who had had a fracture of the femoral shaft in the 3-year period 2008–2010 (97% of those eligible), and found 172 patients with atypical fractures (93% of them women). We obtained data on medication and comorbidity. The risk of atypical fracture associated with bisphosphonate use was estimated in a nationwide cohort analysis. In addition, we performed a case-control analysis with comparison to 952 patients with ordinary shaft fractures. A short report of the findings has recently been presented (Schilcher et al. 2014a). Here we provide full details. Results The age-adjusted relative risk (RR) of atypical fracture associated with bisphosphonate use was 55 (95% CI: 39–79) in women and 54 (CI: 15–192) in men. In bisphosphonate users, women had a 3-fold higher risk than men (RR = 3.1, CI: 1.1–8.4). Alendronate users had higher risk than risedronate users (RR = 1.9, CI: 1.1–3.3). The RR after 4 years or more of use reached 126 (CI: 55–288), with a corresponding absolute risk of 11 (CI: 7–14) fractures per 10,000 person-years of use. The risk decreased by 70% per year since last use. Interpretation Women have a higher risk of atypical femoral fracture than men. The type of bisphosphonate used may affect risk estimates and the risk decreases rapidly after cessation. PMID:25582459

  20. Current evaluation of sonography of the meniscus. Results of a comparative study of sonographic and arthroscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Casser, H R; Sohn, C; Kiekenbeck, A

    1990-01-01

    Sonography of the knee has gained in significance in the diagnosis of the meniscus; experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that the normal and pathological anatomy of the meniscus can be visualized on a sonogram. The aim of this comparative investigation is to evaluate sonographic lesion diagnosis in comparison with arthroscopic findings, using a standardized examination method. Two hundred and six knee joints were first scanned sonographically using a 7.5 MHz sector transducer. The examining doctor had neither anamnestic nor clinical information in advance. On the following day, the joints were examined arthroscopically, without the findings of the day before being available to the examiner. When the findings were compared, the sensitivity of sonographic diagnosis of lesions was found to be 82.2% and its specificity 87.6%. The patients were of varying ages and had varying anamneses. The results show that sonography of the meniscus is a valuable diagnostic help when the knee-joint symptoms are not clear, given that the correct technical equipment and sufficient experience with this form of examination are at hand. The advantage of sonography is that, in contrast to arthroscopy, it is noninvasive and easily available.

  1. COMPREHENSIVE POST‐ARTHROSCOPIC MANAGEMENT OF A MIDDLE‐AGED ADULT WITH GLENOHUMERAL OSTEOARTHRITIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Thomas; Millett, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management (CAM) is a new glenohumeral debridement procedure developed as a joint preserving alternative to total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). The procedure consists of several arthroscopic components including: A. scar tissue and chondral debridement, B. synovectomy, C. inferior humeral osteoplasty, D. capsular release, E. axillary nerve decompression, and F. tenodesis of the long head of the biceps. In this case, an active, middle age patient who failed physical therapy treatment and corticosteroid injections was evaluated and diagnosed with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Anterior‐ posterior (AP) and axillary radiographs showed grade IV changes of the articular cartilage, confirming the diagnosis. The patient was not an ideal candidate for TSA because of her age, activity level, and concern for implant survival; therefore surgical intervention was performed using the CAM procedure. After the surgery, the patient demonstrated increased joint space as shown using radiographic imaging. The patient underwent intensive postoperative rehabilitation with a heavy emphasis on joint range of motion (ROM) and capsular mobility. By eight weeks she achieved 85% active ROM compared to her uninvolved shoulder, and a 55% improvement on the Pennsylvania Shoulder Score. Radiographic imaging provided an understanding of the severity of the arthritic changes present in this patient, identified the limited potential of continued conservative management, and showed structural changes that may be correlated with improved function following the surgical intervention. For patients less than 55 years of age diagnosed with severe glenohumeral osteoarthritis, the CAM procedure and intensive, motion focused therapy presents a promising treatment combination. Level of Evidence: IIIb PMID:23439911

