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Sample records for femoral trochlea arthroscopic

  1. Proximal Scaphoid Arthroplasty Using the Medial Femoral Trochlea Flap

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, James P.; Burger, Heinze K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The medial trochlea of the femur (medial femoral trochlea, MFT) provides a source of convex osteocartilaginous vascularized bone that has been demonstrated to have a similar contour to the proximal scaphoid. This provides a potential solution for difficult recalcitrant proximal pole scaphoid nonunions. Materials and Methods Sixteen consecutive patients who underwent MFT proximal scaphoid arthroplasty were reviewed. Follow-up data were recorded at a minimum of 6 months, with an average of 14 months. The results of this cohort were previously reported in detail but are summarized herein. Description of Technique The ability to reconstruct both bone and cartilage of the nonunion enables the surgeon to resect the nonunited proximal pole to prepare for scaphoid reconstruction. A segment of osteocartilaginous MFT is harvested in dimensions required by the scaphoid defect. The MFT segment is harvested on the transverse branch of the descending geniculate vessels. Fixation may be achieved with ease due to the size of the reconstructed segment. Results Computed tomography imaging demonstrated 15 of 16 reconstructed scaphoids achieving osseous union. Follow-up range of motion (ROM) of the wrist averaged 46.0° extension (range 28-80°) and 43.8° flexion (range 10-80°), which was similar to preoperative (average 45.7° extension and 43.0° flexion). Scapholunate angles remained unaffected (51.6° preoperatively and 48.6° postoperatively), indicating preservation of carpal relationships. Conclusions Vascularized MFT flaps provide a useful tool in the treatment of difficult proximal pole scaphoid nonunions. Early follow-up demonstrates high rate of achieving union with acceptable ROM and good pain relief. PMID:24436821

  2. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O'Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion's proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided.

  3. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O’Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion’s proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided. PMID:27761182

  4. Medial Flatness of the Femoral Trochlea in the Nail Patella Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanek, J; L Fournier, L

    1995-01-01

    The knee joint of an adult male with a nail patella syndrome was examined by standard X-rays and by computerised tomography. The dysplasia of the femoral trochlea has a specific sign which distinguish it from the "common" dysplasia of the recurrent patellar luxation type: a straight line flatness of the medial margin on the profile. This sign should be useful for the diagnosis of incomplete forms of the nail patella syndrome. Key words: nail patella syndrome, osteo-onycho-- dysplasia, knee dysplasia.

  5. Differences between native and prosthetic knees in terms of cross-sectional morphology of the femoral trochlea: a study based on three-dimensional models and virtual total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhe; Chen, Shichang; Yan, Mengning; Yue, Bing; Wang, You

    2017-04-20

    The cross-sectional morphology of the prosthetic knee is crucial to understanding patellar motion and quadriceps strength after total knee arthroplasty. However, few comparative evaluations of the cross-sectional morphology of the femoral trochlea have been performed in the native knee and currently available femoral implants, and the relationship between the trochlear anatomy of prosthetic components and post-operative patellofemoral complications remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the differences in cross-sectional morphology of the femoral trochlea between native knees and prosthetic femoral components. Virtual total knee arthroplasty was performed, whereby four different femoral components (medial-pivot, Triathlon, NRG and NexGen) were virtually superimposed onto three-dimensional models of 42 healthy femurs. The following morphological parameters were measured in three cross-sections (0, 45 and 90°) of the femoral trochlea: sulcus height, lateral tilt angle, medial tilt angle and sulcus angle. Only statistically significant differences are described further (p < 0.05). In the 0° cross-section, sulcus height was smaller in the native knee than in the Triathlon, NRG and NexGen components; all prosthetic components had smaller lateral tilt angles and larger medial tilt angles. In the 45° cross-section, sulcus height was larger in the native knee than in the medial-pivot, Triathlon and NexGen components; both lateral and medial tilt angles were smaller in the prosthetic components. In the 90° cross-section, sulcus height was smaller in the native knee than in the medial-pivot component; all prosthetic components had a larger lateral tilt angle and smaller medial tilt angle. In all cross-sections, the sulcus angle was smaller in the native knee. The discrepancy between native and prosthetic trochlear geometries suggests altered knee mechanics after total knee arthroplasty, but further cadaveric, computational or fluoroscopic investigations are

  6. Evaluation and comparison of clinical results of femoral fixation devices in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Deniz; Ozcan, Mert

    2016-03-01

    Several femoral fixation devices are available for hamstring tendon autograft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, but the best technique is debatable. We hypothesised that different suspensory femoral fixation techniques have no superiority over each other. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical results of different suspensory femoral fixation devices in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. This was a Level III, retrospective, comparative study. A total of 100 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction in a single institution with a mean follow-up time of 40 months (12-67 months) were divided into three groups according to femoral fixation devices as 'Endobutton' (n=34), 'Transfix' (n=35) and 'Aperfix' (n=31). The length of painful period after surgery, time to return to work and sporting activities, final range of motion, anterior drawer and Lachman tests, knee instability symptoms, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation score, Short Form 36 (SF-36) score, Lysholm knee score and Tegner point of the patients were evaluated and compared between groups. There were no significant differences between the groups. All techniques led to significant recovery in knee instability tests and symptoms. In this study, the clinical results of different suspensory femoral fixation techniques were found to be similar. We believe that different femoral fixation techniques have no effect on clinical results provided that the technique is correctly applied. The surgeon must choose a technique appropriate to his or her experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopic subcapital realignment osteotomy in chronic and stable slipped capital femoral epiphysis: early results.

    PubMed

    Roos, Bruno Dutra; Assis, Marcelo Camargo de; Roos, Milton Valdomiro; Camisa Júnior, Antero; Lima, Ezequiel Moreno Ungaretti; Pagani, Rodolfo Cavanus

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes, as well as the complications of arthroscopic subcapital realignment osteotomy in chronic and stable slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). As indicated by the literature review, this is the first time this type of arthroscopic osteotomy was described. Between June 2012 and December 2014, seven patients were submitted to arthroscopic subcapital realignment osteotomy in chronic and stable SCFE. The mean age was 11 years and 4 months, and the mean follow-up period was 16.5 months (6-36). Clinical results were evaluated using the Modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS), which was measured pre- and postoperatively. Radiographs were evaluated using the Southwick quantitative classification and the epiphysis-diaphysis angle (pre- and postoperatively). Complications were assessed. The mean preoperative MHHS was 35.8 points, and 97.5 points post-operatively (p < 0.05). Radiographically, five patients were classified as Southwick classification grade II and two as grade III. The mean correction of the epiphysis-diaphysis angle was 40°. No immediate postoperatively complications were observed. One patient presented femoral head avascular necrosis, without collapse or chondrolysis at the most recent follow-up (22 months). The arthroscopic technique presented for subcapital realignment osteotomy in chronic and stable SCFE showed satisfactory clinical and radiographic outcomes in a 16.5 months follow-up period.

  8. Arthroscopic Treatment of Medial Femoral Condylar Coronal Fractures and Nonunions

    PubMed Central

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, M. Gokhan; Basaran, S. Hakan; Baca, Emre; Kural, Cemal; Avkan, M. Cevdet

    2013-01-01

    Nonunion of medial femoral condylar coronal fractures are uncommon. In neglected Hoffa fractures despite nonunion, there is a risk of missing accompanying ligamentous and intra-articular injuries. Neither preoperative clinical examination nor magnetic resonance imaging showed these injuries before arthroscopy. Arthroscopy before internal fixation gives additional information and changes the surgical protocol for these fractures and nonunions. PMID:24400191

  9. Pseudoaneurysm of a branch of the femoral circumflex artery as a complication of revision arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Naoki; Lisenda, Laughter; Khanduja, Vikas

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of painful internal snapping hip via arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon is becoming the preferred option over open techniques because of the benefits of minimal dissection and fewer complications. However, complications do occur with arthroscopic techniques as well. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with painful internal snapping of her right hip and underwent arthroscopic release of the iliopsoas tendon. Following the procedure she continued to complain of pain in her groin and was therefore investigated further with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which revealed a swelling near the femoral circumflex vessels. A computed tomography (CT) angiogram revealed a 15 mm pseudoaneurysm of the femoral circumflex artery, which was successfully treated by selective catheterisation and embolisation. Hip arthroscopists should be sufficiently familiar with the vascular anatomy around the hip and keep this complication in mind when releasing the iliopsoas tendon arthroscopically especially in revision cases with adhesions. PMID:28322718

  10. Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation to chondral lesion in femoral head.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Sarper; Toker, Berkin; Taser, Omer

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the treatment of 2 cases of full-thickness cartilage defect of the femoral head. The authors performed osteochondral autologous transplantation with a different technique that has not been reported to date. One patient was 37 years old, and the other was 42 years old. Both presented with hip pain. In both patients, radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a focal chondral defect on the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabular impingement. A retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation technique combined with hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic impingement treatment was performed. After a 2-month recovery period, the symptoms were resolved. In the first year of follow-up, Harris Hip scores improved significantly (case 1, 56.6 to 87.6; case 2, 58.6 to 90). The technique described yielded good short- and midterm clinical and radiologic outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe a retrograde osteochondral transplantation technique performed with hip arthroscopy in the femoral head.

  11. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Del Pilar Duque Orozco, M; Record, N C; Rogers, K J; Bober, M B; Mackenzie, W G; Atanda, A

    2017-06-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported.

  12. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients

    PubMed Central

    del Pilar Duque Orozco, M.; Record, N. C.; Rogers, K. J; Bober, M. B.; Mackenzie, W. G.; Atanda, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Methods Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. Results A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Conclusion Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported. PMID:28828058

  13. Treatment of the Bullet, Traversing Femoral Neck, Lodged in Hip Joint: Initial Arthroscopic Removal and Subsequent Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Çatma, Mehmet Faruk; Ünlü, Serhan; Ersan, Önder; Öztürk, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There have been several reports on arthroscopically assisted removal of the bullet imbedded in hip joint in the literature. Similarly, in this case, a bullet lodged in acetabulum was extracted with arthroscopic technique. What makes this case unique in the literature is that the bullet removed from the acetabulum traversed the femoral neck. Case Report: Male patient aged 32 years with a low-velocity gunshot wound was referred to the emergency room on August 28, 2012. The projectile was lodged in acetabular side of the hip joint transversing through the femoral neck. A hip arthroscopy was performed for bullet removal. Two years after surgery, the patient had groin pain and underwent a safe dislocation for femoral chondral injury. In the last follow-up in the second post-operative year, the patient had no clinical complaint. Conclusion: Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive and proper procedure for removal of foreign materials such as a bullet in the hip joint. Arthrotomy can be reserved for further complications such as chondral injury as in this case. PMID:28164046

  14. Arthroscopic evaluation of trochlear dysplasia as an aid in decision making for the treatment of patellofemoral instability.

    PubMed

    Nelitz, M; Lippacher, S

    2014-11-01

    Trochlear dysplasia is an important aetiological factor for the development of patellofemoral instability (PFI). The aim of the study was to identify the arthroscopic morphology of trochlear dysplasia that can be helpful when planning operative treatment for PFI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and strict lateral radiographs of 46 patients treated for PFI were assigned according to Dejour and matched with arthroscopic views from the lateral superior arthroscopic portal. On arthroscopy, signs of trochlear dysplasia were identified and classified into two types. Intra- and inter-observer agreements of the arthroscopic evaluation were assessed. Arthroscopically, 2 major types of trochlear dysplasia could be distinguished. Type I shows a flat trochlear groove with an elevated trochlear floor in relation to the anterior femoral cortex. In type II, the proximal trochlea was convex with a lateral trochlear bump. Arthroscopic evaluation was not consistent with the Dejour's radiographic and axial MRI classification. Arthroscopic grading showed excellent intra- and inter-observer agreements (81-92%). Arthroscopic evaluation can give additional information about the severity of trochlear dysplasia. This additional information can be used as an aid in decision making for the treatment of PFI. II.

  15. In vivo evaluation of femoral and tibial graft tunnel placement following all-inside arthroscopic tibial inlay reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Krawinkel, Alessa; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2014-12-01

    The arthroscopic all-inside tibial inlay technique represents a novel procedure for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. However, in vivo investigations that evaluate the accuracy of this technique regarding anatomic graft tunnel placement are few. The objective of this study was to analyse the femoral and tibial tunnel apertures using computed tomography (CT) and compare these findings to recommendations in the literature. CT scans were obtained in 45 patients following single-bundle PCL reconstruction. The centres of the tibial and femoral tunnel apertures were correlated to measurement grid systems used as a radiographic reference. The centre of the femoral tunnel aperture was located at 42.9% ± 9.4% of the total intercondylar depth and at 12.9% ± 7.2% of the total intercondylar height. The angle α for the femoral tunnel position was measured at 64.2° ± 10.0°. The centre of the tibial tunnel aperture was found at 51.8% ± 4.1% of the total mediolateral diameter of the tibial plateau. The superoinferior distance of the tibial tunnel aperture to the joint line was 9.6 mm ± 4.4 mm on frontal and 9.3 mm ± 3.4 mm on sagittal 3D-CT scans. The distance of the tibial tunnel aperture to the former physis line averaged to 0.8 mm ± 3.4 mm. Comparison to the corresponding reference values revealed no statistically significant difference. Arthroscopic tibial inlay reconstruction is an efficient procedure for precise replication of the anatomical footprint of the PCL. IV, prospective case series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Association between measures of patella height, morphologic features of the trochlea, and patellofemoral joint alignment: the MOST study.

    PubMed

    Stefanik, Joshua J; Zumwalt, Ann C; Segal, Neil A; Lynch, John A; Powers, Christopher M

    2013-08-01

    Patellofemoral joint (PFJ) malalignment (lateral patella displacement and tilt) has been proposed as a cause of patellofemoral pain. Patella height and/or the morphologic features of the femoral trochlea may predispose one to patella malalignment. The purposes of our study were to assess the associations among patella height, morphologic features of the trochlea, and measures of PFJ alignment and to determine which measures of patella height and morphologic features of the trochlea were the best predictors of PFJ alignment. Measures of patella height (Insall-Salvati ratio and modified Insall-Salvati ratio), morphologic features of the trochlea (sulcus angle, trochlear angle, lateral trochlear inclination, medial trochlear inclination), and PFJ alignment (bisect offset and patella tilt angle) were assessed in 566 knees from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. Bisect offset was correlated with the Insall-Salvati ratio (r = 0.25) and lateral trochlear inclination (r = -0.38). Patella tilt angle correlated with the trochlear angle (-0.27) and lateral trochlear inclination (-0.32). Linear regression models including the Insall-Salvati ratio and lateral trochlear inclination explained 20% and 11% of the variance in bisect offset and patella tilt angle, respectively. Of the variables measured in the current study, the Insall-Salvati ratio and lateral trochlear inclination were the best predictors of lateral patella displacement and lateral tilt. This knowledge will aid clinicians in the identification of anatomic risk factors for PFJ malalignment and/or PFJ dysfunction.

  17. Arthroscopic Patellar Lateral Facetectomy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Marcio B; Sanchez, George; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-04-01

    Isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis is relatively prevalent, with the lateral facet of the patella being the most commonly affected portion. This pathology can be a result of a patellar maltracking syndrome, patella instability, or idiopathic degenerative changes. A thorough diagnostic work-up with a physical examination and imaging studies are mandatory for a proper diagnosis and to rule out other causes of patellofemoral knee pain. These patients are often treated nonoperatively with exercises for patella mobility, intra-articular injections, braces, patellar tracking, quadriceps balance and strength, and activity modification. Patients with lateral patellar pain that is refractory to nonoperative management, and who have a clear bony deformity on the patella overriding the lateral aspect of the trochlea, can benefit from surgical intervention. We recommend an arthroscopic lateral patellar facetectomy because the joint can be dynamically assessed, treated, and re-evaluated intraoperatively to ensure that normal bony contact has been restored.

  18. Cold bupivacaine versus magnesium sulfate added to room temperature bupivacaine in sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve block in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alzeftawy, Ashraf Elsayed; El-Daba, Ahmad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cooling of local anesthetic potentiates its action and increases its duration. Magnesium sulfate (MgSo4) added to local anesthetic prolongs the duration of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. Aim: The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the effect of cold to 4°C bupivacaine 0.5% and Mg added to normal temperature (20–25°C) bupivacaine 0.5% during sonar-guided combined femoral and sciatic nerve blocks on the onset of sensory and motor block, intraoperative anesthesia, duration of sensory and motor block, and postoperative analgesia in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Patients and Methods: A total of 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I and II patients who were scheduled to undergo elective ACL reconstruction were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly allocated to 3 equal groups to receive sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. In Group I, 17 ml of room temperature (20–25°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of room temperature saline were injected for each nerve block whereas in Group II, 17 ml of cold (4°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of cold saline were injected for each nerve block. In Group III, 17 ml of room temperature 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of MgSo4 5% were injected for each nerve block. The onset of sensory and motor block was evaluated every 3 min for 30 min. Surgery was started after complete sensory and motor block were achieved. Intraoperatively, the patients were evaluated for heart rate and mean arterial pressure, rescue analgesic and sedative requirements plus patient and surgeon satisfaction. Postoperatively, hemodynamics, duration of analgesia, resolution of motor block, time to first analgesic, total analgesic consumption, and the incidence of side effects were recorded. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in demographic data, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and duration of

  19. Cold bupivacaine versus magnesium sulfate added to room temperature bupivacaine in sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve block in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Alzeftawy, Ashraf Elsayed; El-Daba, Ahmad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Cooling of local anesthetic potentiates its action and increases its duration. Magnesium sulfate (MgSo4) added to local anesthetic prolongs the duration of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the effect of cold to 4°C bupivacaine 0.5% and Mg added to normal temperature (20-25°C) bupivacaine 0.5% during sonar-guided combined femoral and sciatic nerve blocks on the onset of sensory and motor block, intraoperative anesthesia, duration of sensory and motor block, and postoperative analgesia in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. A total of 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I and II patients who were scheduled to undergo elective ACL reconstruction were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly allocated to 3 equal groups to receive sonar-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. In Group I, 17 ml of room temperature (20-25°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of room temperature saline were injected for each nerve block whereas in Group II, 17 ml of cold (4°C) 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of cold saline were injected for each nerve block. In Group III, 17 ml of room temperature 0.5% bupivacaine and 3 ml of MgSo4 5% were injected for each nerve block. The onset of sensory and motor block was evaluated every 3 min for 30 min. Surgery was started after complete sensory and motor block were achieved. Intraoperatively, the patients were evaluated for heart rate and mean arterial pressure, rescue analgesic and sedative requirements plus patient and surgeon satisfaction. Postoperatively, hemodynamics, duration of analgesia, resolution of motor block, time to first analgesic, total analgesic consumption, and the incidence of side effects were recorded. There was no statistically significant difference in demographic data, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and duration of surgery. Onset of both sensory and motor block was

  20. Second-generation arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation for the treatment of degenerative cartilage lesions.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Di Martino, Alessandro; Patella, Silvio; Altadonna, Giulio; Balboni, Federica; Bragonzoni, Laura; Visani, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2012-09-01

    Degenerative cartilage lesions present a negative joint environment, which may have a negative effect on the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical outcome obtained with the treatment for isolated degenerative knee cartilage lesions by second-generation arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Fifty-eight consecutive patients affected by focal degenerative chondral lesions of the femoral condyles and trochlea were treated by second-generation arthroscopic ACI. The mean age at surgery was 34.7 ± 9.1 years and the average defect size was 2.3 ± 0.9 cm(2). The patients were prospectively evaluated with IKDC, EQ-VAS, and Tegner scores preoperatively, at 2 and 6 years. A statistically significant improvement was observed in all scores from the basal evaluation to the final follow-up. The IKDC subjective score improved from 39.3 ± 13.6 to 68.8 ± 22.7 and 68.5 ± 23.9 at the 2- and 6-year follow-ups, respectively, with a significant improvement (P < 0.0005) and stable results over time; the same trend was confirmed by the EQ-VAS and Tegner scores. The worst results were found in patients with a low physical activity level, women, and those having undergone previous surgery, whereas the symptom duration before surgery did not influence the final outcome. The failure rate was 18.5%. Despite a significant improvement, the results were lower with respect to the outcome reported in different study populations, and the number of failures was markedly higher, too. Tissue-engineered cartilage implantation is a promising approach for the treatment of degenerative chondral lesions, but graft properties, besides mechanical and biochemical joint environment, have to be improved. Case series, Level IV.

  1. Incipient malunion of an isolated humeral trochlea fracture treated with an elbow hemiarthroplasty: case report.

    PubMed

    Lechasseur, Benoit; Laflamme, Mélissa; Leclerc, Alexandre; Bédard, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old woman with severe elbow ankylosis 10 weeks after a trochlea fracture treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Imaging confirmed failure of open reduction and internal fixation with a displaced and severely damaged trochlea. We treated the nascent malunited trochlea and associated elbow ankylosis with a distal humeral hemiarthroplasty and circumferential elbow arthrolysis. The patient regained functional range of motion of the elbow and had minimal pain. Distal humeral hemiarthroplasty, which has been indicated for acute fractures involving the capitellum or the entire distal humerus, may also be indicated for certain isolated complex fractures of the trochlea.

  2. Avascular Necrosis of Trochlea After Supracondylar Humerus Fractures in Children.

    PubMed

    Etier, Brian E; Doyle, J Scott; Gilbert, Shawn R

    2015-10-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is a rare but important complication after supracondylar humerus fractures. Posttraumatic humerus deformity was first reported in 1948 and sporadically thereafter. AVN deformity has been classified as type A (AVN of the lateral ossification center) and type B (AVN of the entire medial crista and a metaphyseal portion). In this article, we present 5 cases of AVN after supracondylar humerus fracture, discuss the importance of late clinical findings, and postulate a mechanism of AVN in nondisplaced fractures. Five cases of AVN after supracondylar humerus fracture were reviewed from the Children's of Alabama database. Four of the 5 patients were female. Four patients sustained a Gartland type III fracture, and 1 patient sustained a nondisplaced Gartland type I fracture. Age at time of injury ranged from 5 years to 10 years. All patients had an asymptomatic clinical period after treatment and re-presented 6 months to 7 years later with elbow pain or loss of motion. All patients were treated symptomatically. AVN of the trochlea has a late clinical presentation. The cause of this complication is interruption of the trochlea blood supply. In displaced fractures, the medial and/or lateral vessels are injured, leading to type A or type B deformity. In nondisplaced fractures, the lateral vessels are interrupted by tamponade because of encased fracture hematoma; this presents as a type A deformity. Both type A and type B deformities can be clinically significant. AVN of the trochlea should be considered in patients with late presentation of pain or loss of motion after treatment of supracondylar humerus fractures.

  3. Arthroscopic psoas tenotomy.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Michael; Jung, Jochen; Dienst, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Tenotomy may be indicated for psoas tendinitis or painful snapping if conservative treatment remains unsuccessful. Because of significant complications with open techniques, endoscopic operations have been developed. We present a new arthroscopic technique to access and release the psoas tendon from the hip joint. This procedure can be performed in addition to other arthroscopic procedures of the hip joint or alone. To exclude additional hip disease, a diagnostic round of the joint should be completed. After hip arthroscopy of the central compartment has been performed, traction is released and the 30 degrees arthroscope is placed via the proximal anterolateral portal lying on the anterior femoral neck. The medial synovial fold can be identified. This fold lies slightly medially underneath the anteromedial capsule at the level of the psoas tendon. The arthroscope is turned toward the anterior capsule. Sometimes, the tendon shines through a thin articular capsule, or it may even be accessed directly via a hole connecting the hip joint and the iliopectineal bursa at the level of the anterior head-neck junction. If this cannot be done, an electrothermic probe is introduced via the anterior portal to make a 2-cm transverse capsular incision. The tendon is released with the back side of the electrothermic device turned to the iliacus muscle that lies anterior to the psoas tendon. A complete release is achieved when the tendon stumps can be seen gapping at a distance and the fibers of the iliacus muscle are visible. The first 9 patients who underwent surgery performed according to this technique developed no complications, and their hip flexion strength was restored to normal within 3 months.

  4. OCD Lesions Of The Patella And Trochlea In Children

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Dennis E.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Simoni, Michael; Miller, Patricia; Micheli, Lyle J.; Kocher, Mininder S.; Heyworth, Benton E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this report is to evaluate the functional outcomes of surgical management of OCD lesions of the patella and trochlea in children. Secondary aims include elucidating predictors for higher functional outcomes, determining complication rates, surgical satisfaction and ability to return to sports. Methods: Patients age ≤ 18 years who were surgically treated for OCD of the patellar or trochlea were identified. Charts were queried to record patient/lesion data, surgical procedure, results and complications. Pre- and postoperative imaging was reviewed. Patients were asked to complete a follow-up athletic questionnaire and a Pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (Pedi-IKDC) score. Statistical analysis was conducted to look for predictors for reoperation, residual pain, ability to return to sports and lower Pedi-IKDC scores. Results: Twenty-six children (9 female, 17 male, 3 bilateral) were identified. Mean age was 14.7 (range: 9-18), 21/29 (72%) had open physes, and median follow-up was 3.8 years (range: 1-9 years). The most common location was the trochlea (17/29, 59%). Twenty-two lesions (76%) underwent transarticular drilling (n=14) or drilling with fixation (8), while 7 underwent excision and marrow stimulation. Four patients (14%) required unplanned re-operation. Internal fixation was predictive of reoperation (OR= 8.7, 95% CI= 2.8-26.9, P=0.04). At final follow up, 14 knees (48%) were pain-free, 14 (48%) had mild residual pain. Female gender was predictive of residual pain (OR= 9, 95% CI= 2-56, P=0.02). Twenty-two patients (85%) returned to sports. Longer duration of preoperative pain negatively impacted return to sports (OR= 0.32, 95% CI= 0.05-0.97, P=0.04). On postoperative imaging, the lesion appeared completely healed in 5 cases (42%) and partially healed in 12 cases (58%). All 15 survey respondents were satisfied with surgery. The mean Pedi-IKDC score was 82.4 ± 17.8 (range: 40.2 -100). Conclusion: Surgical treatment

  5. Matrix-encapsulation cell-seeding technique to prevent cell detachment during arthroscopic implantation of matrix-induced autologous chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Masri, Maria; Lombardero, Germán; Velasquillo, Cristina; Martínez, Valentín; Neri, Rosario; Villegas, Hilda; Ibarra, Clemente

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of obtaining a large number of viable cells within a construct that will not be detached by high fluid flow during arthroscopic implantation. Arthroscopic osteochondral biopsy specimens were obtained from the medial femoral trochlea of 8 horses. Chondrocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion and expanded in M199 media until confluency. After 10 to 12 days, cultures were trypsinized and cells resuspended in culture media. Then, 5 x 10(6) cells x mL(-1) were seeded on a culture dish and the same amount in a flask. Once extracellular matrix was formed, a polyglycolic/polylactic acid disk was placed in the culture dish. Cells obtained from the culture flasks (2 x 10(7) cells) were seeded onto the polymer and encapsulated by lifting the monolayer of cells and matrix from the bottom of the dish with surgical forceps. On days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9, viability was evaluated by calcein fluorescence. Fiber cell attachment was evaluated before implantation by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Six horses were implanted with naive cell-polymer constructs, and two horses were implanted with adenoviral vector with green fluorescent protein (AdGFP)-transduced cells. Biopsy specimens of repair tissue were evaluated at 8 weeks in 6 horses and at 4 weeks in the 2 horses implanted with AdGFP-transduced cells by second-look arthroscopy and biopsy, histochemistry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy via MitoTracker Red 580 (Invitrogen [Molecular Probes], Gibco, Carlsbad, CA) to assess cell viability. Viability and attachment of cells to polymer were confirmed by calcein fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy. Consistency of the construct was ideal for implantation between 7 and 9 days. Repair tissue with AdGFP chondrocytes after 4 weeks showed fluorescent cells also positive to MitoTracker probe by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Repair tissue after 8 weeks showed very cellular new

  6. Cartilage thickness and split-line pattern at the canine humeral trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zeissler, M; Maierl, J; Grevel, V; Oechtering, G; Böttcher, P

    2010-01-01

    To characterise the humeral trochlea in middle to large breed dogs in respect to split-line pattern and cartilage thickness. In 15 paired cadaveric elbow joints of mature dogs (>20 kg body weight) collagen network orientation of the hyaline cartilage of the humeral trochlea was visualised using a traditional split-line technique in which a dissecting needle dipped in India ink was inserted into the cartilage (n = 10). Cartilage thickness was measured radiographically on osteochondral plugs harvested at four representative locations within the joint surface of the humeral trochlea (n = 15). The joint surface of the humeral trochlea showed a distinct pattern of centripetally oriented split-lines with less pronounced or even absent split-lines caudo- proximally towards the olecranon fossa. Median cartilage thickness at the canine humeral trochlea was 0.51 mm (interquartile range: 0.42 - 0.61 mm). Centrally, at the region where osteochondrosis lesions commonly occur in middle to large breed dogs, the median cartilage thickness was 0.55 mm (interquartile range: 0.48 - 0.62 mm). When focusing on anatomical joint resurfacing while performing osteochondral transplantation at the canine humeral trochlea, transplants should be implanted such that their split-lines are oriented centripetally. Hyaline cartilage thickness of transferred grafts should be in the range of half a millimetre to optimally match the situation at the canine humeral trochlea.

  7. An arthroscopic hip documentation form.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Satesh; Khan, Munir; Kuiper, Jan-Herman; Richardson, James B; Davies, Jonathan P

    2008-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is becoming increasingly popular. A simple, precise, and practical means of recording arthroscopic findings will be useful for diagnostic, research, and audit purposes. Basic principles of cartography exist to produce two-dimensional paper representations of our spherical planet. We used the same principles to produce a two-dimensional map of the acetabulum and femoral head. The resulting hip diagram shows the acetabulum as viewed from the side and the femoral head as viewed from above. The ligamentum teres is attached to the medial margin of the head. The head-neck junction and part of the femoral neck is shown at the opposite margin of the ligamentum teres. The hip documentation form is simple, precise, and accurate. We use it to record our findings at hip arthroscopy, which we have used to assist us in our practice.

  8. Arthroscopic Treatment of Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cowden, Courtney H.; Barber, F. Alan

    2013-01-01

    Lateral knee pain in athletes is commonly seen in the sports medicine clinic, and the diagnosis of iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is frequently made. Although conservative management including rest from activity, equipment modification, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and physical therapy is the mainstay of treatment initially, refractory cases do exist. Multiple surgical techniques have been described including an arthroscopic technique. Arthroscopic release of the ITB attachment to the lateral femoral epicondyle and resection of the lateral synovial recess for recalcitrant ITB syndrome comprise a valid option that can have a good outcome. This option avoids the complications associated with open surgery and allows for a complete arthroscopic knee examination. Division or lengthening of the ITB band itself is not a necessary step in this technique. PMID:24843846

  9. Correlation of preoperative MRI and MRA with arthroscopically proven articular cartilage lesions of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, John S; Dwyer, Tim; Wolin, Preston M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting elbow articular cartilage injuries through comparison of preoperative MRI and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) with arthroscopic findings. Retrospective case analysis. Tertiary care orthopedic private practice. Consecutive series of 31 patients presenting with elbow pain and diagnosed at arthroscopy with articular cartilage defects of the elbow. All patients had a preoperative MRI or MRA using a 1.5 T magnet. Each patient had a systematic elbow arthroscopy, with careful inspection and recording of chondral injuries in 4 anatomical regions: capitellum, radius, trochlea, and ulna. Each MRI/MRA was then independently reviewed by 2 radiologists blinded to the arthroscopic findings. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy were calculated for MRI and MRI compared with arthroscopy as the gold standard, for each of the anatomical regions. The accuracy of MRI was 45% for chondral injuries of the radius, 65% for the capitellum, 20% for the ulna, and 30% for the trochlea. The accuracy of MRA was 45% for chondral injuries of the radius, 64% for the capitellum, 18% for the ulna, and 27% for the trochlea. We conclude that the ability of MRI and MRA using a 1.5 T magnet to detect articular cartilage lesions is limited. Neither MRI nor MRA demonstrates the intraarticular surface as accurately as direct visualization with the arthroscopy. This may be improved with the use of 3 T MRI. This study demonstrates that MRI and MRA with a 1.5 T magnet, as used in community practice, have limited ability to detect cartilage lesions of the elbow.

  10. [Operative treatment of Dubberley type 3B capitulum-trochlea fractures].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaochuan; Xiang, Ming; Yang, Guoyong; Chen, Hang; Tang, Haochen

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the method and effectiveness of operative treatment of Dubberley type 3B capitulum-trochlea fractures. Between January 2009 and December 2012, 8 cases of Dubberley type 3B capitulum- trochlea fractures were treated. There were 2 males and 6 females with an average age of 55 years (range, 43-65 years). The injury was caused by falling in 6 cases, electric bicycle accident in 1 case, and traffic accident in 1 case. All fractures were fresh and closed injury. No neural or vascular injury was found. The time between injury and operation was 3-15 days (mean, 5.9 days). Olecranon osteotomy was performed by a posterior midline skin incision of the elbow; 3.0 mm Herbert compression screws placed from posterior to anterior, 2.4 mm L shape locking compression plate designed for distal radius or 2.7 mm anatomical locking compression plate designed for distal humerus and 1.0 mm Kirschner wires or 3.0 mm Herbert screw for the transverse and coronal plane in the subchondral of anterior articular surface were used for fixation; and the lateral and medial collateral ligaments were repaired. All incisions healed by first intention. The patients were followed up 12-18 months (mean, 14.5 months). The X-ray films showed that fracture healing was achieved at 12-24 weeks (mean, 15 weeks) in 7 cases. Fracture nonunion and partial bone resorption in the capitellum were observed in 1 case. No failure of internal fixation, ulnohumeral joint instability, or traumatic arthritis occurred. At last follow-up, the range of motion of injured elbow was 0-40° in extension (mean 25.0°), 100-135° in flexion (mean, 116.3°), 60-70° in pronation (mean, 61.3°), and 80-90° in supination (mean, 81.3°). The elbow function score was 64-96 (mean, 81.1) according to the Broberg-Morrey evaluation criteria; the results were excellent in 2 cases, good in 4 cases, and fair in 2 cases with an excellent and good rate of 75%. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score was 0-3 (mean, 1). For Dubbelley

  11. Revision arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Abouali, Jihad Alexander Karim; Hatzantoni, Katerina; Holtby, Richard; Veillette, Christian; Theodoropoulos, John

    2013-09-01

    Failed anterior shoulder stabilization procedures have traditionally been treated with open procedures. Recent advances in arthroscopic techniques have allowed for certain failed stabilization procedures to be treated by arthroscopic surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair. We searched Medline, Embase, and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) for articles on revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Key words included shoulder dislocation, anterior shoulder instability, revision surgery, and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodologic quality, and extracted data. We included 16 studies comprising 349 patients. All studies were retrospective (1 Level II study and 15 Level IV studies). The mean incidence of recurrent instability after revision arthroscopic Bankart repair was 12.7%, and the mean follow-up period was 35.4 months. The most common cause for failure of the primary surgeries was a traumatic injury (62.1%), and 85.1% of patients returned to playing sports. The reasons for failure of revision cases included glenohumeral bone loss, hyperlaxity, and return to contact sports. With proper patient selection, the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair appear similar to those of revision open Bankart repair. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are required to confirm these findings. Level IV, systematic review of Level II and Level IV studies. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Arthroscopic Management of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pitta, Michael; Davis, William; Argintar, Evan H

    2016-02-01

    Arthroscopic surgery is commonly performed in the knee, shoulder, elbow, and hip. However, the role it plays in the management of osteoarthritis is controversial. Routine arthroscopic management of osteoarthritis was once common, but this practice has been recently scrutinized. Although some believe that there is no role for arthroscopic treatment in the management of osteoarthritis, it may be appropriate and beneficial in certain situations. The clinical success of such treatment may be rooted in appropriate patient selection and adherence to a specific surgical technique. Arthroscopy may serve as an effective and less invasive option than traditional methods of managing osteoarthritis.

  13. Intraoperative measurements of femoral anterior tangent (FAT) line for determining the rotational alignment of femoral component of total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroki; Gejo, Ryuichi; Tokunaga, Ayano; Hirano, Norikazu; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2013-12-01

    Previously, we reported using CT images that the anterior surface of the femur immediately proximal to the trochlea and its tangent line (femoral anterior tangent line; FAT line) could be used as a good index of the femoral rotation. In this study, we developed a jig that allowed us to measure the FAT line during surgery, and we examine the relation between preoperative and intraoperative measurement values. The results indicated that the average intraoperative measurement value of the 'surgical' FAT line was 9.8° ± 3.2° internally rotated using surgical transepicondylar axis reference. This value significantly correlated to preoperative FAT line/clinical transepicondylar axis angle. These findings demonstrated that FAT line is a useful index for appropriate rotational alignment of femoral component, both before and during TKA.

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement: early outcomes.

    PubMed

    Polat, Gökhan; Dikmen, Göksel; Erdil, Mehmet; Aşık, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the early outcomes of the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Forty-two femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) patients (mean age: 35.1 years, range: 16 to 52 years) treated arthroscopically between 2006 and 2011 in our clinic were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-five patients had Cam, 6 Pincer and 11 combined femoroacetabular impingement. Mean follow-up time was 28.2 (range: 10 to 72) months. Patients were assessed clinically and functionally using the Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Oxford Hip Score, WOMAC score, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores preoperatively and at the final follow-up. In clinical and functional assessments, there were increases of 24.8 points in mean NAHS, 23.3 in mHHS, 20.6 in WOMAC score and 9.6 in Oxford Hip Score. VAS pain score decreased by 4.9 points in comparison to the preoperative scores. There were no major complications. However, transient pudendal nerve neuropraxia was present in two patients, transient lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropraxia in one and asymptomatic heterotopic ossification in one patient. Short-term clinical results of the arthroscopic treatment of the FAI appear to be satisfactory.

  15. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a cost-effective option for many patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the ankle joint. Rehabilitation is generally quicker than conventional open techniques, and rates of fusion are comparable or better than traditional open techniques. Unless the arthroscopic surgeon has considerable experience, the best results are seen in patients with very little deformity in the ankle joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Arthroscopic therapy of septic hip infections in childhood].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, F F; Langendörfer, M; Wirth, T; Eberhardt, O

    2015-06-01

    The treatment goal is to rapidly make a diagnosis and establish an effective arthroscopic therapy in order to allow the hip joint to develop normally throughout childhood with respect to anatomical and functional development. Coxarthritis suspected of being septic arthritis No experience with arthroscopy, osteomyelitis of the dorsal femoral neck requiring an intervention. Relative contraindication: absence of cannulated systems. Arthroscopic lavage of the hip joint, including revision of the femoral neck and debridement of osteomyelitis of the femoral neck with placement of an antibiotic carrier if necessary. The arthroscopy is performed using the two portal technique, placing the patient supine on a normal operation table (traction table not required). Drain for 2-3 days with mobilization after removal of the drainage. A second look arthroscopy is not normally planned but may become necessary in cases without improvement of the clinical or laboratory test parameters and after follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The two portal hip joint arthroscopy using an irrigation volume of 6-9 l is an efficient minimally invasive method to safely treat septic arthritis of the hip joint with or without concomitant femoral neck osteomyelitis. It is associated with low morbidity and offers all advantages of an arthroscopic procedure. Out of 23 children 19 could be sufficiently treated by a single arthroscopic lavage of the hip joint. In three patients an additional osseous component required a second intervention. Out of 23 children 22 achieved an excellent Harris hip score, with one girl only achieving a moderate outcome. The 22 children had an unrestricted hip function at follow-up and could return fully to previous activity levels.

  17. [The origin of femoral trochlear dysplasia: comparative anatomy, evolution, and growth of the patellofemoral joint].

    PubMed

    Tardieu, C; Dupont, J Y

    2001-06-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of the femoropatellar morphology examining the evolutionary aspects to search for the origin of trochelar dysplasia. Trochlear dysplasia is frequent in the human population and, when associated with morphological and positional abnormalities of the patella, can lead to patellar pain syndrome in minor cases or patellar dislocation in severe cases. There is no strict relationship between the observed anomalies and clinical expression. The shape of the articular surfaces is variable in mammals depending on their type of locomotion: unguligrade, digitigrade, plantigrade. In greater apes, the femoral diaphysis is straight and the trochlea is flat and symmetrical. The patella does not tend to dislocate laterally since the knee under load is always flexed. In human adults, the femoral diaphysis has a valgus obliquity angle of 8 degrees to 10 degrees. Consequently, the trochlea has a deepened sulcus and an elevated lateral lip, avoiding lateral patellar dislocation, especially during initial knee flexion. In the human newborn, the femoral diaphysis is vertical. As the child starts walking, the femoral obliquity angle develops between 1 and 7 years of age, inducing a secondary valgus of the extensor apparatus. This obliquity does not develop in non-walking children. Fossil femurs of australopithecus demonstrate that a high obliquity angle had appeared more than 3 million years ago, but also exhibit a poorly deepened trochlea and a slight elevation of the lateral facet. At 1.8 million years, the fossils have the oblique diaphysis, the strongly deepened sulcus and the strongly elevated lateral facet. The obliquity angle of the femoral diaphysis is the leading feature which initiated the later modifications of the patellofemoral joint that over 3 million years were never inscribed in the human genoma. Lateral trochleal lip and deep sulcus are features that were first acquired, then once selected, genetically assimilated, and now appear on

  18. Arthroscopic reconstruction of the popliteus complex: accuracy and reproducibility of a new surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Frosch, Karl-Heinz; Akoto, Ralph; Heitmann, Maximilian; Enderle, Elena; Giannakos, Antonios; Preiss, Achim

    2015-10-01

    With combined PCL reconstruction and a minimal invasive (extra-anatomical) Larson's procedure, dorsal instability can be reduced by about 50-70 %. Better results are described by open and more anatomical procedures. In this study, a new, standardized, arthroscopic technique for anatomical popliteus tendon (PLT) reconstruction is evaluated. In 13 cadaver knees, an arthroscopic reconstruction of the PLT and the lateral collateral ligament was performed. Twelve defined landmarks were used for arthroscopic tunnel placement, and the distance of the tunnel locations to these specific landmarks was evaluated. The femoral drill channel was located with a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility in the centre of the femoral footprint of the PLT (on average 1.1 (±1.6) mm distal from the centre). On the tibial side, the drill channel was in the distal third of the sulcus popliteus in all cases. On average, the channel was placed exactly at the level of the tip of the fibula (±1.5 mm) and 0.6 (±1.7) mm medially from the medial edge of the fibula. The centre of the channel was 13.4 (±2.3) mm distal from the joint line. The presented arthroscopic technique for PLT reconstruction is standardized, reproducible and has a high accuracy for the placement of the tibial and femoral tunnel. The technique could be clinically relevant for future arthroscopic posterolateral corner reconstructions. III.

  19. Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R; Andrieu, M; Bauer, T

    2016-12-01

    Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis is gaining in popularity based on evidence of bone fusion in over 90% of cases, with a shorter time to healing, a simpler postoperative course, and fewer complication compared to open surgery. Two arthroscopic techniques have been reported: one with the patient in lateral decubitus and lateral portals and the other with the patient prone and posterior portals. The objective of this technical note is to describe these two techniques, with emphasis on the specific characteristics of each. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic Tarsometatarsal Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Tarsometatarsal (Lisfranc) osteoarthritis can be a disabling condition and is commonly due to posttraumatic causes. Tarsometatarsal arthrodesis is indicated if the pain does not subdue with conservative treatment. Classically, this is performed as an open procedure. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a minimally invasive approach of arthroscopic arthrodesis of the involved tarsometatarsal joints. The arthroscopic procedure is performed through the junction portals of the involved articulation. It has the advantages of better cosmesis, less wound complication, less bone resection, and more thorough joint debridement. However, it is contraindicated if there is an associated significant foot deformity or shortening of the involved foot rays.

  1. Modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-09-01

    The open modified Brostrom anatomic repair technique is widely accepted as the reference standard for lateral ankle stabilization. However, there is high incidence of intra-articular pathologies associated with chronic lateral ankle instability which may not be addressed by an isolated open Brostrom procedure. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with suture anchor has been described for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates seemed to be higher than open Brostrom procedure. Modification of the arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with the use of bone tunnel may reduce the risk of certain complications.

  2. Tibial tubercle osteotomy for patello-femoral joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew J; Mandalia, Vipul I

    2016-03-01

    Tibial tubercle osteotomy has a long history in the management of patella instability and patello-femoral arthritis. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the literature describing the biomechanics of the patello-femoral joint and the rationale behind the use of the tibial tubercle osteotomy in modern day practice. Several different tibial tubercle osteotomies are available and we aim to detail the concepts behind their use and the subsequent clinical results. With continued developments of chondrocyte implantation techniques, the potential to fill defects on the chondral surface of either the patella or trochlea in conjunction with a tibial tubercle osteotomy may well become more commonplace in a group that is commonly young and difficult to manage. Level of evidence III.

  3. Arthroscopic core decompression of the lunate in early stage Kienbock disease of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Smith, Michael L; Watts, Adam C

    2011-03-01

    Since the first description of Kienbock disease in 1910, the etiology and treatment have remained controversial topics. Core decompression is an accepted treatment option in early-stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and more recently the humeral head. This paper reports the technique of arthroscopic fluoroscopically guided core decompression of the lunate with 6-year results.

  4. Creating and Closing the T-Capsulotomy for Improved Visualization During Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Reardon, Patrick J.; Levy, Bruce A.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of femoroacetabular impingement through an arthroscopic approach has gained widespread popularity in recent years. Although outcomes are generally favorable, one of the most common reasons for failure is incomplete resection of cam lesions of the femoral neck. As a result, the T-capsulotomy has been introduced as a method for improving access to the femoral head-neck junction, which is not always visible through a standard interportal capsulotomy. The T-capsulotomy has the benefits of improving arthroscopic visualization of the femoral neck, reducing overall fluoroscopy exposure for the patient and surgeon, and facilitating capsular plication. We present a reliable and efficient method for creating and repairing the T-capsulotomy. We routinely perform this technique in patients with cam lesions that are too large or too distal to safely visualize and decompress through an interportal capsulotomy. PMID:26870654

  5. [Arthroscopic treatment for osteoarthritic knee].

    PubMed

    Bloom, Shlomo; Lebel, David; Cohen, Eugen; Atar, Dan; Rath, Ehud

    2008-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of knee morbidity. Age and overweight are the main risk factors for development of knee OA. The majority of patients respond to conservative treatment. For those who don't, surgical treatment is the only alternative. Arthroscopic surgery for the osteoarthritic knee is a well known procedure. Recently, numerous publications addressed the advantages of arthroscopic treatment for this indication. Some of the publications concluded that arthroscopic treatment for knee OA equals placebo. Others found temporary relief of symptoms. Among special subgroup of patients, in which acute pain exacerbation, mechanical block or early OA, utilizing arthroscopic techniques revealed satisfactory results. In this review, we discuss the indications and contraindications for arthroscopic treatment of the osteoarthritic knee according to the latest literature.

  6. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication. PMID:27027027

  7. Arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Bontempo, Nicholas A; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopy is an advancing field in orthopedics, the applications of which have been expanding over time. Traditionally, excision of ganglion cysts has been done in an open fashion. However, more recently, studies show outcomes following arthroscopic excision to be as good as open excision. Cosmetically, the incisions are smaller and heal faster following arthroscopy. In addition, there is the suggested benefit that patients will regain function and return to work faster following arthroscopic excision. More prospective studies comparing open and arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts need to be done in order to delineate if there is a true functional benefit.

  8. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  9. Patellar clunk syndrome after total knee arthroplasty; risk factors and functional outcomes of arthroscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, James A; Aynardi, Michael C; Peters, John D; Kopolovich, Daniel M; Purtill, James J

    2014-09-01

    This study reports the incidence, risk factors, and functional outcomes of the largest reported series of patients treated arthroscopically for patella clunk syndrome (PCS). All patients treated arthroscopically for PCS were identified. Patients were matched with controls by sex and date of surgery. Follow-up was conducted using SF-12 and WOMAC questionnaires. Operative notes and preoperative and postoperative radiographs were reviewed. Seventy-five knees in 68 patients were treated arthroscopically for PCS. Average follow-up was 4.2 years. Functional scores demonstrated no statistical difference. PCS patients had a significantly more valgus preoperative alignment, greater change in posterior femoral offset and smaller patellar component size. PCS is a relatively common complication following TKA. Arthroscopy yields functional results comparable to controls. Radiographic and technical factors are associated with PCS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  11. Autofluorescence imaging for improved visualization of joint structures during arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy Tan; van Horssen, Pepijn; Derriks, Hans; van de Giessen, Martijn; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of our study is to develop the arthroscopic autofluorescence imaging (AFI) system to improve the visualization during arthroscopic surgery by real-time enhancing the contrast between joint structures with autofluorescence imaging. Its validity was evaluated around the arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, specifically improving the contrast between the femoral insertion site and its background. The feasibility of the AFI system was validated with bovine and human knees. The spectral responses of the femoral insertion site and its surrounding bone and cartilage were measured with a fluorospectrometer. A prototype of the AFI system was developed based on the spectral responses (SR) and test images of the insertion site. The accuracy was validated by evaluating the overlap between manually segmented insertion sites on the white light color images and on the corresponding spectral unmixed autofluorescence images. The final prototype of the AFI system was tested during arthroscopy in cadaveric knees. The results showed that the joint structures have different SRs. Spectral unmixing enabled separation of the SRs and improved the contrast between the joint structures. The agreement between visible light and autofluorescence ligament insertions had a mean Dice coefficient of 0.84 and the mean Dice coefficient of the interobserver variability for visible light imaging was 0.85. We have shown that the femoral insertion site can be accurately visualized with autofluorescence imaging combined with spectral unmixing. The AFI system demonstrates the feasibility of real-time and subject-specific visualization of the femoral insertion site which can facilitate anatomic ACL reconstruction. In addition, the AFI system can facilitate arthroscopic procedures in other joints and can also be used as a diagnostic tool.

  12. Changes in articular cartilage following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Martin; Schocke, Michael; Hoser, Christian; Fink, Christian; Mayr, Raul; Rosenberger, Ralf E

    2016-05-01

    To examine degenerative changes in all cartilage surfaces of the knee following arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. For this prospective cohort study, 14 patients (five female) with a mean age of 47.9 ± 12.9 years who had undergone isolated arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy were evaluated. Cartilage-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired from the operated knees before the index operations, as well as at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The MRI scans were assessed for the prevalence, severity, and size of cartilage degenerations. The clinical outcome was assessed using the SF-36 physical and mental component score and the International Knee Documentation Committee Knee Evaluation Form and was correlated with radiological findings. There was a significant increase in the severity of cartilage lesions in the medial tibial plateau (P = 0.019), as well as a trend towards an increase in the lateral tibial plateau. The size of the cartilage lesions increased significantly in the medial femoral condyle (P = 0.005) and lateral femoral condyle (P = 0.029), as well as in the patella (P = 0.019). Functional outcome scores improved significantly throughout the follow-up period. There was no correlation between cartilage wear and functional outcome. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy is associated with adverse effects on articular cartilage and may lead to an increase in the severity and size of cartilage lesions. Post-operative cartilage wear predominantly affected the medial compartment and also affected the other compartments of the knee. Strategies to reduce subsequent osteoarthritic changes need to involve all compartments of the knee. IV.

  13. Groove model of tibia‐femoral osteoarthritis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    de Visser, Huub M.; Weinans, Harrie; Coeleveld, Katja; van Rijen, Mattie H. P.; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will counteract the potential beneficial effects of therapy. The groove model of osteoarthritis uses a one‐time trigger, surgically induced cartilage damage on the femoral condyles, and has been validated for the canine tibia‐femoral compartment. The present study evaluates this model for the rat knee joint. The articular cartilage of the weight bearing surface of both femoral condyles and trochlea were damaged (grooved) without damaging the underlying subchondral bone. Severity of joint degeneration was histologically assessed, in addition to patella cartilage damage, and subchondral bone characteristics by means of (contrast‐enhanced) micro‐CT. Mild histological degeneration of the surgically untouched tibial plateau cartilage was observed in addition to damage of the femoral condyles, without clear synovial tissue inflammation. Contrast enhanced micro‐CT demonstrated proteoglycan loss of the surgically untouched patella cartilage. Besides, a more sclerotic structure of the subchondral bone was observed. The tibia‐femoral groove model in a rat results in mild knee joint degeneration, without permanent joint instability and joint inflammation. This makes the rat groove model a useful model to study the onset and progression of post‐traumatic non‐inflammatory osteoarthritis, creating a relatively sensitive model to study disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:496–505, 2017. PMID:27183198

  14. Groove model of tibia-femoral osteoarthritis in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Huub M; Weinans, Harrie; Coeleveld, Katja; van Rijen, Mattie H P; Lafeber, Floris P J G; Mastbergen, Simon C

    2017-03-01

    Several experimental models of osteoarthritis in rats are used to study the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. Many mechanically induced models have the limitation that permanent joint instability is induced by, for example, ligament transection or meniscal damage. This permanent instability will counteract the potential beneficial effects of therapy. The groove model of osteoarthritis uses a one-time trigger, surgically induced cartilage damage on the femoral condyles, and has been validated for the canine tibia-femoral compartment. The present study evaluates this model for the rat knee joint. The articular cartilage of the weight bearing surface of both femoral condyles and trochlea were damaged (grooved) without damaging the underlying subchondral bone. Severity of joint degeneration was histologically assessed, in addition to patella cartilage damage, and subchondral bone characteristics by means of (contrast-enhanced) micro-CT. Mild histological degeneration of the surgically untouched tibial plateau cartilage was observed in addition to damage of the femoral condyles, without clear synovial tissue inflammation. Contrast enhanced micro-CT demonstrated proteoglycan loss of the surgically untouched patella cartilage. Besides, a more sclerotic structure of the subchondral bone was observed. The tibia-femoral groove model in a rat results in mild knee joint degeneration, without permanent joint instability and joint inflammation. This makes the rat groove model a useful model to study the onset and progression of post-traumatic non-inflammatory osteoarthritis, creating a relatively sensitive model to study disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:496-505, 2017.

  15. Arthroscopic revision of Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Neri, Brian R; Tuckman, David V; Bravman, Jonathan T; Yim, Duke; Sahajpal, Deenesh T; Rokito, Andrew S

    2007-01-01

    The success of revision surgery for failed Bankart repair is not well known. This purpose of this study was to report the success rates achieved using arthroscopic techniques to revise failed Bankart repairs. Twelve arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs were performed on patients with recurrent unidirectional shoulder instability after open or arthroscopic Bankart repair. Follow-up was available on 11 of the 12 patients at a mean of 34.4 months (range, 25-56 months). The surgical findings, possible modes of failure, shoulder scores (Rowe score, University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Simple Shoulder Test), and clinical outcome were evaluated. Various modes of failure were recognized during revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Good-to-excellent results were obtained in 8 patients (73%) undergoing revision stabilization according to Rowe and UCLA scoring. A subluxation or dislocation event occurred in 3 (27%) of the 11 patients at a mean of 8.7 months (range, 6-12 months) postoperatively. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs are technically challenging procedures but can be used to achieve stable, pain-free, functional shoulders with return to prior sport. Owing to limited follow-up and the small number of patients in this study, we were unable to conclude any pattern of failure or selection criteria for this procedure.

  16. Femoral articular geometry and patellofemoral stability.

    PubMed

    Iranpour, Farhad; Merican, Azhar M; Teo, Seow Hui; Cobb, Justin P; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-06-01

    Patellofemoral instability is a major cause of anterior knee pain. The aim of this study was to examine how the medial and lateral stability of the patellofemoral joint in the normal knee changes with knee flexion and measure its relationship to differences in femoral trochlear geometry. Twelve fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were used. Five components of the quadriceps and the iliotibial band were loaded physiologically with 175N and 30N, respectively. The force required to displace the patella 10mm laterally and medially at 0°, 20°, 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion was measured. Patellofemoral contact points at these knee flexion angles were marked. The trochlea cartilage geometry at these flexion angles was visualized by Computed Tomography imaging of the femora in air with no overlying tissue. The sulcus, medial and lateral facet angles were measured. The facet angles were measured relative to the posterior condylar datum. The lateral facet slope decreased progressively with flexion from 23°±3° (mean±S.D.) at 0° to 17±5° at 90°. While the medial facet angle increased progressively from 8°±8° to 36°±9° between 0° and 90°. Patellar lateral stability varied from 96±22N at 0°, to 77±23N at 20°, then to 101±27N at 90° knee flexion. Medial stability varied from 74±20N at 0° to 170±21N at 90°. There were significant correlations between the sulcus angle and the medial facet angle with medial stability (r=0.78, p<0.0001). These results provide objective evidence relating the changes of femoral profile geometry with knee flexion to patellofemoral stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Our Experience with Patello femoral joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Pablo; Arteaga, Gonzalo; Vargas, Medardo; Naranjo, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ten to fifteen percent of knee arthritis is reported to be isolated patellofemoral arthritis. Total knee arthroplasty is not recommended for isolated patella femoral arthritis particularly in young patients. We present the retrospective review our series in 7 years. Objectives: The aim of this presentation is to describe our experience in the management of patellofemoral osteoarthritis with the use of the partial patellofemoral arthroplasty, as well as to delineate the pitfalls and causes of revision in our initial series of 153 cases. Methods: between 2009 and 2016, our group performed 157 patellofemoral arthroplasties (PFA) 74% being in women, and 26% in men, the mean age for women was 58 yrs. And 38 yrs. for men, our initial 13 cases were managed with the Avon prosthesis (Stryker Corporation Kalamazoo, Michigan), and then we switched to the Vanguard PF (Zimmer-Biomet Warsaw In), both systems are an On-Lay design that is more flexible for addressing dysplastic trochleas that are more common in our population. Results: We performed a Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) for the assessment of the success of the procedure and obtained 87% of patients with excellent results (95 to 100), 10% with fair results (70 to 90) and 3% with poor outcomes (50), we performed a total of 3 revisions due to pain or progress to global arthritis. Conclusion: The PFA is a successful, safe and reproducible surgery that can be used in the group of patients that have isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. It requires a thorough knowledge of the patello femoral joint biomechanics, and physiopathology.

  18. Radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition elbow reconstruction after proximal ulnar metastatic tumor resection: case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feiyan; Xia, Jun; Wei, Yibing; Wang, Siqun; Wu, Jianguo; Huang, Gangyong; Chen, Jie; Shi, Jingsheng

    2012-07-16

    Wide en bloc excision of proximal ulna sections is used to treat traumatic and pathological fractures of the ulna, though poor standardization of clinical treatment often results in long-term failure of such reconstructed biomechanical structures. In order to provide insight into effective ulnar reconstructive treatments, the case of an 80-year-old Chinese Han male presenting with pathological fracture caused by a proximal ulnar metastatic tumor concurrent with metastatic renal cancer complicated by occurrence in the brain and lungs is reported and contrasted with alternative treatment techniques. Wide resectioning of the proximal ulna and reconstruction with local radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition resulted in preservation of functionality, sensitivity, and biomechanical integrity after postsurgical immobilization, 6 weeks of passive- and active-assisted flexion, and extension with a hinged brace. The resultant Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating score was 25 of 30 (83 %). Full sensitivity and mobility of the left hand and elbow (10° to 90° with minimally impaired supination and pronation) was restored with minimal discomfort. No evidence of local recurrence or other pathological complications were observed within a 1-year follow-up period. Efficient reconstruction of osseous and capsuloligamentous structures in the elbow is often accomplished by allografts, prosthesis, and soft tissue reconstruction, though wide variations in risk and prognosis associated with these techniques has resulted in disagreements regarding the most effective standards for clinical treatment. Current findings suggest that radius neck-to-humerus trochlea transposition offers a superior range of elbow movement and fewer complications than similar allograft and prosthetic techniques for patients with multiple metastatic cancers.

  19. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest.

  20. Closed Intramedullary Derotational Osteotomy and Hip Arthroscopy for Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement From Femoral Retroversion

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Martin, Hal D.

    2014-01-01

    Femoral retroversion is an uncommon cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may require surgical treatment beyond arthroscopic or open femoroplasty. We present the case of a young adult with bilateral severe femoral retroversion in whom such treatment failed. We discuss the rationale, surgical technique, and outcome of this patient, who underwent bilateral closed intramedullary derotational proximal femoral osteotomies and interlocked nailing with adjunctive pre- and post-osteotomy hip arthroscopies. Clinical improvement with normal foot progression angles, radiographic union, and resolution of bilateral cam femoroacetabular impingement from femoral retroversion was achieved. This surgery permits rapid institution of weight-bearing ambulation and an early rehabilitative program. Femoral retroversion may be an underappreciated and insufficiently treated cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may be readily detected and successfully remedied with this less invasive procedure. PMID:24749047

  1. Arthroscopic approach and intraarticular anatomy of the stifle in South American camelids.

    PubMed

    Pentecost, Rebecca L; Niehaus, Andrew J; Santschi, Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    To describe a cranial arthroscopic approach to the stifle of South American camelids and to report our clinical experience with camelid stifle arthroscopy. Experimental study and retrospective case series. (1) Cadaveric alpaca hindlimbs (n = 18; 9 alpacas); (2) 1 alpaca and 1 llama Polymethylmethacrylate joint casts (n = 2) were made to define stifle joint dimensions. Cadaveric stifle joints (n = 16) were evaluated arthroscopically to determine arthroscopic portal locations, describe the intraarticular anatomy, and report potential complications. An alpaca and a llama with stifle joint disease had diagnostic arthroscopy. Successful entry into the stifle joint was achieved in 16 cadaver limbs. Observed structures were: the suprapatellar pouch, articular surface of the patella, femoral trochlear ridges and groove, cranial aspect of the femoral condyles (n = 16); distal aspect of the cranial and proximal aspect of the caudal cruciate ligaments (14); and cranial aspects of the medial and lateral menisci (11), and cranial meniscotibial and intermeniscal ligaments (8). Stifle arthroscopy allowed for joint evaluation and removal of osteochondral fragments in 1 alpaca and 1 llama with naturally occurring stifle disease. Complications of cadaver or live procedures included minor cartilage scoring (3 stifles) and subcutaneous periarticular fluid accumulation (8 stifles). Arthroscopy provides a safe approach for diagnosis and treatment of stifle lesions in South American camelids. Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  3. The pathoanatomy and arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, L. M.; Leunig, M.

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes pain and chondrolabral damage via mechanical overload during movement of the hip. It is caused by many different types of pathoanatomy, including the cam ‘bump’, decreased head–neck offset, acetabular retroversion, global acetabular overcoverage, prominent anterior–inferior iliac spine, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and the sequelae of childhood Perthes’ disease. Both evolutionary and developmental factors may cause FAI. Prevalence studies show that anatomic variations that cause FAI are common in the asymptomatic population. Young athletes may be predisposed to FAI because of the stress on the physis during development. Other factors, including the soft tissues, may also influence symptoms and chondrolabral damage. FAI and the resultant chondrolabral pathology are often treated arthroscopically. Although the results are favourable, morphologies can be complex, patient expectations are high and the surgery is challenging. The long-term outcomes of hip arthroscopy are still forthcoming and it is unknown if treatment of FAI will prevent arthrosis. PMID:23610655

  4. Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis: a new arthroscopic procedure.

    PubMed

    Arriaza, R; Leyes, M

    2011-01-01

    Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is considered an aggressive and technically demanding procedure that can be used to treat severe deformities of the hindfoot, and it is rarely performed. The indications for ankle arthroscopy are increasing, and arthroscopic tibiotalar arthrodesis is a common and successful procedure, but arthroscopic tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis has not been previously reported in the literature. A case of extensive talus necrosis with severe hindfoot deformity treated by means of an arthroscopic tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is presented.

  5. Fiber-optics couple arthroscope to TV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Convenient, hand-held coupler images output of arthroscope onto coherent fiber bundle. Arthroscope allows surgeons to examine internal organs through any small opening in body. Coupler is also used for engine inspection, instrument repair, and around-corner visual inspection. Image from arthroscope travels along flexible bundle and appears at other cable end where it is recollimated by lens. Image is read from lens or projected on color TV camera.

  6. The use of rapid prototyped implants to simulate knee joint abnormalities for in vitro testing: a validation study with replica implants of the native trochlea.

    PubMed

    Van Haver, Annemieke; De Roo, Karel; De Beule, Matthieu; Van Cauter, Sofie; Labey, Luc; De Baets, Patrick; Claessens, Tom; Verdonk, Peter

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the biomechanical effect of skeletal knee joint abnormalities, the authors propose to implant pathologically shaped rapid prototyped implants in cadaver knee specimens. This new method was validated by replacing the native trochlea by a replica implant on four cadaver knees with the aid of cadaver-specific guiding instruments. The accuracy of the guiding instruments was assessed by measuring the rotational errors of the cutting planes (on average 3.01° in extension and 1.18° in external/internal rotation). During a squat and open chain simulation, the patella showed small differences in its articulation with the native trochlea and the replica trochlea, which could partially be explained by the rotational errors of the implants. This study concludes that this method is valid to investigate the effect of knee joint abnormalities with a replica implant as a control condition to account for the influence of material properties and rotational errors of the implant. © IMechE 2014.

  7. [Arthroscopic treatment for osteoarthritis: knee and shoulder].

    PubMed

    Almazán, Arturo; Cruz, Francisco; Pérez, Francisco; Bravo, César; Ibarra, Clemente

    2007-10-01

    We discuss the role of arthroscopy in the treatment of knee and shoulder osteoarthritis. The most widely used arthroscopic techniques used in these joints for the treatment of osteoarthritis are arthroscopic lavage, arthroscopic debridement, abrasion arthrosplasty and microfractures. Even though arthroscopic techniques are only useful for a specific group of patients and that the procedure does not modify disease's natural history, it is an accessible therapeutic option. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier España S.L Barcelona. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopically Assisted Modified Jones Procedure.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    The modified Jones procedure is the classic operative treatment of symptomatic clawed hallux. It is composed of transfer of the extensor hallucis longus tendon to the first metatarsal neck and fusion of the hallux interphalangeal joint. The purpose of this technical note is to report the technique of an arthroscopically assisted modified Jones procedure. This can be combined with other minimally invasive bone and soft-tissue procedures to correct all aspects of the complex cavus foot deformity.

  9. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo C.; Queiroz, Marcelo C.; Ono, Nelson K.; Honda, Emerson K.; Guimarāes, Rodrigo P; Junior, Walter Ricioli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the short-term follow-up results of arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Our hypothesis is that arthroscopic treatment results are favorable. Methods: Between August 2003 and August 2007, 28 hips had femoroacetabular impingement treated by hip arthroscopy. The mean age was 34 years, with mean follow-up period of 27 months. Clinical results were graded with the modified Harris hip score, which was measured pre- and postoperatively. Patients had also their internal rotation analyzed. These parameters were calculated by using Wilcoxon's t test for analysis of nonparametric paired samples performed. Results: The mean preoperative Harris Hip Score was 54.2, improving to 94.8 postoperatively (p<0,001). The mean increase was 37.5 points. We had 4 good results (15%) and 24 excellent results (85%). Preoperatively, the patients had a mean internal rotation of 17°, and, postoperatively, 36°. The average internal rotation increase was 19° (p<0,001). Conclusions: The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement presents satisfactory results. PMID:27004177

  10. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  11. Arthroscopic extraction of a stainless steel foreign body imbedded in the tibial plateau.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Lee, Y T; Kim, H J

    1998-01-01

    We present a case of foreign body synovitis in the knee joint caused by a fragment of stainless steel imbedded in the tibial plateau for 10 years, which was extracted successfully using an arthroscope. The cause of synovitis was the long-standing release of small stainless steel particles resulting from the abrasion of the steel against the opposing lateral femoral condyle. For an articular foreign body, arthroscopy is by far the best treatment. Arthroscopy allows the surgeon to localize as well as to extract even the smallest foreign body fragment, and also provides for washing out of the joint cavity.

  12. Femoral impaction grafting

    PubMed Central

    Scanelli, John A; Brown, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Femoral impaction grafting is a reconstruction option applicable to both simple and complex femoral component revisions. It is one of the preferred techniques for reconstructing large femoral defects when the isthmus is non-supportive. The available level of evidence is primarily derived from case series, which shows a mean survivorship of 90.5%, with revision or re-operation as the end-point, with an average follow-up of 11 years. The rate of femoral fracture requiring re-operation or revision of the component varies between several large case series, ranging from 2.5% to 9%, with an average of 5.4%. PMID:23362469

  13. Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Matthew D.; Burns, Joseph P.; Snyder, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of glenoid bony integrity is critical to minimizing the risk of recurrence and re-creating normal kinematics in the setting of anterior glenohumeral instability. We present an arthroscopic suture anchor–based technique for treating large bony Bankart fractures in which the fragment is secured to the intact glenoid using mattress sutures placed through the bony fragment and augmented with soft-tissue repair proximal and distal to the bony lesion. This straightforward technique has led to excellent fragment reduction and good outcomes in our experience. PMID:25973373

  14. Results of arthroscopic meniscal repair

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, María Belén; Arroquy, Damián; Chahla, Jorge; Guiñazú, Jorge; Bisso, Martín Carboni; Vilaseca, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Currently the arthroscopic treatment of meniscal pathology has become one of the most common procedures in orthopedic practice and although in most cases meniscectomy is done, meniscal sutures are the treatment of choice when a reparable lesion is diagnosed, especially in young patients. It has been reported that the meniscal repair leads to a lower incidence of developing degenerative changes in the long-term when compared with meniscectomy and nonsurgical treatment of meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of meniscal repair achieved in our sports medicine practice. Methods: Between 2006 and 2015, 62 meniscal tears in 58 patients with a mean age of 31 years (range 15-58) were repaired. Mean follow-up was 52 months (range 6-120 months). In 16 patients (28%) was associated with arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. The repair techniques used included outside-in sutures, inside-out sutures, all-inside sutures and a combination of techniques. Failure of the repair was defined by the requirement for repeat knee arthroscopy and partial or subtotal meniscectomy. The indication of arthroscopic revision was based on the presence of mechanical symptoms, after the suture. Results: Failure of meniscus repair occurred in four patients (failure rate: 6.45%), one case was associated with ACL reconstruction (failure rate: 6.25%) and 3 had undergone isolated meniscal suture (failure rate: 8%). The average time for the reoperation was 15 months (4-24). We had no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: The reported failure rate of meniscal repair in stable knees varies between 12% and 43%, with reports that demonstrate a clinical success rate of 100%. In this study, we obtained a success rate of 93.5%. These results are slightly higher than those in the literature, which can be attributed to careful selection of patients and the fact that clinical success tends to be better than the assessed arthroscopically. In summary, we consider the

  15. Ankle instability and arthroscopic lateral ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle ligament insufficiency has focused on 2 main categories: local soft-tissue reconstruction and tendon grafts/transfer procedures. There is an increasing interest in the arthroscopic solutions for chronic instability of the ankle. Recent biomechanical studies suggest the at least one of the arthroscopic techniques can provide equivalent results to current open local soft-tissue reconstruction (such as the modified Brostrom technique). Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction is becoming an increasingly acceptable method for the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A ganglion of the patellar tendon in patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Touraine, Sébastien; Lagadec, Matthieu; Petrover, David; Genah, Idan; Parlier-Cuau, Caroline; Bousson, Valérie; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2013-09-01

    Intratendinous ganglia are rare. We report the case of a sedentary woman with chronic mechanical anterolateral pain of the knee and an extensive ganglion of the patellar tendon as indicated on magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) examinations. There was evidence of a high-riding patella, patellar malalignment and patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome with significantly close contact between the patellar tendon and the lateral facet of the femoral trochlea. The ultrasound-guided aspiration of the ganglion enabled a localized injection of an anti-inflammatory drug (cortivazol) and the cytopathological examination of the fluid, which confirmed the diagnosis. Clinical improvement was maintained with knee rehabilitation and was satisfactory at follow-up after 1 year. To our knowledge, we report the first case of a ganglion of the patellar tendon subsequent to patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome. We found that this case was illustrative of mucoid degeneration in connective tissue due to chronic repetitive microtraumas. Additionally, this case provided the opportunity to discuss the management of this condition in a sedentary individual with a high-riding patella and patellar malalignment.

  17. Does patellofemoral congruence following total knee arthroplasty correlate with pain or function? Intraoperative arthroscopic assessment of 30 cases

    PubMed Central

    Senioris, Antoine; Rahali, Said; Malekpour, Louis; Dujardin, Franck; Courage, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior knee pain (AKP) is observed in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) both with and without patellar resurfacing, and neither patellar denervation nor secondary resurfacing are effective for treating the symptoms. The exact causes for pain remain unclear, though abnormal patellofemoral forces due to patellar malalignment or inadequate implant design can play an important role. The purpose of this study was to arthroscopically evaluate patellofemoral congruence after wound closure following TKA without patellar resurfacing and correlate it to patellar morphology and postoperative pain and function. Methods The authors prospectively studied 30 patients that received uncemented mobile-bearing TKA. Patellofemoral congruence was assessed arthroscopically after wound closure by estimating the contact area between the native patella and the prosthetic trochlea (> two-thirds, > one-third, < one-third). The findings were correlated to preoperative assessments of patellar geometry (Wiberg classification using X-rays) and clinical outcomes [Knee Society Score (KSS), AKP on Visual Analogic Scale (VAS), and patient satisfaction]. Results Knees of 22 women and 8 men aged 69.8 years (range, 61–84 years) were analyzed at 16 months (range, 12–23 months). Preoperative patellar geometry was Wiberg type A in 11, type B in 12 and type C in 7 knees. Postoperative KSS was 79.1 (range, 50.0–94) and the VAS for AKP was 1.6±1.3 (median, 1; range, 0–5). Patellar congruence was correlated with patellar morphology (P<0.001) but not correlated with any clinical outcomes (KSS, VAS or satisfaction). There were also no statistical correlations between patellar morphology or patellofemoral congruence and patient characteristics. Conclusions While patellar morphology and patellofemoral congruence are strongly related, they are not associated with clinical outcomes or patient demographics. Considering that numerous incongruent patellofemoral joints were pain-free, and conversely

  18. Femoral head-neck junction reconstruction, after iatrogenic bone resection.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Alvarez, Alberto; Lash, Nicholas; Beck, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic over-resection of the head-neck junction during the treatment of a cam deformity can be a devastating complication and is difficult to treat. Large defects of the femoral head-neck junction (FHNJ) increase the risk of femoral neck fracture and can also affect hip biomechanics. We describe a case of an iatrogenic defect of the FHNJ due to excessive bone resection, and a previously non-described treatment using iliac crest autograft to restore femoral head-neck sphericity and hip joint stability. After protecting the femoral neck with an angled blade plate, the large anterior FHNJ defect was reconstructed using autogenous iliac crest bone graft; sphericity was restored by contouring the graft using spherical templates. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed up to 2 years. Results at 2 years showed no residual groin pain and normal range of motion. The Oxford Hip Score was 46/48, rated as excellent. Computed tomography (CT) scanning showed union of bone graft without resorption, and CT arthrogram indicating retained sphericity of the FHNJ without evidence of degenerative changes in the articular surface. This novel surgical technique can be used to restore the structural integrity and contour of the FHNJ that contains a significant anterior defect.

  19. Femoral head-neck junction reconstruction, after iatrogenic bone resection

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Alvarez, Alberto; Lash, Nicholas; Beck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic over-resection of the head-neck junction during the treatment of a cam deformity can be a devastating complication and is difficult to treat. Large defects of the femoral head-neck junction (FHNJ) increase the risk of femoral neck fracture and can also affect hip biomechanics. We describe a case of an iatrogenic defect of the FHNJ due to excessive bone resection, and a previously non-described treatment using iliac crest autograft to restore femoral head-neck sphericity and hip joint stability. After protecting the femoral neck with an angled blade plate, the large anterior FHNJ defect was reconstructed using autogenous iliac crest bone graft; sphericity was restored by contouring the graft using spherical templates. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed up to 2 years. Results at 2 years showed no residual groin pain and normal range of motion. The Oxford Hip Score was 46/48, rated as excellent. Computed tomography (CT) scanning showed union of bone graft without resorption, and CT arthrogram indicating retained sphericity of the FHNJ without evidence of degenerative changes in the articular surface. This novel surgical technique can be used to restore the structural integrity and contour of the FHNJ that contains a significant anterior defect. PMID:27011838

  20. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. [Arthroscopic therapy of Baker's cyst with radiofrequency].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-jie; Wang, Zhi-gang; Li, Zhong-li; Cai, Xu; Zhang, Wen-tao; Hao, Li-bo; Chen, Ji-ying; Gao, Li

    2004-02-22

    To explore the feasibility of arthroscopic therapy of Baker's cysts with radiofrequency. Since Feb. 2000 to Oct. 2002 a surgical arthroscopic treatment for popliteal cyst in a series of 21 patients. Men 14 and female 7, the age from 45 to 66 year. To do CT scan 11 and MR in 8. To insert a arthroscope to Baker's cyst, and inject salline in the visceral layer of capsule under the arthroscope, so that remove of the capsule easily. The radiofrequency to clear the capsule of cyst and hemostasia. All of the cases studied, a connection between joint space and cyst was found in 13 cases. The popliteal cyst was found to be almost invariably associated with other knee disorders. Follow-up in all of the case. No nerve and blood vessel injure, no infection in this group. The function is well include 3 cases relapsed after re-operation by arthroscope debridement. Surgical arthroscopic therapy of Baker's cysts is safety and reliable; To removal of capsule integrity and repair of all intraarticular lesions and sealing of the junction between Baker's cyst and the dorsal recessus of the knee joint for preventing recurrent are very important.

  2. Arthroscopic lysis in knee arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Vidal, C; Medina, E; Baena, J

    1993-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis continues to be a difficult complication in articular surgery on the knee. We present our experience in 21 cases of arthroscopic lysis as an alternative to mobilization under anesthesia. The technique begins with the liberation of the adhesions of the suprapatellar pouch, continues down both gutters, and ends with a cleaning of the notch where necessary. When a restriction of patellar mobility persists, we make a retinacular release. The results obtained are very satisfactory, with an average increase in the arc of mobility of 68 degrees. The average gain in mobility at 6 months is significantly greater than that achieved in the immediate postoperative period. Longer follow-up showed no improvement in range of motion after 6 months.

  3. [Consequences of arthroscopic meniscal resection].

    PubMed

    Faunø, P; Nielsen, A B

    1993-10-18

    The functional and radiological consequences of arthroscopic meniscal resection were assessed in an 8.5 years follow up of 136 patients. Twenty three percent had undergone re-arthroscopy. Function related pain in the operated knee was reported by 44% of the patients. Radiological degenerative changes appeared in significantly more of the operated knees than in the knees not operated. The combination of varus knees and resection of the medial meniscus or valgus knees and lateral resection was associated with significantly more degenerative changes than after resection in knees with normal alignment. Resection of flap tears was associated with more re-operations and more function related knee pain than resection of bucket-handle lesions.

  4. The Wiese Knot: A Sliding-Locking Arthroscopic Knot.

    PubMed

    Parada, Stephen A; Shaw, K Aaron; Eichinger, Josef K; Boykin, Nathan T; Gloystein, David M; Ledford, Cheryl L; Arrington, Edward D; Wiese, Paul T

    2017-02-01

    Despite recent advances in knotless suture devices for arthroscopic surgical procedures, arthroscopic knot tying remains a necessary skill for the arthroscopic surgeon. Successful completion of arthroscopic knot tying relies on a thorough understanding of the chosen technique, proper suture management, adequate knot tensioning and securement, and the ability to reproducibly create the knot. We introduce a technique that serves as both a sliding and locking knot while being simple to master and reproducible to perform.

  5. Revision of failed arthroscopic bankart repairs.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Domenick J

    2007-04-01

    The results following open revision surgery following a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure are not well documented. To evaluate the results of patients with a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair treated with a traditional, open Bankart repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients (28 male and 2 female) who had a mean age of 24 years (range 15-36) at the time of operation were evaluated. The mean interval from the time of the operation to the final follow-up was 46 months (range 24-55). The rating systems of Rowe and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) were recorded preoperatively and at the time of the final evaluation. After open repair, mean modified Rowe scores improved from 25 preoperatively to 84.2 points. The results were excellent in 2 (6.7%), good in 24 (80%), and fair in 4 (13.3%); there were no poor results. The UCLA shoulder score improved from a mean of 17 points preoperatively to 29 points (P = .001 for all comparisons). Twenty-six patients (87%) did not have an anchor placement inferior to the 4-o'clock position for a right shoulder or the 8-o'clock position for the left shoulder after the index arthroscopic repair. There were no rotator interval closures performed at the index arthroscopic Bankart repair, and 10 patients (33%) required an interval closure at the open revision procedure. Twenty-five patients (83%) immobilized the operated arm in a sling for less than 2 weeks following the index arthroscopic repair. Patients with failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs can be successfully treated with a revision, open Bankart repair. Inadequate postoperative immobilization, large rotator intervals, and improper anchor placement are possible risk factors that may increase the incidence of failure of an arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  6. Arthroscopic landmarks of the equine carpus.

    PubMed

    Hurtig, M B; Fretz, P B

    1986-11-15

    The radiocarpal and middle carpal joints of 4 clinically normal horses and 24 necropsy specimens were examined with an arthroscope to describe the topographic anatomy of these joints. The carpal bones of the radiocarpal joint had congruent articular surfaces in extension, but carpal flexion resulted in a stairstep between the radial and intermediate carpal bones. The variable surface anatomy, as well as the restricted synovial space and the technical limitations of the arthroscope, contributed to the need for more than one arthroscopic approach to the radiocarpal joint to ensure a thorough examination. The middle carpal joint's hinge-like biomechanics resulted in a spacious synovial cavity that was more amenable to arthroscopic examination. Careful planning was necessary to ensure that areas of interest were distant from the arthroscope-insertion site to allow the best perspective possible. The lateral approach to the middle carpal joint provided the best viewing of both facets of the intermediate and third carpal bones as well as the dorsal rim of the radial carpal bone. The medial approach did not allow complete inspection of these areas.

  7. Access to the hip joint from standard arthroscopic portals: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Thorey, Fritz; Ezechieli, Marco; Ettinger, Max; Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Budde, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our purpose was to study and describe the areas of the hip joint that can be safely visualized and operated on using a variety of portals for the central and peripheral compartments. Twelve hip joints in 6 human cadavers were examined through 9 different central and peripheral arthroscopic portals. Markings of the accessible areas within the joint were made through an arthroscope. Dissection of the cadavers was carried out for final evaluation of the visible areas and those accessible for instruments. During dissection, anatomic proximity of the portals to relevant neurovascular structures was measured. The central compartment was sufficiently accessible using the anterior, anterolateral, and posterolateral portals, with slight limitations in the posteromedial corner. A more medial portal did not offer substantial advantages regarding accessibility but decreased the safety distance to the femoral nerve. With regard to the peripheral compartment, the combination of the anterolateral and posterolateral portals allowed visualization of most of the joint. It was observed that the structure at highest risk of injury for the central anterior and the peripheral anterolateral portals was the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. In hip arthroscopy, the use of the standard anterior, anterolateral, and posterolateral portals allows proper accessibility of the central compartment, with slight limitations in the posteromedial corner. A more medial portal is not recommended with regard to its risk-benefit ratio. The peripheral compartment of the hip joint is sufficiently visible using the anterolateral and posterolateral portals. For treatment of specific pathologic conditions, a variation of these portals improves surgical accessibility. The anatomic structure at highest risk of injury during hip arthroscopy is the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. The general objectives of this study were to prepare surgeons to develop appropriate concepts of surgery and to facilitate preoperative

  8. ORV Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Myer, Daniel M; Caldwell, Paul E

    2012-12-01

    The arthroscopic treatment of the "bony Bankart lesion" continues to evolve. We present a novel technique that we developed at Orthopaedic Research of Virginia, the "transosseous bony Bankart repair," which incorporates several essential concepts to provide for optimal healing and rehabilitation. We promote arthroscopic repair emphasizing bone preservation, a fracture interface without interposing sutures, the ability to reduce capsular volume, and multiple points of stable glenolabral fixation. Our technique positions suture anchors within the subchondral bone of the intact glenoid to allow for an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment. By use of an arthroscopic drill, spinal needle, and nitinol suture passing wire, the sutures are passed in a retrograde fashion through the bony Bankart fragment and anterior capsule in a mattress configuration. Additional inferior and superior anchors are placed to further provide stability and reduce capsular volume. While maximizing fracture surface area and optimizing bony healing, the end result is an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment and the glenoid articular surface.

  9. Excimer laser in arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.

    1991-05-01

    The development of efficient high-power lasersystems for use in surgery, especially in arthroscopic fields, leads to a new push for all endoscopic techniques. Both techniques, laser and endoscope, complete each other in an ideal way and allow applications which could not be reached with conventional techniques. One of the newer laser types is the excimer laser, which will be a good choice for surface treatment because of its very considerate interaction with tissue. One example is the ablation or smoothing of articular cartilage and meniscal shaving in orthopaedics. On the other hand, the power of this laser system is high enough to cut tissue, for instance in the lateral release, and offers therefore an alternative to the mechanical and electrical instruments. All lasers can only work fine with effective delivery systems. Sometimes there is only a single fiber, which becomes very stiff at diameters of more than 800 micrometers . This fiber often allows only the tangential treatment of tissue, most of the laser power is lost in the background. New fiber systems with many, sometimes hundreds of very thin single fibers, could offer a solution. Special handpieces and fibersystems offer distinct advantages in small joint arthroscopy, especially those for use with excimer lasers will be discussed.

  10. Comparison of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Isometry between Paired Femoral and Tibial Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Cain, E Lyle; Biggers, Marcus D; Beason, David P; Emblom, Benton A; Dugas, Jeffrey R

    2017-03-10

    Accurate tunnel placement is important for a successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Controversy exists concerning the preferred method of femoral tunnel preparation, with proponents of both medial portal and transtibial drilling techniques. Current ACL literature suggests that placement of the femoral ACL attachment site posterior or "low" in the ACL footprint leads to more anatomically correct ACL mechanics and better rotational control. There is limited literature focusing on ACL graft displacement through knee range of motion based on specific paired placement of femoral and tibial tunnels. Our purpose was to assess ACL isometry between multiple combinations of femoral and tibial tunnels. We hypothesized that placement of the graft at the posterior aspect of the ACL footprint on the femur would be significantly less isometric and lead to more graft displacement as compared with central or anterior placement. The ACL of matched pairs of cadaveric knees was arthroscopically debrided while leaving the soft tissue footprint on the femur and tibia intact. One knee from each pair underwent notchplasty. In all knees, three femoral and three tibial tunnels were created at the anterior, central, and posterior aspects of the ACL footprint. A suture was passed through each tunnel combination (nine potential pairs), and the change in isometry was measured throughout full knee range of motion. Placement of the femoral tunnel along the posterior aspect of the ACL footprint was less isometric compared with a central or anterior position in the femoral footprint. Placement of a posterior tibial tunnel also led to decreased isometry, but tibial tunnel placement affected isometry to a lesser extent than femoral tunnel placement. The combination of a posterior femoral and posterior tibial tunnel resulted in greater than 1 cm of graft excursion from full flexion to extension. Placement of ACL tunnels at anisometric sites may adversely affect the mechanical

  11. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthroscopic shoulder anatomy, anatomic variants, and arthroscopic findings in anterior shoulder instability, is presented. In addition, correlation of arthroscopic findings with physical examination and advanced imaging (CT and MRI) in order to improve our understanding in anterior shoulder instability pathology is discussed. Results: Shoulder instability represents a broad spectrum of disease and a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy is the key for a successful treatment of the unstable shoulder. Patients can have a variety of pathologies concomitant with a traditional Bankart lesion, such as injuries of the glenoid (bony Bankart), injuries of the glenoid labrum, superiorly (SLAP) or anteroinferiorly (e.g. anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion, and Perthes), capsular lesions (humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament), and accompanying osseous-cartilage lesions (Hill-Sachs, glenolabral articular disruption). Shoulder arthroscopy allows for a detailed visualization and a dynamic examination of all anatomic structures, identification of pathologic findings, and treatment of all concomitant lesions. Conclusion: Surgeons must be well prepared and understanding the normal anatomy of the glenohumeral joint, including its anatomic variants to seek for the possible pathologic lesions in anterior shoulder instability during shoulder arthroscopy. Patient selection criteria, improved surgical techniques, and implants available have contributed to the enhancement of

  12. [Comprehensive arthroscopic management of shoulder osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Ríos, D; Martetschlager, F; Millett, P J

    2012-01-01

    Shoulder osteoarthritis has been considered as a cause of severe pain and loss of shoulder function. Many patients with shoulder osteoarthritis are young and have demanding activities, which leads to questioning the choice of arthroplasty. This is why in this paper we describe the comprehensive arthroscopic management (CAM) that combines arthroscopic debridement, capsular release, osteoplasty of the lower humeral head, and auxiliary nerve decompression. In our experience this technique has shown short-term promising results as it decreases pain and allows patients to resume high performance demanding activities.

  13. Arthroscopically assisted percutaneous fixation of Bennett fractures.

    PubMed

    Culp, Randall W; Johnson, Jeff W

    2010-01-01

    Arthroscopic-assisted reduction and fixation of Bennett-type fractures of the thumb metacarpal allow for the confirmation of reduction as well as the assessment of the degree of chondral damage. With use of a 1.9-mm arthroscope and a traction tower, direct visualization and reduction is possible. Traditional methods of fixation are used to secure the fracture fragment. Postoperative rehabilitation follows the usual protocol used in both open and percutaneous techniques. However, the potential to obtain and confirm a more accurate articular reduction may reduce the incidence of late arthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal articulation.

  14. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Talocalcaneonavicular Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the talocalcaneonavicular joint can follow talar neck fracture especially if anterior approaches have been used for fracture fixation. Capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint is indicated if the painful hindfoot stiffness cannot be controlled with conservative treatment. Open capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint demands extensive soft tissue dissection and hinders early postoperative mobilization exercise of the joint. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a minimally invasive approach of arthroscopic capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint that is composed of arthroscopic release of the talonavicular joint and the anterior subtalar joint. This allows immediate postoperative mobilization of the joint.

  15. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle is also known as frozen ankle and results in marked fibrosis and contracture of the ankle capsule. Arthroscopic capsular release is indicated for symptomatic frozen ankle that is resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated for ankle stiffness due to degenerative joint disease, intra-articular malunion, or adhesion of the extensors of the ankle. The procedure consists of endoscopic posterior ankle capsulectomy and arthroscopic anterior ankle capsulotomy. It has the advantages of being minimally invasive surgery and allowing early postoperative vigorous mobilization of the ankle joint.

  16. Modified Arthroscopic Brostrom Procedure With Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-08-01

    The open anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments (modified Brostrom procedure) is widely accepted as the standard surgical stabilization procedure for lateral ankle instability that does not respond to conservative measures. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedures with a suture anchor have been reported to achieve both anatomic repair of the lateral ankle ligaments and management of the associated intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates are higher than open Brostom procedures. Many of these complications are associated with the use of a suture anchor. We report a modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure in which the anterolateral ankle capsule is anchored to the lateral malleolus through small bone tunnels instead of suture anchors.

  17. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis].

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Haraux, E; Leroux, J; Gouron, R

    2017-03-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SFCE) is a disorder of the hip, characterized by a displacement of the capital femoral epiphysis from the metaphysic through the femoral growth plate. The epiphysis slips posteriorly and inferiorly. SCFE occurs during puberty and metabolic and epidemiologic risk factors, such as obesity are frequently found. Most chronic slips are diagnosed late. Sagittal hip X-rays show epiphysis slip. In case of untreated SCFE, a slip progression arises with an acute slip risk. Treatment is indicated to prevent slip worsening. The clinical and radiological classification is useful to guide treatment and it is predictive of the prognosis. In situ fixation of stable and moderately displaced SCFE with cannulated screws gives excellent results. Major complications are chondrolysis and osteonecrosis and the major sequelae are femoroacetabular impingement and early arthritis.

  18. Arthroscopic-assisted treatment of coronoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julie E; Merten, Sheri M; Steinmann, Scott P

    2007-10-01

    Little information exists regarding arthroscopic treatment of coronoid fractures; this study reports outcomes in a series of patients. Forty-one coronoid fractures were identified by retrospective chart review; 7 were treated arthroscopically; 6 with >12 months of available follow-up. Regan-Morrey fracture types were II (n = 4) and III (n = 3). The age of the patients averaged 37 years; the mechanism of injury was a fall in 6 patients and a motocross accident in 1 patient. Fracture fixation included: plate-and-screws following arthroscopic reduction (1); screws (2) and threaded Steinmann pins (2); 2 fractures were debrided. Three patients had immediate (2) or delayed (1) lateral ulnar collateral ligament repair. Follow-up averaged 31.8 months. The range of motion averaged 9 degrees to 133 degrees in flexion-extension and 87 degrees/79 degrees in prono-supination. Mayo Elbow Performance scores were 100 in 5 of 6 patients and unavailable in 1 patient. Complications included asymptomatic heterotopic ossification (1) and delayed ulnar neuropathy (1). In our series of coronoid fractures treated with arthroscopic means, all patients had a functional, pain-free result. All patients returned to preoperative avocations and occupations. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  19. [Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis].

    PubMed

    Ozkoç, Gürkan; Akpinar, Sercan; Hersekli, Murat Ali; Ozalay, Metin; Tandoğan, Reha N

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment in patients with rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis unresponsive to conservative treatment. Arthroscopic treatment was performed in 10 patients (6 females, 4 males; mean age 46 years; range 34 to 53 years) in whom pain and functional disability persisted for more than a year despite conservative therapy for rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis. Arthroscopic bursectomy was also carried out. One patient underwent repair for rotator cuff tear. The patients were evaluated before and after surgery with the use of Constant scores and direct radiographs. The mean follow-up period was 12 months (range 6 to 19 months). The mean Constant scores were 66 (range 45 to 70) and 93 (range 89 to 96) before surgery and on final examinations, respectively. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated incomplete removal of calcifications in four patients; however, complaints of pain disappeared in these patients and radiologic controls showed that residual deposits underwent spontaneous resorption. Arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits together with bursectomy seems to be effective and reliable in patients with chronic calcifying tendinitis unresponsive to conservative treatment.

  20. Arthroscopic Arthrodesis of the Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic syndesmosis disruption can occur if an acute lesion is missed or inadequately managed. This can result in significant functional deficit and development of post-traumatic ankle arthritis. Anatomic reduction of the syndesmosis and maintenance of the reduction by syndesmotic screw fixation alone, ligamentous reconstruction, or fusion of the syndesmosis are recommended. A technique of arthroscopic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis arthrodesis is described.

  1. Effect of femoral component designs on the contact and tracking characteristics of the unresurfaced patella in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, Michael; McLean, Christopher A.; Laxer, Eric; Casey, John; Ahmed, Abdul M.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of 5 different femoral components used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on the contact area and tracking characteristics of the nonresurfaced patella and to identify any design features that might adversely affect these characteristics. Design An in-vitro study. Setting The biomechanics laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal. Specimens Six fresh-frozen cadaveric knee-joint specimens. Interventions An unconstrained quadriceps simulator was used to apply the conditions of static lifting to the specimens first in their normal state and then sequentially implanted with femoral and tibial components of various designs (Miller/Galante II, Anatomic Modular Knee [AMK] System, Whiteside Ortholoc Modular, press-fit condylar and Insall–Burstein II). Outcome measures Patellar 3-dimensional tracking characteristics, determined by using a 6 degrees-of-freedom electromechanical goniometer attached directly to the patella, and patellar contact pressure measurements, obtained using low-range Fuji Prescale film. Results Articulation of the normal patella on a prosthetic femoral component resulted in alterations in the normal patellofemoral contact and tracking characteristics. The exact departure depended on the design of the prosthetic trochlea. Although all of the selected prostheses demonstrated satisfactory contact characteristics near extension, marked alterations occurred at higher flexion angles. With 90° or more of flexion, there was incompatibility between the geometries of the prosthetic notch of 2 femoral designs (AMK and PFC) and the normal knee. Conclusion The design of the prosthetic femoral component must be taken into account when determining whether or not to resurface the patella at the time of TKA. PMID:11308236

  2. Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement following slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Oduwole, K. O.; de SA, D.; Kay, J.; Findakli, F.; Duong, A.; Simunovic, N.; Yen, Y-M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the existing literature from 2005 to 2016 reporting on the efficacy of surgical management of patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) secondary to slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Methods The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched and screened in duplicate. Data such as patient demographics, surgical technique, surgical outcomes and complications were retrieved from eligible studies. Results Fifteen eligible level IV studies were included in this review comprising 261 patients (266 hips). Treatment groups included arthroscopic osteochondroplasty, surgical hip dislocation, and traditional open osteotomy. The mean alpha angle corrections were 32.14° (standard deviation (sd) 7.02°), 41.45° (sd 10.5°) and 6.0° (sd 5.21°), for arthroscopy, surgical hip dislocation, and open osteotomy groups, respectively (p < 0.05). Each group demonstrated satisfactory clinical outcomes across their respective scoring systems. Major complication rates were 1.6%, 10.7%, and 6.7%, for arthroscopy, surgical dislocation and osteotomy treatments, respectively. Conclusion In the context of SCFE-related FAI, surgical hip dislocation demonstrated improved correction of the alpha angle, albeit at higher complication and revision rates than both arthroscopic and open osteotomy treatments. Further investigation, including high-quality trials with standardised radiological and clinical outcome measures for young patients, is warranted to clarify treatment approaches and safety. Cite this article: K. O. Oduwole, D. de Sa, J. Kay, F. Findakli, A. Duong, N. Simunovic, Y. Yi-Meng, O. R. Ayeni. Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement following slipped capital femoral epiphysis: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:472–480. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.68.BJR-2017-0018.R1. PMID:28790036

  3. Arthroscopic lavage and debridement for osteoarthritis of the knee: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    MEDICAL TREATMENT, THERE IS LEVEL 1B EVIDENCE THAT: Arthroscopic lavage gives rise to a statistically significant, but not clinically meaningful effect in improving pain (WOMAC pain and VAS pain) up to 12 months following surgery. The effect on joint function (WOMAC function) and the primary outcome (WOMAC aggregate) was neither statistically nor clinically significant. IN MODERATE OR SEVERE OA OF THE KNEE WITH PAIN REFRACTORY TO MEDICAL TREATMENT, THERE IS: Level 1b evidence that the effect on pain and function of arthroscopic lavage (10 L saline) and debridement (with 10 L saline lavage) is not statistically significant up to 24 months following surgery.Level 2 evidence that arthroscopic debridement (with 3 L saline lavage) is effective in the control of pain in severe OA of the medial femoral condyle for up to 5 years.For debridement in combination with meniscectomy, there is level 4 evidence that the procedure, as appropriate, might be effective in earlier stages, unicompartmental disease, shorter symptom duration, sudden onset of mechanical symptoms, and preoperative full range of motion. However, as these findings are derived from very poor quality evidence, the identification of subsets of patients that may benefit from this procedure requires further testing.In patients with pain due to a meniscal tear, of the medial compartment in particular, repair of the meniscus results in better pain control at 2 years following surgery than if the pain is attributable to other causes. There is insufficient evidence to comment on the effectiveness of lateral meniscus repair on pain control. Arthroscopic debridement of the knee has thus far only been found to be effective for medial compartmental OA. All other indications should be reviewed with a view to reducing arthroscopic debridement as an effective therapy. Arthroscopic lavage of the knee is not indicated for any stage of OA. There is very poor quality evidence on the effectiveness of debridement with partial

  4. Randomized controlled trial of arthroscopic electrothermal capsulorrhaphy with Bankart repair and isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    McRae, Sheila; Leiter, Jeff; Subramanian, Kanthalu; Litchfield, Robert; MacDonald, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Electrothermal arthroscopic capsulorrhaphy (ETAC) was introduced as an adjunct to shoulder stabilization surgery to address capsular laxity in the treatment of traumatic anterior dislocation. No previous RCT has compared arthroscopic Bankart repair with ETAC of the medial glenohumeral ligament and anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament versus undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repair alone. Our hypothesis was that there would be no difference in quality of life between these two groups. Complication/failure rates were also compared. Eighty-eight patients were randomly assigned to receive arthroscopic Bankart repair with (n = 44) or without ETAC (n = 44). Post-operative visits occurred at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months with WOSI, ASES, and Constant scores completed, and rates of dislocation/subluxation were determined. Data on 74 patients were analysed, with the rest lost to follow-up. There were no differences between groups at any post-surgery time points for WOSI, ASES, or Constant scores (n.s.). Eight patients in the no-ETAC group and 7 in the ETAC group were considered failures (n.s.). No benefits in patient-reported outcome or recurrence rates using ETAC were found. Mean WOSI scores 2 years post-surgery were virtually identical for the two groups. ETAC could not be shown to provide benefit or detriment when combined with arthroscopic labral repair for traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. II.

  5. Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery: A Prospective Multicenter Trial Utilizing a Validated Grading Scheme.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M; Clohisy, John C; Beaulé, Paul E; Kelly, Bryan T; Giveans, M Russell; Stone, Rebecca M; Samuelson, Kathryn M

    2016-09-01

    There is limited literature looking at comprehensive complication rates after arthroscopic hip procedures. To prospectively report complication rates for a consecutive series of hips undergoing arthroscopic procedures. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Over a 29-month period, 1615 consecutive hips in patients with a mean age of 30.5 years underwent arthroscopic hip procedures at 4 institutions. The diagnosis, demographic information, and procedures were recorded, and a validated grading classification for complications of hip joint surgery was utilized prospectively. The cohort with complications was observed postoperatively for a mean of 36.7 months (range, 24-54 months). There were 1487 primary hip arthroscopic procedures and 128 revision hip arthroscopic procedures. Arthroscopic femoroacetabular impingement correction was performed in 1505 hips (93.2%), and 1273 hips (78.8%) underwent a labral repair procedure. The most common event was postoperative lateral femoral cutaneous (LFC) nerve disturbance (16.5%), which persisted beyond 6 months in only 1.6%. The incidence of iatrogenic chondral injuries was 1.2%, iatrogenic labral punctures was 0.9%, superficial portal infections was 1.1%, sensory deficits about the foot was 0.8%, deep venous thrombosis was 0.1%, pulmonary embolism was 0.1%, perineal numbness (pudendal nerve) was 1.4%, heterotopic ossification was 0.8%, and femoral neck stress fractures was 0.1%. There was no iatrogenic instability, avascular necrosis, or extra-abdominal fluid extravasation identified in this cohort. The overall complication rate, not including temporary LFC periportal and thigh numbness (sequela), was 8.3% (134 hips). Overall, a grade 1 complication was seen in 7.2% (117 hips), grade 2 in 0.6% (10 hips), grade 3 in 0.4% (6 hips), and grade 4 in 0.1% (1 hip). There was a significantly higher rate of complications for longer surgical time and traction time (P < .01) and for female patients as compared with male patients (P = .017

  6. Arthroscopically Assisted Evacuation of Brodie’s Abscess of Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Manandhar, Rajeev R; Lakhey, Shisir; Rijal, Kiran P

    2017-01-01

    Brodie’s abscess is a type of subacute osteomyelitis. Opinions differ as to whether treatment should be surgical or medical for these classic lesions. Failure of symptoms to resolve after six weeks of antibiotics or worsening of the condition during treatment should be followed by surgical treatment. Clinical signs of subperiosteal pus or synovitis indicate that the subacute infection has transformed into an acute component, and it must be drained surgically. Surgical treatment is comprised of evacuation and curettage for small lesions and evacuation, packing with cancellous bone chips, for large cavities. When clinical signs of synovitis are present, with a possibility of pus within a joint, arthrotomy is performed. Arthroscopically assisted evacuation of Brodie’s abscess from the distal femur has never been reported in the literature. We report a case of a 23-year-old female who presented with pain and swelling over the left knee for four months. There was diffuse swelling in the knee; tenderness was present over medial femoral condyle and range of motion (ROM) of the knee was five to 45 degrees at the time of presentation. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed Brodie’s abscess on the lateral aspect of the medial femoral condyle. The patient was treated with the evacuation of pus and curettage of the cavity using an arthroscope. After two weeks, the patient had mild pain with knee ROM from zero to 45 degrees, and at the one-month follow-up, the knee ROM improved to zero to 90 degrees. At the two-year follow-up, the patient had no pain, with knee ROM from zero to 120 degrees. PMID:28168137

  7. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of isolated knee chondral lesions: design of a randomised controlled pilot study comparing arthroscopic microfracture versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative mesenchymal stem cell injections

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Julien; Ford, Jon; Bates, Dan; Boyd, Richard; Hahne, Andrew; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cicuttini, Flavia; Huguenin, Leesa; Norsworthy, Cameron; Shah, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The management of intra-articular chondral defects in the knee remains a challenge. Inadequate healing in areas of weight bearing leads to impairment in load transmission and these defects predispose to later development of osteoarthritis. Surgical management of full thickness chondral defects include arthroscopic microfracture and when appropriate autologous chondrocyte implantation. This latter method however is technically challenging, and may not offer significant improvement over microfracture. Preclinical and limited clinical trials have indicated the capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to influence chondral repair. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a pilot randomised controlled trial comparing arthroscopic microfracture alone for isolated knee chondral defects versus arthroscopic microfracture combined with postoperative autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell injections. Methods and analysis A pilot single-centre randomised controlled trial is proposed. 40 participants aged 18–50 years, with isolated femoral condyle chondral defects and awaiting planned arthroscopic microfracture will be randomly allocated to a control group (receiving no additional treatment) or treatment group (receiving postoperative adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment). Primary outcome measures will include MRI assessment of cartilage volume and defects and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Secondary outcomes will include further MRI assessment of bone marrow lesions, bone area and T2 cartilage mapping, a 0–10 Numerical Pain Rating Scale, a Global Impression of Change score and a treatment satisfaction scale. Adverse events and cointerventions will be recorded. Initial outcome follow-up for publication of results will be at 12 months. Further annual follow-up to assess long-term differences between the two group will occur. Ethics and dissemination This trial has received prospective ethics approval through

  8. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  9. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application. PMID:25177697

  10. Arthroscopic Keller technique for Freiberg disease.

    PubMed

    Carro, Luis Perez; Golano, Pau; Fariñas, Oscar; Cerezal, Luis; Abad, Jose

    2004-07-01

    Freiberg disease is a disorder that has a predilection for the second metatarsal head. Keller excision of the base of the proximal phalanx is a procedure described for the treatment of late-stage Freiberg disease. We describe a case of a 60-year-old man, with a stage IV lesion according to Smillie's classification, treated by debridement, removal of the free body, and arthroscopic Keller excision. Arthroscopic treatment allows the patient to begin and maintain an aggressive postoperative physical therapy program immediately after surgery, thus decreasing the risk of scarring and contracture. At last evaluation, 2 years postoperatively, he is symptom-free. A suggested pattern of minimally invasive surgery management of this disease is proposed.

  11. Arthroscopic releases for arthrofibrosis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michael R; Dragoo, Jason L

    2011-11-01

    Intra-articular inflammation or fibrosis may lead to decreased soft-tissue and capsular compliance, which may result in pain or loss of motion within the knee. Etiology of intra-articular fibrosis may include isolated anterior interval scarring and posterior capsular contracture, as well as fibrosis that involves the suprapatellar pouch or arthrofibrosis that involves the entire synovial space. Initial nonsurgical management, including compression, elevation, and physical therapy, can decrease knee pain and inflammation and maintain range of motion. Surgical management is indicated in the patient who fails conservative treatment. Surgical options include arthroscopic releases of the anterior interval, posterior capsule, and peripatellar and suprapatellar regions. Recent advances in arthroscopic technique have led to improved outcomes in patients with intra-articular fibrosis of the knee.

  12. Arthroscopic Interphalangeal Arthrodesis of the Thumb.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrodesis of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb is an effective treatment for pain, deformity, or instability at the joint. Arthroscopic interphalangeal arthrodesis of the thumb is a minimally invasive surgery and has better cosmetic results and less surgical trauma as compared with the open approaches. The purpose of this technical note is to report the details of the arthroscopic interphalangeal arthrodesis with oblique placement of the headless screw. No traction device is used for this technique. It is indicated in recalcitrant painful arthritis of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb. It is contraindicated in case of significant deformity of the joint as a result of subchondral bone collapse. It is also contraindicated if there is impinging volar osteophyte, local infection, or lack of expertise.

  13. Arthroscopic Taloplasty for an Anterolateral Snapping Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Anterior ankle snapping syndrome is rare. Snapping of the extensor digitorum longus due to attenuated inferior extensor retinaculum and snapping due to hypertrophied or low-lying peroneal tertius muscle have been reported. We reported a new mechanism of anterolateral snapping due to a hypertrophied talar head. Anterolateral snapping ankle can be revealed by active dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the ankle with the foot inverted. Foot inversion will tension the inferior extensor retinaculum and uncover the dorsolateral prominence of the talar head. The dorsolateral prominence of the talar head will snap over the proximal edge of the inferior extensor retinaculum. This technical note reports the technique of arthroscopic contouring of the talar head via extra-articular ankle arthroscopy. We named this technique arthroscopic taloplasty.

  14. Iliotibial Band Lengthening: An Arthroscopic Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Mease, Samuel J; Issa, Kimona; Festa, Anthony; McInerney, Vincent K; Scillia, Anthony J

    2017-06-01

    Iliotibial (IT) band syndrome is a common cause of lateral knee pain in runners and cyclists. Many can be treated nonoperatively; however, some may require surgical lengthening of their IT band to achieve optimal pain relief and a return to preinjury level of activity. Several studies have been published detailing surgical lengthening procedures and satisfactory outcomes after these procedures. However, it is important to continue to improve on and optimize outcomes. We present our arthroscopic IT band-lengthening procedure.

  15. Complications of arthroscopic surgery of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, A. V.; Bardakos, N. V.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent years hip arthroscopic surgery has evolved into one of the most rapidly expanding fields in orthopaedic surgery. Complications are largely transient and incidences between 0.5% and 6.4% have been reported. However, major complications can and do occur. This article analyses the reported complications and makes recommendations based on the literature review and personal experience on how to minimise them. PMID:23610683

  16. Arthroscopic treatment of unstable total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Ricardo; Aguinaga, Iñaki; Corcuera, Irene; Ponte, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime

    2010-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of apparently well-implanted but unstable total hip replacement prostheses. We present 2 cases of arthroscopically assisted capsular tightening in unstable total hip replacements. Both cases had significant capsular laxity. Case 2 had impingement of the lower part of the acetabulum with the lesser trochanter that caused hip dislocation. Early revision surgery can be avoided with the use of this technique in selected cases of unstable total hip replacements.

  17. Biomechanical characteristics of 9 arthroscopic knots.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kevin A; Patton, Daniel J; Dai, Qiang; Wongworawat, Montri D

    2010-06-01

    To determine the optimal arthroscopic slipknot through comparison of ease of placement, loop security, knot security, and amount of suture material needed using a new suture material. Nine commonly used arthroscopic knots (Dines, Field, Nicky, Hu, San Diego, Snyder, Tennessee slider, Triad, and Tuckahoe) were tested by use of modern suture material, FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, FL), with the Instron materials testing machine (Instron, Norwood, MA) for ease of knot placement (forward and backward sliding), loop security, and knot security. The amount of suture material needed to create the knot was compared by use of the knot weight. Analysis of variance with Kruskal-Wallis analysis and Bonferroni correction (alpha < .01) was used to compare different knots. The Tennessee slider knot sustained the greatest force at failure (269 N), the greatest knot resistance (32 N), and the smallest mass (8.5 mg). The Dines was the only knot superior in all 3 knot placement categories. The Nicky held the most loop force (66 N), and the Tuckahoe had the greatest loop resistance (20 N) (P < .01 for all except mass [P < .05]). Our study comprehensively presents ease-of-placement and security characteristics of 9 common and new arthroscopic knots using modern FiberWire suture. The Tennessee slider knot showed superior characteristics in knot security and knot mass. The Dines knot was the most ideal knot to place. However, the surgeon will need to review the individual knot characteristics and select the knot most suited to application. This study analyzed 9 arthroscopic knots with modern suture material and identified those with superior characteristics. Copyright (c) 2010 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with two to nine years of follow-up, comparing the pre- and postoperative range of motion. This was an observational study (case series) of 18 patients who underwent arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness. The mean age was of 53.6 years (range: 39 to 68), with female predominance (77.77%) and nine cases left shoulders. There were 6 primary (33.33%) and 12 secondary cases (66.67%). Arthroscopic capsular release was performed in all patients after a mean of 9.33 months of physical therapy (range: 6 to 20 months) with a minimum follow-up of two years (range: 26 to 110 months). The mean active and passive forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation increased from 94.4°/103.3°, 11.9°/21.9°, and S1/L5 vertebral level, respectively, to 151.1°/153.8°, 57.2°/64.4°, and T12/T10 vertebral level, respectively. There was a significant difference between the pre- and postoperative range of motion (p < 0.001). According to the Constant-Murley functional score (ROM), the value increased from 14 (preoperative mean) to 30 points (postoperative mean). Postoperatively, all patients showed diminished shoulder pain (none or mild/15 or 10 points in the Constant-Murley score). Arthroscopic treatment is an effective treatment for refractory shoulder stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Subtalar arthroscopic arthrodesis: Technique and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vilá-Rico, Jesús; Mellado-Romero, María Angeles; Bravo-Giménez, Beatriz; Jiménez-Díaz, Verónica; Ojeda-Thies, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the surgical technique and our results with arthroscopic posterior subtalar arthrodesis. Retrospective case series of 65 patients (38 men and 27 women) averaging 50 years of age (range 21-72 years) undergoing posterior arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis using one or two percutaneous 6.5-7.3mm screws between May 2004 and February 2011, with a mean follow-up of 57.5 months (range 24-105 months). We achieved a 95.4% union rate after an average of 12.1 weeks (range 9 to 16 weeks). 12.3% of patients suffered complications, including superficial infection, nonunion and need for hardware removal. The AOFAS score improved from 51.5 points (19-61 points) preoperatively to 81.9 points (60-94 points) in the postoperative period. We describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, which as proven to be a safe and reliable technique in our experience, with consistent improvements in AOFAS scores. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic Correlates of Subtle Syndesmotic Injury.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P; DeFontes, Kenneth; Barr, Cameron R; Parks, Brent G; Camire, Lyn M

    2017-05-01

    Arthroscopic criteria for identifying syndesmotic disruption have been variable and subjective. We aimed to quantify syndesmotic disruption arthroscopically using a standardized measurement device. Ten cadaveric lower extremity specimens were tested in intact state and after serial sectioning of the syndesmotic structures (anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament [AiTFL], interosseous ligament [IOL], posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament [PiTFL], deltoid). Diagnostic ankle arthroscopy was performed after each sectioning. Manual external rotational stress was applied across the tibiofibular joint. Custom-manufactured spherical balls of increasing diameter mounted on the end of an arthroscopic probe were inserted into the tibiofibular space to determine the degree of diastasis of the tibiofibular joint under each condition. A ball 3 mm in diameter reliably indicated a high likelihood of combined disruption of the AiTFL and IOL. Disruption of the AiTFL alone could not be reliably distinguished from the intact state. Use of a spherical probe placed into the tibiofibular space during manual external rotation of the ankle provided an objective measure of syndesmotic instability. Passage of a 2.5-mm probe indicated some disruption of the syndesmosis, but the test had poor negative predictive value. Passage of a 3.0-mm spherical probe indicated very high likelihood of disruption of both the AiTFL and the IOL. The findings challenge the previously used but unsupported standard of a 2-mm diastasis of the tibiofibular articulation for diagnosis of subtle syndesmotic instability.

  1. Prospective evaluation of femoral head viability following femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, B.; Kroop, S.A.; Nepola, I.V.; Grantham, A.S.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    The bone scans of 33 patients (pts) with recent subcapital fractures (fx) of the femur were evaluated prospectively to determine their value in predicting femoral head visability. Each of the 33 pts (ll men, 22 women, age range 30-92) had a pre-operative bone scan within 72 hrs of the fx (23 pts within 24 hrs). Anterior and posterior planar views of both hips and pinhole views (50% of pts) were obtained 2 hrs after administration of Tc-99m HDP. The femoral head was classified as perfused if it showed the same activity as the opposite normal side or if it showed only slightly decreased activity. Femoral heads showing absent activity were classified as nonperfused. Overall, 20 of the 33 pts showed a photopenic femoral head on the side of the fx. Only 2 pts showed increased activity at hte site of the fx. Internal fixation of the fx was performed in 23 pts, 12 of whom had one or more follow-up scans. Five of these 12 pts showed absent femoral head activity on their initial scan, but 2 showed later reperfusion. The other 7 pts showed good perfusion initially, with only 1 later showing decreased femoral head activity. The other 10 pts (7 of whom had absent femoral head activity) had immediate resection of the femoral head and insertion of a Cathcart prosthesis. The results suggest that femoral head activity seen on a bone scan in the immediate post-fx period is not always a reliable indicator of femoral head viability. Decreased femoral head activity may reflect, in part, compromised perfusion secondary to post-traumatic edema, with or without anatomic disruption of the blood supply.

  2. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, especially the differences to laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia are discussed in this article. PMID:27826574

  3. Arthroscopic treatment of patients with moderate arthrofibrosis after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg; Aldawoudy, Akram M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the effect of arthroscopic management in patients with knee stiffness after total knee replacement. We present a case series study, in which 32 patients have been treated for moderate arthrofibrosis of the knee after total knee replacement, with the same regimen. We have excluded all cases of stiffness, because of infection, mechanical mal-alignment, loosening of the implants and other obvious reasons of stiffness of the knee, rather than pure arthrofibrosis. All patients first underwent a trial of conservative treatment before going for arthroscopic management. A pain catheter for femoral nerve block was inserted just before anesthesia for post-operative pain management. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the intra-articular pathology was performed in a standardized technique with release of all fibrous bands in the suprapatellar pouch, reestablishing the medial and lateral gutter, release of the patella, resection of the remaining meniscal tissue or an anterior cyclops, if needed. Intensive physiotherapy and continuous passive motion were to start immediately post-operatively. All the patients were available for the follow up and they were evaluated using the knee society rating system. A total of 25 of the 32 procedures resulted in an improvement of the patients knee score. All the knees operated upon had intra-articular fibrous bands, hypertrophic synovitis and peri-patellar adhesions. A total of eight patients suffered from an anterior cyclops lesion and six patients showed pseudomenicus. In 19 cases a medial and lateral relapse of the patella was performed; only 5 patients got an isolated lateral release. The mean knee flexion was 119 degrees (100-130) at the end of arthroscopy and was 97 degrees (75-115) at the last follow up. The eight patients with extension lags decreased from 27 degrees (10 degrees-35 degrees) pre-operatively to 4 degrees (0-10) at time of follow up. The average knee society ratings increased from 70

  4. Arthroscopic visualization during excision of a central physeal bar.

    PubMed

    Stricker, S

    1992-01-01

    A centrally located developmental physeal bar in the proximal tibia was removed via a metaphyseal window. The use of an arthroscope to assist in the complete removal of the bone bridge is described. The arthroscope improved visualization and allowed reduction in the size of the metaphyseal window. At 2-year follow-up, the growth plate showed no evidence of bar reformation.

  5. Subtalar joint arthrodesis: open and arthroscopic indications and surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Roster, Brent; Kreulen, Christopher; Giza, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Arthrodesis of the subtalar joint can be performed via both open and arthroscopic techniques. Both groups of procedures have their own relative indications and contraindications, as well as complications. Good results have been reported for both general procedures, although some studies suggest superiority with arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Arthroscopic Assessment and Treatment of Dancers' Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Daniel M.; Campbell, Pat

    1985-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of 16 dancers with dance-related knee injuries which defied conservative treatment showed 15 meniscal tears and 4 cases of chondromalacia patellae. Partial arthroscopic meniscectomy was used to treat the tears. The results were excellent, with 13 of the 16 returning to preoperative levels of dance activity. (MT)

  7. [Treatment of lateral ankle joint instability. Open or arthroscopic?].

    PubMed

    Galla, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle joint instability often necessitates operative treatment. Operative treatment methods are classified into non-anatomical tenodesis, anatomical reconstruction and direct repair. In addition to open approaches, arthroscopic techniques are increasingly becoming established. This article describes the various operative treatment procedures, their advantages and disadvantages and in particular the arthroscopic feasibility.

  8. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  9. Arthroscopic ablation of osteoid osteoma in the wrist.

    PubMed

    Kamrani, Reza Shahryar; Farhadi, Leyla; Emamzadehfard, Sahra

    2013-09-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumor that rarely involves joints. Although there are several reports of arthroscopic osteoid osteoma excisions, to our knowledge, there are no reports of this type of treatment for osteoid osteoma in carpal bones. We report two cases of arthroscopic (a person who had a pain in the left wrist and the other one with carpal tunnel syndrome) with excision of osteoid osteoma in the carpal bones. We think arthroscopic excision is the best choice for treatment as long as the tumor is accessible for arthroscopic surgery, when osteoid osteoma has classic clinical and imaging findings and is near an articular surface. However, when the tumor is far from the joint surfaces, when we need pathologic confirmation or when the tumor is easily accessible using a non-articular approach, arthroscopic excision may not be the most appropriate technique.