  2. Arthroscopic Remplissage and Open Latarjet Procedure for the Treatment of Anterior Glenohumeral Instability With Severe Bipolar Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Katthagen, J Christoph; Anavian, Jack; Tahal, Dimitri S; Millett, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    Bipolar bone loss in patients with anterior glenohumeral instability is challenging to treat. The goal of the treatment is to restore stability by ensuring that the humeral head remains within the glenoid vault. This can be achieved either with the combination of an arthroscopic Bankart procedure and remplissage (glenoid bone loss <25%), or with a Latarjet procedure (glenoid bone loss >25%). In cases with more severe bipolar bone loss of both the glenoid and the humeral head, the conventional approach has been to lengthen the articular arc of the glenoid and to ignore the Hill-Sachs lesion. However, it has recently been shown that this can still lead to an "off-track" situation with persistent shoulder instability from engagement of the Hill-Sachs on the anterior glenoid. In these cases, the combination of a Hill-Sachs remplissage and the Latarjet procedure can be effective in preventing persistent instability. In this technical note, the surgical technique of an arthroscopic Hill-Sachs remplissage in combination with an open Latarjet procedure is presented.

  3. Two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: Gd-enhanced image features on MRI and arthroscopic excision.

    PubMed

    Sasho, Takahisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Matsuki, Kei; Hoshi, Hiroko; Saito, Masahiko; Ikegawa, Naoshi; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-12-01

    Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint is a relatively rare benign condition with around 200 reported cases. We have recently encountered two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint which preoperative MRI had assessed as highly suspect and which arthroscopic resection and subsequent histological examinations confirmed as synovial hemangiomas. Published studies have identified the following as characteristic MRI features of synovial haemangioma: homogenous low intensity to iso-intensity on T1 sequence; and heterogeneous high intensity with low-intensity septa or spots within the lesion on T2 sequence. However, several other intra-knee disorders mimic these characteristics. In our two cases, we found that gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced images, which have been relatively rarely discussed in the literature, were useful for making the diagnosis and for determining the extent of this condition. These images also were very helpful during arthroscopic excision of the lesion. Nonetheless, even after Gd enhancement, differentiating between malignant conditions such as synovial sarcoma and haemangioma solely from MRI findings is still difficult.

  4. Protocol for a multicentre, parallel-arm, 12-month, randomised, controlled trial of arthroscopic surgery versus conservative care for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FASHIoN)

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, D R; Dickenson, E J; Wall, P D H; Donovan, J L; Foster, N E; Hutchinson, C E; Parsons, N; Petrou, S; Realpe, A; Achten, J; Achana, F; Adams, A; Costa, M L; Griffin, J; Hobson, R; Smith, J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is a recognised cause of young adult hip pain. There has been a large increase in the number of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for FAI; however, a recent Cochrane review highlighted that there are no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating treatment effectiveness. We aim to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery versus best conservative care for patients with FAI syndrome. Methods We will conduct a multicentre, pragmatic, assessor-blinded, two parallel arm, RCT comparing arthroscopic surgery to physiotherapy-led best conservative care. 24 hospitals treating NHS patients will recruit 344 patients over a 26-month recruitment period. Symptomatic adults with radiographic signs of FAI morphology who are considered suitable for arthroscopic surgery by their surgeon will be eligible. Patients will be excluded if they have radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis, previous significant hip pathology or previous shape changing surgery. Participants will be allocated in a ratio of 1:1 to receive arthroscopic surgery or conservative care. Recruitment will be monitored and supported by qualitative intervention to optimise informed consent and recruitment. The primary outcome will be pain and function assessed by the international hip outcome tool 33 (iHOT-33) measured 1-year following randomisation. Secondary outcomes include general health (short form 12), quality of life (EQ5D-5L) and patient satisfaction. The primary analysis will compare change in pain and function (iHOT-33) at 12 months between the treatment groups, on an intention-to-treat basis, presented as the mean difference between the trial groups with 95% CIs. The study is funded by the Health Technology Assessment Programme (13/103/02). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is granted by the Edgbaston Research Ethics committee (14/WM/0124). The results will be disseminated through open access peer

  5. The effect of postural control and balance on femoral anteversion in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Karabicak, Gul Oznur; Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Gulsen, Mustafa; Ozturk, Basar; Cetin, Nuri