  10. Arthroscopic tenodesis of the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Harwin, Steven F; Birns, Michael E; Mbabuike, Jean-Jacques; Porter, David A; Galano, Gregory J

    2014-11-01

    The long head of the biceps (LHB) is commonly implicated in shoulder pathology due to its anatomic course and intimacy with the rotator cuff and superior labrum of the glenoid. Treatment of tendinosis of the LHB may be required secondary to partial thickness tears, instability/subluxation, associated rotator cuff tears, or SLAP (superior labrum, anterior to posterior) lesions. Treatment options include open or arthroscopic techniques for tenodesis vs tenotomy. Controversy exists in the orthopedic literature regarding the preferred procedure. The all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique is a viable and reproducible option for treatment. This article provides a review of the all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique using proximal interference screw fixation and its subsequent postoperative regimen. All-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis maintains elbow flexion and supination power, minimizes cosmetic deformities, and leads to less fatigue soreness after active flexion. Thus, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis should be offered and encouraged as a treatment option for younger, active patients. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of "TMJ arthroscopic surgery", this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results.

  12. Arthroscopic microfracture may not be superior to arthroscopic debridement, but abrasion arthroplasty results are good, although not great.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-03-01

    Microfracture is nonanatomic because microfracture destroys the gross structure and the complex microscopic infrastructure of the subchondral plate, and may promote subchondral cyst formation. In consideration of the destruction of subchondral anatomy, it may be time to abandon the arthroscopic microfracture procedure. However, arthroscopic abrasion arthroplasty results in a positive outcome in 66% of patients, and may still merit consideration as a salvage procedure.

  13. Mycotic femoral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard Scott; Bennett, Kenneth R

    2007-05-01

    After several weeks of fever and chills, a 31-year-old logger developed pain in his right thigh. Upon examination a tender, pulsating upper thigh mass was found with a long loud bruit arising from it. Severe aortic insufficiency was present; however, blood cultures were negative. An angiogram, captured blood with contrast spewing from the profunda femoral artery to fill a 5 x 10 cm sac. A false aneurysm was diagnosed and resected; numerous gram positive cocci were present in cut sections, but cultures from the cavity grew the gram negative bacteria Salmonella and Alcaligenes. After one month of intravenous ampicillin the aortic valve was replaced after being destroyed by endocarditis. Ampicillin was continued and recovery was uneventful. Mycotic aneurysms are commonly caused by Salmonella (10%), which was second only to Staphylococcus (30%). The femoral artery accounts for 38% of all mycotic aneurysms. They typically present with a pulsatile mass (52%), bruit (50%), and fever (48%). This diagnosis can be supported by leukocytosis (64-71%), positive blood cultures (50-85%), and a history of arterial trauma (51%) (injection drug use, intravascular procedure, or trauma) or endocarditis (10%).

  14. Effect of a Focal Articular Defect on Cartilage Deformation during Patello-Femoral Articulation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Benjamin L.; Sah, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine cartilage strains near, and in apposition to, a focal defect during patello-femoral articulation. Bovine osteochondral blocks from the trochlea (TRO) and patella (PAT) were apposed, compressed 12%, and subjected to sliding under video microscopy. Samples, lubricated with synovial fluid, were tested intact and then with a full-thickness defect in PAT cartilage. Shear (Exz), axial (Ezz), and lateral (Exx) strains were determined locally for TRO and PAT cartilage. For articulation with a focal defect, the strain amplitudes of PAT cartilage near the surface were ~2–8× lower in Exz and ~1.4× higher in -Ezz than intact PAT cartilage. At 20% depth, Exz and Exx for PAT cartilage with a focal defect were ~2× and ~10–25× higher than intact PAT, respectively. For TRO articulating against a focal defect, Exz and -Ezz near the surface and at 20% depth were ~2–4× lower than that for articulation against intact cartilage. The results elucidate dramatic region-specific changes in strain due to lateral motion. In these regions, such altered cartilage mechanics during knee movement may cause focal defects to extend by induction of damaging levels of strain to bordering regions of cartilage. PMID:20602462

  15. A new automatic landmark extraction framework on ultrasound images of femoral condyles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Sibut, Agnès; Nakib, Amir; Petit, Eric; Leitner, François

    2012-03-01

    In Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS), surgeons have to acquire some anatomical landmarks as inputs to the system. To do so, they use manual pointers that are localized in the Operating Room (OR) space using an infrared camera. When the needed landmark is not reachable through an opening, it is palpated directly on skin and there is a loss of precision that can vary from several millimeters to centimeters depending on the thickness of soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a new framework based on three main steps to register the bone surface and extract automatically anatomical landmarks with an ultrasound probe. This framework is based on an oriented gradient calculation, a simulated-compound and a contour closure using a graph representation. The oriented gradient allows extracting a set of pixels that probably belong to the bone surface. The simulatedcompound step allows using ultrasound images properties to define a set of small segments which may belong to the bone surface, and the graph representation allows eliminating false positive detection among remaining segments. The proposed method has been validated on a database of 230 ultrasound images of anterior femoral condyles (on the knee). The average computation time is 0.11 sec per image, and average errors are: 0.54 mm for the bone surface extraction, 0.31 mm for the condylar line, and 1.4 mm for the trochlea middle.

  16. Femoral shaft osteotomy for obligate outward rotation due to SCFE.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Peter M; Anderson, Lucas; MacWilliams, Bruce A

    2017-04-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is an adolescent disease that leads to retroversion of the femoral neck and shaft, relative to the head. Observing that patients with SCFE must walk with an outward foot progression angle and externally rotate the leg in order to flex the hip, we have been performing a femoral shaft rotational osteotomy wherein we rotate the lower femur 45° inward, relative to the upper femur. By correcting retroversion, our goal is to improve functional hip and knee motion, thereby mitigating the effects of SCFE impingement. This is a retrospective review of five hips in four patients (two boys and two girls), average age 14.7 years (range 11 + 7-18 years) who underwent femoral midshaft rotational osteotomy for correction of acquired retroversion of the femur secondary to severe SCFE. We compared clinical findings at the outset to those at an average follow-up of 46 months (range 24-74 months). Pre- and post-gait analysis was performed in three patients. Two of the patients underwent elective arthroscopic osteochondroplasty to alleviate residual FAI: contralateral arthroscopy is pending in one. The first patient in this series received a hip arthroplasty, 62 months after his osteotomy, at age 23. Following midshaft osteotomy, all patients experienced improvement in comfort, gait and activities of daily living. With the patella neutral, they had improved range of hip flexion from an average preoperative flexion of <25° to a postoperative flexion of >90°. Two patients (both male) had delayed union and some loss of correction, secondary to broken interlocking screws; each healed with reamed, exchange nailing. The interlocking screws have since been redesigned and enlarged. Femoral shaft rotational osteotomy restores the functional range of hip motion, while correcting obligate out-toeing and improving knee kinematics. This procedure is technically straightforward, permitting progressive weight bearing, while avoiding the risk of AVN

  17. A new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel bone grafting using the OATS harvesters in revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Said, Hatem G; Baloch, Khalid; Green, Marcus

    2006-07-01

    Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is becoming more frequent, especially in specialized centers, because of the large numbers of primary ACL procedures performed. In 2-stage revisions, bone grafting of the tunnels may be undertaken if the primary position was inaccurate or if osteolysis has caused widening of the tunnels. This will allow the desired placement of the new tunnels without the risk of loss of structural integrity. It is technically difficult to deliver and impact bone graft into the femoral tunnel with the standard surgical and arthroscopic instruments. We describe a new technique for femoral and tibial tunnel impaction grafting in 2-stage ACL revisions, using the OATS grafting instruments (Osteochondral Autologous Transfer System; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The appropriately sized OATS harvester is chosen 1 mm larger than the tunnel size and is used to harvest bone graft from the iliac crest through a percutaneous approach. This provides a cylindrical graft, which is delivered to the femoral tunnel through the arthroscopic portal. The inside punch of the harvester is tapped and this allows delivery of the graft in a controlled manner and its impaction into the tunnel. The same is repeated for the tibial tunnel while providing support for the proximal end of the tunnel.

  18. Technical note: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the presence of an intramedullary femoral nail using anteromedial drilling.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Matthew; Lamplot, Joseph; Walley, Kempland C; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J

    2017-05-18

    To describe an approach to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autologous hamstring by drilling via the anteromedial portal in the presence of an intramedullary (IM) femoral nail. Once preoperative imagining has characterized the proposed location of the femoral tunnel preparations are made to remove all of the hardware (locking bolts and IM nail). A diagnostic arthroscopy is performed in the usual fashion addressing all intra-articular pathology. The ACL remnant and lateral wall soft tissues are removed from the intercondylar, to provide adequate visualization of the ACL footprint. Femoral tunnel placement is performed using a transportal ACL guide with desired offset and the knee flexed to 2.09 rad. The Beath pin is placed through the guide starting at the ACL's anatomic footprint using arthroscopic visualization and/or fluoroscopic guidance. If resistance is met while placing the Beath pin, the arthroscopy should be discontinued and the obstructing hardware should be removed under fluoroscopic guidance. When the Beath pin is successfully placed through the lateral femur, it is overdrilled with a 4.5 mm Endobutton drill. If the Endobutton drill is obstructed, the obstructing hardware should be removed under fluoroscopic guidance. In this case, the obstruction is more likely during Endobutton drilling due to its larger diameter and increased rigidity compared to the Beath pin. The femoral tunnel is then drilled using a best approximation of the graft's outer diameter. We recommend at least 7 mm diameter to minimize the risk of graft failure. Autologous hamstring grafts are generally between 6.8 and 8.6 mm in diameter. After reaming, the knee is flexed to 1.57 rad, the arthroscope placed through the anteromedial portal to confirm the femoral tunnel position, referencing the posterior wall and lateral cortex. For a quadrupled hamstring graft, the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons are then harvested in the standard fashion. The tendons are whip

  19. Technical note: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the presence of an intramedullary femoral nail using anteromedial drilling

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Matthew; Lamplot, Joseph; Walley, Kempland C; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To describe an approach to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autologous hamstring by drilling via the anteromedial portal in the presence of an intramedullary (IM) femoral nail. METHODS Once preoperative imagining has characterized the proposed location of the femoral tunnel preparations are made to remove all of the hardware (locking bolts and IM nail). A diagnostic arthroscopy is performed in the usual fashion addressing all intra-articular pathology. The ACL remnant and lateral wall soft tissues are removed from the intercondylar, to provide adequate visualization of the ACL footprint. Femoral tunnel placement is performed using a transportal ACL guide with desired offset and the knee flexed to 2.09 rad. The Beath pin is placed through the guide starting at the ACL’s anatomic footprint using arthroscopic visualization and/or fluoroscopic guidance. If resistance is met while placing the Beath pin, the arthroscopy should be discontinued and the obstructing hardware should be removed under fluoroscopic guidance. When the Beath pin is successfully placed through the lateral femur, it is overdrilled with a 4.5 mm Endobutton drill. If the Endobutton drill is obstructed, the obstructing hardware should be removed under fluoroscopic guidance. In this case, the obstruction is more likely during Endobutton drilling due to its larger diameter and increased rigidity compared to the Beath pin. The femoral tunnel is then drilled using a best approximation of the graft’s outer diameter. We recommend at least 7 mm diameter to minimize the risk of graft failure. Autologous hamstring grafts are generally between 6.8 and 8.6 mm in diameter. After reaming, the knee is flexed to 1.57 rad, the arthroscope placed through the anteromedial portal to confirm the femoral tunnel position, referencing the posterior wall and lateral cortex. For a quadrupled hamstring graft, the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons are then harvested in the standard fashion. The

  20. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P < 0.0001). Controlling for chondral lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  2. Arthroscopic Posterior Subtalar Arthrodesis: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vilá y Rico, Jesús; Ojeda Thies, Cristina; Parra Sanchez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Surgical fusion of the subtalar joint is a procedure indicated to alleviate pain of subtalar origin, such as in post-traumatic osteoarthritis, adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, and other disorders. Open subtalar arthrodesis has been performed with predictable results, but concerns exist regarding injury to proprioception and local vascularity due to wide surgical dissection. Minimally invasive techniques try to improve results by avoiding these issues but have a reputation for being technically demanding. We describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, which has proved to be a safe and reliable technique in our experience, with consistent improvements in American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society scores. PMID:27073783

  3. Arthroscopic Posterior Subtalar Arthrodesis: Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Vilá Y Rico, Jesús; Ojeda Thies, Cristina; Parra Sanchez, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Surgical fusion of the subtalar joint is a procedure indicated to alleviate pain of subtalar origin, such as in post-traumatic osteoarthritis, adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, and other disorders. Open subtalar arthrodesis has been performed with predictable results, but concerns exist regarding injury to proprioception and local vascularity due to wide surgical dissection. Minimally invasive techniques try to improve results by avoiding these issues but have a reputation for being technically demanding. We describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, which has proved to be a safe and reliable technique in our experience, with consistent improvements in American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society scores.

  4. [Arthroscopic treatment for calcaneal spur syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stropek, S; Dvorák, M

    2008-10-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Arthroscopic treatment of calcaneal spur syndrome is a tissue-sparing and effective approach when conservative therapy has failed. This method, its results and our experience with the treatment of this syndrome are presented here. MATERIAL Between January 2003 and November 2007, 26 patients underwent an arthroscopic procedure for calcaneal spur syndrome; of these, 20 were women with an average age of 49 years, and six were men with an average age of 45 years. Four, three women and one man, were lost to follow-up, therefore 22 patients with 24 heels were eventually evaluated. All had conservative therapy for 3 to 6 monts. METHODS The arthroscopic method used was developed by the arthroscopic group of the Orthopaedic Service of Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in Havana, Cuba. The surgical technique insolves treatment of the spur and plantar fasciitis commonly found in calcaneal spur syndrome, but it also addresses adjacent calcaneal periostitis. RESULTS The results were evaluated on the scale that is part of the foot function index developed by Budiman-Mak for measuring rheumatoid arthritis pain. The patients were asked mine questions on pain intensity during various activities before and after surgery. Pain was evaluated on a scale with grades from 0 to 9. The average value was 5.9 before surgery and 1.4 after surgery. A 0-1 pain range was reported by 25 %, 1-2 by 26 % and 2-4 by 22 % of the patients. All patients reported improvement. DISCUSSION The orthopaedic group in Havana led by Carlos achieved 85 % excellent outcomes (pain range, 0-2) at one-year followup; this was 79 % in our study, in which no problems with foot arches or wound infection were recorded. CONCLUSIONS The heel spur syndrome is a result of an inflamed ligament (plantar fascia) due to repeated microtrauma. It is not a traction osteophyte,but a reaction of the tissue where it attaches to the calcaneus. Adjacent calcaneal periostitis is usually present as well. Therefore, this

  5. Ultrasonography of the shoulder with arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Bedi, Asheesh; Morag, Yoav; Jacobson, Jon A

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonography is a well-established and widely accepted modality for the evaluation of rotator cuff tears and injury to the biceps brachii tendon. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging have comparable sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing both full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. This article addresses the ultrasonographic diagnosis of abnormalities of the rotator cuff, rotator interval, and biceps brachii, with magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic correlation. Characteristic ultrasonographic findings as well as imaging pitfalls are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rehabilitation after arthroscopic decompression for femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Enseki, Keelan R; Martin, Robroy; Kelly, Bryan T

    2010-04-01

    The use of arthroscopic technology to address pathologic conditions of the hip joint has become a topic of growing interest in the orthopedic community. Addressing femoroacetabular impingement through this method has generated additional attention. As surgical options evolve, rehabilitation protocols must meet the challenge of providing a safe avenue of recovery, yet meeting the goal of returning to high levels of functioning. Current rehabilitation concepts should be based on the growing body of evidence, knowledge of tissue healing properties, and clinical experience. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopic and open Bankart repairs provide similar outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Abboud, Joseph A; Hasan, Syed A; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R

    2006-05-01

    Recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair has decreased, largely because of improvements in surgical technique. We wanted to know whether there were differences in functional outcomes (using a validated outcomes measure) in patients who had arthroscopic Bankart repair or open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. We retrospectively reviewed 106 patients who had a Bankart repair for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability from 1998-2001. Of the 93 patients included, 69 patients had arthroscopic Bankart repair and 24 patients had open Bankart repair. The indications for surgery in the two groups were similar. The average age of the patients was 29.9 years (arthroscopic Bankart repair, 31 years; open Bankart repair, 28 years). The followup ranged from 24-77 months. The average modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score (PENN score) for pain, satisfaction, and function were 26.3, 8.5, and 55.1, respectively, in the arthroscopic Bankart repair group and 26.6, 8.8, and 54.2, respectively, in the open Bankart repair group. The total score was 90 in the arthroscopic Bankart repair group and 89.5 in the open Bankart repair group. Recurrent instability occurred in one patient in each group. We found no difference in outcomes between the arthroscopic and open Bankart repair groups using patient-assessed outcomes. Therapeutic Study, Level III (retrospective comparative study). See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  8. Hip arthroscopy enables classification and treatment of precollapse subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head associated intra-articular pathology.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Soshi; Noguchi, Moriyuki; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Kanezaki, Shiho; Mori, Toshiharu; Matsuda, Dean K; Sakai, Akinori

    2017-09-23

    The purposes of this study were to investigate (1) the clinical, radiographic and arthroscopic presentation of patients with subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head (SIFFH) and (2) the outcomes following arthroscopic treatment with internal fixation using hydroxyapatite poly-lactate acid (HA/PLLA) threaded pins and concomitant arthroscopic treatment of associated findings. Nine patients (median age 49.0 years, range 43-65, five female and four male patients) with SIFFH who underwent arthroscopic treatment with labral repair, capsular closure and internal fixation of SIFFH using HA/PLLA pins were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were adult patients with precollapse SIFFH with minimum 1-year follow-up (median follow-up 30.0 months, range 12-56). Acetabular labral tears were observed in all patients. The median BMI was 24.3 kg/m(2) (range 20.1-31.8). Clinical presentations and radiographic measurements demonstrated mixed type FAI in six patients, borderline developmental dysplasia in two patients and pincer type FAI in one patient. The median MHHS significantly improved from preoperatively (67.1, range 36.3-78.0) to post-operatively (96.8, range 82.5-100; p = 0.001). The median NAHS significantly improved from preoperatively (34.0, range 17-63) to post-operatively (78.0 range 61-80; p = 0.001). SIFFH is associated with bony deformities and labral tears. Precollapse SIFFH can be treated with bioabsorbable pin stabilization of unstable lesions and treatment of associated intra-capsular pathology in those with stable lesions as determined by a new arthroscopic classification system with promising early outcomes. IV.

  9. Arthroscopic knotless peripheral ulnar-sided TFCC repair.

    PubMed

    Geissler, William B

    2011-08-01

    Peripheral ulnar-sided tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) are common injuries and are amenable to arthroscopic repair. This article describes an all-arthroscopic knotless technique for TFCC repair. This technique has the advantage of being all arthroscopic using 3 portals, has the ability to repair both the superficial and deep layers of the articular disk, repairs the articular disk directly back to bone, and does not require any suture knots that may irritate the surrounding soft tissues. The surgical technique is described in detail. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Femoral offset following trochanteric femoral fractures: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Buecking, Benjamin; Boese, Christoph Kolja; Seifert, Vinzenz; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Frink, Michael; Lechler, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the femoral offset reportedly improves outcome following total hip arthroplasty, but little is known of its influence following hip fractures. We aimed to establish the effect of the femoral offset on the medium-term functional outcome in elderly patients who had sustained trochanteric fractures requiring proximal femoral nailing. We measured the rotation corrected femoral offset (FORC) and relative femoral offset (FORL) on plain anteroposterior radiographs of the hip in 188 patients (58 male, 130 female) with a trochanteric fracture who underwent proximal femoral nailing at our institution. The primary outcome measure was the Harris hip score (HSS) 6 and 12 months postoperatively; the Barthel index was assessed as a secondary outcome. The mean FORC after surgery was 58 mm (±11 mm), while the mean FORL was 1.21 (±0.22). At final follow up, we found significant inverse relationships (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, ρ) between FORC and FORL and the functional outcome assessed by the HSS (FORC: ρ = -0.207, p = 0.036; FORL: ρ = -0.247, p = 0.012), and FORL and the Barthel index (FORC: ρ = -147, p = 0.129; FORL: ρ = -0.192, p = 0.046). A consistent trend was observed after adjustment for confounding variables. Our results underline the biomechanical importance of the femoral offset for medium-term outcomes in elderly patients with trochanteric fractures. In contrast with the published findings on total hip arthroplasty, we found an inverse correlation between functional outcome and the extent of the reconstructed femoral offset. Level I - Prognostic study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26629044

  12. Arthroscopic Anatomic Glenoid Reconstruction Without Subscapularis Split

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan H.; Urquhart, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone loss from the anterior glenoid in recurrent shoulder instability has been well established. We present a completely arthroscopic technique for reconstructing the anterior glenoid with distal tibial allograft and without a subscapularis split. We perform the arthroscopy in the lateral position. We measure and size an allograft distal tibial graft and place it arthroscopically. We use an inside-out medial portal to introduce the graft into the shoulder, passing it through the rotator interval and above the subscapularis. A double-cannula system is used to pass the graft, which is temporarily fixed with K-wires and held in place with cannulated screws. We then perform a Bankart-like repair of the soft tissues to balance the shoulder and augment our repair. Our technique is not only anatomic in the re-creation of the glenoid surface but also anatomic in the preservation of the coracoid and subscapularis tendon and repair of the capsulolabral complex. PMID:26697303

  13. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic procedure in the knee.

    PubMed

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Isolani, Guilherme Rufini; Baracho, Filipe Ribas; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Ridder Bauer, Luiz Antônio; Namba, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review all cases of pseudoaneurysm in the literature, in predominantly arthroscopic procedures on the knee, and to report on a case of pseudoaneurysm that we treated. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific articles published in Brazilian and foreign periodicals over the last 23 years. Forty-seven cases were found, in 40 articles. In addition to these 47 cases, there was the case that we treated, which was also included in the data. Among the operations that progressed with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, 60% were cases of meniscal injuries and 23%, anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In 46% of the cases, the artery affected with the popliteal, and in 21%, the inferomedial genicular artery. The commonest clinical symptom was pain (37%), followed by pulsating tumor (31%), edema of the calf (12%) and hemarthrosis (11%). The median time taken to make the diagnosis was 11 days, but it ranged from one day to 10 weeks after the procedure. Although rare, pseudoaneurysms are a risk that is inherent to arthroscopic surgery. All patients should be made aware of the vascular risks, even in small-scale procedures.

  14. Arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar joint arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Roussignol, X

    2016-02-01

    Arthroscopy has become indispensable for performing tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis. Now in 2015, it is the gold-standard surgical technique, and open surgery is reserved only for cases in which arthroscopy is contraindicated: material ablation after consolidation failure, osteophytes precluding a work chamber, excentric talus, severe malunion, bone defect requiring grafting, associated midfoot deformity, etc. The first reports of arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis date from the early 1990s. Consolidation rates were comparable to open surgery, but with significantly fewer postoperative complications: infection, skin necrosis, etc. Arthroscopy was for many years reserved to moderate deformity, with frontal or sagittal deviation less than 10°. The recent literature, however, seems to extend indications, the only restriction being the surgeon's experience. Tibiotalar arthrodesis on a posterior arthroscopic approach remains little used. And yet the posterior work chamber is much larger, and initial series showed consolidation rates similar to those of an anterior approach. The surgical technique for posterior tibiotalar arthrodesis was described by Van Dijk et al., initially using a posterior para-Achilles approach. This may be hampered by posterior osteophytes or ankylosis of the subtalar joint line (revision of non-consolidated arthrodesis, sequelae of calcaneal thalamus fracture) and is now used only by foot and ankle specialists. Posterior double tibiotalar-subtalar arthrodesis, described by Devos Bevernage et al., is facilitated by transplantar calcaneo-talo-tibial intramedullary nailing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic procedure in the knee☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Isolani, Guilherme Rufini; Baracho, Filipe Ribas; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Ridder Bauer, Luiz Antônio; Namba, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review all cases of pseudoaneurysm in the literature, in predominantly arthroscopic procedures on the knee, and to report on a case of pseudoaneurysm that we treated. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific articles published in Brazilian and foreign periodicals over the last 23 years. Forty-seven cases were found, in 40 articles. In addition to these 47 cases, there was the case that we treated, which was also included in the data. Among the operations that progressed with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, 60% were cases of meniscal injuries and 23%, anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In 46% of the cases, the artery affected with the popliteal, and in 21%, the inferomedial genicular artery. The commonest clinical symptom was pain (37%), followed by pulsating tumor (31%), edema of the calf (12%) and hemarthrosis (11%). The median time taken to make the diagnosis was 11 days, but it ranged from one day to 10 weeks after the procedure. Although rare, pseudoaneurysms are a risk that is inherent to arthroscopic surgery. All patients should be made aware of the vascular risks, even in small-scale procedures. PMID:26229905

  16. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  17. Arthroscopically assisted central physeal bar resection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, James S; Polzhofer, Gert K

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-seven central physeal bars were removed with an arthroscopically assisted technique. Thirty children (32 cases) have been followed to maturity or physeal closure. There were 19 boys and 11 girls, aged 4-14 years (mean, 9.5 years). Site of arrest was distal femur (15), proximal tibia (9), distal tibia (6), and distal radius (2). Mean follow-up was 6.5 years (range, 2-12 years). Adequate longitudinal growth was realized in 21 patients (70%) just after bar resection. Five patients (17%) required osteotomy, lengthening, or epiphysiodesis in addition to bar resection. In 4 patients (13%), bar resection failed. Failures occurred in those patients whose source of growth arrest was infection (3) or degree of physeal trauma approached 50% (1 case). This is the first series that studies and documents the efficacy of the arthroscope in central physeal bar resection. It provides the best visualization with minimal morbidity. The technique is described, including a discussion of technical tips and pitfalls.

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Claudius D; Schmidt, Christopher C

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize the current concepts on rotator cuff disease with an emphasis on arthroscopic treatment. Most rotator cuff tears are the result of an ongoing attritional process. Once present, a tear is likely to gradually increase in size. Partial-thickness and subscapularis tears can both be successfully treated arthroscopically if conservative management fails. Partial tears involving greater than 50% of tendon thickness should be repaired. Articular-sided partial tears involving less than 50% of the rotator cuff can reliably be treated with debridement. A more aggressive approach should be considered for low-grade tears (<50%) if they occur on the bursal side. Biomechanical and anatomic studies have shown clear superiority with dual-row fixation compared with single-row techniques. However, current studies have yet to show clear clinical advantage with dual-row over single-row repairs. Biceps tenotomy or tenodesis can reliably provide symptomatic improvement in patients with irreparable massive tears. True pseudoparalysis of the shoulder is a contraindication to this procedure alone and other alternatives should be considered.

  19. Arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Aprato, Alessandro; Giachino, Matteo; Masse, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hip arthroscopy has gained popularity among the orthopedic community and a precise assessment of indications, techniques and results is constantly brought on. Methods In this chapter the principal standard entry portals for central and peripheral compartment are discussed. The description starts from the superficial landmarks for portals placement and continues with the deep layers. For each entry point an illustration of the main structures encountered is provided and the principal structures at risk for different portals are accurately examined. Articular anatomical description is carried out from the arthroscope point of view and sub-divided into central and peripheral compartment. The two compartments are systematically analyzed and the accessible articular areas for each portal explained. Moreover, some anatomical variations that can be found in the normal hip are reported. Conclusion The anatomical knowledge of the hip joint along with a precise notion of the structures encountered with the arthroscope is an essential requirement for a secure and successful surgery. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066735

  20. [Retro-trochlear wedge reduction trochleoplasty for the treatment of painful patella syndrome with protruding trochleae. Technical note and early results].

    PubMed

    Goutallier, D; Raou, D; Van Driessche, S

    2002-11-01

    Patients with painful patella syndrome without objective instability are often treated by section of the lateral retinacular of the patella or advancement osteotomy of the tibial tuberosity with less than satisfactory mid-term results. One explanation of the persistent pain could be hyperpression within the femoro-patellar joint due to excessive protrusion of the trochleae (>=7 mm). We propose retro-trochlear wedge resection to achieve reduction trochleoplasty. The wedge is cut with a superior base so the trochlear angle remains unchanged. We describe here the operative technique and report early results at more than two years follow-up. We reviewed retrospectively 12 knees treated with trochleoplasty for painful patella syndrome. Eleven of these knees had had previous operations for objective (n=9) or potential (n=2) patellar instability. Mean follow-up was 4 years (range 2-6). A complete pre- and postoperative radiological work-up was obtained for all knees including 30 degrees flexion femoropatellar views and computed tomography measurements of TA-GT value at 30 degrees flexion. Functional outcome was studied with the Arpege scale. Trochleoplasty was performed via an anterolateral approach and was associated with frontal translation of the tibial tuberosity if the preoperative TA-GT was not in accord with the trochlear angle. Functional outcome improved during the first two postoperative years then stabilized. Improvement in pain and instability was statistically significant. Functional outcome was scored good or very good for nine knees. The two failures occurred in the oldest patients whose knees had had several operations. Mean trochlear protrusion was 8 mm preoperatively and 3 mm postoperatively. All trochleoplasties healed; there was no trochlear necrosis. The described trochleoplasty has an advantage over classical reduction trochleoplasty because it does not modify the trochlear angle. In addition, it is quantifiable. It is biomechanically more logical

  1. Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Tenodesis: Loop-Suture Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Young Eun; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2013-01-01

    With advancements in arthroscopic surgery, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor recently has been reported to be a reasonable option for the treatment of biceps pathologies, especially for those that are symptomatic or accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. We introduce our technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor that we call the loop-suture technique, which is constructed with 1 loop strand and another sutured strand. This technique can help to improve biceps grip and simultaneously minimize longitudinal splitting of the tendon. In addition, it is relatively simple and can be performed with the use of conventional devices and arthroscopic portals used for rotator cuff repair, without the formation of additional portals or a separate incision for the tenodesis. PMID:23875133

  2. Open Versus Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis: A Comparison of Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Duchman, Kyle R; DeMik, David E.; Uribe, Bastian; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background The proximal aspect of the long head of the biceps brachii (LHB) is a frequent source of anterior shoulder pain. Multiple techniques for LHB tenodesis have been described. However, comparative outcomes are lacking. The present study aims to compare functional results, patient reported outcomes, complications, and clinical failures for patients undergoing open versus arthroscopic LHB tenodesis. Methods All patients who underwent open or arthroscopic LHB tenodesis from 2009-2012 at a single institution were identified. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative variables of interest, including concomitant procedures, were recorded. Minimum 1-year follow-up was required for inclusion. Outcomes, including patient reported outcomes, physical exam findings, and complications were compared between open and arthroscopic LHB tenodesis patients. Results Overall, 45 patients (25 open, 20 arthroscopic) were available for analysis. In total, there was a single clinical failure in a patient who underwent arthroscopic LHB tenodesis. No other complications or failures were noted. Active shoulder forward elevation was increased in the open tenodesis group as compared to the arthroscopic tenodesis group (177.8 ± 9.3° vs. 171.3 ± 11.7°; p = 0.049). Otherwise, there was no difference in range of motion or strength. For both groups, both the SF-36 and ASES scores improved significantly from preoperative values. Conclusion Both open and arthroscopic LHB tenodesis provide good to excellent outcomes with few complications. Given the recent increased utilization of LHB tenodesis, future studies should use randomization and prospective data collection in order to determine if discrete patient populations are better served by either open or arthroscopic LHB tenodesis techniques PMID:27528841

  3. Arthroscopic Scar Resection for the Treatment of Anteromedial Knee Pain after Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Kohei; Michishita, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Takeshi; Akasaka, Yoshiyuki; Kaminaga, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It has been reported that the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty has good long-term outcomes for Western and Japanese patients. Alternatively, several reports have described reoperations after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty because of post-operative knee pain and sometimes it is difficult to diagnose the cause of pain. Case Report: We treated a patient with anteromedial knee pain caused by intra-articular scar tissue that contained residual cement fragments on the anterior surface of a femoral implant following Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. After arthroscopic resection of the scar tissue and removal of the 3 mm residual cement covered with the scar tissue, the patient’s post-operative symptoms were considerably alleviated. Conclusion: This is the first report describing a case of painful intra-articular scar tissue following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. PMID:28164064

  4. Editorial Commentary: Anatomical Vandalism of the Hip? Hip Capsular Repair Seems a Sound Adjunct to Hip Arthroscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    van Arkel, Richard J; Jeffers, Jonathan R T; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-02-01

    The study "Contribution of the Pubofemoral Ligament to Hip Stability: A Biomechanical Study" by Martin, Khoury, Schröder, Johnson, Gómez-Hoyos, Campos, and Palmer found that cutting the hip capsular ligament allowed a large increase in femoral internal rotation, particularly in the flexed hip, causing subluxation to occur. In addition to providing new data on the role of the pubofemoral ligament, it raises the question of whether hip joint surgeons should repair the capsule-what are the likely consequences?-and whether any beneficial effects persist in long-term clinical follow-ups. For now, hip capsular repair seems a sound adjunct to hip arthroscopic surgery. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Arthroscopic Scar Resection for the Treatment of Anteromedial Knee Pain after Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Kohei; Michishita, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Takeshi; Akasaka, Yoshiyuki; Kaminaga, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty has good long-term outcomes for Western and Japanese patients. Alternatively, several reports have described reoperations after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty because of post-operative knee pain and sometimes it is difficult to diagnose the cause of pain. We treated a patient with anteromedial knee pain caused by intra-articular scar tissue that contained residual cement fragments on the anterior surface of a femoral implant following Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. After arthroscopic resection of the scar tissue and removal of the 3 mm residual cement covered with the scar tissue, the patient's post-operative symptoms were considerably alleviated. This is the first report describing a case of painful intra-articular scar tissue following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

  6. Open and Arthroscopic with Mini-Open Surgical Hip Approaches for Treatment of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis and Concomitant Hip Pathology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare benign tumor affecting large joints and prompts excision to prevent local destruction of the joint. The purpose of this case report is to describe two differing surgical approaches for management of PVNS of the hip in patients requiring concomitant treatment for additional hip pathology. Methods. This report discusses the presentation, clinical and radiographic findings, and operative management of two contrasting cases of PVNS of the hip. Case 1 describes a 31-year-old female with localized PVNS in addition to a labral tear treated with arthroscopic labral repair followed by tumor excision via a mini-open incision. Case 2 describes a 29-year-old male with more diffuse PVNS in addition to a cam deformity managed with open surgical dislocation of the hip, tumor excision, and restoration of the femoral head/neck junction. Results. This report demonstrates two cases of successful excision of PVNS of the hip in addition to addressing concomitant hip pathology in both cases. Conclusions. Open surgical dislocation of the hip or arthroscopic surgery with a mini-open incision may be used in appropriately selected patients to successfully excise PVNS lesions in addition to addressing concomitant hip pathology. PMID:28326214

  7. Open and Arthroscopic with Mini-Open Surgical Hip Approaches for Treatment of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis and Concomitant Hip Pathology.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Bridget; Kamath, Atul F

    2017-01-01

    Background. Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare benign tumor affecting large joints and prompts excision to prevent local destruction of the joint. The purpose of this case report is to describe two differing surgical approaches for management of PVNS of the hip in patients requiring concomitant treatment for additional hip pathology. Methods. This report discusses the presentation, clinical and radiographic findings, and operative management of two contrasting cases of PVNS of the hip. Case 1 describes a 31-year-old female with localized PVNS in addition to a labral tear treated with arthroscopic labral repair followed by tumor excision via a mini-open incision. Case 2 describes a 29-year-old male with more diffuse PVNS in addition to a cam deformity managed with open surgical dislocation of the hip, tumor excision, and restoration of the femoral head/neck junction. Results. This report demonstrates two cases of successful excision of PVNS of the hip in addition to addressing concomitant hip pathology in both cases. Conclusions. Open surgical dislocation of the hip or arthroscopic surgery with a mini-open incision may be used in appropriately selected patients to successfully excise PVNS lesions in addition to addressing concomitant hip pathology.

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Gartsman, G M

    1995-01-01

    Rotator cuff disease represents a spectrum of tendon lesions including inflammation of an intrinsically normal tendon, tendon fibrosis, partial-thickness tears, complete tears, and cuff tear arthropathy. An in-depth analysis of the entire subject is beyond the scope of this article. This article will focus on the arthroscopic management of the spectrum of rotator cuff disease in an attempt to provide a timely summary of the present state of knowledge. Five stages of rotator cuff disease will be reviewed: stage 2 impingement, partial-thickness cuff tears, complete-thickness rotator cuff tears, irreparable rotator cuff tears, and cuff tear arthropathy. In preparing this article I have assumed that the reader is familiar with the diagnosis of rotator cuff lesions through the use of appropriate patient history, physical examination, and radiologic studies.

  9. [Arthroscopically assisted treatment of ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Braunstein, M; Baumbach, S F; Böcker, W; Mutschler, W; Polzer, H

    2016-02-01

    Acute ankle fractures are one of the most common fractures in adults with an incidence of 0.1-0.2 % per year. Operative treatment by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is the standard method of treatment for unstable or dislocated fractures. The main goal of the operation is the anatomical realignment of the joint and restoration of ankle stability; nevertheless, anatomical reduction does not automatically lead to favorable clinical results. According to several studies the mid-term and in particular the long-term outcome following operative treatment is often poor with residual symptoms including chronic pain, stiffness, recurrent swelling and ankle instability. There is growing evidence that this poor outcome might be related to occult intra-articular injuries involving cartilage and soft tissues. In recent studies the frequency of fracture-related osteochondral lesions was reported to be approximately 64 %. By physical examination, standard radiography or even computed tomography (CT), these intra-articular pathologies cannot be reliably diagnosed; therefore, many authors emphasize the value of ankle arthroscopy in acute fracture treatment as it has become a safe and effective diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Arthroscopically assisted open reduction and internal fixation (AORIF) allows control of the reduction as well examination of all intra-articular structures. If necessary, intra-articular pathologies can be addressed by removing ruptured ligaments and loose bodies, performing chondroplasty or microfracturing. So far there is no evidence that supplementary ankle arthroscopy increases the complication rate. On the other hand, the positive effect of AORIF has also not been clearly documented; nevertheless, there are clear indications that arthroscopically assisted fracture treatment is beneficial, especially in complex fractures.

  10. Arthroscopic Suprapectoral and Open Subpectoral Biceps Tenodesis: Radiographic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hodgins, Justin L; Kovacevic, David; Purcell, Stephen; Jobin, Charles M; Levine, William N; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2016-11-01

    To provide a detailed account of the location of the long head of the biceps (LHB) tenodesis tunnels using an all-arthroscopic suprapectoral technique in a prospective group of patients. These patients were then compared with a retrospective group of open subpectoral tenodesis patients of similar characteristics. Postoperative radiographs from a prospective group of all-arthroscopic suprapectoral LHB tenodeses were compared with a retrospective group of open subpectoral tenodeses. Digital anteroposterior images were used to measure distances from clinically pertinent radiographic landmarks to tenodesis tunnel sites. Forty patients (20 all-arthroscopic, 20 open) met the inclusion criteria. The inferior border of the bicipital groove was located a mean distance of 33.7 ± 6.9 mm from the top of the humeral head. The mean distance measured in the open group was approximately 28 mm (P < .001) distal compared with the arthroscopic group. The humeral diameter was 7.5 ± 5.4 mm narrower at the subpectoral tenodesis site (P < .001). All 20 patients in the open subpectoral group had tenodesis tunnels placed distal to the bicipital groove compared with 17 of 20 patients (85%) in the all-arthroscopic group. There were 2 cases of lateral wall cortical reaming during subpectoral tenodesis but no periprosthetic humeral fractures. There were 2 cases of bicortical reaming during the all-arthroscopic tenodesis with no known complications. The location of biceps tenodesis significantly differs between all-arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral techniques, and the open subpectoral method achieves fixation in a significantly narrower region of the humerus. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Second-look arthroscopic assessment of cartilage regeneration after medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woon-Hwa; Takeuchi, Ryohei; Chun, Chung-Woo; Lee, Jung-Su; Ha, Jae-Hun; Kim, Ji-Hyae; Jeong, Jae-Heon

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate regeneration of the articular cartilage after medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for knees with medial-compartment osteoarthritis and to assess the clinical outcome and cartilage regeneration according to the postoperative limb alignment at 2 years postoperatively. The study involved 159 knees in 159 patients. For evaluation of cartilage degeneration, the International Cartilage Repair Society grading system was used for arthroscopic grading on initial arthroscopy during high tibial osteotomy. The patients underwent a second-look arthroscopic evaluation of the articular cartilage at the time of removal of the plate, an average of 2 years after the initial osteotomy. For evaluation of cartilage regeneration, the articular cartilage was classified into 2 stages as no regenerative change (grade 1) or white scattering with fibrocartilage, partial coverage with fibrocartilage, or even coverage with fibrocartilage (grade 2) on second-look arthroscopy. Maturation of the cartilage regeneration was defined as even coverage with fibrocartilage. "Immaturation" of the cartilage regeneration was defined as white scattering with fibrocartilage or partial coverage with fibrocartilage. Clinical evaluations were performed by use of Knee Society scores preoperatively and at 2 years postoperatively. We divided the knees into 3 groups according to the postoperative limb alignment. Group A comprised knees with a mechanical tibiofemoral angle of 0° or less. Group B comprised knees with a mechanical tibiofemoral angle greater than 0° and less than 6°. Group C comprised knees with a mechanical tibiofemoral angle of 6° or greater. Grade 2 regeneration was achieved in the medial femoral condyle articular cartilage in 92% of knees and in the medial tibial plateau articular cartilage in 69% of knees. Maturation of the cartilage regeneration was found in the medial femoral condyle articular cartilage in 4% of knees and in the medial

  12. Femoral Head and Neck Excision.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tisha A M

    2017-07-01

    Femoral head and neck excision is a surgical procedure that is commonly performed in small animal patients. It is a salvage procedure that is done to relieve pain in the coxofemoral joint and restore acceptable function of the limb. Femoral head and neck excision is most commonly used to treat severe osteoarthritis in the coxofemoral joint and can be done in dogs and cats of any size or age. The procedure should not be overused and ideally should not be done when the integrity of the coxofemoral joint can be restored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of capsular distention in the arthroscopic management of arthrofibrosis of the knee: A technical consideration.

    PubMed

    Millett, P J; Steadman, J R

    2001-09-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of arthrofibrosis of the knee is a technically challenging procedure. Capsular distention with fluid before arthroscopy results in easier and safer insertion of arthroscopic instruments with improved arthroscopic visualization. In addition, it stretches the entire capsule, including the difficult to access posterior capsule. This report describes a simple technique for capsular distention before arthroscopic treatment of arthrofibrosis of the knee.

  14. Level of the Subscapularis Split During Arthroscopic Latarjet.

    PubMed

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Arrigoni, Paolo; Narbona, Pablo; Burkhart, Stephen S; Barth, Johannes

    2017-08-16

    To determine the location of the subscapularis split during arthroscopic Latarjet created by an inside-out technique passing a switching stick from the posterior portal across the glenohumeral joint. An inside-out technique was used to arthroscopically create a subscapularis split in 20 fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders. The distance between the exit point of the switching stick and the upper border of the subscapularis and the anterior circumflex vessels was measured arthroscopically and after open dissection. Twelve splits were in the upper third of the subscapularis, 3 were at the junction of the upper third and the middle third, and 5 were in the middle third. None were at the junction between the middle and lower third as desired. Using the inside-out method during arthroscopic Latarjet may produce a high subscapularis split if it is performed from with a switching stick that is inserted through the posterior approach, and passed across the glenohumeral joint at the level of the inferior glenoid. This study analyzed the relative risk of high subscapularis split during the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability in soccer goalkeepers.

    PubMed

    Terra, B B; Ejnisman, B; Figueiredo, E A; Andreoli, C V; Pochini, A C; Cohen, C; Arliani, G G; Cohen, M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report epidemiologic data and results of arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability in soccer goalkeepers. We included 12 soccer goalkeepers with a mean age of 28.9 years (range 18-45 years) with acute or recurrent traumatic anterior instability who underwent an arthroscopic anatomic capsulolabral repair with bone anchors. Patients who underwent surgery within 4 weeks of the first episode of dislocation were classified as acute instability. The results were evaluated using the Rowe Scale and analyzed according to stability, range of motion and function. The mean follow-up was 3.8 years. The most common mechanism of injury (90% of the cases) was abduction, external rotation and extension. Associated injuries were present in 57.2% of recurrent cases and 20% of acute cases (p<0.293). Excellent or good results were observed in 80% of the cases of acute instability and in 57.2% of cases in the group with recurrent instability (p<0.586). From a total of 12 soccer goalkeepers who underwent the arthroscopic capsulolabral repair, good or excellent results were obtained in 66.6% of cases of glenohumeral instability. Surgical arthroscopic repair was possible in all cases of acute or recurrent instability based on well-established inclusion criteria, i. e., with well-defined exclusion criteria, such as HAGL lesion and significant glenohumeral bone loss, the arthroscopic capsulolabral repair can be carried out in soccer goalkeepers.

  16. Arthroscopic treatment for greater tuberosity fractures: rationale and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Ettore; Sansone, Valerio; Battistella, Ferdinando

    2004-07-01

    A description of a new technique for arthroscopic treatment of minimally displaced greater tuberosity fractures of the humerus and associated soft tissue lesions is presented. This kind of fracture is usually treated nonsurgically. However, recent evidence suggests that even a small amount of superior displacement may produce shoulder dysfunction and require a perfect surgical reduction and fixation. Moreover, any displaced fracture of the greater tuberosity presents a high rate of associated and largely undetected soft tissue lesions. To avoid underestimating accompanying soft tissue pathology, arthroscopic assessment before open treatment of greater tuberosity fractures has been suggested. In 2 earlier case reports, we described the use of an arthroscope not only to diagnose and treat a rotator cuff tear and a Bankart lesion associated with a minimally displaced greater tuberosity fracture but also to arthroscopically reduce and treat the fracture. With advancements in arthroscopy and equipment, we refined and systematized the original arthroscopic technique that we have routinely used since 1997. This article presents the new technique.

  17. Comparison of two arthroscopic pump systems based on image quality.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; van den Boomen, H; van Heerwaarden, R J; van Dijk, C N

    2008-06-01

    The effectiveness of arthroscopic pump systems has been investigated with either subjective measures or measures that were unrelated to the image quality. The goal of this study is to determine the performance of an automated pump in comparison to a gravity pump based on objective assessment of the quality of the arthroscopic view. Ten arthroscopic operations performed with a gravity pump and ten performed with an automated pump (FMS Duo system) were matched on duration of the surgery and shaver usage, type of operation, and surgical experience. Quality of the view was defined by means of the presence or absence of previously described definitions of disturbances (bleeding, turbidity, air bubbles, and loose fibrous tissue). The percentage of disturbances for all operations was assessed with a time-disturbance analysis of the recorded operations. The Mann-Whitney U test shows a significant difference in favor of the automated pump for the presence of turbidity only (Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] = 0.015). Otherwise, no differences were determined (Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] > 0.436). A new objective method is successfully applied to assess efficiency of pump systems based on the quality of the arthroscopic view. Important disturbances (bleeding, air bubbles, and loose fibrous tissue) are not reduced by an automated pump used in combination with a tourniquet. The most frequent disturbance turbidity is reduced by around 50%. It is questionable if this result justifies the use of an automated pump for straightforward arthroscopic knee surgeries using a tourniquet.

  18. Using the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool as a Pass-Fail Examination

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Ryan J.; Nicandri, Gregg T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Examination of arthroscopic skill requires evaluation tools that are valid and reliable with clear criteria for passing. The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool was developed as a video-based assessment of technical skill with criteria for passing established by a panel of experts. The purpose of this study was to test the validity and reliability of the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool as a pass-fail examination of arthroscopic skill. Methods: Twenty-eight residents and two sports medicine faculty members were recorded performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on a left and right cadaveric specimen in our arthroscopic skills laboratory. Procedure videos were evaluated with use of the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool by two raters blind to subject identity. Subjects were considered to pass the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool when they attained scores of ≥3 on all eight assessment domains. Results: The raters agreed on a pass-fail rating for fifty-five of sixty videos rated with an interclass correlation coefficient value of 0.83. Ten of thirty participants were assigned passing scores by both raters for both diagnostic arthroscopies performed in the laboratory. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that logging more than eighty arthroscopic cases or performing more than thirty-five arthroscopic knee cases was predictive of attaining a passing Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool score on both procedures performed in the laboratory. Conclusions: The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool is valid and reliable as a pass-fail examination of diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in the simulation laboratory. Clinical Relevance: This study demonstrates that the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool may be a useful tool for pass-fail examination of diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in the simulation laboratory. Further study is necessary to determine whether the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill

  19. Incapacity of work after arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Tobias M; Freude, Thomas; Fiedler, Sebastian; Schröter, Steffen; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ateschrang, Atesch

    2015-10-01

    The incapacity with respect to work following anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation and subsequent Bankart repair has not been previously examined. The objective of this study was to examine a patient's incapacity according to the classification by the REFA Association. The recovery time was measured and the outcome of patients with heavy workload was compared to those with lower workloads. A total of 74 patients who underwent isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The Constant-Murley Score, UCLA Shoulder Score and ROWE Score for Shoulder Instability were recorded for clinical assessment. The mean follow-up time was 43.1 months (SD ± 17.4; 24-110 months) with a mean age of 34.7 years (SD ± 12.6). Workload was classified as per the REFA Association classification system. Postoperative duration of a patient's incapacity with respect to work and other subjective ratings were provided by the patients themselves. The mean incapacity of work was 2.73 months (95 % CI 1.19-5.36). The incapacity of work was 2.06 months (95 % CI 1.55-2.68) in the group with low physical strains at work (REFA 0-1) and 3.40 months (95 % CI 2.70-4.24) in the group with heavy workload (REFA 2-4/p = 0.005). Overall, the mean Constant-Murley Score was 87.7 (SD ± 13.5). The average UCLA Shoulder Score summed up to 31.9 (SD ± 3.87) and the mean ROWE Score was 87.6 (SD ± 21.7). 13 (17.5 %) patients had problems to compete in their jobs. Three patients had to change the job postoperatively. In this study, a relationship between the time of incapacity of work and the workload was observed; patients with low physical strains returned significantly earlier to work after arthroscopic Bankart repair (p = 0.005). In general, the clinical results as measured in the Constant/UCLA/Rowe score were comparable to other studies.

  20. Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Femoral head cartilage disarticulation disorder and necrosis is a major skeletal problem in broiler breeders since they are maintained for a long time in the farm. The etiology of this disease is not well understood. A field study was conducted to understand the basis of this metabolic disease. Six ...

  1. Cardiac resynchronization therapy: Femoral approach.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Luís; Miranda, Rita; Almeida, Sofia; Ribeiro, Luciano; Alvarenga, Carlos; João, Isabel; Pereira, Hélder

    2017-04-01

    We describe the case of a 62-year-old female patient with bilateral subclavian vein occlusion, in whom a cardiac resynchronization system was implanted via a femoral vein. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Implantless Fixation of a Large Osteocartilaginous Fracture of the Lateral Femoral Condyle in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Jitendra; Mhaskar, Vikram; Mhaskar, Parul Maheshwari

    2017-01-01

    We describe for the first time a case of lateral femoral condyle fracture following a fall in a 13-year-old child that was reduced arthroscopically using a probe. It was definitively fixed with 0 vicryl sutures in a cruciate pattern after being initially stabilised with 1.5-mm Kirschner wires. Four beath pins carrying sutures were drilled at four opposing quadrants through the reduced fragment into the femur. The sutures were then tied on the lateral cortex of the femur. After fixation, the child was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks, partial weight bearing from 6 weeks to 12 weeks and then full weight bearing thereafter. Range of motion (ROM) exercises were commenced on the first postoperative day. At one-year follow-up, the ROM was from −5° to 130°, all symptoms disappeared, and complete resumption of all sports activities was allowed. PMID:28231653

  3. Implantless Fixation of a Large Osteocartilaginous Fracture of the Lateral Femoral Condyle in a Child.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Jitendra; Mhaskar, Vikram; Mhaskar, Parul Maheshwari

    2017-03-01

    We describe for the first time a case of lateral femoral condyle fracture following a fall in a 13-year-old child that was reduced arthroscopically using a probe. It was definitively fixed with 0 vicryl sutures in a cruciate pattern after being initially stabilised with 1.5-mm Kirschner wires. Four beath pins carrying sutures were drilled at four opposing quadrants through the reduced fragment into the femur. The sutures were then tied on the lateral cortex of the femur. After fixation, the child was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks, partial weight bearing from 6 weeks to 12 weeks and then full weight bearing thereafter. Range of motion (ROM) exercises were commenced on the first postoperative day. At one-year follow-up, the ROM was from -5° to 130°, all symptoms disappeared, and complete resumption of all sports activities was allowed.

  4. The Arthroscopic Ulnohumeral Arthroplasty: From Mini-Open to Arthroscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Degreef, Ilse; De Smet, Luc

    2011-01-01

    In cubarthritis—osteoarthritis of the elbow—surgical procedures may be considered to debride the elbow joint to reduce pain, to increase mobility, and to postpone joint replacement surgery. The ulnohumeral arthroplasty as described by Outerbridge and Kashiwagi was originally introduced to debride both anterior and posterior elbow compartments through a direct posterior mini-open approach. To achieve this, a distal humeral fenestration throughout the humeral fossa is performed. Although with an elbow arthroscopy, a technique that was obviously developed later on, all compartments can be easily visualized. The arthroscopic fenestration of the humerus preserves its advantages, with good clinical results focused on pain relief and gaining mobility. On top, future elbow joint locking based on degenerative loose bodies can be prevented. Therefore, this surgery is often done in young, more active patients and even in sportsmen. These patients, however, need to be prompted to restrict loading on the elbow in the immediate postoperative period, because the elbow is biomechanically weakened and may be prone to a fracture. However, both outcome and postoperative rehabilitation are promising and the arthroscopic Outerbridge procedure is a reliable procedure with an easy rehabilitation. Therefore, the threshold is relatively low in early cubarthritis and recurrent locking of the elbow. In this paper, we present a literature review and the author's experience and own research on the Outerbridge procedure. PMID:22096621

  5. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  6. Ganglion cyst in the supraspinous fossa: arthroscopically undetectable cases.

    PubMed

    Shimokobe, Hisao; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Eiichiro; Kume, Shinichiro; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Nagata, Kensei; Shiba, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes of arthroscopic decompression for ganglion cyst in the supraspinous fossa; however, little attention has been paid to the difficulty in detecting these cysts during arthroscopy. In this report, we present 2 cases in which ganglion cysts in the supraspinous fossa were undetectable during arthroscopy. The ganglion cysts were not identified in these cases during surgery despite arthroscopic decompression being performed through the area in which the cyst was expected until the suprascapular nerve was entirely exposed. After surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the disappearance of the ganglion cyst and external rotation strength was fully improved, without shoulder pain. We emphasize here that surgeons should be aware of this difficulty when performing arthroscopic decompression of ganglion cysts in the supraspinous fossa.

  7. Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

    1994-01-01

    With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of the septic knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J

    1986-01-01

    Pyarthrosis of the knee was treated in 30 patients by arthroscopic decompression and lavage, coupled with parenteral and oral antibiotics. There were 21 men and nine women patients whose ages ranged from 6 months to 65 years of age. Twenty-two patients were considered to have a hematogenous origin as a cause of their pyarthrosis, and eight were caused by penetrating trauma. Twenty-eight of these patients had the onset of symptoms within 72 h prior to arthroscopy. Two adults had the onset of their symptoms 1 week prior to treatment. Follow-up has ranged from 6 months to 5 years. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 20 knees, Streptococcus pneumonia in three knees, Haemophilus influenzae in four knees, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in one knee. The average hospital stay among 22 children aged 12 years or younger was 3.50 days. The other eight patients had an average hospital stay of 9.50 days. Three adults with diabetes and other medical problems, such as renal failure, had an average hospital stay of 17.33 days. Excellent results were obtained in 28 (93.3%) of 30 patients and good results were obtained in two (6.7%) of 30 patients. There were no poor results or recurrences, and no cases of osteomyelitis occurred. This method of treatment markedly reduces the morbidity and hospital stay of patients with a septic knee.

  9. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Indication and Technique.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit; O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy and rotator cuff repair techniques are frequently used by most practicing orthopaedic surgeons. A thorough patient history and physical examination can often confirm the presence of a rotator cuff tear, and imaging can be used to evaluate the extent of the injury. The indication for rotator cuff repair is a painful shoulder refractory to nonsurgical management. Arthroscopic techniques, including capsular and coracohumeral ligament releases to decrease tension on the repair, facilitate successful rotator cuff repair. Biomechanically, a double-row transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair provides excellent results for medium-size rotator cuff tears. Larger, retracted rotator cuff tears may be better repaired with oblique convergence sutures and a medial single-row rotator cuff repair. The biology of healing, the preservation of blood supply, and the trephination of the bony healing bed are essential parts of all rotator cuff repair procedures. Protection of the rotator cuff repair with an abduction sling for 4 to 8 weeks postoperatively and the delay of active motion until early healing has occurred will improve outcomes.

  10. Arthroscopic release of first metatarsophalangeal arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun H

    2006-08-01

    Various degrees of first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrofibrosis frequently occur in patients with bunion surgery or big toe trauma. In those patients with functional limitation who fail to respond to conservative treatment, surgery is indicated. We describe here an arthroscopic approach to first metatarsophalangeal release that is designed to improve functional results. Dorsomedial and dorsolateral portals are established at the medial and lateral sides of the extensor hallucis longus tendon. Through these 2 portals, the dorsal capsule is released and the medial and lateral joint gutters can be cleared up. The metatarsosesamoid compartment is approached through the straight medial portal and the working portal, the latter of which is located 4 cm proximal to the joint line between the abductor hallucis tendon and the medial head of the flexor hallucis brevis. Under visualization through the medial portal, adhesions around the sesamoid apparatus can be debrided with a shaver through the working portal. This completes the release of joint circumference and improves the motion range of the joint.

  11. Prilocaine or mepivacaine for combined sciatic-femoral nerve block in patients receiving elective knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marsan, A; Kirdemir, P; Mamo, D; Casati, A

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the onset time of surgical block, recovery of motor function and duration of post-operative analgesia of combined sciatic-femoral nerve block performed with either mepivacaine or prilocaine. With Ethical Committee approval and written informed consent, 30 ASA physical status I-II patients, undergoing elective arthroscopic knee surgery, received a combined sciatic-femoral nerve block with 30 ml of either 2% mepivacaine (n=15) or 1% prilocaine (n=15). An independent observer recorded the onset time of sensory and motor blocks, the need for intraoperative analgesia supplementation, recovery of motor function, and first request of post-operative pain medication. Onset time of nerve block required 15+/-5 min with prilocaine and 12+/-7 min with mepivacaine (p=0.33). No patient required general anesthesia to complete surgery; 3 patients receiving prilocaine (20%) and 2 patients receiving mepivacaine (13%) required 0.1 mg fentanyl intravenously to complete surgery (p=0.99). Recovery of motor function and first request of post-operative pain medication occurred after 238+/-36 min and 259+/-31 min with prilocaine, and 220+/-48 min and 248+/-47 min with mepivacaine (p=0.257 and p=0.43, respectively). Patient satisfaction was good in all studied patients. Prilocaine 1% provides adequate sensory and motor block for arthroscopic knee surgery, with a clinical profile similar to that produced by 2% mepivacaine, and may be a good option for surgical procedures of intermediate duration and not associated with severe postoperative pain.

  12. Open Latarjet versus arthroscopic Latarjet: clinical results and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Randelli, P; Fossati, C; Stoppani, C; Evola, F R; De Girolamo, L

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results between open and arthroscopic Latarjet and perform a cost analysis of the two techniques. A systematic review of articles present in PubMed and MEDLINE was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Studies concerning post-operative outcomes following Latarjet procedures for chronic anterior shoulder instability were selected for analysis. The clinical and radiographic results as well as the costs of the open and arthroscopic techniques were evaluated. Twenty-three articles, describing a total of 1317 shoulders, met the inclusion criteria: 17 studies were related to open Latarjet, and 6 to the arthroscopic technique. Despite the heterogeneity of the evaluation scales, the clinical results seemed very satisfactory for both techniques. We detected a statistically significant difference in the percentage of bone graft healing in favour of the open technique (88.6 vs 77.6 %). Recurrent dislocation was more frequent following open surgery (3.3 % after open surgery vs 0.3 % after arthroscopy), but this finding was biased by the large difference in follow-up duration between the two techniques. The direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure were double in comparison to open surgery (€2335 vs €1040). A lack of data prevented evaluation of indirect costs and, therefore, a cost-effectiveness analysis. The open and arthroscopic Latarjet techniques showed excellent and comparable clinical results. However, the much higher direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure do not seem, at present, to be justified by a benefit to the patient. III.

  13. Biomechanical comparison of open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Borges, Johanna; Agneskirchner, Jens D; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Patzer, Thilo; Struck, Melena; Smith, Tomas; Wellmann, Mathias

    2013-04-01

    To biomechanically compare the effectiveness of the standard open and arthroscopic techniques of the Latarjet procedure to address a critical anterior glenoid defect in combination with a capsular insufficiency. Translation testing of 12 human cadaveric shoulder specimens was performed in a robot-assisted setup under 3 different conditions: (1) intact/vented shoulder joint, (2) combined anterior glenoid bone and capsular defect, and (3) open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures. Testing was performed for each condition in 2 test positions: 60° of glenohumeral abduction with neutral rotation (ABD position) and 60° of abduction and external rotation (ABER position). Each position was tested with a passive humerus load of 30 N in the anterior, inferior, and anteroinferior directions. Translational movement of the humeral head was evaluated with and without the application of a 10-N load to the conjoint tendon (CJT). In the ABD position, translations after the open Latarjet procedure significantly differed from the arthroscopic technique in the anterior and anteroinferior directions when testing was performed with loading of the CJTs (CJT loading). Without CJT loading, the open Latarjet technique showed significantly lower translations in the anterior, inferior (P = .004), and anteroinferior (P = .001) testing directions in the ABD position. In the ABER position, the arthroscopic procedure showed no significant difference compared with the standard open procedure. We found a superior stabilization effect of the open Latarjet technique in the ABD position. The difference is ascribed to the anterior capsular repair, which was performed within the open technique and omitted during the arthroscopic procedure. The reduction of translation in a pure abduction position of the arm is more effectively performed with a conventional open Latarjet technique that includes a capsular repair. In combined ABER position, there was no difference found between the open and

  14. Effect of Mirrored Views on Endoscopic and Arthroscopic Skill Performance

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Emanuel; Meier, Christoph; Wirth, Stefan; Koch, Peter Philipp; Meyer, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic procedures may be technically challenging because of impaired vision, limited space, and the 2-dimensional vision of a 3-dimensional structure. Spatial orientation may get more complicated when the camera is pointing toward the surgeon. Hypothesis: Spatial orientation and arthroscopic performance may be improved by simply mirroring the image on the monitor in different configurations regarding the position and orientation of camera and instrument. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirty volunteers from an orthopaedic department were divided into 3 equal groups according to their arthroscopic experience (beginners, intermediates, seniors). All subjects were asked to perform a standardized task in a closed box mimicking an endoscopic space. The same task had to be performed in 4 different configurations regarding camera and instrument position and orientation (pointing toward or away from the subject) with either the original or mirrored image on the monitor. Efficiency (time per stick; TPS), precision (successful completion of the task), and difficulty rating using a visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed. Results: Mirroring the image demonstrated no advantage over the original images in any configuration regarding TPS. Successful completion of the task was significantly better when the image was mirrored in the configuration with the camera pointing toward and the instrument away from the surgeon. There was a positive correlation between TPS and subjective VAS difficulty rating (r = 0.762, P = .000) and a negative correlation between the successful completion of the task and VAS (r = −0.515, P = .000). Conclusion: Mirroring the image may have a positive effect on arthroscopic performance of surgeons in certain configurations. A significantly improved performance was seen when the arthroscope was pointing toward and the grasping instrument pointing away from the subject. Mirroring the image may facilitate surgery in

  15. Complications Associated With Arthroscopic Labral Repair Implants: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Felder, Jerrod J; Elliott, Michael P; Mair, Scott D

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair in the shoulder has become commonplace in recent years. A variety of implants have evolved in parallel with arthroscopic techniques. Any orthopedic implant that is placed in close proximity to the joint has the potential to cause subsequent damage to the articular surface if it is left prominent or dislodges secondary to improper surgical technique. This article focuses on a series of implant-related complications of labral surgery and their subsequent management. Additionally, correct patient selection and surgical technique are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Arthroscopic Correction of a Supracondylar Malunion in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Steven M.; Sakamoto, Sara; Abernathie, Brenon L.; Hausman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Malunions are a well-recognized complication of pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures. Results of corrective osteotomies vary, and complication rates have been reported to be as high as 40%. Considering the high rate of complications for malunion correction, we investigated the feasibility of arthroscopy. We present a technique for arthroscopic supracondylar osteotomy and percutaneous pinning. There are many advantages of an arthroscopic approach to malunion correction, including extension-type deformity correction, safe access to the anterior humerus, and minimal dissection and scarring; any intracapsular contracture can be addressed as well. Elbow arthroscopy appears to be a viable option in the pediatric orthopaedic surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:26258033

  17. Arthroscopic Release of Lateral Half of the Talocalcaneonavicular Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the talocalcaneonavicular joint can follow trauma or surgery of the joint. Arthroscopic release of the lateral half of the talocalcaneonavicular joint is indicated if the painful restriction of hindfoot inversion together with tenderness of the lateral side of the joint that is not controlled with conservative treatment. This procedure is contraindicated in other causes of painful stiffness including post-traumatic arthritis, osteonecrosis, and malunion. This technique includes arthroscopic release of the lateral side of the anterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint. This is a technically demanding technique and should be reserved for the experienced foot and ankle arthroscopists.

  18. Arthroscopic skills assessment and use of box model for training in arthroscopic surgery using Sawbones – “FAST” workstation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Saumitra; Radi, Mohamed Abdel; Ramadan, Islam Karam-allah; Said, Hatem Galal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic skills training outside the operative room may decrease risks and errors by trainee surgeons. There is a need of simple objective method for evaluating proficiency and skill of arthroscopy trainees using simple bench model of arthroscopic simulator. The aim of this study is to correlate motor task performance to level of prior arthroscopic experience and establish benchmarks for training modules. Methods: Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed a set of tasks to assess a) arthroscopic triangulation, b) navigation, c) object handling and d) meniscus trimming using SAWBONES “FAST” arthroscopy skills workstation. Time to completion and the errors were computed. The subjects were divided into four levels; “Novice”, “Beginner”, “Intermediate” and “Advanced” based on previous arthroscopy experience, for analyses of performance. Results: The task performance under transparent dome was not related to experience of the surgeon unlike opaque dome, highlighting the importance of hand-eye co-ordination required in arthroscopy. Median time to completion for each task improved as the level of experience increased and this was found to be statistically significant (p < .05) e.g. time for maze navigation (Novice – 166 s, Beginner – 135.5 s, Intermediate – 100 s, Advance – 97.5 s) and the similar results for all tasks. Majority (>85%) of subjects across all the levels reported improvement in performance with sequential tasks. Conclusion: Use of the arthroscope requires visuo-spatial coordination which is a skill that develops with practice. This simple box model can reliably differentiate the arthroscopic skills based on experience and can be used to monitor progression of skills of trainees in institutions. PMID:27801643

  19. [Femoral shaft fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Dietz, H-G; Schlickewei, W

    2011-05-01

    Femoral shaft fractures in children represent 1.5% of all fractures in childhood. Up to the age of 4 years, conservative treatment in a hip spica or short-term overhead traction is the therapy of choice. Femoral shaft fractures between the age of 5 and 16 years should be treated surgically. In over 90% of these cases elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) is the premier treatment option. Additional end caps can be used for unstable fractures and in length discrepancy. The external fixator and the locking plate are reserved for fractures with severe soft tissue injuries, vascular problems and some specific situations mentioned later on. By adhering to these standards good results can be achieved with a low complication rate.

  20. [Osteonecrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Lafforgue, Pierre

    2002-03-15

    The femoral head is the main location of avascular osteonecrosis. The lesion remains asymptomatic for several months or years before causing non specific hip pain. Risk factors have been identified, mainly femoral neck fractures, corticosteroid therapy and related conditions (lupus erythematosus, organ transplantations), alcohol abuse, dyslipidemia, sickle cell disease, HIV infection, caisson workers, Gaucher's disease, male sex. When typical radiological signs are lacking, MRI is the best investigation. Progression toward hip joint damage highly depends on the necrotic volume assessed at MRI. The combination of plain radiographs which help staging the severity of osteonecrosis, and MRI which indicates the prognosis of the lesion, determines the therapeutic options: symptomatic pain relief therapies or surgical treatment (core decompression, osteotomy or total hip replacement).

  1. The transtibial versus the anteromedial portal technique in the arthroscopic bone-patellar tendon-bone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Lajara, Francisco; Samitier, Gonzalo; Cugat, Ramón

    2010-08-01

    The transtibial (TT) drilling of the femoral tunnel in the bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction was found to place the tunnel non-anatomically. The use of the anteromedial portal (AMP) for the femoral drilling would provide the surgeon with more freedom to anatomically place the tunnel in the real femoral ACL footprint. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of BPTB ACL reconstruction using the AMP or the TT technique for the femoral tunnel drilling. A Medline search was not able to identify any study directly comparing the clinical outcomes of the AMP and the TT techniques. The literature search identified experimental and quasi-experimental studies published from 1966 to March 2009 where at least one group underwent arthroscopic autologous BPTB ACL reconstructions using either the AMP or the TT technique for the femoral tunnel drilling. Overall IKDC, Lysholm score, activity level, range of motion, single-leg hoop test, Lachman test, Pivot shift sign test, KT-1000 arthrometer measurements, and radiographic assessments were indirectly compared between the two groups (AMP versus TT). Twenty-one studies, involving a total of 859 patients (257 in the AMP and 602 in the TT group), were included in this analysis. The AMP group demonstrated significantly earlier return to run and significantly greater range of motion, Lachman test values, and KT-1000 arthrometer measurements in the 1-2-year follow-up, although no differences were found for both the 3-5 and the 6-10-year follow-ups for any of these parameters. In contrast, the TT group demonstrated significantly higher activity level for the 3-5 and 6-10-year follow-up. The use of the AMP elicited greater knee stability and range of motion values, and earlier return to run compared to the TT technique. These results may indicate a potential benefit of the AMP over the TT technique. However, as the benefits of the AMP were not obtained in the mid and long

  2. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  3. [Slipped upper femoral epiphysis (SUFE)].

    PubMed

    Wirth, T

    2011-08-01

    A slipped upper femoral epiphysis (SUFE) is the most common disease of the hip among adolescents. In the light of our current knowledge on the development of coxarthrosis, it represents a first line model case that has led to a series of novel ideas in the therapy for SUFE. The development of coxarthrosis from a cam impingement, i.e., the loss of offset of the neck of the femur and degenerative damage to the acetabular lip as its early form, is seen again in the clinical picture of slipped upper femoral epiphysis. Depending on the degree of slippage, we see a varying severity of the loss of offset and thus also different extents of the potential damage to the hip joint. This knowledge is by no means new. The questions of reorientation of the epiphysis of the humeral head and thus restoration of the anatomy of the coxal end of the femur have been addressed by renowned surgeons and answered with the development of widely varying procedures for surgical correction. However, within the framework of the surgical techniques introduced for treatment of impingement syndromes of the hip, these therapeutic options have been supplemented and broadened. The current discussion about the best therapeutic strategies emphasizes the fascination of the clinical entity of upper femoral epiphysis and constitutes a central component of this article. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The Factors Affecting Pain Pattern after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Dong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the factors that affect pain pattern after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods From June 2009 to October 2010, 210 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operations. Of them, 84 patients were enrolled as subjects of the present study. The evaluation of postoperative pain was conducted by visual analog scale (VAS) scores during postoperative outpatient interviews at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The factors that were thought to affect postoperative pain were evaluated by dividing into three categories: preoperative, operative, and postoperative. Results Pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery showed a strictly decreasing pain pattern. In single analysis and multiple regression tests for factors influencing the strictly decreasing pain pattern, initial VAS and pain onset were shown to be statistically significant factors (p = 0.012, 0.012, 0.044 and 0.028, respectively). With regard to the factors influencing lower than average intensity pain pattern for each period, the stiffness of internal rotation at 3 months postoperatively was shown to be a statistically significant factor in single and multiple regression tests (p = 0.017 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions High initial VAS scores and the acute onset of pain affected the strictly decreasing postoperative pain pattern. Additionally, stiffness of internal rotation at postoperative 3 months affected the higher than average intensity pain pattern for each period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25436062

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Pantalone, Andrea; Vanni, Daniele; Guelfi, Matteo; Di Mauro, Michele; Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic shoulder instability is a common disease, especially in sportsmen. If inadequately or late treated, it may be responsible for an articular biomechanics alteration, with serious problems. This is much more obvious for professionals athletes, because corporate and market needs force them to a premature return to sport. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate if arthroscopic approach may be better than the open one and allowing a shoulder function rapid recovery, with fast return to sport. From January 2003 to January 2014, 46 professional athletes underwent surgical treatment for post traumatic shoulder instability. Two groups were made: 25 athletes treated arthroscopically and 21 treated with open approach. Patients were followed up from 36 to 92 months, according to Rowe Score for Instability and VAS scoring system. Patients in the open group returned later than the first one to sport. Moreover, pain in postoperative period and during rehabilitation, was lower in the arthroscopic group. There was only one recurrence in the open group. Arthroscopic surgical approach appears to be excellent in shoulder instability management, reducing recovery time, allowing a faster return to sport, with less pain, if compared with open surgery. III, a case control-study.

  6. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF OSTEOCHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE TALUS

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Mariana Korbage; de Cillo, Mario Sergio Paulillo; Bittar, Cinthia Kelly; Zabeu, José Luis Amin; Cezar, Caroliny Nociti Moreira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess pain and function of the ankle in patients with injuries up to 1.5 cm diameter by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score after arthroscopic treatment. Methods: The AOFAS scale was applied before and after arthroscopy, as well as the degree of subjective satisfaction of ambulatory patients. Patients with type I osteochondral injuries, acute trauma, using plaster, presenting lesions in other joints of the lower limbs and cognitive impairment that would prevent the application of the satisfaction questionnaire were excluded from the study. Statistical analysis was performed using unpaired t test with Welch correction, Mann Whitney test, and ANOVA, with Kruskal Wallis test and Dun test, considering p value lower than 0.05. Results: There was an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment in 52 (94.5%) patients. The mean values of AOFAS score in 55 patients was 77.32 ± 6.67 points preoperative and 93.10± 8.24 points postoperative, with a mean variation of 15.8 points, p<0.001. Patients with stage II, III and IV injuries showed an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment, p<0.001. No difference was found between medial and lateral injuries, p >0.05. Conclusion: Patients with stage II, III or IV osteochondral injuries of the talus of up to 1.5 cm diameter, whether medial or lateral, showed a significant improvement after arthroscopic treatment. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Study. PMID:26997911

  7. Arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability in professional athletes

    PubMed Central

    Pantalone, Andrea; Vanni, Daniele; Guelfi, Matteo; Di Mauro, Michele; Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Post-traumatic shoulder instability is a common disease, especially in sportsmen. If inadequately or late treated, it may be responsible for an articular biomechanics alteration, with serious problems. This is much more obvious for professionals athletes, because corporate and market needs force them to a premature return to sport. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate if arthroscopic approach may be better than the open one and allowing a shoulder function rapid recovery, with fast return to sport. Materials and methods From January 2003 to January 2014, 46 professional athletes underwent surgical treatment for post traumatic shoulder instability. Two groups were made: 25 athletes treated arthroscopically and 21 treated with open approach. Patients were followed up from 36 to 92 months, according to Rowe Score for Instability and VAS scoring system. Results Patients in the open group returned later than the first one to sport. Moreover, pain in postoperative period and during rehabilitation, was lower in the arthroscopic group. There was only one recurrence in the open group. Conclusions Arthroscopic surgical approach appears to be excellent in shoulder instability management, reducing recovery time, allowing a faster return to sport, with less pain, if compared with open surgery. Level of Evidence III, a case control-study. PMID:28217564

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, J E; Lau, A C; Hechtman, K S; Uribe, J W; Tjin-A-Tsoi, E W

    1999-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare disease, with multiple forms, anatomic sites, and treatment methods having been described. During a 10-year period, 14 patients, 7 male and 7 female, average age 35 years (range, 19 to 64 years) were treated for PVNS with arthroscopic partial or total synovectomy. Average follow-up was 42 months (range, 8 to 83 months). Twelve patients had diffuse and 2 had a localized form. Results were assessed subjectively, clinically, and radiographically, and were rated as excellent, good, fair, or poor. There were no complications and 10 patients (72%) were rated as excellent or good, 2 patients (14%) as fair, and 2 patients (14%) as poor. The recurrence rate was 14% and occurred in the group with diffuse PVNS. Radiographs did not show any bone erosion. The most widely accepted treatment for PVNS is synovectomy, and both open and arthroscopic synovectomy have been advocated as treatment. Advantages of arthroscopic treatment include accurate evaluation of the knee joint, treatment of other pathology, more rapid rehabilitation, decreased risk of joint stiffness, and less pain. In our experience, it appears that arthroscopic synovectomy is an effective method of treatment of this disorder.

  9. Assessing Arthroscopic Skills Using Wireless Elbow-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Georgina S J; Guyver, Paul; Strickland, Louise; Alvand, Abtin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Hargrove, Caroline; Lo, Benny P L; Rees, Jonathan L

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of surgical skill is a critical component of surgical training. Approaches to assessment remain predominantly subjective, although more objective measures such as Global Rating Scales are in use. This study aimed to validate the use of elbow-worn, wireless, miniaturized motion sensors to assess the technical skill of trainees performing arthroscopic procedures in a simulated environment. Thirty participants were divided into three groups on the basis of their surgical experience: novices (n = 15), intermediates (n = 10), and experts (n = 5). All participants performed three standardized tasks on an arthroscopic virtual reality simulator while wearing wireless wrist and elbow motion sensors. Video output was recorded and a validated Global Rating Scale was used to assess performance; dexterity metrics were recorded from the simulator. Finally, live motion data were recorded via Bluetooth from the wireless wrist and elbow motion sensors and custom algorithms produced an arthroscopic performance score. Construct validity was demonstrated for all tasks, with Global Rating Scale scores and virtual reality output metrics showing significant differences between novices, intermediates, and experts (p < 0.001). The correlation of the virtual reality path length to the number of hand movements calculated from the wireless sensors was very high (p < 0.001). A comparison of the arthroscopic performance score levels with virtual reality output metrics also showed highly significant differences (p < 0.01). Comparisons of the arthroscopic performance score levels with the Global Rating Scale scores showed strong and highly significant correlations (p < 0.001) for both sensor locations, but those of the elbow-worn sensors were stronger and more significant (p < 0.001) than those of the wrist-worn sensors. A new wireless assessment of surgical performance system for objective assessment of surgical skills has proven valid for assessing arthroscopic skills. The elbow

  10. Femoral Nerve Palsy with Patella Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyoung; Lee, Tong Joo; Woo, Min Su

    2013-01-01

    Femoral neuropathy may be associated with various etiologies and can cause severe walking disability. We present the case of a 25-year-old woman who underwent surgical repair for a patella fracture and complained of lower extremity pain, paresthesia, and weakness postoperatively. Electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed partial peripheral neuropathy of the left femoral nerve associated with the patella fracture. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of femoral neuropathy associated with a patella fracture. PMID:24369003

  11. Tissue sparing total femoral arthroplasty: technical note.

    PubMed

    Willimon, Samuel Clifton; Bolognesi, Michael P; Attarian, David E

    2011-01-01

    It is predicted that the number of revision hip and knee arthroplasties will double by the years 2026 and 2015, respectively. As the burden of end-stage prosthetic disease increases, there will be a greater potential need for total femoral arthroplasty. This report describes a patient with a femoral neck fracture nonunion with an ipsilateral multiply revised failed total knee arthroplasty treated by a tissue sparing total femoral arthroplasty. The technique is described, and potential benefits are reviewed.

  12. Fundamental arthroscopic skill differentiation with virtual reality simulation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kelsey; Pedowitz, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use and validity of virtual reality modules as part of the educational approach to mastering arthroscopy in a safe environment by assessing the ability to distinguish between experience levels. Additionally, the study aimed to evaluate whether experts have greater ambidexterity than do novices. Three virtual reality modules (Swemac/Augmented Reality Systems, Linkoping, Sweden) were created to test fundamental arthroscopic skills. Thirty participants-10 experts consisting of faculty, 10 intermediate participants consisting of orthopaedic residents, and 10 novices consisting of medical students-performed each exercise. Steady and Telescope was designed to train centering and image stability. Steady and Probe was designed to train basic triangulation. Track and Moving Target was designed to train coordinated motions of arthroscope and probe. Metrics reflecting speed, accuracy, and efficiency of motion were used to measure construct validity. Steady and Probe and Track a Moving Target both exhibited construct validity, with better performance by experts and intermediate participants than by novices (P < .05), whereas Steady and Telescope did not show validity. There was an overall trend toward better ambidexterity as a function of greater surgical experience, with experts consistently more proficient than novices throughout all 3 modules. This study represents a new way to assess basic arthroscopy skills using virtual reality modules developed through task deconstruction. Participants with the most arthroscopic experience performed better and were more consistent than novices on all 3 virtual reality modules. Greater arthroscopic experience correlates with more symmetry of ambidextrous performance. However, further adjustment of the modules may better simulate fundamental arthroscopic skills and discriminate between experience levels. Arthroscopy training is a critical element of orthopaedic surgery resident training

  13. Graft position and fusion rate following arthroscopic Latarjet.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Laurent; Gerometta, Antoine; Massein, Audrey; Khiami, Frederic; Rousseau, Romain; Hardy, Alexandre; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is recently becoming an increasingly popular technique. Nevertheless, position and fusion of the autograft had not been well studied yet. The purpose of this study was to assess the positioning of the coracoid graft and the fusion rate on CT scan in the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. The study design was a prospective series of 19 consecutive patients who received arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Radiological assessment on CT scan performed 3 months post-operatively included an analysis of the fusion and the position of the coracoid bone graft using a validated method. 02:30-04:20 was considered an ideal positioning in the sagittal view. In the axial view, the positioning was considered as flush, congruent, medial, too medial, or lateral. The median age of patients was 27.6 (±6.9). Mean operative time was of 161 min ±34.8. The fusion rate was of 78 %. Coracoid grafts were positioned 01:52 h (56° ± 14°) to 4:04 h (122° ± 12.5°). In the axial view, 32 % of the grafts positioning were considered as flush, 38 % as congruent, 30 % as medial, and 6 % too medial. No lateral position was noted. Two complications occurred, one graft fracture during screwing requiring opening conversion and an early case of osteolysis in a medial-positioned graft. The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is a technically challenging technique that provides satisfactory fusion rate and graft positioning with a low complication rate. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the position of the coracoid bone graft in arthroscopic Latarjet according to a detailed and validated method. IV.

  14. Systematic Review of Biceps Tenodesis: Arthroscopic Versus Open.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Vineet Thomas; Tan, Bryan H M; Kumar, V Prem

    2016-02-01

    We present a systematic review of the recent literature regarding the use of arthroscopic and open methods of tenodesis for lesions of the long head of the biceps brachii and present an analysis of the subjective and objective outcomes after these 2 procedures. PubMed was carefully reviewed for suitable articles relating to biceps tenodesis, both open and arthroscopic. We included studies reporting on the clinical outcomes of these 2 procedures that were of Level I to IV evidence and were published in the English language. The primary clinical outcomes for each study were determined, normalized, and reported as the percentage of good or excellent results versus poor results based on the outcome scores and criteria laid out by the authors in each of the studies. The exclusion criteria included studies in which biceps tenodesis was performed in patients with concomitant rotator cuff repairs, nonhuman studies, and biomechanical studies. A total of 16 studies met our inclusion criteria. Among all studies, a total of 205 arthroscopic tenodesis procedures and a total of 271 open tenodesis procedures were performed. Among the 271 open tenodesis patients, 98% had a good or excellent outcome, with a poor outcome in 5 patients (2%). Among the 205 patients who underwent arthroscopic tenodesis, 98% had a good or excellent outcome, with a poor outcome in 5 patients (2%). Both open and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis provided satisfactory outcomes in most patients, and there were no identifiable differences in this review. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF PIGMENTED VILLONODULAR SYNOVITIS OF ANKLE].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Li, Jian; Li, Qi

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the ankle. Twelve patients who were initially diagnosed as having PVNS of the ankle were treated between January 2005 and May 2012. There were 6 males and 6 females, aged 20-50 years (mean, 35.4 years). Disease duration ranged from 6 months to 12 years (median, 3.6 years). One case of recurrence was included. The preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score was 55.5 ± 7.6. According to degree and range of the PVNS lesions, 4 cases of local PVNS were treated with arthroscopic debridement, and 8 cases of diffuse PVNS were treated with arthroscopically assisted arthrotomy; and local radiotherapy was given in all patients after operation. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients. The mean follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 1-6 years). At 12 months after operation, no obvious pain, swelling, and limited range of motion of the ankle were observed. The AOFAS score was increased to 84.3 ± 3.4 at 12 months, and it was significantly higher than that at preoperation (P < 0.05) and at 3 months after operation (82.8 ± 3.8) (P < 0.05). There was no recurrence during follow-up. Arthroscopic arthrotomy combined with postoperative radiotherapy are recommended for PVNS of the ankle according to the PVNS lesion degree and range. And arthroscopically assisted surgery has many advantages of less traumas and hemorrhage, fast recovery, and less complications.

  16. Long Term Outcomes of Arthroscopic Shoulder Instability Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karataglis, D.; Agathangelidis, F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder instability has been successfully managed arthroscopically over the past two decades with refined “anatomic” reconstruction procedures involving the use of anchors for the repositioning and re-tensioning of the antero-inferior capsuloligamentous complex, in an effort to recreate its “bumper effect”. Methods: Research and online content related to arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability was reviewed and their results compared. Results: The short- and mid-term results of this technique have been very satisfactory. The greatest number of recent reports suggests that long-term results (>5 years follow-up) remain rather satisfactory, especially in the absence of significant glenoid bone loss (>20-25%). In these studies recurrent instability, in the form of either dislocation or subluxation, ranges from 5.1 to over 20%, clinical scores, more than 5 years after the index procedure, remain good or excellent in >80% of patient population as do patient satisfaction and return to previous level of activities. As regards arthroscopic non-anatomic bony procedures (Latarjet or Bristow procedures) performed in revision cases or in the presence of >20-25% bone loss of the anteroinferior aspect of the glenoid, recent reports suggest that their long-term results are very satisfactory both in terms of re-dislocation rates and patient satisfaction. Conclusion: It appears that even “lege artis” performance of arthroscopic reconstruction decelerates but does not obliterate the degenerative procedure of dislocation arthropathy. The presence and grade of arthritic changes correlate with the number of dislocations sustained prior to the arthroscopic intervention, the number of anchors used and the age at initial dislocation and surgery. However, the clinical significance of radiologically evident dislocation arthropathy is debatable. PMID:28400881

  17. First validation of the PASSPORT training environment for arthroscopic skills.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J M; van Sterkenburg, Maayke N; Sierevelt, Inger N; van Oldenrijk, Jakob; Van Dijk, C Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2010-02-01

    The demand for high quality care is in contrast to reduced training time for residents to develop arthroscopic skills. Thereto, simulators are introduced to train skills away from the operating room. In our clinic, a physical simulation environment to Practice Arthroscopic Surgical Skills for Perfect Operative Real-life Treatment (PASSPORT) is being developed. The PASSPORT concept consists of maintaining the normal arthroscopic equipment, replacing the human knee joint by a phantom, and integrating registration devices to provide performance feedback. The first prototype of the knee phantom allows inspection, treatment of menisci, irrigation, and limb stressing. PASSPORT was evaluated for face and construct validity. Construct validity was assessed by measuring the performance of two groups with different levels of arthroscopic experience (20 surgeons and 8 residents). Participants performed a navigation task five times on PASSPORT. Task times were recorded. Face validity was assessed by completion of a short questionnaire on the participants' impressions and comments for improvements. Construct validity was demonstrated as the surgeons (median task time 19.7 s [8.0-37.6]) were more efficient than the residents (55.2 s [27.9-96.6]) in task completion for each repetition (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.05). The prototype of the knee phantom sufficiently imitated limb outer appearance (79%), portal resistance (82%), and arthroscopic view (81%). Improvements are required for the stressing device and the material of cruciate ligaments. Our physical simulation environment (PASSPORT) demonstrates its potential to evolve as a training modality. In future, automated performance feedback is aimed for.

  18. Anesthetic and recovery profiles of lidocaine versus mepivacaine for spinal anesthesia in patients undergoing outpatient orthopedic arthroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Julius; Orr, Kevin; Kim, Ku-Mie; Pappas, Ana Lucia; Sukhani, Radha; Jellish, W Scott

    2012-03-01

    To compare isobaric lidocaine and mepivacaine in outpatient arthroscopic surgery. Prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Ambulatory surgery center affiliated with an academic tertiary-care hospital. 84 adult, ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 ambulatory patients, age 18-70 years, undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. Patients were randomized to receive a combination spinal-epidural anesthetic using 80 mg of either isobaric 2% mepivacaine or isobaric 2% lidocaine. Patients also received a femoral 3-in-1 block with 0.5% bupivacaine applied to the affected extremity. Demographic data and level and duration of the block were recorded. The use of supplemental epidural anesthesia was noted along with frequency of bradycardia, hypotension, and episodes of nausea and vomiting. Duration of block and times to ambulation and voiding were recorded. Delayed variables, including fatigue, difficulty urinating, back pain, and transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) were obtained. No demographic differences were noted between groups, and surgical duration was similar. Satisfactory anesthesia was achieved in all cases, with no differences noted in hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, or vomiting. Onset of sensory and motor block was similar. Duration of block before epidural supplementation was 94 ± 21 minutes with lidocaine versus 122 ± 23 minutes for mepivacaine (P < 0.011). Times to ambulation and voiding were longer in patients receiving mepivacaine but did not affect PACU stay. Twenty-four and 48-hour recovery was similar with no TNS symptoms reported. No major differences were noted between lidocaine and mepivacaine spinal anesthesia. Time to ambulation and voiding were longer in patients who received mepivacaine as was time to first dose of epidural catheter. Neither group had TNS symptoms. Lidocaine and mepivacaine are both appropriate spinal anesthetics for ambulatory orthopedic lower extremity procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty: revision surgery using a ceramic femoral component - a case report.

    PubMed

    Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2012-03-01

    We present a case involving the revision of a total knee arthroplasty with a metal femoral component using a ceramic implant due to metal hypersensitivity. A 58-year-old female patient underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with a standard metal bicondylar knee system. She suffered from persistent pain and strong limitations in her range of motion (ROM) associated with flexion during the early postoperative period. Arthroscopic arthrolysis of the knee joint and intensive active and passive physical treatment, in combination with a cortisone regime, temporarily increased the ROM and reduced pain. No signs of low grade infection or other causes of implant failure were evident. Histology of synovial tissue revealed lymphoplasmacellular fibrinous tissue, consistent with a type IV allergic reaction. Allergometry (skin reaction) revealed type IV hypersensitivity against nickel-II-sulfate and palladium chloride. Revision surgery of the metal components was performed with a cemented ceramic femoral component (same bicondylar design) and a cemented titanium alloy tibial component. Postoperative evaluations were performed 10days, and 3 and 12months after the revision surgery. There was an increased ROM in flexion to 90° at the 12month follow-up. No swelling or effusion was observed at all clinical examinations after the revision surgery. No pain at rest and moderate walking pain were evident. The presented case demonstrates that ceramic implants are a promising solution for patients suffering from hypersensitivity to metal ions in total knee arthroplasty.

  20. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of

  1. Arthroscopic classification of posterior labrum glenoid insertion.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, G; Radier, C; Aim, F; Lacoste, S

    2014-04-01

    We performed a prospective arthroscopic study to explore the variability of the posterior labrum glenoid insertion. We aimed to classify the insertions and to explore whether these insertions can be identified by pre-operative arthro-CT scan. From January to December 2011, 86 patients were prospectively included in the current study. During arthroscopy, anterior labrum was evaluated and posterior labrum was assessed in 3 different locations: superior, medial, and inferior. For each segment, the labrum was considered normally inserted (directly to the glenoid cartilage), medialized (inserted at the posterior part of the glenoid bone, without direct contact with the cartilage), torn (macroscopic degenerative changes, tears, fragments) or absent (agenesis). Imaging was analyzed segment by segment by an experienced osteoarticular radiologist, using the same classification. Four types of posterior labrum insertions were identified. Type 1, 60% of the cases, corresponded to a posterior labrum totally inserted in the glenoid, with direct contact with the cartilage. Type 2, 20% of the cases, represented medialized insertion of the superior segment. Type 3, 15% of the cases, represented an associated medialization of the superior and medial segment of the posterior labrum. Type 4 is a medialized insertion of the all-posterior labrum. Fifty-six shoulders were used for arthro-CT and arthroscopy correlation: for the superior segment (n=22/56), the sensitivity of arthro-CT to identify an abnormal insertion when the labrum is medialized was 68.18%, specificity 70.59%, positive predictive value (PPV) 60%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 77.42%. For the medial segment (n=16/56), the sensitivity of arthro-CT to identify an abnormal insertion when the labrum is medialized was 81.25%, specificity 57.50%, PPV 43.33% and NPV 88.46%. For the inferior segment (n=5/56), the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 47.60%, PPV 15.63% and NPV 100%. The current study points out the high

  2. Arthroscopic proximal versus open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young; Lee, Jong-Myoung; Kwon, Seok Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The study was aimed to compare arthroscopic proximal biceps tenodesis and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis in repair of small or medium rotator cuff tears. Eighty-five patients underwent biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, and 66 patients were followed for median of 26.8 (18-42) months with ultrasonography were reviewed. The arthroscopic biceps tenodesis group included 34 cases, and the open subpectoral biceps group included 32 cases. Patients were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and constant scores. Rotator cuff repair and fixation of the biceps tendon were assessed by ultrasonography. Fixation failure and degree of deformity were evaluated by the pain in the bicipital groove and biceps apex distance (BAD). VAS score and tenderness at the bicipital groove decreased significantly in the open subpectoral group at 3 months postoperative. In both groups, the range of motion, ASES score, and constant score increased significantly (P < 0.05). Rotator cuff retear occurred in three cases (8.8 %) in the arthroscopic group and two cases in the open subpectoral group (6.2 %). There was no significant difference in BAD between the two groups. There was no difference between open subpectoral tenodesis and arthroscopic proximal tenodesis at the time of the final follow-up; however, open subpectoral tenodesis showed encouraging results at 3-month follow-up. This early result of subpectoral tenodesis was related to removing most part of biceps tendinitis and using intra-bicipital groove tenodesis technique. III.

  3. Long-term results of abrasion arthroplasty for full-thickness cartilage lesions of the medial femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Valerio; de Girolamo, Laura; Pascale, Walter; Melato, Marco; Pascale, Valerio

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the long-term functional results of arthroscopic abrasion arthroplasty for the treatment of full-thickness cartilage lesions of the medial femoral condyle. Between 1990 and 1996, 75 consecutive patients with isolated chondral lesions of the medial femoral condyle were treated with arthroscopic chondral abrasion. A retrospective analysis of the clinical results of this cohort was performed. The patients were evaluated according to the Knee Society Score questionnaire preoperatively, at 10 years postoperatively, and at final long-term follow-up at a mean of 20 years. At final follow-up, they were also assessed according to the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. Patients were divided according to the lesion size and by age, and the Kaplan-Meier survivorship function (with second operation taken as an endpoint) for the various groups was calculated. At a mean of final follow-up of 20 years (range, 16.94 to 23.94 years), a positive functional outcome (Knee Society Score ≥70 points or no reoperation) was recorded in 67.9% of the patients. Twenty-year survivorship in this cohort was 71.4% (95% confidence interval, 0.5690 to 0.8590). The survivorship was 89.5% for patients younger than 50 years and 55.7% for patients aged 50 years or older. The functional results for patients with lesions smaller than 4 cm(2) were significantly better than those for patients with lesions of 4 cm(2) or greater (P = .031). There were no statistical differences between patients with and without associated lesions at the time of surgery. Our hypothesis that there would be survivorship greater than 86% was disproved. However, arthroscopic abrasion arthroplasty can be a valid treatment for medial femoral condylar full-thickness defects of the knee, even in the long-term, particularly for younger patients and those with smaller lesions. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier

  4. [Effect of continuous femoral nerve catheter length on blockade of femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and obturator nerve].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Wei

    2013-02-18

    To assess the effects of length of continuous femoral catheter on blockade of femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and obturator nerve. In the study, 70 patients with American Association of Anesthesiologist grades I-II undergoing total knee arthroplasty were randomly divided into three groups, femoral nerve catheters were inserted 5 cm, 10 cm or 20 cm with assistance of a nerve stimulator, patient-controlled analgesia pumps were connected after load of 30 mL 0.3% ropivacaine via the catheters. Sensory blockade of the femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and obturator nerve were recorded at 24 h postoperatively. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores during rest and motion were recorded at 24 h and 48 h postoperatively. The blockade effect of lateral femoral nerve in the 20 cm group was the best. There was no significant difference in sensory blockade between the 5 cm group and the 10 cm group. There was no significant difference in VAS score among the three groups. When continuous femoral nerve block is used for postoperative analgesia after total knee arthroplasty surgery, the catheters that are inserted 5 cm, 10 cm or 20 cm could provide similar and satisfying analgesia effect.

  5. Fuctional outcome after open and arthroscopic bankart repair for traumatic shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Lützner, Jörg; Krummenauer, F; Lübke, J; Kirschner, S; Günther, K-P; Bottesi, M

    2009-01-28

    Both open and arthroscopic Bankart repair are established procedures in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. While the open procedure is still considered as the "golden standard" functional outcome is supposed to be better in the arthroscopic procedure. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional outcome between open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. In 199 patients a Bankart procedure with suture anchors was performed, either arthroscopically in presence of an detached, but not elongated capsulolabral complex (40) or open (159). After a median time of 31 months (12 to 67 months) 174 patients were contacted and agreed to follow-up, 135 after open and 39 after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Re-dislocations occurred in 8% after open and 15% after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After open surgery 4 of the 11 re-dislocations occurred after a new adequate trauma and 1 of the 6 re-dislocations after arthroscopic surgery. Re-dislocations after arthroscopic procedure occurred earlier than after open Bankart repair. An external rotation lag of 20 degrees or more was observed more often (16%) after open than after arthroscopic surgery (3%). The Rowe score demonstrated "good" or "excellent" functional results in 87% after open and in 80% patients after arthroscopic treatment. In this retrospective investigation the open Bankart procedure demonstrated good functional results. The arthroscopic treatment without capsular shift resulted in a better range of motion, but showed a tendency towards more frequently and earlier recurrence of instability. Sensitive patient selection for arthroscopic Bankart repair is recommended especially in patients with more than five dislocations.

  6. Outcomes after trifocal femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michelle; Dick, Alastair G; Umarji, Shamim

    2014-01-01

    Trifocal femur fractures are those of the femoral neck, diaphysis, and distal femur. These high-energy injuries predominantly occur in young people with the potential for long-term complications and disability. We present the cases of two men who were treated with proximal dynamic hip screws and distal periarticular locking plates to effectively manage trifocal femur fractures. Our cases have shown union at 2 years with good functional outcomes without the need for reintervention. We provide evidence for a successful surgical treatment option for these rare and complex injuries.

  7. Outcomes after Trifocal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle; Dick, Alastair G.; Umarji, Shamim

    2014-01-01

    Trifocal femur fractures are those of the femoral neck, diaphysis, and distal femur. These high-energy injuries predominantly occur in young people with the potential for long-term complications and disability. We present the cases of two men who were treated with proximal dynamic hip screws and distal periarticular locking plates to effectively manage trifocal femur fractures. Our cases have shown union at 2 years with good functional outcomes without the need for reintervention. We provide evidence for a successful surgical treatment option for these rare and complex injuries. PMID:24800097

  8. Comparative analysis of visual field and image distortion in 30° and 70° arthroscopes.

    PubMed

    Kekatpure, Aashay L; Adikrishna, Arnold; Sun, Ji-Ho; Sim, Gyeong-Bo; Chun, Jae-Myung; Jeon, In-Ho

    2016-07-01

    There have been very few attempts to compare the visual fields and image distortion in arthroscopes. To better understand the images generated using existing arthroscopes, we performed image-mapping experiments to assess field of view and image distortion. The purpose of this study was to quantify and compare the visual fields obtained using 30° and 70° arthroscopes and assess image distortion in each arthroscope. A complete arthroscopy system was used in this study. To perform this quantitative analysis, we created a customized measurement device that consisted of three parts: (1) distance marker, (2) chessboard pattern, and (3) angle marker. Three observers collectively assessed the appropriate position of the arthroscope during simulation. For each scope, ten simulations were performed at distances between 1 and 3 cm. Using the obtained arthroscope images, field of view and image distortion were measured and calculated. The field of view of the 70° arthroscope was 5, 10, and 15 mm wider in diameter in comparison with the 30° arthroscope at 1, 2, and 3 cm, respectively. Moreover, the 70° arthroscope had less 0.66, 0.13, and 0.26 pixels of root-mean-square distance than the 30° arthroscope at 1, 2, and 3 cm, respectively. The 70° arthroscope also contained 0.78 pixels less at the maximal error than the average 30° arthroscope. Therefore, the 70° arthroscope demonstrated less distortion than the 30° arthroscope. There was no significant difference between the two scopes with respect to median curvature measurement at 1-cm distance. The 70° arthroscope demonstrates technical advantages over the 30° arthroscope, including a wider field of view and a less image distortion at the periphery. A wide angle and less image distortion can help better orient the surgeon within the joint cavity when a panoramic picture is needed to repair rotator cuff tears, in case of hip arthroscopy, or while treating the lesions of posterior horn of medial meniscus.

  9. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  10. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  11. Relaxation response in femoral angiography.

    PubMed

    Mandle, C L; Domar, A D; Harrington, D P; Leserman, J; Bozadjian, E M; Friedman, R; Benson, H

    1990-03-01

    Immediately before they underwent femoral angiography, 45 patients were given one of three types of audiotapes: a relaxation response tape recorded for this study, a tape of contemporary instrumental music, or a blank tape. All patients were instructed to listen to their audiotape during the entire angiographic procedure. Each audiotape was played through earphones. Radiologists were not told the group assignment or tape contents. The patients given the audiotape with instructions to elicit the relaxation response (n = 15) experienced significantly less anxiety (P less than .05) and pain (P less than .001) during the procedure, were observed by radiology nurses to exhibit significantly less pain (P less than .001) and anxiety (P less than .001), and requested significantly less fentanyl citrate (P less than .01) and diazepam (P less than .01) than patients given either the music (n = 14) or the blank (n = 16) control audiotapes. Elicitation of the relaxation response is a simple, inexpensive, efficacious, and practical method to reduce pain, anxiety, and medication during femoral angiography and may be useful in other invasive procedures.

  12. Comparison of Outcomes of Two Femoral Fixation Devices in Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Carrasco, Miguel Angel; Abellán, Juan Francisco; Qudsi-Sinclair, Salima; Ruiz-Merino, Guadalupe; Carrillo-Juliá, Francisco Javier; Bo-Rueda, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common ligamentous injury of the knee. Reconstruction of this ligament is often required to restore functional stability of the knee. Outcome of ACL reconstruction is significantly affected by how the graft is fixed to the bone. This study is to determine if there is a different clinical outcome after cortical versus cortical-cancellous suspension femoral fixation in hamstring based anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective comparative study conducted between 2006 and 2010. We enrolled patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Sixty two patients met inclusion criteria and 41 agreed to come for followup assessment. Median age was of 28 years (range 18–39 years). Demographic baseline profile of both groups was similar. The femoral fixation devices were cortical (n = 16) and cortical-cancellous suspension techniques (n = 25). The average period of evolution at the time of assessment was 40 months (range 12-72 months). The patients were examined according to Lachman test (using Rolimeter knee tester), anterior drawer test, pivot shift test, International Knee Documentation Committee questionnaire, and Tegner-Lysholm knee scoring scale. Results: The objective evaluation of the patients (Lachman test) showed better results in terms of stability in the group of patients who underwent the cortical-cancellous suspension method. These differences were not reflected in the assessment of activity level (Tegner-Lysholm), where both groups showed the same results. Conclusions: ACL reconstruction with both cortical and cortical-cancellous suspension femoral fixation techniques show the same clinical results at medium long followup. However, cortical-cancellous fixations seem to provide greater stability to the reconstruction. PMID:28966371

  13. Graft position in arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: anteromedial versus transtibial technique.

    PubMed

    Guler, Olcay; Mahırogulları, Mahir; Mutlu, Serhat; Cercı, Mehmet H; Seker, Ali; Cakmak, Selami

    2016-11-01

    When treating anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, the position of the ACL graft plays a key role in regaining postoperative knee function and physiologic kinematics. In this study, we aimed to compare graft angle, graft position in tibial tunnel, and tibial and femoral tunnel positions in patients operated with anteromedial (AM) and transtibial (TT) methods to those of contralateral healthy knees. Forty-eight patients who underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral hamstring tendon autograft were included. Of these, 23 and 25 were treated by AM and TT techniques, respectively. MRI was performed at 18.4 and 19.7 months postoperatively in AM and TT groups. Graft angles, graft positions in the tibial tunnel and alignment of tibial and femoral tunnels were noted and compared in these two groups. The sagittal graft insertion tibia midpoint distance (SGON) has been used for evaluation of graft position in tunnel. Sagittal ACL graft angles in operated and healthy knees of AM patients were 57.78° and 46.80° (p < 0.01). With respect to TT patients, ACL graft angle was 58.87° and 70.04° on sagittal and frontal planes in operated knees versus 47.38° and 61.82° in healthy knees (p < 0.001). ACL graft angle was significantly different between the groups on both sagittal and frontal planes (p < 0.001). Sagittal graft insertion tibia midpoint distance ratio was 0.51 and 0.48 % in the operated and healthy knees of AM group (p < 0.001) and 0.51 and 0.48 % in TT group (p < 0.001). Sagittal tibial tunnel midpoint distance ratio did not differ from sagittal graft insertion tibia midpoint distance of healthy knees in either group. Femoral tunnel clock position was better in AM [right knee 10:19 o'clock-face position (310° ± 4°); left knee 1:40 (50° ± 3°)] compared with TT group [right knee 10:48 (324° ± 5°); left knee 1:04 (32° ± 4°)]. With respect to the sagittal plane, the anterior-posterior position of femoral tunnel was

  14. Three cases of septic arthritis following a recent arthroscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Rowton, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We report three cases of septic arthritis in patients who presented with a painful, swollen and supurative knee joint following a recent arthroscopic procedure, 8–15 days prior to attendance. In all three cases, patients presented with pain and swelling of the affected knee joint with discharge from the port sites. All were sent for washout of the affected joint and received intravenous antibiotic cover. Any patient presenting within 1 month of a recent arthroscopic procedure with pain and swelling of that joint should be presumed to have septic arthritis until proven otherwise. They must have urgent treatment in the form of joint washout and intravenous antibiotics, and receive 6 weeks oral antibiotics on discharge. PMID:23345477

  15. Evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, José Carlos; Maia, Lucas Russo; Fonseca, Juliano Rocha; Zabeu, José Luís Amim; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide data for the analysis of arthroscopy as a method of surgical treatment for shoulder and discuss its actual indications and preliminary results. METHODS: We evaluated 15 patients submitted to reverse Bankart arthroscopic surgery. We used the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score to measure the results before surgery and 12 months thereafter. RESULTS: The average UCLA score changed from 26.67±0.25 (SD 0.97) before surgery to 34.20±0.53 (SD 2.04) after surgery. The effectiveness of surgery was 93%. In five cases loose bodies were found. A patient undergoing remplissage was evaluated separately. The data did not change after 24 months post-surgery. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability and posterior dislocation of the shoulder has been proved feasible and results in our series followed the same trends as in the literature. Level of Evidence III, Transversal Retrospective Study. PMID:26207089

  16. Arthroscopic Management of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Dwidmuthe, Samir; Barick, Devashis; Rathi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS) of knee joint is a rare disorder of Synovium. Hip and knee joint are commonly affected joints. The knee PVNS presents as a localized or diffuse form. Diagnosis if often delayed and permanent joint damage occurs with advanced disease. Ultrasound examination shows fluid collection and synovial hypertrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging helps in clinching the diagnosis. Final confirmation of PVNS is done with histopathological examination of synovial tissue removed. Post operative radiation has shown to reduce the rate of recurrent disease. 25 years male presented to us with painless swelling of left knee joint of 3 months duration. Radiographs were normal. MRI showed synovial hypertrophy with changes suggestive of PVNS. We did arthroscopic six portal synovectomy. The patient regained his function and was asymptomatic at 2 year follow up. We want to emphasize that early diagnosis and well done arthroscopic Synovectomy gives good clinical outcome with low recurrence rate. Radiotherapy should be reserved for recurrent disease.

  17. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  18. Arthroscopy for shoulder instability and a technique for arthroscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Wiley, A M

    1988-01-01

    At this time the principal role of the arthroscope in the management of dislocating shoulder seems to be the identification of the intra-articular pathology. The findings should enable a surgeon to carry out an appropriate open repair, and the results of such surgery are excellent. Is there a place for arthroscopic repair? Some patients sometimes request it; others have had a failed open repair, or wish to avoid a scar. The author has devised a removable "Rivet," which fixes a loose labrum and the inferior glenohumeral ligament back on to a roughened glenoid margin. Use of this technique avoids some of the hazards that occur with implanting a staple or similar device in the joint. The "Rivet" is removed after 4-6 weeks. Ten patients have been so treated, with a follow-up of 6 months to 2 years. There was one failure, with a return of dislocation.

  19. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  20. A virtual-reality training system for knee arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Heng, Pheng-Ann; Cheng, Chun-Yiu; Wong, Tien-Tsin; Xu, Yangsheng; Chui, Yim-Pan; Chan, Kai-Ming; Tso, Shiu-Kit

    2004-06-01

    Surgical training systems based on virtual-reality (VR) simulation techniques offer a cost-effective and efficient alternative to traditional training methods. This paper describes a VR system for training arthroscopic knee surgery. Virtual models used in this system are constructed from the Visual Human Project dataset. Our system simulates soft tissue deformation with topological change in real-time using finite-element analysis. To offer realistic tactile feedback, we build a tailor-made force feedback hardware.

  1. Virtual reality based system for training on knee arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Heng, Pheng-Ann; Cheng, Chun-Yiu; Wong, Tien-Tsin; Yangsheng, Xu; Chui, Yim-Pan; Chan, Kai-Ming; Tso, Shiu Kit

    2004-01-01

    Surgical training systems based on virtual reality (VR) and simulation techniques offer a cost-effective and efficient alternative to traditional training methods. This paper describes a virtual reality system for training arthroscopic knee surgery. The virtual model used in this system is constructed from the Visual Human Project dataset. The system simulates the real-time deformation of soft tissue with topological change using finite element analysis. To offer the realistic tactile feedback, we construct a specialized force feedback hardware.

  2. Arthroscopic Revision Surgery for Failure of Open Latarjet Technique.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Adrián; Cuéllar, Ricardo; de Heredia, Pablo Beltrán

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy in treating pain, limited range of motion, and continued instability of the Latarjet open technique via the use of arthroscopy. A retrospective review of patients who underwent arthroscopic capsule plication after failure of an open Latarjet technique was performed. Revision surgery was indicated in cases of recurrent instability and associated pain. Only patients with a glenoid defect <25% were considered. The Constant and Rowe scores were administered, whereas pain was assessed with a visual analog scale before the reoperation and at 24 months after operation. Radiographs, computed tomography, and CT arthrography scans were performed. Twelve patients met the inclusion criteria. All patients had capsular distension and consequently were subjected to a capsuloplasty. Shoulder function, stability, and pain had all improved significantly at 24 months after arthroscopic revision (P < .0001). In particular, the Constant score increased from 44.9 (standard deviation [SD] 7.10) to 89.3 (SD 12.6) points, the Rowe score improved from 49.5 (SD 10.1) to 80.9 (SD 10.9), whereas the visual analog scale pain score decreased from 6.75 (SD 1.17) to 1.38 (SD 1.06). Primary open Latarjet with a glenoid bone defect <25% that failed due to capsular redundancy is amenable to successful treatment with arthroscopic capsuloplasty. Arthroscopic approaches can offer a good solution for treating previously failed open Latarjet procedures. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical Outcomes after Arthroscopic Release for Recalcitrant Frozen Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Moradi, Ali; Pour, Mostafa Khalili; Moghadam, Mohammad Hallaj; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To explain the role of arthroscopic release in intractable frozen shoulders. We used different questionnaires and measuring tools to understand whether arthroscopic release is the superior modality to treat patients with intractable frozen shoulders. Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, in a prospective study, we enrolled 80 patients (52 females and 28 males) with recalcitrant frozen shoulder, who underwent arthroscopic release at Ghaem Hospital, a tertiary referral center, in Mashhad, Iran. Before operation, all patients filled out the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Constant, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), ROWE and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain questionnaires. We measured the difference in range of motion between both the normal and the frozen shoulders in each patient. Results: The average age of the patients was 50.8±7.1 years. In 49 patients, the right shoulder was affected and in the remaining 31 the left side was affected. Before surgery, the patients were suffering from this disease on average for 11.7±10.3 months. The average time to follow-up was 47.2±6.8 months (14 to 60 months). Diabetes mellitus (38%) and history of shoulder trauma (23%) were the most common comorbidities in our patients. We did not find any significant differences between baseline characteristics of diabetics patients with non-diabetics ones. After surgery, the average time to achieve maximum pain improvement and range of motion were 3.6±2.1 and 3.6±2 months, respectively. The VAS score, constant shoulder score, Rowe score, UCLA shoulder score, and DASH score showed significant improvement in shoulder function after surgery, and shoulder range of motion improved in all directions compared to pre-operation range of motion. Conclusions: According to our results, arthroscopic release of recalcitrant frozen shoulder is a valuable modality in treating this disease. This method could decrease pain and improve both subjective and objective mid

  4. [The isolated subscapularis tendon tear: arthroscopic and open repair].

    PubMed

    Minzlaff, P; Bartl, C; Imhoff, A B

    2012-11-01

    Arthroscopic or open reconstruction of isolated subscapularis tendon tears with the use of suture anchors to restore the glenohumeral function and joint biomechanics. Traumatic full-thickness tears, chronic tears with a functional deficit or decentration of the humerus head, anterosuperior rotator cuff insufficiency, symptomatic reruptures after prior arthroscopic or open surgical procedures. Frozen shoulder, atrophy > grade II (Thomazeau) or fatty infiltration > grade III (Goutallier/Fox) of the muscle, high-grade omarthrosis. Diagnostic arthroscopy and careful tendon release. If the inferior edge of the rupture is reliable visible and the tendon-mobilisation works proper, the repair is performed arthroscopically. The footprint is decorticated lightly and 1-4 suture anchors (depending on the lesion-size) are placed from inferior to superior. Knots are tied starting from caudal in a modified Mason-Allen technique (alternative: single or double mattress stitches) with a slipknot and three half hitches in opposite directions. In case of larger tears, a double-row technique for better reconstruction of the trapezoidal footprint is performed. For open reconstruction, a deltopectoral approach is used to reattache the tendon in an analogous fashion. Arthroscopic or open repair of isolated subscapularis tendon tears (Fox type II-IV) was performed in 35 patients. The Constant score increased significantly after 36 m, with no difference between these two groups. The majority of subscapularis tests were postoperatively negative, 6% in both groups showed a rerupture. A symptomatic period of > 6 m prior to the operation and a high grade atrophy and fatty infiltration of the muscle was correlated with poorer results.

  5. Arthroscopic Bony Bankart Fixation Using a Modified Sugaya Technique

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Bach, Bernard R.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart lesions in the setting of anterior shoulder instability has had successful long-term results. Key factors such as patient positioning, portal placement, visualization, mobilization of bony/soft tissues, and anatomic reduction and fixation are crucial to yield such results. We present a modified Sugaya technique that is reproducible and based on such key principles. This technique facilitates ease of anchor and suture placement to allow for anatomic reduction and fixation. PMID:24265994

  6. Arthroscopic foveal repair of the triangular fibrocartilage complex.

    PubMed

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-02-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei-European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications.

  7. Arthroscopic Foveal Repair of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications. PMID:25709875

  8. Arthroscopic Triple Arthrodesis in Management of Chronic Flatfoot Deformity.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2017-06-01

    Triple arthrodesis has a significant role in the management of hindfoot osteoarthritis and deformity. Traditionally, it is an open procedure with extensive soft tissue dissection. Arthroscopic triple arthrodesis would appear to provide good visualization and preparation of the fusion surfaces while preserving the soft tissue envelope. The purpose of this Technical Note is to describe a minimally invasive approach of triple arthrodesis to correct chronic flatfoot deformity.

  9. Arthroscopic stabilization procedures for recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Yahiro, M A; Matthews, L S

    1989-11-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is a common and functionally disabling problem in young athletes. The goal in treatment of this condition is a stable, yet mobile, joint. Current methods now being utilized in the arthroscopic stabilization of the anterior shoulder include staple capsulorrhaphy, removable rivet capsulorrhaphy, cannulated screw fixation, and the transglenoid suture technique. These techniques and the clinical experience with each are reviewed, with an emphasis on providing stability, improving function, and allowing earlier rehabilitation in the unstable shoulder of the athlete.

  10. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Frank, Rachel M.; Pulido, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain, and when indicated, can be successfully managed through open surgery or hip arthroscopy. The goal of this review is to describe the different approaches to the surgical treatment of FAI. We present the indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and complications associated with (1) open hip dislocation, (2) reverse periacetabular osteotomy, (3) the direct anterior “mini-open” approach, and (4) arthroscopic surgery for FAI. PMID:26697431

  11. The Urgent Need for Evidence in Arthroscopic Meniscal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Monk, Paul; Garfjeld Roberts, Patrick; Palmer, Antony J R; Bayliss, Lee; Mafi, Reza; Beard, David; Hopewell, Sally; Price, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the knee is one of the most frequently performed orthopaedic procedures. One-third of these procedures are performed for meniscal injuries. It is essential that this commonly performed surgery be supported by robust evidence. To compare the effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery for meniscal injuries in all populations. Systematic review. An online search was conducted for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews (SRs) that compared treatment options for meniscal injury. The following databases (inception to April 2015) were included in the search: CENTRAL; MEDLINE; EMBASE; NHS Evidence; National Guideline Clearing House, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Health Technology Assessment; ISRCTN; Clinicaltrials.gov ; WHO trials platform. Only studies whose participants were selected on the basis of meniscal injury were included; no restrictions were placed on patient demographics. Two independent reviewers applied AMSTAR (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews) criteria for SRs and the Cochrane Collaboration risk-of-bias tool for RCTs. Nine RCTs and 8 SRs were included in the review. No difference was found between arthroscopic meniscal debridement compared with nonoperative management as a first-line treatment strategy for patients with knee pain and a degenerative meniscal tear (mean difference: Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, 1.6 [95% CI, -2.2 to 5.2], pain visual analog scale, -0.06 [95% CI, -0.28 to 0.15]). Some evidence was found to indicate that patients with resistant mechanical symptoms who initially fail nonoperative management may benefit from meniscal debridement No studies compared meniscal repair with meniscectomy or nonoperative management. Initial evidence suggested that meniscal transplant might be favorable in certain patient groups. Further evidence is required to determine which patient groups have good outcomes from each intervention. Given the current widespread use of

  12. Arthroscopic Lysis of Arthrofibrosis of the Fifth Tarsometatarsal Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Loss of motion of the fifth tarsometatarsal joint can be a cause of lateral foot pain after Lisfranc fracture-dislocation or fracture of the fifth metatarsal tubercle. Arthroscopic lysis of the joint can be an effective surgical treatment with the advantage of minimal soft-tissue trauma and early vigorous mobilization of the joint. The lysis can be extended to the fourth tarsometatarsal joint and the adjacent tendons if indicated.