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between femoral anteversion and functional balance and postural control in children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty children with spastic cerebral palsy (mean age=12.4 ± 4.5) with grosss motor functional classification system levels I, II, and III were recruited for this study. Functional balance was evaluated using the Pediatric Balance Scale, postural control was evaluated using the Trunk Control Measurement Scale, and femoral anteversion was assessed with a handheld goniometer using the great trochanter prominence method. [Results] The results indicated that there was significant correlation between femoral anteversion and Trunk Control Measurement Scale dynamic reaching score. There were no significant correlation between femoral anteversion and the Trunk Control Measurement Scale static sitting balance, Trunk Control Measurement Scale selective movement control, total Trunk Control Measurement Scale and Pediatric Balance Scale results. [Conclusion] Increased femoral anteversion has not correlation with functional balance, static sitting, and selective control of the trunk. Femoral anteversion is related to dynamic reaching activities of the trunk, and this may be the result of excessive internal pelvic rotation. It is important for the health professionals to understand that increased femoral anteversion needs to be corrected because in addition to leading to femoral internal rotation during walking, it also effects dynamic reaching activities of spastic children with cerebral palsy.

  6. Proteomic changes in plasma of broiler chickens with femoral head necrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) is a skeletal problem in broiler chickens where the proximal femoral head cartilage shows susceptibility to separation from its growth plate. The FHN selected birds showed higher bodyweights and reduced plasma cholesterol. The proteomic differences in the plasma of health...

  7. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  8. The effect of postural control and balance on femoral anteversion in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Karabicak, Gul Oznur; Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Gulsen, Mustafa; Ozturk, Basar; Cetin, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between femoral anteversion and functional balance and postural control in children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty children with spastic cerebral palsy (mean age=12.4 ± 4.5) with grosss motor functional classification system levels I, II, and III were recruited for this study. Functional balance was evaluated using the Pediatric Balance Scale, postural control was evaluated using the Trunk Control Measurement Scale, and femoral anteversion was assessed with a handheld goniometer using the great trochanter prominence method. [Results] The results indicated that there was significant correlation between femoral anteversion and Trunk Control Measurement Scale dynamic reaching score. There were no significant correlation between femoral anteversion and the Trunk Control Measurement Scale static sitting balance, Trunk Control Measurement Scale selective movement control, total Trunk Control Measurement Scale and Pediatric Balance Scale results. [Conclusion] Increased femoral anteversion has not correlation with functional balance, static sitting, and selective control of the trunk. Femoral anteversion is related to dynamic reaching activities of the trunk, and this may be the result of excessive internal pelvic rotation. It is important for the health professionals to understand that increased femoral anteversion needs to be corrected because in addition to leading to femoral internal rotation during walking, it also effects dynamic reaching activities of spastic children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27390397

  9. Histopathology and serum clinical chemistry evaluation of broilers with femoral head separation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head disarticulation (FHD) and necrosis is a sporadic leg problem of unknown etiology in broiler breeders. To determine the underlying physiology of FHD, the blood chemistry and the histopathology of the femoral heads of the affected chickens were compared with their age matched controls. Ch...

  10. Serum chemistry and histopathology of broiler femoral head necrosis and tibial dyschondroplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) are two major leg problems in young meat type poultry which cause lameness, bone deformity and infections. Whereas FHN results from disarticulation of the femoral growth plate from the articular cartilage, TD lesions are characterized by i...

  11. Quantification of Femoral Neck Exposure Through a Minimally Invasive Smith-Petersen Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    subcapital, mid cervical , and basicervical femoral neck fractures. Key Words: Smith Petersen, surgical exposure, anterior hip approach, femoral neck...two senior authors (TLG and JRH). These authors are fellowship- trained in arthroplasty and trauma, respectively. A minimally Accepted for publication...intermuscular plane and thus places the superior gluteal nerve at risk. The direct anterior approach was initially used for hip arthroplasty but

  12. Adventitial cystic disease of the common femoral vein presenting as deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Chun, Ho Jong; Hwang, Jeong Kye; Kim, Ji Il; Kim, Sang Dong; Park, Sun-Cheol; Moon, In Sung

    2016-07-01

    Adventitial cystic disease of the common femoral vein is a rare condition. We herein report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with painless swelling in her left lower leg that resembled deep vein thrombosis. She underwent femoral exploration and excision of the cystic wall. The presentation, investigation, treatment, and pathology of this condition are discussed with a literature review.