  13. Arthroscopic Synovectomy for Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a condition typically found in ballet dancers and sometimes in soccer players and is related to chronic overuse. It mostly involves the portion of the tendon behind the ankle joint. However, the portion of the tendon under the sustentaculum tali can also be involved. Open synovectomy requires extensive dissection. We report the technique of arthroscopic synovectomy of the deep portion of the flexor hallucis longus.

  14. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases

  15. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF POST-TRAUMATIC ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Jose Carlos Garcia; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim; Junior, Ivaldo Angelo Cintra; Mattos, Carlos Augusto; Myrrha, Jesely Pereira

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate patients undergoing arthroscopic release of a stiff elbow, with discussion of the technique, possible difficulties and risks. Methods: Twenty-four elbow arthroscopy procedures were performed. All the patients were evaluated using goniometry before the operation and six months afterwards and were rated using the Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS). Results: Fifteen men and nine women underwent surgery (14 right elbows and ten left elbows). Their mean age was 34.58 years and length of follow-up, 38.41 months. Their mean gain of range of motion was 43.3° and of MEPS, 85.4. Conclusion: Arthroscopic release might enable better intra-articular viewing and enhance the options for changing strategy during surgery, reducing surgical trauma and enabling early rehabilitation. This technique can reach similar or better results than open surgery. The disadvantages of arthroscopy are the long learning curve and higher cost of the procedure. Neurovascular complications are reported with both techniques. To avoid such problems, the protocol for portal construction must be rigorously followed. Arthroscopic release was shown to be a safe and effective option for achieving range-of-motion gains in cases of post-traumatic stiff elbow. PMID:27042641

  16. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CALCIFYING TENDINITIS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Trevizani, Cassio Silva; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Neto, Francisco José dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of the rotator cuff in patients with calcifying tendinitis. Method: A retrospective study was conducted on twenty patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder between March 1999 and November 2005. Six patients were excluded due to loss of follow-up. The average follow-up period was 41.4 months. Eight patients (57%) were female and six (43%) were male. The right side was affected in 10 cases (71%) and the left in four cases (29%). Nine cases (64%) had calcification in the supraspinatus tendon, two (14%) in the infraspinatus tendon, and three (21%) in both tendons. Results: In all cases, resection of the calcium deposits was performed by means of a needle (Jelco® No. 14) in combination with curettage (mini-curette). Two shoulders (14%) underwent subacromial decompression, and one (7%) underwent excision of the distal clavicle. A tendon-tendon suture was performed in three shoulders (21%). None of the patients underwent tendon-bone reinsertion. The mean score obtained on the UCLA scale was 33 points (26-35), thus indicating that a majority of patients had good results. In the final radiographic evaluation, none of the patients showed signs of calcification. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder safely allows excision of the calcification, leading to good results in relation to shoulder pain and function. PMID:27022591

  17. [Arthroscopical subtalar arthrodesis for malunion of calcaneal fractures].

    PubMed

    Mi, Kun; Liu, Pengfei; Liu, Wu; Feng, Zhibin

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical results of arthroscopical subtalar arthrodesis for malunion of calcaneal fractures. Between July 2006 and December 2008, 12 cases of malunion of calcaneal fractures were treated with arthroscopical subtalar arthrodesis, including 10 males and 2 females with an age range of 38-54 years (44.8 years on average). The location was left side in 5 cases and right side in 7 cases. The injury was caused by falling from height in 8 cases, by traffic accident in 3 cases, and other in 1 case. It was 3-7 months from injury to operation. All cases were classified as Stephens type II. The total score was 35.68 +/- 10.35 and the pain score was 8.14 +/- 1.83 before operation according to Hindfoot scores system of American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS). All incisions achieved primary healing and the patients were all followed up 14-32 months (18 months on average). The X-ray films showed bony fusion after 10-14 weeks (11.5 weeks on average). The total score was 76.45 +/- 9.83 and the pain score was 1.52 +/- 1.48 after operation according to Hindfoot scores system of AOFAS, showing significant difference when compared with those before operation (P < 0.01). Arthroscopical subtalar arthrodesis can get satisfactory fusion rate with few complications for malunion of calcaneal fractures.

  18. Use of an Irrigation Pump System in Arthroscopic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Mark S; Kusnezov, Nicholas; Sieg, Ryan N; Owens, Brett D; Herzog, Joshua P

    2016-05-01

    Since its inception, arthroscopic surgery has become widely adopted among orthopedic surgeons. It is therefore important to have an understanding of the basic principles of arthroscopy. Compared with open techniques, arthroscopic procedures are associated with smaller incisions, less structural damage, improved intra-articular visualization, less pain in the immediate postoperative period, and faster recovery for patients. Pump systems used for arthroscopic surgery have evolved over the years to provide improved intraoperative visualization. Gravity flow systems were described first and are still commonly used today. More recently, automated pump systems with pressure or dual pressure and volume control have been developed. The advantages of automated irrigation systems over gravity irrigation include a more consistent flow, a greater degree of joint distention, improved visualization especially with motorized instrumentation, decreased need for tourniquet use, a tamponade effect on bleeding, and decreased operative time. Disadvantages include the need for additional equipment with increased cost and maintenance, the initial learning curve for the surgical team, and increased risk of extra-articular fluid dissection and associated complications such as compartment syndrome. As image quality and pump systems improve, so does the list of indications including diagnostic and treatment modalities to address intra-articular pathology of the knee, shoulder, hip, wrist, elbow, and ankle joints. This article reviews the current literature and presents the history of arthroscopy, basic science of pressure and flow, types of irrigation pumps and their functions, settings, applications, and complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e474-e478.].

  19. Prognostic Factors of Arthroscopic Adhesiolysis for Arthrofibrosis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the results of arthroscopic adhesiolysis for arthrofibrosis of the knee and to investigate possible prognostic factors. Materials and Methods Among the patients who developed arthrofibrosis after knee joint surgery, 68 patients who underwent arthroscopic adhesiolysis and were available for at least one-year follow-up were evaluated with regard to the Lysholm knee score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee score, patient satisfaction, and range of motion (ROM) of the knee. The influence of possible prognostic factors including the cause of arthrofibrosis, duration of disease, and age of the patient on the postoperative ROM was analyzed. Results Sixty-one patients (89.7%) obtained an average increase of 48.6° in ROM; however, the remaining seven patients (10.3%) did not show any increase at the final follow-up. The Lysholm knee score and IKDC subjective knee score increased significantly at the final follow-up. Patient satisfaction was high or very high in 89.7% of the patients at the final follow-up. There was no association between the cause of arthrofibrosis and the increase in postoperative ROM. The duration of disease was significantly related to the postoperative recovery of ROM. Age had no significant influence on the postoperative recovery of ROM. Conclusions We believe that arthroscopic adhesiolysis is effective for the treatment of intraarticular arthrofibrosis. In particular, the duration of the disease had significant influence on the postoperative outcome. PMID:24368998

  20. Prognostic factors of arthroscopic adhesiolysis for arthrofibrosis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mo; Joo, Yong Bum

    2013-12-01

    To assess the results of arthroscopic adhesiolysis for arthrofibrosis of the knee and to investigate possible prognostic factors. Among the patients who developed arthrofibrosis after knee joint surgery, 68 patients who underwent arthroscopic adhesiolysis and were available for at least one-year follow-up were evaluated with regard to the Lysholm knee score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee score, patient satisfaction, and range of motion (ROM) of the knee. The influence of possible prognostic factors including the cause of arthrofibrosis, duration of disease, and age of the patient on the postoperative ROM was analyzed. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) obtained an average increase of 48.6° in ROM; however, the remaining seven patients (10.3%) did not show any increase at the final follow-up. The Lysholm knee score and IKDC subjective knee score increased significantly at the final follow-up. Patient satisfaction was high or very high in 89.7% of the patients at the final follow-up. There was no association between the cause of arthrofibrosis and the increase in postoperative ROM. The duration of disease was significantly related to the postoperative recovery of ROM. Age had no significant influence on the postoperative recovery of ROM. We believe that arthroscopic adhesiolysis is effective for the treatment of intraarticular arthrofibrosis. In particular, the duration of the disease had significant influence on the postoperative outcome.

  1. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone.

    PubMed

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications.

  2. The Comprehensive Arthroscopic Management Procedure for Treatment of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mook, William R; Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Younger, high-demand patients who are less suitable for joint replacement procedures are often affected by advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. There are several alternatives to total joint arthroplasty for the treatment of these patients. However, the outcomes of these procedures are less predictable and have limited durability. The comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure, which includes a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral debridement, chondroplasty, synovectomy, loose body removal, humeral osteoplasty with excision of the goat's beard osteophyte, capsular releases, subacromial and subcoracoid decompressions, axillary nerve decompression, and biceps tenodesis, has been shown to reduce pain, improve function, and provide a predictable short-term joint-preserving option for patients with advanced glenohumeral osteoarthritis. A unique feature of the comprehensive arthroscopic management procedure is the indirect and direct decompression of the axillary nerve, which may explain the difference in outcomes with this technique compared with other approaches. Furthermore, the technique is technically demanding and associated with several notable pitfalls that are preventable when using the meticulous surgical technique detailed in this article and accompanying video.

  3. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CALCIFYING TENDINITIS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF.

    PubMed

    Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreira; Trevizani, Cassio Silva; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emílio Conforto; Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Neto, Francisco José Dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of the rotator cuff in patients with calcifying tendinitis. A retrospective study was conducted on twenty patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment for calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder between March 1999 and November 2005. Six patients were excluded due to loss of follow-up. The average follow-up period was 41.4 months. Eight patients (57%) were female and six (43%) were male. The right side was affected in 10 cases (71%) and the left in four cases (29%). Nine cases (64%) had calcification in the supraspinatus tendon, two (14%) in the infraspinatus tendon, and three (21%) in both tendons. In all cases, resection of the calcium deposits was performed by means of a needle (Jelco® No. 14) in combination with curettage (mini-curette). Two shoulders (14%) underwent subacromial decompression, and one (7%) underwent excision of the distal clavicle. A tendon-tendon suture was performed in three shoulders (21%). None of the patients underwent tendon-bone reinsertion. The mean score obtained on the UCLA scale was 33 points (26-35), thus indicating that a majority of patients had good results. In the final radiographic evaluation, none of the patients showed signs of calcification. Arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder safely allows excision of the calcification, leading to good results in relation to shoulder pain and function.

  4. Arthroscopic Removal of Shotgun Pellet From Within the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Kyle; Cooke, Chris; Cooke, Pat; Tonnos, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic techniques are effective for the removal of intra-articular bullet and metal fragments after gunshot wounds to the shoulder, hip, knee, and sacroiliac joints. Surgical removal of bullets retained within the synovial joints is indicated; lead is dissolved by synovial fluid over time, leading to proliferative synovitis, lead arthropathy, elevated serum lead levels, and lead toxicity. We present an arthroscopic technique for removal of a shotgun pellet retained within the medial meniscus. In this technique, diagnostic knee arthroscopy is initially performed, which allows for localization of the pellet within the medial meniscus. An up-biter is used to resect the inner rim of meniscus surrounding the pellet, and the pellet is removed with a grasper. This arthroscopic approach is advantageous because it allows for efficient visualization of the pellet within the meniscus, thorough visualization of all compartments of the knee, a reduction in blood loss, and a decrease in surgical morbidity to the surrounding cartilaginous, neurovascular, and soft-tissue structures. This technique may therefore be one option to address bullet fragments or shotgun pellets that are retained within the medial meniscus. PMID:27073774

  5. Treatment of Type 3 Arthrofibrosis Following Arthroscopic Reconstruction of ACL and Posterolateral Corner Injury with Tibia Plateau Fracture in a Professional Dancer

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Neslihan; Abay, Burak; Soydan, Ramazan; Atansay, Vefa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Arthrofibrosis is a serious complication following the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterolateral corner (PLC) injury. Loss of motion caused by arthrofibrosis can be disabling in young and active patients. We report the clinical results of the treatment of arthrofibrosis following arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL with ipsilateral hamstring tendon graft and surgically repairing PLC with 2 suture anchors in a 30 year-old professional dancer, treated with surgical lysis and manipulation under general anesthesia followed by aggressive physical therapy. Methods: A 30 year-old male professional dancer presented with pain, effusion and severe instability in his left knee after falling in a dance event. The pain was evaluated on Visual analog scale (VAS) as 6 to 8. At the physical examination, anterior drawer test was evaluated as grade 3, pivot shift test, varus test, dial test and posterolateral drawer test were found positive. The Tegner Lysholm score was evaluated as 22 (poor). Under general anesthesia, left knee had tendency to external rotation and recurvatum when leg was suspended by toes. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) revealed the presence of a total ACL rupture, PLC injury and a fracture of lateral tibia plateau. The patient was treated with arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL with ipsilateral hamstring tendon graft fixed with endobutton through femoral tunnel and bio interference screw through tibial tunnel and PLC injury was treated with 2 suture anchors. Postoperatively first day, quadriceps musculature and active and passive ROM exercises was trained. During postoperatively third week, the patient was allowed to mobilize nonweight bearing with the use of two crutches without functional knee brace. At the sixth week, arthroscopic lysis was performed due to type 3 arthrofibrosis. At the tenth week, manipulation was performed to the left knee under general anesthesia. Results: At the 3 month- follow-up, the patient

  6. Lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia: an anatomical insight.

    PubMed

    Dias Filho, L C; Valença, M M; Guimarães Filho, F A V; Medeiros, R C; Silva, R A M; Morais, M G V; Valente, F P; França, S M L

    2003-07-01

    A detailed anatomic study was carried out on the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve to better understand the etiology and treatment of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. As it passed from the pelvis into the thigh, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve ran through an "aponeuroticofascial tunnel," beginning at the iliopubic tract and ending at the inguinal ligament; as it passed through the tunnel, an enlargement in its side-to-side diameter was observed, suggesting that the fascial structures proximal to the inguinal ligament may be implicated in the genesis of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. The finding of pseudoneuromas at this location, distant from the inguinal ligament, supports this hypothesis. The anterior superior iliac spine is located approximately 0.7 cm from the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and serves as the bony landmark for nerve localization. Within the first 3 cm of leaving the pelvis, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was observed deep to the fascia lata; therefore, surgical dissection within the subcutaneous fascia may be conducted with relative impunity near the anterior superior iliac spine just inferior to the inguinal ligament. In 36% of cases there was no posterior branch of the nerve, which is correlated to lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia symptoms often being limited to the anterior branch region. An accessory nerve was found in 30% of cases. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison.

    PubMed

    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Kogler, Michael; Henninger, Benjamin; Forstner, Thomas; Reichkendler, Markus; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried

    2015-06-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. • The used traction technique was well tolerated by most patients. • The used traction technique almost consistently achieved separation of cartilage layers. • Traction MR arthrography enabled accurate detection of chondral and labral lesions.

  8. Arthroscopic debridement of osteoarthritic elbow in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Cui, Guo-Qing; Wang, Jian-Quan; Yin, Yu; Ao, Ying-Fang

    2011-12-01

    Arthroscopic debridement is an appropriate procedure for osteoarthritic elbow in general populations. However, the results of arthroscopic debridement in the professional athletes, a younger and highly active patient cohort is unclear. The purposes of this study were to assess the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic debridement of osteoarthritic elbow in professional athletes and to evaluate the effect of prognostic factors on the clinical outcomes. From January 1999 to January 2006, 35 professional athletes with osteoarthritc elbow (36 elbows) were treated with arthroscopic debridement, consisted of osteophytes removal, loose bodies removal and fenestration of the olecranon fossa as necessary. Average patient age was (23 ± 5) years (range 7 - 34 years). Average follow-up was (43 ± 23) months (range 16 - 98 months). Athletic activities consisted mainly of wrestling, judo and weightlifting. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with the modified Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) elbow scoring system. According to the modified HSS elbow scoring system, the result was excellent for 16 elbows, good for 14 and poor for 6. No case had got worse after surgery. All athletes reported an improvement in pain. After athletic training, 15 elbows were not painful, 16 mildly painful, 3 moderately painful and 2 severely painful. The arc of flexion-extension improved from 111° preoperatively to 127° postoperatively. All of the athletes were able to return to their previous level of training. Five athletes won national-level championships. At follow-up, 17 athletes (18 elbows) were greatly satisfied with the results, 12 satisfied and 6 unsatisfied. Postoperatively, one athlete reported ulnar nerve symptoms and two others had residual loose bodies. The fenestration of the olecranon fossa was associated with a significantly increased chance of a poor outcome. The nature of the osteoarthritis, duration of symptoms, osteophytes removal and loose bodies removal

  9. Arthroscopic autologous bone graft with arthroscopic Bankart repair for a large bony defect lesion caused by recurrent shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yu; Hachisuka, Hiroki; Kashiwagi, Kenji; Oomae, Hiromichi; Yokoya, Shin; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2007-06-01

    Many clinicians believe that a large bony defect of the glenoid must be treated with bone grafting when a Bankart procedure is performed. Various types of bone graft, such as open bone graft, Eden-Hybinnette, J-bone graft, coracoid transfer, and Latarjet, have been used. These require open procedures that are difficult to perform arthroscopically. We performed an arthroscopic autologous bone graft and an arthroscopic Bankart repair at the same time to treat a patient with recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint and a large bony Bankart lesion. We harvested from the lateral site of the acromion 2 bones that were 2.7 mm in cylindrical diameter. We transplanted these bones to the large bony defect of the anteroinferior area of the glenoid and placed anchors between the 2 plugs. During the 30 months since the surgery was performed, the patient has not experienced dislocation or apprehension about the shoulder. A 3-dimensional computed tomography scan showed enlargement of the glenoid surface. Our surgical procedure offers promise for treatment of patients with recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint and a large bony Bankart lesion because it allows the surgeon to alter the size and the grafted site of the cylindrical bone according to the size of the defect.

  10. Ultrasonography-Assisted Arthroscopic Proximal Iliotibial Band Release and Trochanteric Bursectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weinrauch, Patrick; Kermeci, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We describe arthroscopic iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy assisted by intraoperative ultrasonography for accurate placement of arthroscopic portals and to ensure adequate decompression of the peritrochanteric space. We have found ultrasonography for endoscopic iliotibial band release a useful tool to assist with localizing the site and length of decompression. PMID:24400195

  11. Ultrasonography-assisted arthroscopic proximal iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy.

    PubMed

    Weinrauch, Patrick; Kermeci, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We describe arthroscopic iliotibial band release and trochanteric bursectomy assisted by intraoperative ultrasonography for accurate placement of arthroscopic portals and to ensure adequate decompression of the peritrochanteric space. We have found ultrasonography for endoscopic iliotibial band release a useful tool to assist with localizing the site and length of decompression.

  12. Computer-aided navigation for arthroscopic hip surgery using encoder linkages for position tracking.

    PubMed

    Monahan, Emily; Shimada, Kenji

    2006-09-01

    While arthroscopic surgery has many advantages over traditional surgery, this minimally invasive technique is not often applied to the hip joint. Two main reasons for this are the complexity of navigating within the joint and the difficulty of correctly placing portal incisions without damaging critical neurovascular structures. This paper proposes a computer-aided navigation system to address the challenges of arthroscopic hip surgery. Unlike conventional arthroscopic methods, our system uses a hyper-redundant encoder linkage to track surgical instruments, thus eliminating the occlusion and distortion problems associated with standard optical and electromagnetic tracking systems. The encoder linkage position information is used to generate a computer display of patient anatomy. The tracking error from the encoder linkage was evaluated to be within an acceptable range for this tracking prototype, and the new computer-aided approach to arthroscopic hip surgery was applied to a prototype system for concept verification. This navigation system for arthroscopic hip surgery can be used as a tool to address the challenges of joint navigation and portal placement in arthroscopic hip surgery by visually supplementing the limiting view from the arthroscope. The introduction of a tracking linkage shows significant potential as an alternative to other tracking systems. Positive feedback about the completed demo system was obtained from surgeons who perform arthroscopic procedures. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity due to shoulder sling pressure after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Canbora, Mehmet Kerem; Polat, Atilla; Subaşı, Ferhunde Dilek; Ulkü, Tekin Kerem

    2012-01-01

    The beach chair position is one of the most commonly used positions in arthroscopic shoulder surgery because of its anatomical nature and easy modifiability to open surgery. Despite these advantages, thromboembolic and neurologic complications have been reported. We report a case of carotid sinus hypersensitivity due to shoulder sling pressure after arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  14. Arthroscopic revision arthrodesis for non-union of the naviculocuneiform joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-08-01

    Naviculocuneiform arthrodesis is a viable treatment for symptomatic flatfoot with sag of the naviculocuneiform joint. Nonetheless, non-union is a common complication, and revision arthrodesis is indicated. This study reports arthroscopic revision arthrodesis for non-union of the naviculocuneiform. Accurate debridement and bone grafting of the nonunion site was performed arthroscopically.

  15. Femoral epiphyseal cartilage matrix changes at predilection sites of equine osteochondrosis: Quantitative MRI, second-harmonic microscopy, and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Martel, Gabrielle; Couture, Charles-André; Gilbert, Guillaume; Bancelin, Stéphane; Richard, Hélène; Moser, Thomas; Kiss, Sabrina; Légaré, François; Laverty, Sheila

    2016-10-01

    Osteochondrosis is an ischemic chondronecrosis of epiphyseal growth cartilage that results in focal failure of endochondral ossification and osteochondritis dissecans at specific sites in the epiphyses of humans and animals, including horses. The upstream events leading to the focal ischemia remain unknown. The epiphyseal growth cartilage matrix is composed of proteoglycan and collagen macromolecules and encases its vascular tree in canals. The matrix undergoes major dynamic changes in early life that could weaken it biomechanically and predispose it to focal trauma and vascular failure. Subregions in neonatal foal femoral epiphyses (n = 10 osteochondrosis predisposed; n = 6 control) were assessed for proteoglycan and collagen structure/content employing 3T quantitative MRI (3T qMRI: T1ρ and T2 maps). Site-matched validations were made with histology, immunohistochemistry, and second-harmonic microscopy. Growth cartilage T1ρ and T2 relaxation times were significantly increased (p < 0.002) within the proximal third of the trochlea, a site predisposed to osteochondrosis, when compared with other regions. However, this was observed in both control and osteochondrosis predisposed specimens. Microscopic evaluation of this region revealed an expansive area with low proteoglycan content and a hypertrophic-like appearance on second-harmonic microscopy. We speculate that this matrix structure and composition, though physiological, may weaken the epiphyseal growth cartilage biomechanically in focal regions and could enhance the risk of vascular failure with trauma leading to osteochondrosis. However, additional investigations are now required to confirm this. 3T qMRI will be useful for future non-invasive longitudinal studies to track the osteochondrosis disease trajectory in animals and humans. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1743-1752, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley

  16. An unusual complication of femoral vein catheterisation: pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Yildizdas, D; Tepe, T; Parlak, M; Akcali, M

    2007-12-01

    A 2-month-old girl with severe pneumonia required a central venous line. Femoral vein catheterisation was attempted but insertion was difficult. Pneumoperitoneum developed, which is a rare complication of femoral vein catheterisation. It is important when undertaking femoral vein catheterisation to use the correct landmarks in the femoral triangle below the inguinal ligament and an appropriate size of catheter.

  17. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  18. A biomechanical comparison of proximal femoral nails and locking proximal anatomic femoral plates in femoral fracture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Korhan; Türkmen, İsmail; Sahin, Adem; Yildiz, Yavuz; Erturk, Selim; Soylemez, Mehmet Salih

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of fractures in the trochanteric area has risen with the increasing numbers of elderly people with osteoporosis. Although dynamic hip screw fixation is the gold standard for the treatment of stable intertrochanteric femur fractures, treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fractures still remains controversial. Intramedullary devices such as Gamma nail or proximal femoral nail and proximal anatomic femur plates are in use for the treatment of intertrochanteric femur fractures. There are still many investigations to find the optimal implant to treat these fractures with minimum complications. For this reason, we aimed to perform a biomechanical comparison of the proximal femoral nail and the locking proximal anatomic femoral plate in the treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Twenty synthetic, third generation human femur models, obtained for this purpose, were divided into two groups of 10 bones each. Femurs were provided as a standard representation of AO/Orthopedic Trauma Associationtype 31-A2 unstable fractures. Two types of implantations were inserted: the proximal femoral intramedullary nail in the first group and the locking anatomic femoral plate in the second group. Axial load was applied to the fracture models through the femoral head using a material testing machine, and the biomechanical properties of the implant types were compared. Result: Nail and plate models were locked distally at the same level. Axial steady load with a 5 mm/m velocity was applied through the mechanical axis of femur bone models. Axial loading in the proximal femoral intramedullary nail group was 1.78-fold greater compared to the plate group. All bones that had the plate applied were fractured in the portion containing the distal locking screw. Conclusion: The proximal femoral intramedullary nail provides more stability and allows for earlier weight bearing than the locking plate when used for the treatment of

  19. Superior labrum anterior to posterior lesions of the shoulder: Diagnosis and arthroscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Nuri; Sirin, Evrim; Arya, Alp

    2014-01-01

    After the improvement in arthroscopic shoulder surgery, superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears are increasingly recognized and treated in persons with excessive overhead activities like throwers. Several potential mechanisms for the pathophysiology of superior labral tears have been proposed. The diagnosis of this condition can be possible by history, physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging combination. The treatment of type 1 SLAP tears in many cases especially in older patients is non-operative but some cases need arthroscopic intervention. The arthroscopic management of type 2 lesions in older patients can be biceps tenodesis, but young and active patients like throwers will need an arthroscopic repair. The results of arthroscopic repair in older patients are not encouraging. The purpose of this study is to perform an overview of the diagnosis of the SLAP tears and to help decision making for the surgical management. PMID:25035838

  20. [Arthroscopic suturing of the rotator cuff. Placing of anchor, suturing and tying techniques].

    PubMed

    Kettler, M; Kurtoglu, E; Grifka, J; Tingart, M

    2007-09-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of a rotator cuff tear is a demanding technique. Besides assessment and appraisal of the different types of tears, their mobilisation and, especially, secure refixation of the soft tissue are necessary if the operation is to be successful: suture anchors must be optimally placed, and suturing must be reliably achieved while the surgical field is viewed arthroscopically. A correct technique for arthroscopic knot tying after passage of the suture thread through the tendon is also essential for the holding strength of the sutures. The way the suture thread is tied during the arthroscopic procedure needs to be tailored to the individual situation. It is essential that the operator has mastered the technique of tying nonslipping knots, by alternating holding and connecting threads with the use of a knot-pusher. There is a vast number of published arthroscopic knots, and the one selected as suitable also needs to be adapted to the suture material.

  1. Subtrochanteric Femoral Fracture during Trochanteric Nailing for the Treatment of Femoral Shaft Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chi Hun; Yi, Ju Won

    2013-01-01

    We report on three cases of subtrochanteric femoral fractures during trochanteric intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral shaft fractures. Trochanteric intramedullary nails, which have a proximal lateral bend, are specifically designed for trochanteric insertion. When combined with the modified insertion technique, trochanteric intramedullary nails reduce iatrogenic fracture comminution and varus malalignment. We herein describe technical aspects of trochanteric intramedullary nailing for femoral shaft fractures to improve its application and prevent implant-derived complications. PMID:24009910

  2. Meralgia paresthetica and femoral acetabular impingement: a possible association.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-12-11

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies.

  3. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  4. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  5. Current Concepts in Paediatric Femoral Shaft Fractures

    PubMed Central

    John, Rakesh; Sharma, Siddhartha; Raj, Gopinathan Nirmal; Singh, Jujhar; C., Varsha; RHH, Arjun; Khurana, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric femoral shaft fractures account for less than 2% of all fractures in children. However, these are the most common pediatric fractures necessitating hospitalization and are associated with prolonged hospital stay, prolonged immobilization and impose a significant burden on the healthcare system as well as caregivers. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive review of epidemiology, aetiology, classification and managemement options of pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:28603567

  6. Femoral nerve entrapment: a new insight.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M T; Murillo, J; Maranillo, E; Parkin, I G; Sanudo, J

    2007-03-01

    Compression of the femoral nerve in the iliac fossa has been reported as a consequence of several pathologies, but never as a result of muscular compression. Aberrant slips of iliacus, however, have occasionally been reported to cover or split the femoral nerve. This study aimed to assess such variations as potential factors in femoral nerve compression. A large and homogeneous sample of 121 embalmed cadavers (242 specimens) was studied. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi-squared test. Muscular slips from iliacus and psoas, piercing or covering the femoral nerve, were found in 19 specimens (7.9%). No significant differences by sex or side were found. The more frequent variation was piercing of the femoral nerve by a muscular slip (17 specimens, 7.0%). The nerve then entered the thigh as one or more branches. The less frequent variation found was a muscular slip or sheet covering the femoral nerve as it lay on iliacus (2 specimens, 0.8%). Each disposition may be a potential risk for nerve entrapment.

  7. Treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures following total hip arthroplasty with femoral component revision.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Berry, Daniel J; Lewallen, David G

    2003-11-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty is indicated for most periprosthetic fractures that occur around the stem of the femoral implant. The purpose of the present study was to assess the results and complications of revision total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures. We evaluated 118 hips in 116 patients who underwent revision total hip arthroplasty because of an acute Vancouver type-B periprosthetic femoral fracture. The femoral implant used for the revision was a cemented stem in forty-two hips, a proximally porous-coated uncemented stem in twenty-eight, an extensively porous-coated stem in thirty, and an allograft-prosthesis composite or tumor prosthesis in eighteen. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.4 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the probability of survival was 90% at five years and 79.2% at ten years with revision or removal of the femoral implant for any reason as the end point. Sixteen femoral components were rerevised: ten were rerevised because of loosening; three, because of loosening in association with a fracture nonunion; two, because of recurrent dislocation; and one, because of a new periprosthetic fracture. Additionally, six femoral implants were resected because of deep infection (five) or prosthetic loosening (one). Radiographs of the ninety-six hips with a surviving implant showed that twenty-one had evidence of loosening of the femoral implant, four had a nonunion of the femoral fracture, and two had both a nonunion and loosening of the femoral implant. Revision total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of a periprosthetic fracture around the stem of the femoral implant successfully restored function for most patients. The greatest long-term problems were prosthetic loosening and fracture nonunion. Better results were seen when an uncemented, extensively porous-coated stem was used.

  8. Analysis of risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jun-Ying; Zha, Guo-Chun; Jiang, Tao; You, Zhen-Jun; Yuan, De-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Femoral head necrosis is a rare but devastating complication following femoral neck fracture. The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fracture. This retrospective study included 166 patients with femoral neck fractures treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation at the authors' institution from January 2004 to December 2008. Eight patients died for reasons unrelated to the surgery, and 12 patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 fractures) were followed until union or until conversion to total hip arthroplasty. The patients included 61 males and 85 females with an average age of 47.5 years (range, 18-68 years). The authors analyzed the following factors: age, sex, Garden classification, reduction quality, surgical methods, injury-to-surgery interval, preoperative traction, weight-bearing time, and implant removal. All patients were followed for a mean of 52 months (range, 6-90 months). The incidence of femoral head necrosis was 14.4% (21/146). Garden classification (P=.012), reduction quality (P=.008), implant removal (P=.020), and preoperative traction (P=.003) were significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. Patient age (P=.990), sex (P=.287), injury-to-surgery interval (P=.360), weight-bearing time (P=.868), and surgical methods (P=.987) were not significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, implant removal was not a significant risk factor for femoral head necrosis development (P=.498). Garden classification, reduction quality, and preoperative traction had a significant effect on femoral head necrosis development. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Femoral and Tibial Tunnel Widening following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction using Various Modalities of Fixation: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanthila, Mahesha; Saya, Rama Prakasha; Vidyasagar, JVS

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone tunnel enlargement after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction (ACL-R) is a well-accepted phenomenon but there are very few published data comparing the extent of tunnel widening by various methods of fixation after ACL-R. Aim To compare the femoral and tibial tunnel widening following ACL-R with different methods of fixation using CT scan. Materials and Methods This one year prospective study included all patients with chronic Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL-R using tripled hamstring tendon autograft. The graft was fixed to the tibial tunnel by Interference Screw (IFS) or Suture Disc (SD) and to the femoral tunnel by IFS, SD, Cross-Pin (CP) or Endo-button CL (Smith & Nephew). The widening of the tibial and femoral tunnels in different methods of fixation was assessed by Computed Tomography (CT) at 12 months follow-up; and was compared using paired sample test. Results A total of 63 patients were included in the study of which 58 (92%) were males and 5 (8%) were females, with a mean age of 29.1 ± 5.9 years. The tibial tunnel widening at one year follow-up was 1.680 ± 1.08794 (19.37%) and 1.517 ± 0.94834 mm (17.39%) by IFS and SD methods respectively. Femoral tunnel widening at one year follow-up was 1.294 ± 0.231, 1.809 ± 0.912, 1.320 ± 0.238, 1.779 ± 0.889 mm by IFS, SD, EB, and CP methods respectively. Femoral tunnel widening following suture disc method of fixation was very highly significant (p<0.001) in comparison with other methods. Conclusion Femoral tunnel and tibial tunnel widening varies with different methods of fixation and was maximum with suture disc method compared to others at one year follow-up after ACL-R. PMID:28050456

  10. Arthroscopic management of shoulder instabilities: anterior, posterior, and multidirectional.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jeffrey S; Bradley, James P; Angelo, Richard L; Burks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Arthroscopy is considered a relatively new technique for the surgical repair of an unstable shoulder. Shoulder arthroscopy has grown in popularity and is considered the gold standard for treating carefully selected patients. Despite its increasing popularity, the procedure has a significant learning curve and has resulted in early higher recurrence rates when compared with patients treated with open techniques. With the addition of newer instrumentation, the refinement of techniques, and additional capsular plication and tensioning, outcomes for patients treated with shoulder arthroscopy should continue to improve. A major distinguishing feature in selecting appropriate candidates for shoulder arthroscopy is whether there have been significant bone changes resulting from dislocation recurrence. Recurrent anterior dislocation may create an anterior glenoid rim fracture, erosion loss from multiple recurrences, and an impression defect on the posterior aspect of the humeral head. The loss of contact area between the "ball and cup" may compromise the results of techniques that restore the anatomic restraints of soft tissues. Early intervention is becoming recognized as an important factor in patient selection for arthroscopic treatment. Imaging studies after traumatic injuries include radiographs, CT scans, possible articular contrast studies, and MRIs. These studies can identify and quantify rim fractures and the remaining articular contact in patients with recurrent subluxations, allowing for earlier appropriate intervention. Patients with significant bone loss may be best treated with an open procedure that allows grafting of the deficiency. Arthroscopic techniques to repair fractures or graft deficiencies continue to evolve. Rim fractures can be anatomically repaired with a suture anchor technique when recognized early. Rim erosion from chronic recurrent dislocations may require a combination of soft-tissue reattachment and coracoid grafting. Humeral head defects

  11. Open Latarjet procedure for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Flinkkilä, T; Sirniö, K

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective study assessed the functional results of open Latarjet operation for recurrence of instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a consecutive series of patients. Fifty two patients (mean age 28.4 [range 17-62] years, 45 men) were operated on using open Latarjet operation after one (n=46) or two (n=6) failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs. The indication for revision surgery was recurrent dislocation or subluxation. Fifty patients had a Hill-Sachs lesion and 32 patients had glenoid bone lesions on plain radiographs. No attempt was made to grade the severity of bony pathology. Functional outcome and stability of 49 shoulders were assessed after an average follow-up of 38 (range 24-85) months using Western Ontario Shoulder Instability (WOSI) score, Oxford shoulder instability score, and subjective shoulder value (SSV). Forty-two patients had a stable shoulder at follow-up. Seven of 49 (14%) had symptoms of instability; one patient had recurrent dislocation, and six patients had subluxations. Mean WOSI, Oxford, and SSV scores were 83.9, 19.9, and 84.9, respectively. All scores were significantly better in patients who had a stable shoulder compared with those who had an unstable shoulder (WOSI 86.8 vs. 64.3; Oxford 18.2 vs. 30.8; and SSV 88.3 vs. 61.7; P<0.01). One patient needed a reoperation. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Open Latarjet operation is a good option for failed arthroscopic Bankart repair. The instability recurrence rate is acceptable and the reoperation rate was low. Level IV, retrospective case series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR FOR RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Filho, Ildeu Afonso; de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Fim, Márcio; da Silva Corrêa, Lincoln Vargas; de Carvalho Junior, Antônio Enéas Rangel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clinically and radiologically evaluate patients who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment for anterior shoulder instability by means of the Bankart technique, using metal anchors. Methods: This was a retrospective study on 49 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability between 2002 and 2007. The patients were evaluated using the Carter-Rowe score and the Samilson and Prieto classification. The mean age at the time of surgery was 30 years. The mean length of follow-up was 42.7 months (ranging from 18 to 74). 85% of the patients were male. Results: The mean Carter-Rowe score was 83 points (ranging from 30 to 100) including 31 excellent results, 7 good, 3 fair and 8 poor. Recurrent dislocation was observed in 16% (8 patients), and 37.5% of them were of traumatic origin. Joint degeneration was present in 32.5% of the cases, including 5 cases of grade 1, 6 cases of grade 2 and 2 cases of grade 3. The average loss of external rotation was 12° and the loss of anterior elevation was 8°. There was a statistically significant relationship (p < 0.05) between arthritis and age at first dislocation, age at surgery and crackling. 92% of the patients reported high degrees of satisfaction after the procedure. Among the complications, there were two cases of stiff shoulder, one patient with prominence of the synthesis material and one case of anchor loosening. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of anterior shoulder instability using metal anchors was shown to be effective, with a low complication rate. PMID:27042624

  13. Arthroscopic Transosseous Rotator Cuff Repair: Technical Note, Outcomes, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Black, Eric M.; Lin, Albert; Srikumaran, Uma; Jain, Nitin; Freehill, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the authors’ initial experience with arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair. Thirty-one patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair over a 15-month period. Preoperatively, demographics and subjective scores were recorded. Postoperatively, pain levels, subjective shoulder values, satisfaction scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, complications, and reoperations were noted with a minimum 2-year follow-up. The relationships between pre- and intraoperative variables and outcome scores were determined with univariate analysis. Average patient age was 56 years, and 23 patients (74%) were men. Twenty patients (65%) underwent primary rotator cuff repair, and 11 patients (35%) underwent revision repair. Average time to follow-up was 26 months. Average preoperative pain level and subjective shoulder value were 5.1 of 10 and 35%, respectively. Average postoperative scores included pain level of 0.9 of 10, subjective shoulder value of 84%, satisfaction score of 90.6 of 100, and ASES score of 86.3 of 100. There were 3 (9.7%) major and 2 (6%) minor complications. Patients undergoing revision rotator cuff repair had significantly worse outcomes (pain level, subjective shoulder value, ASES score; P<.05) compared with those undergoing primary repair, and cortical augmentation did not significantly affect outcome. Overall, outcomes after arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair are good, although patients undergoing revision repair do not have the same outcomes as those undergoing primary cuff repair. The procedure is not without complications (9.7% major, 6% minor complications). Cortical augmentation may be used to supplement fixation, although it does not necessarily affect outcomes. Patients without such augmentation may be at increased risk for suture cutout through the bone. PMID:25970360

  14. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the weight-bearing shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jacek; Borbas, Paul; Meyer, Dominik C; Gerber, Christian; Buitrago Téllez, Carlos; Wieser, Karl

    2015-12-01

    In wheelchair-dependent individuals, pain often develops because of rotator cuff tendon failure and/or osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint. The purposes of this study were to investigate (1) specific rotator cuff tear patterns, (2) structural healing, and (3) clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a cohort of wheelchair-dependent patients. Forty-six shoulders with a mean follow-up of 46 months (range, 24-82 months; SD, 13 months) from a consecutive series of 61 shoulders in 56 patients (46 men and 10 women) undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were available for analysis. Clinical outcome analysis was performed using the Constant-Murley score, the Subjective Shoulder Value, and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score. The integrity of the repair was analyzed by ultrasound. Of the shoulders, 87% had supraspinatus involvement, 70% had subscapularis involvement, and 57% had an anterosuperior lesion involving both the supraspinatus and subscapularis. Despite an overall structural failure rate of 33%, the patients showed improvements in the Constant-Murley score from 50 points (range, 22-86 points; SD, 16 points) preoperatively to 80 points (range, 40-98 points; SD, 12 points) postoperatively and in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score from 56 points (range, 20-92 points; SD, 20 points) preoperatively to 92 points (range, 53-100 points; SD, 10 points) postoperatively, with a mean postoperative Subjective Shoulder Value of 84% (range, 25%-100%; SD, 17%). Failure of the rotator cuff in weight-bearing shoulders occurs primarily anterosuperiorly. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair leads to a structural failure rate of 33% but satisfactory functional results with high patient satisfaction at midterm follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Knee dislocation: concurrent arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction - operating technique].

    PubMed

    Piontek, Tomasz; Ciemniewska-Gorzela, Kinga; Szulc, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Injuries involving knee luxation or subluxation generally result in damage to two or three out of the four major ligaments which stabilize this joint. Past treatment of this type of multiligament injuries, consisting in 6- to 12-week immobilization in a plaster cast, does not allow for restoration of the normal, anatomical course of these ligaments. A consequence of this type of healing, which involves the formation of random scars in place of ligaments, is mechanical and functional instability of the knee joint. The goal of this article is to present a classification of multiligament knee injuries and surgical treatment options. We also present our own technique of arthroscopic, concurrent reconstruction of knee joint ligaments. The study material consisted of 20 patients who underwent surgical treatment for multiligament knee injuries in the Department of Pediatric Orthopedics and Traumatology in Poznań. We performed concurrent arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL and PCL in all 20 patients. In addition, reconstruction of the medial complex was performed in 7 patients, and lateral complex was reconstructed in another 7 patients. In three cases we stitched the medial meniscus using a Smith & Nephew FasT-Fix system, and partial menisectomy was performed in 2 patients. The details of the proposed concurrent arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction are extensively discussed. One of the advantages of this operating technique is the exclusive use of autogenous ST and GR tendon grafts for reconstruction of all damaged knee joint structures. The presented operating technique makes possible the reconstruction of all damaged knee joint ligaments in less than two hours, which in turn allows the surgery to be performed in an ischemic setting using an Esmarch band around the limb.

  16. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  17. Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder: midterm results after arthroscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Bielefeld, Rebecca; Schmidt, Carolin; Dedy, Nicolas; Liem, Dennis

    2012-03-01

    Calcifying tendinitis is a common and painful disorder of the shoulder characterized by the presence of calcific deposits in the tendons of the rotator cuff. When nonoperative treatment over a prolonged period of time fails, surgical treatment should be considered. Midterm success rates are inconsistent, and the role of subacromial decompression is still unclear. Our hypotheses were that the rate of supraspinatus tears after arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis is comparable with that in the contralateral uninvolved shoulder and that subacromial decompression does not have beneficial effects compared with calcium removal alone. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. In 70 shoulders of 62 patients with a mean age of 54 years, arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits of the supraspinatus tendon was performed. In 44 shoulders, additional subacromial decompression was performed. After a mean follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-13 years), patients were clinically investigated, and function was statistically evaluated using Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. Affected and contralateral shoulders were examined by ultrasound in 48 shoulders, and rotator cuff tears were documented. The mean Constant scores of the operated shoulders were significantly lower than those of the healthy shoulders (P < .001). The ASES scores significantly (P < .001) increased after surgery but were still lower than the ASES scores of the healthy shoulders (P < .001). Concerning the additional subacromial decompression, there were no significant differences in the overall ASES and Constant scores; the subitem "pain" was significantly better in the subacromial decompression group (P = .048). Ultrasound examination at last follow-up (48 shoulders) showed a partial supraspinatus tendon tear in 11 operated and 3 contralateral shoulders. Although the good clinical results after arthroscopic treatment of calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder persist midterm, the affected

  18. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  19. [Arthroscopic percutaneous osteosynthesis of low-energy tibial plateau fractures].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziguang

    2009-11-01

    To explore the treatment of low-energy tibial plateau fractures with arthroscopic percutaneous osteosynthesis. From May 2004 to April 2008, 27 cases of tibial plateau fractures were treated with arthroscopic management. There were 19 males and 8 females, aged 18-61 years old (mean 41.5 years old). Fracture was caused by traffic accident in 18 cases, by falling from height in 6 cases, by bruise in 2 cases, and by other in 1 case. There were 8 cases of type I, 12 cases of type II, 2 cases of type III and 5 cases of type IV according to Schatzker classification. The time from injury to operation was 3-15 days (mean 5.2 days). After symptomatic managements were performed arthroscopically in 11 cases of meniscus tear, 4 cases of medial collateral ligament rupture of knee joint, 3 cases of anterior cruciate ligament rupture of knee joint and 2 cases of cartilage fracture resulting in joint bodies, fracture was reduced and fixed with 2 or 4 cannulated screws (7 mm in diameter). Autograft of ilium was given 6 cases of bone defect. Early functional exercise was done. The operation time was 55-150 minutes (mean 93 minutes); the hospitalization days were 7-22 days (mean 16 days). All incision healed primarily. Edema of the affected leg occurred in all patients and subsided after 3 days of symptomatic management. In one patient who did not cooperate in functional exercise, adhesion occurred and normal function was recovered after by manual dissolution under conditions of anesthesia after 3 months of operation. All patients were followed up 6-36 months (mean 16.6 months). The range of motion of knee joint was 105-140 degrees (mean 121 degrees). According to Lysholm scale of knee joint, the score was 72-100 points (mean 93.6 points) 6 months after operation. The X-ray film showed no signs of osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic percutaneous osteosynthesis yields satisfactory results and can be accepted as an alternative and effective method for the treatment of low-energy tibial plateau

  20. Arthroscopic Management of Anterior, Posterior, and Multidirectional Shoulder Instabilities.

    PubMed

    Field, Larry D; Ryu, Richard K N; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Provencher, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder stabilization offers several potential advantages compared with open surgery, including the opportunity to more accurately evaluate the glenohumeral joint at the time of diagnostic assessment; comprehensively address multiple pathologic lesions that may be identified; and avoid potential complications unique to open stabilization, such as postoperative subscapularis failure. A thorough understanding of normal shoulder anatomy and biomechanics, along with the pathoanatomy responsible for anterior, posterior, and multidirectional shoulder instability patterns, is very important in the management of patients who have shoulder instability. The treating physician also must be familiar with diagnostic imaging and physical examination maneuvers that are required to accurately diagnose shoulder instability.

  1. Arthroscopic Technique for Acetabular Labral Reconstruction Using Iliotibial Band Autograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Soares, Eduardo; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Mitchell, Justin J; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic function of the acetabular labrum makes it an important structure for both hip stability and motion. Because of this, injuries to the labrum can cause significant dysfunction, leading to altered hip kinematics. Labral repair is the gold standard for symptomatic labral tears to keep as much labral tissue as possible; however, in cases where the labrum has been injured to such a degree that it is either deficient or repair is not possible, arthroscopic labral reconstruction is preferred. This article describes our preferred approach for reconstruction of the acetabular labrum using iliotibial band autograft.

  2. Midterm clinical outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Garofalo, Raffaele; Lo, Eddie Y.; Feher, LeeAnne; Castagna, Alessandro; Qin, Huanying; Krishnan, Sumant G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic transosseous (TO) rotator cuff repair has recently emerged as a new option for surgical treatment of symptomatic rotator cuff tears. Limited data is available regarding outcomes using this technique. This study evaluated midterm clinical outcomes following a novel arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A consecutive series of 107 patients and 109 shoulders underwent arthroscopic TO (anchorless) rotator cuff repair for a symptomatic full-thickness tear. Pre and postoperative range of motion (ROM) was compared at an average of 11.8 months. Postoperative outcome scores were obtained at an average of 38.0 months. Statistical analysis was performed to compare pre and postoperative ROM data. Univariate analysis was performed using Student's t-test to compare the effect of other clinical characteristics on final outcome. Results: Statistically significant improvements were noted in forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation (P < 0.0001). Average postoperative subjective shoulder value was 93.7, simple shoulder test 11.6, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score 94.6. According to ASES scores, results for the 109 shoulders available for final follow-up were excellent in 95 (87.1%), good in 8 (7.3%), fair in 3 (2.8%), and poor in 3 (2.8%). There was no difference in ROM or outcome scores in patients who underwent a concomitant biceps procedure (tenodesis or tenotomy) compared with those who did not. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in outcome between patients who underwent either biceps tenodesis or tenotomy. Age, history of injury preceding the onset of pain, tear size, number of TO tunnels required to perform the repair, and presence of fatty infiltration did not correlate with postoperative ROM or subjective outcome measures at final follow-up. Two complications and four failures were noted. Conclusions: Arthroscopic TO rotator cuff repair technique leads to

  3. Arthroscopic Preparation 0f the Posterior and Posteroinferior Glenoid Labrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    bankart repair. Ar- throscopy.2003; 19:672-677. 2. Costouros lG, Cia vert P, War- ner JJ. Trans-cuff portal for arthroscopic posterior capsu...La lK, Burkhart SS. Triple labral lesions : pathology and surgical repair technique-report of seven cases. Arrhroscopy. 2005; 2 lot 86- I 93. 7...1471. 13. Kim SH, Ha KI, Yoo lC, Noh KC. J(jm ’s lesion : an incom- plete and concealed avulsion of the posteroinferior labrum in {Xlsterior or

  4. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients older than 60 years.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzi, Enrico; Coletti, Nicolò; Schiavetti, Stefano; Giusto, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze results by age, tear size, and type of suture repair (margin convergence by side-to-side suture, direct tendon-to-bone repair with suture anchor, or side-to-side plus suture anchor) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients older than 60 years (average, 67.7 years). Retrospective case series. From January 1999 to January 2001, 64 patients (64 shoulders) older than 60 years had an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair performed by the same surgical team. Fifty-four patients (84.3%) were available for follow-up (average, 27 months); 54 shoulders were evaluated using the UCLA rating scale (0-35 points). Tears were categorized according to size. The pattern of tears determined the repair technique: crescent-shaped tears were repaired in a direct tendon-to-bone fashion and U-shaped tears by margin convergence with or without suture anchor. The mean of postoperative UCLA score improved from 10.4 (range, 8.2-20 points) to 30.5 (range, 21-35 points) (P < .0001). Sixteen patients (29.6%) had excellent results (34-35 points), 28 (51.8%) had good results (28-33 points), 10 (18.5%) had fair results (21-27 points), and none had poor results. There were no statistical differences between postoperative UCLA score and groups by age (P = .53), suture technique (P = .06), and tear size (P = .5). The correlation between technique of repair, age, and postoperative score has not shown statistical differences between margin convergence with or without suture anchor and direct tendon-to-bone repair with suture anchor in the 61- to 65-year-old patients. Patients older than 65 years achieved the best results with margin convergence by side-to-side suture. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in the elderly achieves satisfactory results in a large percentage of cases regardless of the patient's age, tear size, and type of suture repair. These results are comparable to those of traditional open repair. We believe that arthroscopic evaluation allows an

  5. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: Ulnar Shortening vs. Arthroscopic Wafer Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Luc De; Vandenberghe, Lore; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of ulnar shortenings was compared with that of arthroscopic wafer resections for ulnar impaction (or abutment) syndrome in patients with a positive ulnar variance. The outcome was measured by DASH score, visual analog scale for pain, and working incapacity. The mean DASH score in the ulnar shortening group was 26; in the wafer group it was 36. The VAS scores were respectively 4.4 and 4.6. The working incapacity was 7?months in the ulnar shortening group and 6.1 months in the wafer group. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. PMID:25032075

  6. Arthroscopic Knotless Peripheral Ulnar-Sided TFCC Repair

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, William B.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the indications and technique for all-arthroscopic knotless repair of a peripheral tear to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). The advantage of this technique is that it allows repair of the articular disk back to the fovea of the ulna without any suture knots to irritate the patient. The learning curve is steep, but once learned, this technique can be performed very quickly and is faster. There are no knots to irritate the patient, and in the author's opinion, there is quicker pain relief than with other techniques. PMID:25945301

  7. Arthroscopic Knotless Peripheral Ulnar-Sided TFCC Repair.

    PubMed

    Geissler, William B

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the indications and technique for all-arthroscopic knotless repair of a peripheral tear to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). The advantage of this technique is that it allows repair of the articular disk back to the fovea of the ulna without any suture knots to irritate the patient. The learning curve is steep, but once learned, this technique can be performed very quickly and is faster. There are no knots to irritate the patient, and in the author's opinion, there is quicker pain relief than with other techniques.

  8. Arthroscopic meniscal suture with the "double-loop technique".

    PubMed

    Wageck, J M; Rockett, P R

    1997-02-01

    A new personal technique of arthroscopic meniscal suture in which the knots are all inside the knees, fixed only in the meniscus is presented. Using a new tool, a flexible double-loop allows the suture in the posterior horn of the meniscus to pass the suture from the anterior portal to the posterior portal without the necessity of large posterior incision to protect the vascular-nervous plexus. This paper presents the indication and the technique, as well as a variety of possible knots and their advantages.

  9. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Arthroscopic Fixation of Cell Free Polymer-Based Cartilage Implants with a Bioinspired Polymer Surface on the Hip Joint: A Cadaveric Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Matthias; Duif, Christian; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Kaps, Christian; Kalwa, Lukas; Seidl, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the adhesion capacity of a polyglycolic acid- (PGA-) hyaluronan scaffold with a structural modification based on a planar polymer (PM) surface in a cadaver cartilage defect model. Two cadaver specimens were used to serially test multiple chondral matrices. In a cadaver hip model, cell free polymer-based cartilage implants with a planar bioinspired PM surface (PGA-PM-scaffolds) were implanted arthroscopically on 10 mm × 15 mm full-thickness femoral hip cartilage lesions. Unprocessed cartilage implants without a bioinspired PM surface were used as control group. The cartilage implants were fixed without and with the use of fibrin glue on femoral hip cartilage defects. After 50 movement cycles and removal of the distraction, a rearthroscopy was performed to assess the outline attachment and integrity of the scaffold. The fixation techniques without and with fibrin fixation showed marginal differences for outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation after 50 cycles. The PGA-PM-scaffolds with fibrin fixation achieved a higher score in terms of the attachment, integrity, and endpoint fixation than the PGA-scaffold on the cartilage defect. Relating to the outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation, the fixation with PGA-PM-scaffolds accomplished significantly better results compared to the PGA-scaffolds (P = 0.03752, P = 0.03078, P = 0.00512, P = 0.00512). PGA-PM-scaffolds demonstrate increased observed initial fixation strength in cadaver femoral head defects relative to PGA-scaffold, particularly when fibrin glue is used for fixation. PMID:25247185

  11. Femoral tunnel malposition in ACL revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joseph A; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific "technical cause of failure." Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Aetiology of femoral hernias revisited: bilateral femoral hernia in a young male (two cases).

    PubMed

    Kochupapy, R T; Ranganathan, G; Dias, S; Shanahan, D

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral femoral hernias are less common in men than in women and rare in young adults. Only one case of a bilateral femoral hernia in a young man has been reported in the literature before. Three main theories have been postulated for femoral hernias. The theory that they are an acquired disease is the most accepted due to the common occurrence of such hernias in multiparous women but the theory lacks enough evidence. We report two cases in young men. Anatomical variations in the femoral canal could be the primary aetiological factor in these patients. A unilateral femoral hernia in young men with acquired aetiological factors requires a clinical examination of the opposite side.

  13. Comparison of arthroscopic and open Latarjet with a learning curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, G; Benchouk, S; Kherad, O; Lädermann, A

    2016-02-01

    To compare arthroscopic and open Latarjet performed by a single shoulder surgeon with learning curve analysis A comparative and learning curve analysis was carried out on a prospectively gathered database of 2 consecutive series of patients treated with arthroscopic and open Latarjet procedures performed by a single shoulder surgeon between 2008 and 2014. The database included patient characteristics, ISIS scores, operative time, intra- and postoperative complications, graft and screws positioning, as well as pre- and postoperative Walch-Duplay scores. Sixty-four patients were included in the study, 28 in the arthroscopic group and 36 in the open group with similar age, sex ratio and preoperative ISIS score. Operative time was significantly higher in the arthroscopic group (146 versus 81 min, p = 0.001), and although no intra-operative complications were recorded in either group, there were significantly more postoperative complications in the arthroscopic group (29 vs. 11 %, p = 0.03). Screw placement was more accurate in the open group, and postoperative Walch-Duplay score did not show any significant difference between the groups (88 points in the arthroscopic group and 91 points in the open group). The arthroscopic Latarjet learning curve analysis showed that the need for conversion ceased after the first 10 patients and that surgical time came close to that of open procedure after 20 procedures. In this study, 10 arthroscopic Latarjet procedures were needed to overcome the need for conversion, and 20 procedures to achieve equal operating time to the open technique. Even though functional outcome and patient satisfaction were similar in both techniques, complications, screw placement inaccuracy, persistent apprehension and recurrences still remain higher with the arthroscopic technique. Retrospective comparative analysis, Level III.

  14. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3(+) T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could

  15. Demographic trends in arthroscopic and open biceps tenodesis across the United States.

    PubMed

    Vellios, Evan E; Nazemi, Alireza K; Yeranosian, Michael G; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Wang, Jeffrey C; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate trends in procedures and to report on demographic data of patients undergoing arthroscopic vs. open biceps tenodesis. A retrospective review of a commercially available database (PearlDiver) was conducted to identify cases of arthroscopic and open biceps tenodesis performed between 2007 and 2011 with concurrent diagnoses of commonly associated shoulder disorders. Each record provided the patient's age, gender, and region within the United States, and statistical significance was determined with respect to each of these demographics. There were 9011 patients who underwent arthroscopic biceps tenodesis and 11,678 patients who underwent open biceps tenodesis between 2007 and 2011. The number of biceps tenodesis cases increased from 2007 to 2011 (2047 to 5832; P = .015). Both arthroscopic and open biceps tenodesis procedures were performed most commonly in the 30- to 59-year-old age group (76.3% and 76.1%; P < .00001). Men underwent arthroscopic or open biceps tenodesis more commonly than women did (66.1% and 71.9%; P < .00001). Rates of both open and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis varied significantly among the Midwest, South, Northeast, and West regions (P = .009; P = .007); 49.8% of arthroscopic and 44.6% of open biceps tenodesis cases were associated with rotator cuff tears, whereas 14.4% of arthroscopic and 16.2% of open cases were associated with biceps tendon disorders. Both arthroscopic and open biceps tenodesis cases increased annually from 2007 to 2011. The majority of biceps tenodesis cases were performed in men aged 30 to 59 years, and the South had the highest overall number of cases. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of these procedures with and without concomitant pathologic processes. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the outside-in femoral tunnel drilling technique: a prospective study and short- to mid-term results.

    PubMed

    Abdelkafy, Ashraf

    2015-03-01

    Anatomic positioning of the femoral and tibial tunnels in the native ACL femoral and tibial footprints requires an independent drilling either via an accessory medial portal (trans-portal drilling) or using an outside-in drilling technique. Conventional trans-tibial drilling (dependant drilling) was found to lack the ability to accurately position the femoral tunnel in the native ACL footprint. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the functional outcome results of anatomic single-bundle ACLR using the OI femoral tunnel drilling technique. Single surgeon single center prospective case series study. 64 patients having complete ACL tears were included in the current study. Average follow-up was 15.8 months (range 8-25). Objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm knee score, SF-36 score, VAS for patients' satisfaction, VAS for pain and Kellgren and Lawrence (K/L) classification of osteoarthritis were used for follow-up evaluation. Objective IKDC score revealed that 60 patients had grade ''A'' and 4 had grade ''B'', while no single patient had neither grade ''C'' nor ''D''. The average Lysholm Score was 92.4, average subjective IKDC was 91.5. Average SF-36 score was 96.7. The average VAS for operation satisfaction was 9.7. Average VAS for pain was 0.3. Forty-nine patients were classified as normal K/L classification, 7 were grade ''1'', 8 were grade ''2''. Comparing pre-operative and follow-up Objective IKDC, Subjective IKDC, Lysholm, SF-36 and VAS for pain scores revealed statistically significant differences (P value <0.05). Arthroscopic-assisted ACL reconstruction using the outside-in femoral tunnel drilling technique shows a good and satisfactory functional outcome results at short- to mid-term follow-up. Level IV.

  17. Correlation of ultrasound appearance, gross anatomy, and histology of the femoral nerve at the femoral triangle.

    PubMed

    Lonchena, Tiffany K; McFadden, Kathryn; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Correlation between ultrasound appearance, gross anatomic characteristics, and histologic structure of the femoral nerve (FN) is lacking. Utilizing cadavers, we sought to characterize the anatomy of the FN, and provide a quantitative measure of its branching. We hypothesize that at the femoral crease, the FN exists as a group of nerve branches, rather than a single nerve structure, and secondarily, that this transition into many branches is apparent on ultrasonography. Nineteen preserved cadavers were investigated. Ultrasonography was sufficient to evaluate the femoral nerve in nine specimens; gross dissection was utilized in all 19. Anatomic characteristics were recorded, including distances from the inguinal ligament to femoral crease, first nerve branch, and complete arborization of the nerve. The nerves from nine specimens were excised for histologic analysis. On ultrasound, the nerve became more flattened, widened, and less discrete as it coursed distally. Branching of the nerve was apparent in 12 of 18 images, with mean distance from inguinal ligament of 3.9 (1.0) cm. However, upon dissection, major branching of the femoral nerve occurred at 3.1 (1.0) cm distal to the inguinal ligament, well proximal to the femoral crease. Histologic analysis was consistent with findings at dissection. The femoral nerve arborizes into multiple branches between the inguinal ligament and the femoral crease. Initial branching is often high in the femoral triangle. As hypothesized, the FN exists as a closely associated group of nerve branches at the level of the femoral crease; however, the termination of the nerve into multiple branches is not consistently apparent on ultrasonography.

  18. Arthroscopic Excision of an Intraarticular Osteoid Osteoma in the Distal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk; Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Lee, Min Young

    2016-01-01

    An intraarticular osteoid osteoma of the knee is uncommon, and its treatment is challenging. The authors present a case of arthroscopic excision of an intraarticular osteoid osteoma in the distal femur, which was accessible through the knee joint. After confirming the nidus of the osteoid osteoma by computed tomography, the lesion was completely removed arthroscopically. The patient reported complete pain relief immediately after surgery. This case demonstrates that intraarticular osteoid osteomas in the knee joint can be treated by arthroscopic excision and that good results can be obtained. PMID:27904732

  19. Arthroscopic Excision of an Intraarticular Osteoid Osteoma in the Distal Femur.

    PubMed

    Kang, Suk; Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Ho Min; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jong Pil

    2016-12-01

    An intraarticular osteoid osteoma of the knee is uncommon, and its treatment is challenging. The authors present a case of arthroscopic excision of an intraarticular osteoid osteoma in the distal femur, which was accessible through the knee joint. After confirming the nidus of the osteoid osteoma by computed tomography, the lesion was completely removed arthroscopically. The patient reported complete pain relief immediately after surgery. This case demonstrates that intraarticular osteoid osteomas in the knee joint can be treated by arthroscopic excision and that good results can be obtained.

  20. Arthroscopic bony bankart repair using double-threaded headless screw: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, Takeshi; Nagura, Issei; Mifune, Yutaka; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of arthroscopic fixation for bony Bankart lesion using a double-threaded cannulated screw. A 39-year-old man sustained a left shoulder injury from a motorcycle accident. Radiographs showed bony Bankart lesion and CT revealed 40% defect of glenoid articular surface. Arthroscopic fixation was performed using double-threaded cannulated screw after the bony fragment was reduced by suturing the labrum at the edge with a suture anchor. Arthroscopic bony Bankart repair using double-threaded cannulated screw fixation is effective because compression force could be applied between bony fragments and the screw head is not exposed in the glenohumeral joint.

  1. Arthroscopic removal of an osteoid osteoma of the talus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Resnick, R B; Jarolem, K L; Sheskier, S C; Desai, P; Cisa, J

    1995-04-01

    This article describes a patient with a 10-year history of persistent ankle pain. Differential diagnosis included osteoid osteoma and anterior ankle impingement. This patient subsequently underwent arthroscopic excision of a lesion on the talar neck following a complete radiographic work-up, which was nondiagnostic. The diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was finalized upon pathologic study of the arthroscopic shavings. The use of a motorized instrument for excision did not preclude pathologic evaluation of the specimen. Therefore, in an accessible location on the talar neck, arthroscopic excision of an osteoid osteoma can be performed.

  2. Arthroscopic excision of distal pole of patella for refractory patellar tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John D

    2009-07-01

    This article examines the results of arthroscopic tendon debridement with excision of the distal pole of the patella for refractory patellar tendinitis. Nine patients failed at least 3 months of conservative therapy and underwent arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with debridement of the deep proximal patella tendon. At least 3 months postoperatively (range, 3 months-5 years), 8 patients reported no distal patellar pole tenderness (Bassett sign), and 1 patient reported only mild tenderness. Arthroscopic excision of the distal patellar pole with tendon debridement holds promise for the treatment of refractory patellar tendinitis.

  3. Femoral lipectomy increases postprandial lipemia in women

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Teri L.; Bessesen, Daniel H.; Cox-York, Kimberly A.; Erickson, Christopher B.; Law, Christopher K.; Anderson, Molly K.; Wang, Hong; Jackman, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Femoral subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) appears to be cardioprotective compared with abdominal SAT, possibly through better triglyceride (TG) sequestration. We hypothesized that removal of femoral SAT would increase postprandial TG through a reduction in dietary fatty acid (FA) storage. Normal-weight (means ± SD; BMI 23.9 ± 2.6 kg/m2) women (n = 29; age 45 ± 6 yr) were randomized to femoral lipectomy (LIPO) or control (CON) and followed for 1 yr. Regional adiposity was measured by DEXA and CT. A liquid meal labeled with [14C]oleic acid was used to trace the appearance of dietary FA in plasma (6-h postprandial TG), breath (24-h oxidation), and SAT (24-h [14C]TG storage). Fasting LPL activity was measured in abdominal and femoral SAT. DEXA leg fat mass was reduced after LIPO vs. CON (Δ−1.4 ± 0.7 vs. 0.1 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.001) and remained reduced at 1 yr (−1.1 ± 1.4 vs. −0.2 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.05), as did CT thigh subcutaneous fat area (−39.6 ± 36.6 vs. 4.7 ± 14.6 cm2, P < 0.05); DEXA trunk fat mass and CT visceral fat area were unchanged. Postprandial TG increased (5.9 ± 7.7 vs. −0.6 ± 5.3 × 103 mg/dl, P < 0.05) and femoral SAT LPL activity decreased (−21.9 ± 22.3 vs. 10.5 ± 26.5 nmol·min−1·g−1, P < 0.05) 1 yr following LIPO vs. CON. There were no group differences in 14C-labeled TG appearing in abdominal and femoral SAT or elsewhere. In conclusion, femoral fat remained reduced 1 yr following lipectomy and was accompanied by increased postprandial TG and reduced femoral SAT LPL activity. There were no changes in storage of meal-derived FA or visceral fat. Our data support a protective role for femoral adiposity on circulating TG independent of dietary FA storage and visceral adiposity. PMID:25968576

  4. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnel Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Laurie A.; Kerslake, Sarah; Lafave, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a procedure aimed to reestablish the checkrein to lateral patellar translation in patients with symptomatic patellofemoral instability. Correct femoral tunnel position is thought to be crucial to successful MPFL reconstruction, but the accuracy of this statement in terms of patient outcomes has not been tested. Purpose: To assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in an MPFL reconstruction cohort and to determine the correlation between tunnel accuracy and a validated disease-specific, patient-reported quality-of-life outcome measure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Between June 2008 and February 2014, a total of 206 subjects underwent an MPFL reconstruction. Lateral radiographs were measured to determine the accuracy of the femoral tunnel by measuring the distance from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point. Banff Patella Instability Instrument (BPII) scores were collected a mean 24 months postoperatively. Results: A total of 155 (79.5%) subjects had adequate postoperative lateral radiographs and complete BPII scores. The mean duration of follow-up (±SD) was 24.4 ± 8.2 months (range, 12-74 months). Measurement from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point resulted in 143 (92.3%) tunnels being categorized as “good” or “ideal.” There were 8 failures in the cohort, none of which occurred in malpositioned tunnels. The mean distance from the center of the MPFL tunnel to the center of the Schöttle point was 5.9 ± 4.2 mm (range, 0.5-25.9 mm). The mean postoperative BPII score was 65.2 ± 22.5 (range, 9.2-100). Pearson r correlation demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between accuracy of femoral tunnel position and BPII score (r = –0.08; 95% CI, –0.24 to 0.08). Conclusion: There was no evidence of a correlation between the accuracy of MPFL reconstruction femoral tunnel in relation to the Schöttle point and

  5. Ultrasound-guided arthroscopic management of hallux rigidus

    PubMed Central

    Kruczyński, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of metatarso-phalangeal joint arthroscopy in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans was first described in 1988. The technique produces good results. However, it can be difficult to enter a joint when it is deformed by degenerative disease. Sonography is a modern visualisation modality which can be used in orthopaedic surgery. Aim To describe a method of intraoperative sonographic navigation during first metatarso-phalangeal joint arthroscopy. Material and methods The modality was used in 3 patients. The joint was visualised in the ultrasound scanner. After confirming the intra-articular position of the guide needle, a medial portal was established. The procedure started with the removal and vaporisation of the hypertrophic synovium. Gradual resection of the osteophytes was then carried out. The procedure was terminated after the ultrasound image showed that a smooth upper surface of the metatarsal head had been achieved. Results All 3 patients were satisfied with the procedure and function of the treated feet. Average surgery time was 81 min. No complications were found. Conclusions Mini-invasive treatment of hallux rigidus with sonography-guided arthroscopic cheilectomy appears to be a reproducible procedure leading to good clinical results. We encourage surgeons familiar with ultrasound visualisation of the joints to use the technique described in this paper in the arthroscopic treatment of hallux rigidus. PMID:27829936

  6. (Dry) arthroscopic partial wrist arthrodesis: tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    del Piñal, F; Tandioy-Delgado, F

    2014-10-01

    One of the options for performing a partial wrist arthrodesis is the arthroscopic technique. As a first advantage arthroscopy allows us to directly assess the state of the articular surface of the carpal bones and define the best surgical option during the salvage operation. Furthermore, it allows performance of the procedure with minimal ligament damage and minimal interference with the blood supply of the carpals. These will (presumably) entail less capsular scarring and more rapid healing. Lastly, there is cosmetic benefit by reducing the amount of external scarring. The procedure has a steep learning curve even for accomplished arthroscopists but can be performed in a competitive manner to the open procedure if the dry technique is used. The aim of this paper is to present the technical details, tricks and tips to make the procedure accessible to all hand specialists with an arthroscopic interest. As it is paramount that the surgeon is acquainted with the "dry" technique, some technical details about it will also be presented. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Arthroscopic management of chondromatosis of the elbow: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wzietek, Bogdan; Frańczuk, Bogusław

    2002-06-30

    Background. This article describes a case of chondromatosis of the elbow in a 33-year-old male patient. An arthroscopic method was used to remove multiple loose bodies from the joint.
    Case history. The patient complained of pain in the right elbow. He presented with edema in the elbow joint, pain during movement, occasional slippage, and a 300 functional reduction in elbow extension.
    Procedure. After the arthroscope was introduced into the joint, numerous loose bodies were detected, covered with cartilage, pale pink synovial membrane with hyperthropied villi. The cartilage of the joint surfaces bent slighty under pressure: however, there was no sign of decay, destruction, or deep deficits. Using a punch and Pean forceps we removed ca. 20 loose chondral and condro-osseous bodies ranging in diameter from 0,3 to 2,0 cm.
    Outcome. There were no post-surgical complications. After several days the patient was discharged. Within a week he recovered a full range of motion in the joint and no pain. The patient continues to work in a job demanding physical exertion and plays volleyball.
    Conclusion. Arthroscopy of the elbow is a good solution for the problem of loose bodies in the elbow joint, especially when they occur in both sections of the joint, where classical surgical techniques require two routes of surgical access or two-phase surgery.

  8. [Arthroscopic removal of an intraarticular projectile from the knee].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Martín, A A; Guerrero-Moyano, N; Salinas-Sánchez, P; Guerado-Parra, E

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a patient who sustained a gunshot wound; the projectile was located in the knee and was arthroscopically removed. A 31 year-old patient sustained a gunshot wound in the right thigh, right hand and left knee. X-rays revealed the presence of a projectile in the knee, thigh and hand. The projectile was arthroscopically removed. Traumas causing articular wounds of the knee are infrequent. Excluding the most frequent causes of articular wounds, a small percentage of them are due to gunshot wounds. There is consensus around arthroscopy as a technique useful to remove articular foreign bodies; it has advantages over open surgery. This procedure minimizes surgical morbidity, reduces the risk of septic arthritis, synovitis, arthropathy or systemic lead toxicity, and it also hastens the patient's functional recovery. Knee arthroscopy allows physicians to provide a definitive treatment of these injuries, explore the joint, diagnose associated injuries and perform debridement and articular lavage. Arthroscopy is an effective tool for the extraction of articular projectiles; it also allows diagnosing and treating associated lesions.

  9. Development of Atomic Force Microscope for Arthroscopic Knee Cartilage Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imer, Raphaël; Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.; Stolz, Martin; Aebi, Ueli; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Koenig, Uwe; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A. U.; Staufer, Urs

    2006-03-01

    A recent study, based on ex vivo unconfined compression testing of normal, diseased, and enzymatically altered cartilage, revealed that a scanning force microscope (SFM), used as a nano-intender, is sensitive enough to enable measurement of alterations in the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Based on these ex vivo measurements, we have designed a quantitative diagnosis tool, the scanning force arthroscope (SFA), able to perform in vivo measurements during a standard arthroscopic procedure. For stabilizing and positioning the instrument relative to the surface under investigation, a pneumatic system has been developed. A segmented piezoelectric tube was used to perform the indentation displacement, and a pyramidal nanometer-scale silicon tip mounted on a cantilever with an integrated deflection sensor measured the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Mechanical means were designed to protect the fragile cantilever during the insertion of the instrument into the knee joint. The stability of the pneumatic stage was checked with a prototype SFA. In a series of tests, load-displacement curves were recorded in a knee phantom and, more recently, in a pig’s leg.

  10. The strength of suture configurations in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    White, Clive D; Bunker, Timothy D; Hooper, Robert M

    2006-08-01

    This study evaluated the strength of different suture configurations with the use of a recently introduced arthroscopic suture passer (ExpressSew; Surgical Solutions, Valencia, CA). The ultimate tensile strength and mode of failure of each suture configuration were repeatedly tested on a validated porcine rotator cuff tendon model, with the use of standard suture material (No. 2 FiberWire [Arthrex, Naples, FL]) passed with ExpressSew and tested on a Hounsfield digital tensiometer type H20K-W (Tinius Olsen, Hersham, PA). The strongest construct was 2 mattress sutures (mean, 169 N; standard deviation, 56.1 N); this was followed in strength by a single modified Kessler suture (mean, 161 N; standard deviation, 16.9 N), 4 simple sutures (mean, 155 N; standard deviation, 27.3 N), and finally, a single Mason-Allen suture (mean, 140 N; standard deviation, 28.6 N). Study results show little difference in strength for varying complexities of suture configurations. In simple terms, no demonstrable difference was seen in the strength of construct, whether the surgeon used 4 simple sutures, 2 mattress sutures, or 1 grasping suture. This study allows the surgeon to justify use of the simplest configuration of suture passage that works in his hands, for the purpose of attaining a reliable and repeatable repair of the rotator cuff through arthroscopic methods.

  11. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Faunø, P; Nielsen, A B

    1992-01-01

    A follow-up study was conducted to clarify the clinical and radiological long-term consequences of arthroscopic meniscus resection. One hundred thirty-six patients who had unilateral arthroscopic resection of an isolated meniscal tear attended for an interview and a physical and radiological examination. Follow-up averaged 8.5 years, with a range of 7.9-11.6 years. The reoperation rate was as high as 22.8%, but was the lowest in the bucket handle tear group (13%). Pain after exercise was less frequent among patients treated for a bucket handle tear compared to other lesions. Fifty-three percent of the patients had at least one of the Fairbanks change in the operated knee and only 22% in the control knees. The radiographic result was not influenced by the type of meniscus lesion nor were high age or intraoperatively described cartilage damage factors of significance. Malalignment less than 4 degrees of valgus and greater than 10 degrees of valgus was found to be a significant risk factor for the development of degenerative changes following meniscus resection.

  12. Does arthroscopic subacromial decompression improve quality of life.

    PubMed

    Butt, U; Whiteman, A; Wilson, J; Paul, E; Roy, B

    2015-04-01

    There has been a significant rise in the volume of subacromial decompression surgery performed in the UK. This study aimed to determine whether arthroscopic subacromial decompression improves health related quality of life in a cost effective manner. Patients undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery for impingement were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. The Oxford shoulder score and the EQ-5D™ instruments were completed prior to and following surgery. A cost-utility analysis was performed. Eighty-three patients were eligible for the study with a mean follow-up duration of 15 months (range: 4-27 months). The mean Oxford shoulder score improved by 13 points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11-15 points). The mean health utility gain extrapolated from the EQ-5D™ questionnaire improved by 0.23 (95% CI: 0.16-0.30), translating to a minimum cost per QALY of £5,683. Subacromial decompression leads to significant improvement in function and quality of life in a cost effective manner. This provides justification for its ongoing practice by appropriately trained shoulder surgeons in correctly selected patients.

  13. The successful arthroscopic treatment of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nikhil K; Spinner, Robert J; Smith, Jay; Howe, Benjamin M; Amrami, Kimberly K; Iannotti, Joseph P; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can distinguish between intraneural ganglion cysts and paralabral (extraneural) cysts at the glenohumeral joint. Suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts share the same pathomechanism as their paralabral counterparts, emanating from a tear in the glenoid labrum. The authors present 2 cases to demonstrate that the identification and arthroscopic repair of labral tears form the cornerstone of treatment for intraneural ganglion cysts of the suprascapular nerve. METHODS Two patients with suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts were identified: 1 was recognized and treated prospectively, and the other, previously reported as a paralabral cyst, was identified retrospectively through the reinter-pretation of high-resolution MR images. RESULTS Both patients achieved full functional recovery and had complete radiological involution of the intraneural ganglion cysts at the 3-month and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Previous reports of suprascapular intraneural ganglion cysts described treatment by an open approach to decompress the cysts and resect the articular nerve branch to the glenohumeral joint. The 2 cases in this report demonstrate that intraneural ganglion cysts, similar to paralabral cysts, can be treated with arthroscopic repair of the glenoid labrum without resection of the articular branch. This approach minimizes surgical morbidity and directly addresses the primary etiology of intraneural and extraneural ganglion cysts.

  14. Arthroscopic gluteal muscle contracture release with radiofrequency energy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Jie; Wang, Yan; Xue, Jing; Lui, Pauline Po-Yee; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture is common after repeated intramuscular injections and sometimes is sufficiently debilitating to require open surgery. We asked whether arthroscopic release of gluteal muscle contracture using radiofrequency energy would decrease complications with clinically acceptable results. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients with bilateral gluteal muscle contractures (57 males, 51 females; mean age, 23.7 years). We used inferior, anterosuperior, and posterosuperior portals. With the patient lying laterally, we developed and enlarged a potential space between the gluteal muscle group and the subcutaneous fat using blunt dissection. Under arthroscopic guidance through the inferior portal, we débrided and removed fatty tissue overlying the contractile band of the gluteal muscle group using a motorized shaver introduced through the superior portal. Radiofrequency then was introduced through the superior portal to gradually excise the contracted bands from superior to inferior. Finally, hemostasis was ensured using radiofrequency. Patients were followed a minimum of 7 months (mean, 17.4 months; range, 7-42 months). At last followup, the adduction and flexion ranges of the hip were 45.3 degrees +/- 8.7 degrees and 110.2 degrees +/- 11.9 degrees, compared with 10.4 degrees +/- 7.2 degrees and 44.8 degrees +/- 14.1 degrees before surgery. No hip abductor contracture recurred and no patient had residual hip pain or gluteal muscle wasting. We found gluteal muscle contracture could be released effectively with radiofrequency energy.

  15. [Fracture arthroplasty of femoral neck fractures].

    PubMed

    Braun, K F; Hanschen, M; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    A paradigm shift in the treatment of elderly patients has recently taken place leading to an increase in joint replacement surgery. The aim of this article is to highlight new developments and to present a treatment algorithm for femoral neck fractures. The age limit must be individually determined considering the comorbidities and perioperative risk profile. Pertrochanteric femoral fractures are nearly exclusively treated by osteosynthesis regardless of age. The situation for femoral neck fractures is more complex. Patients younger than 65 years should generally be treated by osteosynthesis but patients older than 65 years benefit from hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty. In patients aged between 65 and 75 years with high functional demands and a justifiable perioperative risk, total joint replacement is the treatment of choice. In physically less active patients older than 75 years and poor general condition, preference should be given to hemiarthroplasty.

  16. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. The terminal branches of the medial femoral circumflex artery: the arterial supply of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Lazaro, L E; Klinger, C E; Sculco, P K; Helfet, D L; Lorich, D G

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates and defines the topographic anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery (MFCA) terminal branches supplying the femoral head (FH). Gross dissection of 14 fresh-frozen cadaveric hips was undertaken to determine the extra and intracapsular course of the MFCA's terminal branches. A constant branch arising from the transverse MFCA (inferior retinacular artery; IRA) penetrates the capsule at the level of the anteroinferior neck, then courses obliquely within the fibrous prolongation of the capsule wall (inferior retinacula of Weitbrecht), elevated from the neck, to the posteroinferior femoral head-neck junction. This vessel has a mean of five (three to nine) terminal branches, of which the majority penetrate posteriorly. Branches from the ascending MFCA entered the femoral capsular attachment posteriorly, running deep to the synovium, through the neck, and terminating in two branches. The deep MFCA penetrates the posterosuperior femoral capsular. Once intracapsular, it divides into a mean of six (four to nine) terminal branches running deep to the synovium, within the superior retinacula of Weitbrecht of which 80% are posterior. Our study defines the exact anatomical location of the vessels, arising from the MFCA and supplying the FH. The IRA is in an elevated position from the femoral neck and may be protected from injury during fracture of the femoral neck. We present vascular 'danger zones' that may help avoid iatrogenic vascular injury during surgical interventions about the hip.

  18. [Epiphyseolysis of the femoral head: new aspects of diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Funk, J F; Lebek, S

    2014-08-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease in adolescents and is always surgically treated with the aim to avoid further slippage and to reduce the risk of degenerative arthritis at young age. A summary of the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, radiographic imaging and current therapy concepts is given. A selective review of the literature was performed. With an increasing body mass index in adolescents the incidence of SCFE also increases. The diagnostic routine is comprised of a clinical examination with the evaluation of Drehmann's sign and a radiographic evaluation including anterior-posterior aspect and frog's legs view. In situ stabilization with a single screw is the standard treatment for the most prevalent mild or moderate stable slippages. In cases of acute slippage a gentle reduction maneuver may be attempted. Hardware removal must not be performed before epiphyseal closure. Common bilateral but not simultaneous occurrence of the disease requires prophylactic pinning of the unaffected side by default, at least in central Europe. Various surgical treatment options exist to reduce the femoroacetabular impingement caused by the slippage. Current treatment algorithms result in satisfactory long-term outcomes. If the risk of developing degenerative arthritis after SCFE may be reduced even more with modern arthroscopic or open surgical procedures to restore the anatomic pre-slip conditions has to be confirmed through further long-term studies. The implementation of programs to prevent obesity in adolescents may also reduce the incidence of SCFE.

  19. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat S; Karkamkar, Sachin S; Patil, Vaishali S Dumbre; Patil, Shailesh S; Ranaware, Abhijeet S

    2016-01-01

    Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN) or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS) are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP) of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22–65 years) and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27–72 months). Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion. PMID:27512218

  20. Arthroscopic and open management of posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H

    2014-09-01

    Posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI) is the most common cause of residual instability following a simple elbow dislocation. PLRI may result from trauma or iatrogenic injury to the radial ulnohumeral ligament during treatment for other conditions, such as lateral epicondylitis. PLRI can be identified through a combination of history and physical examination, and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging arthrography. Once diagnosed, surgery is necessary to correct persistent instability. Instability can be confirmed arthroscopically through several findings, including subluxation of the radial head on the capitellum and the arthroscopic "drive through sign of the elbow." Acute repairs, both open and arthroscopic, heal with excellent patient outcomes. In the chronic setting, graft reconstruction may be required. This report describes arthroscopic repair of the radial ulnohumeral ligament and open reconstruction with associated outcomes. A high index of suspicion is necessary to correctly diagnosis this condition in patients with lateral elbow pain and feelings of instability.

  1. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    PubMed Central

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique. PMID:26998453

  2. Result from arthroscopic surgical treatment of renewed tearing of the rotator cuff of the shoulder☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; França, Flávio de Oliveira; Freitas, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; Prandini, Alexandre; Godinho, André Couto; Costa, Rafael Patrocínio de Paula

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate function among patients with postoperative recurrence of rotator cuff injuries that was treated arthroscopically (case series) and compare this with function in patients without recurrence (control group); and to compare function among patients with recurrence of rotator cuff injuries that were greater than and smaller than 3 cm. Methods This was a retrospective evaluation of patients who underwent arthroscopic revision of rotator cuff injuries using the ASES, Constant & Murley and UCLA scores and a visual analog pain scale, in comparison with patients in a control group who underwent primary rotator cuff repair. Results The size of the rotator cuff injury recurrence had a statistically significant influence on the result from the arthroscopic surgical treatment. The functional scores showed worse results than those from the first procedure. Conclusion Arthroscopic surgical treatment of renewed tearing of rotator cuff injuries showed worse functional scores than those from primary repair of the injury. PMID:26229900

  3. McMurray Test: A Prediction of Arthroscopic Meniscectomy Outcomes in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng; Lin, Xiangjin; Zhu, Liulong; Li, Min

    2015-05-01

    The McMurray test is used to evaluate patients with meniscal tears of the knee. Analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of McMurray test and the correlation between McMurray sign and postoperative outcomes are helpful to screen the candidates for arthroscopic meniscectomy. The present study compares the results of McMurray test with arthroscopic examination in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We studied 149 patients diagnosed as meniscal lesion with osteoarthritis by radiology and had arthroscopic surgery. Our data show that positive McMurray sign implies good postoperative outcomes for the patients with meniscal tear associated with osteoarthritis. For patients with osteoarthritis, those whose positive McMurray signs are in line with their radiological findings indicate they are eligible candidates for arthroscopic meniscectomy. Our study suggests that McMurray sign can be used as an indication for both symptomatic meniscal tear and postoperative outcomes.

  4. Can arthroscopic revision surgery for shoulder instability be a fair option?

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, Silvana; Garofalo, Raffaele; Tafuri, Silvio; Cesari, Eugenio; Rose, Giacomo Delle; Castagna, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    the aim of this study was to evaluate the role of arthroscopic capsuloplasty in the treatment of failed primary arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability. we retrospectively examined at a minimum of 3-years follow-up 22 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment between 1999 and 2007 who had recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a post-surgical failure. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate which variable could influence the definitive result and clinical outcomes at final follow-up. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. we observed after revision surgery an overall failure rate of 8/22 (36.4%) including frank dislocations, subluxations and also apprehension that seriously inhibit the patient's quality of life. No significant differences were observed in the examined parameters. according to our outcomes we generally do not recommend an arthroscopic revision procedure for failed instability surgery.

  5. Compression of the suprascapular nerve by a ganglion cyst of the spinoglenoid notch: the arthroscopic solution.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Sven; Magosch, Petra; Habermeyer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated an all arthroscopic technique for treating suprascapular nerve entrapment by cyst formation in the spinoglenoid notch. Eight patients showed positive MRI and EMG findings with clinical sign of weakness and pain and with atrophy of the muscle. All patients underwent an all-arthroscopic procedure. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and 6 weeks and 3 months postoperatively and for the latest follow-up by clinical examination, MRI, and EMG. All patients improved in terms of pain, strength, and function. We found six superior labrum anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions. In these patients the cyst was drained, and the SLAP lesion was repaired. In two patients there was no communication between the joint and the cyst, and therefore capsulotomy was performed and left open. The results of our study show that arthroscopic decompression of the suprascapular nerve can be achieved by an all arthroscopic technique if the cyst formation is located at the spinoglenoid notch.

  6. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  7. Anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery with respect to the vascularity of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zlotorowicz, M; Szczodry, M; Czubak, J; Ciszek, B

    2011-11-01

    We performed a series of 16 anatomical dissections on Caucasian cadaver material to determine the surgical anatomy of the medial femoral circumflex artery (MFCA) and its anastomoses. These confirmed that the femoral head receives its blood supply primarily from the MFCA via a group of posterior superior nutrient arteries and the posterior inferior nutrient artery. In terms of anastomoses that may also contribute to the blood supply, the anastomosis with the inferior gluteal artery, via the piriformis branch, is the most important. These dissections provide a base of knowledge for further radiological studies on the vascularity of the normal femoral head and its vascularity after dislocation of the hip.

  8. Postoperative femoral component rotation and femoral anteversion after total knee arthroplasty in patients with distal femoral deformity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong-Chul; Bae, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Seung-Ju

    2013-08-01

    We asked whether total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with distal femoral deformity (DFD) would change femoral component rotation (FCR) and investigated the correlation between DFD and femoral anteversion (FA). 75 patients were divided into two groups according to the preoperative posterior condylar angle (PCA); group A without DFD (PCA<7°), group B with DFD (PCA>7°). We evaluated the different angles on the CT scan: (1) PCA, (2) angle between the line which is perpendicular to the Whiteside's line and PCL (WLP), and (3) FA. The mean FCRs were external rotation of 0.21°+2.75° in group A and internal rotation of 4.48°+2.51° in group B (P=0.001). The mean preoperative and postoperative FAs were similar in group A but were significantly different in group B (P=0.035). DFD resulted in excessive internal rotation of the femoral component. There was a secondary decrease in FA in patients with DFD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. All-Arthroscopic Technique for Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Cutbush, Kenneth; Hirpara, Kieran M.

    2015-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are a common injury particularly among contact sports players. There has been an increasing trend toward arthroscopic management of these injuries. To date, these reconstructions have primarily addressed superoinferior instability by reconstructing the coracoclavicular ligaments. We describe an all-arthroscopic technique for reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments using Arthrex ABS TightRopes (Arthrex, Naples, FL), with additional stabilization of the superior acromioclavicular joint capsule using an anchor-based suture bridge to address anteroposterior instability. PMID:26697307

  10. Anatomic and radiographic comparison of arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis sites.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Adam M; Macalena, Jeffrey A; Carson, Eric W; Tompkins, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral surgical techniques are both commonly utilized approaches for proximal biceps tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii. A central limitation to the widespread use of an arthroscopic approach for biceps tenodesis is that the tendon may be tenodesed too proximally in the bicipital groove, leading to persistent pain and tendinopathy. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo tenodesis location using arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral techniques for proximal biceps tenodesis in relation to clinically pertinent anatomic and radiographic landmarks. The null hypothesis was that arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis would not be significantly different in terms of the location from open subpectoral biceps tenodesis. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 20 matched pairs of cadaveric shoulder specimens were randomized such that within each pair, 1 shoulder underwent a standard open subpectoral biceps tenodesis and the other underwent an arthroscopic suprapectoral tenodesis. Limited dissection and exposure of the surgical tunnel site and reference landmarks were subsequently performed, and anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were obtained. Direct measurements were performed anatomically using a digital caliper and radiographically using picture archiving and communication system (PACS) software from the proximal lip of the humeral tunnel to regional landmarks. Both techniques were able to place the humeral tunnel distal to the bicipital groove in all specimens. On average, the open subpectoral approach placed the tunnel 2.2 cm distal to the arthroscopic suprapectoral approach. The arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis technique used in this study consistently placed the tenodesis tunnel distal to the bicipital groove, which may allay concerns about the bicipital groove as a pain source after this procedure. This anatomic study provides new information on tunnel

  11. Isolated HAGL lesion after arthroscopic Bankart repair in a professional soccer player.

    PubMed

    Celik, Haluk; Seckin, Mustafa Faik; Kara, Adnan; Akman, Senol

    2017-05-01

    Post-traumatic anterior shoulder instability commonly occurs following an avulsion of capsulolabral complex from glenoid (Bankart lesion) or rarely after humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligaments (HAGL lesion). Arthroscopic Bankart repair offers high success rates of healing. However, trauma following the treatment may cause implant failure or re-avulsion of the treated tissue. We aim to present the diagnosis and treatment of an isolated HAGL lesion in a professional soccer player who had previously undergone arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  12. A new "double-pulley" dual-row technique for arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart lesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Chunyan

    2011-09-01

    The double-row technique is a new concept for arthroscopic treatment of bony Bankart lesion in shoulder instability. It presents a new and reproducible technique for arthroscopic fixation of bony Bankart fragments with suture anchors. This technique creates double-mattress sutures which compress the fragment against its bone bed and restores better bony anatomy of the anterior glenoid rim with stable and non-tilting fixation that may improve healing.

  13. [Effectiveness comparison between arthroscopic and nonsurgical treatments for ankle degenerative osteoarthropathy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Shi, Xinge; Liu, Yujie; Wang, Zhigang; Wei, Min

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment and nonsurgical treatment on ankle degenerative osteoarthropathy. Between July 2009 and June 2011, 58 patients (58 ankles) suffering from ankle degenerative osteoarthropathy underwent arthroscopic treatment (arthroscopic group, n=28) and routine treatment (control group, n=30). There was no significant difference in gender, age, body mass index, disease duration, and degree of ankle degenerative osteoarthropathy between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Mazur score, visual analogue scale (VAS), and Tegner activity scale were used to evaluate the effectiveness. Incision healed primarily in arthroscopic group. The patients of 2 groups were followed up 1-2 years, averaged 1.5 years in arthroscopic group and 1.6 years in control group. At last follow-up, Mazur, VAS, and Tegner scores were significantly improved when compared with the preoperative scores in 2 groups (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was found at last follow-up between 2 groups (P > 0.05). According to Mazur scoring, the results were excellent in 8 cases, good in 14 cases, fair in 5 cases, and poor in 1 case, with an excellent and good rate of 79% in arthroscopic group; the results were excellent in 6 cases, good in 15 cases, fair in 6 cases, and poor in 3 cases, with an excellent and good rate of 70% in control group; and no significant difference was observed between 2 groups (u=0.98, P=0.77). Moreover, there was no correlation between Outerbridge classification and Mazur score in patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment (r=0.18, P= 0.34). Arthroscopic and nonsurgical treatments of ankle degenerative osteoarthropathy can both achieve good effectiveness.

  14. Does combined open and arthroscopic synovectomy for diffuse PVNS of the knee improve recurrence rates?

    PubMed

    Colman, Matthew W; Ye, Jason; Weiss, Kurt R; Goodman, Mark A; McGough, Richard L

    2013-03-01

    Diffuse-type pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) has a high local recurrence rate and as such can lead to erosive destruction of the involved joint. Multiple surgical modalities exist, but it is unknown which technique best minimizes local recurrence and surgical morbidity. We compared recurrence rates, arthritis progression, and complications between arthroscopic and open modalities for diffuse PVNS of the knee. We retrospectively identified 103 patients with PVNS treated between 1993 and 2011. Of these, 48 had diffuse-type PVNS of the knee treated by all-arthroscopic, open posterior with arthroscopic anterior, or open anterior and open posterior synovectomy. We recorded patient demographics, treatment profiles, recurrence rates, and arthritic progression. Minimum followup was 3 months (median, 40 months; range, 3-187 months). Recurrence rates were lower in the open/arthroscopic group compared with the arthroscopic or open/open groups: 9% versus 62% versus 64%, respectively. Arthritic progression occurred in 17% of the total study group with 8% going onto total knee arthroplasty within the followup period. We detected no difference between groups with regard to arthritic progression or progression to arthroplasty. The most common complication was hemarthrosis, which we drained in three patients (6% of the total study group), but there were no detectable differences between groups. Open posterior with arthroscopic anterior synovectomy is a viable, comprehensive approach to diffuse PVNS of the knee and provides both low recurrence rates and a low postoperative complication profile. Greater numbers of recurrences may be partially explained in the arthroscopic group by technical challenges associated with posterior arthroscopic synovectomy and in the open/open group by selection bias toward more aggressive disease. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. Arthroscopic Ultrasound Assessment of Articular Cartilage in the Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kaleva, Erna; Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Sahlman, Janne; Sirola, Joonas; Puhakka, Jani; Paatela, Teemu; Kröger, Heikki; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We tested whether an intra-articular ultrasound (IAUS) method could be used to evaluate cartilage status arthroscopically in human knee joints in vivo. Design: Seven patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery of the knee were enrolled in this study. An ultrasonic examination was conducted using the same portals as in the arthroscopic surgery. A high-frequency (40-MHz) ultrasound transducer (diameter = 1 mm) was directed to the desired location on the articular surface under arthroscopic control. In addition to ultrasound data, an IAUS video and optical video through the arthroscope were recorded. Classification of cartilage injuries according to International Cartilage Repair Society, as conducted by the orthopedic surgeon, provided reference data for comparison with the IAUS. Results: The IAUS method was successful in imaging different characteristics of the articular surfaces (e.g., intact surface, surface fibrillation, and lesions of varying depth). In some cases, also the subchondral bone and abnormal internal cartilage structure were visible in the IAUS images. Specifically, using the IAUS, a local cartilage lesion of 1 patient was found to be deeper than estimated arthroscopically. Conclusions: The IAUS method provided a novel arthroscopic method for quantitative imaging of articular cartilage lesions. The IAUS provided quantitative information about the cartilage integrity and thickness, which are not available in conventional arthroscopy. The present equipment is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for intravascular use and might be transferred to intra-articular use. The invasiveness of the IAUS method might restrict its wider clinical use but combined with arthroscopy, ultrasonic assessment may enlarge the diagnostic potential of arthroscopic surgery. PMID:26069583

  16. Sporting Activity After Arthroscopic Bankart Repair for Chronic Glenohumeral Instability.

    PubMed

    Plath, Johannes E; Feucht, Matthias J; Saier, Tim; Minzlaff, Philipp; Seppel, Gernot; Braun, Sepp; Imhoff, Andreas B

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect detailed data on postoperative sporting activity after arthroscopic Bankart repair for chronic shoulder instability. Of 113 patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair between February 2008 and August 2010, 81 met the inclusion criteria and were surveyed by a specially designed postal sport-specific questionnaire. Of these 81 patients, 66 (82%) were available for evaluation. All previously active patients performed some activity at follow-up. Of 9 patients (56%) who had been inactive, 5 took up new activities postoperatively. Forty-four patients (66%) stated that surgery had (strongly) improved their sporting proficiency. Seventeen patients (26%) reported no impact, and 5 patients (8%) reported a further deterioration compared with preoperatively. The improvement in sporting proficiency was negatively correlated with the preoperative risk level (ρ = 0.42, P < .001), preoperative performance level (ρ = 0.31, P = .012), and preoperative Tegner scale (ρ = 0.36, P = .003), as well as hours of sporting activity per week (ρ = 0.25, P = .042), whereas age showed a positive correlation (ρ = 0.28, P = .023). There was no change in duration, frequency, number of disciplines, Tegner activity scale, risk category, or performance level. Arthroscopic Bankart repair provides a high rate of return to activity among patients treated for chronic shoulder instability. A number of previously inactive patients returned to activity postoperatively. However, one-third of patients reported no benefit from surgery in terms of sporting activity. The improvement in sporting proficiency was highly dependent on the demands on the shoulder in sports, as well as the age of the patient. Overall, there was no significant increase in duration, frequency, number of disciplines, Tegner activity scale, or performance level between preoperative and follow-up evaluation and no increased return to high-risk activities. Level IV, therapeutic

  17. Rotator cuff preservation in arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Maier, Dirk; Jaeger, Martin; Izadpanah, Kaywan; Bornebusch, Lutz; Suedkamp, Norbert Paul; Ogon, Peter

    2013-05-01

    We sought to evaluate (1) clinical and radiologic results after arthroscopic calcific deposit (CD) removal and (2) the relevance of remnant calcifications (RCs). The study included 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic CD removal, preserving integrity of the rotator cuff. Postoperatively, we divided patients into 2 groups according to the extent of CD removal achieved. Group 1 consisted of patients with complete CD removal. Group 2 included patients showing minor RCs. Ninety-three patients (99 shoulders) completed follow-up. The mean patient age was 50.6 years (31 to 68 years), and the mean follow-up period was 37.3 months (24 to 83 months). We obtained anteroposterior (AP) and outlet radiographs before surgery, postoperatively, and at follow-up. We used the absolute and age- and sex-related Constant scores (CSabs, CSrel) as outcome measures. We compared both groups statistically (Mann-Whitney U test; P < .05). Complete CD removal was achieved in 82 of 99 (82.8%) shoulders (group 1). Postoperatively, minor RCs were found in 17 of 99 (17.2%) shoulders (group 2), an average of 58.6% (± 26.2) of the mean preoperative size. All RCs showed complete (14 of 17) or virtually complete (3 of 17) resolution at follow-up. Overall mean CSabs and CSrel were 88.8 points (± 10.4) and 99.0% (± 3.7), respectively. Mean values of CSabs and CSrel in group 1 (89.5 points ± 9.5 and 99.1% ± 3.7, respectively) and group 2 (86.1 points ± 12.9 and 98.7% ± 4.2, respectively) did not differ. Arthroscopic CD removal, preserving integrity of the rotator cuff yielded good to excellent results in 90% of patients and avoided iatrogenic tendon defects in all patients. Minor RCs did not impair clinical outcome and spontaneously resolved at follow-up. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishing Maximal Medical Improvement After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Zuke, William A; Leroux, Timothy S; Gregory, Bonnie P; Black, Austin; Forsythe, Brian; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-06-01

    As health care transitions from a pay-for-service to a pay-for-performance infrastructure, the value of orthopaedic care must be defined accurately. Significant efforts have been made in defining quality and cost in arthroplasty; however, there remains a lag in ambulatory orthopaedic care. Two-year follow-up has been a general requirement for reporting outcomes after rotator cuff repair. However, this time requirement has not been established scientifically and is of increasing importance in the era of value-based health care. Given that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a common ambulatory orthopaedic procedure, the purpose of this study was to establish a time frame for maximal medical improvement (the state when improvement has stabilized) after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Systematic review. A systematic review of the literature was conducted, identifying studies reporting sequential patient-reported outcomes up to a minimum of 2 years after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The primary clinical outcome was patient-reported outcomes at 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year follow-up. Secondary clinical outcomes included range of motion, strength, retears, and complications. Clinically significant improvement was determined between various time intervals by use of the minimal clinically important difference. The review included 19 studies including 1370 patients who underwent rotator cuff repair. Clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes was seen up to 1 year after rotator cuff repair, but no clinical significance was noted from 1 year to 2 years. The majority of improvement in strength and range of motion was seen up to 6 months, but no clinically meaningful improvement was seen thereafter. All reported complications and the majority of retears occurred within 6 months after rotator cuff repair. After rotator cuff repair, a clinically significant improvement in patient-reported outcomes, range of motion, and strength was seen up to 1

  19. Pathologic femoral neck fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Shrader, M Wade; Schwab, Joseph H; Shaughnessy, William J; Jacofsky, David J

    2009-02-01

    Pathologic fractures in children occur in a variety of malignant and benign pathologic processes. Pediatric pathologic femoral neck fractures are particularly rare. Until now, all reported cases have been isolated cases, small series, or cases reported in series of adult pathologic hip fractures. The present article is the first report of a relatively large series of pathologic femoral neck fractures in a pediatric population. We identified pathologic femoral neck fractures, including 2 basicervical fractures, in 15 children (9 boys, 6 girls) ranging in age from 18 months to 15 years (mean age, 9 years) and treated between 1960 and 2000. The pathologic diagnoses were fibrous dysplasia (5 children), unicameral bone cyst (2), Ewing's sarcoma (2), osteomyelitis (2), leukemia (1), rhabdomyosarcoma (1), osteogenesis imperfecta (1), and osteopetrosis (1). Treatment methods, including time to reduction and fixation, were reviewed in detail. One patient was lost to follow-up. All others were followed until union; mean long-term follow-up was 7 years (range, 1-16 years). All patients ultimately went on to union. Mean time to union was 19 weeks (range, 5-46 weeks). However, 2 patients died before 2 years. There was a 40% complication rate, with limb-length discrepancy being the most common (4 children). No patient developed avascular necrosis. Pathologic femoral neck fractures are rare in children. Pediatric patients who present with a pathologic hip fracture are at significant risk for complications. Physicians and family should be alerted to the prolonged course involved in treating these fractures to union.

  20. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN DIAPHYSEAL FEMORAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Cassiano Ricardo; Traldi, Eduardo Franceschini; Posser, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the personal, fracture, treatment and complication characteristics among patients with pediatric femoral shaft fractures attended at the pediatric orthopedic service of the Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on a population consisting of patients with femoral shaft fractures, aged between birth and 14 years and 11 months, who were divided into four age groups. Information was obtained from medical records and was transferred to a survey questionnaire to present personal, fracture, treatment and complication variables. Results: The study population consisted of 96 patients. Their mean age was 6.8 years. The cases were predominantly among males, comprising closed fractures on the right side, in the middle third with a single line. Regarding fracture etiology, traffic accidents predominated overall in the sample. Most of the patients (74 to 77.1%) presented femoral fractures as their only injury. Conservative treatment predominated in the group younger than six years of age, and surgical treatment in the group aged 6 to 14 years and 11 months. The complications observed until bone union were: discrepancy, infection and movement limitation. The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.6 ± 2.4 weeks, varying with age. Conclusion: The features of these fractures were similar to those described in the literature and the treatment used showed good results. The Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital has used the treatment proposed in the literature for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27042619

  1. Femoral Prosthesis Infection by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Savini, Vincenzo; Sozio, Federica; Catavitello, Chiara; Talia, Marzia; Manna, Assunta; Febbo, Fabio; Balbinot, Andrea; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Piccolomini, Raffaele; Parruti, Giustino; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    This case report is a case history of a femoral prosthesis infection caused by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in a human immunodeficiency virus patient. Though the pathogenicity of this organism for bone tissue has been previously reported, this is the first reported case of an orthopedic prosthesis infection by this species of the genus Rhodotorula. PMID:18753353

  2. Femoral development in chronically centrifuged rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    Groups of 30-d-old male and female rats were centrifuged at 2.00 G (RE, Rotation Experimental), 1.05 G (RC, Rotation Control) or exposed to the noise and wind of the centrifuge at 1.00 G (EC, Earth Control) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements of their femurs indicated that exposure to centrifugation a) decreased femoral length in RE animals, b) increased femoral length in RC animals, c) reduced femoral diameter in RE and RC animals, d) increased L/D ratios in RC animals, e) decreased L/D ratios in RE animals, f) increased femur length/body weight in RE animals, g) decreased cortical thickness (CT) in RE animals, h) increased relative CT in RE animals, and decreased it in RC animals, i) accelerated ossification in RC femoral heads, j) thinned and distorted RE epiphyseal plates, and k) thickened condylar cartilage in RE females. The effects tended to be strongly sexually dimorphic, with females more severely affected by the stress than males.

  3. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  4. Influence of Femoral Component Design on Retrograde Femoral Nail Starting Point.

    PubMed

    Service, Benjamin C; Kang, William; Turnbull, Nathan; Langford, Joshua; Haidukewych, George; Koval, Kenneth J

    2015-10-01

    Our experience with retrograde femoral nailing after periprosthetic distal femur fractures was that femoral components with deep trochlear grooves posteriorly displace the nail entry point resulting in recurvatum deformity. This study evaluated the influence of distal femoral prosthetic design on the starting point. One hundred lateral knee images were examined. The distal edge of Blumensaat's line was used to create a ratio of its location compared with the maximum anteroposterior condylar width called the starting point ratio (SPR). Femoral trials from 6 manufacturers were analyzed to determine the location of simulated nail position in the sagittal plane compared with the maximum anteroposterior prosthetic width. These measurements were used to create a ratio, the femoral component ratio (FCR). The FCR was compared with the SPR to determine if a femoral component would be at risk for retrograde nail starting point posterior to the Blumensaat's line. The mean SPR was 0.392 ± 0.03, and the mean FCR was 0.416 ± 0.05, which was significantly greater (P = 0.003). The mean FCR was 0.444 ± 0.06 for the cruciate retaining (CR) trials and was 0.393 ± 0.04 for the posterior stabilized trials; this difference was significant (P < 0.001). The FCR for the femoral trials studied was significantly greater than the SPR for native knees and was significantly greater for CR femoral components compared with posterior stabilized components. These findings demonstrate that many total knee prostheses, particularly CR designs, are at risk for a starting point posterior to Blumensaat's line.

  5. Arthroscopic capsule reconstruction in the hip using iliotibial band allograft.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Christiano A C; Sawyer, Gregory A; Fukui, Kiyokazu; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2015-02-01

    The hip capsule has been identified as an important static stabilizer of the hip joint. Despite the intrinsic bony stability of the hip socket, the capsule plays a key role in hip stability, particularly at the extremes of motion, and the iliofemoral ligament is the most important stabilizer in extension and external rotation. Patients who do not undergo capsular closure or plication may continue to complain of hip pain and dysfunction postoperatively, likely because of microinstability or muscle invagination into the capsular defect, and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging or magnetic resonance arthrography will identify the capsular defect. Seen primarily in the revision setting, capsular defects can cause recurrent stress at the chondrolabral junction. An attempt at secondary closure can be challenging because of capsular limb adherence to the surrounding soft tissues. Therefore reconstruction may be the only possible surgical solution for this problem. We describe our new surgical technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using iliotibial band allograft.

  6. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion.

    PubMed

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L; Krych, Aaron J; Dahm, Diane L

    2015-12-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy.

  7. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  8. Arthroscopic assessment of Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Nakamura, R; Imaeda, T

    1995-06-01

    Arthroscopic examination was performed on 32 wrists of 32 patients with Kienböck's disease to relate the appearance of the intraarticular structures, particularly the articular cartilage, to the radiographic stage. The articular cartilage showed osteoarthritic changes in stage III, although this was not evident on plain radiographs. Cracking in the distal facet and flapping at the proximal facet of the lunate were identified as features of Kienböck's disease. The incidence of interosseous ligament tears was correlated with radiographically determined stage, whereas changes in triangular fibrocartilage were correlated with age and ulnar variance. Wrist arthroscopy is a useful staging tool for Kienböck's disease, supplying helpful information about the intraarticular pathoanatomy which can be used to guide patient management.

  9. Arthroscopic Interpositional Arthroplasty of the Second Metatarsophalangeal Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Painful degenerative diseases of the second metatarsophalangeal joint are frequently progressive and difficult to treat. Surgical options for the degenerated second metatarsophalangeal joint include joint debridement and synovectomy, drilling and microfracture, core decompression, dorsal closing-wedge metatarsal osteotomies, joint arthroplasty (implant or interpositional), elevation of the depressed articular fragment and bone graft, distraction arthroplasty, osteochondral plug transplantation, osteochondral distal metatarsal allograft reconstruction, and resection arthroplasty (phalangeal base or metatarsal head). This technical note describes the arthroscopic approach of interpositional arthroplasty of the second metatarsophalangeal joint using the extensor digitorum brevis tendon. It is indicated in adult patients with extensive involvement of the metatarsal head cartilage, especially when cartilage degeneration of the proximal phalanx is also present. It is contraindicated if there is significant bone loss of the metatarsal head or the extensor digitorum brevis tendon is flimsy.

  10. Structural damage and chemical contaminants on reprocessed arthroscopic shaver blades.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masahiko; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    on the reprocessed arthroscopic shaver blades. Surgeons should keep in mind that mechanical damage and chemical contamination are found on reprocessed arthroscopic blades.

  11. Functional outcomes after bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Alexander W; Syed, Usman Ali M; Wascher, Jocelyn; Zoga, Adam C; Close, Koby; Abboud, Joseph A; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears is a common procedure performed by orthopedic surgeons. There is a well-known incidence of up to 35% of bilateral rotator cuff tear disease in patients who have a known unilateral tear. The majority of the literature focuses on outcomes after unilateral surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are clinical differences in shoulders of patients who underwent staged bilateral rotator cuff repairs during their lifetime. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent staged bilateral arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery at our institution was performed. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Clinical outcome scores including the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation, and Rowe measures were obtained. A subset of patients returned for clinical and ultrasound evaluation performed by an independent fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist. Overall, 110 shoulders in 55 patients, representing 68% of all eligible patients, participated. No clinical or statistical difference was found in any outcome measure. ASES scores averaged 86.5 (36.7-100) in the dominant shoulder compared with 89.6 (23.3-100) in the nondominant shoulder (P = .42). Ultrasound was available on 34 shoulders and showed complete healing rate of 88%. The shoulders with retearing of the rotator cuff (12%) demonstrated clinically relevant lower ASES scores (72.5) compared with shoulders with confirmed healed repairs (86.2; P = .2). Patients who undergo staged bilateral rotator cuff repair can expect to have similarly good clinical outcomes regardless of hand dominance or chronologic incidence with excellent healing rates in both shoulders. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation Between Femoral Neck Shaft Angle and Surgical Management in Trainees With Femoral Neck Stress Fractures.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Rivera, Jessica C; Tennent, David J; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The most common overuse injury leading to medical discharge of military recruits is a stress fracture. One of the high-risk stress fractures is of the lateral femoral neck which risks osteonecrosis of the femoral head, the need for arthroplasty and permanent disability. To prevent fracture progression early surgical intervention is recommended. Surgical repairs are performed in about 25% of cases of femoral neck stress fractures at military treatment facilities. Hip geometry is an important intrinsic risk for stress fractures. Loads in the average loading direction will not cause a fracture, but loads of extreme magnitude or extreme orientation may. The purpose of this study was to determine if, in the presence of femoral neck stress fracture, there is a correlation between femoral neck shaft angle, surgical treatment and outcomes. The results of this study suggest there is no correlation between return to full military duty rates, treatment, femoral neck shaft angle or fracture grade on MRI. Patients who underwent surgical fixation had greater fracture grade and pain than those that did not have surgery. Individuals who did not return to duty tended to have higher pain scores at initial evaluation.

  13. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Manikandan; Indiran, Venkatraman; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a fracture through the physis with resultant slip of the epiphysis, is the most common hip abnormality in adolescents and is a major cause of early osteoarthritis. Plain radiograph is the initial modality used to evaluate patients with painful hip joints. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which do not involve radiation exposure, have also been used. This case report supports the view that ultrasound can be used as an initial, cost-effective and radiation-free modality for the evaluation of suspected SCFE. Case Report A 15-year-old male patient presented with pain in the right hip for 5 days, following a slip and fall accident while playing soccer. The patient was referred to the Department of Radio-diagnosis for ultrasound. A posterior displacement of the femoral head epiphysis with a physeal step was seen on the longitudinal section obtained over the right hip joint region. The anterior physeal step (APS) measured ~3.8 mm on the right side. The distance between the anterior rim of the acetabulum and the metaphysis measured ~20.4 mm on the affected right side and ~23.6 mm on the left side. A plain radiograph in frog leg position showed a widening of the right proximal physis below the right femoral head, with a medial and posterior slip of the right femoral head. A frontal radiograph of the pelvis taken six months before showed a widening of the proximal right femoral physis. Conclusions Although MRI appears to be the most sensitive modality for identifying slips early, ultrasound may be used as a cost-effective and radiation-free alternative before proceeding with further evaluation of suspected SCFE, especially considering the demographics of the affected population. PMID:28382187

  14. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Manikandan; Indiran, Venkatraman; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2017-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a fracture through the physis with resultant slip of the epiphysis, is the most common hip abnormality in adolescents and is a major cause of early osteoarthritis. Plain radiograph is the initial modality used to evaluate patients with painful hip joints. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which do not involve radiation exposure, have also been used. This case report supports the view that ultrasound can be used as an initial, cost-effective and radiation-free modality for the evaluation of suspected SCFE. A 15-year-old male patient presented with pain in the right hip for 5 days, following a slip and fall accident while playing soccer. The patient was referred to the Department of Radio-diagnosis for ultrasound. A posterior displacement of the femoral head epiphysis with a physeal step was seen on the longitudinal section obtained over the right hip joint region. The anterior physeal step (APS) measured ~3.8 mm on the right side. The distance between the anterior rim of the acetabulum and the metaphysis measured ~20.4 mm on the affected right side and ~23.6 mm on the left side. A plain radiograph in frog leg position showed a widening of the right proximal physis below the right femoral head, with a medial and posterior slip of the right femoral head. A frontal radiograph of the pelvis taken six months before showed a widening of the proximal right femoral physis. Although MRI appears to be the most sensitive modality for identifying slips early, ultrasound may be used as a cost-effective and radiation-free alternative before proceeding with further evaluation of suspected SCFE, especially considering the demographics of the affected population.

  15. Efficacy of magnesium as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 nerve block for arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament repair

    PubMed Central

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Arora, Mahesh K; Trikha, Anjan; Sunder, Rani A; Prasad, Ganga; Singh, Preet M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Three-in-one and femoral nerve blocks are proven modalities for postoperative analgesia following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of magnesium (Mg) as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 block for ACL reconstruction. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were randomly allocated to Group I (3-in-1 block with 30 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine preceded by 1.5 ml of intravenous [IV] saline), Group II (3-in-1 block with 30 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine preceded by 1.5 ml of solution containing 150 mg Mg IV) or Group III (3-in-1 block with 30 ml containing 0.25% bupivacaine and 150 mg of Mg as adjuvant preceded by 1.5 ml of IV saline). Post-operatively, patients received morphine when visual analogue scale (VAS) score was ≥4. Quantitative parameters were compared using one-way ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis test and qualitative data were analysed using Chi-square test. Results: Demographics, haemodynamic parameters, intra-operative fentanyl requirement, post-operative VAS scores and total morphine requirement were comparable between groups. Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged in Group III (789 ± 436) min compared to Group I (466 ± 290 min) and Group II (519 ± 274 min), (P = 0.02 and 0.05). Significantly less number of patients in Group III (1/20) received morphine in the first 6 h post-operatively, compared to Group I (8/20) and Group II (6/20) (P = 0.008 and 0.03). No side effects were observed. Conclusion: Mg as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in 3-in-1 block for ACL reconstruction significantly prolongs the time to first analgesic requirement and reduces the number of patients requiring morphine in the immediate post-operative period. PMID:27512165

  16. Biceps tenodesis (long head): arthroscopic keyhole technique versus arthroscopic interference screw: a prospective comparative clinical and radiographic marker study.

    PubMed

    Kany, Jean; Guinand, Régis; Croutzet, Pierre; Amaravathi, Rajkumar; Sekaran, Padmanaban

    2016-01-01

    The long head biceps tenodesis (LHBT) is an alternative to tenotomy in order to prevent Popeye sign.Biomechanical studies showed that interference screw(IFS) was the strongest fixation but there might be complications and cost. What's more, the analyses of tenodesis failures are undervalued because they only take visible deformations of the arm into account. The purpose of this study was to compare a modified arthroscopic "keyhole" LHBT (modified @KH) with an arthroscopic IFS LHBT(@IFS) using an objective method. We hypothesized that modified @KH gave similar clinical outcomes as @IFS without its hassles or drawbacks. We present a 12-month prospective comparative study (modified @KH versus @IFS) performed by two experienced orthopedic surgeons. Modified @KH was performed on one hundred and nine patients versus @IFS that was performed on one hundred and two. A radiopaque marker was placed into the tendon. The review was conducted in the sixth month with clinical examination and plain standard X-ray to objectify the potential migration of the marker. Modified @KH showed 2.4 % visible deformity without any Popeye sign but 3.4 % radiographic metallic marker migrations. No complications were noted. @IFS showed 5.8 % visible deformity with 2.9 % Popeye sign and with 10.3 % radiographic metallic marker migrations;pain at tenodesis location was noted in 2 %. P value (0.13) indicates that there were no statistically significant differences. We confirm the hypothesis that the modified@KH gives clinical and radiographic outcomes at least similar to @IFS without any complications and cost. The establishment of the radiopaque marker allows us to know the exact number of failures.Level of evidence Consecutive prospective comparative clinical, Level II-1 studies.