  13. Trans-femoral amputee pilots: criteria for return to the fighter cockpit.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Goldstein, Liav; Heim, Michael; Barenboim, Erez; Dudkiewicz, Israel

    2005-04-01

    Proximal lower limb amputations (trans-femoral) usually leave amputees with significant functional disturbances. This article contains information regarding three pilots with trans-femoral amputations that returned swiftly to continue their aeronautical careers despite their disabilities. Adaptations are needed in the limb prostheses to enable the amputees to access the minimally spaced cockpit.

  14. Ultrasonographic Measurement of the Femoral Cartilage Thickness in Hemiparetic Patients after Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunc, Hakan; Oken, Oznur; Kara, Murat; Tiftik, Tulay; Dogu, Beril; Unlu, Zeliha; Ozcakar, Levent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the femoral cartilage thicknesses of hemiparetic patients after stroke using musculoskeletal ultrasonography and to determine whether there is any correlation between cartilage thicknesses and the clinical characteristics of the patients. Femoral cartilage thicknesses of both knees were measured in 87 (33…

  15. Restoration of Femoral Anatomy in TKA With Unisex and Gender-specific Components

    PubMed Central

    Hentz, Joseph G.

    2008-01-01

    Recent modifications in total knee prosthesis design theoretically better accommodate the anatomy of the female femur and thereby have the theoretical potential to improve clinical results in TKA by more accurately restoring femoral posterior condylar offset, reducing femoral notching, reducing femoral component flexion, and reducing component overhang. First, we radiographically evaluated whether a contemporary unisex prosthesis would accommodate female anatomy equally as well as male anatomy. Next, we radiographically evaluated female knees in which a gender-specific prosthesis was used. Pre- and postoperative radiographs of 122 knees (42 female unisex, 41 male unisex, 39 female gender-specific) were reviewed. In the unisex groups, there were no differences in femoral notching or femoral component flexion. Posterior femoral offset increased in both groups. However, femoral component overhang was worse in female knees (17%) than in male knees (0%). In the gender-specific female group, the incidence of component overhang was similar to that in the unisex female group. Unisex femoral components of this specific design do not equally match the native anatomy male and female knees. In some women, a compromise was required in sizing. PMID:18719972

  16. Simultaneous Bilateral Fracture of Femoral Neck in Korea: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hwa-Jae; Shin, Hun-Kyu; Kim, Eugene; Ko, Taeg Su; Choi, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral femoral neck factures are common and their incidence is increasing. However, simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures are rare. Although cases of simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures have been reported, most were caused by strong muscle contractions during electroconvulsive therapy. Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures caused by a simple fall are an extremely rare injury; therefore, limited literature is available, and no case has been reported in Korea. We report herein a case of simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures caused by a simple fall. An 83-year-old woman visited the emergency department with bilateral hip joint pain and gait disturbance, which developed 1 day after a fall. Tenderness and severe limitation in left hip joint range of motion and mild limitation in right hip joint range of motion were observed on a physical examination. A Garden type IV femoral neck fracture in the left hip joint and a Garden type I femoral neck fracture in the right hip joint were observed on plain radiography. She underwent right screw fixation and left bipolar hemiarthroplasty 2 days after admission. The patient could walk using a walker 4 weeks postoperatively. Bone union in the right femoral neck was observed at the 3 month follow-up. No specific findings were observed at the left hip hemiarthroplasty site. PMID:27536603

  17. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma arising in the femoral vein: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oike, Naoki; Ogose, Akira; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Umezu, Hajime; Inagawa, Shoichi