  17. Muscle strength after anterior shoulder stabilization: arthroscopic versus open Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yong Girl; Lim, Chan Teak; Cho, Nam Su

    2007-11-01

    A number of reports have been made on the muscle strength at the last follow-up after arthroscopic or open Bankart repairs. Few have analyzed the change over time in muscle strength and compared the changes between different operative methods. Muscle strength recovers faster after arthroscopic Bankart repair than after open Bankart repair, and the final muscle strength is not different between the 2 procedures. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Sixty patients with anterior shoulder instability and an isolated Bankart lesion were enrolled for this study. Thirty patients underwent open Bankart repair (open group), and 30 patients went through arthroscopic Bankart repair (arthroscopic group). The open group demonstrated markedly weaker muscle strength during forward elevation than did the arthroscopic group up to 3 months after surgery, but the difference narrowed to about 5% at 6 months (P = .074). At 6 months after surgery, the muscle strength of the open group measured 85.8% +/- 11.5% in forward elevation, 89.5% +/- 10.3% in external rotation, and 89.3% +/- 13.3% in internal rotation. The corresponding figures of the arthroscopic group were 90.6% +/- 8.6%, 92.1% +/- 9.1%, and 92.1% +/- 11.7%. As for external and internal rotations, the open group demonstrated markedly weaker muscle strength 6 weeks after surgery, but the differences were reduced to about 6% and 4%, respectively, at 3 months (P = .092 and .163, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in final muscle strength 12 months after the operation between the 2 groups (P = .503, .468, and .659, respectively). Muscle strength recovered faster with an arthroscopic procedure than with an open procedure during the early postoperative periods, and strength was restored to the level of the unaffected side at 6 months postoperatively. In the group with open Bankart repairs, the muscle strength during forward elevation recovered slower than did external and internal rotation muscle

  18. [High recurrence and good functional results after arthroscopic resection of pigmented villonodular synovitis].

    PubMed

    Isart, A; Gelber, P E; Besalduch, M; Pelfort, X; Erquicia, J I; Tey-Pons, M; Monllau, J C

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVS) is a synovial proliferation disorder of uncertain aetiology, with some controversy as regards its proper treatment. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the functional outcome and recurrence rate in a series of patients diagnosed with both the diffuse and the localised type of PVS and treated by arthroscopic resection. Twenty-four patients diagnosed with PVS were retrospectively assessed. There were 11 cases with the diffuse type, and 13 cases with the localised type of PVS. They were followed-up for a median of 60 months (range, 34-204). They underwent arthroscopic synovectomy, and were functionally evaluated with IKDC, WOMET, and Kujala scores. There was recurrence in 8 out of 13 (61.5%) cases with the diffuse type of PVS. Two of these patients were treated with radiation. One patient underwent surgical resection with an open procedure due to extra-articular involvement. The remaining 5 patients underwent a second arthroscopic resection, and no recurrence was subsequently observed. Cases with localised PVS did not recur after a single arthroscopic resection. IKDC, WOMET and Kujala scores improved by 30.6, 37.4 and 34.03 points, respectively. Pigmented villonodular synovitis treated by arthroscopic resection showed good functional results at mid-term follow-up. A single arthroscopic resection was sufficient to treat the localised PVS, whereas the diffuse type of PVS required a second arthroscopic resection in most cases, due to its high rate of recurrence. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Femoral remodeling may influence patient outcomes in slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    DeLullo, James A; Thomas, Eric; Cooney, Timothy E; McConnell, Sharon J; Sanders, James O

    2007-04-01

    Clinical studies of patients treated for slipped capital femoral epiphysis have found limited functional impairment and femoral neck deformity causing eventual coxarthrosis. Since patient-focused assessments minimize bias and reflect health-related quality of life status, we coupled their use to a clinical examination to obtain a more patient-centered picture of slipped capital femoral epiphyseal outcomes. The impact of residual deformity on outcomes also was examined. Of 78 patients treated for slipped capital femoral epiphyses between 1972 and 1998, 29 (38 hips) were evaluated at a mean followup of 7.6 years (range, 1.4-26 years). The average patient age was 21.8 years (range, 14.6-39 years), 55% were female, and the average body mass index was 28.7 (range, 16.1-50.2). Most slips were stable (92%, 35 of 38) and mild or moderate in severity (98%, 36 of 37). Followup examinations revealed slight deficits in range of motion, strength, and limb length. Radiographs showed slight improvements in head-shaft angle and reduced but persistent femoral neck deformity. Osteoarthritic changes were absent or negligible in 84% (32 of 38) of the hips. The average Iowa hip score was 90.5 (range, 51-100). Patient outcome scores for the AAOS Hip/Knee Questionnaire fell slightly below 50th percentile norms. Neither slip stability, severity, nor body mass index impacted outcome. Femoral neck deformity correlated with function, pain, and Boyer grade. Overall, patients had minor functional deficits and pain that may have been related to femoral neck deformity, but longer followup is warranted.

  20. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  1. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention. PMID:26504733

  2. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  3. Femoral bifurcation disease: balloon or knife.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, Marc; Deloose, Koen

    2009-10-01

    Arterial occlusive disease at the level of the femoral bifurcation mostly occurs in combination with inflow and/or outflow lesions. Surgical endarterectomy of the femoral bifurcation is a well-proven low-risk and easy surgical intervention with known durable success, while, although proven to be safe, evidence is lacking about the durability of the endovascular approach. Based on the evidence at hand, the surgical approach should be recommended for the vast majority of patients and the endovascular approach should only be indicated as the first strategy in selected cases presenting with factors that might compromise the outcome of surgery in the groin. If feasible, the hybrid approach with endarterectomy at the level of the bifurcation and endovascular repair of the inflow and outflow lesions is preferred in patients with multilevel disease.

  4. When femoral fracture fixation fails: salvage options.

    PubMed

    Petrie, J; Sassoon, A; Haidukewych, G J

    2013-11-01

    Most hip fractures treated with modern internal fixation techniques will heal. However, failures occasionally occur and require revision procedures. Salvage strategies employed during revision are based on whether the fixation failure occurs in the femoral neck, or in the intertrochanteric region. Patient age and remaining bone stock also influence decision making. For fractures in young patients, efforts are generally focused on preserving the native femoral head via osteotomies and repeat internal fixation. For failures in older patients, some kind of hip replacement is usually selected. Disuse osteopenia, deformity, bone loss, and stress-risers from previous internal fixation devices all pose technical challenges to successful reconstruction. Attention to detail is important in order to minimise complications. In the majority of cases, good outcomes have been reported for the various salvage strategies.

  5. Postcatheterization Femoral Arteriovenous Fistulas: Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Baran Kosar, Sule; Gumus, Terman; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Akpek, Sergin

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To report our results of stent-graft implantation for the endovascular treatment of postcatheterization femoral arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) occurring between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein.Methods: Endovascular treatment of iatrogenic femoral AVFs as a result of arterial puncture for coronary angiography and/or angioplasty was attempted in 10 cases. Balloon-expandable stent-grafts, one for each lesion, were used to repair the fistulas, which were between the deep femoral artery and the femoral vein in all cases. Stent-graft implantation to the deep femoral artery was performed by a contralateral retrograde approach.Results: All stent-grafts were deployed successfully. Complete closure of the fistulas was accomplished immediately in nine of 10 cases. In one case, complete closure could not be obtained but the fact that the complaint subsided was taken to indicate clinical success. In three cases, side branch occlusion of the deep femoral artery occurred. No complications were observed after implantation. Follow-up for 8-31 months (mean 18.5 months) with color Doppler ultrasonography revealed patency of the stented arterial segments without recurrent arteriovenous shunting in those nine patients who had successful immediate closure of their AVFs.Conclusion: Our results with a mean follow-up 18.5 months suggest that stent-graft implantation for the closure of postcatheterization femoral AVFs originating from the deep femoral artery is an effective, minimally invasive alternative procedure.

  6. Synchronous femoral hernias diagnosed during endoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Putnis, Soni; Wong, April; Berney, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    During totally extraperitoneal (TEP) endoscopic repair of inguinal hernias, it is possible to see the internal opening of the femoral canal. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence of synchronous femoral hernias found in patients undergoing TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. This was a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 362 consecutive patients who underwent 484 TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repairs during a 5-year period, May 2005 to May 2010. During surgery, both inguinal and femoral canal orifices were routinely inspected. The presence of unilateral or bilateral inguinal and femoral hernias was recorded and repaired accordingly. There were a total of 362 patients. More males (343, 95%) underwent a TEP hernia repair than females (19, 5%). There were more cases of unilateral (240/362, 66%) than bilateral (122/362, 34%) inguinal hernias. A total of 18 cases of synchronous femoral hernias were found during operation. There was a higher incidence of femoral hernia in females (7/19, 37%) compared to males (11/343, 3%) (P < 0.001). None of the femoral hernias were clinically detectable preoperatively. Females undergoing elective inguinal hernia repair are more likely to have a synchronous femoral hernia than males. We suggest that all women presenting with an inguinal hernia also have a formal assessment of the femoral canal. TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair is an ideal approach as both inguinal and femoral orifices can be assessed and hernias repaired simultaneously during surgery.

  7. All-arthroscopic suprapectoral versus open subpectoral tenodesis of the long head of the biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Gombera, Mufaddal Mustafa; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Nair, Rueben; Saltzman, Matthew D; Terry, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Pathologic changes of the long head of the biceps tendon are a recognized source of shoulder pain in adults that can be treated with tenotomy or tenodesis when nonoperative measures are not effective. It is not clear whether arthroscopic or open biceps tenodesis has a clinical advantage. Pain relief and shoulder function after all-arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis are similar to outcomes after an open subpectoral tenodesis. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A prospective database was reviewed for patients undergoing an all-arthroscopic suprapectoral or open subpectoral biceps tenodesis. Adult patients with a minimum 18-month follow-up were included. Patients undergoing a concomitant rotator cuff or labral repair were excluded. The groups were matched to age within 3 years, sex, and time to follow-up within 3 months. Pain improvement, development of a "Popeye" deformity, muscle cramping, postoperative American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, satisfaction scores, and complications were evaluated. Forty-six patients (23 all-arthroscopic, 23 open) with an average age of 57.2 years (range, 45-70 years) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 30.1 months (range, 21.1-44.9 months). No patients in either group developed a Popeye deformity or complained of arm cramping. There was no significant difference in mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores between the open and all-arthroscopic groups (92.3 vs 88.9; P=.42); similarly, there was no significant difference in patient satisfaction scores between the groups (8.9 vs 9.1; P=.73). Eighteen patients (78.3%) in the arthroscopic cohort and 16 (69.6%) in the open cohort fully returned to athletic activity (P=.50). Eight patients (34.8%) in the arthroscopic group and 10 (39.1%) in the open group reported pain at night or with heavy activities. There were no complications in the all-arthroscopic group. There were 2 complications in the open group that resolved by final follow-up. Biceps tenodesis remains a

  8. Alterations of the Deltoid Muscle After Open Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam Su; Cha, Sang Won; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2015-12-01

    Open repair can be more useful than arthroscopic repair for immobile and severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. However, it is not known whether the deltoid muscle is altered after open repair or to what extent the deltoid origin remains detached after surgery. To compare postoperative alterations of the deltoid muscle in open versus arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Enrolled in this study were 135 patients who underwent surgical repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears and who had routine follow-up MRIs at least 6 months after surgery. Open repairs were performed in 56 cases and arthroscopic repairs in 79 cases. The detachment and thickness of the deltoid muscle at its proximal origin were recorded in 5 zones on MRI. The alterations of the deltoid muscle and postoperative integrity of the repaired rotator cuff were evaluated. Partial detachment of the deltoid occurred in 1 patient (1.8%) in the open group and in 2 patients (2.5%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .80). All the partial detachments occurred in zones 2 and 3. Attenuation of the proximal origin of the deltoid was found in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and in 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .87). Atrophy of the deltoid muscle was shown in 3 patients (5.4%) in the open group and 4 patients (5.1%) in the arthroscopic group (P = .61). The retear rate of the repaired cuff was 30.4% (17/56) in the open group and 38.0% (30/79) in the arthroscopic group (P = .74). Between open and arthroscopic repair for severely retracted, large to massive rotator cuff tears, there was no significant difference in detachment of the deltoid origin and alterations of the deltoid muscle after repair. Postoperative alterations of the deltoid occurred in arthroscopic surgery as well as in open surgery. For immobile massive rotator cuff tear, open repair is an acceptable technique

  9. [Avascular necrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Porubský, Peter; Trč, Tomáš; Havlas, Vojtěch; Smetana, Pavel

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in adults is not common, but not too rare diseases. In orthopedic practice, it is one of the diseases that are causing implantation of hip replacement at a relatively early age. In the early detection and initiation of therapy can delay the implantation of prosthesis for several years, which is certainly more convenient for the patient and beneficial. This article is intended to acquaint the reader with the basic diagnostic procedures and therapy.

  10. Vascular Complications in Arthroscopic Repair Of Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana; Grignaffini, María Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament is the primary stabilizer of the knee. Among the potential complications in arthroscopic repair of this ligament, there are vascular lesions, due to laceration, thrombosis and injury of the intima of the popliteal artery. We used one case to show the vascular complications that may arise in arthroscopic repair of the posterior cruciate ligament, how to handle it and the results. Methods: One patient, 33 years old, with a history of traffic accident. In a physical exam the patient shows pain and swelling of the knee, positive posterior drawer test and positive Godfrey test. X-rays on the knee show posterior tibial translation and MRI a complete fibers rupture at the middle third of the posterior cruciate ligament. An arthroscopic repair surgery was scheduled three weeks after trauma, with PCL reconstruction using simple band technique.After surgical intervention, hemostatic cuff was released, no peripheral pulse, paleness and coldness of the member was confirmed. An arteriography was carried out, which confirmed absences of distal vascular filling in the popliteal artery. An urgent referral was carried out with Vascular Surgery Services, who had been informed of the surgery previously (a notification that is part of our routine for this kind of interventions). Arteriorrhaphy and venorrhaphy of the popliteal arteries was fulfilled 12 hours later, with a leg fasciotomy. Daily monitoring was performed, and after 72 hours, muscle necrosis is seen with wound drainage, analysis shows presence of gram-negative bacilli, Proteus Mirabilis-Pseudomonas spp and the lab results showed leukocytes: 8.700/ml, ESR: 58, CRP: 48. A new surgery is performed with complete resection of the anterior external compartment of the leg, and a system of continuous cleansing is applied with physiological saline solution and boric acid for 14 days until drainage is eliminated. Vancomycin and ceftazidime EV was indicated for 14 days and, after a good

  11. Lateral Decubitus All-Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure for Treatment of Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lewington, Matthew R.; Urquhart, Nathan; Wong, Ivan H.

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder instability can be a challenging condition to treat when it becomes refractory to soft-tissue procedures or when bone loss exceeds 25% to 27% of the glenoid. The Bristow-Latarjet procedure has been developed and popularized to deal with these concerns. Traditionally, the procedure has been performed as an open approach; however, this has been recently supplanted by novel arthroscopic techniques. We present a technique for the procedure performed with the patient in a semi-lateral decubitus position that assists with optimal graft placement on the native glenoid. We use the cannulated Bristow-Latarjet Instability Shoulder System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA). After a diagnostic arthroscopic evaluation, we use multiple arthroscopic anterior portals to debride the rim of the glenoid. The coracoid is prepared and taken down arthroscopically, and the cannulated guide is attached and advanced through an arthroscopically created subscapularis split. With the shoulder held in a reduced position, we are then able to drill and anchor the graft to the native glenoid. The patient is able to begin gentle range-of-motion exercises immediately postoperatively. PMID:26258032

  12. Result of arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee.

    PubMed

    De Ponti, Alessandro; Sansone, Valerio; Malcherè, Marco

    2003-01-01

    We report 10 years' experience in arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the knee in a series of patients affected by the localized or diffuse form of the disease. The purpose of the study is to critically examine the results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the knee affected by PVNS, to determine the safety and effectiveness of the procedure. Retrospective case analysis. The study population consists of 19 patients, with an average follow-up of 60 months (minimum, 12; maximum, 128). All patients underwent knee arthroscopy. The 3 standard portals were used; posteromedial and posterolateral portals were added if required. Four patients were affected by localized PVNS and were subject to partial synovectomy with excision of the pathologic tissue. The remaining 15 patients presented a diffuse form of PVNS; 7 of them underwent extended arthroscopic synovectomy and 8 underwent partial synovectomy. The diagnosis was confirmed by synovial biopsy. In the group affected by the localized form of PVNS, the arthroscopic local excision resulted in a complete and persistent regression of the pathology. Among the patients affected by the diffuse form of PVNS, clinical results were better and the recurrence rate was lower in the group treated with extended synovectomy. No relevant complications were encountered. In particular, no cases of infection, stiffness, or neurovascular lesions were seen. Arthroscopic synovectomy is an appropriate treatment for knee PVNS. Extended synovectomy must be performed in all cases of diffuse PVNS.

  13. Subtrochanteric fractures after retrograde femoral nailing

    PubMed Central

    Mounasamy, Varatharaj; Mallu, Sathya; Khanna, Vishesh; Sambandam, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Secondary fractures around femoral nails placed for the management of hip fractures are well known. We report, two cases of a fracture of the femur at the interlocking screw site in the subtrochanteric area after retrograde femoral nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. Only a few reports in the existing literature have described these fractures. Two young men after sustaining a fall presented to us with pain, swelling and deformity in the upper thigh region. On enquiring, examining and radiographing them, peri-implant fractures of subtrochanteric nature through the distal interlocking screws were revealed in both patients who also had histories of previous falls for which retrograde intramedullary nailing was performed for their respective femora. Both patients were managed with similar surgical routines including removal of the existing hardware, open reduction and ace cephallomedullary antegrade nailing. The second case did show evidence of delayed healing and was additionally stabilized with cerclage wires. Both patients had uneventful postoperative outcomes and union was evident at the end of 6 mo postoperatively with a good range of motion at the hip and knee. Our report suggests that though seldom reported, peri-implant fractures around the subtrochanteric region can occur and pose a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We suggest these be managed, after initial stabilization and resuscitation, by implant removal, open reduction and interlocking intramedullary antegrade nailing. Good results and progression to union can be expected in these patients by adhering to basic principles of osteosynthesis. PMID:26495251

  14. Monitoring femoral component installation using vibration testing.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Seana; Cornwell, Phillip; Meneghini, R Michael

    2005-01-01

    With emerging minimally invasive surgical techniques in total hip arthroplasty, there has been anecdotal evidence of an increase in fractures associated with the insertion of the prosthesis into the femur. The diminished visibility associated with minimally invasive surgical techniques necessitates a greater emphasis on the surgeon's tactile and auditory senses. These senses are used to ascertain the femoral component position of maximum stability and interference fit, as well as to prevent further component impaction and subsequent fracture of the femur. The work described herein attempts to identify a means to supplement the surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used in civil and mechanical structures to monitor the insertion process of the prosthesis. It is hypothesized that vibration characteristics of the impact process may be used intraoperatively to determine at what position the femoral component has reached appropriate interference fit and stability in the femur. Such information may be used to prevent further impaction of the femoral component past a threshold that could result in a periprosthetic fracture. A piezoelectric accelerometer and impact hammer will be used to monitor the impact process. The acceleration time history data were analyzed by using low and high pass filters to allow frequency analysis of the time history signals. This paper will summarize features derived from the measured data that will be used to develop an insertion process termination indicator.

  15. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  16. Femoral stem fracture and in vivo corrosion of retrieved modular femoral hips.

    PubMed

    Huot Carlson, J Caitlin; Van Citters, Douglas W; Currier, John H; Bryant, Amber M; Mayor, Michael B; Collier, John P

    2012-08-01

    A series of 78 retrieved modular hip devices were assessed for fretting and corrosion. Damage was common at both the head-neck junction (54% showing corrosion; 88% showing fretting) and at the stem-sleeve junction (88% corrosion; 65% fretting). Corrosion correlated to in vivo duration, patient activity, and metal (vs ceramic) femoral heads but did not correlate to head carbon content. Femoral stem fatigue fracture was observed in seven retrievals; all had severe corrosion, were under increased stress, and were in vivo longer than the non-fractured cohort. This study emphasizes the potential for stem fracture when small diameter femoral stems with large offsets are used in heavy and active patients. Designs which reduce fretting and corrosion in modular implants is warranted as patients demand longer lasting implants.

  17. Hybrid approach to limb salvage in the setting of an infected femoral-femoral bypass graft.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas W; Meltzer, Andrew J; Schneider, Darren B

    2014-08-01

    Prosthetic vascular graft infection in patients with advanced peripheral arterial disease can lead to multiple additional procedures, including extra-anatomic bypass or even amputation. We report the case of an 88-year-old woman with critical limb ischemia and an infected prosthetic femoral-femoral bypass graft. Using a planned hybrid 2-stage approach, we performed endovascular recanalization of the native left iliac arterial system using remote access via the superficial femoral artery to avoid infected groin wounds. Recanalization of the patient's Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II D chronic iliac occlusion allowed for removal of the infected graft and placement of a profunda femoris artery to proximal posterior tibial artery bypass, thereby restoring inflow and avoiding the infected left groin. Newer endovascular techniques coupled with open surgical options may lead to limb salvage in patients with previously unreconstructable peripheral arterial disease.

  18. Management and outcome of interprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Schuster, Rupert; Luxl, Monika; Widhalm, Harald Kurt; Eipeldauer, Stefan; Krusche-Mandl, Irena; Ostermann, Roman; Blutsch, Beate; Vécsei, Vilmos

    2011-11-01

    Interprosthetic femoral fractures following ipsilateral hip and knee arthroplasty are a rare but serious complication in clinical practice. In most cases, adequate management of these injuries might constitute a challenging problem. However, the literature provides only few data regarding the treatment and outcome of interprosthetic femoral fractures, and there are only few classifications available, which might assist in finding an appropriate treatment concept. The purpose of this study was to analyse our experience in the management of interprosthetic femoral fractures following ipsilateral hip and knee joint replacement. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of 23 patients (15 female and eight male, average age: 79.2 years) with an interprosthetic fracture after ipsilateral hip and knee joint replacement between 1992 and 2008. For the classification of interprosthetic femoral fractures, the fractures were divided into three types, depending on the fracture site and the adjacency to the prostheses. All patients underwent operative stabilisation, either by lateral plate fixation (n=19), by revision arthroplasty using a long stem (n=2) or by plate fixation and revision arthroplasty (n=2). Referring to the clinical outcome, 16 patients returned to their pre-injury activity level and were satisfied with their clinical outcome. In six patients, we saw a relevant decrease of hip or knee function and severe limitations in gait and activities of daily living. We had a mean Harris Hip Score (HHS) of 78.4 points, and a mean Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) of 71.8 points. Relating to the radiographic outcome, successful fracture healing was achieved in 19 of 22 patients (86%) within 6 months. Failures of reduction and fixation were noted in four (18%) of 22 patients. We had a satisfactory outcome following individualised treatment of interprosthetic femoral fractures following ipsilateral hip and knee joint replacement. Compared to the rare

  19. Large ceramic femoral heads: what problems do they solve?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J A; Cooper, H J

    2013-11-01

    Large ceramic femoral heads offer several advantages that are potentially advantageous to patients undergoing both primary and revision total hip replacement. Many high-quality studies have demonstrated the benefit of large femoral heads in reducing post-operative instability. Ceramic femoral heads may also offer an advantage in reducing polyethylene wear that has been reported in vitro and is starting to become clinically apparent in mid-term clinical outcome studies. Additionally, the risk of taper corrosion at a ceramic femoral head-neck junction is clearly lower than when using a metal femoral head. With improvements in the material properties of both modern ceramic femoral heads and polyethylene acetabular liners that have reduced the risk of mechanical complications, large ceramic heads have gained popularity in recent years.

  20. Incomplete transposition of the common femoral artery and vein.

    PubMed

    Leite, J O; Carvalho Ventura, I; Botelho, F E; Costa Galvao, W

    2010-02-01

    Anatomical variations of the great saphenous vein, femoral artery and femoral vein at the inguinal level are rare. Modifications in the anatomical relationships among theses vessel can cause technical difficulties. There are two reports in the literature of the complete transposition of the femoral artery and vein. Both patients had large varicose veins only in the limb that presented the variation, which suggested an extrinsic compression. In the present paper, we report a case study of a patient with an incomplete transposition of the femoral artery and vein. Specifically, the common femoral vein and the saphenofemoral junction were completely overlapped by the common femoral artery. Although this anatomical variation did not present any clinical signs, it required a more complex surgical procedure.

  1. Femoral neuropathy and meralgia paresthetica secondary to an iliacus hematoma.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tae Im; Yoon, Tae Hee; Kim, Joo Sup; Lee, Ga Eun; Kim, Bo Ra

    2012-04-01

    Compressive femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies from an iliacus hematoma are unusual presentation. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy who developed right femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies as a complication of traumatic ipsilateral iliacus hematoma formation. The patient complained of numbness in the right thigh and calf as well as right leg weakness, and pain in the right inguinal area. Nerve conduction study and needle electromyography identified the neuropathies. After the electrodiagnostic studies, the pelvic bone MRI revealed a large, 9×5×4.5 cm right iliacus hematoma. As a result, diagnosis of a right iliacus hematoma compressing the femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves was made, and the patient underwent an operation to remove the hematoma. Symptoms and neurological signs showed notable improvement after surgical decompression. Subsequent follow-up electrodiagnostic studies after 11 weeks demonstrated regeneration evidence.

  2. Femoral Neuropathy and Meralgia Paresthetica Secondary to an Iliacus Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tae Im; Kim, Joo Sup; Lee, Ga Eun; Kim, Bo Ra

    2012-01-01

    Compressive femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies from an iliacus hematoma are unusual presentation. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy who developed right femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies as a complication of traumatic ipsilateral iliacus hematoma formation. The patient complained of numbness in the right thigh and calf as well as right leg weakness, and pain in the right inguinal area. Nerve conduction study and needle electromyography identified the neuropathies. After the electrodiagnostic studies, the pelvic bone MRI revealed a large, 9×5×4.5 cm right iliacus hematoma. As a result, diagnosis of a right iliacus hematoma compressing the femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves was made, and the patient underwent an operation to remove the hematoma. Symptoms and neurological signs showed notable improvement after surgical decompression. Subsequent follow-up electrodiagnostic studies after 11 weeks demonstrated regeneration evidence. PMID:22639754

  3. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis associated with hyperparathyroidism. A case report].

    PubMed

    Khiari, Karima; Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Nejib; Maazoun, Imen; Hadj Ali, Insaf; Bentaarit, Chokri; Turki, Sami; Ben Maïz, Hedi

    2003-12-01

    Slippage of the upper femoral epiphysis can occur in association with multiple endocrine imbalances. A case of slipped femoral epiphysis with primary hyperparathyroidism is reported. The patient was an adolescent, 16 Years of age, who presented bilateral slipped epiphysis. Investigation showed that he had hypercalcemia (3.1 mmol/l) related to primary hyperparathyroidism. A parathyroid adenoma was removed. Outcome was favorable and the slipped femoral epiphyses did not require a specific treatment.

  4. Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Higgins, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    All early (Pliocene-Early Pleistocene) hominins exhibit some differences in proximal femoral morphology from modern humans, including a long femoral neck and a low neck-shaft angle. In addition, australopiths (Au. afarensis, Au. africanus, Au. boisei, Paranthropus boisei), but not early Homo, have an "anteroposteriorly compressed" femoral neck and a small femoral head relative to femoral shaft breadth. Superoinferior asymmetry of cortical bone in the femoral neck has been claimed to be human-like in australopiths. In this study, we measured superior and inferior cortical thicknesses at the middle and base of the femoral neck using computed tomography in six Au. africanus and two P. robustus specimens. Cortical asymmetry in the fossils is closer overall to that of modern humans than to apes, although many values are intermediate between humans and apes, or even more ape-like in the midneck. Comparisons of external femoral neck and head dimensions were carried out for a more comprehensive sample of South and East African australopiths (n = 17) and two early Homo specimens. These show that compared with modern humans, femoral neck superoinferior, but not anteroposterior breadth, is larger relative to femoral head breadth in australopiths, but not in early Homo. Both internal and external characteristics of the australopith femoral neck indicate adaptation to relatively increased superoinferior bending loads, compared with both modern humans and early Homo. These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb.

  5. Arthroscopic decompression with indigo carmine for treating paralabral cysts in the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kabuto, Y; Morihara, T; Furukawa, R; Kida, Y; Sukenari, T; Onishi, O; Minami, M; Arai, Y; Fujiwara, H; Kubo, T

    2016-12-01

    Paralabral cysts in the shoulder are a relatively rare pathology. It is sometimes difficult to detect the location of a paralabral cyst in the shoulder using arthroscopy, and it can be difficult to confirm sufficient decompression by arthroscopy. We describe the case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent arthroscopic decompression for a paralabral cyst in the shoulder. Indigo carmine was injected into the cyst under ultrasonography guidance just before the operation. The leakage point of indigo carmine was detected using arthroscopy. Arthroscopic decompression was performed until the indigo carmine was completely discharged. Her shoulder pain, limited range of motion, and muscle weakness during abduction and external rotation improved postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the disappearance of the cyst. Arthroscopic decompression using an ultrasonography-guided injection of indigo carmine is a useful treatment for a paralabral cyst in the shoulder.

  6. Traumatic arteriovenous fistula as consequence of TMJ arthroscopic surgery. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Fernandez, Ana-Belen; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-01-01

    The ocurrence of a traumatic arteriovenous fistula after arthroscopic surgery of TMJ represents an extremely rare event. Specifically, this uncommon complication has been described only in a few case reports. In this light, the most frequent symptoms showed by this disease are thrills, bruits, pulsatile tinnitus, and an expansible vascular mass. Importantly, the severity of these symptoms is also dependent on the vessels involved. With regard to the management, is important to note that the vessel ligation with surgery as well as vessel emolization with endovascular procedures have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these cases. In view of that, the present study describes a case of superficial temporal arteriovenous fistula that arose as a postoperative complication of a bilateral arthroscopic eminoplasty of TMJ. The aim of the present report is to characterize this rare syndrome with the goal of proposing suitable treatments. Key words:Arteriovenous fistula, arthroscopic surgery, eminoplasty of TMJ, temporal vessels. PMID:27398189

  7. Arthroscopic 360° Capsular Release for Adhesive Capsulitis in the Lateral Decubitus Position.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Leroux, Timothy; Hamamoto, Jason T; Higgins, John D; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-10-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder is a relatively common condition that results in pain and loss of motion due to capsular thickening and fibrosis. Most cases are successfully treated with conservative management including physical therapy and intra-articular steroid injections. If conservative management fails, arthroscopic capsular release allows precise release of thickened capsular tissue with a lower risk of complications and less soft-tissue trauma than manipulation under anesthesia alone. Arthroscopic capsular release in the beach-chair position typically requires some degree of manipulation to release the inferior capsule, which is often not visualized intraoperatively. In this technique article and video, we describe and demonstrate a technique of arthroscopic capsular release in the lateral decubitus position, providing a clear view of the inferior capsule, which facilitates a complete, 360° capsular release and mitigates the need for any manipulation under anesthesia.

  8. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft Tissue in Bone Socket Fixation: Arthroscopic Technique With Technical Pearls.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Troy A; Wyland, Douglas J

    2017-04-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation may slow the progression of degenerative changes in the meniscus-deficient knee. The current literature suggests patients can experience good early to mid-term satisfaction and patient-reported outcomes with reasonable expectations of return to work. More ambitious applications in athletes have also shown good results although long-term data are lacking. Traditionally, meniscal allograft transplantation has been considered an open procedure with incorporation of bone blocks from the allograft source. However, as arthroscopic techniques have advanced, it has become possible to perform this procedure through a predominantly arthroscopic approach while securing the soft tissue graft in bone tunnels. The current demonstration provides this background and technical pearls for success in arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation.

  9. Arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1A ankle Fractures in Children: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aubaidi, Zaid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The risk of growth arrest following paediatric ankle fractures type 1 A is very high. Therefore all attempts should be done to anatomically reduce this kind of fracture. The advances in ankle arthroscopy have brought the possibility to reduce these fractures under direct vision, without the need of capsulotomy. The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance of the use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures. Case Report: We describe two cases with SH type IV fractures of the distal medial tibia, one treated with open reduction and percutaneous screw fixation and the other treated with arthroscopically assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation. The first case ended with severe growth disturbance, while the second gave a very good result. Conclusion: The use of arthroscopically assisted reduction of type 1 A fractures should be considered to ensure anatomical reduction. PMID:27298899

  10. How to Build Your Simple and Cost-effective Arthroscopic Skills Simulator.

    PubMed

    Arealis, Georgios; Holton, James; Rodrigues, Joana Bento; Sagkrioti, Maria; Snow, Martyn; Hamlet, Mark; Levy, Ofer

    2016-10-01

    Acquisition of arthroscopic skills is not always easy and can be time-consuming. Simulation in arthroscopy improves surgical skills and can bridge the gap between reduced surgical exposure and training time and the need to reach a required level of competency. We propose a method to create a simple and cost-effective arthroscopic skills simulator using readily available materials and a low-cost Web camera available from online shops. This arthroscopic simulation device can be used to improve skills of all levels of trainees at home, in a bioskills laboratory, or in the theater. It can also be used by experienced surgeons to train with instruments and devices before using them for the first time in theaters, thus ensuring safe use and improving patient safety. Further validation as a training tool is needed and should be the focus of additional research, but early results are very promising.

  11. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff: functional outcome after arthroscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ruben; Debeer, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    In this study, we assessed the functional results after arthroscopic excision of rotator cuff calcifications. Sixty-one shoulders in 57 patients with chronic calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff were treated with arthroscopic excision, subacromial bursa debridement and shaving. In patients with fraying or roughness of the coracoacromial ligament, an acromioplasty was also performed. Patients were evaluated after a mean follow-up of 15 months. The modified Constant score and DASH score significantly improved from 33.4 to 66.8 and from 49.7 to 17.3 respectively. Performing an acromioplasty did not influence the final outcome. Frozen shoulder was a frequent complication (18%) without significant effect on the final DASH or Constant score. The presence of residual calcifications after arthroscopic needling did not influence the final outcome. We therefore believe that the presence of residual calcifications can be accepted if this is deemed necessary to preserve the integrity of the tendon.

  12. Preemptive intraarticular tramadol for pain control after arthroscopic knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Bilge; Babacan, Avni; Arslan, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of intraarticular (ia) bupivacaine and tramadol injection and preemptive intraarticular tramadol in providing pain control after arthroscopic knee surgery. Following local research ethics committee approval, 60 patients were assigned in a randomized manner into three groups: Group I received ia 20 ml of 0.25 % bupivacaine at the end of the operation, Group II received ia 20 ml of 0.25 % bupivacaine and 100 mg of tramadol at the end of the operation and Group III received ia 100 mg of tramadol diluted in 20 ml of saline solution 30 minutes before skin inscision and 20 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine at the end of the operation as well. Analgesic duration, total analgesic consumption and postoperative VAS pain scores recorded at rest and with movement were significantly lower and patient satisfaction was significantly higher in Group II and III, compared to Group I. Total analgesic consumption and the number of patients requiring supplementary analgesics were significantly lower in the preemptive tramadol group compared to the postoperative tramadol group. In conclusion, preemptive ia tramadol provided effective and reliable pain control after artroscopic knee surgeries and may be preferred to postoperative administration.

  13. Arthroscopic Hip Labral Augmentation Technique With Iliotibial Band Graft.

    PubMed

    Locks, Renato; Chahla, Jorge; Frank, Jonathan M; Anavian, Jack; Godin, Jonathan A; Philippon, Marc J

    2017-04-01

    The importance of the acetabular labrum has been well documented for the function and overall health of the hip joint. Several biomechanical studies have shown the sealing effect of the acetabular labrum. In the past decade, labral repair procedures have gained increased attention, with the literature suggesting that the outcomes after hip arthroscopy are directly related to labral preservation. However, a primary labral repair can be challenging in cases of hypoplastic, ossified, or complex and irreparable labral tears in which there is insufficient tissue to perform a primary repair. For these cases, labral reconstruction becomes a viable option with good outcomes at short-term and midterm follow-up. A subset of these patients may show viable remnants of the labral circumferential fibers but, because of the low tissue volume, these remnant fibers are unable to maintain the suction seal. In this situation, a labral augmentation may be a viable alternative to labral reconstruction while preserving as much native labral tissue as possible. The purpose of this Technical Note is to describe an arthroscopic hip labral augmentation technique using iliotibial band autograft or allograft.

  14. Arthroscopically assisted anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Seo, Young-Jin; Noh, Kyu-Cheol; Patro, Bishu Prasad; Kim, Do-Young

    2011-07-01

    We describe a method of arthroscopically assisted, mini-open, anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament. This method restores both components of the native ligament with the aim of achieving maximum stability with minimal disruption of the normal anatomy. Using the same principles of ligament reconstruction that are employed in other joints, transosseous tunnels are created following the native footprints of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments and an autologous graft is fixed using a PEEK screw. Adequate healing of the ligament occurs within the bone, to prevent stress risers with an appropriate working length. This procedure is unique, as it replaces the torn ligament with a natural substitute, in the appropriate location, through a minimally invasive procedure. This technique would be suitable for treatment of patients with either grade III or V acute acromioclavicular dislocations. Clinical outcomes for the first 13 consecutive patients treated with this procedure are reported, revealing excellent satisfaction rates with a Constant score of 96.6 at final follow-up.

  15. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree. PMID:26998466

  16. Arthroscopic Repair of Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion and Subscapularis Remplissage.

    PubMed

    Luedke, Colten; Tolan, Stefan J; Tokish, John M

    2017-06-01

    Posterior shoulder instability with glenoid bone loss has only a fraction of the prevalence of anterior instability. Unlike the latter, there is a paucity of literature regarding the treatment of posterior bony Bankart lesions and even less with concomitant reverse Hill-Sachs lesions. This combination of pathology leads to a difficult situation regarding treatment options. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of a posterior bony Bankart lesion and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. The importance of proper portal placement cannot be overstated. By use of the lateral position and strategically placed portals, the posterior bony Bankart lesion and attached labral complex were appropriately mobilized. We reduced the glenoid bone, with the attached capsulolabral complex, to the glenoid rim and performed fixation using a knotless suture anchor. We then placed 2 double-loaded suture anchors into the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. The sutures were passed creating horizontal mattress configurations that were tied at the end of the procedure, effectively externalizing the humeral head defect. Our technique results in satisfactory fragment reduction, as well as appropriate capsular tension, and effectively prevents the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion from engaging.

  17. Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis: the posterior approach in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Carro, Luis Perez; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2007-04-01

    Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, as reported by Tasto, is done in the lateral decubitus position, and the portal sites are lateral. This report describes a new alternative method in which the patient is in the prone position and a posterior 2-portal approach is used, as described by van Dijk et al. The initial debridement and synovectomy are performed with 4- and 5-mm resectors. Debridement and decortication are done posterior to the interosseous ligament because only the posterior facet is fused. Denudation of the articular surfaces is performed with curettes, as well as 4.5- and 5.5-mm burs, to remove 2 mm of subchondral bone. Stabilization in 5 degrees of hindfoot valgus is accomplished with 2 percutaneous cannulated headless screws from the non-weight-bearing portion of the calcaneal tuberosity directed to a point 5 to 10 mm posterior to the anterior margin of the posterior facet. The advantages of this alternative treatment are better intra-articular visualization, more thorough preparation of the fusion site, and minimal bone removal of the lateral side with better control of the arthrodesis position and with less chance of malunion, as well as the possibility to perform a concomitant surgical fusion or debridement of the ankle joint during the same operative procedure with no need for additional portals or orientation.

  18. [Acromioclavicular instability: arthroscopic and mini-open combined treatment].

    PubMed

    Slullitel, D; Galán, H; Della, V F; Ibañez, F

    2016-01-01

    The surgical treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation remains controversial. We describe herein a combined two-stage technique that includes an arthroscopic approach followed by a mini-invasive approach. 41 patients with acromioclavicular dislocation grades III, IV and V. Acute and chronic lesions and revision surgeries were included during the follow-up. Patients with other shoulder conditions were excluded. Mean age was 28.6 years. Patients were assessed preoperatively with the UCLA and Constant scores, and the pain visual analog scale. The 6- and 12-month postoperative evaluation included X-rays to assess coronal and axial stability, coracoclavicular ossifications, signs of acromioclavicular arthrosis and/or distal clavicular osteolysis. The Constant scores were as follows: 41.3 preoperatively; 89.4 at 6 months; 92.3 at 12 months. The UCLA scores were as follows: 21.7 preoperatively; 29.1 at 6 months; 31.4 at 12 months. The VAS scores were 8.4, 2.3 and 1.2, for the same periods respectively. Two cases had repeated injury due to trauma and one case was dissatisfied with the cosmetic appearance of the scar. The X-ray assessment showed two cases of loss of stability and one case of distal clavicular osteolysis. The combination of two reduction methods, a synthetic one and a biological one allows for a solid anatomical reconstruction that is stable in the coronal and axial planes and good medium-term results.

  19. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2009-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree.

  20. Arthroscopic outside-in meniscal repair through a needle hole.

    PubMed

    Laupattarakasem, Wiroon; Sumanont, Sermsak; Kesprayura, Suraphol; Kasemkijwattana, Channarong

    2004-07-01

    This article describes an alternative method for outside-in repair of a longitudinal meniscal tear through a needle hole, which will produce an almost negligible cutaneous scar. The procedure is performed under arthroscopic set-up using an 18-gauge needle preloaded with appropriate suture material. Insert the needle twice through the same cutaneous entry hole to form a mattress loop across the torn meniscal segments. The first insertion penetrates both segments and forms a loop. The second insertion then engages the outer segment and forms another loop. Draw the free end of this second loop into the joint and feed it into the first loop. Pull the first loop out from the joint together with the trapped portion near the free end, until the whole suture becomes a vertical mattress. Finally, tie a slipknot and several half hitches to close the meniscal gap under the stitch. In a large bucket-handle tear, stitches should be started at the middle and then alternating anteriorly and posteriorly 3 to 4 mm apart. To ensure that no significant extracapsular structures are trapped in each stitch, a 13-gauge needle can be used as a cannula sheath. This technique is economical and technically safe and simple for reparable meniscal lesions, including the posterior horn.

  1. Swimmers' painful shoulder arthroscopic findings and return rate to sports.

    PubMed

    Brushøj, C; Bak, K; Johannsen, H V; Faunø, P

    2007-08-01

    Shoulder pain is the most common musculo-skeletal complaint in competitive swimmers. It remains one of the shoulder pain syndromes in overhead athletes where no golden standard of treatment exists. Eighteen competitive swimmers who all had undergone shoulder arthroscopy for therapy-resistant shoulder pain were retrospectively evaluated with respect to operative findings and ability to return to their sport after the operation. The most common finding at arthroscopy was labral pathology in 11 (61%) and subacromial impingement in five shoulders (28%). Operative procedures included debridement in 11 swimmers, partial release of the coraco-acromial ligament in four, and bursectomy in four. Sixteen (89%) responded to the follow-up evaluation. Nine swimmers (56%) were able to compete at preinjury level after 4 (2-9) months. Findings at arthroscopy suggest that the term "Swimmer's shoulder" covers a variety of pathologies including labral wearing and subacromial impingement. Arthroscopic debridement of labral tears or bursectomy in swimmers with shoulder pain has a low success rate with regard to return to sport. Further understanding and investigation of this syndromes complex pathophysiology is needed.

  2. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joon Soon; Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-06-01

    Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures.

  3. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay.

  4. The arthroscopic latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder instability: 5-year minimum follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guillaume D; Fogerty, Simon; Rosso, Claudio; Lafosse, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure combines the benefits of arthroscopic surgery with the low rate of recurrent instability associated with the Latarjet procedure. Only short-term outcomes after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure have been reported. To evaluate the rate of recurrent instability and patient outcomes a minimum of 5 years after stabilization performed with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Patients who underwent the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure before June 2008 completed a questionnaire to determine whether they had experienced a dislocation, subluxation, or further surgery. The patients also completed the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI). A total of 62 of 87 patients (64/89 shoulders) were contacted for follow-up. Mean follow-up time was 76.4 months (range, 61.2-100.7 months). No patients had reported a dislocation since their surgery. One patient reported having subluxations since the surgery. Thus, 1 patient (1.59%) had recurrent instability after the procedure. The mean ± standard deviation aggregate WOSI score was 90.6% ± 9.4%. Mean WOSI domain scores were as follows: Physical Symptoms, 90.1% ± 8.7%; Sports/Recreation/Work, 90.3% ± 12.9%; Lifestyle, 93.7% ± 9.8%; and Emotions, 88.7% ± 17.3%. The rate of recurrent instability after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is low in this series of patients with a minimum 5-year follow-up. Patient outcomes as measured by the WOSI are good. © 2014 The Author(s).

  5. Septic arthritis following arthroscopic reconstruction of cruciate ligaments of the knee: retrospective case review.

    PubMed

    Erice, Alejo; Neira, M Inmaculada; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Chiaraviglio, Ana; Gutiérrez-Guisado, Javier; Rodríguez de Oya, Ricardo

    2017-06-23

    Rupture of cruciate ligaments of the knee is a common injury that is repaired by arthroscopic reconstruction, which can give rise to septic arthritis. The objective of this article is to describe the clinical and microbiological aspects of this entity. Retrospective review of cases of septic arthritis following arthroscopic reconstruction of cruciate ligaments of the knee that occurred at a single institution from 2000-2015. According to time elapsed from surgery, infections were classified as acute (< 14 days), subacute (> 14 days and<30 days), and late (> 30 days). A descriptive and comparative analysis stratified by type of infection and causative microorganism was performed. 3,219 patients underwent arthroscopic reconstruction of cruciate ligaments of the knee and 30 (0.9%) developed septic arthritis. Seventeen (57%) were acute infections and 12 (40%) subacute; there was one late infection. The causative microorganisms were coagulase-negative Staphylococci (n=13; 43%), Staphylococcus aureus (n=12; 40%), other grampositive cocci (n=3; 10%), and gramnegative bacilli (n=2; 7%). All patients underwent arthroscopic debridement; no grafts were removed. All patients received antibiotic therapy for a median of 23.5 days (range: 14 - 78 days); all infections were cured. No significant differences were found in any of the variables analysed among the infection type or the causative microorganism. Septic arthritis after arthroscopic reconstruction of cruciate ligaments of the knee is uncommon. It generally presents within 4 weeks of surgery and is caused by Staphylococci. Its treatment consists of arthroscopic debridement (without necessarily removing the graft) and antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic factors for recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a prognostic study.

    PubMed

    Fermont, Anouk J; Wolterbeek, Nienke; Wessel, Ronald N; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; de Bie, Rob A

    2015-08-01

    Studies concerning prognostic factors of recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair mostly focus on tendon integrity or functional recovery as an outcome. Little is known about how they influence quality of life after surgery. We therefore tried to identify prognostic factors having an impact on quality of life after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This study included 30 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We assessed Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index as primary outcome and RAND-36, Constant-Murley score, and a shoulder hindrance score as secondary outcomes. Patients were repeatedly measured: once preoperatively and 4 times postoperatively. Preoperative range of motion, obesity, fatty infiltration, and cuff retraction were preselected as prognostic factors. Patients were significantly improved at 3 months and 6 months after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. In multiple regression analysis, none of the preselected factors could be identified as a prognostic factor influencing quality of life after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (measured with the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index). For the outcome variables RAND-36 (6 months, 1 year) and shoulder hindrance score (1 year), fatty infiltration Goutallier stages 1 and 2 and retraction grades II, III, and IV were significant predictors. Although fatty infiltration and retraction grade predict the RAND-36 and shoulder hindrance score, this study could not support preoperative range of motion, obesity, fatty infiltration, or retraction of the cuff as a prognostic factor for quality of life after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. This study shows that if selection of patients is done properly, these factors do not influence a successful outcome. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopic treatment of painful Sinding-Larsen-Johansson syndrome in a professional handball player.

    PubMed

    Kajetanek, C; Thaunat, M; Guimaraes, T; Carnesecchi, O; Daggett, M; Sonnery-Cottet, B

    2016-09-01

    Sinding-Larsen-Johansson (SLJ) syndrome is a type of osteochondrosis of the distal pole of the patella most often caused by repeated microtrauma. Here, we describe the case of a professional athlete with painful SLJ syndrome treated arthroscopically. A 29-year-old male professional handball player presented with anterior knee pain that persisted after 4 months of an eccentric rehabilitation protocol and platelet-rich plasma injections. Despite this conservative treatment, the patient could not participate in his sport. The SLJ lesion was excised arthroscopically, which led to complete disappearance of symptoms and return to competitive sports after 5 months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic-assisted posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autograft: a technique for graft passage.

    PubMed

    Mariani, P P; Adriani, E; Maresca, G

    1996-08-01

    During arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, passage of the graft into the knee joint may be difficult, especially when using the patellar tendon. Because of the angle of passage, the bone block ends may become entangled or caught on the superior edge of the posterior tibial tunnel when passing the graft from the tibia to the femur. The use of a blunt trocar through the posteromedial portal avoids impingement of the bone block against the edge of the tibial tunnel. This method uses the pulley principle and permits the graft to pass freely into the knee. This method has been used successfully by the authors in more than 40 PCL arthroscopic reconstructions.

  9. Combined partial arthroscopic synovectomy and radiation therapy for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Blanco, C E; Leon, H O; Guthrie, T B

    2001-05-01

    We present the results of combined partial arthroscopic synovectomy and low-dose external-beam radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the knee. Mechanical synovectomy is an effective tool in treating PVNS of the knee, but when used alone it may be insufficient to eliminate all affected tissue. Intra-articular radiation or external-beam radiation may be added to mechanical synovectomy to treat recurrence but is not routinely done at the time of initial synovectomy. Combining intra-articular synovectomy with RT at the initial treatment for PVNS of the knee may reduce the recurrence rate. We present a prospective study of the treatment of 22 patients with clinical, ultrasonic, and histologically confirmed findings of diffuse PVNS of the knee. Characteristic clinical findings included pain, swelling, and erythema. These patients were treated by the Arthroscopic Surgery Group of the Orthopaedic Service at the Hospital "Hermanos Ameijeiras" in Havana, Cuba from 1990 to 1998. The protocol included anterior (patellofemoral, medial, and lateral) arthroscopic synovectomy and postoperative RT with a total dose of 2,600 cGy. This combination therapy was effective in reducing symptoms of pain and edema, and in improving overall function of patients. Nineteen patients (86%) had good or excellent results at an average follow-up of 33 months (range, 26 to 76 months). Three patients had residual stiffness and swelling, 2 of whom also had pain. Three had clinically and ultrasonically confirmed recurrence of disease and were treated with repeat arthroscopic synovectomy without harmful effects from RT. In all of the cases requiring repeat arthroscopic synovectomy, we observed fibrous bands secondary to reorganization of synovial inflamed tissue, meniscal retraction, and microscopic findings of fibrosis and cellular paucity. Partial arthroscopic synovectomy combined with low-dose RT in anti-inflammatory doses produced good results

  10. Arthroscopic Resection of Too-Long Anterior Process of the Calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    A too-long anterior process (TLAP) of the calcaneus is an elongated anteromedial process of the calcaneus impinging the navicular or the talar head. TLAP can cause recurrent ankle sprain, peroneal muscle spasm, or persistent tarsal pain in adolescents. Arthroscopic resection is indicated if the symptoms do not respond to conservative treatment. It has the advantage of assessment of completeness of bone resection and treatment of associated lesions of the adjacent joints. The purpose of this technical note is to report an arthroscopic approach of the resection of the TLAP with the lateral midtarsal portal as the viewing portal.

  11. Arthroscopic First Metatarsophalangeal Arthrodesis for Repair of Fixed Hallux Varus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis for fixed hallux varus deformity can be very difficult because narrowing of the medial joint space results in difficult access. The abductor hallucis tendon and the medial capsule can be released through a small proximal plantar medial incision. This will convert the deformity into a flexible one and open up the medial joint space. This allows arthroscopic arthrodesis using the standard dorsolateral and medial portals. The plantar medial incision can also be used for arthroscopy of the metatarsosesamoid compartment and insertion of a screw for first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis.

  12. Correlation Between Residual Displacement and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Following Cannulated Screw Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Xu, Gui-Jun; Han, Zhe; Jiang, Xuan; Zhang, Cheng-Bao; Dong, Qiang; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a new method for measuring the residual displacement of the femoral head after internal fixation and explore the relationship between residual displacement and osteonecrosis with femoral head, and to evaluate the risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with femoral neck fractures treated by closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation.One hundred and fifty patients who sustained intracapsular femoral neck fractures between January 2011 and April 2013 were enrolled in the study. All were treated with closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw internal fixation. The residual displacement of the femoral head after surgery was measured by 3-dimensional reconstruction that evaluated the quality of the reduction. Other data that might affect prognosis were also obtained from outpatient follow-up, telephone calls, or case reviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess the intrinsic relationship between the risk factors and the osteonecrosis of the femoral head.Osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 27 patients (18%). Significant differences were observed regarding the residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification. Moreover, we found more or less residual displacement of femoral head in all patients with high quality of reduction based on x-ray by the new technique. There was a close relationship between residual displacement and ONFH.There exists limitation to evaluate the quality of reduction by x-ray. Three-dimensional reconstruction and digital measurement, as a new method, is a more accurate method to assess the quality of reduction. Residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification were risk factors for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. High-quality reduction was necessary to avoid complications.

  13. Femoral shaft medialisation and neck-shaft angle in unstable pertrochanteric femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Pajarinen, J; Lindahl, J; Savolainen, V; Michelsson, O; Hirvensalo, E

    2004-12-01

    We analysed the time-dependent mean changes in the femoral neck length, neck-shaft angle and hip offset in a randomised study comprising 48 patients who were treated with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) or the proximal femoral nail (PFN) for an unstable intertrochanteric femoral fracture. As a consequence of fracture compression, the mean post-operative neck length was significantly shorter in patients treated with the DHS. During the first 6 weeks after the operation, a mean decrease of 4.6 degrees was observed in the neck-shaft angle, but there was not a significant difference between the treatment groups. The radiographic measures remained virtually unaffected during the interval from 6 weeks to 4 months in both groups. When the operated hip was compared to the opposite hip, patients who had received the DHS showed significantly greater medialisation of the femoral shaft at 4 months than those treated with the PFN. We thus recommend that unstable intertrochanteric fractures should be initially reduced in a slight valgus position in order to achieve an outcome after healing that is as normal as possible. As a result of differences in operative technique and implant stability, the PFN may be superior to the DHS in retaining the anatomical relations in the hip region in unstable intertrochanteric fractures.

  14. Pitfalls of femoral titanium elastic nailing.

    PubMed

    Salonen, A; Lahdes-Vasama, T; Mattila, V M; Välipakka, J; Pajulo, O

    2015-06-01

    Despite several potential complications of elastic intramedullary nailing, it is currently the treatment of choice for femoral diaphyseal fractures in school-aged children. This study aimed to critically evaluate the complications of titanium elastic nailing in pediatric femoral shaft fractures. This study evaluated patients with a diaphyseal femoral fracture treated with titanium elastic nailing (TEN) in Tampere University Hospital in Finland. The study group included 32 children with a mean age of 9 years during a 5-year period, from 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2007. Data were collected from medical records and x-rays. Mean follow-up time was 42 months. Of 32 patients, 9 (28%) reported a postoperative complication. Complications were associated with nail prominence in five (16%) patients and instability in four (12%) patients. In patients with nail prominence, the titanium elastic nailing-nail ends were unbent and 10-35 mm outside the cortex of the distal femur. The nail prominence caused pain and delayed knee mobilization until the nail was removed after a mean time of 4 months. In patients with fracture instability, the mean titanium elastic nailing-nail/medullary canal diameter ratio was 46% and periosteal callus formation was 5.4 mm at the first control. In those with stable fractures, the values were 66% and 9.2 mm, respectively. Based on this study, two types of pitfalls in a small volume center were found. Titanium elastic nail ends were left unbent and too long. We recommend palpating the nail ends to exclude nail prominence and to verify free movement of the knee after nail cutting and bending. Fracture instability was caused by inserting titanium elastic nailing-nails that were too narrow. To avoid this complication, careful preoperative planning to select the proper-size titanium elastic nailing-nails and intraoperative testing of fracture stability under continuous fluoroscopy after the operation is advised. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  15. Overgrowth of the femoral neck after hip fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Feng-Chih; Kuo, Shu-Jui; Ko, Jih-Yang

    2016-04-26

    Overgrowth after pediatric femoral shaft fractures is well documented; however, overgrowth of the femoral neck after hip fractures has not been especially reported previously. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of femoral neck overgrowth after hip fractures in children. From January 1990 to December 2012, there were 30 consecutive patients with pediatric hip fractures. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of all the patients, including age at injury, gender, injury mechanism, fracture type, methods of treatment, time to bony union, and complications. The functional outcome was evaluated by Ratliff's criteria. The radiography of the pelvis was performed in controlled positions of abduction and external rotation. The length of the femoral neck was measured by two observers. The overgrowth of the femoral neck was defined as lengthening more than 3 mm in comparison with the uninjured hip. At a mean follow-up of 4.9 years (range 2-8 years), 12 patients (40 %) had an overgrowth of the femoral neck. The average overgrowth of the femoral neck was 6.2 mm (range 3.2-8.5 mm). The patients with femoral neck overgrowth were younger (p = 0.0002), have lower rate of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (p = 0.0006), and have better functional outcome (p = 0.0026). Our results provide evidence that overgrowth of the femoral neck following hip fractures may occur in children and the overgrowth phenomenon in the femoral neck was a predictor of good outcomes after treatment.

  16. Role of Sonography in Clinically Occult Femoral Hernias.

    PubMed

    Brandel, David W; Girish, Gandikota; Brandon, Catherine J; Dong, Qian; Yablon, Corrie; Jamadar, David A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of sonography in clinically occult femoral hernias and to describe our sonographic technique. The clinical and imaging data for 93 outpatients referred by general surgeons, all of whom underwent sonographic evaluation and surgery, were reviewed retrospectively. Of these, 55 patients who underwent surgical exploration for groin hernias within 3 months of sonography and met all inclusion criteria were included in the study. The sonographic technique involves using the pubic tubercle as an osseous landmark to identify and appropriately visualize the femoral canal. The Valsalva maneuver is then used to differentiate the movement of normal fat (a potential pitfall) from true herniation in the femoral canal. Surgical findings were used as the reference standard by which sonographic results were judged. Two-by-two contingency tables were used to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. In these 55 patients, surgery revealed 15 femoral hernias. Eight femoral hernias occurred in women, and 7 occurred in men. For diagnosing femoral hernias, sonography demonstrated sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 88%, a positive predictive value of 71%, and a negative predictive value of 92%. True-positive cases of femoral hernias have a sonographic appearance of a hypoechoic sac with speckled internal echoes. When examining during the Valsalva maneuver, a femoral hernia passes deep to the inguinal ligament, expands the femoral canal, displacing the normal canal fat, and effaces the femoral vein. Sonography can exclude femoral hernias with high confidence in light of its exceptional negative predictive value. With attention to technique and imaging criteria, the diagnostic accuracy of sonography can be enhanced.

  17. Femoral neck preservation in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Pipino, F; Molfetta, L

    1993-01-01

    Preservation of the femoral neck in hip arthroplasty creates a particular biomechanical situation which is clearly different from what is found even after partial neck removal. The femoral neck consists in fact of a "cylinder of cortical bone" that can be used as the "base" for anchoring the stem to the femur, in contrast to the press-fit procedure or other solutions. The mechanical and biological advantages are as follows: 1) Primary triplanar stem stability, in particular rotational stability. Rotational movements of the stem are blocked by the tough lateral cortical cylinder of the neck. Resistance to varus-valgus stress and collapse is also increased vertically and frontally. 2) Proximal cortical fixation. Primary fixation of the stem is provided by the neck cortex, whereas its mid-distal part is merely held by the metaphyseal cancellous bone and the tip is undersized with respect to the medullary canal. 3) Stress loads distributed along physiological lines of stress. Retention of the neck permits preservation of the trabecular systems, along which the stress is distributed towards the diaphysis and the greater trochanter. 4) Elasticity of the bone-prosthesis system. Most of the stem is contained within the metaphyseal cancellous bone that lies between the prosthesis and the cortical bone, creating a bone-prosthesis module with variable and integrated elasticity. 5) Preservation of the bone-stock. The amount of residual bone following implant of the prosthesis increases, not only because of the presence of the femoral neck, but also as a result of the preservation of most of the metaphyseal cancellous bone. There is therefore greater bone-ingrowth, which is also favoured by the fewer changes in the endosteal blood supply. 6) Prosthesis revision is simpler, since the stem can easily be removed and a second neck resection performed. Our clinical and experimental studies, together with those of Freeman et al., confirm that the femoral neck is present for a long

  18. An anatomical measurement of medial femoral torsion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Y; Lee, Sang K; Lee, Neung K; Choy, Won S

    2012-11-01

    Medial femoral torsion (MFT) can be corrected with derotational osteotomy. Derotational osteotomies can be performed in the proximal or the distal part of the femur. Similar results have been reported for these two procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathologic location of the MFT by measuring the degree of infratrochanteric and supratrochanteric torsion (STT) of the femur using computed tomography (CT) scans. The current study was carried out in patients with the chief complaint of an in-toeing gait because of the MFT. Sixty-seven patients were enrolled in the study. Forty-one patients (72 lower extremities) were included in the intervention group; 20 patients were included in the cerebral palsy (CP) group (35 lower extremities) and 21 patients were included in the developmental MFT group [developmental femoral torsional (DF) group, 37 lower extremities]. The control group included 26 patients (33 lower extremities) with uninjured limbs with a femoral or a tibial fracture. In this study, torsional angles [MFT, STT and infratrochanteric torsion (ITT)] were measured on CT scan using picture archiving and communication system measurement tools. To measure the STT and ITT, the most prominent points of the lesser and the greater trochanter were marked on CT scans; these two points were connected and were defined as the intertrochanteric line (ITL). The angle between the ITL and the axis of the femoral neck was defined as the STT. The angle between the ITL and the axis of the condylar axis was defined as the ITT. Two authors measured the MFT, STT, and ITT angles of each femur independently. The twisting of the femur had occurred in a different location for each case. In all groups, however, STT was reduced with increasing age; this change was statistically significantly. ITT of the each group showed a random distribution. The means of the ITT in the control group and the DF group did not change significantly, and that of the CP group tended to decrease

  19. The Role of Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy in the Management of Degenerative Meniscus Tears: A Review of the Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohsin; Shenoy, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for middle aged to older adults with knee pain is one of the most common surgical procedures with approximately 150,000 knee arthroscopies being carried out in the United Kingdom each year, and about five times that number in the United States. Despite this, the procedure remains controversial. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the role of arthroscopic meniscectomy in patients with degenerative meniscus tears and suggest recommendations for clinical practice. Methods: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases, including Pubmed, Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library to cover important randomised control trials surrounding the use of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Results: The majority of randomised control trials suggest that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is not superior to conservative measures such as exercise programmes. Furthermore, one randomised control trial found that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was not even superior to sham surgery. Conclusion: There is significant overtreatment of knee pain with arthroscopic partial meniscectomy when alternative, less invasive and less expensive treatment options are equally effective. First-line treatment of degenerative meniscus tears should be non-operative therapy focused on analgesia and physical therapy to provide pain relief as well as improve mechanical function of the knee joint. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should be considered as a last resort when extensive exercise programmes and physiotherapy have been tried and failed. PMID:28217206

  20. Revision Arthroscopic Repair Versus Latarjet Procedure in Patients With Recurrent Instability After Initial Repair Attempt: A Cost-Effectiveness Model.

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Lamba, Nayan; Swart, Eric; Steinhaus, Michael E; Ahmad, Christopher S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic revision instability repair and Latarjet procedure in treating patients with recurrent instability after initial arthroscopic instability repair. An expected-value decision analysis of revision arthroscopic instability repair compared with Latarjet procedure for recurrent instability followed by failed repair attempt was modeled. Inputs regarding procedure cost, clinical outcomes, and health utilities were derived from the literature. Compared with revision arthroscopic repair, Latarjet was less expensive ($13,672 v $15,287) with improved clinical outcomes (43.78 v 36.76 quality-adjusted life-years). Both arthroscopic repair and Latarjet were cost-effective compared with nonoperative treatment (incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of 3,082 and 1,141, respectively). Results from sensitivity analyses indicate that under scenarios of high rates of stability postoperatively, along with improved clinical outcome scores, revision arthroscopic repair becomes increasingly cost-effective. Latarjet procedure for failed instability repair is a cost-effective treatment option, with lower costs and improved clinical outcomes compared with revision arthroscopic instability repair. However, surgeons must still incorporate clinical judgment into treatment algorithm formation. Level IV, expected value decision analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. BiPOD Arthroscopic Acromioclavicular Repair Restores Bidirectional Stability.

    PubMed

    De Beer, Joe; Schaer, Michael; Latendresse, Kim; Raniga, Sumit; Moor, Beat K; Zumstein, Matthias A

    2016-09-19

    Stabilizing the acromioclavicular joint in the vertical and horizontal planes is challenging, and most current techniques do not reliably achieve this goal. The BiPOD repair is an arthroscopically assisted procedure performed with image intensifier guidance that reconstructs the coracoclavicular ligaments as well as the acromioclavicular ligaments to achieve bidirectional stability. Repair is achieved with a combination of 2-mm FiberTape (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) and 20-mm Poly-Tape (Neoligaments, Leeds, England) to achieve rigid repair, prevent bone abrasion, and promote tissue ingrowth. This study is a prospective review of the first 6 patients treated for high-grade acute acromioclavicular injury with the BiPOD technique. The study included 6 men who were 21 to 36 years old (mean, 27 years). At 6-month follow-up, complications were recorded and radiographic analysis was used to determine the coracoclavicular distance for vertical reduction and the amount of acromioclavicular translation on the Alexander axillary view was used to determine horizontal reduction. One patient had a superficial infection over the tape knot. The difference in coracoclavicular distance between the operated side and the uninvolved side was 9±2 mm preoperatively and 0.3±2 mm at 6-month follow-up. On Alexander axillary view, all 6 patients showed stable reduction, which is defined as a clavicle that is in line with the acromion. The findings show that BiPOD acromioclavicular reconstruction restores bidirectional stability of the acromioclavicular joint at 6 months. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):exx-exx.].

  2. An arthroscopic evaluation of the anatomical "critical zone".

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Nerissa; Lazarus, Lelika; Osman, Shameem Ahmed; Satyapal, Kapil Sewsaran

    2016-09-26

    The "critical zone", a region of speculated vascularity, is situated approximately 10mm proximal to the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon. Despite its obvious role as an anatomical landmark demarcator, its patho-anatomic nature has been identified as the source of rotator cuff pathology. Although many studies have attempted to evaluate the vascularity of this region, the architecture regarding the exact length, width and shape of the critical zone, remains unreported. This study aimed to determine the shape and morphometry of the "critical zone" arthroscopically. The sample series, which comprised of 38 cases (n = 38) specific to pathological types, employed an anatomical investigation of the critical zone during routine real-time arthroscopy. Demographic representation: i) Sex: 19 Males, 19 Females; ii) Age range: 18 - 76 years old; iii) Race: White (29), Indian (7) and Coloured (2). The incidence of shape and the mean lengths and widths of the critical zone were determined in accordance with the relevant demographic factors and patient history. Although the cresenteric shape was predominant, hemispheric and sail-shaped critical zones were also identified. The lengths and widths of the critical zone appeared markedly increased in male individuals. While the increase in age may account for the increased incidence of rotator cuff degeneration due to poor end vascular supply, the additional factors of height and weight presented as major determinants of the increase in size of the critical zone. In addition, the comparisons of length and width with each other and shape yielded levels of significant difference, therefore indicating a directly proportional relationship between the length and width of the critical zone. This detailed understanding of the critical zone may prove beneficial for the success of post-operative rotator cuff healing.

  3. Arthroscopic intralesional curettage for large benign talar dome cysts.

    PubMed

    El Shazly, Ossama; Abou El Soud, Maged M; Nasef Abdelatif, Nasef Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Surgical management of large talar dome cysts is challenging due to increased morbidity by associated cartilage damage and malleolar osteotomy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome of endoscopic curettage and bone graft for large talar dome cysts. This is a retrospective analysis of data for eight patients (eight feet) who were treated by arthroscopic curettage and grafting for large talar dome cysts. Seven cases were treated by posterior ankle arthroscopy as the lesion was located posteriorly while one case was treated by anterior ankle arthroscopy as the lesion was breached anteriorly. The final diagnosis, was; large osteochondral lesion of talus (two cases), aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (two case), intra-osseous ganglion (two cases), Chronic infection in talus (one case) and angiomatous lesion of the talus (one case). The mean follow up period was 18.3 (±3.06 SD) months (range 16-25 months). The median preoperative AOFAS score was 74.5 (±5.34 SD) points. The mean postoperative AOFAS score at one year follow up was 94.6 (±2.97 SD) points. None of the patient had recurrence of the lesion during follow up. Return to normal daily activity was achieved at 11.25 (±2.37 SD) weeks. In this short case series study, large talar dome bony cysts of different pathologies including aneurysmal bone cysts could be treated effectively by endoscopic curettage and bone grafting with no recurrence no complications during the follow-up period.

  4. Effect of nabumetone on hemostasis during arthroscopic knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, T J; Donahue, J R; Toomey, E P; Holtby, R M; Scuderi, G R; Adams, P L; Poland, M P

    1998-01-01

    The known effects of commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on hemostatic parameters have led to concern over their use in the perioperative period. Nabumetone, unlike other NSAIDs, has little effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. To evaluate the effect of nabumetone 2000 mg daily on other hemostatic parameters (e.g., bleeding time, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time) in the clinical setting, this double-masked study was conducted in patients with osteoarthritis undergoing arthroscopic knee surgery. After a 1-week placebo washout period, 58 patients were randomized to receive nabumetone and 53 were randomized to receive placebo. They were assessed before surgery (after 1 to 2 weeks of treatment) and again after surgery (after an additional 3 weeks of treatment). The study was designed to have 90% power to show equivalence in bleeding time to within 1.5 minutes, a difference assumed to be of no clinical importance. No meaningful differences were observed between the groups in any of the measured hemostatic parameters. Before surgery, the bleeding time increased by only 0.3 minutes with nabumetone and decreased by 0.2 minutes with placebo. The mean (+/- SD) difference between the groups in change from baseline was 0.5 +/- 0.3 minutes. After surgery, the changes were 0.1 minutes and 0.0 minutes, respectively, and the difference between groups was 0.2 +/- 0.3 minutes. These differences were neither statistically nor clinically significant, and maximum individual increases were similar in each group. Furthermore, there were no reports of abnormal bleeding in the operative knees. The results of this study show that nabumetone had little or no effect on hemostasis and suggest that this drug can be used safely in the perioperative period.

  5. The Impact of Weight on Arthroscopic Osteochondral Talar Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Maccario, Camilla; Ursino, Chiara; Serra, Nicola; D'Ambrosi, Riccardo

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the functional and radiologic outcomes after AT-AMIC (arthroscopic talus autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis) in 2 weight groups of patients with osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs): patients with BMI <25 (Healthy Weight Group [HG]) and with BMI ≥25 (Overweight Group [OG]). Thirty-seven patients were evaluated. HG was composed of 21 patients (BMI = 21.90 ± 1.94), whereas OG consisted of 16 patients (BMI = 27.41 ± 1.98). All patients were treated with AT-AMIC repair for OLTs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), Visual Analgoue Scale (VAS) for pain, American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle and Hindfoot score and Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) were administered preoperatively (T0) and at 6 (T1), 12 (T2), and 24 (T3) months postoperatively. In both groups, we found a significant difference for clinical and radiologic parameters with analysis of variance for repeated measures through 4 time points ( P < .001). In HG, AOFAS increased at every follow-up ( P < .05), whereas in OG, AOFAS improved only between T2 and T3 ( P = .0104). In OG we found a significant difference comparing CT and MRI at each follow-up; in HG this difference was found only at T0 ( P < .0001) and T1 ( P = .0492). Finally, OG presented a significantly larger lesion measured with MRI at T0 ( P = .033). OLTs in overweight patients were characterized by a larger preoperative size. At final follow-up, both groups showed a significant clinical improvement. AT-AMIC can be considered a safe and reliable procedure, regardless of weight, with a significant improvement also in quality of life. Level III, comparative study.

  6. Energy-Based Metrics for Arthroscopic Skills Assessment.

    PubMed

    Poursartip, Behnaz; LeBel, Marie-Eve; McCracken, Laura C; Escoto, Abelardo; Patel, Rajni V; Naish, Michael D; Trejos, Ana Luisa

    2017-08-05

    Minimally invasive skills assessment methods are essential in developing efficient surgical simulators and implementing consistent skills evaluation. Although numerous methods have been investigated in the literature, there is still a need to further improve the accuracy of surgical skills assessment. Energy expenditure can be an indication of motor skills proficiency. The goals of this study are to develop objective metrics based on energy expenditure, normalize these metrics, and investigate classifying trainees using these metrics. To this end, different forms of energy consisting of mechanical energy and work were considered and their values were divided by the related value of an ideal performance to develop normalized metrics. These metrics were used as inputs for various machine learning algorithms including support vector machines (SVM) and neural networks (NNs) for classification. The accuracy of the combination of the normalized energy-based metrics with these classifiers was evaluated through a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The proposed method was validated using 26 subjects at two experience levels (novices and experts) in three arthroscopic tasks. The results showed that there are statistically significant differences between novices and experts for almost all of the normalized energy-based metrics. The accuracy of classification using SVM and NN methods was between 70% and 95% for the various tasks. The results show that the normalized energy-based metrics and their combination with SVM and NN classifiers are capable of providing accurate classification of trainees. The assessment method proposed in this study can enhance surgical training by providing appropriate feedback to trainees about their level of expertise and can be used in the evaluation of proficiency.

  7. Compressive femoral neuropathy: a rare complication of anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Ong, H S

    2007-03-01

    The most common coagulation disorder associated with warfarin use is bleeding, but compressive femoral neuropathy is an unusual presentation. A 63-year-old man with compressive femoral neuropathy from an iliacus haematoma is reported. The diagnosis was confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging and treated conservatively with good clinical response and radiological evidence of resolution.

  8. Routine femoral head fluoroscopy to reduce complications in coronary catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Joshua A.; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether routine preprocedure fluoroscopy of the femoral head would improve sheath placement or reduce the incidence of groin complications. Patients were randomized to receive either fluoroscopy or “blind” sheath placement using palpation alone. The location of the femoral sheath was established by femoral artery angiography. Sheath placement in relation to the femoral head, arterial location, and complication rates were compared. Placement was considered “ideal” if the sheath was in the common femoral artery and in the top or middle third of the femoral head. A total of 256 patients were enrolled. There was no difference in average age, body mass index (BMI), or rate of anticoagulation between the groups. There was no major bleeding in either group. The overall risk of minor bleeding was not statistically different. The treatment group showed higher “ideal” placement relative to the femoral head. In patients who had a BMI ≥30 kg/m2, the difference between the groups was statistically significant (treatment 69% vs control 50%). In conclusion, routine femoral fluoroscopy prior to sheath placement in coronary angiography and angioplasty did not significantly alter bleeding or complication rates but did increase the likelihood of ideal placement, especially in obese patients. PMID:19169390

  9. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for ischemic femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Song, H-J; Lan, B-Sh; Cheng, B; Zhang, K-F; Yan, H-W; Wang, W-Zh; Gao, Z-Q

    2010-06-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) is a highly mutilating disease. There is no effective way to treat femoral head ischemia. This study was designed to show the curative effects of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation to induce vascular regeneration and improve ischemic femoral head necrosis in rabbits. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent ischemic femoral head necrosis in both hindlimbs using liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. One cohort of rats was intraperitoneally injected with granulocyte-specific colony-stimulating factor (250 microg/kg/d), and control animals received equivalent saline solution. The right side was used as the transplantation group and the left as the control. After separation of peripheral blood, a stem cell suspension was poured into the right femoral artery and saline solution into the left femoral artery. At 4 weeks after peripheral stem cell transplantation, standing ability and activity of the the transplanted right hindlimb were remarkably improved, but there were no obvious changes in the control limbs. The experimental rabbits underwent arteriography of bilateral femoral heads, which indicated increased and thickened blood supply to the transplanted right hindlimb compared with the left control. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation improved ischemic femoral head necrosis.

  10. Cemented femoral stems in patients with DDH.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cimbrelo, E

    2007-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is the procedure of choice for most adult patients with symptomatic arthrosis secondary to developmental dysplasia (DDH), but it requires complex reconstructive techniques, is usually performed in young patients, and has an increased risk of complications. THA is indicated in presence of severe pain and when osteotomy is contraindicated. The complexity of surgery is related to the degree of dysplasia. Anatomic abnormalities in the acetabulum and femur are the cause of the complexity and complications of this procedure. Acetabular bone deficiency requires reconstructive techniques before implanting the cup at the anatomic acetabular location, such as bone autograft augmentation, implanting the cup at higher level of the hip center and cup medialization. Femoral shortening and special cemented or uncemented stems are currently used to avoid intraoperative complications. While a cemented stem needs metaphyseal femoral shortening, subtrochanteric shortening requires a cementless stem. Because of these patients' age, alternative bearing surfaces, such as alumina-on-alumina couples are recommended when possible. Although the long-term results of total hip arthroplasty in DDH are inferior to those in a general population, the results show a high level of pain relief and functional improvement.

  11. Failed internal fixation of femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Hoelsbrekken, Sigurd Erik; Opsahl, Jan-Henrik; Stiris, Morten; Paulsrud, Øyvind; Strømsøe, Knut

    2012-06-12

    There are two types of surgical treatment for fractures of the femoral neck; internal fixation and arthroplasty. Internal fixation is associated with a higher risk of complications such as secondary displacement, non-union and avascular necrosis. To improve treatment results of internal fixation, we have tried to identify procedure related risk-factors associated with fixation failure. A retrospective study was conducted based on the medical records and X-ray images of 337 patients sustaining intracapsular fractures of the hip during the period 1999-2000. The patients were treated with closed reduction and internal fixation at Oslo University Hospital, Aker. The reduction of the fracture and the placement of the fixation implants were evaluated and scored (six points representing best achievable result). Fixation failed in 23 (18,3 %) out of 126 patients with displaced fractures awarded six points for the reduction. In contrast, fixation failed in five (50 %) out of ten patients given a score of three points or less (p = 0.017). The risk of non-union increased when patients were treated more than 48 hours after the initial injury. In this group, 5 (25 %) out of 20 patients developed non-union compared to 16 (8 %) out of 200 patients treated within 48 hours (p = 0.014). Our findings emphasize the importance of achieving anatomical reduction of displaced femoral neck fractures, and to perform surgery within 48 hours unless an acute medical condition needs to be stabilized.

  12. Femoral head banking: NUH tissue bank experience.

    PubMed

    Nather, Aziz; David, Vikram

    2007-04-01

    National University Hospital Tissue Bank protocol follows guidelines recommended by the American Association of Tissue Banks and the European Association of Tissue Banks using donor selection criteria: medical history, clinical examination, chart review and laboratory tests for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), hepatitis B, hepatitis C, syphilis, and specimen for culture/sensitivity tests. For living donors, repeat testing is performed for AIDS and hepatitis C approximately 180 days after procurement. Femoral heads are procured using the "sterile double jar technique" and stored at -80 degrees C. Our first study of 273 consecutive potential donors undergoing hemiarthroplasty from 1989 to 1994 showed that a high percentage (42.5%) was unsuitable for use. A second study involving 175 potential donors was conducted from 1995 to 2003 after hepatitis C screening was introduced. The bacterial contamination rates in both studies (3.5% and 5.7%) are low. The incidence of other diseases also are low: hepatitis B, 2.3% and syphilis, 1.8% in the first study and hepatitis B, 5.7%; hepatitis C, 0.6%; and syphilis, 5.1% in the second cohort. No cases of AIDS were reported in either study. By 2003, femoral heads were transplanted in 205 patients with a low complication rate of 2.9%.

  13. Femoral bone marrow aspiration in live mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Young Rock; Kim, Eunhee; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2014-07-05

    Serial sampling of the cellular composition of bone marrow (BM) is a routine procedure critical to clinical hematology. This protocol describes a detailed step-by-step technical procedure for an analogous procedure in live mice which allows for serial characterization of cells present in the BM. This procedure facilitates studies aimed to detect the presence of exogenously administered cells within the BM of mice as would be done in xenograft studies for instance. Moreover, this procedure allows for the retrieval and characterization of cells enriched in the BM such as hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) without sacrifice of mice. Given that the cellular composition of peripheral blood is not necessarily reflective of proportions and types of stem and progenitor cells present in the marrow, procedures which provide access to this compartment without requiring termination of the mice are very helpful. The use of femoral bone marrow aspiration is illustrated here for cytological analysis of marrow cells, flow cytometric characterization of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor compartment, and culture of sorted HSPCs obtained by femoral BM aspiration compared with conventional marrow harvest.

  14. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  15. Same day discharge following inter-scalene block administration for arthroscopic shoulder surgery: implementing a change in practice.

    PubMed

    Lane, Suzanne; Blundell, Clare; Mills, Simon; Charalambous, C P

    2014-10-01

    Patients who had arthroscopic shoulder surgery with the provision of an inter-scalene nerve block (ISB) at Blackpool Teaching Hospitals, were previously required to remain in hospital overnight. We introduced a new protocol that allowed same day discharge following arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anaesthesia and ISB. The aim of this study was to review the outcome of this change in practice. Our results indicated that providing a discharge protocol for patients having arthroscopic shoulder surgery with the inclusion of ISB can avoid unnecessary overnight stay and enable significant cost savings, without detriment to patient safety or satisfaction.

  16. [Distal femoral periprosthetic fractures: classification and therapy].

    PubMed

    Tomás, T; Nachtnebl, L; Otiepka, P

    2010-06-01

    Periprosthetic fracture is one of the most serious complication of total knee arthroplasty. In our retrospective clinical study we designed our classification with rules for treatment of those fractures. During the last thirty years we treated 53 distal femoral periprosthetic fractures in our orthopaedic department. In our clinical study we reviewed our group of distal femoral periprosthetic fractures with on the basis of X-ray findings, the treatment method used and treatment outcomes. According to our findings we divided distal femoral periprosthetic fractures into six groups: Type I Nondisplaced fractures, 5.7%; treatment failure rate, 33%. Type II a Fractures with lateral comminution (the most often type of fractures), 37.7%; treatment failure rate, 20%. Type II b Fractures with medial comminution, 7.5%; treatment failure rate, 60%. Type II c Fractures above TKA (the second most often type), 34%; treatment failure rate, 18%. Type II d Comminuted fractures, 5.7%; treatment failure rate, 18%. Type IIIFractures with loosening of TKA, 9.4%; treatment failure rate, 20%. For the treatment of fractures we used various methods according to the type of fracture: Plate osteosynthesis in 32 cases, with failure in seven. Three failures in IIa group due to incorrect osteosynthesis with condylar plate, treated by reosteosteosynthesis with same implant. One in IIb group treated primarily with cement plomb, after second failure treated with revision total knee arthroplasty. Two failures in IIc group, treated by reosteosynthesis with spongioplasty using the same implant. One failure in III group solved with revision TKA. Intramedullary nail in nine cases , with failure in two. One failure in IIb group treated by reosteosynthesis with condylar plate and cement plombage. One in IIc group due to infection, solved with extraction of material and second stage revision TKA. Conservative treatment in three cases,with failure in two. One in I group treated with condylar plate. One in

  17. Distal femoral osteotomy using a novel deformity reduction device.

    PubMed

    Panichi, Enrico; Cappellari, Fulvio; Olimpo, Matteo; Piras, Lisa A; Radasch, Robert; Ferretti, Antonio; Peirone, Bruno

    2016-09-20

    Distal femoral osteotomy is a surgical procedure used to correct patellar luxation, secondary to a femoral deformity. A distal femoral osteotomy using the tibial plateau levelling osteotomy-jig to temporarily provide stability of the distal femoral osteotomy, maintaining limb alignment in the frontal and axial planes prior to internal plate fixation of the osteotomy, has been described. This report describes a novel jig named Deformity Reduction Device (DRD). This device was developed with the specific aim of increasing precision and predictability during corrective osteotomy execution in order to be consistent with the preoperative planning. The distal femoral osteotomy DRD-assisted procedure is described in detail, discussing the theoretical and practical principles of the application.

  18. Extensively coated cementless femoral components in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, N; Antoniou, J; Paprosky, W

    2000-01-01

    A septic loosening and osteolysis can compromise the available host bone in patients requiring revision hip arthroplasty. Secure fixation of revision femoral components may not be possible if reliant only on proximal femoral bone for biologic fixation or cement interdigitation. The challenge for the revision arthroplasty surgeon is to find the best method to secure the implant in a femur with deficient bone proximally that will provide stability for load bearing and motion. In addition to providing stability, the implant must be durable and maintain long-term fixation. With over 16 years of experience with fully porous coated femoral revision implants, we have found that maximizing prosthetic-bone fit in the proximal femoral diaphyseal bone provides reliable long-term fixation in the majority of femoral revision cases.

  19. Extensively Coated Cementless Femoral Components in Revision Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, Nelson; Antoniou, John; Paprosky, Wayne

    2000-10-01

    A septic loosening and osteolysis can compromise the available host bone in patients requiring revision hip arthroplasty. Secure fixation of revision femoral components may not be possible if reliant only on proximal femoral bone for biologic fixation or cement interdigitation. The challenge for the revision arthroplasty surgeon is to find the best method to secure the implant in a femur with deficient bone proximally that will provide stability for load bearing and motion. In addition to providing stability, the implant must be durable and maintain long-term fixation. With over 16 years of experience with fully porous coated femoral revision implants, we have found that maximizing prosthetic-bone fit in the proximal femoral diaphyseal bone provides reliable long-term fixation in the majority of femoral revision cases.

  20. Analgesic efficacy of intra-articular morphine after arthroscopic knee surgery in sport injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Yari, Mitra; Saeb, Morteza; Golfam, Parisa; Makhloogh, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tearing is a common injury among football players. The present study aims to determine the best single-dose of intra-articular morphine for pain relief after arthroscopic knee surgery that, in addition to adequate and long-term analgesia, leads to fewer systemic side effects. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 40 ASA-I athletes. After surgery, all participants received an injection of 20cc of 0.5% intra-articular bupivacaine. In addition, the first control group received a saline injection and 5, 10 and 15 mg of morphine were respectively injected into the joints of the second, third and fourth groups by use of Arthroscopic equipment before the Arthroscopic removal. The amount of pain based on VAS at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours after surgery, duration of analgesia and the consumption of narcotic drugs were recorded. Results: The VAS scores in the fourth, sixth and twenty-fourth hours after surgery showed a significant difference between the study groups. The average time to the first analgesic request from the bupivacaine plus 15 mg morphine group was significantly longer than other groups and total analgesic requests were significantly lower than other groups. No drowsiness complications were observed in any of the groups in the first 24 hours after injection. Conclusions: Application of 15 mg intra-articular morphine after Arthroscopic knee surgery increases the analgesia level as well as its duration (IRCT138902172946N3). PMID:23281420

  1. Arthroscopic irrigation of the bovine stifle joint increases cartilage surface friction and decreases superficial zone lubricin.

    PubMed

    Teeple, Erin; Karamchedu, Naga Padmini; Larson, Katherine M; Zhang, Ling; Badger, Gary J; Fleming, Braden C; Jay, Gregory D

    2016-09-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of arthroscopic irrigation on cartilage superficial zone lubricin and surface friction. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgeries in the United States, but rates of osteoarthritis progression following this procedure are high. The effect of arthroscopic irrigation on articular surface lubrication has not been previously considered as a contributing factor in outcomes after arthroscopy. Fourteen bovine stifle joints were randomized to receive arthroscopic irrigation (n=7) or no treatment (n=7). Full-thickness osteochondral explants from these joints underwent friction testing to measure static and dynamic coefficients of friction. Following mechanical testing, samples were fixed and stained for lubricin. Percent integrated density, a measure of the amount of lubricin in the superficial zone (0-100µm depth), was determined. Static and dynamic coefficients of friction were found to be significantly greater in arthroscopy specimens compared to controls (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Percent integrated density of lubricin in the superficial zone was significantly lower in arthroscopy specimens compared to controls (p<0.001). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of a Remodeled Neo-tendon After Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Daniel; Went, Philip; Tomala, Dirk; Sternberg, Christoph; Lafosse, Laurent; Leuzinger, Jan

    2017-03-01

    To macroscopically, histologically, and radiologically describe a time-dependent remodeling process of a neo-tendon or -ligament in the shoulder after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. During follow-up surgery after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure, 17 shoulders in 16 patients were evaluated for a remodeled tendon-like structure. The mean overall follow-up period was 27.4 months. The mean time between the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure and revision was 11.6 months. All shoulders were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging, and seven histologic specimens were obtained during revision surgery. A distinct, oriented strand of tissue was found in 16 of 17 shoulders on revision surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging analyses showed a signal-free, longitudinal tendon-like structure originating at the tip of the acromion, traversing the space of the former subcoracoid bursa to attach in the course of the transposed conjoint tendon or the proximal short head of the biceps. Histologic analysis of seven specimens showed a characteristic timeline of remodeling. A tendon- or ligament-like structure is remodeled between the anterior bottom tip of the acromion and the transposed coracoid process in a time-dependent manner after the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Modified arthroscopic Latarjet procedure for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability].

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Jiang, C Y; Lu, Y; Zhu, Y M; Li, F L; Li, X

    2015-04-18

    To present the surgical technique and to evaluate the results of the modified arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Arthroscopic Latarjet procedure has proven to be a reliable method of treatment for difficult anteroinferior instability of the shoulder joint. However, there is no anterior capsule reattachment and too much subscapularis damage for the classic procedure. From February 2013, we modified the classic procedure with reattachment of anterior joint capsule and muscle-tendon junction splitting of subscapularis. Coracoid graft position was evaluated using CT scanning. From March 2012 to August 2014, 51 modified Latarjet procedures were successfully performed arthroscopically for patients with anterior shoulder instability. According to the CT scanning at the final follow up, the graft was flush with the glenoid in 94.1%, and medially placed in 5.9%. Vertical positioning was perfect in 96.0% (2 to 5 o'clock), too high in 2.0%, and too low in 2.0%. There were no cases of recurrent dislocation or subluxation. The modified arthroscopic Latarjet procedure has shown satisfactory results with good graft positioning. It is a minimal invasive and accurate approach, which combines the advantages of the open procedure.

  4. Association between quantitative MRI and ICRS arthroscopic grading of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Casula, Victor; Hirvasniemi, Jukka; Lehenkari, Petri; Ojala, Risto; Haapea, Marianne; Saarakkala, Simo; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the association of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) parameters with arthroscopic grading of cartilage degeneration. Arthroscopy of the knee is considered to be the gold standard of osteoarthritis diagnostics; however, it is operator-dependent and limited to the evaluation of the articular surface. qMRI provides information on the quality of articular cartilage and its changes even at early stages of a disease. qMRI techniques included T 1 relaxation time, T 2 relaxation time, and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage mapping at 3 T in ten patients. Due to a lack of generally accepted semiquantitative scoring systems for evaluating severity of cartilage degeneration during arthroscopy, the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification system was used to grade the severity of cartilage lesions. qMRI parameters were statistically compared to arthroscopic grading conducted with the ICRS classification system. qMRI parameters were not linearly related to arthroscopic grading. Spearman's correlation coefficients between qMRI and arthroscopic grading were not significant. The relative differences in qMRI parameters of superficial and deep cartilage varied with degeneration, suggesting different macromolecular alterations in different cartilage zones. Results suggest that loss of cartilage and the quality of remaining tissue in the lesion site may not be directly associated with each other. The severity of cartilage degeneration may not be revealed solely by diagnostic arthroscopy, and thus, qMRI can have a role in the investigation of cartilage degeneration.

  5. Orthopedic resident's learning curve for arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repair: short-term clinical and radiographic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Visonà, E; Vio, S; Franceschi, G; Maron, A; Corona, K; Cerciello, S; Merolla, G; Berizzi, A; Aldegheri, R

    2017-07-29

    Arthroscopic subscapularis (SSC) repair is a technically demanding procedure with a long learning curve. As effective completion of resident's practical experience remains controversial, a prospective clinical study was performed to assess the functional and anatomical outcomes of subscapularis (SSC) arthroscopic repair by orthopedic residents. The pathological anatomy of the tears, the surgical approach and the difficulties encountered at the beginning of the learning curve were reported. Between June 2009 and June 2010, 30 patients with rotator cuff tear were preoperatively evaluated with clinical exam, Constant and UCLA scores. Surgery was performed under arthroscopy by a team of three orthopedic surgeons in training. A SSC tear, if present, was recorded and treated. The same clinical exam and functional scores were repeated at minimum 6 months of follow-up. Subscapularis strength recovery and tendon healing were investigated with arthromagnetic resonance imaging. A SSC tear was observed in 11 cases out of 30 and treated arthroscopically. The clinical scores improved in all patients: the average Constant score increased from 34 ± 14 to 77 ± 11 and the UCLA score from 11 ± 5 to 29 ± 3. The SSC tests were negative in all patients with the exception of one. Tendon healing was observed in 10 out of 11 cases. Arthroscopic SSC repair performed by educated residents is possible and leads to good clinical and anatomical results. Surgery duration progressively improved as the learning curve advanced. Level 2.

  6. Posterior Arthroscopic Subtalar Arthrodesis: Clinical and Radiologic Review of 19 Cases.

    PubMed

    Martín Oliva, Xavier; Falcão, Pedro; Fernandes Cerqueira, Raul; Rodrigues-Pinto, Ricardo

    Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis has recently gained popularity in the treatment of primary subtalar or post-traumatic arthritis, coalition, or inflammatory diseases with subtalar arthritis. The present study reports the clinical and radiologic results of 19 patients (19 feet) who underwent posterior arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis using 2 posterior portals. A total of 19 posterior arthroscopic subtalar arthrodeses (minimum follow-up of 24 months) performed without a bone graft and with 2 parallel screws were prospectively evaluated. The fusion rate was 94% (mean time to fusion 9.8 weeks). Modified American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale score (maximum 94 points) improved significantly from 43 to 80 points and the visual analog scale for pain score improved from 7.6 to 1.2. The 12-item short-form physical and mental scores at the last follow-up point were 52.5 and 56.4, respectively. One (5.3%) patient underwent open repeat fusion for nonunion, 2 (10.5%) patients required a second procedure for implant removal, and 1 (5.3%) experienced reversible neuropraxia. In conclusion, posterior arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis is a safe technique with a good union rate and a small number of complications in patients with no or very little hindfoot deformity. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Relation of ultrastructural changes of articular cartilage and the arthroscopic classification in osteoarthritic knee].

    PubMed

    Chai, B F

    1992-01-01

    This paper reported the ultrastructural changes found in the diseased articular cartilages of 43 osteoarthritic knee joints, which were assessed according to the "Arthroscopic classification of the articular cartilage". The electron microscopic findings and the arthroscopic classification of the articular lesions were correlated. The lesioned articular cartilage revealed two categories of pathological changes. 1. The changes on the part of the articular chondrocytes comprised (1) The nucleus showed pyknosis and karyorrhexis. (2) The cytoplasm exhibited fat droplets, glycogen granules, and/or microfilaments. Lysosomes also emerged frequently. The mitochondria swelled and the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum dilated and became vesiculated. At the same time there was detachment of cell processes or of the cytoplasmic membrane. The chondrocyte underwent necrosis, contracted and eventually disintegrated into lipid debris. These changes increased in extent and degree with the lesion and the severity went parallel with the sequence of the "Arthroscopic stage classification". 2. The changes on the part of the matrix included appearance of electron-dense lipid debris and numerous, coarse and banded collagen fibrils. They resided both in the pericellular matrix and in the general matrix. Sometimes fibroblast-like cells made their appearance in the matrix. These cells also revealed degenerative changes. All these changes went parallel with the sequence of the "Arthroscopic grade classification".

  8. Intra-articular mepivacaine reduces interventional analgesia requirements during arthroscopic surgery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dutton, T A G; Gurney, M A; Bright, S R

    2014-08-01

    To document efficacy of intra-articular mepivacaine in dogs based on the hypothesis that this would blunt the haemodynamic response to a nociceptive stimulus (arthroscopic surgery), reducing interventional analgesia requirements. A dose of mepivacaine 2% 0 · 1 ml/kg (2 mg/kg) was injected intra-articularly into one randomly assigned elbow joint before surgery in eight dogs undergoing bilateral elbow arthroscopy. Baseline haemodynamic measurements were recorded immediately before the start of each arthroscopic procedure and repeated at arthrocentesis, saline distension of the joint, incision, arthroscopic cannula and obturator insertion and placement of the second portal and haemodynamic variability calculated. If baseline parameters increased by more than 20% suggesting nociception, 1 µg/kg fentanyl was administered intravenously. Significantly less fentanyl was required during arthroscopy on the mepivacaine treated elbows compared to the non-treated elbows (P = 0 · 003) and the time to first fentanyl administration was significantly longer (P = 0 · 0001) in the mepivacaine treated elbows (21 · 2 ± 4 · 9 minutes) compared to the non-treated elbows (6 · 1 ± 2 · 3 minutes). Haemodynamic variability was significantly reduced in the mepivacaine group (heart rate P = 0 · 04, mean arterial pressure P = 0 · 003). Intra-articular mepivacaine blunts the haemodynamic response to arthroscopic surgery in dogs and reduces interventional analgesia requirement. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  9. Arthroscopically Assisted Acromioclavicular and Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction for Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Instability.

    PubMed

    Martetschläger, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Habermeyer, Peter; Hawi, Nael

    2016-12-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries are common injuries, especially in the young and active, male population. AC joint injuries account for 12% of all injuries of the shoulder girdle in the overall population. Although conservative treatment is recommended for Rockwood type I and type II injuries, there is controversial debate about optimal treatment for type III injuries. High-grade injuries are typically treated operatively to avoid painful sequelae. A vast number of different surgical methods have been described over the past few decades. Recent advances in arthroscopic surgery have enabled the shoulder surgeon to treat acute and chronic AC lesions arthroscopically assisted. Clinical studies have already shown good and reliable results. Although surgeons agree that a biological augmentation is required to minimize the risk of recurrent instability in chronic cases, a gold standard still needs to be defined. We present an arthroscopically assisted biological augmentation technique to reconstruct the AC and coracoclavicular ligaments, protected by a button-suture tape construct for chronic AC joint instability. The presented arthroscopic biological augmentation technique uses less and/or smaller drill holes in the clavicle and coracoid than previously described, thus reducing weakening of the bony structures. At the same time it enhances both horizontal and vertical stability.

  10. Radial nerve palsy after arthroscopic anterior capsular release for degenerative elbow contracture.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Sung-Tae; Kang, Chul-Hyung

    2007-12-01

    Because the use of arthroscopy has increased recently for the treatment of elbow lesions, reports of complications have become more common. Nerve injury after arthroscopic anterior capsular release is an extremely rare complication, with 4 reported cases worldwide. We usually use a sharp-tipped electrocautery device with a 0.5-mm diameter during arthroscopic capsular release. In this case, because the former was not prepared, we used a ball-tipped electrocautery device with a 3-mm diameter. Herein, we experienced a case of radial nerve palsy after arthroscopic anterior capsular release using a ball-tipped electrocautery device on a degenerative elbow contracture. We supposed that the electrocautery device caused transiently thermal injury of the radial nerve despite proper portal entry site, intra-articular distension, and gentle arthroscopic manipulation. Elbow arthroscopy remains a technically difficult procedure with the potential for neurologic complications. To perform surgery safely, knowledge of the regional neuroanatomy and a thorough understanding of proper instrument usage are required.

  11. [Medium-term results of arthroscopic repair of relapsing anteroinferior glenohumeral instability].

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, R; Díez-Nicolás, E; Vilá-y-Rico, J; Martín-López, C M; Cano-Egea, J M

    2011-01-01

    Arthroscopic repair of Bankart lesion has become the treatment of choice of anterior shoulder instability. Our objective is to analyze the medium-term results of arthroscopic Bankart repair. Between January 1999 and November 2007, 86 shoulders of 85 patients with diagnosis of relapsing shoulder dislocation were treated arthroscopically. After a mean 62-month follow-up (minimum 24 months) the results obtained were retrospectively assessed according the Rowe and Constant functional scales. A statistical analysis was done of the relation between functional results and age, sex, the side operated, capsulorrhaphy, rehabilitation and postoperative immobilization in our series. Moreover, the validity of MRI for diagnosing Bankart lesion was assessed. Eighty-five percent of patients had good or excellent results according to the Rowe scale. The mean Constant scale score was 90.6. There-dislocation rate in our series was 9%. The statistical analysis showed that female sex and immobilization time were related with worse results according to the Constant scale. In our hands, arthroscopic Bankart repair provides results similar to those in other published series. MRI is a useful diagnostic test in our setting, albeit its important implications for the diagnosis of Bankart lesion. Female sex and prolonged immobilization were related with worse functional results.

  12. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of triangular fibrocartilage in distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    García-Ruano, Á A; Najarro-Cid, F; Jiménez-Martín, A; Gómez de los Infantes-Troncoso, J G; Sicre-González, M

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) are associated with distal radioulnar joint instability. Arthroscopic treatment of these lesions improves functional outcome of affected patients. The aim of the present work is to evaluate functional and occupational outcome of TCF repair using an arthroscopic knotless anchor device in patients with associated distal radius fracture. An observational, descriptive study was carried out between November 2011 and January 2014 including 21 patients with distal radius fracture and Palmer 1B lesions of TCF (Atzei class 2 and 3) that were treated by arthroscopic knotless anchor (PopLok® 2,8mm, ConMed, USA). Mean follow-up was 18 months. Functional (Mayo Wrist Score) and occupational outcome results were analyzed. Mean age of the group was 43.0±8.8 years, with 19% of the patients being female. There was an associated scapholunate lesion in 5 cases. Functional results reached a mean of 83.4±16.1 points onMayo Wrist Score. Mean sick-leave time was 153.16±48.5 days. Complete occupational reintegration was reached in 89.5% of cases. There were no postoperative complications. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of 1B TFC tears is a minimally invasive method of treatment that improves tension of fixation, avoiding subsequent loosen, in our experience, with few complications and good functional and occupational results. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin young; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  14. Complete Arthroscopic Synovectomy in Management of Recalcitrant Septic Arthritis of the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2017-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the knee is a potentially life-threatening condition and can be associated with many late complications. The key of success of management of septic arthritis of the knee joint is early aggressive treatment of surgical debridement and decompression and antibiotic therapy. In adults, arthroscopic drainage with synovectomy is the treatment of choice in septic arthritis of the knee, with lower rates of infectious recurrence than needle aspiration and better functional results than open surgery. Repeated arthroscopic debridement and drainage is needed in case of delayed treatment with an advanced arthroscopic stage of the infection, early unfavorable course, or multiresistant germ. In these situations, synovectomy should be as complete as possible to maximize the reduction of the bacterial burden and avoid the need of further debridement. The purpose of this Technical Note is to describe the details of complete arthroscopic synovectomy of the knee joint. This includes 2 circles of circumferential synovectomy. One circle is in the axial plane and includes the intercondylar notch, anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral compartments. The other circle is in the coronal plane and includes the supra-patellar pouch, medial and lateral recesses, and the anterior compartment.

  15. The role of osteonecrosis in canine coronoid dysplasia: arthroscopic and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Mariee, I C; Gröne, A; Theyse, L F H

    2014-06-01

    Coronoid dysplasia (CD) or medial coronoid disease is part of canine elbow dysplasia and eventually results in osteoarthrosis. Although CD was originally attributed to disturbed endochondral ossification, more recent data point to the subchondral bone. The objective of this study was to assess dysplastic bone and cartilage of dogs that underwent unilateral or bilateral arthroscopic subtotal coronoidectomy for the treatment of CD. Arthroscopic findings and histopathology of bone and cartilage removed from elbow joints with CD were compared. The most common arthroscopic finding was fragmentation with softening of the subchondral bone of the central part of the medial coronoid process. In dogs without obvious fragmentation, CD was characterised by bone softening and chondromalacia. During arthroscopic intervention dysplastic bone and cartilage were collected for histopathological assessment. Forty-five slices of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded bone and cartilage samples were stained using haematoxylin and eosin and evaluated. Histopathological findings primarily consisted of osteonecrosis of subchondral bone with necrosis within the marrow spaces. Histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were characterised by fibrillation, chondrocyte clone formation, and focal cartilage necrosis. The pathology was found primarily in the subchondral bone and not in the articular cartilage. Vascular compromise may play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis in CD.

  16. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: basic science, surgical technique, and clinical follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Miller, Drew V.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1990-06-01

    Recent basic science studies (5) have provided a scientific foundation for the use of the Contact Nd:YAG Laser as an arthroscopic tool for xneniscal resection and acroxnioplasty of the shoulder in a saline medium. This study prospectively evaluates the results of a three stage laboratory investigation as well as the clinical results of arthroscopic xneniscal resection. Fifteen patients with meniscal tears underwent subtotal meniscectomies utilizing a Contact Nd:YAG Laser (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malvern, Pennsylvania) . This was done in a saline medium with an average laser wattage of 25 W, (range 20 W to 30 W). Patients were evaluated postoperatively with reference to subjective and objective parameters at one week and four weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated with regard to wound healing, intraarticular swelling and pain. Assessment of technical parameters such as ease of resection, time of resection and instrument access were compared to conventional instruments. All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing and swelling. In addition, although there was increased time with setting up the laser and calibrating it, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. Little, or no, secondary "trimmuning" was necessary with the laser. Increased accessibility was noted due to the small size of the laser. Arthroscopic Contact Nd:YAG Laser surgery is a safe and effective tool for menisca]. resection and coagulation in arthroscopic acromioplasties. It provides significant advantages over conventional cutting instruments with regard to accessibility and reduced need for secondary instruments.

  17. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-01-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  18. Arthroscopic subscapularis bankart technique as a salvage procedure for failed anterior shoulder stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Salma; Delos, Demetris; Dines, Joshua S; Altchek, David W; Dodson, Christopher C; Newman, Ashley M; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    Shoulder instability is a relatively common problem. Even with contemporary surgical techniques, instability can recur following both open and arthroscopic fixation. Surgical management of capsular insufficiency in anterior shoulder stabilization represents a significant challenge, particularly in young, active patients. There are a limited number of surgical treatment options. The Laterjet technique can present with a number of intraoperative challenges and postoperative complication. We report an arthroscopic subscapularis tenodesis technique as a salvage procedure for challenging glenohumeral instability cases. Sutures are passed through the subscapularis tendon and capsule before they are tied as one in the subdeltoid psace. The rotator interval is closed with superior and medial advancement of anterior and inferior tissue. This technical note carefully describes this procedure with useful technical tips, illustrations, and diagrams. Two clinical cases are described involving patients with recurrent instability following failed surgery who were successfully managed with this procedure. Both cases described resulted in improved shoulder stability, range of motion, and function following management with this surgical technique. This arthroscopic subscapularis tenodesis procedure is proposed as a useful alternative repair technique for cases of recurrent instability after failed surgery with isolated capsular insufficiency. It is believed that this arthroscopic subscapularis tenodesis technique can potentially provide similar outcomes to open bone block stabilization procedures, while reducing the risks associated with those procedures.

  19. Arthroscopic bursectomy with concomitant iliotibial band release for the treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Farr, Derek; Selesnick, Harlan; Janecki, Chet; Cordas, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Trochanteric bursitis with lateral hip pain is a commonly encountered orthopaedic condition. Although most patients respond to corticosteroid injections, rest, physical therapy (PT), stretching, and anti-inflammatory medications, those with recalcitrant symptoms may require operative intervention. Studies have explored the use of the arthroscope in the treatment of these patients. However, these reports have not addressed the underlying pathology in this chronic condition. We believe that the iliotibial band must be addressed and is the main cause of pain, inflammation, and trochanteric impingement leading to the development of bursitis. We report a new technique for arthroscopic trochanteric bursectomy with iliotibial band release. Our technique involves 2 incisions--one 4 cm proximal to the greater trochanter along the anterior border of the iliotibial band, and the other 4 cm distal and along the posterior border. The 30 degrees arthroscope is introduced through the inferior portal, and a cannula is introduced through the superior portal. A 5.5-mm arthroscopic shaver is inserted through the superior cannula to clear off the surface of the iliotibial band, so that it may be adequately visualized. A hooked electrocautery probe is then used to longitudinally incise the iliotibial band until it no longer rubs, causing impingement over the greater trochanter.

  20. Increased incidence of postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic compared with open biceps tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brian C; Pehlivan, Hakan C; Hart, Joseph M; Carson, Eric W; Diduch, David R; Miller, Mark D; Brockmeier, Stephen F

    2014-09-01

    To determine the incidence of postoperative stiffness after open and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis, compare the incidence between each method, and determine relevant risk factors for its occurrence. A consecutive series of patients who underwent biceps tenodesis during a 3-year period were retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated 249 patients, which included 143 who underwent open subpectoral tenodesis and 106 who underwent arthroscopic suprapectoral tenodesis. The mean overall follow-up period for the arthroscopic group was 9.9 months (range, 5.1 to 33.5 months). The mean overall follow-up period for the open group was 9.5 months (range, 4.7 to 49.2 months). There was no significant difference in overall follow-up duration between groups (P = .627). A significantly increased incidence of postoperative stiffness was found in the arthroscopic group compared with the open group (17.9% v 5.6%, P = .002). Within the arthroscopic group, patients with postoperative stiffness were more frequently female patients than those without stiffness (63.2% v 33.3%, P = .016) and were more likely to be smokers than those without stiffness (36.8% v 16.1%, P = .040). The tenodesis site was located significantly more proximal in the arthroscopic group of patients with postoperative stiffness compared with patients without postoperative stiffness (32.44 ± 7.8 mm from the top of the humeral head v 50.34 ± 7.8 mm, P < .0001). Our results show a notably increased incidence of postoperative stiffness after arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis compared with open subpectoral biceps tenodesis. This appears to occur more commonly in female patients and smokers and may have a relation to the position of the tenodesis, with a more superiorly placed tenodesis site being a potential influencing factor. On the basis of this series, this complication most commonly will improve over time and with symptom-based management. Level III, therapeutic case-control study. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy

  1. Traumatic anterior instability of the pediatric shoulder: a comparison of arthroscopic and open bankart repairs.

    PubMed

    Shymon, Stephen J; Roocroft, Joanna; Edmonds, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic and open Bankart repairs have proven efficacy in adults with recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Although studies have included children in their analysis, none have previously compared functional outcomes or redislocation rates between these 2 methodologies for anteroinferior glenoid labrum repair in this young population. We hypothesize that open and arthroscopic Bankart repair in children will have similar functional outcomes and redislocation rates, but differing results from adults treated in a similar manner. A retrospective chart review was performed on all Bankart repairs performed between 2006 and 2010 at a tertiary care children's hospital. A shift in treatment modalities occurred in 2008 creating 2 cohorts, open and arthroscopic. Brachial plexus injury, congenital soft-tissue disorder, or incomplete charts were excluded. Demographics, age at surgery, follow-up length, and sport were recorded. Telephone interviews were then performed obtaining the most current QuickDASH (Disability Arm, Shoulder, or Hand), WOSI (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index), SF-12 (Short Form 12), SANE (Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation), and verbal pain scores; as well as, inquiring about recurrent dislocation and further surgery. Ninety-nine children (16.9±1.5 y) were included (28 open, 71 arthroscopic). There were no differences in preoperative demographics. Fifty-one patients completed the questionnaires (11 open, 40 arthroscopic). No significant differences in the outcomes scores were seen between the 2 groups. Of the 99 patients, 21 (21%) had redislocation or secondary surgery; there was no significant difference in failure rate between groups (4 open, 17 arthroscopic). A plotted survival curve demonstrated that the adolescent shoulder undergoing Bankart repair for recurrent traumatic anterior instability has a 2-year survival of 86% and a 5-year survival of only 49%, regardless of technique. In adolescents, there is no significant difference in

  2. Effect of irrigation fluid temperature on core body temperature and inflammatory response during arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Ye, Luyou; Liu, Zhongtang; Wen, Hong; Hu, Yuezheng; Xu, Xinxian

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of irrigation fluid on the patients' physiological response to arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients who were scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were prospectively included in this study. They were randomly assigned to receive warm arthroscopic irrigation fluid (Group W, n = 33) or room temperature irrigation fluid (Group RT, n = 33) intraoperatively. Core body temperature was measured at regular intervals. The proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and IL-10 were measured in drainage fluid and serum. The changes of core body temperatures in Group RT were similar with those in Group W within 15 min after induction of anesthesia, but the decreases in Group RT were significantly greater after then. The lowest temperature was 35.1 ± 0.4 °C in Group RT and 35.9 ± 0.3 °C in Group W, the difference was statistically different (P < 0.05). Hypothermia occurred in 31 out of 33 subjects in Group RT (31/33; 94 %), but was significantly lower in Group W (9/24; 27 %; P < 0.05). Serum TNF-α changes were undetectable postoperatively. No statistical significant differences in serum IL-1 and serum IL-10 levels were observed between groups. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly lower in Group W (P < 0.05). The levels of the above cytokines in drainage fluid were all significantly lower in Group W after surgery (P < 0.05). Hypothermia occurs more often in arthroscopic shoulder surgery by using room temperature irrigation fluid compared with warm irrigation fluid. And local inflammatory response is significantly reduced by using warm irrigation fluid. It seems that warm irrigation fluid is more recommendable for arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  3. Short-term Complications of the Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure: A North American Experience.

    PubMed

    Athwal, George S; Meislin, Robert; Getz, Charles; Weinstein, David; Favorito, Paul

    2016-10-01

    To report on the intraoperative and early postoperative (<3 months) problems and complications encountered with the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure in patients with complex anterior shoulder instability. Between 2010 and 2014, 83 patients underwent an arthroscopic Latarjet procedure for recurrent post-traumatic anterior instability. The group's mean age was 28 ± 10 years and consisted of 76 (92%) male patients. A "problem" was defined as an unanticipated perioperative event that was not likely to affect the patient's final outcome. A "complication" was defined as an event that was likely to negatively affect outcome. At a mean follow-up of 17 months (range, 3 to 43 months), 20 (24%) patients sustained either a problem and/or a complication. The problem rate was 18% and the complication rate was 10%. The most commonly encountered adverse event was intraoperative fracture of the coracoid graft, which occurred in 6 patients (7%). In addition, 1 arthroscopic case was intraoperatively converted to open and 1 patient sustained a transient axillary nerve injury. A total of 7 cases underwent secondary operative procedures. The rate of problems and/or complications in primary cases was not significantly different than revision cases (P = .335). The rate of adverse events reported in this arthroscopic series is not insignificant and is similar to that reported with the traditional open Latarjet. With appropriate training, the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure can be effective for the management of patients with complex shoulder instability. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantification of the learning curve for arthroscopic suprascapular nerve decompression: an evaluation of 300 cases.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to quantify the learning curve for arthroscopic suprascapular nerve decompression (SSND) using the log-linear model. Three hundred consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic SSND by release of the transverse scapular ligament at the suprascapular notch by a single surgeon. Cases with a bony suprascapular nerve foramen were excluded. The arthroscopic SSND time was defined as the time from the beginning of shaving the soft tissue medial to the acromioclavicular joint until the completion of the transverse scapular ligament release. Regression analysis was applied to predict the time required for SSND on the basis of the cumulative case volume after logarithmic transformation of both statistics. The mean SSND time decreased from the first 50 cases (mean, 29.5 minutes) to the last 50 cases (mean, 6.2 minutes). The estimated SSND times of the first and last 50 cases were 25.1 minutes and 5.5 minutes, respectively. A significant linear correlation was observed between the SSND time and the cumulative volume of cases after logarithmic transformation (r(2) = 0.481, P < .01), and the best-fit linear equation was calculated as log y = -0.52 log x + 4.6, where y represents the estimated SSND time and x represents the cumulative volume of cases, resulting in an estimated learning rate of 69.7% (which equals 2(-0.52)). This study presents the overall time reduction in arthroscopic SSND in support of a learning-curve effect. Furthermore, this study quantifies the learning rate, estimated as approximately 70%, indicating that the time required for arthroscopic SSND can decrease by up to 30% when the cumulative volume of cases doubles. Level II, prospective comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Morphological classification of acromial spur: correlation between Rockwood tilt view and arthroscopic finding

    PubMed Central

    Kongmalai, Pinkawas; Apivatgaroon, Adinun; Chernchujit, Bancha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and hypothesis: Acromion spur is the extrinsic factor for impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tear. The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate prominence of the anterior acromion, however no study has shown the correlation of findings between the Rockwood tilt view and the arthroscopic finding. Methods: We developed the arthroscopic classification of acromion spur as type 1 flat spur, type 2 bump spur, type 3 heel spur, type 4 keel spur, and type 5 irregular spur. Patients with rotator cuff syndrome who underwent arthroscopic surgery were recruited. Two observers were asked to classify the type of spur from arthroscopic findings and Rockwood tilt views separately in random pattern. The prevalence of supraspinatus tendon tear was also recorded as no tear, partial-thickness tear, and full-thickness tear. Results: The keel spur (33.9%) was the most common finding followed by the heel spur (27.8%). The correlation was high especially for the heel, the keel, and the irregular spur (75.47%, 74.03%, and 72.73%, respectively.) These three types of spurs have a high prevalence of full thickness of supraspinatus tendon tear. Conclusion: The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate the morphology of an acromion spur, especially the at-risk spur that correlates highly with the full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. The arthroscopic classification will also be a useful tool to improve communication between the surgeon and the guide for appropriate treatment in a rotator cuff tear patient when encountering the heel, keel, and irregular spur. PMID:28074776

  6. The low-anterolateral portal for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis: description of technique and cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Michael L; Hibbard, Jason C; Nuckley, David J; Braman, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopic biceps tenodesis surgery is an important procedure for the correction of biceps tendonitis or in conjunction with rotator cuff repair with biceps symptoms. Recent trends have developed in placing the biceps tendon lower in the bicipital groove for a tenodesis. However, a more distal biceps tenodesis location is technically challenging when carried out arthroscopically with standard posterior and lateral portals. We aimed to establish the safety of a low-anterolateral portal location for direct access to the lowest aspect of the bicipital groove. An anatomical study design was used to examine portal to neurovascular structural measurements in 23 cadaveric shoulders. These shoulders had undergone low-anterolateral portal placement over the inferior most aspect of the bicipital groove as determined by palpation and direct arthroscopic visualization. No arthroscopic irrigation was performed. Following this, the shoulders underwent open dissection with the cannula in place to evaluate for any potential damage to any portion of the axillary nerve. All of the resultant portals in this study provided direct access to the inferior most aspect of the bicipital groove, and the dissection revealed that the portal was touching a small distal axillary nerve branch on the undersurface of the anterior deltoid in nearly half of the shoulders. The placement of a low-anterolateral portal for arthroscopic biceps tenodesis at the distal bicipital groove does not produce significant neurovascular damage; the portal trajectory comes close to distal anterior branches of the axillary nerve. Given these findings, this portal should be placed bluntly to best protect these underlying neurovascular structures.

  7. Reversal of suprascapular neuropathy following arthroscopic repair of massive supraspinatus and infraspinatus rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Costouros, John G; Porramatikul, Mason; Lie, Denny T; Warner, Jon J P

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the prevalence of suprascapular neuropathy (SSN) in the setting of massive rotator cuff tears and to determine if arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, even if partial, was associated with reversal of SSN and clinical improvement in pain and function. Over a 13-month period, 26 of 216 patients with rotator cuff tears treated operatively were identified to have massive tears associated with retraction and moderate to severe fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles. All patients had pain and marked weakness in abduction and external rotation which did not improve with conservative treatment. Electrodiagnostic electromyographic/nerve conduction velocity (EMG/NCV) evaluation, as well as pre- and postoperative questionnaire and physical examination, were performed. An arthroscopic repair, either partial or complete, was performed on patients identified to have a massive rotator cuff tear in association with SSN. Fourteen of 26 patients with massive rotator cuff tears (54%) were identified to have a peripheral nerve injury. Seven of these 26 (38%) had isolated suprascapular nerve injury, 4 had axillary nerve injury, 2 had an associated upper trunk brachial plexus injury, and 1 had a cervical radiculopathy. All 7 patients with isolated suprascapular injury underwent arthroscopic treatment, 1 of which was not technically reparable at the time of surgery. In the 6 patients who underwent either partial or complete arthroscopic repair, follow-up EMG/NCV after 6 months demonstrated partial or full recovery of the suprascapular nerve palsy that correlated with complete pain relief and marked improvement in function. SSN is found in a significant proportion of patients with massive rotator cuff tears, and is associated with pain and dysfunction. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair can result in reversal of SSN, which may correlate with substantial improvement in pain and function. Level IV, case series.

  8. Postoperative pain after arthroscopic versus open rotator cuff repair. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Pham, T T; Bayle Iniguez, X; Mansat, P; Maubisson, L; Bonnevialle, N

    2016-02-01

    Although the arthroscopic technique is becoming the gold standard for rotator cuff tendon repair, there is no proof that this technique results in less postoperative pain compared to open repair. The aim of this study was to prospectiv