    2014-10-01

    Soft tissue tumors arising in deep veins of the extremities are uncommon, although a few cases of synovial sarcoma or leiomyosarcoma arising in the femoral vein have been documented. However, to the best of our knowledge, an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) arising in the femoral vein has not been reported in the English literature. We report a case of EMC arising in the femoral vein of a 70-year-old man who presented with right leg edema and was diagnosed with a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) by computed tomography (CT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the right proximal thigh that was diagnosed as myxomatous sarcoma by aspiration cytology, and anticoagulant therapy was initiated. The mass was surgically resected en bloc, including the femoral vein and surrounding soft tissue, and the femoral artery was preserved. The femoral vein was not reconstructed. The histologic diagnosis was an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. The patient received postoperative local radiation treatment, with a total dose of 60 Gy, and is currently doing well with no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis at 8 months after surgery. In summary, this case report shows that EMC can arise in the femoral vein, and that reconstruction of the femoral vein is not always necessary during surgery for soft tissue tumors.

  18. Effect of the high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Day, B.; Shim, S.S.; Leung, G.

    1984-05-01

    This investigation was done to study the effects of high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip and to further our knowledge of its physiologic basis. We have used established methods of study, including bone scans, microangiography, isotope clearance and perosseous venography, and based upon the results of these studies, we have reached certain conclusions. First, high femoral osteotomy increases the blood flow and vascularity in the hip joint, the femoral head and neck and the great trochanter. Second, bone scanning techniques using /sup 99m/Tc labeled diphosphonate have shown increased uptake in the femoral head and neck after high femoral osteotomy. The localization was done using a Digital Gamma III computer, and the activity on the osteotomy side at two weeks was 3.5 times as great as on the control side. By 16 weeks postoperatively, there was still two times as much activity on the osteotomy side. Third, microangiography showed increased vascularity both at the osteotomy site and in the femoral head and neck and the greater trochanter on that side. Such an increase in vascularity first became evident two weeks after osteotomy and persisted during the four month period studied. Fourth, the results of the /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate clearance study showed a 25 per cent increase in femoral head blood flow on the operative side. Fifth, perosseous venography of the femoral head and neck showed a marked increase in venous drainage through the osteotomy site in the immediate postosteotomy stage.

  19. More complications with uncemented than cemented femoral stems in total hip replacement for displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chammout, Ghazi; Muren, Olle; Laurencikas, Evaldas; Bodén, Henrik; Kelly-Pettersson, Paula; Sjöö, Helene; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Total hip replacement (THR) is the preferred method for the active and lucid elderly patient with a displaced femoral neck fracture (FNF). Controversy still exists regarding the use of cemented or uncemented stems in these patients. We compared the effectiveness and safety between a modern cemented, and a modern uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated femoral stem in patients 65–79 years of age who were treated with THR for displaced FNF. Patients and methods In a single-center, single-blinded randomized controlled trial, we included 69 patients, mean age 75 (65–79) and with a displaced FNF (Garden III–IV). 35 patients were randomized to a cemented THR and 34 to a reverse-hybrid THR with an uncemented stem. Primary endpoints were: prevalence of all hip-related complications and health-related quality of life, evaluated with EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) index up to 2 years after surgery. Secondary outcomes included: overall mortality, general medical complications, and hip function. The patients were followed up at 3, 12, and 24 months. Results According to the calculation of sample size, 140 patients would be required for the primary endpoints, but the study was stopped when only half of the sample size was included (n = 69). An interim analysis at that time showed that the total number of early hip-related complications was substantially higher in the uncemented group, 9 (among them, 3 dislocations and 4 periprosthetic fractures) as compared to 1 in the cemented group. The mortality and functional outcome scores were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation We do not recommend uncemented femoral stems for the treatment of elderly patients with displaced FNFs. PMID:27967333

  20. Shortening cemented femoral implants: an in vitro investigation to quantify exeter femoral implant rotational stability vs simulated implant length.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lance J; Roe, John A; Pearcy, Mark J; Crawford, Ross W

    2012-06-01

    The Exeter stems vary in length from 90 to 150 mm. The shorter stems generally have lower offsets. The purpose of this study was to determine if length of stem, with fixed offset, affected rotational stability. Mechanical testing was carried out on 10 implant-cement constructs with 2 loading profiles, rising from chair and stair climbing, at different simulated implant lengths using purpose-built apparatus. This paper presents a mechanism for clinically observed rotational stability and explains the mechanical characteristics required for rotational stability in Exeter femoral stems.